Student Feedback by dffhrtcv3

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									Student	
  Feedback	
  



                                                               Student	
  Feedback	
  
	
  
Introduction	
  
	
  
There	
  are	
  a	
  number	
  of	
  purposes	
  for	
  obtaining	
  feedback	
  from	
  students	
  on	
  courses,	
  including:	
  	
  
         Basic	
  good	
  practice	
  in	
  routinely	
  monitoring	
  the	
  quality	
  of	
  courses/modules	
  and	
  to	
  identify	
  
              any	
  issues	
  that	
  arise;	
  	
  
         Obtaining	
  useful	
  information	
  to	
  help	
  modify	
  or	
  re-­‐design	
  the	
  course	
  for	
  future	
  cohorts;	
  	
  
         Obtain	
  insights	
  into	
  the	
  students’	
  perspectives	
  on	
  the	
  module,	
  how	
  it	
  fits	
  with	
  other	
  parts	
  of	
  
              the	
   course,	
   how	
   much	
   effort	
   they	
   are	
   putting	
   in	
   and	
   the	
   perceived	
   level	
   of	
   difficulty	
   or	
  
              interest	
  in	
  the	
  topic;	
  	
  
         Helping	
   to	
   address	
   potential	
   issues	
   in	
   the	
   delivery	
   (e.g.	
   clarity	
   of	
   speaking,	
   access	
   to	
  
              materials,	
  notes,	
  etc)	
  or	
  organisation	
  of	
  the	
  course;	
  	
  
         Discovering	
  and	
  resolving	
  potential	
  problems	
  that	
  arise	
  with	
  particular	
  groups	
  of	
  students	
  
              or	
  individuals	
  (e.g.	
  non-­‐native	
  language,	
  anxieties,	
  etc)	
  	
  
         Assessing	
   or	
   grading	
   the	
   ‘performance’	
   of	
   lecturers	
   for	
   probation,	
   promotion,	
   awards	
   or	
  
              other	
  purposes.	
  	
  
	
  
The	
  aim	
  and	
  context	
  of	
  the	
  feedback	
  should	
  of	
  course	
  inform	
  the	
  methods	
  and	
  techniques	
  used.	
  	
  
	
  
Here	
   we	
   will	
   present	
   a	
   simple	
   summary	
   of	
   the	
   principal	
   methods,	
   which	
   are	
   currently	
   in	
   use	
   across	
  
the	
   university	
   and	
   provide	
   practical	
   suggestions	
   for	
   their	
   implementation.	
   There	
   are	
   of	
   course	
  
many	
  alternative	
  forms	
  of	
  feedback	
  including	
  informal	
  approaches,	
  which	
  lecturers	
  and	
  tutors	
  use	
  
as	
  part	
  of	
  routine	
  practice.	
  	
  
	
  
It	
  is	
  important	
  to	
  emphasise	
  that	
  student	
  feedback	
  is	
  only	
  one	
  possible	
  source	
  of	
  information	
  and	
  
therefore	
   provides	
   a	
   particular	
   perspective.	
   To	
   fully	
   evaluate	
   the	
   effectiveness	
   and	
   the	
   operation	
   of	
  
a	
  course	
  or	
  teaching	
  team	
  a	
  wider	
  range	
  of	
  inputs	
  is	
  necessary.	
  Students	
  are,	
  after	
  all,	
  still	
  novices	
  in	
  
the	
   particular	
   academic	
   discipline	
   (and	
   may	
   not	
   be	
   able	
   to	
   appreciate	
   yet	
   the	
   importance	
   of	
  
individual	
  topics	
  or	
  methods	
  until	
  later	
  in	
  their	
  development),	
  still	
  developing	
  their	
  own	
  skills	
  and	
  
experience	
  as	
  learners	
  and	
  are	
  influenced	
  by	
  the	
  broader	
  context	
  in	
  which	
  they	
  are	
  currently	
  taking	
  
the	
   course	
   under	
   review,	
   their	
   opinions	
   often	
   shaped	
   by	
   personal	
   circumstances	
   and	
   peer	
   group	
  
effects.	
  Nonetheless,	
  as	
  the	
  primary	
  intent	
  of	
  any	
  programme	
  of	
  learning	
  is	
  to	
  aid	
  the	
  development	
  
of	
   students'	
   knowledge	
   and	
   understanding,	
   methods	
   of	
   obtaining	
   insight	
   into	
   their	
   perspective	
   is	
  
absolutely	
  vital.	
  	
