The Boy Who Didn�t Believe in Spring - PowerPoint

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					 The Boy Who Didn‘t
  Believe in Spring
By: Lucille Clifton
Illustrated by: Brinton Turkle
An example of city wildlife:
      •   http://community-2.webtv.net/hotmail.com/verle33/HummingBirdNest
    Unit Overview
• Raise your hands if you can answer the
  following questions:
  – What do you know about city wildlife before
    we read the selection?
  – What do you know about the kinds of
    animals and plants that live and grow in the
    city?
  – Have you already read any books about city
    wildlife?
City Wildlife (Read Aloud)

 • Prior Knowledge
   – This is a nonfiction article that
     discusses habitat-the natural
     environment of living things.
   – The author of this article has been a
     biology teacher, and a professor of
     science.
―City Lots: Living Things in Vacant Spots‖
Te 113L-113O


               • Focus Questions:
                 – How important are open spaces in a
                   city?
                 – What makes a city a good place to live
                   for some wildlife?
                 – Listen to the story I read to you.
City Lots (article discussion)
      • Why is this selection called ―City Lots:
        living Things in Vacant Lots?‖
         – It is about plants, insects, and animals that
           live in city lots.
      • Why do many plants and animals live in
        vacant lots all year round?
         – They find, everything they need to live there,
           such as food, water, sunlight, and space.
City Lots (article discussion)

      • How do the plants in city lots help
        insects live?
         – Some insects lay their eggs in the
          plants; others feed on the plants and
          use them for shelter.
Objectives:
      • You will:
        – recognize antonyms and synonyms,
        – Recognize compound words
        – Recognize base words and the suffix –y and
          the prefix un-
        – Practice using the spelling patterns ar and
          air
        – Recognize the long u sound spelled u, u_e,
          _ue, _ew.
  Word Knowledge
hollered whispered grinned frowned
vacant empty bare
streetlight playground tiptoe
spiky cottony smelly silvery
unbelievable undecorated untied uneaten unoccupied
started apartments dark car air
  Word Knowledge
• Tony stopped and made believe his sneaker was
  untied to see what King was going to do.
• ―Well, come on, man,‖ King whispered, and they
  started down the street.
• Just after the friends passed some apartments,
  they came to a vacant lot.
• An indigo car is a dark blue color.
What do these words have in common?

       hollered whispered grinned
            frowned
         – The words are antonyms. What‘s an
           antonym?
           • An antonym means opposite. With your
             partner, identify the antonyms.
              – Hollered/whispered, grinned/frowned
           • Use each word in a sentence and come up
             with other examples of antonyms.
           • Hot/cold, hard/soft, up/down, left/right,
             day/night, all/none.
What is the same with these words?

       vacant empty bare
       • These words are synonyms. Raise your hand if
         you can tell me what a synonym is.
         – Synonyms are words that mean the same thing.
       • What is the synonym to these words?
         – happy…
            • joyful
         – tired…
            • sleepy
         – large…
            • huge, big
         – end…
            • finish, complete
         – grow…
            • mature, develop
What is the spelling pattern in the next set of
words?
        streetlight playground tiptoe
        • The words are compound words.
            – What words make up each compound
              word?
               • street + light
               • play + ground
               • tip + toe
            – Do the two words help us understand
              the meaning of the word?
What‘s the secret pattern between these words?

        spiky cottony smelly silvery
        • The suffix –y is added to base words.
        • Give a definition for each word and use the
          word in a sentence.
        • Identify the part of speech the word becomes
          in a sentence.
        • By adding the suffix –y , the word becomes an
          adjective (a describing word).
What do these words have in common?
      unbelievable undecorated untied uneaten unoccupied

