Lesson Plan Guide - DOC by opza81

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									Grade: 9 Unit: 2                                                                                          Materials:
Section/Period: Merit/Honors                         Lesson Plan Guide                               “The Most Dangerous
                                            Writing to Inform: Mini-Unit Day 1 of 7                   Game” in textbook
Indicator:                                                                                           Notes/Power Point on
LA.E9.10.04f                                                                                          figurative language
LA.E9.10.03c                                                                                         Student notebook/
                                                                                                      journal
Objective:                                                                                           Images At Work
Students will be able to apply the reading process to a short story                                   handout
Students will be able to extract figurative language (metaphor, simile, hyperbole,
       Personification, imagery) from short story

Assessment:
Informal assessment of Images At Work handout; Teacher Observation


Scoring Tool:
Students have correctly identified figurative language within short story


Warm-Up:
   1. Discuss specific types of animals hunted and/or scavenger hunt, paintball, laser tag, etc. What types of feelings are
      associated with the hunter/prey? Expand by asking questions about feelings of excitement and also feelings of
      fear. Lead into “The Most Dangerous Game.” (10 min)

Guided Practice: (do it with help)
   2. Begin reading “TMDG,” applying and modeling the reading process using the Images At Work handout. Using the
       beginning of the text, model for students how to appropriately complete the handout. Give students two paragraphs
       to read silently and practice the activity individually. Review. (15 min.)

Independent Practice: (do it themselves)
    3. Continue activity through page 45 (1/3 of the story). (20 minutes)

Direct Instruction: (see it)
    4. After completing approx. 1/3 the story, review images chosen for the handout in groups of 4 or 5. (10 min.)
    5. As an entire class, provide direct instruction to class concerning figurative language elements: simile, metaphor,
        personification, imagery (15 min)

Guided Practice: (do it with help)
   6. Model for students how to pick out examples of simile, metaphor, personification, and imagery. Consider using as
       many or as few of the following examples as necessary: (10 min)
          a. “‟Can‟t see it,‟ remarked Rainsford, trying to peer through the dank tropical night that was palpable as it
              pressed its thick warm blackness in upon the yacht” (metaphor) – Page 40
          b. „Ugh! It‟s like moist black velvet‟ (simile) – Page 40
          c. “The sea was as flat as a plate-glass window” (simile) – Page 40
          d. “The night would be my eyelids” (metaphor) – Page 41
          e. “It was like trying to see through a blanket” (simile) – Page 42)
          f. “Ten minutes of determined effort brought another sound to his ears – the most welcome he had ever
              heard – the muttering and growling of the sea breaking on a rocky shore.” (personification) – Page 43
Independent Practice: (do it themselves)

    7. Pair students and identify further images produced either on the handouts or from the pages read in the book.
       Assign groups to find and label at least one example of each type of figurative language. Allow each group to
       present their findings. (20 min)

Closure:
Students predict ending of short story on exit slip. Hand in when leaving classroom.

Homework:
Complete Creating Similes activity
Grade: 9 Unit: 2                                                                                               Materials:
Section/Period: Merit/Honors                          Lesson Plan Guide                                   “The Most Dangerous
                                             Writing to Inform: Mini-Unit Day 2 of 7                       Game”
Indicator:                                                                                                notes/ppt on figurative
LA.E9.10.04f                                                                                               language
LU #36                                                                                                    student
LA.9.10.02                                                                                                 notebook/journal
                                                                                                          LU handbooks
Objective:                                                                                                Places and Product
Students will effectively combine sentences to create varied patterns                                      Handout
Students will be able to create brainstorming chart to provide prewriting ideas for brochure

Assessment:
Formal assessment of homework
Informal assessment of paired work


Scoring Tool:
Students have effectively combined sentences

Warm-Up:
   3. Discuss the reading from yesterday. Set a purpose for students to recognize and label noted figurative language
      from yesterday. Review examples to model this activity. (10 min)

