EDC 347 by 9QfUG7oE

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									                                                 EDC 347
                          Teaching English and Communication in the Middle School
                                         Course Syllabus – Fall 2007

Tuesday/Thursday – 1:00 – 2:50 PM                                                 Dickey Hall – Room 331

Instructor: Dr. Laurie Henry
Phone: 257-7399 (Office) or (860) 933-1503 (Cell)
Email: laurie.henry@uky.edu or lahenry96@gmail.com
AIM: lahenry96
Office: 310/317, Dickey Hall
Office Hours: Tuesday/Thursday 10AM-12PM & by appointment

Purpose
The general purpose of this course is to acquaint prospective middle school language arts teachers with methods
of effectively teaching and enhancing language usage in grades 5-9. The six language arts (listening, speaking,
reading, writing, viewing, and visually representing) will be viewed in an integrative manner, with particular
emphasis on oral and written language. The course content, readings, and assignments are designed to assist
preservice teachers in meeting the Kentucky New Teacher Standards and the Standards for the English Language
Arts (IRA/NCTE, 1996) within the conceptual framework for the professional education unit at the University of
Kentucky, which emphasizes the theme, Research and Reflection for Learning and Leading. In addition, course
activities will require access to the Kentucky Core Content for Assessment (Language Arts) and Program of
Studies (Language Arts) for middle school grade levels. Finally, overarching themes throughout the course
include the role of the middle school language arts teacher as a reflective decision maker, teacher as researcher,
and becoming a culturally responsive educator.

Academic Expectations
Since this course is tied to teacher certification, the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) initiatives are
imbedded in the course content and experiences. This course will provide students an opportunity to advance their
knowledge and mastery of the “tools” associated with KERA, including the Kentucky Learning Goals and
Academic Expectations (LGAE), the Kentucky Program of Studies (POS), and the Commonwealth
Accountability Testing System (CATS), which includes the Core Content for Assessment. As students carry out
projects and complete assignments that involve instructional activities for P-12 students in Kentucky schools, they
will address one or more components of the KERA initiatives.

Specific academic expectations for students in this course include the following:
   1. Plan, implement, evaluate, and reflect upon language arts instruction while in the field placement
        associated with this class
   2. Construct a writing portfolio that meets state standards for grade 7 portfolios and reflect on the process
   3. Identify and evaluate materials that may be used in teaching language arts
   4. Engage in professional development through researching and sharing instructional ideas

Required Texts
Finders, M. J., & Hynds, S. (2003). Literacy lessons: Teaching and learning with middle school students. Upper
        Saddle River, NJ: Merrill

Articles/chapters on supplemental reading list found at the end of the syllabus

Supplemental Materials
Writer’s portfolio (e.g. 3-ring binder or expandable file folder)

Course Attendance, Participation, & Field Placements
Attendance in class and at field placements is expected. This course includes a variety of learning engagements
and activities that require your regular presence and active participation. Since we will be working
collaboratively, your attendance and preparation for ALL class meetings are crucial. Regular attendance,
punctuality, and participation are expected. Unexcused absences will adversely affect your grade. More
specifically, your final grade will be lowered by 5 points for each class that you miss. Two tardy arrivals will
constitute as one absence. Additionally, for an excused absence to be counted as such, documentation must be
provided. If you must miss a class because of illness or other legitimate circumstance, PLEASE call or email the
instructor before the class or as soon as possible afterwards.

You are expected to participate in class discussions, ask and answer questions, and voluntarily share your
thoughts and ideas. The attendance/participation component of the course grade will reflect this requirement. It is
expected that you will read and reflect on all required readings PRIOR TO the specified course meeting.

Students are expected to exhibit courteous, professional behavior at all times, whether in course meetings or in
practicum placements. Adherence to the New Teacher Standards requires such professionalism. This is essential
to becoming a successful teacher and critical to the student’s success in the course. In class, everyone’s opinion
matters and may be expressed, but not to the extent that it becomes offensive to others. If serious concerns arise,
documentation may be submitted to the program faculty. Further, cell phone, beepers, and pagers must be
turned off or silenced during class and at field placements.