  
	
  
Some	
   institutions	
   operate	
   a	
   centralised,	
   institution-­‐wide	
   feedback	
   service	
   using	
   either	
   online	
   or	
  
paper-­‐based	
  forms.	
  Such	
  an	
  approach	
  can	
  be	
  effective	
  and	
  efficient	
  but	
  also	
  requires	
  considerable	
  
resources	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  running	
  a	
  risk	
  of	
  implying	
  that	
  such	
  feedback	
  is	
  an	
  external	
  requirement	
  rather	
  
than	
   an	
   important	
   aspect	
   of	
   the	
   whole	
   course	
   design-­‐delivery-­‐evaluation	
   cycle.	
   In	
   NUI	
   Galway,	
  
responsibility	
   for	
   feedback	
   is	
   associated	
   with	
   wider	
   currricular	
   ownership	
   and	
   hence	
   is	
   in	
   the	
  
domain	
   of	
   the	
   schools	
   and	
   colleges	
   themselves,	
   with	
   however	
   an	
   understanding	
   that	
   such	
  
autonomy	
   is	
   matched	
   with	
   implementation	
   of	
   appropriate	
   methods	
   on	
   all	
   available	
  
courses/modules.	
  	
  
	
  

(1) Feedback	
  Questionnaires	
  	
  
	
  
By	
   far	
   the	
   most	
   common	
   form	
   of	
   evaluation	
   within	
   higher	
   education	
   is	
   the	
   use	
   of	
   (often	
  
standardised)	
   feedback	
   questionnaires	
   either	
   provided	
   in	
   paper	
   or	
   web-­‐based	
   formats.	
   A	
  
preference	
  for	
  paper-­‐based	
  questionnaires	
  is	
  still	
  strong	
  in	
  many	
  instances	
  because,	
  if	
  administered	
  
in	
  class,	
   the	
   response	
   rate	
   may	
   be	
   quite	
   high.	
   However,	
  the	
   downside	
  of	
   such	
   is	
   the	
   amount	
   of	
   time	
  
and	
  effort	
  required	
  in	
  processing	
  the	
  data,	
  whether	
  via	
  scanner	
  or	
  by	
  hand.	
  	
  	
  

CELT	
                                                                        	
                                                                     	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  1	
  of	
  4	
  
Student	
  Feedback	
  
	
  
Online	
   questionnaires,	
   because	
   of	
   their	
   overuse	
   in	
   a	
   huge	
   variety	
   of	
   contexts	
   (not	
   just	
   in	
   the	
  
students'	
   university	
   experience)	
   tend	
   to	
   yield	
   low	
   rates	
   of	
   return,	
   unfortunately.	
   Any	
   evaluation	
  
based	
   on	
   questionnaires	
   needs,	
   therefore,	
   to	
   take	
   a	
   balanced	
   view	
   of	
   what	
   the	
   best	
   approach	
   might	
  
be	
  in	
  each	
  case	
  and,	
  if	
  online	
  is	
  preferred,	
  some	
  techniques	
  (or	
  even	
  just	
  stressing	
  the	
  importance)	
  
to	
  promote	
  completion	
  should	
  be	
  considered.	
  	
  
	
  
Blackboard	
   (the	
   University's	
   learning	
   management	
   system)	
   provides	
   a	
   very	
   direct	
   means	
   of	
  
surveying	
  students	
  enrolled	
  on	
  any	
  module	
  and	
  allows	
  anonymous	
  submissions,	
  along	
  with	
  simple	
  
analysis,	
  in	
  addition	
  to	
  offering	
  data	
  in	
  downloadable,	
  spreadsheet	
  format.	
  Note	
  that	
  the	
  survey	
  tool	
  
in	
  Blackboard	
  also	
  provides	
  ‘instructors’	
  with	
  information	
  on	
  who	
  has	
  completed	
  the	
  questionnaire	
  
(although	
   their	
   individual	
   responses	
   are	
   anonymised),	
   allowing	
   follow	
   up	
   reminders.	
   In	
   addition,	
   it	
  
may	
  be	
  possible	
  to	
  link	
  such	
  with	
  ‘adaptive	
  release’	
  and	
  other	
  tools	
  to	
  encourage	
  completion.	
  	