      • The prefix un- is added to words.
         – What does the prefix un- mean?
            • Un- means not.
         – Give the base word and explain how
           the word changes when you add un-.
            • Example: the base word for unbelievable is
             believe.
               – When you add un- the word means not true.
What is the same with these words?
      started apartments dark car air
      • These words are spelling words
        found in ―The Boy Who Didn‘t
        Believe in Spring‖.
      • Let‘s review the spelling patterns
        for ar and air.
Please read the sentences and find the
antonyms:
         • Tony stopped and made believe his sneaker was
           untied to see what King was going to do.
         • ―Well, come on, man,‖ King whispered, and they
           started down the street.
         • Just after the friends passed some apartments,
           they came to a vacant lot.
           – stopped/started, untied/tied, whispered/shouted,
             down/up, after/before, friends/enemies,
             vacant/occupied
Now, let‘s identify any synonyms or prefixes

         • Tony stopped and made believe his sneaker was
           untied to see what King was going to do.
         • ―Well, come on, man,‖ King whispered, and they
           started down the street.
         • Just after the friends passed some apartments,
           they came to a vacant lot.
             – Synonyms: stopped/discontinued, untied/undone,
               started/began, some/several, vacant/bare/empty
             – Prefixes: untied-not tied.
Now, let‘s read the following sentence together:

        • An indigo car is a dark blue color.
           – Identify the words that have the /ar/
             sound spelled ar
                 – Car, dark
  Prior Knowledge
• What do you remember from the
  Read Aloud?
• Raise you hand if you can share
  with me what you notice about the
  first signs of spring.
Background Information
     • ―The Boy Who Didn‘t Believe in
       Spring‖ is realistic fiction.
     • Realistic fiction may include
       descriptions of actual places and
       things, and also situations that are
       made up but could happen.
     • The author invents the characters,
       then involves them in solving a
       problem.
Background Information
     • The author, Lucille Clifton, uses
       idiomatic spellings and phrases.
     • Some of the spelling in the story
       was used to show natural speech
       and may differ from the dictionary
       spelling.
       – bout for about
       – comin for coming
Preview and Prepare
(Reading 2.6 pp. 114O-114P)

            • Let ‗s read aloud: the title, the author and
              illustrator.
            • Now let‘s browse the first page or two of the
              story.
                 – Who are the main characters?
                 – Look at the illustrations in the selections.
                 – Make sure you make predictions about the text to
                   help monitor your comprehension.
                 – Look for: clues, problems, such as unfamiliar words
                   (trans. 46)
            • Now let‘s look at the focus questions.
                 – What is city wildlife?
                 – What types of wildlife would you expect to find in a
                   city?
Student Observation



Clues                  Problems     Wonderings
Can a person           Weissman‘s   How can you
―believe‖ in Spring?                 find Spring?
The Boy Who Didn‘t
Believe in Spring




                     mound
                     crops
                     patch
                     vacant
                     decorated
crops          plants grown for food or to sell to
               make money

        •One day after the teacher
        had been talking about birds
        that were blue and his
        Mama had started talking
        about crops coming up, King
        Shabazz decided he had just
        had enough.



        •Now that spring has
        arrived, the farmer is busy
        planting his crops.
decorated    made beautiful by adding fancy
             things and frills

     • They passed the Church of the
       Solid Rock with high windows all
       decorated and pretty.
     • The wedding reception hall looked
       lovely, decorated with twinkling
       lights and pretty flowers.
vacant   empty; abandoned


     • Just after they passed some
       apartments King Shabazz and Tony
       Polito came to a vacant lot.

     • The warehouse looked as though it
       had been vacant for years.
mound    small hill or pile of dirt, rocks, or other
         material

    •The wheels were gone
    and so were the doors,
    but it was dark red and
    sitting high on a dirt
    mound in the middle of
    the lot.
    •The catcher walked
    toward the pitcher‘s
    mound, a slightly raised
    area of ground on a
    baseball field. He
    wanted to talk to the
    pitcher about the next
    batter.
patch   an area different from what is around it


                                      •He looked down
                                      and saw a patch of
                                      little yellow pointy
                                      flowers, growing in
                                      the middle of short
                                      spiky green leaves.
                                      •A large empty
                                      patch stood out
                                      from the full green
                                      lawn.
Investigating Concepts Beyond the Text
TG 125A Inquiry


            • What do you know already about
              city wildlife? During the next six
              weeks, we read stories about city
              wildlife.
                  – Does anyone have any further
                    questions or points to share up to this
                    point?
                    • Complete Inquiry Journal, pg. 28
Word Analysis   (TE. P. 35F)




      • Spelling – This week, we will spell
        words wit the /ar/ sound.
      started apartments dark car air
        – Let‘s take our spelling pretest.