Assignments
This course includes a variety of experiences and assignments designed to support student growth in learning
effective methods of teaching English and communication in the middle grades. As such, it is expected that all
assignments will be submitted on their due dates. Late assignments will be penalized 20% of the total point value
of the assignment for each successive class period past the due date.

Cheating and Plagiarism
Cheating and plagiarism are serious offenses that lead to significant consequences. The University views
academic dishonesty very seriously. Plagiarism and cheating on any assignment or exam will receive a minimum
penalty of the grade “E” for the course. Students should be aware that suspension or dismissal from the University
is a possible consequence of academic infractions.

See part II: Selected Rules of the University Senate, section VI – Student Academic Affairs, 6.3.0 – Academic
Offenses and procedures (http://www.uky.edu/StudentAffairs/Code/part2.html)

Policy on Need for Instructional Modifications
Students who have a disability or condition that may impair abilities to complete assignments or otherwise satisfy
course criteria are encouraged to meet with the course instructor to identify, discuss, and document any feasible
instructional modifications or accommodations. The students should notify the instructor no later than the end of
the second class session, or not later than the next class session after the disability is diagnosed, whichever occurs
earliest. If you need an accommodation for a disability that limits your ability to participate fully and meet the
expectations of this class, you must first go through the University of Kentucky Disability Resource Center,
located at 42 Alumni Gymnasium (257-2754).

Course Requirements and Evaluation

Grades for this course will be based on 320 points:

        A = 296 – 320 points (93 – 100 %)                 B = 274 – 295 points (86 – 92 %)
        C = 252 – 273 points (79 – 85 %)                  D = 230 – 251 points (72 – 78 %)

The following assignments will comprise the above points:

Daily Participation and Attendance Grade – 50 points – As we are building a community of learners, learning
to be teachers as reflective decision makers, and becoming professional educators who maintain the high
standards set for us, attendance and participation must be high priority aims. Students will be required to
participate in individual and/or group activities carefully chosen to scaffold learning.
Leadership in class Discussions – 15 points – Each student will provide leadership for colleagues by taking on
the role of discussion leader or facilitator. This role may be assumed by an individual or with a partner. As
discussion leaders, students are responsible for:
            a. Reading and reflecting upon the given week’s required readings and selecting key information to
                emphasize in discussion.
            b. Locating at least one additional related source and providing the groups with information (either
                verbal, written, or visual) to extend the group’s understanding of the topic.
            c. Using appropriate literacy instructional strategies to actively engage the group in experiences to
                enhance understanding of the topic.

                                  Scoring Rubric for Discussion Leaders
            14-15 points                        12-13 points                        10-11 points
Presentation indicates a thorough   Presentation indicates a thorough   Presentation indicates a surface
reading of assigned material; key   reading of assigned material; some  level reading of assigned material;
aspects are selected to highlight innon-essential aspects are           key aspects are not included in
discussion.                         highlighted in discussion.          discussion.
Additional source correlates well   Additional source correlates        Additional source does not correlate
with assigned material and clearly  tangentially with assigned material with assigned material and group
enhances learning for the group.    and somewhat enhances learning for learning is not enhanced by it
                                    the group
Literacy instructional strategies   Literacy instructional strategies   Literacy instructional strategies
employed actively engage the group employed engage the group and        employed fail to engage the group
and enhance understanding of the    somewhat enhance understanding of in active learning
material                            the material

Reading-Writing Connections Project – 50 points – The purpose of this project is for you to identify trade
books which may be used as examples of writing for which middle school students are held responsible: personal
expressive, literary, and transactive. For this project, you must identify a minimum of 12 trade books, at least 4
for each of the above types of writing that may be used to facilitate students’ understanding of the type of writing.
Additionally, you should include a range of books for younger and older middle school students and at least 2 that
would be appropriate for struggling readers. For each text, you must include the following information:
      Complete bibliographic information (APA style)
      Type of writing which the text links (personal expressive, literary, or transactive)
      Whether the text is appropriate for younger or older middle school students or struggling readers and why
      Brief summary of the text
      Description of how you would use the text during instruction
The format for this assignment is flexible. You may arrange information as you wish, provided it is neat, logical,
and consistent.