Guided Practice: (do it with help)
   4. Complete another 1/3 of TMDG reading using the same process as yesterday. After reading, discuss pieces
       students picked out from their graphic organizer. Consider pulling examples from text as well. (20-25 min)

Direct Instruction: (see it)
    5. Check and review homework from yesterday, pulling multiple examples of student work.
    6. Teacher provides direct instruction on LU #36, combining basic sentence patterns together to create varied patterns
        (25 min)

Guided Practice: (do it with help)
   7. In pairs, students will effectively combine sentences from homework sheets (10 min)
   8. Teacher aides students in making connection about how the author of TMDG helps create the visual through
       figurative language. Discuss with students how well they represented themselves via the homework assignment
       last night.

Independent Practice: (do it themselves)
    9. Using the Places and Products handout, have students brainstorm a list of places they‟ve been or places they can
        conjure with their imaginations, as well as products they are particularly interested in or which pertain to them in
        some way.
    10. Students will narrow down list to one place and one product that they are drawn to
    11. Following quick discussion with partner, students will narrow down list to only ONE place or product

Closure:
Students must compose sentence with at least one type of figurative language pertaining to place or product of choice on
exit ticket

Homework:
Bring in materials (picture, product, element) pertaining to product or place of interest to the student
Grade: 9 Unit: 2                                                                                         Materials:
Section/Period: Merit/Honors                         Lesson Plan Guide                              “The Most Dangerous
                                            Writing to Inform: Mini-Unit Day 3 of 7                  Game” in textbook
                                                                                                    notes/ppt on figurative
Indicator: 9.20.06a; 9.10.02; 9.10.04                                                                language
                                                                                                    student
Objective:                                                                                           notebook/journal
Students will be able to apply the reading process to a short story
Students will be able to extract figurative language (metaphor, simile, hyperbole,
       Personification, imagery) from short story
Students will able to create a metaphor to describe a selected place.

Assessment:
Teacher Observation, student journal

Scoring Tool:
Informal assessment of student group work and journal

Warm-Up:
Why did you choose the place or product you did? What about this place/product is attractive to you? What specifically
makes you want to go back for another visit or buy this product again and again?

Direct Instruction: (see it)
    1. Complete the final 1/3 of TMDG reading using the same process as yesterday. (15-20 min.)
        After reading, discuss pieces students picked out from their graphic organizer. Consider pulling examples from text
        as well.
    2. Introduce the end-product (the brochure) to the students. Sharing the goal should guide the students during their
        pre-writing process. (5-10 min.)
    3. Provide students with instruction on journaling as a pre-writing technique and begin the prewriting process.
        Students should have their photos or items they were assigned to bring and journal about them. Be sure to include
        direction that instructs students to write down all ideas, thoughts, keywords, pictures, etc. without worrying about
        sentences or paragraphs. Pre-writing is simply the gathering of ideas. Tell students to be prepared to share their
        work. (5 min.)
    4. After the journaling, instruct students that they will either be sharing their journal with one person or with a larger
        group aloud. Differentiate here based on student preference/ability/level. (5-10 min.)

Guided Practice: (do it with help)
   5. Consider putting the pairs on one side of the room and larger groups on the other side of the room. Assign ALL
       students to keep a list (possibly in their journal?) of adjectives or imagery words they hear from their partner/group
       that were effective. This will help students to create a “bank” of more effective words to use in descriptive writing.
       (10 min.)

Direct Instruction: (see it)
    6. Begin instruction on creating metaphors to create imagery using the following example: “Camden Yards is a
        tsunami of waves, “yay!”s, and smoky barbeque.” Instruct students to use their homework lists from yesterday to
        create one of these for their selected place. You may need to provide more scaffolding or examples for students or
        even dissect the above example; i.e. – “What words or phrases in this example help you to “see” Camden Yards?
        What do you see when you think of your selected place? What can you do to help others see it the way you do
        without traveling there?” (15 min.)