  
	
  
Pre-­‐built,	
   standard	
   questionnaires	
   (for	
   routine	
   end-­‐of-­‐module	
   surveys	
   and	
   for	
   more	
   detailed	
  
evaluations	
   of	
   a	
   course)	
   in	
   Blackboard	
   format	
   are	
   available	
   for	
   download	
   from	
   the	
   CELT	
   website	
  
(and	
  the	
  Learning	
  &	
  Teaching	
  Forum)	
  and	
  can	
  be	
  readily	
  embedded	
  in	
  any	
  module.	
  These	
  can	
  also	
  
be	
   customised	
   since	
   individual	
   staff	
   or	
   schools	
   may	
   have	
   their	
   own	
   preferred	
   set	
   of	
   questions	
   or	
  
particular	
  additional	
  queries,	
  which	
  they	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  raise	
  with	
  their	
  students.	
  	
  
	
  
A	
   key	
   aspect	
   to	
   bear	
   in	
   mind	
   is	
   of	
   course	
   that	
   of	
   evaluation	
   overload,	
   or	
   survey	
   fatigue,	
   particularly	
  
if	
   students	
   are	
   being	
   expected	
   to	
   fill	
   out	
   questionnaires	
   on	
   most	
   or	
   all	
   of	
   their	
   modules.	
   Some	
  
consideration	
  therefore	
  should	
  be	
  made	
  to	
  this	
  issue	
  and	
  simple,	
  quick	
  surveys	
  may	
  be	
  more	
  suited	
  
to	
  routine	
  feedback.	
  	
  

(2)	
  Simple	
  Feedback	
  Questions	
  	
  
	
  
Richer	
   feedback	
   is	
   often	
   obtained	
   by	
   asking	
   open	
   questions	
   of	
   students	
   such	
   as	
   the	
   classic	
   three	
  
examples:	
  	
  
	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  What’s	
  good	
  about	
  this	
  module?	
  	
  
	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  What’s	
  not	
  so	
  good?	
  	
  
	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  What	
  suggestions	
  do	
  you	
  have	
  for	
  improvement?	
  	
  
	
  
Of	
   course,	
   with	
   large	
   classes,	
   processing	
   data	
   from	
   such	
   feedback	
   whether	
   collected	
   from	
   written	
  
submissions	
  or	
  online,	
  may	
  take	
  considerable	
  time.	
  However,	
  in	
  practice,	
  common	
  themes	
  are	
  often	
  
quickly	
   identified	
   and	
   because	
   the	
   questions	
   are	
   open,	
   issues	
   which	
   the	
   lecturer/course	
  
coordinator	
   may	
   not	
   have	
   anticipated	
   but	
   which	
   are	
   important	
   to	
   the	
   students	
   can	
   be	
   revealed.	
  
Again,	
   Blackboard	
   can	
   provide	
   an	
   effective	
   means	
   of	
   gathering	
   such	
   information	
   and	
   results	
   can	
  
quickly	
   be	
   browsed.	
   Alternatively,	
   requesting	
   paper-­‐based	
   responses	
   might	
   be	
   appropriate	
   in	
   a	
  
class	
  session	
  (and	
  indeed	
  many	
  staff	
  use	
  such	
  an	
  approach	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  a	
  particular	
  lecture).	
  	
  
	
  
Asking	
  these	
  questions	
  at	
  a	
  time	
  in	
  which	
  it	
  is	
  still	
  possible	
  to	
  make	
  adjustments	
  to	
  the	
  module	
  is	
  
also	
   a	
   valuable	
   approach,	
   particularly	
   if	
   the	
   issues	
   raised	
   are	
   readily	
   rectifiable.	
   Indeed,	
   these	
  
questions	
  form	
  the	
  basis	
  of	
  the	
  existing	
  mid-­‐semester	
  feedback	
  scheme	
  (see	
  next),	
  but	
  there	
  is	
  no	
  
reason	
   why	
   such	
   feedback	
   cannot	
   be	
   sought	
   routinely	
   rather	
   than	
   having	
   to	
   depend	
   on	
   the	
  
presence	
  of	
  an	
  external	
  facilitator,	
  etc.	
  	