**A master list will be created from individual submissions and distributed to class members for use in future
teaching

                           Scoring Rubric for Reading-Writing Connections Project
 Component                                                                    Value                 Points Earned
 Personal expressive trade books (4 included)                                    2
 Literary trade books (4 included)                                               2
 Transactive trade books (4 included)                                            2
 Texts appropriate for struggling middle school readers (2 included)             2
 Complete bibliographic information included for each text                       6
 Grade/Age appropriate and why                                                  12
 Summary of text                                                                12
 Description of text use during instruction                                     12
 Total Points                                                                   50
Fieldwork Journal – 80 points (20 @ 4 points each) – Your fieldwork journal is “designed to support the
development of reflective practice by providing tools for inquiry and opportunities for guided reflection” (Finders
& Hynds, 2003, p. viii). The Finders & Hynds (2003) text contains journal assignments within each chapter.
These will be due according to the schedule of assigned readings (with the exception of Journal entries 3-2, 4-1,
4-2, and 6-1, which will be completed during your practicum placement).

                                       Fieldwork Journal Scoring Rubric
 Journal     Due                                                                                             Points
  Entry     Date                                       Topic                                        Value    Earned
    1-1      8/23    Becoming a Middle School English Teacher: Expectations/Assumptions               4
    1-2      8/28    Middle School Experiences: Schooling for Early Adolescents                       4
    2-1      8/30    Artifact Analysis: Revisiting Your Teachers and Textbooks                        4
    2-2      8/30    Cutting the Pie: Your Approach to Literacy Teaching                              4
    3-1       9/4    Classroom Inquiry: Adolescent Portraits                                          4
    3-2        *     Describing Your Teaching Context                                                 4
    4-1        *   Learning from Support Personnel                                                    4
    4-2        *   Adapting Instruction to Support All Learners                                       4
    5-1      9/13  Alternatives to Traditional Testing                                                4
    5-2      9/13  Artifact Analysis: Examining Your State or District Tests                          4
    6-1        *   Classroom Inquiry: Viewing a Lesson Through Language Lenses                        4
    7-1      9/25  Reading and Viewing for Multiple Purposes                                          4
    7-2      9/25  Artifact Analysis: Stances and Strategies in Your Lessons                          4
    8-1      11/8  Writing Assumptions                                                                4
    8-2      11/8  Writing for Multiple Purposes                                                      4
    8-3      11/8  Writing in the Disciplines                                                         4
    9-1     11/15  Talking and Listening for Multiple Purposes                                        4
    9-2     11/15  Classroom Inquiry: Discourse Analysis                                              4
   10-1     11/27  A Little Detective Work Into Your Discourse Communities                            4
   10-2     11/27  A Letter Home                                                                      4
                   Total Points                                                                      80
*Due following practicum

Lesson Plans – 50 points (2 @ 25 points each) – Using the approved Middle School Lesson Plan Format, you
must design, implement, evaluate, and reflect upon two Language Arts lessons. One should focus on writing and
one should focus on promoting oral language.

    An exemplary lesson plan will include the following components:

    1) Setting the context that includes: a) an explanation of how the lesson relates to the unit of study or your
    learning goals, b) a description of the students’ prior knowledge or focus of previous lesson, and c) a
    description of student attributes that will affect student learning.

    2) Statement of the objectives of the lesson: a) what students will demonstrate as a result of the lesson.

    3) Statement that connects your goals and objectives to: a) Kentucky Core Content, b) Program of Studies,
    and c) IRA/NCTE Standards for English Language Arts.

    4) Description of your assessment plan that includes: a) student objective(s), b) type of assessment, c) depth
    of knowledge level, and d) adaptations or accommodations that were made.

    5) A list of the resources that were used including: a) specific materials or equipment, b) copies of printed
    materials, and/or c) technology resources.

    6) Description of the strategies and activities including how you: a) triggered prior knowledge, b) engaged
    students, and/or c) made adaptations to meet individual student needs
    7) An analysis and reflection following the implementation of the lesson plan that includes: a) a rubric
    explaining levels of student performance, b) evaluation of student performance, c) description of students’
    strengths and/or misconceptions about content, d) description of modifications or differentiation of instruction
    to move students forward, e) reflection regarding successes and failures of strategies used during instruction,
    and f) plans to report or communicate learning results to students and parents.

