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					STUDENTS FOR ECONOMIC JUSTICE TRAINERS
            HANDBOOK 2002
               DRAFT 6-27-02
                  STUDENTS FOR ECONOMIC JUSTICE TRAINERS
                       HANDBOOK TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION: ORGANIZING CONTEXT IN SAN DIEGO

INTRODUCTION OF THIS HANDBOOK

THANK YOUS

OVERVIEW OF SEJ & SUMMARY OF GOALS
      KEY ORGANIZING STRATEGY: INTERGENERATIONAL MODEL OF ORGANIZING
      SEJ SUMMER INTERNSHIP PROGRAM OVERVIEW
      INTERNSHIP COMPONENTS

SUMMARY OF POLITICAL EDUCATIONAL AND SKILLS WORKSHOPS
       POLITICAL EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOP SUMMARIES
       SKILLS WORKSHOP SUMMARIES
       GUIDELINES FOR SUCCESS AND POSITIVE WORKSHOPS
       BASICS OF THE AGENDAS

SEJ ORIENTATION SCHEDULE

POLITICAL EDUCATION WORKSHOP OUTLINES

SKILLS WORKSHOP OUTLINES

OUR PRACTICE: SEJ CAMPUS BASED PROGRAMS

       CASE STUDIES:       UCSD SEJ VICTORY AND HOW TO BUILD AN ORGANIZATION (UCSD SEJ CASE STUDY)
                           SDSU SEJ MISSION VALLEY HILTON BOYCOTT

MUJERS DEL MILENIO PROGRAM

“ORGANIZE THE ORGANIZING”

READINGS

SAMPLE QUOTES

FILM

EXPOSURE TOURS

ONE ON ONES

CONCLUSION

APPENDIX      SEJ IN THE NEWS
         STUDENTS FOR ECONOMIC JUSTICE TRAINERS HANDBOOK
INTRODUCTION: ORGANIZING CONTEXT IN SAN DIEGO

OVERVIEW
The San Diego border region is a historically conservative, anti-immigrant and anti-worker environment. Although
with a strong military presence, San Diego has also faced many Department of Defense cutbacks after the end of the
Cold War. In addition, this border region has one of the largest concentrations of Immigration and Naturalization
Service (INS) border officials in the nation. These factors, along with the loss of jobs due to globalization, have
created a political climate that placed many challenges on grassroots organizing.

The region consists of multi-ethnic, low-income individuals and families, who in recent census data show that 19% of
San Diegans live in poverty, higher than both state of California (16.8%) and the nation (13.3%). The service and
retail industries comprise 49% of the region’s total employment, with health care, hotel and restaurants, and are
dominated by women, immigrants, and people of color. These workers do not have access to health care; and
affordable housing.

Furthermore, according to a 1997 study, Prosperity and Poverty in the New Economy, by the Center on Policy
Initiatives, 51% of African-Americans, 32% of Latinos, 18% Asians and 10% of whites were living in poverty. With
this, one in four children in San Diego were also living in poverty. The Bureau of the Census provided conservative
poverty thresholds; otherwise these percentages would be higher.

OTHER SIGNIFICANT ISSUES INCLUDE (IN NO PARTICULAR ORDER):

   1) Immigration – Since the construction of Operation Gatekeeper in 1996, over 720 migrants have died by
      crossing the border. Since 9-11, the INS have also conducted raids on the trolley, bus stations and high
      schools to target ‘undocumented’ immigrants

   2) Policy Brutality – the San Diego Police Department has one the highest levels of fatal shootings in the nation

   3) Housing Crisis – Rental rates have increased 23% from 2000-2001. In June 2001 the median price for homes
      was $271,000. The San Diego City Council has already declared a Housing Crisis.

   4) Environmental Racism – High Concentrations of lead poisoning has been found in Barrio Logan, a working
      class Chicano community.

   5) Education – San Diego Unified and Sweetwater Union high schools not only face low performing test scores,
      but also poor school conditions (i.e. lack of proper school supplies, bathroom standards, overcrowded
      classrooms). For example, in 2001, Castlepark High School has the highest number of dropouts with 86 and
      only spent $2,424 per student, while in 1997-1998 California spent about $5,776 per student.

   6) Family Health Care – in 1996, while 72% of the nation’s population had their health insurance fully or
      partially paid for my their employer, San Diego only had 47% of the population.

LACK OF AN ORGANIZING INFRASTRUCTURE
On a structural level, the difficulties in organizing are pressed when there are only a few community-based
organizations in San Diego who are organizing. Organizations include, but are not limited to, Environmental Health
Coalition, San Diego Organizing Project, ACORN SD, etc. San Diego is also spread out spatially and with very poor
public transportation, organizing is deeply challenged. Even as one of the state’s major metropolitan area, San Diego
also has large low-income suburban areas.

However, in recent years, these dire conditions have led to new possibilities and strategies in organizing low wage
immigrant workers to concrete and historic victories. San Diego’s union density and public support has shown an
increase. Many of these successes can be attributed to utilizing a new strategy of untapping the potential of student
and worker organizing with the Students for Economic Justice Program. For instance, in San Diego alone, there are
over 9 major universities and colleges. This new intergenerational strategy of organizing has planted the seeds of a
stronger economic justice movement in San Diego.

WHY SAN DIEGO?
As a major metropolitan area in California, organizing in San Diego needs to as resourced and developed as other
major regions such as the Bay area and Los Angeles in order to build state power. Otherwise state power will not
exist in California.
INTRODUCTION OF THIS HANDBOOK AND THANK YOUS

This handbook is based on the model of organizing for college students from immigrant families and low wage
immigrant workers through the intensive yearly 8-week SEJ Summer Internship Program and SEJ year round
programs. Many of these exercises and activities are a blend of other student organizations, grassroots community
based organizations’ models. Most of the workshops run from 2-3 hours each. However, it is our belief that these
workshops should just serve as ideas or model and can easily be molded into workshops that fits the needs of the
political context of your region and/or constituency. Also, different activities and exercises within the workshops can
be used or included in other workshops. Ultimately, political education and skills training around economic justice
are rooted in a common understanding of power relations and action. We are thankful of all other organizations
organizing and creating a space for political education and skills training.

THANK YOUS
Thank you to organizations and individuals we have used as resources to develop this curriculum. Without these
individuals and organization this handbook would not be possible.

INDIVIDUALS & ORGANIZATIONS
Asian Pacific Environmental Network (APEN)
Brigette Browning, HERE Local 30
Center for Third World Organizing (CTWO)
Chinese Progressive Association (CPA)
Communities for a Better Environment (CBE)
Community Coalition
Donald Cohen, Center on Policy Initiatives, Executive Director
Erin O’Brien, UCLA Summer Internship Program, Coordinator
George Lipsitz, UC San Diego, Ethnic Studies Professor
Hotel Employee and Restaurant Employee Union Local 30
Kent Wong, UC Los Angeles Labor Center, Director
Magdalena Cerda, Environmental Health Coalition
Mary Grillo, SEIU Local 2028 Executive Director
May Fu, UC San Diego, Ethnic Studies Ph.D. Student
Mike Wilzoch, SEIU Local 2028 Deputy Organizer
Norma Chavez, DURO & MAAC Project
Ofelia Cortez, SEIU Local 2028 Organizer
Patricia Castellanos, Strategic Training Education Program
PODER
Quynh Nguyen, Center on Policy Initiatives, Organizing Director
School of Unity and Liberation (SOUL)
Service Employee International Union
Service Employee International Union Local 2028

RESOURCES
Co/motion Guide to Youth Led Social Change by Alliance for Justice
CPA & PODER: Common Roots Political Education Manual
Groundwork Books Resource Library
Organizing for Social Change: A manual for Activists in the 1990’s by the Midwest Academy
Popular Education for Movement Building by Project South
SOUL: Political Education Workshop Manual
Union Summer by AFL-CIO
United for a Fair Economy
Women’s Education in the Global Economy (WEDGE) by the Women of Color Resource Center
OVERVIEW OF SEJ & SUMMARY OF GOALS

The Students for Economic Justice (SEJ) Program is an organizing project of the Center on Policy Initiatives. It is a
year round leadership development and organizing program that helps to facilitate student-led campaigns to support
low wage immigrant workers in San Diego. This includes: The SEJ Summer Internship Program, the SEJ ‘Mujeres
del Milenio’ Student and Worker Women’s Leadership Program, and SEJ Campus Based Campaigns.

The Center on Policy Initiatives was established in 1997 to promote higher standards of living for poor and moderate-
income families through research, policy development, public education and effective advocacy. CPI focuses on
research and policy development that address structural factors and issues crucial for linking community and regional
economic development.

The Center believes a fair economy is one in which economic opportunities are universally accessible. Specifically, a
healthy community is one that offers good jobs, democratic workplaces, affordable health care, quality childcare,
affordable housing, and secure retirement benefits.

GOALS: THE CENTER ON POLICY INITIATIVES IS DEDICATED TO THE FOLLOWING LONG-TERM GOALS:
   Develop and promote strategies and economic policies that foster a fair economy and widely-shared economic
     prosperity
   Build working partnerships and alliances to promote innovative policy development
   Support and foster effective community-based organization and advocacy.

OVERALL GOALS AND HISTORY OF THE SEJ NEWTORK

THE OVERALL GOALS OF STUDENTS FOR ECONOMIC JUSTICE:
 To build an institutional foundation of local young leadership to increase the capacity of San Diego.
 To become a nexus for campus activists and organizers to become trained and to continue their activism after
  college in the San Diego community.
 To bring a new model of organizing unique to the labor movement and challenges traditional forms of organizing.
 To institutionalize an Intergenerational Leadership Development of Immigrant workers and Students
 To use strategic Organizing to win concrete victories with low wage workers in San Diego

SEJ BRIEF HISTORY

In 1999, Students for Economic Justice (SEJ) started as a program that educated and mobilized San Diego college
students around low wage immigrant worker issues. SEJ assisted in the Justice for Janitors 2000 campaign by launch
food drives and support committees at the various campuses for downtown janitors. After a long month strike, this
led an unprecedented victory of health care downtown janitors. In the summer of 2000, SEJ launched its first
internship program with seven interns. This internship provided political education, skills based trainings and field
experience with low wage immigrant workers in San Diego. In the fall of 2000, SEJ Interns returned onto campuses.
At UCSD, SEJ Interns spurred on a campaign to support campus non-union janitors and formed the first SEJ campus
chapter in the winter of 2001. UCSD SEJ mobilized students, community members, and workers; and through
strategic planning and utilizing the new intergenerational model of organizing, UCSD SEJ and janitors won living
wages, full health care, and a pension plan. In the summer of 2001, SEJ conducted its second internship with eleven
interns. Now, the SEJ Network continues to grow with more capacity and a stronger foundation of young local
leadership from immigrant communities.

WHERE ARE THEY NOW?
ISABEL SOLIS recently graduated from Cal State San Marcos and is now working on immigrant rights issues in San
Diego. GENO AGULIAR recently graduated from University of San Diego and is now organizing around housing /
gentrification issues in San Diego. JESSICA LOPEZ just graduated from UC San Diego and is now organizing with
college students and low wage workers through SEJ in San Diego. ERICK CARBAJAL just graduated from San
Diego State University and is now organizing around immigrant and worker rights in San Diego.

KEY ORGANIZING STRATEGY: INTERGENERATIONAL MODEL OF ORGANIZING

SEJ organizing strategy is an intergenerational model of organizing that targets young college students of color from
immigrant communities. These students have direct experience and understand the struggle of immigrant workers
best; many have family member who are low wage workers. At the core, the students for immigrant communities are
the most effective to guide and lead the movement. This relationship also gives students more investment and
commitment to creating a stronger economic justice movement in San Diego.

SEJ second organizing strategy is to work in partnership with community organizations and/or union organizing
around economic justice issues. We realize that students on their own, or any organization on their own would have
great difficulty in building campaign to medium and long term victories. SEJ has created strong relationships with
the Center on Policy Initiatives, HERE Local 30 and SEIU Local 2028. Unlike other models of economic justice
organizing, SEJ is at the table with these organizations and groups to make key decisions about campaign steps. This
has proved to be a successful model in wining concrete victories with low wage immigrant workers in San Diego.

CAMPAIGN VICTORIES

   Justice for Janitors 2000 Downtown Strike: Downtown SEIU Janitors win health care benefits
   Justice for Janitors 2000 Suburban Janitors: Suburban SEIU Janitors win a 20% raise
   Hotel Del Coronado Strike: HERE hotel workers win raises, benefits and 230 new members
   UCSD non-Union Janitors: UCSD non-union janitors win living wages, health care, and 401k pension fund


                                                                            ORGANIZING LESSON LEARNED
More specifically, when SEJ at UCSD conducted their weekly building visits to the janitors, SEJ was critical of the
traditional methods used to organize workers. SEJ worked with the janitors’ union to create an alternative model of
organizing that utilized students from immigrant families to organize janitors. Already through employer
harassment, there was immense fear of deportation from janitors, which deterred the ability of the union to convince
enough workers to join the campaign. SEJ suggested an approach to the janitors that was non-traditional and proved
most successful. The students began by listening to the janitors and were empathetic to the janitors’ struggles.
Instead of only trying to get the janitors to sign a union card, students showed that they cared more about the
relationship building than just the union card. Students immediately connected well with the janitors because the
students were primarily from working class immigrant families too.
SEJ SUMMER INTERNSHIP PROGRAM OVERVIEW

SEJ SUMMER INTERNSHIP PROGRAM PURPOSE
The Students For Economic Justice Summer Internship Program is a project of CPI, which aims to build stronger
capacity for a student-led economic justice movement in San Diego. It is an intensive 8-week program that gives
committed student activists organizing experience in a current campaign for economic justice, such as the Service
Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 2028 Justice for Janitors Suburban Organizing Campaign and the Hotel
Employees and Restaurant Employees Union (HERE) Local 30 Hotel Del Coronado and Mission Valley Hilton
Boycott. Students receive skills-based training and engage in political educational discussions on various topics on
organizing for social and economic justice.

OVERALL GOALS
 To provide a critical perspective with organizing for social & economic justice
 To learn lessons from past social and economic justice movements
 To present the culture of best practices within student activism and organizing
 To strengthen the pipeline of students and workers’ struggles
 To develop new organizers for campus and community organizing in economic justice and expand the SEJ
  Network

INTERNSHIP COMPONENTS
Campaign work, political education, organizing skills based training, and reality tours were linked at the foundation
of the SEJ Internship.

CAMPAIGNS
In San Diego there are few economic justice organizations and unions that dedicate resources to organizing. SEJ
interns are generally placed in two major union campaigns with SEIU Local 2028 and HERE Local 30. In the
summer of 2001, SEIU Local 2028 interns were involved in various campaigns ranging from ensuring a smooth
transition of the UCSD non-union janitors to rallying support to re-hire workers from Westfield Malls in San Diego.
HERE Local 30 continued the Mission Valley Hilton Boycott, which demanded a massive divestment campaign on
local and national corporations and pressured the Hotel Del Coronado to negotiate a fair contract. In the end, the
UCSD janitors fully transitioned in the new jobs and the Hotel Del Coronado won the best contract in the history of
the local with wage and benefit increases to 230 new members. The campaigns allow interns to connect their
organizing tools and political education to making concrete institutional changes in the lives of low wage janitors and
hotel workers.

POLITICAL EDUCATION
The purpose of the series of educational workshops was to have presentations, discussions, and readings that would
inform the organizing work in the HERE and SEIU campaigns. It helped interns understand the global context of
organizing in the 21st Century and how to use the lessons learned from previous social and economic justice
movements to improve their organizing practice. In the end, the hope was to understand how to use the tools and take
actions locally on their campuses and community, while still thinking globally.

ORGANIZING SKILLS BASED TRAINING
This series of training were given on the basic organizing and leadership skills . The purpose was not only to provide
the skills needed, but to also practice through interactive role plays, scenarios and discussion. Interns utilized and
practiced these skills the most in the major union campaigns.

EXPOSURE TOURS
Reality tours gave the interns direct contact with communities facing economic and social injustices and connected
them with key social and economic justice organizations in San Diego. Some of the tours included: a Statewide
Border Justice Conference with an exposure tour of the US/Mexican Border with American Friends Service
Committee (AFSC), Environmental Racism Tour in Tijuana with Environmental Health Coalition (EHC), a workers’
center tour in Los Angeles with the Korean Immigrant Workers’ Advocates (KIWA) and the Garment Worker Center,
and Exposure Tour of San Diego Housing.
SUMMARY OF POLITICAL EDUCATIONAL AND SKILLS WORKSHOPS

GOALS OF POLITICAL EDUCATION
 To use praxis: how theory and analysis needs to connect with practice
 To understand how race, class, gender and sexuality intersect
 To have a historical context of social and economic justice movements and organizing
 To understand the present day stage of the economic structure
 To understand the role of unions
 To motivate everyone towards social and economic justice & to understand change is always possible with action

SUMMARY
The purpose of the series of educational workshops is to have presentations, discussions, and readings that will inform
our organizing work in the HERE and SEIU campaigns. It will help us understand the global context of our
organizing in the 21st Century and how to use the lessons learned from previous social and economic justice
movements to improve our organizing practice. In the end, our hope is to understand how to use the tools and take
actions locally on campus and in the community, while still thinking globally.

The SEJ Internship Program is centered on labor and will not cover all subjects within eight weeks. To be clear,
being labor centered does not mean we will only discuss “labor or class” issues, it just means that labor will be the
context of our discussions. The critical intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality within labor will be integral
in our discussions.

UNDERSTANDING THE SOCIAL & POLITICAL CONTEXT

WEEK 1:        WHO ARE WE? WHY ARE WE HERE?
WEEK 2:        HOW DID WE ORGANIZE? HISTORY OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC JUSTICE MOVEMENTS P1
WEEK 3:        HOW DID WE ORGANIZE? HISTORY OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC JUSTICE MOVEMENTS P2

THE LESSONS LEARNED & TAKING ACTIONS

WEEK 4:        THE LESSONS LEARNED PI: WOMEN’S ROLES IN MOVEMENTS, THE INTERSECTIONS OF OPPRESSIONS
WEEK 5:        THE LESSONS LEARNED PII: NON-TRADITIONAL FORMS OF ORGANIZING
WEEK 6:        COMMUNITY JUSTICE
WEEK 7:        US IMMIGRATION HISTORY AS LABOR HISTORY
WEEK 8:        THINK GLOBALLY, ACT LOCALLY

SKILLS BASED TRAININGS SUMMARY
This series of training will give the basics organizing skills of: Giving a Message and Rap, Presentations, Facilitation
and Public Speaking, Power and Political Analysis, Using the Media, Campus Recruitment and Retention, and
Coalition Building. The purpose is not only to provide the skills needed, but to also practice through interactive role
plays, scenarios and discussion.

SKILLS BASED TRAINING GOALS
  To connect the educational workshops with our skills, which will provide a context to organizing practice
  Give us effective tools on how to educate, agitate, and organize
UNDERSTANDING THE GOALS OF EACH WEEK

WEEK 1 TO 3: UNDERSTANDING THE SOCIAL & POLITICAL CONTEXT

The purpose of these first weeks is to ground the interns in understanding the role of grassroots organizing and the
political/social/economic landscape of San Diego. The overall goal is to get the interns on the same page and to get
them invested in the large movement SEJ wants to help build. The strategy is to first start with a better understanding
of why they and the other interns are involved in the internship. The next step is to take their understanding and
connect it to past struggles and for them to understand that they are all a part of the past. Social movements and social
change are an accumulation of collective struggle. The interns will also do some case studies on social movements to
understand how organizations were able to win concrete victories.

WEEK 1: WHO ARE WE? WHY ARE WE HERE?