  

(3)	
  Mid-­‐Semester	
  Evaluation	
  or	
  Grouped	
  Student	
  Feedback	
  Scheme	
  	
  
	
  
Within	
   NUI	
   Galway	
   (originally	
   under	
   the	
   auspices	
   of	
   the	
   Quality	
   Office,	
   but	
   more	
   recently	
   CELT),	
  
academic	
   staff	
   are	
   provided	
   with	
   the	
   opportunity	
   for	
   an	
   independent	
   external	
   facilitator	
   to	
   take	
  
some	
  time	
  in	
  class	
  (typically	
  15-­‐20	
  minutes	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  a	
  lecture)	
  to	
  arrange	
  students	
  into	
  small	
  
groups	
  and	
  complete	
  the	
  response	
  to	
  the	
  three	
  basic	
  questions	
  referred	
  to	
  in	
  the	
  previous	
  section.	
  
The	
  advantage	
  of	
  obtaining	
  feedback	
  under	
  this	
  scheme	
  is	
  that	
  because	
  the	
  students	
  are	
  in	
  groups	
  
they	
  need	
  to	
  reach	
  agreement	
  on	
  the	
  feedback	
  which	
  they	
  submit	
  and	
  they	
  have	
  scope	
  to	
  discuss	
  
the	
  items	
  amongst	
  themselves,	
  hopefully	
  leading	
  to	
  a	
  more	
  considered	
  set	
  of	
  responses.	
  In	
  addition,	
  

CELT	
                                                                         	
                                                                       	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  2	
  of	
  4	
  
       Student	
  Feedback	
  
       because	
   the	
   process	
   is	
   managed	
   by	
   an	
   independent	
   person	
   and	
   is	
   confidential,	
   there	
   is	
   an	
  
       expectation	
  that	
  students	
  may	
  be	
  more	
  forthcoming	
  about	
  issues	
  than	
  were	
  they	
  under	
  the	
  gaze	
  of	
  
       the	
   lecturer	
   concerned.	
   Finally,	
   the	
   confidentiality	
   of	
   the	
   whole	
   process	
   can	
   be	
   reassuring	
   to	
   the	
  
       lecturer	
  who	
  has	
  volunteered	
  to	
  undertake	
  this	
  form	
  of	
  evaluation.	
  	
  
       	
  
       The	
   main	
   disadvantage	
   of	
   this	
   process	
   is	
   that	
   it	
   is	
   costly.	
   The	
   use	
   of	
   an	
   external	
   facilitator,	
   who	
  
       collates,	
  summarises	
  and	
  analyses	
  the	
  feedback	
  in	
  the	
  form	
  of	
  a	
  detailed	
  report,	
  requires	
  payment	
  
       which	
  to	
  date	
  has	
  been	
  provided	
  via	
  CELT	
  from	
  a	
  number	
  of	
  sources.	
  This	
  is	
  the	
  limiting	
  factor	
  in	
  
       scaling	
   such	
   a	
   process	
   and	
   presents	
   an	
   added	
   challenge	
   in	
   times	
   of	
   reduced	
   budgets.	
   Priority,	
  
       therefore,	
  is	
  given	
  to	
  those	
  staff	
  who	
  are	
  currently	
  undertaking	
  the	
  PgCert	
  in	
  Teaching	
  &	
  Learning	
  
       in	
  Higher	
  Education	
  for	
  which	
  this	
  process	
  is	
  compulsory.	
  	
  
       	
  
       There	
  is	
  of	
  course	
  no	
  reason	
  why	
  a	
  basic	
  version	
  of	
  such	
  a	
  process	
  cannot	
  be	
  undertaken	
  internally,	
  
       perhaps	
  facilitated	
  by	
  colleagues	
  from	
  within	
  or	
  outwith	
  the	
  school.	
  Trust	
  and	
  confidentiality	
  will	
  
       however	
  be	
  important	
  for	
  success.	
  	
  

       (4)	
  Partnerships	
  for	
  Learning	
  &	
  Teaching	
  (PLT)	
  -­‐	
  Peer	
  Review	
  and	
  Observation	
  	
  
       	
  
       PLT	
  partnerships	
  are	
  an	
  effective	
  and	
  informative	
  method	
  of	
  receiving	
  feedback	
  on	
  some	
  aspect	
  of	
  
       your	
  teaching	
  practice,	
  be	
  it	
  with	
  respect	
  to	
  a	
  lecture,	
  practical	
  session,	
  or	
  a	
  review	
  of	
  materials	
  or	
  
       resources	
  you	
  provide.	
  Typically,	
  an	
  academic	
  staff	
  member	
  will	
  pair	
  with	
  a	
  'critical	
  friend'	
  or	
  peer	
  
       who	
   agrees	
   to	
   attend	
   and	
   review	
   a	
   teaching	
   session	
   of	
   their	
   choosing,	
   and	
   this	
   is	
   then	
   reciprocated.	
  	