 Guided Practice: (do it with help)
    7. Allow students some time to create their own metaphor for their chosen place. Be careful about requiring that this is
       due within 10 minutes. Honors students may be capable of this, but merit students may need more time. Give
       some time to come up with ideas and think. Circulate throughout the room during this process. Ask students who
       do finish to share their examples with the class, and assign those who need more time for to finish for homework.
       (10 min.)

Direct Instruction: (see it)
    8. Provide students with several examples of brochures of places and/or informative pamphlets on a product. Discuss
        with the class and keep a list of what is present in each of these. (5 min.) Some online examples may include:
            a. http://www.buythebullet.com/howitworks.php (The Magic Bullet)
            b. http://www.capri.com/en/grotta-azzurra (The Isle of Capri)
            c. http://visitmaryland.org/Central/Pages/Destinations.aspx (Visit Maryland)

Guided Practice: (do it with help)
   9. Put students into pairs or group of 4-5 to review an individual brochure. Ask them to find specific pieces of
       information and also to comment on what they notice as effective. Have them look for such things as imagery,
       similes, metaphors, personification hyperbole, etc. (10 min.)

Closure:
Ask students to summarize the pieces of a good brochure. Collect or discuss as a class.

Homework:
Place or product must be selected by tomorrow, as work on the brochure will begin. Students must locate and bring at least
two-four additional pieces of information concerning chosen topic.
Grade: 9 Unit: 2                                                                                                Materials:
Section/Period: Merit/Honors                             Lesson Plan Guide                              “The Death of Benny
                                                Writing to Inform: Mini-Unit Day 4 of 7                  Paret” or other nonfiction
Indicators: 9.10.04                                                                                      descriptive essay
            9.30.01c                                                                                    -notes/ppt on figurative
                                                                                                         language (if needed for
Objectives:                                                                                              reteaching)
Students will be able to extract figurative language (metaphor, simile, hyperbole,                      student notebook/journal
       personification, imagery) from a short story                                                     Favorite Places and
Students will explain the meaning of examples of figurative language                                     Products organizer
Students will complete questions to use as pre-writing for their brochures                              Other materials gathered
                                                                                                         for brochure by students
Assessment: Figurative Language Sheet for “The Most Dangerous Game”

Scoring Tool: BCR Rubric

Warm-Up: Ask students to think about real-life experiences and to journal/note/discuss with a classmate the most vivid
images that remain from that incident. Ask for a few volunteers to share responses. (10 minutes)

Direct Instruction: (see it)
    1. Explain that figurative language to describe is also present in nonfiction writing. Use an example of a nonfiction
        descriptive essay such as “The Death of Benny Paret” by Norman Mailer, originally published in Esquire, a
        nonfiction, first person account of a boxing match to students. Consider reading it as a class. (10 minutes)
Guided Practice: (do it with help)
    2. Model for students how to pick out examples of figurative language. Have them underline and label each example
        they notice in the nonfiction descriptive essay. Discuss how the examples of figurative language create visual
        pictures for the reader. (10 minutes)
    3. Afterward, have students discuss in pairs and/or create a BCR answering how the examples of figurative language
        help create a visual for the reader. (10-15 minutes)
Independent Practice: (do it themselves)
    4. Students independently complete the figurative language assessment titled “The Most Dangerous Game” and
        Figurative Language. Consider using the BCR rubric to score. (10 minutes)
    5. Afterward, have students discuss in pairs and/or create a BCR answering how the examples of figurative language
        help create a visual for the reader. (10 minutes)

Direct Instruction: Review what students did in groups yesterday (pieces of a good brochure). Explain that they will be
completing their own brochures about either a specific place and/or product. Provide a list of scaffolding questions for
students to plan out what will be included in the brochure. (10 minutes) Some examples may be:
                                   PLACE
                        Physical description of the place
                        Types of food available
                        Types of transportation most convenient in environment
                        Suggestions for daily activities
                        Tips for daily travel/dealing with locals
                        Etc.