GOALS
 To understand each other personally and politically
 To develop working relationships with each other
 To understand purpose of the SEJ internship
 To understand goals and roles of CPI
 To understand the political & economic context of organizing
 To understand why we organize: workers, unions, interfaith, tenants, and students

WEEK 2 & 3: HOW DID WE ORGANIZE? HISTORY OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC JUSTICE MOVEMENTS P1

GOALS
 To understand that change always demands action
 To understand that things were not always the same as today. For example, people of color and women’s voting,
 labor rights, to name a few.
 To give a historical context of organizing
 To present a well rounded history that is inclusive of race, class, gender and sexuality
 To understand that the roots of movements have been multiracial
 To understand the dynamics of the global perspective and the vanguard of the 1960’s movement
 To draw the connections between the 1930’s and 1960’s social and economic justice movement
 To learn and understand power and strategic actions through the Power Analysis
 To understand of how previous social movements were able to win and how we could learn lessons from these
 movements (i.e. UFW and SNCC)
WEEK 3-8: THE LESSONS LEARNED & TAKING ACTIONS

The next following weeks of the internship, the intern will sharpen their analysis and understand how to apply the
‘lessons learned’ to the current struggles. These weeks will look at the role of women in the movement and how race,
class, gender, sexual orientation and ability oppressions are interconnected. In order for us to really have a grassroots
movement we need to respect differences and stand behind a common ground. Through exposure tours, the interns
will have a better understanding of the environmental racism in San Diego, Los Angeles and the US/Mexico border
on issues of: housing, immigration, worker justice, etc. Towards the end of the internship, interns will be creating
strategic plans on what their next steps will be on campus and/or community.

WEEK 4: THE LESSONS LEARNED PI: WOMEN’S ROLES IN MOVEMENTS, THE INTERSECTIONS OF OPPRESSIONS

GOALS
 For women to be recognized and for men to be sensitized
 To understand the multiple facets of the women’s liberation movements
 To understand how women have been the backbone of all movements
 To understand the complexities and intricacies of fighting within multiple layers of oppressions
 To understand the current dynamics of women in the labor movement
 To understand the systemic inequities of sexism and patriarchy
WEEK 5: THE LESSONS LEARNED PII: NON-TRADITIONAL FORMS OF ORGANIZING

GOALS
 To understand the environmental and economic conditions in LA and SD
 To understand the role of worker centers in the environmental and economic justice movement
 To give the new structure (restructuring) of the economy, what are the new strategies workers are using to gain
 power.
 To understand new models of organizing (For example, collective strategies and collective leadership)
 To see labor organizing as one fundamental way to improve living standards intertwined with other community
 organizing and social movements
 To understand that all people have the right and power to organize in their communities, regardless if they are in a
  union
 To learn how to conduct presentations, facilitate meetings, and speak in public

WEEK 6: COMMUNITY JUSTICE

GOALS
 To connect issues from the community to economic justice
 To understand that an overwhelming majority of low-income communities facing gentrification and
  environmental pollution are also communities of color
 To understand how to use the corporate media as a tool and tactic for social justice
 To understand that independent media is our long term goal
WEEK 7: US IMMIGRATION HISTORY AS LABOR HISTORY

GOALS
 To understand the system’s demand for cheap labor as immigrants
 To understand how policies create systemic hierarchy of race, class, and gender
 To understand how immigrant workers have changed the dynamics within union organizing and organizing in
  general
 To understand the myths and facts of having a immigrant work-force
 To understand the dynamics of living in a border region
 To understand the patterns and causes for migration of labor
 To understand the increasing barriers immigrants face. For example, receiving documentation, and the anti-
  immigrant sentiments from Proposition 187 and other policies
 To understand how immigration is connected to issues of police brutality and poverty.
 To learn how to recruit and retain members and how to build coalitions on campuses and in the community
WEEK 8: THINK GLOBALLY, ACT LOCALLY

GOALS
 To understand the difference between ‘globalization’ and ‘corporate globalization’
 To understand the role of the GATT, WTO, NAFTA, APEC, FTAA.
 To understand that global resistance is connected to local action
 To take actions locally and develop next steps for everyone
 To develop next steps and plans for SEJ on campuses and in the community
POLITICAL EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOP SUMMARIES

WEEK 1: WHO ARE WE? WHY ARE WE HERE?

WHY ARE WE HERE?
What is ‘economic justice’? And why is it important for students to have a role in this movement? Why now? This
workshop will open the crucial discussion of a student-led economic justice movement in the 21st Century. We will
discuss and define terms within organizing for social and economic justice. And finally, this workshop will provide a
clear understanding of power, how power functions, and what to do to change the power structure.

WHAT IS THE POLITICAL ECONOMY?
What does the state of the world’s economy have to do with us? And what role do labor unions play? Understanding
the political economy and labor unions can answer many of these questions. This workshop will give an overview of
the current economic system and the shifts within the past decades. We will have a discussion of how the global
economy is connected to organizing of hotel workers and janitors.

WEEK 2: HOW DID WE ORGANIZE? HISTORY OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC JUSTICE MOVEMENTS P1

HISTORY OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC JUSTICE “PAST MOVEMENTS AND THEIR LEGACY”
This workshop will begin with a historical overview of San Diego during the civil rights movement. Next, a general
history of US social and economic justice movements will be provided. More specifically, an in-depth analysis of the
1930’s and 1960’s social and economic justice movements will be given. Topics such as the: Great Depression, New
Deal, Ella Baker, Highlander Institute and the Founding of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, Black
Panther Party, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Cesar Chavez, Saul Alinsky, Septima Clark, ALF-CIO, will be
discussed.

WEEK 3: HOW DID WE ORGANIZE? HISTORY OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC JUSTICE MOVEMENTS P2

CASE STUDIES ON SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC JUSTICE MOVEMENTS
The goal of this workshop is to provide a better understanding of how previous social movements were able to win
and how we could learn lessons from these movements. Social change is always an accumulation of different
struggles. This workshop will focus on the United Farm Workers (UFW) movement and the Student Non-Violent
Coordinating Committee (SNCC). It will give us a better historical context of why we organize today. The historical
gains will be discussed along with the consequences of the different organizing practices of these movements.

WEEK 4: THE LESSONS LEARNED PI – WOMEN’S LIBERATION & THE INTERSECTION OF
OPPRESSIONS

WOMEN’S LIBERATION AND THE INTERSECTION OF OPPRESSIONS
What is the role of women in movements? The purpose of this workshop is to learn lessons from the past movements,
which traditionally suppressed women’s roles. This workshop will provide an understanding that women have always
been the foundation of all movements. There will be panel of women from different community organizations and
labor unions in San Diego. It will use women’s liberation as a lens to understand the complexities and intricacies of
fighting within multiple layers of oppression, such as race, class, gender, sexuality and disability. The purpose is to
understand how we can better our organizing practices.
WEEK 5: THE LESSONS LEARNED PII – NON-TRADITIONAL FORMS OF ORGANIZING

NON-TRADITIONAL FORMS OF ORGANIZING AND UNIONIZATION
The purpose of this workshop is to understand that with the restructured economy, a multifaceted strategy is needed to
address the needs of all workers. The economy has shifted from a manufacture to a service economy with the
massive deindustrialization of the past decades. This ‘new economy’ has created low wage sector jobs that rarely
have the capacity of unionization. This has altered the forms of organizing from tradition union organizing to
organizing different service, garment, day-time, community worker centers. These centers play a vital role because it
fills a void in the labor movement and provides services and tools for empowerment for workers.

LOS ANGELES ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AND WORKER CENTER TOUR
This will be an all day exposure tour of the environmental and economic conditions in Los Angeles. The tour will provide a general historical, political and
economic context of Los Angeles and tours of various worker centers. The tour will consist of the LA Garment Worker Center, Pilipino Worker Center,
Korean Immigrant Workers Advocates*, among other worker centers. This exposure will be a joint tour with the UCLA Summer Internship Program.


WEEK 6: COMMUNITY JUSTICE

SAN DIEGO HOUSING CRISIS / ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE TOUR
Did you know that there are residents in Sherman and Logan Heights being wrongfully evicted and left homeless
because of new corporate development? The targets are mostly undocumented or newly arrived immigrants. This
workshop and exposure tour will tie in the issues from the community to economic justice. An overwhelming
majority of low-income communities facing gentrification and environmental pollution are also communities of
color.

WEEK 7: US IMMIGRATION HISTORY AS LABOR HISTORY

NORTH COUNTY MIGRANT LABOR EXPOSURE TRIP
The dominant perception of North County San Diego is that it is predominately a suburban white upper-class
community. In actuality, there are many diverse pockets of low-income Samoan, Cambodian, Mexican and Native
American communities in North County. In addition, many Mexican laborers find exploitative jobs in the fields of
North County. This is also where the atrocious migrant attacks occurred last year by a group of North County youth.
The workshop and exposure trip will talk give an overview of low wage labor in North County and how it is
connected to the system of US exploitation.

NOTE FOR TRAINERS: This exposure tour – especially – needs to be conducted with an organization that already
has a strong relationship organizing or working with some of the migrant families. Otherwise the tour can be seen
and taken at disrespectful and intrusive to the community.

ASIAN IMMIGRANT AND REFUGEE LABOR
This workshop will provide a history of immigrant labor in the context of Asian and Pacific Islanders and a deeper
understanding of the history of the refugee community in San Diego. Furthermore, the workshop will connect the
history to the contemporary issues in San Diego. For instance, after 9-11 hard working legal immigrant airport
screeners – mostly Pilipino – could potentially lose their jobs in November 2002 due the Federal Aviation Security
Act, which mandates that all baggage screeners have to have full-citizenship. There is also a large refugee
community in San Diego that has an immense lack of access to: good jobs, housing, education and health care.
STATEWIDE IMMIGRATION WORKSHOP & TJ/BORDER EXPOSURE TRIP
Joined by UC Berkeley’s “Labor Summer” and UC Los Angeles’ Summer Internship Program, this workshop will
give a historical account of US immigration policies and the impact on people’s daily lives. The purpose is to
understand how US immigration policies are closely intertwined to US’s need of a racialized and gendered cheap
labor pool. We will also discuss the consequences these policies have on people’s families and humanity. At this
conference, there will be an interactive workshop on globalization and immigration and a panel of speakers working
on immigration issues. Then we will go on an exposure trip of the border and Tijuana to understand the dire
situation of immigration, working conditions and environmental pollution.

WEEK 8: “THINK GLOBALLY, ACT LOCALLY”

TAKING THE GLOBAL TO THE LOCAL
The rise of corporate globalization, the trend of corporations exploiting cheap labor internationally, has evoked a tidal
wave of international and local resistance. From the Zapatistas rising up against the passage of NAFTA, to US
environmental groups and labor unions and protesting the World Trade Organization and Inter-Monetary Fund – the
resistance is widespread. This workshop will provide an overview of globalization and will also use the ideas of the
global resistance to local action.
SKILLS WORKSHOP SUMMARIES

WEEK 1 SKILLS WORKSHOP: GIVING A MESSAGE AND RAP
In order to be effective organizers, we need to understand how to talk to people one-on-one and get them to take
action with their lives. This skills workshop will give an overview of how to craft a message and give a one-on-one
rap during the campaigns. Giving a strong message and rap and building a positive one-on-one relationship is
essential to our organizing. We will do practice role plays with each other during this workshop.

WEEK 2 SKILLS WORKSHOP: PRESENTATIONS, FACILITATION & PUBLIC SPEAKING
Another key skill of organizing is to be able to agitate people to take life long actions of justice. This skills workshop
will use the message and rap skills to provide some of the fundamentals and the “do’s and don’t” of presenting and
public speaking in a large or small groups and organizations. Additionally, we will focus on how to facilitate a group
to reach consensus decisions.

WEEK 3 SKILLS WORKSHOP: HOW TO RECRUIT AND RETAIN STUDENTS
In building a movement, we need to understand how to build the organization and sustain members to maintain their
commitment and passion. This workshop will provide basic principles on how to recruit students and tips on how to
keep students in campaigns and organizations. This is vital to the lifeline of any group and organization.

WEEK 4 INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP: PRAXIS – INTERSECTIONS OF OPPRESSIONS
Taking action against the oppression against the poor, people of color, women, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered
and disabled can be overwhelming. The purpose of this interactive workshop is to understand how to connect theory
to action and to build a movement with the intersections of different oppressions. This workshop will provide a space
for interns to dialogue and share ideas on to take action.

WEEK 5 SKILLS WORKSHOP: POWER AND POLITICAL ANALYSIS
One of the most important elements of winning concrete victories in a campaign is to have an organized strategic
plan. This skills workshop will provide an understanding of how to map the political landscape of a campaign. We
will also show a method of drawing out long, medium, and short term goals for an issue campaign with a clear
strategy and tactics.

WEEK 6 SKILLS WORKSHOP: USING THE MEDIA
Within our overall political strategy, the corporate media is a useful tool and tactic that we can influence to get our
message and issue to a large mass audience in the short term. In this workshop, we will discuss how to craft a
message, write a press advisory/release, and conduct follow up calls for a campaign. We will also dialogue on the
importance and long term goal of creating our own independent media.

WEEK 7 SKILLS WORKSHOP: HOW TO BUILD A CAMPUS COALITION
After recruiting students and building a stronger base, the next step is to learn how to build solidarity with other group
and organizations on campus. This workshop will review the purpose of working in a coalition and how to maintain a
sustaining coalition.

WEEK 8 SKILLS WORKSHOP: HOW BRING IT BACK TO YOUR CAMPUS & COMMUNITY
Now what? What do we do with this internship experience and how do we do it? This workshop will provide
different models and examples of how to bring it all back to you campus and community. The goal of this internship
is to bring these skills and education back and agitate people to take greater action in their lives.
GUIDELINES FOR SUCCESS AND POSITIVE WORKSHOPS

ROOM SETUP
 Have room in a circle / semicircle, where the facilitator is not the center of the workshop
 Always have enough supplies (colored pens, markers, paper for the facilitators and participants)
 Extra paper and pens for participants/interns
 Remember to rotate facilitators and keep it gender balanced

GUIDES FOR POSITIVE FACILITATION
 Use visuals (i.e. handouts of the agenda typed out, or on the wall; symbols or pictures)
 Prepare ahead of time
 Don’t argue with participants/interns, pose questions back to the group
 Check in with quiet participants during breaks
 Listen and nod to show reception
 Always feel out the dynamics of the group (who is participating, talking, etc)
 Be passionate about the issues/activities (you really have to feel the workshop and show it)
 Be flexible about the workshop but also stay on task (flexibility not conformity)
 When brainstorming: every idea, is a good idea and you must write them all down in the way it was said
 Relax and use humor


GENERAL IDEAS TO MAKE WORKSHOPS INTERACTIVE AND FUN!
 Splitting up into groups: this allows less confident people a smaller space to discuss and share ideas
 Show clips of a video and have a discussion
 Play experts of music
 Use different methods of communicating to each other: have participants draw, mimic, hum an idea or topic of
  discussion
 Use teatro
 Do Icebreakers and energizers
 Invite speakers to come in
 Rotate facilitators
BASICS OF THE AGENDAS



BASICS OF THE WORKSHOP AGENDAS

    I.   QUOTE OF THE DAY
   II.   CHECK INS/INTROS
  III.   ICEBREAKER/ENERGIZER
 IV.     OVERVIEW OF THE AGENDA/DAY
   V.    WORKSHOP ACTIVITY
 VI.     FINAL GO AROUND (WRAP UP OR COMMENTS)
 VII.    ANNOUNCEMENTS




BASICS OF THE BRIEFINGS AGENDAS

    I.   QUOTE OF THE DAY
   II.   CHECK INS/INTROS
  III.   ICEBREAKER/ENERGIZER
  IV.    OVERVIEW OF THE WEEK’S GOALS AND EVENTS
   V.    FINAL QUESTIONS
  VI.    ANNOUNCEMENTS




BASICS OF THE DEBRIEFS AGENDAS

    I.   QUOTE OF THE DAY
   II.   CHECK INS/INTROS
  III.   ICEBREAKER/ENERGIZER
 IV.     REVIEW OF THE WEEK’S GOALS AND EVENTS, DID WE ACHIEVE THEM?
   V.    + (WHAT WENT WELL) & ++ (WHAT COULD HAVE BEEN BETTER)
 VI.     GO AROUND: FINAL THOUGHTS
 VII.    ANNOUNCEMENTS
SEJ ORIENTATION SCHEDULE

AGENDA                                             ACTIVITY       TIME      WHO?   NEEDS?
ICEBREAKER: HUMAN BINGO                             EXERCISE      25 MIN            HUMAN
                                                                                    BINGO
                                                                                    SHEET
INTRODUCTIONS                                      DISCUSSION     25 MIN

OVERVIEW OF ORIENTATION AGENDA                       REVIEW       5 MIN              SEJ
                                                                                    BINDER
OVERVIEW OF SEJ SUMMER PROGRAM PURPOSE            PRESENTATION    25 MIN             SEJ
COMPONENTS OF SEJ INTERNSHIP                                                        BINDER

BREAK (MOVE TO LABOR COUNCIL)                                     15 MIN

CENTER ON POLICY INITIATIVES OVERVIEW              DISCUSSION     50 MIN             SEJ
                                                                                    BINDER
CENTER ON POLICY INITIATIVES OVERVIEW LOGISTICS   PRESENTATION    30 MIN           SS# & W2
                                                                                    FORMS
LUNCH / SEJ PANEL                                 PRESENTATION     1 HR             FOOD
                                                   / DISCUSSION
SEIU CAMPAIGN OVERVIEW                             DISCUSSION      1 HR            PAPER &
                                                                                   MARKERS
HERE CAMPAIGN OVERVIEW                             DISCUSSION     30 MIN           PAPER &
                                                                                   MARKERS
CPI CAMPAIGN OVERVIEW                              DISCUSSION     30 MIN           PAPER &
                                                                                   MARKERS
BREAK (MOVE TO BACK TO CPI)                                       15 MIN

SEJ EXPECTATIONS & OUR PRAXIS: HOW DO WE           DISCUSSION     30 MIN              SEJ
ORGANIZE                                                                           BINDERS

OUR POINTS OF UNITY: COLLECTIVE EXPECTATIONS &      EXERCISE      30 MIN           PAPER &
PERSONAL GOALS                                                                      GOALS
                                                                                    SHEET
“WHO ARE WE? & WHY ARE WE HERE?” ACTIVITY           EXERCISE      1 HR 45          PAPER &
                                                                   MIN             COLORED
                                                                                   MARKERS
CLOSING & WRAP UP                                  DISCUSSION     5 MIN
                             POLITICAL EDUCATION WORKSHOP OUTLINES

WHY ARE WE HERE? WHAT IS A UNION? WHAT IS THE POLITICAL ECONOMY?

WHY ARE WE HERE?
What is ‘economic justice’? And why is it important for students to have a role in this movement? Why now? This
workshop will open the crucial discussion of a student-led economic justice movement in the 21st Century. We will
discuss and define terms within organizing for social and economic justice. And finally, this workshop will provide a
clear understanding of power, how power functions, and what to do to change the power structure.

WHAT IS THE POLITICAL ECONOMY?
What does the state of the world’s economy have to do with us? And what role do labor unions play? Understanding
the political economy and labor unions can answer many of these questions. This workshop will give an overview of
the current economic system and the shifts within the past decades. We will have a discussion of how the global
economy is connected to organizing of hotel workers and janitors.

AGENDA                                                      ACTIVITY         TIME       WHO?        NEEDS?
QUOTE OF THE DAY                                            DISCUSSION       5 MIN                   PAPER,
                                                                                                    MARKERS
ICEBREAKER                                                   EXERCISE       10 MIN
WHAT IS THE POLITICAL ECONOMY? WHAT IS A UNION?            PRESENTATION     30 MIN                   PAPER,
COMMON SENSE ECONOMICS POWERPOINT                                                                   MARKERS
PRESENTATION                                                                                        AND PROPS
WHY STUDENTS? WHAT ARE STUDENTS’ PLACE IN SOCIAL           BRAINSTORM       15 MIN                   PAPER,
CHANGE & SOCIAL MOVEMENTS?                                 & DISCUSSION                             MARKERS,
                                                                                                       FACT
                                                                                                      SHEET
APPROACHES TO SOCIAL CHANGE - HUNGRY PERSON                  EXERCISE       30 MIN                   PAPER,
EXERCISE                                                                                            MARKERS
                                                                                                    AND PROPS
DEFINING AND DISCUSSING TERMS IN ORGANIZING                 DISCUSSION      15 MIN                   PAPER,
-ORGANIZING, LEADERSHIP, PRACTICE, CONTEXT,                                                         MARKERS
EMPOWERMENT, THEORY

QUESTIONS BEFORE GOING TO INTERNSHIP SITES?                 DISCUSSION      10 MIN
AGENDA FOR TRAINERS

AGENDA                                                       ACTIVITY      TIME     WHO?   NEEDS?
QUOTE OF THE DAY                                             DISCUSSION    5 MIN            PAPER,
                                                                                           MARKERS
ICEBREAKER                                                    EXERCISE     10 MIN
WHAT IS THE POLITICAL ECONOMY? WHAT IS A UNION?             PRESENTATION   30 MIN          COMPUTER
COMMON ECONOMICS POWERPOINT PRESENTATION (THIS                                                AND
PRESENTATION IS DONE BEST BY A REPRESENTATIVE FROM                                         PROJECTOR
THE CENTRAL LABOR COUNCIL)

WHY STUDENTS? WHAT ARE STUDENTS’ PLACE IN SOCIAL            BRAINSTORM     30 MIN           PAPER,
CHANGE & SOCIAL MOVEMENTS?                                  & DISCUSSION                   MARKERS,
                                                                                              FACT
WHY STUDENTS? WHY ECONOMIC JUSTICE?                                                          SHEET

Optional Opener: Ask general questions about day to
day activities that would not be possible if not for the
student movements. Or day to day activities that has
been impacted by social movements.