      • Vocabulary Skill Words (antonyms)
      whispered shouted slowly mound
       vacant
English Language Conventions
(TG p. 125F Eng. Lang. Conv. 1.0, 1.4)


                  • Let‘s read L.A. Handbook, p. 272 to learn about
                    quotation marks.
                        – Quotation marks let the reader know that something
                          is being said.
                        – A comma sets of the speaker‘s words from the rest of
                          the sentence.
                        – If the sentence ends with the quotation, the
                          punctuation goes inside the closing quotation mark.
                              • ―I‘m hungry!‖ Shelly said.
                              • ―Are you tired?‖ Michael asked.
                              • Brian said, ―It‘s time to go to school.‖
                        – The name of a short story, poem, song or book
                          chapter should be in quotes.
                  • Now, we will work on Comprehension and
                    Language Arts Workbook pages 26-27 for more
                    practice with quotation marks.
Writing Process Strategies
Getting Ideas: Responding to Fiction TG p. 125F (writing 1.1, 1.4)

             • Read Language Arts handbook, pgs. 78-79
               in order to find out about expository writing.
              Let‘s read L.A. handbook, pgs. 84-87 on
               responding to fiction
              Let‘s go over an example of good writing:
               responding to fiction (transparency 4)
              Let me share you the writing rubric with you:
Writing Process Strategies
Getting Ideas: Responding to Fiction TG p. 125F (writing 1.1, 1.4)


              Total point value: 10
                   Ideas are stated clearly and are easy to understand. (2
                    points)
                   There is a topic sentence for each paragraph.
                   (2 points)
                   There is at least one supporting detail or example for
                    each topic sentence (2 points)
                   The final copy is clean, neat, and legible. (2 points)
                   Mechanics-punctuation, spelling, and capitalization is
                    correct. (2 points)
Writing Process Strategies
Getting Ideas: Responding to Fiction TG p. 125F (writing 1.1, 1.4)

                I like the character King Shabazz in the story
                 ―The Boy Who Didn‘t Believe in Spring‖.
                     I could write a response to fiction explaining why.
                What plots, settings, and ideas could you use to
                 write responses to fiction?
                     Let‘s make a list on the board.
Developing Oral Language

  hollered whispered grinned frowned
  vacant empty bare
  streetlight playground tiptoe
  spiky cottony smelly silvery
  unbelievable undecorated untied uneaten
    unoccupied
  started apartments dark car air
  • Partner work:
    – One student selects a word from above and
      your partner will put the word in a sentence.
    – Then we will switch!
The Boy Who Didn‘t Believe in Spring                  Te. 114Q-
R (first reading-orally pgs. 114-123)



                   • When I read this story I will:
                   • Predict what the story might be
                     about
                   • What Questions come to mind?
                   • What images pop into my
                    mind? (Visualize)
                   • Summarize story in own words
                                        Listen/Speak 1.1,1.2
Discussing Strategy Use
TG 122


         • How did you clarify confusing passages?
         • What questions did you ask yourself as
           you read the story?
         • Did you make predictions as you read
           the story? What were they?
         • What did you visualize as you read the
           story?
Discussing the Selection

      • Let‘s use handing off to answer
        these questions:
        – Why didn‘t King believe in spring?
        – What did King and Tony do to find
          spring?
        – What signs of spring did they find?
        – What types of wildlife are common in
          cities?
          • Write your answers in your response
            journal
Concept/Question Board TE p. 125B

       • Let‘s use the Concept/Question
         board to:
         – Post questions we have about the
           story that have not been answered yet.
         – Post articles about city wildlife.
         – Answer our story focus question.
Word Analysis           (TE. P.125G) ELC 1.8, Reading 1.4


    •Spelling
       –Here is Sound/Spelling card 27 /ar/.
       –Repeat after me: armadillo. Sort your spelling words by ar,
       are, air, or ear spellings.