                                    PRODUCT
                              What the product is used for
                              How to use the product in general
                              Techniques for a specific result (i.e. – using a hair product to achieve a certain style)
                         Demonstrations
                         Customer Reviews
                         Etc.

Guided Practice: (do it with help): Have students use their Favorite Places and Products Organizer and the
supplementary information they were asked to locate/note as homework the night before in order to start answering some of
the scaffolding questions with a peer. As they discuss, they can add to their organizers and move to the back of the page if
they need to do so. (10 minutes)

Independent Practice: (do it themselves): Students independently work on their scaffolding questions. (10 minutes)


Closure: Ask a few students to share answers to the scaffolding questions. (5 minutes)


Homework: Have students complete answering the scaffolding questions.
Grade: 9 Unit: 2                                                                                         Materials:
Section/Period: Merit/Honors                         Lesson Plan Guide                               “The Most Dangerous
                                            Writing to Inform: Mini-Unit Day 5 of 7                   Game” reading
Indicator:                                                                                           LU Lesson #26
LA.E09.20.02                                                                                         Notebook
LU #26

Objective:
Students will be able to apply the writing process to the informative brochure
Students will be able to extract figurative language (metaphor, simile, hyperbole,
       Personification, imagery) from short story

Assessment:
Informal evaluation of drafting/editing process
Completed Scaffolding Homework from yesterday

Scoring Tool:
Completed Teacher‟s Guide of LU #26


Warm-Up:
Check scaffolding questions homework. Oral discussion- what unexpected aspects turned up in examining your product
and place in depth? Why might these “hidden” aspects be important in developing a brochure? Direct student attention to
how less obvious facts might make a brochure more interesting and compelling. (5 minutes)

Direct Instruction: (see it)
    1. Explain to students that they are currently in the Drafting stage of the writing process. Explain that they will actually
        be writing what may end up on their brochure, so they should try to organize brainstormed ideas into sentences and
        paragraphs. As the teacher, be wary of enforcing strict silence during this process as some students may need to
        ask questions or bounce ideas off of others or you before writing. Use your discretion in assigning groups to
        complete this process. Be sure to remind students to answer the questions gone over during the scaffolding
        process yesterday and to consider the audience who will be reading the brochure (you may want to create a list of
        who will be the audience for merit students). (10 minutes)

Guided Practice: (do it with help)
   2. At this point, allow time for students to complete the drafting piece of the writing process for their brochure. As the
       teacher, be wary of enforcing strict silence during this process as some students may need to ask questions or
       bounce ideas off of others or you before writing. Encourage students to go back to the original model, “The Most
       Dangerous Game,” to compare their writing. Use your discretion in assigning groups to complete this process. (20
       minutes)

Direct Instruction: (see it)
    3. Complete LU Lesson #26: Clarify ideas through logical coordination and subordination of ideas. (25 minutes)

Independent Practice: (do it themselves)
    4. Allow students to go back to today‟s draft and make changes that incorporate skills from Lesson #26. (10 minutes).

Direct Instruction: (see it)
    5. Instruct your students on the editing piece of the writing process. Depending on the level, you may direct them to
        specific areas. For example, instead of telling students they are responsible for finding all errors in mechanics,
        assign them to look for misplaced commas. Remind students that they should locate any errors in spelling,
        mechanics, and transitions. Show an example of each of these. (5 minutes)

Guided Practice: (do it with help)
   6. Put students with a partner to finish the editing process. (10 minutes)

Closure:
Use some time for reflection of the process completed so far. Have students assess how their writing has gotten better
specifically for this assignment. How did the brainstorming process help organize their thoughts? How did the editing
process help make their writing better?