For example:
Take a step forward if you have gone into a store or
school?
Take a step forward if you have ever voted or know of
anyone who has voted?
Take a step forward if you have ever or know of anyone
who has used a social service (welfare, free and reduced
lunch, etc)?
Take a step forward if you have ever eat vegetables?
Take a step forward if you have ever been to court?
Take a step forward if you have ever taken an ethnic
studies class?
(think of other more applicable question, these are
just ideas)

BRAINSTORM why student are important (write all
ideas down)

WHY STUDENTS?

STUDENTS HAVE ALWAYS BEEN AN
INTEGRALPART OF MOVEMENTS

STUDENT NON-VIOLENT COORDINATING
COMMITTEE
1960 4 black freshpersons in North Carolina staged a sit
in at Woolworth and ordered pie and coffee. They
stayed until closing, and the next day 26 students joined
them – In hundreds of cities, 3600 in jails, won.

Formed SNCC, Student Non-Violent Coordinating
Committee. Congress Multiracial Group and Congress
of Racial Equality. Also Organized Freedom Rides to
win enforcement of non-segregation (1960 Supreme Ct)
Voter registration

CHANGE: FEDERAL ENFORCEMENT           OF   DESEGREGATION
AND VOTER REGISTRATION RIGHTS

Black Panther/Young Lords/I WOR KUEN/Brown
Berets: Out of the late 1960’s, students and young
people emerged to form groups that defended the rights
of their communities. Although tainted by dominant
society as ‘out of control militants,’ The BPP, YL, IWK
initiated the first social service programs open to all
people. They started free breakfast programs, police
accountability, free TB testing and health clinics, free
clothing programs, among others.

CHANGE:  SOCIAL SERVICE FUNDING (HEALTH CARE,
WELFARE, ETC) FOR POOR COMMUNITIES, POLICE
ACCOUNTABILITY.

Chicano Blowouts: ELA School Conditions, UMAS
(Untied Mexican American Students) walked out to
demand educational planning and programming,
bilingual instruction, more representation – 15,000 youth
of 5 schools, students and community!

CHANGE: BETTER SCHOOL CONDITIONS & NUTRITION IN
SCHOOLS

Third World Strikes: Starting in the Northern
California in San Francisco and UC Berkeley, students
formed multiracial coalitions to fight for African
American, Asian American, Chicano, and Native
American Studies Programs to teach histories about the
rich diversity and struggle of the US. These struggles
continue today in universities and high schools.

CHANGE:     ETHNIC STUDIES CLASSES, HISTORY OF ALL
PEOPLE

UFW: Hundreds of college students across the southwest
and nation volunteered to organize and help the Pilipino
and Mexican farm workers to win better wages, working
conditions and dignity.
CHANGE: BETTER WORKING CONDITIONS &            WAGES FOR
PILIPINO AND MEXICAN FARM WORKERS

Anti-Apartheid: divestment across campuses and
universities to end apartheid in South Africa

CHANGE: GLOBAL PRESSURE HELPED TO END APARTHIED

Save Affirmative Action: 1000’s of students across the
UC and State

CHANGE:     STUDENT MOVEMENT TO REPEAL SP1 & 1

ALSO: Students are privileged. They typically have
more time, idealistic, passionate, etc.

WE HAVE ALL BENEFITED FROM THE GAINS…

Why is economic justice? What is it?
-fair economy, everyone has money equally…
what if the govt just have everyone the same amount of
money would that be the solution? is it just money does
it have social impacts?

ALL THIS INJUSTICES ARE CONNECTED TO
ECONOMIC INJUSTICE

Why now?
What is the urgency? What is happening that is so bad?
-Poverty on the rise in SD and nation, deregulation, low
wage jobs, no jobs, no system of support, people getting
more and more screwed. (reconnect to Common Sense
Economics)

Who’s future? Our future.
Bad economy, perpetuates bad society (i.e. cut in fees,
affirmative action, bilingual education, welfare rights, in
general)



APPROACHES TO SOCIAL CHANGE - HUNGRY PERSON                    EXERCISE      30 MIN    PAPER,
EXERCISE                                                                              MARKERS
                                                                                      AND PROPS
DEFINING AND DISCUSSING TERMS IN ORGANIZING                   BRAINSTORM     15 MIN    PAPER,
                                                              & DISCUSSION            MARKERS
DEFINING TERMS: (BRAINSTORM)
 Within organizing and this internship we need to all
  be on the same page to have constructive and clear
  dialogues. This is not to say we will all agree, but at
  least we can begin the conversation.
 Many times we throw around these terms and forget
  to really define them

PROBLEM: The general large problem, i.e. racism,
sexism, classism or drugs in our community.

ISSUE: The issue is the things that stem from the
problem – like low wages, no health care, etc.

SOLUTION: This is a solution to issue like living
wages, health care, (it is often seen as a policy or law
that can make institutional change )

Organizing: to mobilize and give people the tools of self
empowerment toward social and econ change –
challenging power with organized collective strength –
by using different strategies to change power.

Theory: Is an attempt to explain who or how certain
thing happen, a theory of social change might try to
explain the causes of a problem or condition, what the
long-term solutions are, how existing structures in a
society prevent or promote the solutions, and how to
bring those solutions about. (theories have plans or
proposals)

Practice: Is the follow through of your theory, the
action. These two elements must be connected.

Context: The political, economic, social conditions and
situation, a context is the layer of understanding we
need in order to strategize, and take action. It is a
deeper background of an issue/person not just a
“history”

Leadership: What is leadership? Is it only one person,
are leaders born, and not trained? Or are their multiple
forms of leadership? Is it creating a collective
environment that is accessible to everyone to be a
leader?

Empowerment: What does it mean to be empowered?
Is it focusing on being apart of the power structure or is
it about transforming the power structure? Is it
individual advancement? Using your skills to
breakthrough the glass ceiling? Or is it collective
power? Is empowerment giving people money or a
service? Or is empowerment giving people tools to
change their lives permanently?

QUESTIONS BEFORE GOING TO INTERNSHIP SITES?   DISCUSSION   10 MIN
                 APPROACHES TO SOCIAL CHANGE – HUNGRY PERSON EXERCISE

SCENARIO:
I am an unemployed garment worker. My employer has filed for bankruptcy and still owes me back wages. I now find
myself without money to feed my family. I have decided to search for someone to help me with my problems. In my
search for help and food, I went to five different organizations that I thought could help me.

   I. See handout on Hungry Person Scenarios

   II. Instructions: Drawing from your experience and knowledge of each type of organization, take 15 minutes in
       small groups to answer the following questions:

       1. What does the hungry person GET from the organization?

       2. What does the organization see as the ROOT CAUSE of the person’s hunger (what will the organization
          do about it)? Who is at fault?

       3. How does the organization see its RELATIONSHIP with the hungry person? Who gets the CREDIT?

       4. Who do you think would OPPOSE the work of the organization? Does the work of your organization
          change the POWER RELATIONSHIP between the hungry person and the opposition?

       5. What type of long term RELATIONSHIP can or will exist with the organization and the hungry person?
  III. Write down the group’s responses and be prepared to report this back to the big group.

BRAINSTORM:
What are the advantages and disadvantages/limitations of each type of organization?

TYPE OF ORGANIZATION              ADVANTAGES                         DISADVANTAGES / LIMITATIONS
(provide example)
Service


Advocacy


Economic development


Electoral


Organizing
NOTES FOR TRANINERS:

TYPE OF ORGANIZATION   ADVANTAGES                        DISADVANTAGES / LIMITATIONS
(provide example)
Service                   Meets immediate need             Very temporary benefit
                          Large numbers of people can      Doesn’t address root causes
                           benefit


Advocacy                  Expert help to maneuver          operates within set policies and
                           through system                    structures
                                                            does not address root causes
                                                            can create dependency


Economic development      acquire new skills               does not change power relations
                          limited self-sufficiency         limited resources/ability to compete


Electoral                 more accountable leaders         does not change power relations
                          more responsive legislation      no guarantees


Organizing                addresses power relations        takes a long time
                          long term change              
HUNGRY PERSON SCENARIOS

DAY 1: SERVICE ORGANIZATION

HP:   I heard of a place that gives food to people in need so I went. Inside, there were a lot of people waiting in line
      for food. Many of them were families. I got in line and waited my turn. Behind the counter was a woman
      putting food onto peoples’ plates.

O:    “Welcome to the Soup Kitchen.” [put food on plate]

HP:   She put the food onto my plate and I went to sit down at the long tables to eat with the others. After eating,

      I asked the woman: “Could I have some food to take home?”

O:    “Sorry, but you’re not allowed to take any food off the premises. You can come back everyday for dinner
      though.”

DAY 2: ADVOCACY ORGANIZATION

HP:   On another day, I went to an organization where they are supposed to help you get things you need, like
      food and housing and stuff. I waited and then a woman came out to see me.

O:    “Let’s go to my desk. Have a seat. Tell me what you need.”

HP:   “I lost my job because my employer had gone out of business and still owed me back wages and my family
      was hungry and I need food to feed them.”

O:    “How many kids do you have? Where do you live? Are you on public assistance, getting any kind of help?
      You’re eligible for food stamps.”

HP:   “I had tried to get them before but got turned down.”

O:    [pick up phone, pretend to talk for 2 seconds] “I know a worker at the food stamp office. She can see us now if
      you have time to go now.”

HP:   We went to the food stamp office and I got food stamps. She also gave me a name and number for a lawyer to
      talk to about my lost wages.

DAY 3: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

HP:   I went to another place that was a house with a little store in front and a huge garden in back. People were
      working in the garden and a few people were in the store, working and buying things.

      [go to person at desk]

      “Hello. I lost my job because my employer had gone out of business and still owed me back wages and,
      although I had gotten food stamps, I was still short of food for my family and I needed help. Could you help
      me?”
O:    “This organization is a food cooperative. People join by paying dues and working a certain number of hours in
      the garden. We also teach people how to set up their own gardens in their homes or apartments. There’s a
      Saturday market where members bring the produce they grew and exchange it with other members or for
      credits which they could buy things they needed later. This way all the members got to share the food that was
      sold cheaply in the store. The food is organic – grown without any poisonous -chemicals. Would you like to
      join?”

HP:   “I don’t have any money to join or buy food from the store.”

O:    “I’m not really supposed to, but here’s a little food, and you could work off your dues by doing extra work in
      the garden.”

HP:   I took the food and told him I’d come back later to join. I did join the organization and I now grow vegetables
      and spices in my apartment and I trade my produce at the swap meets.


DAY 4: ELECTORAL ORGANIZATION

HP:   While watching TV at the Soup Kitchen, I saw this politician being interviewed about what’s wrong with this
      country. What he said seemed to make a lot of sense to me especially when he said that what people really
      need are decent jobs to support themselves and their families. I remembered that his campaign office is down
      the street, so I went. There were a lot of people running in and out of the office, carrying clipboards, buttons,
      and signs.

HP:   [go to person at desk]

      “Hello. I am out of work and that my employer still owed me back wages and that my family was hungry and
      I really need a job.”

O:    “This is a campaign office, and our job is Alex T. Tom elected as the new mayor of our city. It’s important to
      have people in office who understand the needs of the community and of people like you.” “Are you
      registered to vote?”

HP:   “No, I said I’ve never voted in my life.”

O:    “I can get you registered now so you can vote Alex T. Tom into office. Things will be better for poor people in
      our city if he gets to be mayor.” Will you volunteer to make voter ID calls and to turn people out to vote?”

HP:   I said, “_________.” [go with whatever you feel]

      Before I left, he gave me some donuts and coffee.

DAY 5: COMMUNITY ORGANIZING

HP:   On another day, I came to a place called Asian Immigrant Women’s Advocates.

      [go to person desk]

      “Hello. I had lost my job because my employer had gone out of business and still owed me back wages and
      my family was hungry and I need food to feed them.”
O:    “We don’t have food there, but would you like to sit down and tell me about your old job and why your
      employer did not pay you?”

HP: [sit down]

O:    “Who did you work for? How many other women worked there? Why do you think the employer closed
      down? How long have you lived around this neighborhood? How do you feel about being cheated out of your
      wages and whose fault do you think it was?

O:    “This is a community organization and women paid dues and meet to solve their common problems.”

HP:   “I don’t have any money.”

O:    “You could pay my dues a little at a time. Would you be interested in bring your ex-coworkers together in
      order to try to solve your problem?”

HP:   I was able to bring 16 out of the 36 women that worked at our sewing factory. In the meeting we told our
      stories of what was owed to us and discovered that our employer owed all of us over $36,000.

      The organizer had done some research on the owner and found out that he had filed for bankruptcy and
      showed no asset. We also learned that we only sewed clothing for a company called Jessica McClintock, who
      made huge profits from the designer dresses that we sewed. We agreed to stand together and find out who was
      responsible for our problem.

      We worked together for a 3-year period and organized a national boycott of Jessica McClintock clothing. We
      picketed her boutique in downtown San Francisco every Saturday until she signed an agreement to monitor the
      subcontractors and guarantee the wages and working conditions of the 4000 garment workers who make her
      products. Plus she made a donation of $36,000 to the women who had their wages stolen by their employer.
                                 Printed Materials for workshop 1

 INSERT the 5 Flyer of the different forms of change
 Include the powerpoint of commonsense economics
 INSERT Why Students flyer
HISTORY OF SOCIAL / ECONOMIC JUSTICE – HISTORY OF SAN DIEGO ACTIVISM

HISTORY OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC JUSTICE “PAST MOVEMENTS AND THEIR LEGACY”
This workshop will begin with a historical overview of San Diego during the civil rights movement. Next, a general
history of US social and economic justice movements will be provided. More specifically, an in-depth analysis of the
1930’s and 1960’s social and economic justice movements will be given. Topics such as the: Great Depression, New
Deal, Ella Baker, Highlander Institute and the Founding of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, Black
Panther Party, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Cesar Chavez, Saul Alinsky, Septima Clark, ALF-CIO, will be
discussed.

AGENDA                                                     ACTIVITY         TIME        WHO        NEEDS?
QUOTE OF THE DAY                                            DISCUSSION      10 MIN

ICEBREAKER                                                   EXERCISE       10 MIN

INTRODUCTION OF THE CONTEXT OF SOCIAL MOVEMENTS           PRESENTATION      45 MIN

COMMUNTY SPEAKER ON SAN DIEGO ACTIVISM &                     SPEAKER        30 MIN
ORGANIZING

QUESTION AND ANSWER                                         DISCUSSION      10 MIN

LESSON LEARNED: THE ROSA PARKS STORY                        DISCUSSION      15 MIN

CONCLUSION                                                  DISCUSSION      15 MIN
AGENDA FOR TRAINERS

AGENDA                                                       ACTIVITY      TIME     WHO   NEEDS?
QUOTE OF THE DAY                                             DISCUSSION    10 MIN

ICEBREAKER                                                    EXERCISE     10 MIN

INTRODUCTION OF THE           CONTEXT OF SOCIAL             PRESENTATION   45 MIN
MOVEMENTS (ADOPTED BY        NOTES FROM MAY FU AND
ALEX T. TOM)

MAIN POINTS FOR THE SOCIAL MOVEMENT CONTEXT:

 Labor history and social movements (1930’s to
  60’s): The 1930’s was a time of great economic
  disparity – the Great Depression, this gave rise to the
  welfare state in the US, but it was not necessarily in
  the interest of helping poor people but to maintain the
  current structures. If FDR did not create a strong
  welfare state, the power structure would have been in
  graver danger. The era reshaped past racism and
  solidified white racism to become less and less
  obvious.
 The Black, Brown, Red, Yellow Power movements
  are typically seen by society as reactive and militant
  movement without a clear purpose.
 However, these movement were clearly a collective
  response to the investment in whiteness in the 1930’s
  New Deal / Franklin D. Roosevelt plans that aided
  mostly working class white families. (i.e. National
  Labor Relations Act created but with the Wagner
  Act did not allow immigrants, domestic and farm
  workers to join unions – these workers were mostly
  people of color. Asian and Mexican farm workers
  and domestic workers).
 New Deal also created the 1934 Federal Housing
  Act that allowed greater home ownership but also
  enacted redlining and restrictive covenants that
  continued to segregate communities and create
  greater barriers for families of color own property
  (i.e. people of color paid more for mortgage).
 The FHA spent $120 Billion on newer and better
  housing, but less than 2% was actually available for
  people of color.
 Urban Renewal Program: New highways were
  needed but these new highways also broke up
  neighborhoods (mostly communities of color were
  displaced and had to move, 60% of those who had to
  move were people of color)
 This led to communities of color to NOT have equal
  access to land and disproportionately put poor whites
  in the 1930s to on the track to the middle class and to
  accumulate wealth.
 This was NOT about race-based inclusion, but really
  about white inclusion. This discouraged class
  solidarity at a great potential moment in US history.

BRAINSTORM WHAT YOU THINK OF THE
1960’S

Mainstream: Hippies, college students, flower power,
peace, civil rights, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr.,
anti-war.

Non-mainstream: Empowerment of women of color,
multiracial alliances, first social programs for people of
color, decolonization movements in Africa, Latin
America, Asia, etc.

      WHY WERE THESE MOVEMENTS SO
      IMPORTANT? WHY ARE THEY STILL
              IMPORTANT?

 It was a period of many different movements,
  different lessons, messages…
 1960’s and 70’s was powerful because of identity and
  also because of our communities and other groups
 These movements learned from each other – for
  example, Martin Luther King Jr. went against the
  Vietnam War because of meeting Thich Nhat Hanh,
  a Vietnamese Buddhist monk. Black and Mexican
  soldiers went against the Vietnam War bc their own
  country did not support them.
 The UFW Grape Boycott was inspired by Pilipino
  farm workers. This movement was with Mexican
  farmworkers and many white college students
 Black Panther Party: Richard Aoki, a Japanese
  American was one of the first panthers and was also
  the Minister of Information with Huey Newton and
  Bobby Seale.
 SNCC: Began as a strong coalition of Blacks and
  whites in the south to fight for voting and civil rights.

 MYTH: These movements were divisive.

   FACT: These movements were interconnected and
   strong. Imagine if we all united, we would be able to
   really have power. The system uses race to divide
   us.

 For example, the Rainbow Coalition was
  popularized by Jesse Jackson, but was really initiated
  by Fred Hampton, Black Panther Party Chairperson
  of Chicago. His vision was to create a coalition of all
  races down with real social change. He met the
  leader of the Young Lords, a Puerto Rican street
  gang in New York in prison. Afterwards, the Young
  Lords began to model themselves after the Black
  Panther Party. Fred Hampton’s multiracial vision
  was too dangerous and powerful; that is why the
  FBI plotted to assassinate him…
 Although there were points of solidarity, there were
  also many division across gender and sexual
  orientation. Many of these organizations were
  sexist and homophobic. Women leadership and
  inclusion of gays and lesbians was not always at the
  top of the agenda.
 Social change is about working through our
  differences. This is further important because since
  the we are treated differently by the system
  depending on our race, class, gender or sexuality, we
  need to understand that working together is not
  being the same.