                                             Lesson Plan Feedback Form
                                                                                                          Points
Component                                                                                    Value        Earned
1. Context: a) an explanation of how the lesson relates to the unit of study or your           3
learning goals, b) a description of the students’ prior knowledge or focus of previous
lesson, and c) a description of student attributes that will affect student learning

Comments:
2. Objectives: a) what students will demonstrate as a result of the lesson                      3

Comments:
3. Connections: a) Kentucky Core Content, b) Program of Studies, and c) IRA/NCTE                3
Standards for English Language Arts

Comments:
4. Assessment plan: a) student objective(s), b) type of assessment, c) depth of                 3
knowledge level, and d) adaptations or accommodations that were made

Comments:
5. Resources: a) specific materials or equipment, b) copies of printed materials, and/or        3
c) technology resources

Comments:
6. Strategies and activities: a) triggered prior knowledge, b) engaged of students, and/or      3
c) made adaptations to meet individual student needs

Comments:
7. Analysis and reflection: a) assessment rubric, b) evaluation of student performance,         6
c) description about content, d) description of modifications or differentiation of
instruction, e) reflection on instruction, and f) report of learning results

Comments:
8. Lesson plan format was followed                                                              1

Comments:
Total Points                                                                                   25


Internet Text Set – 25 points – With increased attention to technology in the classroom and the many helpful
websites available, teachers of all age groups will find useful online teaching tools. For this assignment, choose a
theme that you predict you will be able to use in your classroom. Then, research and find at least 10 websites that
will help you teach and/or present information related to that theme. Be prepared to share a few of the sites in
class. The format for the assignment will be an annotated bibliography. In your annotation, include the APA style
bibliographic information for the website followed by a paragraph description (including, website description,
examples of the information found on the website useful to your theme, and a rationale for using the website with
your target age group).
                                      Scoring Rubric for Internet Text Sets
    Component                                                                                Value        Points Earned
    Ten websites included                                                                      5
    Complete bibliographic information included for each website                               5
    Summary of website content                                                                15
    Total Points                                                                              25

Writing Portfolio – 50 points – Each student will complete a writing portfolio similar to those completed by
public school students as part of the statewide assessment process. The portfolio will contain evidence of taking
the following types of writing through the writing process: personal expressive (narrative, memoir, or personal
essay), transactive, and literary. The portfolio will also contain a letter to the reviewer (reflective writing) in
which you reflect on pieces in the portfolio as well as your growth as a writer. The portfolio may contain one
piece already written and graded in another course. You will be given time in class to engage in peer conferencing
about your writing. Drafts containing feedback from colleagues must be submitted as part of the portfolio, along
with evidence of prewriting activities. Individual writing pieces will be scored based on Kentucky’s Holistic
Scoring Guide. Full portfolios will be scored using the portfolio feedback form.
*Note: This assignment may be included in your Middle School TEP portfolio under NTS #8.

                                             Kentucky’s Holistic Scoring Guide
                7                              5-6                          3-4                             1-2
         Distinguished                     Proficient                  Apprentice                         Novice
    Well-established               Focused on a purpose;       Some evidence of               Limited awareness of
     purpose and clear               awareness of audience;       communicating with an           audience and/or
     focus; strong awareness         evidence of voice            audience for a specific         purpose
     of audience; evidence           and/or suitable tone         purpose; some lapses in        Minimal idea
     of distinctive voice           Depth of idea                focus                           development; limited
     and/or appropriate tone         development supported  Unelaborated idea                    and/or unrelated details
    Depth and complexity            by elaborated, relevant      development;                   Random and/or weak
     of ideas supported by           details                      unelaborated and/or             organization
     rich, engaging, and/or         Logical, coherent            repetitious details            Incorrect and/or
     pertinent details;              organization                Lapses in organization          ineffective sentence
     evidence of analysis,          Controlled and varied        and coherence                   structure
     reflection insight              sentence structure          Simplistic and/or              Incorrect and/or
    Careful and/or subtle          Acceptable, effective        awkward sentence                ineffective language
     organization                    language                     structure                      Errors in spelling,
    Variety in sentence            Few errors in spelling,     Simplistic and/or               punctuation, and
     structure and length that       punctuation, and             imprecise language              capitalization
     enhances effect of              capitalization relative to  Some errors in spelling,        disproportionate to
     writing                         length and complexity        punctuation, and                length and complexity
    Precise and/or rich                                          capitalization that do
     language                                                     not interfere with
    Control of spelling,                                         communication
     punctuation, and
     capitalization
                                               Portfolio Feedback Form
Writing Genres                                                                   Value            Points Earned
Personal expressive (e.g. personal narrative, memoir, personal essay)              7
   Evidence of pre-writing included                                                2
   Draft with feedback included                                                    2
Transactive (e.g. editorial, feature article)                                      7
   Evidence of pre-writing included                                                2
   Draft with feedback included                                                    2
Literary (e.g. fable, short story, recycled fairy tale, epic poem)                 7
   Evidence of pre-writing included                                                2
   Draft with feedback included                                                    2
Letter to reviewer                                                                 7
   Evidence of pre-writing included                                                2
   Draft with feedback included                                                    2
In-class peer review                                                               3
Portfolio presentation (mechanics, spelling, organization)                         3
Total Points                                                                      50