Homework:
If not done so already, completed rough draft of brochure must be done for class tomorrow
Grade: 9 Unit: 2                                                                                          Materials:
Section/Period: Merit/Honors                         Lesson Plan Guide                                Peer Checklist
                                            Writing to Inform: Mini-Unit Day 6 of 7                   Computer lab
Indicator: 9.20.02; 9.30.08c                                                                          “The Death of Benny
                                                                                                       Paret” or other
                                                                                                       nonfiction descriptive
Objective:                                                                                             essay
Students will be able to apply the reading process to a short story                                   Brochure samples
Students will be able to extract figurative language (metaphor, simile, hyperbole,
       Personification, imagery) from short story

Assessment:
Brochure, group work on word impact, individual work on word impact

Scoring Tool:
Informal assessment of group work/individual work; brochure rubric (Use FCPS ECR Rubric)

Warm-Up:
Discuss with students the most important qualities of a good peer editor. What is a peer editor‟s responsibility?

Direct Instruction: (see it)
    1. Hand out the Peer Checklist to students. Explain that they should check to be sure their partner incorporated
        everything listed on the Peer Checklist. Remind students that they will definitely need to read through the draft
        more than once. (5 minutes)

Guided Practice: (do it with help)
   2. Pair students to go through the drafts and check a peer‟s work using the Peer Checklist. Circulate throughout the
       room to be sure students are on task. (10 minutes)

Direct Instruction: (see it)
    3. Review the elevated language in “The Death of Benny Paret” (or the essay you used) and in the brochure samples
        that students have looked at (you may want to print these out from the websites visited on day 3). Identify for
        students that the most effective language is not when the author uses words like “nice” or “good.” Show them a
        specific piece of the writing that you find effective descriptively and highlight or underline the words that are
        elevated, thereby creating that extra bit. (5 minutes)

Guided Practice: (do it with help)
   4. In pairs, have students extract powerful words themselves from one of the samples. Ask students to extract at least
       5 as a pair (they should write these down), but also to be prepared to share one aloud to the class. As the teacher,
       circulate around the room, reading over examples that students are writing down. Come together as a class, and
       choose groups you feel have great examples to read theirs aloud. (10 minutes) *Because pairs are used
       frequently within this unit, you might want to spend a few minutes on the first few days of school assigning students
       to different pairs. One way to do this is to allow students to choose 4 partners (partner a, partner b, partner c,
       partner d), so that when you assign pair work, you simply need to assign partner b and the students know where to
       go; be sure to have students write down their partners to keep them straight. Another option is to pre-assign
       students who sit relatively close together, thereby minimizing extra movement and time out of the lesson.

Independent Practice: (do it themselves)
    5. Have students go through their own brochure individually to adjust word choice for impact. (10 minutes)
    6. Allow time in a computer lab to work on the final draft of the brochure. Remind students about technological tools
       that might be of use to them (thesaurus in Word, dictionary.com, etc.) Circulate throughout the lab to help students
        with various issues that may arise. (45 minutes) *Another option that will help with timing of the lesson is to choose
        3 or 4 students who you feel are technologically advanced or savvy. At the beginning of class one day, ask them to
        come to your desk and show each of them how to get into Microsoft Publisher and choose the correct format to use
        for the assignment. Allow each one to try it alone to be sure they can do it. When you take your class to the lab,
        you know have 4 or 5 people who can help students get into the appropriate program.*



Closure:
Orally review the best word revisions students made today! (5 minutes)

Homework:
None
Grade: 9 Unit: 2                                                                                     Materials:
Section/Period: Merit/Honors                         Lesson Plan Guide                           Computer lab
                                            Writing to Inform: Mini-Unit Day 7 of 7

*This lesson is less structured for time so that classes needing more time on other
activities will have time to catch up. If your class has finished each day on time, you
may need to plan an additional piece to this lesson plan.

Indicator:
9.30.08c

Objective:
The student will finish the descriptive brochure
The student with peer edit another student‟s brochure

Assessment:
Descriptive brochure, peer editing

Scoring Tool:
FCPS ECR Rubric, Informal Observation of peer editing.