 GOOD QUOTES: “No one is free if others are
  oppressed.” “The true revolutionary is guided by
  great feelings of love.” (che)

 Social movements as an ‘accumulation of
  struggle’: Past, present and future struggles are all
  connected and have impact on each other.
 Social movements Emphasize change does not
  happen over night
 When we resolve contradictions (issues/problems),
  new contradictions arise – this is the slow upward
  spiral of social change. For example, when slavery
  “ended,” it was a good thing, but new forms of racial
  emerged. When the Voting Act / Civil Rights Act of
  1965 passed, newer forms of institutional racism
  emerged (i.e. the movement to end affirmative action,
  ‘reverse’ racism)
 We need to always remember the lessons learned
  from the past can help us move forward today.

COMMUNTY SPEAKER ON SAN DIEGO ACTIVISM                      SPEAKER   30
                                                                      MINS
Main Points for Speaker:
Find a community activist organizer from SD to show:

 The connectedness to the issues surrounding the
  internship (economic justice)
 The different context of the political and social
  climate (post war, conservative, border climate)
 That there is a clear need for a younger generation of
  organizers in San Diego.

QUESTION AND ANSWER                                            DISCUSSION    10
                                                                            MINS

LESSON LEARNED: THE ROSA PARKS STORY                           DISCUSSION   15 MIN

 ROSA PARKS STORY: Who knows who Rosa
  Parks is? And what did she do? Did she start the
  civil rights movement? What do you remember
  learning in school?


    MYTH: Rosa Parks, the little old lady, who was
     just tired of the injustice and tired of sitting in the
     back of the bus. Once she sat down at the front
     of the bus, she started the most unforgettable
     movement in the US – the Montgomery Bus
     Boycott.

    FACTS:
      Rosa Parks was an organizer
      She was a trained at the Highlander School,
       an organizing training center for people in the
       South.
      She was a member of the NAACP and started
       various youth program and ran a women’s
       political caucus
      She was on the Montgomery Bus Boycott
       Committee, a group as big as this room and
       planned a strategy around how to challenge
       desegregation laws. They had a legal team
       that was ready to file charges on the city once
       they arrested Rosa Parks
      She has tried to sit in the front of the bus 6-7
       previous time; so often that bus drivers
       recognized her as a ‘troublemaker’ and would
       drive by her if she was at a bus stop.
      That day she got arrested, there were 3 other
       women around Montgomery trying to do the
       same thing.
      Rosa Parks was a long time experienced
          organizer

MORAL OF THIS STORY:
 Social Change does not happen over night
 Movements are not based on ‘super humans’ but
  rather on the collective power of average people like
  us who want change and want to do it with a plan.
 WE CAN DO IT!!

CONCLUSION                                                DISCUSSION   15 MIN

CASE STUDIES ON SOCIAL MOVEMENTS: UFW AND SNCC

CASE STUDIES ON SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC JUSTICE MOVEMENTS
The goal of this workshop is to provide a better understanding of how previous social movements were able to win
and how we could learn lessons from these movements. Social change is always an accumulation of different
struggles. This workshop will focus on the United Farm Workers (UFW) movement and the Student Non-Violent
Coordinating Committee (SNCC). It will give us a better historical context of why we organize today. The historical
gains will be discussed along with the consequences of the different organizing practices of these movements.

AGENDA                                                     ACTIVITY        TIME        WHO         NEEDS?
QUOTE OF THE DAY                                           DISCUSSION      10 MIN

ICEBREAKER                                                  EXERCISE       10 MIN

INTRODUCTION OF SOCIAL MOVEMENT CASE STUDIES             PRESENTATION      15 MIN

CASE STUDY VIDEO CLIP ON UFW                                 VIDEO           10
                                                                            MINS
CASE STUDY VIDEO CLIP ON SNCC                                VIDEO           10
                                                                            MINS
BREAK OUT INTO GROUPS: DISCUSS AND ANSWER                 GROUP WORK       20 MIN
QUESTIONS
SOCIAL MOVEMENT TEATROS!                                    EXERCISE       30 MIN

REPORT BACKS                                                 GROUP         15 MIN
                                                         PRESENTATIONS
CONCLUSION                                                DISCUSSION       10 MIN
AGENDA FOR TRAINERS

AGENDA                                                      ACTIVITY        TIME     WHO   NEEDS?
QUOTE OF THE DAY                                            DISCUSSION      10 MIN

ICEBREAKER                                                   EXERCISE       10 MIN

INTRODUCTION OF SOCIAL MOVEMENT CASE STUDIES               PRESENTATION     10 MIN

CASE STUDY ON UNITED FARM WORKER’S MOVEMENT               VIDEO AND GROUP   20 MIN          VIDEO
                                                               WORK
CASE STUDIES ON SOCIAL MOVEMENTS #1

KEY FOOTAGE (FIGHT IN THE FIELDS)

WHAT WERE THE GOALS OF THE MOVEMENT?

Short term Goals
What did they do tactically to win

Medium term Goals
Did they have concrete gains (what kinds of change was
it? Systemic change?)
How did they win with organized power

Long term Goals
Did they have a mission statement?

IN SMALL GROUPS (USE QUESTION SHEET)                                        20 MIN

WHAT WERE THE KEY CHANGES IN POWER
RELATIONSHIPS THAT UNIONS LIKE THE UFW
DEMANDED AND WON AND WHY DID THESE
THINGS REPRESENT SYSTEMIC CHANGE?

What were the key elements of organized power that
was built and exercised that resulted in them winning
that change?

What was going on at the time (the political and social
context, global, local, etc)?

WHAT ARE THE LESSONS LEARNED? HOW IS IT
REVEVANT TO OUR WORK TODAY?

GROUP DISCUSSION                                                            15 MIN

BREAK                                                                       10 MIN
CASE STUDY ON THE STUDENT NON-VIOLENT                     VIDEO/PRESENTATION   25 MIN    VIDEO
COORDINATING COMMITTEE                                     AND GROUP WORK

SHOW KEY FOOTAGE (EYES ON THE PRIZE
P3)

WHAT WERE THE GOALS OF THE
MOVEMENT?

Short term Goals
What did they do tactically to win

Medium term Goals
Did they have concrete gains (what kinds of change was
it? Systemic change?)
How did they win with organized power

Long term Goals
Did they have a mission statement?

IN SMALL GROUPS (USE QUESTION SHEET)

WHAT WERE THE KEY CHANGES IN POWER
RELATIONSHIPS THAT UNIONS LIKE THE UFW
DEMANDED AND WON AND WHY DID THESE
THINGS REPRESENT SYSTEMIC CHANGE?

what were the key elements of organized power that
was built and exercised that resulted in them winning
that change?

What was going on at the time (the political and social                        20 MIN
context, global, local, etc)?


WHAT ARE THE LESSONS LEARNED? HOW IS IT
REVEVANT TO OUR WORK TODAY?

GROUP DISCUSSION / FINAL THOUGHTS                                              15 MIN

SOCIAL MOVEMENT TEATRO! (IDEA FROM CTWO)                       EXERCISE        20 MIN   SHEET AND
                                                                                          PROPS
Teatros (theater) were instrumental in the farm worker
movement to inspire and motivate people to continue to
struggle.

IMAGINE you all are in charge of putting on a teatro
for a group to educate, inspire and agitate them to get
involved.
PERFORM A TEATRO THAT SHOWS:
What the problems are?
What they did to change it?
What was won?

BE CREATIVE! Back in the day farm workers were
poor, so they would improvise with home made masks,
signs, chairs, rakes, shovels, etc. Use whatever is in the
room, you can use people as props too! Remember,
you’re teatro is supposed to motivate and agitate people
to continue the struggle.

The teatro can only be 5 minutes long.
You have 20 minutes to plan

SPLIT INTO 2 GROUPS.

TEATROS!                                                     GROUP TEATROS   15 MIN

CONCLUSION                                                    DISCUSSION     10 MIN
       DIRECTIONS FOR THE SOCIAL MOVEMENT TEATRO!
                                                            (IDEA ADOPTED FROM THE CENTER FOR THIRD WORLD ORGANIZING)



BACKGROUND:                 In 1965, El Teatro Campesino, was founded. It was the beginning of Chicano
                            theater, with Luis Valdez during the Delano Grape Strike. The teatro group
                            created songs and plays, performed on picket lines, at meetings and rallies, and
                            before labor unions and cultural groups using satire to entertain, educate, and
                            keep the movement alive. Teatros (theater) was an instrumental political art form
                            in the farm worker movement that inspired and motivated people to continue to
                            struggle.


DIRECTIONS:                 IMAGINE you all are in charge of putting on a teatro for a group to educate,
                            inspire and agitate them to get involved.


PERFORM A TEATRO THAT SHOWS

 WHAT THE PROBLEMS ARE?
 WHAT THEY DID TO CHANGE IT?
 WHAT WAS WON?


BE CREATIVE! Back in the day farm workers were poor, so they would improvise with home made
masks, signs, chairs, rakes, shovels, etc. Use whatever is in the room, the table the chair; you can use people
as props too! Remember the teatro is supposed to motivate and agitate people to continue the struggle.

THE TEATRO CAN ONLY BE 5 MINUTES LONG.
YOU HAVE 20 MINUTES TO PLAN

                                   Luis Valdez and Agustin, founders of
                                   El Teatro Campesino, Delano, CA - 1965.
INSERTS FOR UFW AND SNCC

          UFW Summary Sheet
          SNCC Summary Sheet
                STUDENTS FOR ECONOMIC JUSTICE INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
                CASE STUDIES ON SOCIAL MOVEMENTS:   SNCC & UFW WORKSHEET

VIDEO: THE UNITED FARMWORKERS MOVEMENT

WHAT WERE THE KEY CHANGES IN POWER RELATIONSHIPS THAT UNIONS LIKE THE UFW DEMANDED AND
WON AND WHY DID THESE THINGS REPRESENT SYSTEMIC CHANGE?



WHAT WERE THE KEY ELEMENTS OF ORGANIZED POWER THAT WAS BUILT AND EXERCISED THAT RESULTED
IN THEM WINNING THAT CHANGE?




WHAT WAS GOING ON AT THE TIME (THE POLITICAL AND SOCIAL CONTEXT, GLOBAL, LOCAL, ETC)?




                             WHAT ARE THE LESSONS LEARNED? HOW IS IT REVEVANT TO OUR WORK TODAY?




VIDEO: BEGINNINGS OF THE STUDENT NON-VIOLENT COORDINATING COMMITTEE

WHAT WERE THE KEY CHANGES IN POLICIES THAT THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT DEMANDED AND WON AND
WHY DID THESE THINGS REPRESENT SYSTEMIC CHANGE?




WHAT WERE THE KEY ELEMENTS OF ORGANIZED POWER THAT WAS BUILT AND EXERCISED THAT RESULTED
IN THEM WINNING THAT CHANGE?



WHAT WAS GOING ON AT THE TIME (THE SOCIAL AND POLITICAL CONTEXT, GLOBAL,
LOCAL, ETC)?
WHAT ARE THE LESSONS LEARNED? HOW IS IT REVEVANT TO OUR WORK TODAY?


Worksheets adopted from the Strategic Trainings for Education for Power (STEP), 2000-2001
WOMEN’S LIBERATION / ROLE IN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

WOMEN’S LIBERATION AND THE INTERSECTION OF OPPRESSIONS
What is the role of women in movements? The purpose of this workshop is to learn lessons from the past movements,
which traditionally suppressed women’s roles. This workshop will provide an understanding that women have always
been the foundation of all movements. There will be panel of women from different community organizations and
labor unions in San Diego. It will use women’s liberation as a lens to understand the complexities and intricacies of
fighting within multiple layers of oppression, such as race, class, gender, sexuality and disability. The purpose is to
understand how we can better our organizing practices.

AGENDA                                                       ACTIVITY         TIME        WHO         NEEDS?
QUOTE OF THE DAY                                             DISCUSSION       10 MIN

ICEBREAKER                                                     EXERCISE       10 MIN

WHO’S THAT SHEROE?                                            EXERCISE        25 MIN

ECONOMIC JUSTICE & WOMEN’S LIBERATION                         EXERCISE        10 MIN
POWERPOINT PRESENTATION
BREAK                                                                         15 MIN

WOMEN IN THE MOVEMENT PANEL:                                PRESENTATION       1 HR
WOMEN WORKERS, ORGANIZER, COMMUNITY MEMBER
QUESTION AND ANSWER                                          DISCUSSION       10 MIN

CONCLUSION                                                   DISCUSSION       15 MIN
INSERT Slide show
 Who’s that sheroe?
NON-TRADITIONAL FORMS OF ORGANIZING

NON-TRADITIONAL FORMS OF ORGANIZING AND UNIONIZATION
The purpose of this workshop is to understand that with the restructured economy, a multifaceted strategy is needed to
address the needs of all workers. The economy has shifted from a manufacture to a service economy with the
massive deindustrialization of the past decades. This ‘new economy’ has created low wage sector jobs that rarely
have the capacity of unionization. This has altered the forms of organizing from tradition union organizing to
organizing different service, garment, day-time, community worker centers. These centers play a vital role because it
fills a void in the labor movement and provides services and tools for empowerment for workers.

AGENDA                                                      ACTIVITY         TIME        WHO         NEEDS?
QUOTE OF THE DAY                                             DISCUSSION      10 MIN                  PEN AND
                                                                                                     MARKERS
ICEBREAKER                                                    EXERCISE       10 MIN

CONTEXT OF ORGANIZING IN THE NEW MILLENNIUM                PRESENTATION      15 MIN

INSTRUCTIONS AND EXAMPLE FOR ORGANIZING ACTIVITY           PRESENTATION      10 MIN                    PEN,
                                                                                                     MARKERS,
                                                                                                      SHEET.
BREAKOUT GROUPS: FILL IN BOXES                                 GROUP         20 MIN                    PEN,
                                                                                                     MARKERS,
                                                                                                      SHEET.
REPORT BACK AND DISCUSSION                                   DISCUSSION      25 MIN

CONCLUSION                                                   DISCUSSION      15 MIN

COMMUNITY SPEAKER OR PROFESSOR ON NON-                     PRESENTATION       1 HR
TRADITIONAL ORGANIZING
AGENDA FOR TRAINERS
AGENDA                                                     ACTIVITY      TIME     WHO   NEEDS?
QUOTE OF THE DAY                                           DISCUSSION    10 MIN         PEN AND
                                                                                        MARKERS
ICEBREAKER                                                  EXERCISE     10 MIN

CONTEXT OF ORGANIZING IN THE NEW MILLENNIUM               PRESENTATION   15 MIN

CHANGING/GLOBAL ECONOMY: DECLINE OF UNION
MEMBERSHIP, NEED FOR WORKERS TO BE ORGANIZED FOR
POWER.

MULTIPLE IDENTITIES: WE HAVE MULTIPLE IDENTITIES –
COMMUNITY RESIDENTS, STUDENTS, ETC, - NOT ALL TYPES
OF ORGANIZATIONS MEET ALL OUR NEEDS

RECOGNIZE   THAT NOT ONE TYPE OF ORGANIZING WILL
CHANGE THE WORLD FOR ALL OF US. THIS IS TO LOOK AT
VARIOUS TYPES, WHAT THEY CONTRIBUTE AND WHAT
THEIR LIMITATIONS ARE.

INSTRUCTIONS AND EXAMPLE FOR “TYPES OF                    PRESENTATION   10 MIN           PEN,
ORGANIZNG” ACTIVITY                                                                     MARKERS,
                                                                                         SHEET.
  A) Now that we have worked with so many different
     groups in the community, there are many different
     types of organizing (i.e. community organizing,
     union organizing, etc); this activity will help us
     identify the overall structure. We will also
     evaluate each of the different types.

  B) Let’s start off with ACORN, they are a community
     organizing group. Association of Community
     Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN)

Who are the members? What is the general
structure?
      Residents in neighborhoods
      Members organize into chapters, which affiliate
       region-wide, nationally

Who recruit members? How?
     Systematic door-to-door outreach programs by
      staff to recruit new members.

How is there internal political education &
development?
      Training for members on basic outreach &
       campaign skills.
      Training for members on skills of confronting
       decision-makers, i.e., public speaking,
       demonstrating.

What strategic alliance(s) is organization part of?
     Network of local ACORN organizations across
      the country
     Usually temporary coalitions with other
      progressive / liberal groups in local areas around
      key issues.


Decision-making? What decisions do members make?
Staff?
      Work primarily directed, coordinated, &
       implemented by staff at local & national level.
      Leadership bodies of members & coalition
       committees    participate     in    planning    &
       implementing campaigns.

Who is the organizer accountable to?
     Senior staff
     Members of local organizations

Where do the resources come from?
    Grants from foundations
    Small share from individual members’ dues

   What LIMITS the organization’s ability to fight
   for and make change?

   What are EFFECTIVE or GOOD things about
   this organization?

BREAKOUT GROUPS: FILL IN BOXES                                            20 MIN     PEN,
                                                                                   MARKERS,
Each staff person should split into the groups and help                             SHEET.
the facilitator. Each group should have a facilitator,
notetaker and someone to present back to the larger
group.

REPORT BACK AND DISCUSSION                                  DISCUSSION    25 MIN

ACTIVITY WRAP UP                                            DISCUSSION    10 MIN

COMMUNITY SPEAKER OR PROFESSOR ON NON-                     PRESENTATION    1 HR
TRADITIONAL ORGANIZING

KEY POINTS:
   Union organizing is important; but with the new
    conditions within the political economy, not
    everyone is able to be in a union.
   The role of collective work as empowerment
   The role of worker centers as way to challenge
    traditional methods and structures of union
    organizing. Worker centers should also help to
    lead workers to a union
[INSERT TABLE OF ORGANIZING TYPES]
WHAT IS GLOBALIZATION?

TAKING THE GLOBAL TO THE LOCAL
The rise of corporate globalization, the trend of corporations exploiting cheap labor internationally, has evoked a tidal
wave of international and local resistance. From the Zapatistas rising up against the passage of NAFTA, to US
environmental groups and labor unions and protesting the World Trade Organization and Inter-Monetary Fund – the
resistance is widespread. This workshop will provide an overview of globalization and will also use the ideas of the
global resistance to local action.

AGENDA                                                        ACTIVITY         TIME        WHO          NEEDS?
QUOTE OF THE DAY                                              DISCUSSION       10 MIN

ICEBREAKER                                                      EXERCISE       10 MIN

WHAT IS GLOBALIZATION?                                        DISCUSSION       15 MIN

Definitions & Brainstorms: Is globalization bad if it is
fair? globalization vs. corporate globalization

Other things to define: WTO, FTAA, NAFTA, APEC,
etc.

SPEAKER INTRO                                                PRESENTATION      10 MIN

VIDEO ON GLOBALIZATION: THIS IS WHAT DEMOCRACY                                 20 MIN
LOOKS LIKE
SPEAKER ON GLOBALIZATION                                     PRESENTATION      25 MIN

QUESTION AND ANSWER                                           DISCUSSION       15 MIN

CONCLUSION/WRAP UP                                            DISCUSSION       10 MIN
[INSERT GLOBALIZATION FACT SHEET]
                                              EXPOSURE TOURS

SAN DIEGO HOUSING CRISIS / ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE TOUR

SAN DIEGO HOUSING CRISIS / ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE TOUR
Did you know that there are residents in Sherman and Logan Heights being wrongfully evicted and left homeless
because of new corporate development? The targets are mostly undocumented or newly arrived immigrants. This
workshop and exposure tour will tie in the issues from the community to economic justice. An overwhelming
majority of low-income communities facing gentrification and environmental pollution are also communities of color.