  
       The	
  issues	
  to	
  be	
  reviewed	
  or	
  observed	
  are	
  agreed	
  in	
  advance	
  and	
  then	
  a	
  final	
  feedback	
  discussion	
  is	
  
       held.	
  Those	
  who	
  have	
  previously	
  used	
  this	
  approach	
  have	
  found	
  it	
  to	
  be	
  highly	
  effective	
  and	
  a	
  direct	
  
       means	
   of	
   strengthening	
   collegiality	
   and	
   a	
   sense	
   of	
   mutual	
   support	
   in	
   a	
   non-­‐threatening	
   context.	
  
       Partners	
   are	
   often	
   paired	
   from	
   separate	
   disciplines	
   as	
   this	
   can	
   provide	
   refreshing	
   and	
   alternative	
  
       perspectives.	
  However,	
  it	
  can	
  also	
  be	
  advantageous	
  to	
  organise	
  such	
  within	
  related	
  cognate	
  fields,	
  
       particularly	
  if	
  the	
  content	
  of	
  the	
  teaching	
  event	
  under	
  review	
  is	
  a	
  major	
  focus.	
  The	
  reported	
  benefits	
  
       are	
   often	
   focused	
   on	
   the	
   value	
   of	
   observing	
   another	
   person's	
   approach	
   to	
   teaching,	
   rather	
   than	
  
       simply	
  having	
  one's	
  own	
  practice	
  subject	
  to	
  scrutiny.	
  	
  
	
  

       (5)	
  Simple	
  Progress	
  checks	
  	
  
       	
  
       The	
   usefulness	
   of	
   informal	
   checks	
   throughout	
   a	
   course/module	
   should	
   not	
   be	
   overlooked.	
   	
   For	
  
       example,	
   a	
   lot	
   can	
   be	
   gained	
   from	
   informal	
   discussion	
   with	
   students	
   and	
   class	
   representatives	
   be	
   it	
  
       at	
   the	
   end	
   of	
   a	
   lecture	
   or	
   in	
   tutorial/seminar	
   sessions.	
   	
   Checks	
   on	
   attendance	
   and	
   levels	
   of	
  
       participation	
  can	
  help	
  highlight	
  issues	
  that	
  may	
  need	
  more	
  attention	
  or	
  investigation.	
  Performance	
  
       on	
  tasks,	
  assignments	
  and	
  routine	
  assessments	
  also	
  of	
  course	
  provide	
  some	
  indication	
  as	
  to	
  student	
  
       progress,	
  which	
  can	
  be	
  combined	
  with	
  direct	
  and	
  indirect	
  feedback.	
  	
  

       (6)	
  The	
  Class	
  Rep	
  system	
  and	
  School	
  meetings	
  	
  
       	
  
       Student	
   nominated/elected	
   class	
   representatives	
   are	
   normally	
   invited	
   to	
   attend	
   School	
   meetings.	
  
       Ideally,	
  this	
  will	
  result	
  in	
  students	
  being	
  better	
  informed	
  of	
  School-­‐level	
  decisions	
  related	
  to	
  their	
  
       education.	
   	
   An	
   item	
   on	
   the	
   agenda	
   should	
   be	
   dedicated	
   to	
   student	
   issues	
   where	
   representatives	
  
       have	
   the	
   opportunity	
   to	
   highlight	
   and	
   discuss	
   matters	
   on	
   behalf	
   of	
   their	
   class.	
   	
   Class	
   reps	
   should	
  
       ensure	
  that	
  they	
  are	
  indeed	
  being	
  representative	
  of	
  the	
  feelings	
  of	
  their	
  colleagues	
  by	
  ensuring	
  that	
  
       they	
  consult	
  regularly	
  with	
  class	
  members	
  and	
  act	
  on	
  their	
  behalf.	
  	