Warm-Up:
Have a brief review of the goal of the descriptive brochure. (5 minutes)

Independent Practice: (do it themselves)
    1. Allow students approximately 30-50 minutes in the computer lab today to finish the brochures. Again, circulate
       throughout the room to ensure that all students are working well and are on the right track.
    2. Upon completion, allow 10 minutes for peers editing. Allow a final 5 minutes for students to change anything that
       their peer editor found that may need to be changed.

Closure:
What was the most difficult part of the writing process for you? What was the easiest?


Homework:
None
                                          Creating Similes

       A simile is a figure of speech that uses a comparison to create meaning for the reader. A
simile is a direct comparison of two things that uses the word like or as.

       If I say that the students swarmed through the hallway like ants, I am using a simile. If I
said instead that the students rushed through the hallways like zebras that shows a different
picture. I could also say that the students thundered through the hallway like rhinoceroses.
Each simile creates a different meaning.

       You are going to use the exercise below to create some similes that help show the reader
something about you. For each pair of items listed, decide which one you think fits you better.
Write one sentence comparing yourself to that item, and one more sentence telling why that
item fits you.

Example: Glass of Milk or Cup of Coffee?

I am more like a cup of coffee.               or     I am more like a glass of milk.
I am energetic and sort of complicated.              I am very healthy and clean.

Serene Pond or Rushing River?



Turtle or Rabbit?



Sneakers or Dress Shoes?



Mountain or Valley?



Sun or Moon?



Now, on the back of this sheet, create three more similes of your very own!
                                        Favorite Places and Products

                    Objectives: Chart favorite places and products
                                Use description to help create an image

              Directions: Brainstorm your favorite places and products. List them below.

     Places                                        Products




Now, select one from each column. Write as many descriptive words and phrases as you can think of to
help SHOW what you have chosen!
      Place:                                     Product:
Name ___________________________


                      “The Most Dangerous Game” and Figurative Language

Look at the following excerpts from the story ―The Most Dangerous Game‖ and answer the questions
for each. Think carefully and do your very best work!

1. ―Sometimes I think evil is a tangible thing—with wavelengths, just as sound and light have. An evil
place can, so to speak, broadcast vibrations of evil.‖

The author is making a direct comparison of evil with sound and light, using the words like or as,
which is called a(n) ___________________ .

In your own words, explain in what ways evil could be like sound and light:

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________


2. ―All he knew was that he was safe from his enemy, the sea, and that utter weariness was upon him.‖

The author is making a comparison of the sea to some type of enemy, which is called a(n)
________________________.

In your own words, explain in what ways the sea feels like some type of enemy to the man.

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________
3. ―The lights of the chateau were out now, and it was dark and silent, but there was a fragment of
sallow moon, and by its wan light he could see, dimly, the courtyard; there, weaving in and out in the
pattern of shadow, were black, noiseless forms; the hounds heard him at the window and looked up,
expectantly, with their green eyes.‖

The author is using words here to create a vivid picture for the reader, which is called a(n)
___________________ .

In your own words, explain something that this description helps you ―see.‖

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________


4. ―Following the trail with the sureness of a bloodhound came General Zaroff.‖

The author is making a comparison of General Zaroff to a bloodhound, which is called a(n)
________________________.

In your own words, explain in what ways the General Zaroff could be like a bloodhound.

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________
                      Images at Work: Identifying Sensory Details Connected to Plot

Short Story Title:                                                          Author:

Directions:  Complete the timeline.
             When you encounter a main event, summarize it under the first arrow.
             Under your summary sentence, QUOTE two images (Don’t forget to include page numbers!)
             from that section in the reading.
             Under that, draw a picture to help show what is occurring.
   ________________________________________________________________________________



One to Two Sentence
Summary:




Two DIRECT Quotes from the
Text –
These Must Show Imagery!




Original Picture to
Help Show the Imagery


								
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