WHERE:         1) Gentrified Neighborhood of San Diego (Sherman Heights)
               2) Neighborhood Polluted by Toxic Waste (Barrio Logan)

AGENDA                                                     ACTIVITY        TIME        WHO         NEEDS?
  I. INTRODUCTION & OVERVIEW OF DAY                                         10
                                                                            MINS
   II. SAN DIEGO HOUSING CRISIS                           PRESENTATION       30
       NORMA CHAVEZ, DURO AND MAAC PROJECT                                  MINS
       (MEET AT MERCADO APARTMENTS)

  III.   QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS                                               10
                                                                            MINS
  IV. BREAK (GO TO EHC)                                                      15
                                                                            MINS
   V. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH COALITION                      PRESENTATION       30
      BORDER JUSTICE CAMPAIGN                                               MINS

  VI.    QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS                                               10
                                                                            MINS
 VII. CONCLUSION/WRAP UP                                   DISCUSSION        10
                                                                            MINS
STATEWIDE IMMIGRATION WORKSHOP & TJ/BORDER EXPOSURE TRIP

Joined by UC Berkeley’s “Labor Summer” and UC Los Angeles’ Summer Internship Program, this workshop will
give a historical account of US immigration policies and the impact on people’s daily lives. The purpose is to
understand how US immigration policies are closely intertwined to US’s need of a racialized and gendered cheap
labor pool. We will also discuss the consequences these policies have on people’s families and humanity. At this
conference, there will be an interactive workshop on globalization and immigration and a panel of speakers working
on immigration issues. Then we will go on an exposure trip of the border and Tijuana to understand the dire situation
of immigration, working conditions and environmental pollution.

WHERE:        Border State Field Park, US
              Metales y Derivados, an abandoned US-owned smelter and battery recycler
              Colonia Chilpancingo, Residents in Mexico impacted by toxic waste and lead poisoning

GOALS
 To have a better understanding of the system’s demand for cheap labor as immigrant
 To have a better understanding of how policies create a systemic hierarchy of race, class, and gender
 To have a better understanding of how immigrant workers have changed the dynamics within union
 organizing and organizing in general
 To have a better understanding of the myths and facts of having a immigrant work-force
 To have a better understanding of the dynamics of living in a border region
 To have a better understanding of the increasing barriers immigrants face. For example, receiving
 documentation, and the anti-immigrant sentiments from Proposition 187, 227 and other policies.
 To have a better understanding of the patterns and causes for migration of labor
 To have a better understanding of how immigration is connected to issues of globalization,
 police brutality, poverty, etc.

AGENDA: DAY 1

8:30 am – 9:00 am            Check-in / Breakfast at Casa Familiar Civic & Rec Center

9:00 am – 9:40 am            Introduction / Icebreaker

9:40 am – 9:50 am            Overview of the Day / Housekeeping Notes

9:50 am – 10:00 am           Overview of Maquiladoras and Border Region
                             Cesar Luna, Environmental Health Coalition

10:00 am –10:40 am           Leave and arrive in TJ

10:40 am – 11:45 am          Environmental Justice Tour with Environmental Health Coalition
                             Metales y Derivados, an abandoned US-owned smelter and battery recycler
                             Driving Tour of Maquiladoras in the Otay Mesa Industrial Park

11:45 am – 12:50 pm          Speak to residents of Colonia Chilpancingo & maquiladora workers
                             Magdalena Cerda, Environmental Health Coalition
                      Carmen Valadez, Casa de la Mujer - Groupo Factor X

12:50 pm – 1:30 pm    Return to Casa Familiar Civic & Rec Center

1:30 pm – 3:00 pm     Immigrant Rights Panel / Lunch
                      1) Carmen Valadez, Organizer, Casa de la Mujer - Groupo Factor X
                      2) Paul Espinosa, US-Mexico Border Filmmaker, Espinosa Productions
                      3) Christian Ramirez, La Raza Right Coalition/American Friend Service Committee

3:00 pm – 3:30 pm     Leave for Border Exposure Trip

3:30 pm – 4:30 pm     Border Exposure Trip by La Raza Right Coalition/American Friend Service
Committee

4:30 pm – 5:00 pm     Return to Casa Familiar Civic & Rec Center

5:00 pm – 6:00 pm     Debrief

6:00 pm – 6:15 pm     Closing & Announcements

6:15 pm – 8:00 pm     Rest up!! Drive to Overnight Sites (I.E. HOTELS, HOUSES, ETC)

8:00 pm – 10:00 pm    Dinner & Bonfire at Mission Beach!?

AGENDA: DAY 2

9:30 am - 10:30 am    Breakfast

10:30 am              Forums
                      Legalization                           (UC Los Angeles)
                      Guest Worker Program                   (UC Berkeley)
                      Gentrification                         (San Diego)
                      Fast Track                             (UC Berkeley)
                      Prisons                                (UC Berkeley & San Diego)
                      Labor & Student Involvement            (UC Los Angeles)

                      () indicate that a person from that school will briefly
                      present the issue to the whole group

11:00 am - 12:00 pm   Talk within Forum Groups

12:15 pm - 1:15 pm    Present back to the whole group

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm     Lunch at Chicano Park

3:00 pm               Speaker/Tour: History and Struggle of the Chicano Park

                      Chicano Park clean-up

                      Network
4:00 pm - 4:30 pm   Day Ends
SPEAKER BIOS

CESAR LUNA graduated in law from University of San Diego and headed the ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH COALITION
Border Justice Campaign for the past 5 years. Currently, he has an immigration law practice in San Diego.

MAGDALENA CERDA, a community organizer with the ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH COALITION Border
Environmental Justice Campaign in the Colonia Chilpancingo, Tijuana. She works in solidarity with social justice
groups in the border region to promote worker and community right-to-know about the chemicals used by
maquiladoras, to increase their capacity to influence conditions that directly affect their health, and to demand cleanup
of abandoned and contaminated sites.

CARMEN VALADEZ is a organizer and member of CASA DE LA MUJER - GROUPO FACTOR X, a feminist center in
TJ that specializes in counseling and legal assistance to women workers in the maquiladora industry and offers
programs about sexual abuse and reproductive rights. In Tijuana, the CASA DE LA MUJER grabbed hold of the issue
and took action with a publicity campaign about the need for safe and legal abortion. In November they coordinated a
forum with pro-choice organizations in the United States and Mexico to educate women maquiladora workers about
their history, rights as women workers, and to create a self-sufficient, grassroots movement that seeks to educate other
women.

PAUL ESPINOSA is an award-winning Independent Filmmaker based in San Diego who has been involved with
producing films and documentaries for over 20 years. His company — Espinosa Productions — is a film and video
company specializing in documentary and dramatic films focused on the U.S.-Mexico border region. His major
national PBS productions include: THE U.S.-MEXICAN WAR: 1846-1848, ...AND THE EARTH DID NOT SWALLOW HIM,
THE LEMON GROVE INCIDENT, THE HUNT FOR PANCHO VILLA, AND THE BORDER. His films have been screened at
festivals around the world and have won eight Emmys and five CINE Golden Eagles.

CHRISTIAN RAMÍREZ was born in Tijuana in 1976. The Ramírez family moved to San Ysidro in 1986. He
attended Southwest for 2 years. He accepted to San Diego State University in 1994, where he completed a BA in
History and Anthropology. As an undergraduate student he joined the ranks of the RAZA RIGHTS COALITION and
UNIÓN DEL BARRIO, both independent Mexican organizations. He has been the coordinator of the RAZA RIGHTS
COALITION since 1996, currently he serves as the Coordinator of the US-México Border Program of the AMERICAN
FRIENDS SERVICE COMMITTEE.

RESIDENTS & WORKERS OF COLONIA CHILPANCINGO live below the Mesa de Otay and Metales, an
abandoned US-owned toxic waste site, which is a community of about 1,000 households. While in operation,
residents of this community repeatedly complained to Mexican authorities about Metales’ polluting activities, its
illegal hazardous waste disposal practices and the frequent health problems related to skin and eye irritations as well
as gastrointestinal problems in the community. Community residents were also concerned that underground water
sources were being contaminated by the Metales site. All of these hazardous wastes remain on the site completely
exposed to the natural environment. Seasonal winds and rainfall carry these wastes to nearby communities. Colonia
Chilpancingo faces great risk of exposure to the runoff that may carry toxic chemicals from Metales because it is
located downhill from and almost adjacent to the abandoned toxic site.

CHICANO PARK STEERING COMMITTEE established in April of 1970 “To oversee (on behalf of the
community) the continuing development and expansion of the Chicano Park and to insure that the park would be
developed in a Chicano/Mexicano/Indigenous style.” One of the original goals of the Chicano Park and the CPSC was
to transform the cold grey concrete and rock-hard dirt that once dominated the site into a glorious thing of beauty that
would mirror and showcase the beauty, culture and spirit of the Chicano people. Today the murals in Chicano Park
are world-famous and constitute (along with various sculptures) the world’s largest outdoor art gallery.
LOS ANGELES ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AND WORKER CENTER TOUR

This will be an all day exposure tour of the environmental and economic conditions in Los Angeles. The tour will
provide a general historical, political and economic context of Los Angeles and tours of various worker centers. The
tour will consist of the LA Garment Worker Center, Pilipino Worker Center, Korean Immigrant Workers Advocates*,
among other worker centers. This exposure will be a joint tour with the UCLA Summer Internship Program.

FRIDAY, JULY 20ST

7:30 pm – 9:00 pm             Dinner
9:00 pm – 11:00 pm            Leave to Los Angeles Summer Internship Program Site

SATURDAY, JULY 21ST – LA WORKER CENTER EXPOSURE TOUR

9:00 am – 9:30 am             Breakfast at Los Angeles Summer Internship Program Site at Conference Center
9:30 am – 10:00 am            Leave for the Garment Worker Center
10:00 am – 10:30 am           Icebreaker at Garment Worker Center
10:30 am – 11:30 am           Garment Worker Center Presentation & Tour
11:30 am – 12:30 pm           Tour of the Fashion District
12:30 pm – 12:45 pm           Leave for Mercado District
12:45 pm – 1:45 pm            Mercado District – Lunch
1:45 pm – 2:00 pm             Leave for KIWA and PWC
2:00 pm – 3:00 pm             Korean Immigrant Worker Advocates & Pilipino Worker Center
3:00 pm – 4:00 pm             Bus Riders Union
4:00 pm – 5:00 pm             Quick Collective Debrief


WHAT TO BRING?

Sleeping Bag/pillow
Toilet stuff
$$$ Some Money $$$
Clothes, swimwear, etc.
Bath Towel
Your Bomb ass spirit!

DIRECTIONS

Los Angeles Summer Internship Program Site

           209 SOUTH WESTMORELAND
           CONTACT: DANIEL KATO (310) 880-6978

   Directions:
   405 North
   10 East
   Exit Vermont (Take a left)
   On 3rd Street (Take a right)
On South Westmoreland (Take a Left)
                                      SKILLS WORKSHOP OUTLINES

HOW TO GIVE A MESSAGE AND RAP

In order to be effective organizers, we need to understand how to talk to people one-on-one and get them to take
action with their lives. This skills workshop will give an overview of how to craft a message and give a one-on-one
rap during the campaigns. Giving a strong message and rap and building a positive one-on-one relationship is
essential to our organizing. We will do practice role plays with each other during this workshop.

AGENDA                                                     ACTIVITY        TIME        WHO        NEEDS?
  I)   QUALITIES OF A GOOD COMMUNICATOR /                  BRAINSTORM      20 MIN
       ORGANIZER                                            (+ AND ++)

   II)    MESSAGE AND RAP TRAINING & OVERVIEW              DISCUSSION      20 MIN


   III)   ROLE PLAYING                                      EXERCISE       1 HR 10
                                                                            MINS
              a) MODEL ROLE PLAY AND DEBRIEF (20
                 MINS)
              b) ONE ON ONE ROLE PLAYS (20 MINS)
              c) GAME SHOW ROLE PLAYS (30 MINS)


   IV)    FINAL DEBRIEF                                    DISCUSSION      10 MIN
QUALITIES OF A GOOD COMMUNICATOR / ORGANIZER

start with things to be improved (act out motions)
good qualities:
listener
asks questions
enthusiasm
know your issues
use self interests
honest
adjust tone/rap to audience level of understanding

MESSAGE AND RAP TRAINING & OVERVIEW

What is a rap?
Why is it important
Sometimes only a few minutes to get started, in or even finish
What is the message? Goal of the rap? Must begin with this
Open and probe with questions to ID issues (self-interest), close
Not info sharing
Not helping people – challenging people to accept opportunity to reach empowerment
Stay patient and persistent
Must know your issues, but if not, get back to them later (it will create an opportunity to continue talking next time)

ROLE PLAYING

WORKER/ORGANIZER ROLE PLAY EXAMPLE

A janitor is pushing a cart through the mall. The organizer surprises the janitor accidentally. The janitors is looking
for the management. The organizer introduces and asks questions about the janitor to calm down. The janitor has 2
kids, no benefits, 2 jobs, no time with family. S/he wants more but does not want to disappoint the supervisor friend,
The janitor wants a life, time with kids, for him/herself. The organizer continues trying but the janitor will not sign
the card because of surroundings. The janitor gives phone, address – maybe he will agree to meet again.

Debrief what could have gone better and what went well.

ONE ON ONE ROLL PLAYS

Each person pairs off with another
Each plays the organizer and either worker or tenant
5 minutes each
10 minute debrief, what was really good and why?

GAME SHOW

Rules/process are to first get 3 volunteers (some from the different campaigns)
Explain that all will get keys to moving the worker or tenant
Facilitator will interrupt at point of close
Crowd will determine how far organizer get based on overall rap and # of key ids
Roll Play concluded with the close

Then they step out, we explain worker/tenant keys on chart pad
Roll play begins

After 3 done, debrief whole training

WORKER/ORGANIZING #1:
-sign card and introduce each other
-just sign card
-leave door open for another try

BUSINESS/TENANT #2:
-This shoe business is using the Hilton Hotel
-He does not have personal ties with the Hilton
-He is ‘moderate’ and does not want to get into politics, does charity
-He sells shoes, small business, but has a lot of business
-He organizes an annual shoe makers conference and it has been at the Hilton for the past 8 years
-He gets intimidated, scared of union thing

GOAL:          Stop using the Hilton
               Write a letter to the Hilton
               Sign the endorsement

RAP

-People are paid poorly no benefits, don’t focus on the union
-workers have been fired for wanting a living wages
-regardless if it is a union, the workers are still paid poverty wages and the union is the only legal way they can get
better wages legally
-there is a labor dispute
-we would not want you to get in the middle of this dispute
-we know your conference is a very important thing to the san diego community

BUSINESS/TENANT #3:
-This shoe business is using the Hilton Hotel
-He does not have personal ties with the Hilton
-He is ‘moderate’ and does not want to get into politics, does charity
-He sells shoes, small business, but has a lot of business
-He organizes an annual shoe makers conference and it has been at the Hilton for the past 8 years
-He gets intimidated, scared of union thing

GOAL:          Stop using the Hilton
               Write a letter to the Hilton
               Sign the endorsement

RAP
-don’t talk about the union so much, but about the people
-he is involved in the march of dimes for children and is raising money in his store
-if he knows that they have no health care and have to pay $200+ for health care he is pissed
-if he hears a personal story or example
-he has 7 kids and is a positive father
-he really really cares about children!!!!
HOW TO FACILITATE MEETINGS, PUBLIC SPEAKING AND PRESENTATIONS

Another key skill of organizing is to be able to agitate people to take life long actions of justice. This skills workshop
will use the message and rap skills to provide some of the fundamentals and the “do’s and don’t” of presenting and
public speaking in a large or small groups and organizations. Additionally, we will focus on how to facilitate a group
to reach consensus decisions.

AGENDA                                                         ACTIVITY         TIME        WHO          NEEDS?
  I)   QUOTES                                                  DISCUSSION       5 MIN                    MARKERS
                                                                                                         & PAPER
   II)       ICEBREAKER                                         EXERCISE        10 MIN

   III)      FACILITATION                                     DISCUSSION &      5 MIN                   MARKERS,
             a) WHAT DO YOU NEED IN A MEETING TO                EXERCISE                                PAPER AND
                MAKE IT EFFECTIVE                                                                        ACTIVITY
             b) WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF CONSENSUS                                                          SHEET
             c) WHY DO YOU NEED A FACILITATOR
             d) WHAT IS FACILITATING, IS THIS PERSON
                BETTER?
             e) WHAT MAKES A GOOD FACILITATOR                                   15 MIN
                (BRAINSTORM)

             f) ACTIVITY: SCENERIO                                              10 MIN

          DEBRIEF                                                               15 MIN

   IV)       BREAK                                                              10 MIN

   V)        PRESENTATION AND PUBLIC SPEAKING                                   15 MIN                  MARKERS
             BRAINSTORM                                                                                 AND PAPER

   VI)       DIFFERENT FORMS OF PUBLIC SPEAKING                                 20 MIN                  MARKERS
                                                                                                        AND PAPER
   VII)      SPEECHES                                                           15 MIN                  MARKERS
                                                                                                        AND PAPER
   VIII) AT THE SAME TIME – ON THE SPOT                                                                 MARKERS
         PRESENTATION / RAPS WITH OTHERS                                                                AND PAPER

   IX)       PRESENTATIONS AND DEBRIEF                                          35 MIN                  MARKERS
                                                                                                        AND PAPER
AGENDA FOR TRAINERS

AGENDA                                                ACTIVITY       TIME     WHO   NEEDS?
  V)   QUOTES                                          DISCUSSION    5 MIN          MARKERS
                                                                                    & PAPER
  VI)    ICEBREAKER                                    EXERCISE      10 MIN

  VII)   FACILITATION                                 DISCUSSION &                  MARKERS,
         a) WHAT DO YOU NEED IN A MEETING TO            EXERCISE     5 MIN          PAPER AND
            MAKE IT EFFECTIVE                                                        ACTIVITY
                                                                                      SHEET
            -WHAT IS THE GOAL OF A MEETING?

            -AGENDA?

            -LOGISTICS?

            -ATTENDANCE?

            -MATERIALS?

            -ROLES? RECORDER, MEMBERS,
            FACILITATOR,

         b) WHY DO YOU NEED A FACILITATOR                            15 MIN
         c) WHAT IS FACILITATING, IS THIS PERSON                     10 MIN
            BETTER?
         d) WHAT MAKES A GOOD FACILITATOR
            (BRAINSTORM)
            i) REMIND PEOPLE OF THE GROUND
                 RULES
            j)   REVIEW AGENDA
            k)   KEEP THE MEETING GOING
            l)   ID DECISIONS THAT NEED TO BE MADE
            m)   HELP GROUP COME TO A DECISION
            n)   ENCOURAGE PARTICIPATION
            o)   BRING CLOSURE TO DECISIONS
            p)   RESPECT EVERYONE’S OPINION

         e) ACTIVITY: SCENERIO

            i) GROUP     MUST WORK THROUGH AN
                 ISSUE EVERYONE WILL HAVE A ROLE.
                 THE GROUP MUST DECIDE ON A
                 TACTICAL DECISION IN A CAMPAIGN IF
                 THE GROUP SHOULD ESCALATE AND
                 HOW?    THIS IS A WORKER JUSTICE
                 CAMPAIGN THAT HAS BEEN GOING ON
                 FOR A COUPLE MONTHS, SOME BELIEVE
          THAT THE GROUP NEEDS TO DO MORE
          OUTREACH AND SOME BELIEVE THAT
          THE GROUP NEEDS TO TAKE MORE
          ACTION.

          PASS OUT ROLES: HAVE         HALF
          OBSERVE AND ROLEPLAY

FACILITATOR

DOUBTER – THIS     PERSON IS NEGATIVE AND      15 MIN
BELIEVES THAT IT WILL NEVER WORK
REGARDLESS; THIS PERSON ALSO HAS A
TENDENCY TO INTERRUPT PEOPLE – BUT THIS
PERSON STILL RESPECTS THE GROUP PROCESS.

THE KNOW-IT-ALL– THIS PERSON USES THEIR
CREDENTIALS, BIG WORDS, AGE, “STATUS” IN THE
MOVEMENT, “IVE BEEN DOING THIS FOR …. AND
I BELIEVE WE SHOULD…” THIS PERSON THINKS
THE GROUP SHOULD ESCALATE.

EXTREMIST – THIS PERSON DOES NOT THINK IT
IS ENOUGH! S/HE WANTS TO ESCALATE TO A
MAJOR ACTION.     THIS PERSON IS VERY
PASSIONATE AND HAS A TENDANCY TO NOT
LISTEN VERY WELL.