Alignment of Course Experiences
A check list depicting the congruence of course experiences with the various standards of the Department of
Curriculum and Instruction and the College of Education, the Educational Professional Standards Board, the
Kentucky Department of Education, and the International Reading Association/National Council of Teachers of
English Standards for the English Language Arts to which we must align follows this brief narrative that explains
the context for the checklist.

The conceptual framework for the professional education unit at the University of Kentucky (UK) is guided by
the theme, Research and Reflection for Learning and Leading. This theme is aligned closely with both the
institutional vision and mission of UK and the vision and mission of the professional education unit. The theme
reflects and guides how we approach preparation of professional educators within the context of a research
extensive, land grant university. The mission of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction is to 1) Design,
develop, and implement programs that will improve the quality of elementary, middle, and secondary education
and provide educational leaders; 2) Prepare teachers and provide continuing professional development; 3)
Conduct and disseminate research; and 4) Provide services in a variety of educational and professional settings.

The Middle School Teacher Education Program (Middle School TEP) supports the College of Education’s
focus on the teacher as a reflective decision maker. The program emphasizes the development of professionally
trained specialists in teaching early adolescents. As such, the program models team teaching and collaborative
learning. Active learning experiences are emphasized, as are real-world connections. Throughout the program,
students are encouraged to consider their present position and make plans for improvement. Students are urged to
gather data continuously and to use this data in planning effective instruction. Students are required to provide
questions for reflection when writing lessons they do not teach and to provide reflective summaries as part of
lesson plans, which are delivered to students. Students are provided time and resources to revise and improve
curricular materials they develop within the program. Students assess their own progress through the program’s
curriculum, preparing them for the continuous self-assessment required of practicing professionals. The
performance standards are as follows:

    Standard 1. Young Adolescent Development: Middle level teacher candidates understand the major
    concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development, and they provide
    opportunities that support student development and learning.

    Standard 2. Middle Level Philosophy and School Organization: Middle level teacher candidates
    understand the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations
    of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work successfully within
    these organizational components.
    Standard 3. Middle Level Curriculum and Assessment: Middle level teacher candidates understand the
    major concepts, principles, theories, standards, and research related to middle level curriculum and
    assessment, and they use this knowledge in their practice.

    Standard 4. Middle Level Teaching Fields: Middle level teacher candidates understand and use the
    central concepts, tools of inquiry, standards, and structures of content in their chosen teaching fields, and
    they create meaningful learning experiences that develop all young adolescents’ competence in subject
    matter and skills.

    Standard 5. Middle Level Instruction and Assessment: Middle level teacher candidates understand and
    use the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to effective instruction and assessment,
    and they employ a variety of strategies for a developmentally appropriate climate to meet the varying
    abilities and learning styles of all young adolescents.

    Standard 6. Family and Community Involvement: Middle level teacher candidates understand the major
    concepts, principles, theories, and research related to working collaboratively with family and community
    members, and they use that knowledge to maximize the learning of all young adolescents.

    Standard 7. Middle Level Professional Roles: Middle level teacher candidates understand the complexity
    of teaching young adolescents, and they engage in practices and behaviors that develop their competence
    as professionals.