    •Vocabulary: Antonyms
                               whispered
    •Antonyms are two words with opposite meanings.
       –The antonym for whispered is: __________.
           •Shouted, screamed, yelled, hollered
    •Let‘s complete Spelling and Vocabulary Skills Workbook
    pages 26-27 for more practice identifying antonyms.



                              100
                                0
                                     2nd4t h
                                    1s t 3r d
                                      Q Q    Q
                                    Q t r t rt r t r
Antonyms
Antonyms are words that have
 opposite meanings.

Hot and cold are antonyms.

Happy and sad are antonyms.

Push and pull are antonyms.
English Language Conventions
(TG p. 125G E.L.C., 1.5)

     • Review: Quotation Marks.
        – When are quotation marks used?
            • Quotation marks are used when someone speaks, for short story,
              poem and song titles and chapters in a book.
     • Name two or more animals that live in the city.
        – Imagine what animals would say to each other about how
          humans treat them.
        – What would they say? Let‘s write their conversation on the
          board.
     • Find one declarative (.), one interrogative (?), and one
       exclamatory (!) quotation in ―The Boy Who Didn‘t Believe in
       Spring.‖
Writing Process Strategies
Prewriting- Responding to Fiction TG p. 125G      (Writing 1.1, 1.4)


   • Let‘s review our ideas for responding to fiction from
     yesterday.
   • Let‘s read Writer‘s Workbook, pg. 6 on prewriting for
     responding to fiction.

   • Graphic organizers help writers organize their thoughts.
       – Now, we will go over a Character Web (transparency 11).
           • In a Character Web, you need to add details and examples.
   • I would like you to complete the character web on
     Writer‘s Workbook pages 6-7.
Phonics and Fluency
Review the long u sound spelled u, u_e,
_ue, _ew
       • Here is the Sound/Spelling Card 36, the
         long u sound.
      unit    used menu Utah
      cue     human humid January
      puny     fuel pupil unicorn
      mew      few unify universe
          – Can you identify the letters that make the long u
            sound?
      •   My favorite month is January.
      •   I ate a few cookies after dinner.
      •   He used to sit with his friend Tony Polito on the bottom step
          when the days started getting longer and warmer and talk about
          it.
          – Can you find the words with the long u sound?
Investigation

      • Let‘s begin planning our
        investigations.
      • Work with your groups to complete
        the calendar on Inquiry Journal
        page 33-34.
―The Boy Who Didn‘t Believe in Spring‖
Second Read

        • Comprehension Skills – Classify and
          Categorize
              – What does classifying and categorizing
                mean?
                • It is sometimes useful to put story
                  information into sections or categorizes.
                • Putting things that are alike together in a
                  group will help you understand and learn
                  information.
              – As you read the story, try to classify
                and categorize different things.
Classify and Categorize
      Signs of Spring   People in the   Things in King   Things King   Things King
                        Story           and Tony‘s       Does          and Tony Smell
                                        Neighborhood
Checking Comprehension                  (reading 2.3)




    • What does this story have to do with city
      wildlife?
      – Tony and King find plants beginning to grow and a
        bird‘s blue eggs in the car in a vacant lot.
    • What do Tony and King realize when
      they find the flowers and the bird‘s eggs?
      – They realize that spring has really arrived.
    • How do you think they feel about their
      discovery?
      – They feel happy and amazed at finding signs
        of spring in the city.
Interviewing, TE. 125D