QUITE & SHY – THIS PERSON WANTS TO SHARE,
HAS GOOD IDEAS BUT DOES NOT REALLY FEEL
COMFORTABLE SHARING. THIS PERSON IS ALSO
NOT SURE IF THE GROUP SHOULD TOTALLY
ESCALATE, BUT IS OPEN TO IDEAS; INSTEAD THIS
PERSON WHISPERS TO HER/HIS NEIGHBOR.

THE INTERPRETER – THIS PERSON ALWAYS
TRYS TO SPEAKS FOR EVERYONE ELSE AND SAY
“_________ IS TRYING TO SAY THAT …” TAKES
POWER AWAY FROM PEOPLE UNINTENTIONALLY.
THIS PERSON DOES NOT THINK THE GROUP
SHOULD ESCALATE.

OFF POINT – THIS PERSON IS VERY INTERESTED
BUT TENDS TO REPEAT THEIR IDEAS OVER AND
OVER AGAIN; ALSO THIS PERSON TENDS TO BRING
IN ISSUES THAT ARE NOT ON THE TOPIC. FOR
EXAMPLE, WHILE THE GROUP IS DECIDING ON A
TACTIC THIS PERSON WANTS BRING UP
SOMEONE’S BIRTHDAY.
      DEBRIEF



VIII) BREAK                                         10 MIN

X)       PRESENTATION AND PUBLIC SPEAKING           15 MIN   MARKERS
         BRAINSTORM                                          AND PAPER
         a) EYE CONTACT
         b) BODY LANGUAGE
         c) VISUALS, IMAGES
         d) KNOW AUDIENCE
         e) TRY NOT TO READ
         f) PRACTICE
         g) USE STORIES, HUMOR,
         h) USE PACE
         i) REPEAT POWERFUL PHRASES AND IDEAS
         j) ASK SIMPLE QUESTIONS FOR AUDIENCE
              PARTICIPATION
         k)

XI)      DIFFERENT FORMS OF PUBLIC SPEAKING         20 MIN   MARKERS
         l) LARGE AUDIENCE                                   AND PAPER
         m) SMALL AUDIENCE
         n) STRANGERS
         o) PEERS

XII)     SPEAKERS PREP (WITH GENO, SANDRA, RON,     15 MIN   MARKERS
         FATIMA, MARTIN, MAYRA)                              AND PAPER

         p) SCENERIO #1: YOU ARE SPEAKING TO A
              GROUP OF ENVIRONMENTALIST ABOUT
              YOUR CAMPAIGN AND YOU WANT THEM TO
              GO TO A RALLY

         q) SCENERIO #2: YOU ARE SPEAKING TO A
              GROUP OF WOMEN ABOUT YOUR CAMPAIGN
              AND YOU WANT THEM TO GO TO A RALLY

         r) SCENERIO #3: YOU ARE SPEAKING TO A
              GROUP OF WORKERS ABOUT YOUR
              CAMPAIGN AND YOU WANT THEM TO GO TO
              A RALLY

XIII) AT THE SAME TIME – ON THE SPOT                         MARKERS
      PRESENTATION / RAPS WITH OTHERS                        AND PAPER

XIV) PRESENTATIONS AND DEBRIEF                      35 MIN   MARKERS
                                                             AND PAPER
                           FACILITATION ACTIVITY: SCENERIO SHEET
Group must work through an issue everyone will have a role. The group must decide on a tactical decision in a
campaign if the group should escalate and how? This is a worker justice campaign that has been going on for a
couple months, some believe that the group needs to do more outreach and some believe that the group needs to take
more action.

  CUT OUT ROLES AND PASS THEM OUT: HAVE HALF OBSERVE AND HALF ROLEPLAY


   FACILITATOR


   DOUBTER – This person is negative and believes that it will never work regardless; this
   person also has a tendency to interrupt people. But this person still respects the group
   process.


   THE KNOW-IT-ALL– This person uses their credentials, big words, age, “status” in the
   movement, “ive been doing this for …. And I believe we should…” This person thinks
   the group should escalate.


   EXTREMIST – This person does not think it is enough! S/he wants to escalate to a
   major action. This person is very passionate and has a tendency to not listen very well.


   QUITE & SHY – This person wants to share, has good ideas but does not really feel
   comfortable sharing. This person is also not sure if the group should totally escalate, but
   is open to ideas; instead this person whispers to her/his neighbor.


   THE INTERPRETER – This person always speaks for everyone else and say
   “_________ is trying to say that …” Takes power away from people unintentionally. This
   person does not think the group should escalate.


   OFF POINT – This person is very interested but tends to repeat their ideas over and over
   again; also this person tends to bring in issues that are not on the topic. For example,
   while the group is deciding on a tactic this person wants bring up someone’s birthday.
COALITION BUILDING

After recruiting students and building a stronger base, the next step is to learn how to build solidarity with other group
and organizations on campus. This workshop will review the purpose of working in a coalition and how to maintain a
sustaining coalition.

AGENDA                                                         ACTIVITY         TIME        WHO          NEEDS?
  I. QUOTES                                                                     5 MIN

   II. ICEBREAKER                                                               10 MIN

  III. BRAINSTORM ON COALITION BUILDING                                         15 MIN

           WHEN/WHY ARE COALITIONS NEEDED?
           WHAT WORKS?

  IV. CAMPUS POWER ANALYSIS BREAKOUTS                                           30 MIN

           REPORT BACK                                                          10 MIN

   V. BREAK

  VI. REGIONAL COALITION DISCUSSION                                             30 MIN

 VII. WHAT IS THE ROLE OF SEJ? IS IT NEEDED?                                    30 MIN
AGENDA FOR TRAINERS
AGENDA                                            ACTIVITY   TIME     WHO   NEEDS?
  I. QUOTES                                                  5 MIN

  II. ICEBREAKER                                             10 MIN

 III. BRAINSTORM ON COALITION BUILDING                       15 MIN

         WHEN/WHY ARE COALITIONS NEEDED?

         WHAT WORKS?
         a. POINTS OF UNITY ISSUES
         b. RESPECT
         c. AGREEING TO DISAGREE
         d. TACTICS
         e. DECISION MAKING STRUCTURE
         f. SELF-INTERESTS?
         g. WINNABLE
         h. INTERNAL POLITRIC OF OTHER GROUPS
         i. LETTERHEAD COALITION

 IV. CAMPUS BREAKOUTS                                        30 MIN
       a. CREATE A GENERAL POWER ANALYSIS OF
              YOUR CAMPUS
         b.   IDENTIFY TACTICS YOU WOULD USE TO
              BUILD A STRONGER COALITION
         c.   (DON’T HAVE TO FINISH TODAY)

         d. TRIANGLE: DECISION MAKING POWERS
         e. BOX: PROGRESSIVE ORGANIZED GROUPS
         f. CIRCLE: UNORGANIZED

         CRITERIA FOR TACTICS
         a. ACTIVATE BASE AND LEADERSHIP
         b. RECRUITS AND INVOLVES NEW PEOPLE
         c. POLITICAL CONSCIOUSNESS WITH BASE                10 MIN
         d. CAPACITY TO DO IT

         REPORT BACK

  V. BREAK

 VI. REGIONAL COALITION DISCUSSION                           30 MIN

 VII. WHAT IS THE ROLE OF SEJ? IS IT NEEDED?                 30 MIN
        a. -PURPOSE OF SEJ AND GOALS
        b. -ROLE WITH UNIONS AND OTHER STUDENT
              ORGANIZATIONS
POWER ANALYSIS STUFF FOR BREAKOUTS
       CREATE CUT OUTS TOO
HOW TO ORGANIZE THE MEDIA

Within our overall political strategy, the corporate media is a useful tool and tactic that we can influence to get our
message and issue to a large mass audience in the short term. In this workshop, we will discuss how to craft a
message, write a press advisory/release, and conduct follow up calls for a campaign. We will also dialogue on the
importance and long term goal of creating our own independent media.

AGENDA                                                       ACTIVITY         TIME        WHO         NEEDS?
  I. QUOTES                                                                   5 MIN                  PAPER AND
                                                                                                        PEN
   II. ICEBREAKER                                                             10 MIN

  III. OVERVIEW OF GOALS OF WORKSHOP                                          5 MIN

  IV. WHAT   IS THE MEDIA?     WHAT    IS THE DIFFERENT                       20 MIN                    INFO
       MEDIA? (BRAINSTORM)                                                                           SHEETS ON
                                                                                                     WHO OWNS
                                                                                                       MEDIA
   V. HOW TO ORGANIZE THE MEDIA? WHAT DO WE DO?                               10 MIN                   PAPER,
                                                                                                      PENS AND
                                                                                                       SHEETS
PRESS RELEASE EXERCISE                                                        20 MIN                  FAKE AND
                                                                                                        GOOD
                                                                                                        PRESS
                                                                                                       RELEASE
  VI. CASE STUDY: JUSTICE FOR JANITORS 2000 STRIKE                            20 MIN                    VIDEO
                                                                                                        CLIP,
                                                                                                     PAPER AND
                                                                                                       PENS
 VII. NOW ITS YOUR TURN. Create your own                                      30 MIN
      press release and event on the campaigns you all
      are doing.

VIII. REPORT BACK                                                             15 MIN
“HOW TO ORGANIZE THE MEDIA” AGENDA FOR TRAINERS

AGENDA                                                      ACTIVITY   TIME     WHO   NEEDS?
 IX. QUOTES                                                            5 MIN          PAPER AND
                                                                                         PEN
  X. ICEBREAKER                                                        10 MIN

 XI. OVERVIEW OF GOALS OF WORKSHOP                                     5 MIN

 XII. WHAT  IS THE MEDIA?     WHAT    IS THE DIFFERENT                 20 MIN            INFO
      MEDIA? (BRAINSTORM)                                                             SHEETS ON
                                                                                      WHO OWNS
      MAINSTREAM MEDIA:            Radio (90.3, 92.5),                                  MEDIA
      television stations (kgtv, kusi, fox, etc) –
      basically this is the kind of media that is owned
      by corporations.

      INDEPENDENT MEDIA: Independent media center,
      zines, newsletters, public radio shows, posters, T-
      shirts, etc. (this is something we produce and
      does not have to go through filters from
      corporations.

    OVERALL CONTEXT OF THE MEDIA
    WHO OWNS THE MEDIA? (SHOW CHART)

      a. As you can see the mainstream media is
         owned by many corporate entities, (see chart)
         therefore our message and ideas will not fully
         come across to the mainstream.

      b. Our goal with the mainstream media is to not
         ‘take it over’ but rather to challenge it and to
         get our message across. (i.e. Families deserve
         Living Wages; Equal Access to Education;
         etc.)

      c. So Why is mainstream media still
         important…? Well, people watch it, and use it
         as a legitimate source of FACT. We need to
         use the media as a tool for organizing.
         Getting media coverage will not win the
         campaign, but will help as a tactic.

      d. DON’T ANSWER TO THE MEDIA, WE
         RESPOND TO THE MEDIA.

      e. This is where independent media is important.
         Independent media allows us to have
         ownership of our production (i.e. our
         message, expression, voice). It will reach a
         fewer people, but the quality and truths will
         be greater.

XIII. How to organize the media? What do we do?          10 MIN    PAPER,
                                                                  PENS AND
    There are many things that need to be done to                  SHEETS
    organize the media. Here are the first key steps:

    REVIEW BASIC STEPS:

    1) FRAMING A MESSAGE / WHAT IS THE
    HOOK?

    2) WRITE AND SEND THE PRESS RELEASE

    TWICE
               a) At least 3-5 days before the event
               b) Day before the event

    3) DO THE FOLLOW-UP CALLS
    (CREATE A PHONE SCRIPT)

    TWICE
             a) Day you sent the press release
             b) Day before the event
PRESS RELEASE EXERCISE                                    20 MIN   FAKE AND
                                                                     GOOD
Give everyone a press release with at least 5-8 obvious              PRESS
and subtle mistakes. (i.e. no major heading, small or               RELEASE
ugly font, no time, grammar mistakes, use personal
voice, etc.) You can make some of these examples funny
too.

Give them 10 minutes to look at the press release

Ask them to go around and give comments.

And start off with some of these questions:
       What is this press release about?
       Is this doing a good job in framing the message?
       Would you want to go to this event?

REVIEW A GOOD PRESS RELEASE

Give them the real press release and go over their
comments

XIV. CASE STUDY: JUSTICE FOR JANITORS 2000 STRIKE         20 MIN    VIDEO
                                                                    CLIP,
     HISTORY:                                                      PAPER AND
     a. The low-wage downtown janitors in 1999                       PENS
        were mounting up for big big strike in 2002.
        2000 was when all major metropolitan cities
        were going to go on strike. San Diego was
        next after Los Angeles. There was no
        coverage and no real interest in the media at
        the time. Organizers were faxing and calling
        the media for every action and demo, there
        was still no interest.

      b. By early 2000, there was a lot of energy
         behind passing the Cesar Chavez State
         Holiday in March. It brought a lot of people
         and interests together on the same issue.

      c. This was also the same time for the strike to
         happen. Organizers knowing this ahead of
         time, decided to strategically frame the
         message and kick off of the strike on March
         31st, 2000, Cesar’s Chavez’s Birthday.

     SHOW VIDEO CLIP

           D. The message was: “IN THE SPIRIT
              OF CESAR CHAVEZ, JANITORS GO
            ON STRIKE”

         e. This was a clear yet non-violent
            message. In this action 7 students,
            janitors, and union members conducted a
            civil disobedience to shutdown the
            downtown Wells Fargo Bank.

         f. Especially since the LA strike was
            perceived in SD as violent, the SD strike
            looked more peaceful and spiritual.
            All the media covered it and followed
            the story until the strike ended and
            janitors won health care.

         g. This is only part of the story, the
            movement and strike had to continue
            with major events such as: a 10 day fast
            for justice, community food drives for
            striking janitors, candle light vigils, a
            press conference with building owners,
            janitor house visits, etc.

XV. NOW ITS YOUR TURN. Create your own                    30 MIN
    press release and event on the campaigns you all
    are doing.

   In your campaign teams: Create a scenario and
   situation that is likely to happen and write a press
   release.

   Give each group some butcher paper.

XVI. REPORT BACK                                          15 MIN
Insert who owns the media?

 Insert a bad press release

    And a good one…

       Phone script

        Media list
HOW TO RECRUIT AND RETAIN MEMBERS

In building a movement, we need to understand how to build the organization and sustain members to maintain their
commitment and passion. This workshop will provide basic principles on how to recruit students and tips on how to
keep students in campaigns and organizations. This is vital to the lifeline of any group and organization.

AGENDA                                                    ACTIVITY        TIME       WHO         NEEDS?
ICEBREAKER                                                   30 MIN

QUOTE OF THE DAY/CHECKIN                                      20
                                                             MINS
WHY? WHAT IS THE GOAL OF RECRUITMENT/RENTENTION              20 MIN

           BRAINSTORM AND OVERVIEW OF
           RECRUITMENT
           -WHY DON’T PEOPLE JOIN?

           WHAT IS IMPORTANT ABOUT RECRUITMENT?

RECRUITMENT ACTIVITY                                          40
                                                             MINS
        PREP

        SCENARIO: YOU ARE TABLING   AT AN EVENT
        (BREAK INTO SMALL GROUPS)

GROUP EXAMPLE & DISCUSSION

BREAK                                                        10 MIN

BRAINSTORM / OVERVIEW OF RETENTION                  20 MIN   65 MIN
         -WHY DO PEOPLE LEAVE ORGANIZATIONS?

           WHAT MAKES GOOD RETENTION?

           SCENARIO: CREATE YOUR OWN ORGANIZATION
           -SMALL GROUPS AND NEED A FACILITATOR
           AND RECORDER

           NAME OF THE GROUP                        20 MIN
           PURPOSE/GOALS OF ORGANIZATION
           (SHORT/MED/LONG TERM)
           TARGET MEMBERS/CONSTITUENCY
           ACTIVITIES/YEAR PLAN (3-5)
           WHAT IS MAIN THING ABOUT YOUR
           ORGANIZATION THAT WOULD MAKE SOME ONE
           WANT TO JOIN?

  GROUP DISCUSSION EVALUATION / FINAL THOUGHTS      25 MIN
AGENDA FOR TRAINERS
AGENDA                                                ACTIVITY     TIME      WHO   NEEDS?
ICEBREAKER “ELBOW TAG”                                    10 MINS 30 MIN

QUOTE OF THE DAY/CHECKIN                                  20 MINS




WHY? WHAT IS THE GOAL OF RECRUITMENT/RENTENTION           20 MINS   20 MIN
       -POTENTIAL MEMBERS
       -EDUCATE AND RAISE CONSCIOUSNESS FOR THE
           MOVEMENT
           -KEEP PEOPLE
           -AS MASS LINE

           BRAINSTORM AND OVERVIEW OF
           RECRUITMENT
           -WHY DON’T PEOPLE JOIN?

           WHAT IS IMPORTANT ABOUT RECRUITMENT?
           THESE ARE SIMILAR TO THE MESSAGE AND RAP
           -LEGITIMACY
           -LISTEN
           -AGITATE
           -COMMITMENT
           -SELF-INTEREST
           -PERSONAL
           -ACTIVITY NOT MEETING
           -GOOD RAP
           -MULTIPLE OPPORTUNITIES

RECRUITMENT ACTIVITY                                                 40
                                                                     MIN
        PREP                                               5 MINS

        SCENARIO: YOU ARE TABLING AT AN EVENT             25 MINS
        (BREAK INTO SMALL GROUPS)
           -#1: PERSON IS SCARED OF ORGANIZATIONS,
           NEVER INVOLVED
           -#2: PERSON WAS INVOLVED AND HAD
           NEGATIVE EXPERIENCE
           -#3: PERSON HAS 2 JOBS/FAMILY – NOT TOO        10 MINS
           HOPEFUL
           -#4: PERSON FROM ANOTHER ORGANIZATION

                 GROUP EXAMPLE & DISCUSSION

BREAK                                                      10 MIN   10 MIN
BRAINSTORM / OVERVIEW OF RETENTION                20 MIN 65 MIN
         -WHY DO PEOPLE LEAVE ORGANIZATIONS?

         WHAT MAKES GOOD RETENTION?
           -OPPS FOR NEW MEMBERS
           -MIXED ACTIVITIES
                  POLITICAL PROCESS

            -NOT PERSONALLY ATTACKED
            -OPEN AND COLLECTIVE
            -OWNERSHIP
            -VALUE
            -BIG BRO/SIS / MENTORSHIP PROGRAM
            -OFFERING SOMETHING NEW
            -FRIENDSHIPS
            -LEADERSHIP / SKILLS TRAINING
            -POLITICAL TRUST
            -CONSISTENT
            -REPUTATION
            -DEBRIEFS/EVALS

         SCENARIO: CREATE YOUR OWN ORGANIZATION   20 MIN
         -SMALL GROUPS AND NEED A FACILITATOR
         AND RECORDER
         -NAME OF THE GROUP
         -PURPOSE/GOALS OF ORGANIZATION
         (SHORT/MED/LONG TERM)
         -TARGET MEMBERS/CONSTITUENCY
         -ACTIVITIES/YEAR PLAN (3-5)
         -WHAT IS MAIN THING ABOUT YOUR
         ORGANIZATION THAT WOULD MAKE SOME ONE    25 MIN
         WANT TO JOIN?

  GROUP DISCUSSION EVALUATION / FINAL THOUGHTS
SEJ RECRUITMENT ACTIVITY: CREATE YOUR OWN ORGANIZATION

DIRECTIONS:
  1) DECIDED WHO WILL FACILITATE THE SESSION

  2) ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS & PUT THE ON THE BUTCHER PAPER:

WHAT IS THE NAME OF THE GROUP?




WHAT IS THE PURPOSE/GOALS OF ORGANIZATION (SHORT/MED/LONG TERM)?




WHO ARE THE TARGET MEMBERS/CONSTITUENCY?




WHAT ARE THE ACTIVITIES/YEAR PLAN (3-5)?




WHAT IS MAIN THING ABOUT YOUR ORGANIZATION THAT WOULD MAKE SOME ONE WANT TO JOIN?
BRINGING IT ALL BACK

Now what? What do we do with this internship experience and how do we do it? This workshop will provide
different models and examples of how to bring it all back to you campus and community. The goal of this internship
is to bring these skills and education back and agitate people to take greater action in their lives.