  
       	
  
       The	
   Class	
   Reps	
   scheme	
   is	
   valuable	
   but	
   it	
   may	
   also	
   be	
   possible	
   to	
   consider	
   involving	
   students	
   at	
   a	
  
       more	
  direct	
  level	
  in	
  the	
  other	
  feedback	
  methods.	
  One	
  example	
  might	
  be	
  to	
  allow	
  the	
  student	
  reps	
  to	
  
       collate	
   and	
   summarise	
   the	
   feedback	
   from	
   module	
   questionnaires.	
   This	
   would	
   give	
   them	
   a	
   more	
  
       responsible	
  role	
  and	
  provide	
  a	
  greater	
  sense	
  of	
  ownership	
  in	
  the	
  process	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  raising	
  the	
  quite	
  
       legitimate	
  expectation	
  that	
  such	
  feedback	
  will	
  be	
  considered	
  and,	
  where	
  appropriate,	
  acted	
  upon	
  by	
  
       staff	
  members	
  or	
  at	
  the	
  School	
  level	
  as	
  appropriate.	
  	
  

       CELT	
                                                                        	
                                                                     	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  3	
  of	
  4	
  
Student	
  Feedback	
  

"Closing	
  the	
  Feedback	
  Loop"	
  	
  
	
  
Evaluation	
  of	
  modules	
  and	
  courses	
  is	
  sometimes	
  seen	
  as	
  an	
  add-­‐on	
  or	
  afterthought	
  to	
  a	
  course	
  or	
  
module,	
   when	
   in	
   fact	
   it	
   should	
   play	
   a	
   key	
   role	
   in	
   the	
   course	
   life-­‐cycle.	
   Furthermore,	
   in	
   an	
   age	
   in	
  
which	
  there	
  is	
  considerable	
  discussion	
  about	
  levels	
  of	
  student	
  engagement	
  in	
  the	
  learning	
  process,	
  
it	
   could	
   be	
   argued	
   that	
   the	
   evaluation	
   process	
   is	
   an	
   opportunity	
   for	
   the	
   development	
   of	
   a	
   greater	
  
sense	
  of	
  participation	
  and	
  student	
  responsibility.	
  	
  
	
  
For	
   both	
   these	
   reasons,	
   it	
   is	
   essential	
   that	
   the	
   results	
   of	
   feedback	
   and	
   the	
   actions	
   taken	
   in	
   response	
  
to	
   such	
   are	
   communicated	
   back	
   to	
   students.	
   This	
   demonstrates	
   the	
   value	
   of	
   participating	
   in	
   the	
  
process,	
   shows	
   that	
   the	
   School	
   and	
   academic	
   staff	
   are	
   responsive	
   and	
   reflective	
   practitioners.	
   Of	
  
course,	
   it	
   may	
   well	
   be	
   that	
   some	
   changes	
   suggested	
   by	
   students	
   are	
   not	
   feasible	
   or	
   appropriate,	
  but	
  
in	
   these	
   cases	
   it	
   is	
   even	
   more	
   important	
   to	
   let	
   the	
   students	
   know	
   why	
   or	
   what	
   the	
   practical	
  
constraints	
  may	
  be.	
  Reporting	
  back	
  should	
  be	
  to	
  students	
  who	
  participated	
  (and	
  not	
  just	
  comments	
  
to	
  new	
  cohorts),	
  even	
  if	
  they	
  are	
  now	
  moving	
  on	
  to	
  another	
  module	
  or	
  year	
  of	
  the	
  programme	
  and	
  
this	
  can	
  easily	
  be	
  done	
  by	
  email,	
  Blackboard	
  or	
  other	
  means.	
  	
  

Resources	
  	
  
	
  
Examples	
   of	
   feedback	
   questionnaires,	
   protocols	
   for	
   various	
   methods	
   and	
   other	
   relevant	
  
information	
   are	
   all	
   contained	
   in	
   the	
   NUI	
   Galway	
   Teaching	
   &	
   Learning	
   Forum	
   on	
   Blackboard	
  
(http://blackboard.nuigalway.ie/)	
   to	
   which	
   all	
   staff	
   have	
   access.	
   The	
   CELT	
   website	
  
(http://www.nuigalway.ie/celt)	
   should	
   also	
   prove	
   useful	
   and	
   details	
   workshops	
   and	
   training	
  
sessions	
  on	
  a	
  wide	
  range	
  of	
  topics	
  including	
  feedback	
  and	
  course	
  review.	
  	
  
	
  




CELT	
                                                                          	
                                                                       	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
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