    •    In an interview, you ask another person
         questions to get information about a subject
         or to find out what she or he thinks or feels
         about something.
    •    In an interview, a person is the source.
    •    Here are the rules of doing an interview:
        1.   Always ask permission to interview a person.
        2.   Ask Who? What? Where? Why? And How? Questions.
        3.   Write down your questions in the order you want to
             ask them.
        4.   Speak clearly and politely during an interview.
        5.   Take notes as the person answers the questions.
        6.   Thank the person after the interview.
Word Analysis
  • Spelling
    – bare     bear
    – Listen to the /air/ sounds in bare and bear
    – Now, complete Spelling and Vocabulary Skills Workbook
      pg. 28 for more practice with the /ar/ and /air/ sounds.


  • Vocabulary
                                  mound
    – hole, indentation, and valley are antonyms to mound
       • Knowing the meaning of the antonyms, what is the meaning of the word
         mound.
           – hill, bump, pile
    – Work with your partner to think of some more antonyms
      for the word mound.
           – Flat land, valley, dip
English Language Conventions TG. p. 125H


        Read L.A. Handbook, pg. 272 to review
        quotations.
           Where does the quotation marks go for
           the following sentences?
              Fragrant flowers are flourishing in the field,
              Fred said gratefully.
                 Fragrant flowers are flourishing in the field
                 Fred said gratefully.
                 Rachel Carson said We need to protect the
                 natural world.
English Language Conventions TG. p. 125H

        Where does the quotation marks go for the following
        sentences?
           When will the cardinal eggs hatch? asked Ellen.
           That cardinal is bright red! Gasped Deonte.


        Note: The end punctuation goes inside the closing
        quotation mark.
        Assignment: Write a brief dialogue among animals
        about life in the city.
Writing Process Strategies
Drafting : Responding to Fiction

      • Although responding to fiction means giving
        opinions, these opinions need to be supported with
        examples from the writing.
          – Time order words are words that show the transition
            of events.
              • Before, after, first, next, later, last, until, then, finally
          – Time order words are used to help readers follow
            actions.
          – Let‘s read L.A. handbook, pgs. 198-199 for more
            examples.
              • Let‘s complete Comprehension and L.A. skills book, pgs. 28-29.
              • Complete your first draft using Writer‘s Workbook, pg. 7.
Sequence is
 the order in
which events
   happen.
Certain words
   can be
 sequence
    clues.
Time-Order Words
      first
      next
      then
     finally
Time-Order Expression
     in the morning
       after that
     later that day
    two weeks later
Other Time Words
    yesterday
    Saturday
      April
     winter
  Now be a sequence
 detective. See if you
can spot the clue words
 in the following story.
   Last Tuesday I met my new
friend Mickey. We were both
in a ball game at recess. I told
him he had made a good
catch during the game. Later
that day we played in a
softball game. We were on the
same team and we won!
   Last Tuesday I met my new
friend Mickey. We were both
in a ball game at recess. I told
him he had made a good
catch during the game. Later
that day we played in a
softball game. We were on the
same team and we won!
After the game, we traded
some baseball cards, and then
he said he wanted to ask me
something. After he finished
talking, we walked to the bus
stop.
After the game, we traded
some baseball cards, and then
he said he wanted to ask me
something. After he finished
talking, we walked to the bus
stop.
The next morning, I was able to
answer his question. My
parents said that I would go to
his family’s apartment to have
dinner with him on his birthday,
December 6.
The next morning, I was able to
answer his question. My
parents said that I would go to
his family’s apartment to have
dinner with him on his birthday,
December 6.
Developing Oral Language
     unit     used menu Utah
     cue      human humid January
     puny      fuel pupil unicorn
     mew       few unify universe
     • A             is a mammal.
         – Human
     •               is a cold month.
         – January
     • I need        to run my gold car.
         – fuel
Developing Oral Language
     unit   used menu Utah
     cue    human humid January
     puny    fuel pupil unicorn
     mew     few unify universe
     • The state of     is very pretty.
       – Utah
     • Our Open Court          is called City
       Wildlife.
       – unit
     • The word         means small.
       – puny
Meet the Author
• Please read the top half of page 124 with
  your partner to learn about the author of
  ―The Boy Who Didn‘t Believe in Spring‖,
  Lucille Clifton.
  – Lucille Clifton was the first person in her family
    to earn a scholarship and attend college. What
    does this tell you about her desire to learn?
     • She was determined to get an education and studied
       hard to be able to succeed by getting a scholarship.
  – What do you think is special about Lucille
    Clifton‘s writing that makes her ―one of the
    most famous poets and children‘s authors‖?
     • believable characters, interesting use of slang and
       dialect in dialogue
Meet the Illustrator
      • Please read the bottom half of page 124 with
        your partner to learn about the illustrator of
        ―The Boy Who Didn‘t Believe in Spring‖, Brinton
        Turkle.
         – Brinton Turkle writes and illustrates books in the
           hope that they will teach children kindness, honesty,
           and a love for life. Why do you think he chose to
           illustrate this story for Lucille Clifton?
            • The story deals with friendship and springtime; the boys
              find evidence of life even in an abandoned lot.
         – Look back at the pictures in ―The Boy Who Didn‘t
           Believe in Spring.‖ Brinton Turkle had to do research
           for the background scenery for New York City. Why
           would an artist do research?
            • Turkle would research to be sure his pictures were
              authentic. The more details possible, the better the
              pictures complement the story line.
Literary Elements: Characterization
        Characterization is the way that a writer shows what the
       characters in his or her story are like.
        Writers do this by telling what the characters do, say, think, and
       feel.
        Let‘s complete the table:


        Character            What I Know About Him     Evidence

        King Shabazz



        Tony Polito
Word Analysis

    • Spelling
       – Dark
          • Knowing the spelling of dark can help us know that the
            rhyming word park is spelled the same way.
       – Now let‘s complete Spelling and Vocabulary Skills page
         29 for more practice with strategies for spelling /ar/
         and /air/ words.


    • Vocabulary
                              vacant
       – Empty, clear, and blank are synonyms of vacant.
       – What are the antonyms for vacant?
          • full, loaded, crowded
       – What is the definition of vacant , now that we know
         its‘ antonyms and synonyms?
          • empty space, clear area
English Language Conventions                            listen/Speak
1.1




      Remembering what we hear
        Being able to recall a story is an important listening skill.
        If we listen well the first time, we won‘t have to get the
        information again.
        Another good listening skill is repeating and paraphrasing
        what we hear in our own words. This helps us share
        information with others. We can give the same message
        using our own words.

            In small groups, paraphrase the important points and details
            of the story.
               Students will decide on a group leader.
               The group leader will record the important points.
               As a class, we will call on the group leader to share their
               information with the class.
Writing Process Strategies: Revising
(Writing 1.1, 1.4)
        • Let‘s read Writer‘s Workbook, pg. 8 on
          revising.
        • Let‘s discuss Language Arts Transparency 26
          on revising.
           • When the supporting sentences stray from the topic
             of the paragraph, readers lose interest.
           • When statements about a character, setting, idea,
             or plot are not supported with details from the
             story, it makes the statements hard to believe.
           • Misspelling names of people and places can be
             distracting and it makes it seem like you did not
             read the story carefully.
        • Revise your drafts using time order words.
           • Use the checklist on page 9 of your Writer‘s
             Workbook to help you revise your response to
             literature.
Day 5…
Word Knowledge Review
     hollered whispered grinned frowned
        –   past tense
     vacant empty bare
        – synonyms
     streetlight playground tiptoe
        – compound words
     spiky cottony smelly silvery
        – suffix -y
     unbelievable undecorated untied uneaten unoccupied
        – prefix un-
     started apartments dark car air
        – /ar/ and /air/ sounds