AGENDA                                                    ACTIVITY         TIME       WHO         NEEDS?
  IX)  QUOTES                                            5 MIN

   X)     ICEBREAKER                                     10 MIN

   XI)    BRAINSTORM ON ORGANIZATIONAL                   15 MINS
          ASSESSMENT

   XII)   CAMPUS BREAKOUTS                               30 MINS

          REPORT BACK                                    10 MIN

   XIII) BREAK

   XIV) REGIONAL COALITION DISCUSSION                    30 MINS

   XV)    WHAT IS THE ROLE OF SEJ? IS IT NEEDED?         30 MINS
          -PURPOSE OF SEJ AND GOALS
          -ROLE WITH UNIONS AND OTHER STUDENT
          ORGANIZATIONS
AGENDA FOR TRAINERS

AGENDA                                                 ACTIVITY   TIME     WHO   NEEDS?
  I. QUOTES                                                       5 MIN          PAPER AND
                                                                                   PENS
  II. ICEBREAKER                                                  10 MIN

 III. BRAINSTORM ON ORGANIZATIONAL / CAMPUS                       15 MIN          SHEET
     ASSESSMENT

       PASS OUT ASSESSMENT SHEET

   a. This is a time for interns to assess what kind
      of capacity they have on campus or in their
      organization to organize around issues.

   b. Interns will be asked to go through their
      campus or organization to see what the SEJ
      staff or other interns can help with.

   c. FOR EXAMPLE, if nobody knows how to
      contact the media at the organization or
      school, then SEJ can help with the training.
      Or if nobody has access to progressive films,
      they could get films from SEJ.

   d. CAMPUS BREAKOUTS                                            30 MIN         PAPER AND
                                                                                   PENS
        a. REPORT BACK                                            10 MIN

   e. BREAK

   f. WHAT IS THE ROLE OF THE SEJ NETWORK?                        30 MIN         PAPER AND
       a. Purpose of SEJ and Goals                                                 PENS
       b. Role with unions and other student
          organizations
       c. What can SEJ do in the school year?
       d. When can we schedule a network
          meeting with all interns.
STUDENTS                 FOR          ECONOMIC                   JUSTICE              SUMMER                INTERNSHIP
PROGRAM
ORGANIZATION AND CAMPUS ASSESSMENT
As we have learned, in order to have the capacity to organize, you all will need certain resources and training to be most successful.
This is a check off list for you to see what your school and organization has and needs. From this sheet, you all can formulate what
you need.

                SKILLS TRAINING AND LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
                 In order for your organization to grow, you will need to conduct leadership trainings on facilitation, recruitment,
                 message and rap, etc. These can be done every month or every other week.

                 NOTES: __________________________________________________________
                POLITICAL EDUCATION
                 In building a movement, we need to understand how to continue educating members and individuals of your school
                 or organization in an interactive way. As a start, the topics can be the ones within the internship. These can be
                 done every month or every other week.

                 NOTES: __________________________________________________________
                PROGRESSIVE FILMS
                 Films are good ways to reach out to new people and to educate at the same time. You all can show films at a
                 meeting or have a social by showing a film. These can be done every month or every other week.

                 NOTES: __________________________________________________________
                MEDIA CAPACITY
                 Media is an important tool for organizing. If you have an event and want media coverage, you will need to have
                 media contact lists, and faxing abilities.

                 NOTES: __________________________________________________________
                 MEETING SPACE AND STUDENT CENTER
                 A vital piece to organizing is to be able to have a safe space on campus to have meetings and to organize. Some
                 campuses have cultural centers, student unions, Women’s Centers, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual Transgendered Centers, etc.

                 NOTES: __________________________________________________________

                 STUDENT ORGANIZATION/COALITIONS
                 Working with other organizations is also very key to being able to organize. Does your campus have an Associated
                 Students? Which student organizations would be good to connect with?
              NOTES: __________________________________________________________
             ORGANIZATION BINDERS
              How do we organize our organizing? The binders that you all have from the internship, we encourage to you
              continue using them as tools to organize your work.

              NOTES: __________________________________________________________
SEJ READING CURRICULUM LIST


AFL-CIO. Common Sense Economics: “The Rap”

AFL-CIO. Recognizing Our Common Bonds. America@Work

Almaguer, Tomas. Racial Fault Lines: The Historic Origins of White Supremacy in California. UC Press, 1994.

Bacon, David. Which Side are you on? Colorlines Summer 2001.

Craig Scharlin & Lilia V. Villanueva.       Philip Vera Cruz : a personal history of Filipino immigrants and the
farmworkers movement.

Davis, Angela. Working Women, Black Women and the History of the Suffrage Movement. Women, Race, Class

Ferriss, Susan and Sandoval, Ricardo. The Fight in the Fields: Cesar Chavez and the Farmworkers Movement.

hooks, bell. Rethinking the Nature of Work. Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center.

Lee, Hoon. Building Class Solidarity Across Racial Lines: Korean-American Workers in Los Angeles. Beyond
Identity Politics

Mann, Eric & Ramsey, Kikanza. The Left Choice is the Best Choice. AhoraNow No. 1 – Bus Riders Union.

Milkman, Ruth and Wong, Kent. Voices from the Front Lines: Organizing Immigrant Workers in Los Angeles.

Munoz Jr., Carlos. The Rise of the Chicano Student Movement and Chicano Power. Youth, Identify, Power

Nguyen, Tram. Showdown in K-Town. Colorlines Spring 2001.

Ong, Paul and Bonacich, Edna and Cheng, Lucie. The Political Economy of Capitalist Restructuring and the New
Asian Immigration

Payne, Charles. Give Light and the People Will Find A Way. I’ve Got a Light of Freedom: The Organizing
Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle

Yates, Michael. Why Unions Matter.

United for a Fair Economy. Globalization for Beginners,
SEJ READING NOTES


Common Sense Economics: “The Rap”

This powerpoint presentation/reading provides a good overview of the growth of corporate wealth. It also shows the
decline of union density and the significance of unionization, especially in communities of color.

Recognizing Our Common Bonds. America@Work

The AFL-CIO and union have historically been anti-immigrant. This article is good because it talks about the rise of
the traditional unions consciousness on the issues of immigration. It describes arguments for undocumented
immigrants to receive amnesty and the AFL-CIO federal legislative efforts.

Racial Fault Lines: The Historic Origins of White Supremacy in California. UC Press, 1994.

Another good piece of writing that documents the racist AFL (under Samuel Gompers) during their extreme anti-asian
era in California. This article is interesting because it shows the importance and history of multi-racial organizing
since the 1900’s. Japanese beet workers were pitted against Mexican farm workers by the AFL. The AFL would
only allow Mexicans into the union. In the end, Mexican farm workers denied the AFL and stood strong with the
Japanese beet workers. However, without the support of the AFL, the Japanese and Mexican Labor Association
(JMLA) fell apart. This is why it is important that we are in the labor movement to challenge it to become more
progressive.

Which Side are you on? Colorlines Summer 2001.

This is a short article that describes the immigration debate well. It talks about the how the AFL-CIO is stepping up
to take a stronger stance in support of immigrants, especially undocumented immigrants.

Philip Vera Cruz : a personal history of Filipino immigrants and the farmworkers movement.

This is the only fully historicized biography of Pilipinos in the farm worker movement. Written by Philip Vera Cruz,
it is an important piece of literature because it is a primary source of information. It describes the horrible conditions
of workers, the importance of the union, the solidarity and disunity of Pilipinos and Mexicans. It is the only source
that talks about how the Pilipinos were the ones to push the Mexican farm workers to strike and how in the end most
the of the Pilipinos left because Cesar Chavez supported the Ferdinand Marcos, the dictator who declared martial law
in the Philippines. This teaches us the potential and history of multi-racial organizing and also teaches us to learn
from our mistakes.

Working Women, Black Women and the History of the Suffrage Movement. Women, Race, Class

In this reading, Angela Davis clearly outlines the positioning of women of color in the white feminist movement. It
explains how leaders of the suffrage movement were misguided because they placed only gender at the center of the
discussion. Instead, Davis argues that race, class and gender need to be the center. Davis also identifies the
importance and power of voting rights for Black women.

The Fight in the Fields: Cesar Chavez and the Farmworkers Movement.
This is a book based on the Cesar Chavez / UFW documentary “The Fight in the Fields.” It does a through job on
describing the life of Cesar Chavez, the formation of the UFW with Fred Ross, organizer with the Community Service
Organization (CSO), and the victories of the farm workers. It travels through all aspects of the farm worker
movement. This book has a lot of good historical pictures.
Rethinking the Nature of Work. Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center.

bell hooks gives the reader a strong critical lens on understanding the feminist movement’s push to get women
‘outside the home’ as liberation. hooks argues that regardless inside or outside the home, women would still be
oppressed by low paying jobs and no agency. She also explains how this so-called liberation would be differentiated
for white and Black women. For example, white women would get more jobs than Black women. Her critique is that
if improving the conditions of the workplace and getting better paying jobs for women were central to the feminist
movement, it would have benefited all women.

Building Class Solidarity Across Racial Lines: Korean-American Workers in Los Angeles. Beyond Identity
Politics

Although this is older article written in 1994, it provides a detailed overview of the formation of KIWA in light of the
1992 Uprising and the importance of the multiracial solidarity between Mexican and Korean restaurant workers in
LA. Starting with conducting relief work for Korean displaced workers, KIWA has moved to become a strong
organizing force in LA in building bridges with Korean workers in the ‘front’ of the restaurant waiting tables and
Mexican workers in the ‘back’ of the restaurant cooking and washing dishes.

The Left Choice is the Best Choice. AhoraNow No. 1 – Bus Riders Union.

This article is from the Strategy Center’s newsletter and does a good basic historical analysis of the 1990s, an
overview of the BRU’s political analysis of the LA economy and the need for new alternatives to organizing. In
underlines the key problems in LA with the lack of access to public transportation for poor communities of color. In
the end, it describes their fight with the MTA and the steps they took in the initial stages of the campaign.

Voices from the Front Lines: Organizing Immigrant Workers in Los Angeles.

From the UCLA Labor Center, this is a solid collection of rank in file and union officials that have organized major
campaigns from Justice for Janitors to the Drywall Strike. This is a good read because it provides personal stories of
the workers and organizers.

Showdown in K-Town. Colorlines Spring 2001.

This is the most updated reading on KIWA and is a shorter read than the previous KIWA reading.

The Political Economy of Capitalist Restructuring and the New Asian Immigration

From the onset, this reading may seem long; however, this reading is one of the clearest readings that identifies the
complicated layers within Asian immigration. It provides a historical analysis of the post 1965 immigration and
discuss how the restructuring of the global and local economy has changed the dynamics of immigration and labor.
This reading identifies the difficulty of lumping Asians into one class since the immigration patterns are mixed with
rich and poor Asians.

Give Light and the People Will Find A Way. I’ve Got a Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the
Mississippi Freedom Struggle

Charles Payne’s book provides one of the most detailed understanding of the organizers behind the scenes that know
nothing about in history. As organizers, this is a very good read to understand the true role of organizing and how we
view history. This chapter is based on the role of Ella Baker and Septima Clark during the pre-civil right and civil
rights era. It also discusses the need for intergenerational links to exist with students and community members.
Why Unions Matter.

This reading is critical because it is a pro-union book that gives a clear insight on the contradictions of corporate
unionism and the racism and sexism within the leadership of the AFL-CIO. It is good because it shows how we are
needed in the labor movement to make it more progressive.

Globalization for Beginners, United for a Fair Economy

This is a quick popular education piece that gives a basic understanding of globalization jargon.
SEJ FILM CURRICULUM LIST

A FORCE MORE POWERFUL                                       CATEGORY:   SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
                                                            LENGTH:     60 MINS


A PLACE OF RAGE                                                  CATEGORY:    WOMEN IN
MOVEMENTS
                                                            LENGTH:     60 MINS


AT THE RIVER I STAND                                        CATEGORY:   LABOR AND RACE
                                                            LENGTH:     60 MINS?


BREAD AND ROSES                                             CATEGORY:   LABOR
                                                            LENGTH:     1 HOUR 40 MINS


BUS RIDERS UNION: THE MOVIE                                 CATEGORY:   LABOR AND RACE
                                                            LENGTH:     2 HOURS


EYES ON THE PRIZE (PART 3: “AIN’T SCARED OF YOUR JAILS!”)         CATEGORY: SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
                                                            LENGTH:    60 MINS


FIGHT IN THE FIELDS                                         CATEGORY:   LABOR AND RACE
                                                            LENGTH:     2 HOURS


NEW WORLD BORDERS                                           CATEGORY:   IMMIGRATION AND BORDER
                                                            LENGTH:     60 MINS


SALT OF THE EARTH                                           CATEGORY:   LABOR, GENDER, AND RACE
                                                            LENGTH:     92 MINUTES


THIS IS WHAT DEMOCRACY LOOKS LIKE!                          CATEGORY:   GLOBALIZATION
                                                            LENGTH:     2 HOURS? (LONG)


UNEASY NEIGHBORS                                            CATEGORY:   LABOR AND RACE
                                                            LENGTH:     60 MINS


ZAPATISTA THE MOVIE                                         CATEGORY:   GLOBALIZATION
                                                            LENGTH:     60 MINS
SEJ FILM NOTES

A FORCE MORE POWERFUL

CATEGORY:      SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
LENGTH:        60 MINS

Summary: This video underscores the importance of non-violence movements and the discipline. As organizers, this
is important for people to understand that true social change takes the strategy of political education, skills and
practice.


A PLACE OF RAGE

CATEGORY:      WOMEN IN MOVEMENTS
LENGTH:        60 MINS

Summary: This video gives voice to women of color in movements such as the Black Panthers. This video features
Angela Davis (and her history), June Jordan (her poetry), Alice Walker, and some other women of color. It is good
because it features personal biographical information and why they are in the movement.


AT THE RIVER I STAND

CATEGORY:      LABOR AND RACE
LENGTH:        60 MINS?

Summary: This video is on the sanitation workers’ attempt in Civil rights movement in Memphis to enter the racist
union AFSCME. It shows how MLK Jr. risked his life to go out to Memphis to support the workers. His was
assassinated standing up for sanitation workers. This video shows the deep connection we are not used to hearing
about in history between workers rights and civil rights.


BREAD AND ROSES

CATEGORY:      LABOR
LENGTH:        1 HOUR 40 MINS

Summary: This is an independent film on the Janitors struggle in LA. This is a bit flashy, but a good start for new
people in getting them motivated and agitated. It features actual workers and organizers from LA in the movie.


BUS RIDERS UNION: THE MOVIE

CATEGORY:      LABOR AND RACE
LENGTH:        2 HOURS
Summary: This is a feature length documentary on the BRU in LA. It covers everything from their meetings, bus
visits, actions, city council meeting actions and strategy. It is a good documentary that describes the LA economy
well.


EYES ON THE PRIZE (PART 3: “AIN’T SCARED OF YOUR JAILS!”)

CATEGORY:     SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
LENGTH:       60 MINS

Summary: This video shows the development of SNCC and the role of political education and skills training in the
movement. It also showed how they were assisted by Rev James Lawson, a trainer on non-violence. This video has
interviews and footage on the sit-ins that launched the 6 years of SNCC.


FIGHT IN THE FIELDS

CATEGORY:     LABOR AND RACE
LENGTH:       2 HOURS

Summary: (same as book) This is a video based on the Cesar Chavez / UFW documentary “The Fight in the Fields.”
It does a through job on describing the life of Cesar Chavez, the formation of the UFW with Fred Ross, organizer
with the Community Service Organization (CSO), and the victories of the farm workers. It travels through all aspects
of the farm worker movement. This video has a lot of good historical footage of marches, teatros, etc.


NEW WORLD BORDERS

CATEGORY:     IMMIGRATION AND BORDER
LENGTH:       60 MINS

Summary: Made in San Diego, this documentary shows the horrible conditions of the border and provides some
personal accounts from immigrants and organizers of the scapegoating of immigrants.



SALT OF THE EARTH

CATEGORY:     LABOR, GENDER, AND RACE
LENGTH:       92 MINUTES

Summary: Controversial film banned in US in 1952. Based on true story on Chicano miners getting exploited and
the rise of Chicana leadership in the role of the family. Women are able to redefine what the role of the union should
be, should it only be for the worker or for the family too? Women pushed for better wages AND clean heated water
system for the homes. It is a good film that connects race, class and gender issues.


THIS IS WHAT DEMOCRACY LOOKS LIKE!
CATEGORY:      GLOBALIZATION
LENGTH:        2 HOURS? (LONG)

Summary: This video is on the WTO/IMF protests in DC. In particular, this video really shows the connection
between the labor movement and progressive student groups. It has a lot of different interviews with student and
labor organizers.


UNEASY NEIGHBORS

CATEGORY:      LABOR AND RACE
LENGTH:        60 MINS

Summary: This documentary talks about the North County migrant labor camps and how the rich exploit their labor.
It is based in Encinitas and really shows the stark realities of the rich and poor. It follows a priest and his work in
organizing the migrant workers.


ZAPATISTA THE MOVIE

CATEGORY:      GLOBALIZATION
LENGTH:        60 MINS

Summary: This film is flashy but also very informational. It is a good movie on how third world countries respond to
globalization. It has good footage on Chiapas and documents well the type of low intensity warfare that exists in
Chiapas right now.
CASE STUDY FOR UCSD SEJ LIVING WAGE VICTORY

WHAT ISSUE WAS THE FOCUS OF YOUR CAMPAIGN (E.G. LIVING WAGE, A CONTRACT FOR CAMPUS WORKERS, ETC.)

A living wage union contract for UCSD non-union janitors

WHAT   WERE THE GOALS OR CONCRETE DEMANDS OF YOUR CAMPAIGN?                      (PLEASE   LIST UP TO THREE, AND
DISTINGUISH LONG-TERM, INTERMEDIATE, AND SHORT-TERM IF APPLICABLE)

SHORT-TERM:           Rehire fired worker, Alejandra Rodriguez

INTERMEDIATE: Union contract, including health benefits, living wage, sick days and pension plan

LONG-TERM:            That the university set higher standards for its contractors, by contracting with union
                      contractors that 1. Pay the living wage of $11.24/hour 2. Offer family health insurance, sick
                      days, and holidays for all janitors 3. Respects workers rights, including the right to organize,
                      and is in compliance with all labor and employment laws.

BRIEFLY DESCRIBE YOUR ORGANIZATION OR COALITION (PLEASE INCLUDE: NAME OR GROUP, MISSION, HOW OLD,
NUMBERS, DEMOGRAPHIC MAKE UP, AVERAGE YEAR IN SCHOOL, ETC.)

Students for Economic Justice (SEJ) is a grassroots organization formed to mobilize with students, staff, faculty,
workers, and community members in San Diego, around issues of social and economic inequality. SEJ emerged as an
extension of a labor justice internship program with the Center on Policy and Initiatives. Members began meeting
regularly in late February of 2001, and became an official UCSD organization in April. Founded primarily by
students of color, SEJ has developed into the only large-scale multi-racial/multi-ethnic organizing space at UCSD. It
is composed of approximately 30 core members, with contact lists of over 500 supportive students that vary in class,
ethnic background and years at school from 1st year undergraduate to graduate levels.

WHO  WERE YOUR GROUP'S ALLIES IN THIS CAMPAIGN?              (ORGANIZATIONS     WHO YOU WORKED WITH          -   OTHER
STUDENTS, LABOR, COMMUNITY, FAITH-BASED, ETC.)

Allies of SEJ included various UCSD student organizations such as, MEChA, APSA, AASU, KP, Student
Affirmative Action Committee (SAAC), Green Party, Student centers such at OASIS, the Cross Cultural Center,
student co-ops such as the Che Café, and Groundwork books community organizations such as the center on policy
and initiatives and the
Interfaith committee for worker justice, Hotel and Restaurant Employees Union (H.E.R.E local 30) and Service
Employees International Union (S.E.I.U local 2028) Professors such as George Lipsitz, Jorge Mariscal and Paula
Chakravarty, Chair of Cognitive Science Department ( dept. from which Alejandra was fired), Chair of the Academic
Senate, celebrity personalities such as Ozomatli, Jammin Z-90 radio DJs, and Patch Adams, local public officials.