The UK Educator Preparation Unit Technology Standards.
        Standard 1: Candidates integrate media and technology into instruction.
        Standard 2: Candidates utilize multiple technology applications to support student learning.
        Standard 3: Candidates select appropriate technology to enhance instruction.
        Standard 4: Candidates integrate student use of technology into instruction.
        Standard 5: Candidates address special learning needs through technology.
        Standard 6: Candidates promote ethical and legal use of technology disciplines.

The Education Professional Standards Board’s (EPSB) themes of diversity, assessment, literacy education, and
closing the achievement gap are also imbedded in this course. The required text and supplemental readings pays
attention to aspects of literacy instruction as it ties directly to the issue of diversity, paying attention to: who is
privileged in literacy instruction; how literacy instruction should meet the needs of multicultural enrollments; the
impact of race, poverty and power on students’ literacy achievement; culturally responsive instruction within the
new literacies paradigm; preparing literacy educators for divers settings; linguistic diversity, etc.

KERA has identified nine New Teacher Standards (NTS) as guides for beginning teacher preparation and
certification. These standards include the following:
    Standard I. Designs/Plans Instruction
    Standard II. Creates/Maintains Learning Climate
    Standard III. Implements/Manages Instruction
    Standard IV. Assesses and Communicates Learning Results
    Standard V. Reflects/Evaluates Teaching/Learning
    Standard VI. Collaborates with Colleagues/Parents/Others
    Standard VII. Engages in Professional Development
    Standard VIII. Knowledge of Content
    Standard IX. Demonstrates Implementation of technology

Like several of the standard sets already mentioned, the IRA/NCTE Standards for the English Language Arts
are designed specifically to guide the preparation of educators in P-12 settings. These standards are, therefore,
provided as an additional guiding force for the content of this course:

    Standard 1. Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of
    themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond
to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts
are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

Standard 2. Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an
understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.

Standard 3. Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate
texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their
knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their
understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context,
graphics).

Standard 4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style,
vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

Standard 5. Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process
elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

Standard 6. Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and
punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and
non-print texts.

Standard 7. Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by
posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and non-
print texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and
audience.

Standard 8. Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases,
computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate
knowledge.

Standard 9. Students develop an understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns, and
dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles.

Standard 10. Students whose first language is not English make use of their first language to develop
competency in the English language arts and to develop understanding of content across the curriculum.

Standard 11. Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a
variety of literacy communities.

Standard 12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g.,
for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).
                                      NCATE/EPSB Checklist for Syllabus: EDC 347
                                                                                                                     Addressed
                                                                                                                     in Course
 Skills and Dispositions of UK Educator Preparation Unit
  Functional Skill and Disposition 1: Candidates communicate appropriately and effectively.                             X
  Functional Skill and Disposition 2: Candidates demonstrate constructive attitudes                                     X
  Functional Skill and Disposition 3: Candidates demonstrate ability to conceptualize key subject matter ideas and      X
  relationships
  Functional Skill and Disposition 4: Candidates interact appropriately and effectively with diverse groups of          X
  colleagues, administrators, students, and parents in educational settings.
  Functional Skill and Disposition 5: Candidates demonstrate a commitment to professional ethics and behavior           X
Middle School Teacher Education Program (TEP) Performance Standards
  Young Adolescent Development                                                                                          X
  Middle Level Philosophy and School Organization                                                                       X
  Middle Level Curriculum and Assessment                                                                                X
  Middle Level Teaching Fields                                                                                          X
  Middle Level Instruction and Assessment                                                                               X
  Family and Community Involvement                                                                                      X
  Middle Level Professional Roles                                                                                       X
Education Professional Standards Board (EPSB) New Teacher Standards
  Standard 1: Designs and Plans Instruction                                                                              X
  Standard 2: Creates and Maintains Learning Climates                                                                    X
  Standard 3: Implements and Manages Instruction                                                                         X
  Standard 4: Assesses and Communicates Learning Results                                                                 X
  Standard 5: Reflects and Evaluates Teaching and Learning                                                               X
  Standard 6: Collaborates with Colleagues, Parents, and Others                                                          X
  Standard 7: Engages in Professional Development                                                                        X
  Standard 8: Knowledge of Content                                                                                       X
  Standard 9: Demonstrates Implementation of Technology                                                                  X
UK Educator Preparation Unit Technology Standards
  Standard 1: Candidates integrate media and technology into instruction                                                 X
  Standard 2: Candidates utilize multiple technology applications to support student learning.                           X
  Standard 3: Candidates select appropriate technology to enhance instruction.                                           X
  Standard 4: Candidates integrate student use of technology into instruction.                                           X
  Standard 5: Candidates address special learning needs through technology.                                              X
  Standard 6: Candidates promote ethical and legal use of technology disciplines.                                        X
EPSB Themes
  Diversity                                                                                                             X
  Assessment                                                                                                            X
  Literacy Education                                                                                                    X
  Closing the Achievement Gap                                                                                           X
IRA/NCTE Standards for the English Language Arts
  Standard 1: Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts                X
  Standard 2: Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres                                 X
  Standard 3: Students apply a wide rand of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts         X
  Standard 4: Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language to communicate effectively              X
  Standard 5: Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements       X
  Standard 6: Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions, media techniques, figurative        X
  language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and non-print texts.
  Standard 7: Students conduct research on issues and interest by generating ideas and questions, and by posing         X
  problems.
  Standard 8: Students use a variety of technological and information resources to gather and synthesize                X
  information and to create and communicate knowledge.
  Standard 9: Students develop and understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns, and            X
  dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles.
  Standard 10: Students whose first language is not English make use of their first language to develop competency      X
  in the English language arts and to develop understanding of content across the curriculum.
  Standard 11: Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of        X
  literacy communities.
  Standard 12: Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes.                      X
                                                 Course Calendar