     Tony stopped and made believe his sneaker was untied to
       see what King was going to do.
     ―Well, come on, man,‖ King whispered, and they started
       down the street.
     Just after the friends passed some apartments, they came
       to a vacant lot.
     An indigo car is a dark blue color.
Phonics and Fluency Review
      unit   used menu Utah
      cue    human humid January
      puny    fuel pupil unicorn
      mew     few unify universe

      My favorite month is January.
      I ate a few cookies after dinner.
      He used to sit with his friend Tony Polito
        on the bottom step when the days
        started getting longer and warmer and
        talk about it.
The Boy Who Didn‘t
Believe in Spring




                     mound
                     crops
                     patch
                     vacant
                     decorated
crops          plants grown for food or to sell to
               make money

        •One day after the teacher
        had been talking about birds
        that were blue and his
        Mama had started talking
        about crops coming up, King
        Shabazz decided he had just
        had enough.



        •Now that spring has
        arrived, the farmer is busy
        planting his crops.
decorated    made beautiful by adding fancy
             things and frills

     • They passed the Church of the
       Solid Rock with high windows all
       decorated and pretty.
     • The wedding reception hall looked
       lovely, decorated with twinkling
       lights and pretty flowers.
vacant   empty; abandoned


     • Just after they passed some
       apartments King Shabazz and Tony
       Polito came to a vacant lot.

     • The warehouse looked as though it
       had been vacant for years.
mound    small hill or pile of dirt, rocks, or other
         material

    •The wheels were gone
    and so were the doors,
    but it was dark red and
    sitting high on a dirt
    mound in the middle of
    the lot.
    •The catcher walked
    toward the pitcher‘s
    mound, a slightly raised
    area of ground on a
    baseball field. He
    wanted to talk to the
    pitcher about the next
    batter.
patch   an area different from what is around it


                                      •He looked down
                                      and saw a patch of
                                      little yellow pointy
                                      flowers, growing in
                                      the middle of short
                                      spiky green leaves.
                                      •A large empty
                                      patch stood out
                                      from the full green
                                      lawn.
English Language Conventions
Review
      • Remember…
        – Quotation marks are used to let the reader
          know that something is being said.
        – A comma sets off the speaker‘s words from
          the rest of the sentence.
        – The ending punctuation goes inside the
          closing quotation mark.
           • ―I‘m hungry!‖ Shelly said.
           • ―Are you tired?‖ Michael asked.
           • Brian said, ―It‘s time to go to school.‖
        – The name of a short story, poem, song, or
          book chapter should also be in quotation
          marks.
Listening

      • Now, we will listen to the story on
        CD…
Assessments
     • Selection Assessment
       – ―The Boy Who Didn‘t Believe in
         Spring‖—Unit 2 Assessment, p. 2-4
     • Vocabulary Assessment
       – Unit 2 Assessment, p. 5
     • Spelling Assessment
       – The /ar/ and /air/ sounds—
       –   Unit 2 Assessment, p. 27
English Language Conventions (Penmanship)


          • Let‘s practice using cursive n and m:
          • n n n n n n n nnn n n n n n n n
          • m m mm m m mmmmmmmmm

          • Practice writing rows of        n’s and m’s in your
            Writer‘s Notebook.
          • once
          • time
          • named
          • spring
Writing Process Strategies      (Writing 1.1, 1.4)



        Editing, Proofreading,
        &Publishing
          Let‘s read Writer‘s Workbook, pg. 9 on
          editing/proofreading.
          Now, we will edit, proofread, and publish our
          responses to fiction.
          Use the checklist on Writer‘s Workbook page
          9.
Writing Process Strategies
Getting Ideas: Responding to Fiction TG p. 125F (writing 1.1, 1.4)

              Total point value: 10
                    Ideas are stated clearly and are easy to understand. (2
                     points)
                    There is a topic sentence for each paragraph.
                    (2 points)
                    There is at least one supporting detail or example for
                     each topic sentence (2 points)
                    The final copy is clean, neat, and legible. (2 points)
                    Mechanics-punctuation, spelling, and capitalization is
                     correct. (2 points)

				
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