WHO WERE OPPONENTS? (THOSE WHO WORKED ACTIVELY AGAINST YOU.)

UCSD contract company, Bergenson's
UCSD public relations

WHO WAS/WERE THE TARGET/S OF YOUR CAMPAIGN?               WHO    WAS THE DECISION-MAKER WHO COULD GIVE YOU
WHAT YOU WERE DEMANDING?
Chancellor Robert Dynes
Vice Chancellor of Business Affairs, Steve Relyea
Vice Chancellor, Rogers Davis
Physical Plant Services, Jack Hug

IN UP TO 6 PARAGRAPHS, PLEASE TELL THE STORY OF YOUR CAMPAIGN, INCLUDING THE TACTICS YOUR GROUP
USED (WHAT YOUR ORGANIZATION AND ALLIES DID TO THE TARGET TO DEMONSTRATE YOUR POWER AND FORCE
THEM TO MEET YOUR DEMANDS); THE LESSONS LEARNED (THINGS YOU THOUGHT YOU DID WELL THAT HELPED,
AND THINGS YOU WOULD DO DIFFERENTLY IF YOU HAD TO DO IT OVER AGAIN); AND ANY RELEVANT BACKGROUND
INFORMATION (YOUR SCHOOL'S DEMOGRAPHIC MAKE-UP, THAT OF THE WORKERS INVOLVED, THE POLITICAL
CLIMATE ON YOUR CAMPUS, ETC.)

A public campaign started at UCSD in mid February of 2001 and grew into a nationally recognized community
movement to support the Bergensons janitors' demands for Living Wages and respect on the job. After four months of
constant pressure, UCSD administrators were challenged to enforce standards of conduct and fair compensation from
its contractors. Bergensons janitors here on campus began meeting with Service Employees International Union
(SEIU local 2028) on how to improve their living and working standards, and build a better future for themselves and
their families. In April, Bergensons responded by firing leader Alejandra Rodriguez and threatening and interrogating
others for their Union activity. After investigating evidence submitted by SEIU and the employees, the National
Labor Relations Board has found the company guilty of these charges and is in the process of issuing complaints
against them to seek remedies for these violations of the workers' legal rights.

SEJ applied pressure to the university administration by holding three major rallies and press conferences anchored by
a civil disobedience, by obtaining strong support from community groups, professors and politicians to pressure the
administration, by obtaining celebrity endorsement, and by active recruitment techniques.

SEJ kicked off it's campaign February 17, 2001 by holding a rally in a La Jolla Shopping center contracted by
Bergensons. The rally was composed of over 300 students and SEIU workers attending the UC wide, Student of Color
Conference held at UCSD. In March and April we conducted research and we held two mini campaigns. First we held
our "Need Cash?" campaign in which we widely advertised for a job that paid poverty wages and described the
conditions under which UCSD janitors were working. Second, during the same time that our school was holding
elections for a controversial fee referendum to expand our student center, we held a mock referendum, including real
ballots, asking students if janitors should be paid poverty wages.

We held our second rally on May 1st, International Worker's Day, in conjunction with an Ozomatli concert being held
on our campus. During this month our efforts intensified as we focused on the unjust firing of Alejandra. Our mini-
campaign was "Have You Seen Me?" Our flyers answered, "No, I've been fired," and it described the unjust
conditions that janitors were facing. During this time we continued to table and recruit members, creating a large
phone-banking sheet that we employed each time we held an action or an event. We also held a teach-ins, phone, fax,
and letter drives, screened Bread and Roses, a movie about the Justice for Janitors, and participated in building visits
with janitors. During a teach-in at a Chancellor's Associates meeting in which important donors to the university were
present, the university staff including an administrator, reacted to SEJ members with physical violence, resulting in a
very harmful public relations image. As a result of our May efforts the administration finally agreed to meet with us,
and promised nothing as we presented our demands. One week after this meeting, on June 1st, we held a civil
disobedience and rally, in which 15 students and workers blocked a nearby intersection and were arrested. The
following day the administration damaged it's own public image again, when the story in the San Diego Union
Tribune published that UCSD had called the INS on its own workers, in a tactic that is widely used to intimidate
workers.
After several large demonstrations and increasing public awareness of the unwarranted manner in which the
contracted janitors were being treated here, University administrators met with SEIU and AFSCME on June 13th. At
that meeting, The University announced it would no longer contract out these jobs-to Bergensons or any other
company, but would instead bring them "in-house" as UCSD employees covered by their Union contract with
AFSCME. UCSD agreed to offer every affected Bergensons janitor who wished it, including Alejandra Rodriguez,
one of these positions, and "…make every reasonable effort to see that these employees have the opportunity to be
successful as UCSD employees." SEIU organizers and SEJ members met with Bergensons janitors that same night.
The workers were overjoyed to hear that their compensation would basically double-with huge wage increases and
first-ever benefits like paid sick days, holidays, and full family health coverage. Upon hiring, janitors will receive: $9
- $12 / hour (depending on training and experience), Special Training for Bergensons Janitors, Full Family Health
Insurance, 12 paid holidays, 1 weeks paid vacation, and a Pension Plan of 14%. The janitors' main concern, of course,
was that they be retained in the transition once Bergensons' contract expired. The workers were assured that this
agreement was to be in writing, and that if there was any attempt to falter on the agreement-the same coalition that
fought with them to win these improvements would fight again to enforce them. The contract will begin on October
1st, 2001.

Assessing the effectiveness of our strategy and our tactics we give credit to several factors including that we were able
to work with a full time community organizer to help us develop and carry out our campaign. We were able to target
and pressure key administrators with pressure from professors and the larger community, and the humiliation that
they often imposed upon themselves in reaction to our tactics. In SEJ we did not practice any hierarchal positions,
instead we had four committees: research, logistics, art, and outreach. We were also able to incorporate large events,
celebrities and entertainment into our major actions, including a local radio DJ, Danza Azteca, speakers, a puppet,
drums, and Ozomatli. We also were able to get Patch Adams to talk about the janitors and SEJ at the UCSD
commencement speech. One of the most rewarding outcomes of this struggle besides janitors receiving a living wage
and full medical coverage, is that we now have a multi-racial organizing space in which we will continue to mobilize
with students, workers, and the community for social and economic justice.
SDSU SEJ MISSION VALLEY HILTON BOYCOTT

Summary

In the summer of 1998, workers of the Mission Valley Hilton were mistreated, getting paid low wages and poor
benefits. Many of the workers were immigrants and did not speak english; the hotel management took advantage of
this and did not provide workers with respect nor dignity. Workers decided to come together to form a union, they
called HERE Local 30 and started an intensive organizing campaign. The organizing committee signed up a majority
of the hotel workers but were met with heavy resistance. HERE Local 30 filed federal charges against the Mission
Valley Hilton accusing them of massive unfair labor practices.

Currently, the Mission Valley Hilton is still being prosecuted by the general counsel of the National Labor Relations
board for alleged multiple violations of a federal labor law including allegations of unlawful termination and
discrimination. Antonia’s termination is among one of issues still pending. In the meantime, the workers have called
for a boycott of the Mission Valley Hilton. This boycott calls for local and national businesses to stop using the
Mission Valley Hilton.
PRESS RELEASE

   AFTER HUNDREDS RALLY WITH DOLORES HUERTA,
  CO-FOUNDER OF THE UFW WITH CESAR CHAVEZ, SDSU
STUDENT GOVERNMENT PASS A RESOLUTION TO SUPPORT
       THE MISSION VALLEY HILTON BOYCOTT
              UNDER CURRENT PROSECUTION AND WITH SDSU AS ONE OF MISSION VALLEY HILTON’S LARGEST CLIENT,
             SDSU ASSOCIATED STUDENT GOVERNMENT PLEDGES THEIR SUPPORT FOR MISSION VALLEY HILTON WORKERS
                                          ON INTERNATIONAL WORKERS DAY.


SAN DIEGO, CA – Yesterday, April 30th, hundreds of students from across San Diego, workers from HERE Local
30, and union members held a demonstration in front of the Mission Valley Hilton to support the Mission Valley
Hilton Boycott and hotel workers. Joined by Dolores Huerta, protesters reminded Mission Valley Hilton that the
community is seriously concerned with the rights and dignity of the hotel’s workers.

Launched by hotel workers in 1998 after the Mission Valley Hilton harassed and intimidated workers for organizing
for better wages and respect, the hotel workers and HERE Local 30 filed federal charges against the Mission Valley
Hilton accusing them of massive unfair labor practices. Currently, the Mission Valley Hilton is being prosecuted by
the general counsel of the National Labor Relations Board for discriminating workers. Furthermore, through SDSU
related business of department, alumni and sporting events, SDSU is one of Mission Valley Hilton’s largest clients.
Therefore, SDSU student support and the AS SDSU Resolution for the boycott have been vital to the boycott.

Referring back to the farmworkers’ struggle and their victories, Dolores Huerta encouraged supporters in the current
four year boycott struggle, “As long as we don’t give up, we will eventually win.”

Organizations/Schools that attended: San Diego State University, UC San Diego, Southwestern College, University
of San Diego, SDSU MEChA, SDSU Andres Bonafacio Samaham, Students for Economic Justice (SEJ) Network,
UCSD SEJ, Southwestern College MEChA, University of San Diego MEChA, SDSU Students Against Sweatshops,
SWC MEChA, USD MEChA, USD Black Student Union, UCSD Dancza Azteca, Hotel Employees and Restaurant
Employees (HERE) Union Local 30, Service Employees International (SEIU) Union Local 2028, AFSCME Local
3299, Environmental Health Coalition, United Farmworkers Union, Pipefitters Union, Interfaith Committee for
Worker Justice in San Diego and Center on Policy Initiatives.
Today, May 1st, on International Workers Day, the AS External Affairs Board, Students for Economic Justice and a
variety of SDSU student organizations moved to pass a resolution through the Associated Student government of
SDSU. This resolution called for the university to stop using the Mission Valley Hilton and to start using facilities
that treated workers respectfully and fairly.

SDSU STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS ENDORSERS: SDSU Between my Sistas, SDSU Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de
Aztlán (MEChA), SDSU Green Party, SDSU Native American Student Alliance (NASA), SDSU Students Against
Sweatshops (SAS), SDSU Association of Chicana Activists (AChA), SDSU Andres Bonafacio Samaham, SDSU
Associated Students External Affairs Board, SDSU Women’s Resource Center (WRC), and SDSU Asian and Pacific
Islander Student Alliance (APSA).
                                  AS SDSU RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF
                                  MISSION VALLEY HILTON BOYCOTT

WHEREAS San Diego State University is a California public university with over 34,000 students;

WHEREAS the San Diego living wage for a family of four is $11.24 an hour;

WHEREAS a overwhelming majority of Mission Valley Hilton workers do not receive livable wages or full
employer-paid health care;

WHEREAS the Mission Valley Hilton workers have been organizing for better wages and benefits for four years and
have called for a boycott of the Mission Valley Hilton;

WHEREAS San Diego State University is one of the largest client of the Mission Valley Hilton through various
sports events, conferences and events;

WHEREAS Mission Valley Hilton has not treated workers with respect and dignity;

WHEREAS Mission Valley Hilton is currently being prosecuted by the general counsel of the National Labor
Relations Board for alleged multiple violations of a federal labor law, which includes an anti-worker campaign of
intimidating, illegally firing and discriminating against workers;

WHEREAS the campaign is supported by community organizations, students, staff and faculty members of San
Diego State University;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Associated Students of San Diego State University support the Mission
Valley Hilton Boycott by utilizing other hotels in San Diego that respect workers and provide livable wages and
benefits, such as Island Palms, Handlery Hotel, Hilton Mission Bay, Hotel Del Coronado, Hilton San Diego Airport,
Holiday Inn on the Bay, Hyatt Islandia, La Costa Resort and Spa, or Shelter Island Pointe and referring business to
the aforementioned hotels;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Associated Students of San Diego State University sign onto a
Responsible Contracting Policy, which would ensure SDSU only uses facilities that pay workers livable wages and
benefits and that their employees are treated with dignity and respect.
MUJERS DEL MILENIO PROGRAM

A 4 PART SERIES ON WOMEN STUDENTS’ AND WORKERS’ LEADERSHIP

OVERVIEW:
Workers from HERE and SEIU and students from various colleges and universities in San Diego will gather to learn
organizing skills and bridge the gap from college organizing and workplace organizing, while discussing issues
relating to women of color from immigrant families. The goal of this program is to prepare students and workers for
organizing campaigns on campus and in their workplace respectively, and to connect generations of activists to create
a broad band network.

The workshops will be run entirely in Spanish, with translation available upon request. Workers will receive a small
monetary gift for participating in the program. Transportation and child-care will also be available upon request.
Participants will be provided with an organizing folder, a composition journal, breakfast and lunch foods.


SESSION I. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 2002

THEMES:                 SELF-ESTEEM, HISTORY OF LABOR MOVEMENT

AGENDA

    I. Breakfast

   II. Introductions/ice-breaker: why are you here, what do you expect from the program?

  III. Program Overview

  IV. Themes of the day

   V. Points of unity

  VI. Exercises: Agree/disagree; topics of race, culture, gender, class

 VII. Labor movement
         a. go over basic terms
         b. history/timeline: women in labor

VIII. SEIU breakdown

  IX. HERE breakdown

   X. Check-outs

Assignments for next time: present next week’s theme: write in composition book about relating ideas from program
to their experiences
SESSION II. SATURDAY, MARCH 9 2002

THEMES:           MESSAGE AND RAP, ORGANIZING STRUCTURE, UCSD JANITORS’ CASE STUDY
GUEST SPEAKER(S): ANA LOPEZ, UCSD JANITOR LEADER

AGENDA

    I. Breakfast

   II. Check-ins

  III. Share assignments

  IV. Organizing Chart

   V. UCSD case study

  VI. Message and Rap

 VII. Role plays

VIII. Introduce Cesar Chavez Day

  IX. Check outs

(possibility: go to a building/mall to flyer/talk to workers)

Assignments for next time: write a rap, make a list of people they know they can organize

SESSION III. SATURDAY, MARCH 30 2002

THEMES:                PUBLIC SPEAKING, MEDIA TRAINING
GUEST SPEAKER:         GUADALUPE CORONA

AGENDA

    I. Breakfast

   II. Check-ins

  III. Assignment updates

  IV. Public Speaking Workshop

   V. Group break outs

  VI. Group reunion

 VII. Media training
VIII. Role plays

 IX. Pairs

  X. Check-outs

SESSION IV. SATURDAY, APRIL 13 2002

THEMES:               IMMIGRATION AND LABOR, FUTURE PLANS
GUEST SPEAKER:        ANA, VOZ FRONTERIZA

AGENDA

   I. Breakfast

  II. Check-ins

 III. Guest Speaker

 IV. Strategy Charts/Future plans

  V. Closing exercise

 VI. Certificates

 VII. Check-outs
“ORGANIZE THE ORGANIZING”

          Methods of Accountability
          Day/Week/Month Workplans
          Job Descriptions
          Debrief Sheets (overview)
          Action Mobilization
RESOURCE & ALLIES PHONE LIST                       619-708-3367
                                                   drcohen@earthlink.net
UNION CONTACTS
                                                   Gracia Molina de Pick
Mike Wilzoch – Deputy Organizer, SEIU Local 2028   858-459-6738
619-261-8908                                       858-488-5162 fax
FIRMEMIGUELON@aol.com
                                                   May Fu, UCSD Ethnic Studies Department
Brigette Browning, Lead Organizer                  mfu@weber.ucsd.edu
HERE Local 30
619-516-3737 X2                                    George Lipsitz, UCSD Ethnic Studies Department
brigettebrowning@yahoo.com                         glipsitz@ucsd.edu

CAMPUS CONTACTS                                    ALLY COMMUNITY GROUPS

Jose Garcia / Diana Rodriguez                      Patricia – EJEJEP / AGENDA, LA
UC San Diego MEChA                                 323-789-7920
1-619-778-2461
                                                   Kimi Lee
San Diego State University MEChA                   LA Garment Worker Center
619-594-6541                                       1250 S. Los Angeles Suite 206
                                                   LA, CA, 90015
Enrique de la Cruz                                 213-748-5945 office
City College                                       213-864-1744 cell
619-284-7225                                       213-748-5876 fax

Edwina Welch                                       World Beat Center
Cross Cultural Center, UCSD                        619-230-1190
858-822-9689
                                                   Nohelia Ramos, Organizer
Chris Wilson (AS President)                        Environmental Health Coalition
USD United Front                                   Military Toxic Projects
619-260-4716                                       1717 Kettner Blvd. Suite 100
                                                   San Diego, CA, 92101
Alicia Garcia                                      619-235-0281
Southwestern College MEChA                         FAX 619-232-3670
619-421-6700 x5754 office                          noheliar@environmentalhealth.org
619-838-0880 cell
                                                   Norma Chavez, Organizer
Groundwork Books at UCSD                           Developing Unity through Resident Organizing
858-452-9625                                       (DURO)
                                                   2681 Market Street
Christian Ramirez, American Friends Service        San Diego, CA, 92102
Committee                                          619-426-3595 x227
619-233-4114 office                                duro@cox.net
619-885-1289 cell
cramcar@yahoo.com                                  Rick Jankow, Director
                                                   Project YANO (Youth and Non-Military
Donald Cohen, Central Labor Council of SD          Opportunities)
P.O. Box 230157                                       Los Angeles Youth Organizing Communities
Encintas, CA, 92023                                   2811 Whittier Blvd.
760-634-3604 / 760-753-7518                           Los Angeles, CA, 90023
FAX 760-753-7518                                      323-780-7874 c
ProjYANO@aol.com                                      FAX 323-793-4849
                                                      jairus@schoolsnotjails.com
Levin Sy, SCAPLE/SD Asian Alliance
858-382-8628                                          Ana Soto / Juan Orozco
levingsy@yahoo.com                                    HOMEY Youth Foundation
                                                      4981 Market Street
Trusten Faulkner                                      San Diego, CA, 92102
SLAP/USSA                                             619-262-1477
501 3rd St                                            queenana03@hotmail.com
Washington DC, 20001
202-434-1106 office                                   Emmanuelle Regis, Organizer
202-434-1477 fax                                      Californians for Justice
tfaulkner@cwa-union.org                               4265 Fairmont Drive, Suite 270
                                                      San Diego, CA, 92105
Tommy Peterson / Shamroc                              619-641-7750
619-784-7426 cell                                     emmanuelle@caljustice.org
shamroc15@hotmail.com
                                                      Yazmin Araiza / Adrian Acosta
Erin O’Brien                                          Teatro Con Safos
UCLA Labor Center                                     4233 Kansas Street
310-206-2111 office                                   San Diego, CA, 92104
310-880-7083 cell                                     619-563-9156
geobrien@ucla.edu                                     doblearojo@hotmail.com

Sara Flocks                                           Lori Guterriez
UC Berkeley Labor Center                              Youth Action Network
510-643-7077 office                                   Groundwork Books 0323 Student Center
510-502-7077 cell                                     La Jolla, CA, 92037
510-642-6432 fax                                      858-452-9625
laborsummer@excite.com                                FAX 858-452-0325
                                                      lori@libertad.ucsd.edu
MEDIA CONTACTS
Leonel Sanchez, Union Tribune                         Tommy Ramirez
619-293-1228                                          SD Youth Organizing Communities
                                                      1385 Third Ave
YOUTH ORGANIZING LIST:                                Chula Vista, CA, 91911
                                                      619-203-3714
Jairus Ramos, Schools Not Jails Network Coordinator   FAX 619-609-7585
                                                      tvaletino@yahoo.com
CONCLUSION
APPENDIX
             SEJ in the news



OTHER WORKSHOP IDEA?
WHAT IS POWER? WHO HAS IT? POWER ANALYSIS CHART       BRAINSTORM      45 MIN            PAPER,
(LITTLE VILLAGE STORY, BUT DO ONE FOR THE US)         & DISCUSSION                     MARKERS
ACTIVITY? (WALL TIMELINE, POINT OF ENTRY, SHOW          EXERCISE        10
CONNECTEDNESS) ????                                                    MINS


    Create a sheet for What is power? (draw the first thing that come to your mind)

				
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