To facilitate learning, the instructor may alter the syllabus at any time during the semester

 DATE                       TOPIC                                    READINGS                   ASSIGNMENTS
Aug 23        Introduction to course                                                            Journal 1-1
              Defining literacy, culturally
              responsive teaching, and
              assessment
Aug 28        Middle Schoolers and Middle            F & H – Chapter 1                          Journal 1-2
              School                                 Daniels (2005)
                                                     Perlstein (2004)
                                                     Williams-Boyd, et al. (2000)
Aug 30        English Language Arts from Mid-        F & H – Chapter 2                          Journal 2-1 and
              century to the Millennium              Foster (2000)                              2-2
                                                     Loder (2006)
                                                     Russo, et al. (1994)
Sep 4         Planning and Adapting Instruction      F & H – Chapter 3                          Journal 3-1 and
              for Middle School Learners             Hammerberg (2004)                          3-2*
Sep 6         Planning and Adapting Instruction      Anderson (2007)
              (continued)                            George (2005)
Sep 11        Including Middle School Learners       F & H – Chapter 4                          Journal 4-1* and
              with Disabilities                      Darling-Hammond & Ilfill-Lynch (2006)      4-2*
                                                     Giangreco (2007)
Sep 13        Integrating Assessment                 F & H – Chapter 5                          Journal 5-1 and
                                                     Holzberg (2005)                            5-2
Sep 18        Language Lenses: Integrating the       F & H – Chapter 6                          Journal 6-1*
              Language Arts in the Middle            Biondo, et al. (1999)
              Grades
Sep 20        Language Lenses (continued)            Bowser (1993)                              Internet Text Set
                                                     McConachie, et al. (2006)
                                                     Vavilis & Vavilis (2004)
Sep 25        Reading and Viewing in the             F & H – Chapter 7                          Journal 7-1 and
              Middle Grades                                                                     7-2
Sep 27        Reading and Viewing (continued)        Camp (2000)
                                                     Miller (1998)
Oct 1                                                                                           Submit at least
through       FIELD PLACEMENTS                                                                  one lesson plan
Nov 2                                                                                           electronically by
                                                                                                Oct 26
Nov 6         Welcome Back! Lessons from the                                                    Lesson Plan 2
              classroom
Nov 8         Focus on Writing in the Middle         F & H – Chapter 8                          Journal 8-1, 8-2,
              Grades                                                                            and 8-3
Nov 13        Focus on Writing (continued)           Anderson (2006)
                                                     Bintz & Shelton (2004)
                                                     Short, et al., (2000)
Nov 15        Writing Portfolio Workshop                                                        Journal 9-1 and
(NCTE)                                                                                          9-2
Nov 20        Talking and Listening in the           F & H – Chapter 9                          Reading-Writing
              Middle grades                          Goodson & Goodson (2005)                   Connections
                                                     Schwalb (2006)                             Project
                                                     Turner (2006)
Nov 22        No Class – Holiday
Nov 27        A Focus on Language Study              F & H – Chapter 10                         Journal 10-1 and
                                                     Farris et al. (2007)                       10-2
Nov 29        New Literacies: Focus on               TBA
(NRC)         Technology Integration
Dec 4         New Literacies: Focus on               Coiro (2003)
              Technology Integration (continued)     Leu, et al., (2007)
                                                     Henry (2006)
Dec 6         Entering the Profession                F & H – Chapter 11
Dec 11        Entering the Profession (continued)    Quarles (2007)
Dec 13        No Class                                                                             Final portfolios
                                                                                                   due by 5 PM

                                            Supplemental Reading List

Anderson, J. (2006). Helping writers find power. Educational Leadership, 63, 70-73.

Anderson, K. M. (2007). Differentiating instruction to include all students. Preventing School Failure, 51, 49-54.

Biondo, S. M., Raphael, T. E., & Gavelek, J. R. (1999, March). Mapping the possibilities of integrated literacy
       instruction. Reading Online. Available at: http://www.readingonline.org

Bintz, W., & Shelton, K. (2004). Using written conversation in middle school: Lessons from a teacher researcher
        project. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 47, 492-507.

Bowser, J. (1993). Structuring the middle-school classroom for spoken language. The English Journal, 82, 38-41.

Camp, D. (2000). It takes two: Teaching with twin texts of fact and fiction. The Reading Teacher, 53, 400-408.

Daniels, E. (2005). On the minds of middle schoolers. Educational Leadership, 62, 52-54.

Farris, P. J., Nelson, P. A., & L’Allier, S. (2007). Using literature circles with English Language Learners at the
         middle level. Middle School Journal, 38(4), 38-42.

Foster, J. D. (1991). The role of accountability in Kentucky’s Education Reform Act of 1990. Educational
         Leadership, 48, 34-36.

George, P. S. (2005). A rationale for differentiating instruction in the regular classroom. Theory Into Practice, 44,
       185-193.

Giangreco, M. F. (2007). Extending inclusive opportunities. Educational Leadership, 64, 34-37.

Hammerberg, D. (2004). Comprehension instruction for socioculturally diverse classrooms: A review of what we
     know. The Reading Teacher, 58, 126-137.

Holzberg, C. S. (2005, October 15). Designing rubrics. TechLearning.

Loder, T. L. (2006). Why we can’t leave public schools behind: The inseparable legacy of public education and
        American democracy. Educational Researcher, 35, 30-35.

McConachie, S., Hall, M., Resnick, L., Ravi, A. K., Bill, V. L., Bintz, J., & Taylor, J. A. (2006). Task, text, and
      literacy for all subjects. Educational Leadership, 64, 8-14.

Miller, T. (1998). The place of picture books in middle-level classrooms. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy,
        41, 376-381.

Perlstein, L. (2004). Allies can reach middle-schoolers. Education Digest, 70, 56-58.

Quarles, B. (2007). Middle school-Are you ready for the journey?, Middle Ground, 11(1), 24.
Russo, C. J., Harris, J. J., & Sandidge, R. F. (1994). Brown v. Board of Education at 40: A legal history of equal
       educational opportunities in American public education. Journal of Negro Education, 63, 297-309.

Schwalb, N. (2006). East of the river: Crossing borders through poetry in middle schools. English Journal, 96(1),
       40-45.

Short, K., Kauffman, G., & Kahn, L. (2000). “I just need to draw”: Responding to literature across multiple sign
        systems. The Reading Teacher, 54, 160-171.

Turner, T. M. (2006). Using improvisational storytelling in the classroom. Middle Ground, 10(1), 32-33.

Vavilis, B., & Vavilis, S. L. (2004). Why are we learning this? What is this stuff good for, anyway? Phi Delta
         Kappan, 86, 282-287.

Williams-Boyd, P., Skaggs, K., & Ayres, L. (2000). Marriage in the middle: The art and craft of teaching early
       adolescents. Childhood Education, 76, 236-239.

								
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