Solomon (PowerPoint download)

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					COLLABORATIVES STRIKE
     THE MATCH


 INTERACTING WITH DATA AND
   EACH OTHER TO PREPARE
         TEACHERS
        Pearl Solomon: psolomon@stac.edu, Robert Searson rsearson@stac.edu,
   Gerardo Iturrino: iturrino@ldeo.columbia.edu , David Fried dfried@ercsd.k-12.ny.us
          THE COLLABORATIVE
          PARTNERS

                                           PEARL SOLOMON AND ROBERT SEARSON
                                                PROFESSORS OF EDUCATION
                                               ST. THOMAS AQUINAS COLLEGE
                                                          STAC


       DAVID FRIED         SHELDON SILVER AND WILLIAM SCHMALZ         GERARDO ITURRINO                JACK CHIRIKJIAN
ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT               PRINCIPALS             LAMONT-DOHERTY EARTH OBSERVATORY GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY-EDVOTEK
  EAST RAMAPO SCHOOLS             PARKRIDGE SCHOOLS                  COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
        NEW YORK                       NEW JERSEY                           LDEO
MAJOR PROJECTS AND
     FINDINGS

FROM PRESERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
STUDENTS TO GRADUATE STUDENTS
             AND
     IN-SERVICE TEACHERS
    The RENEW Model

R Recruit the best teachers
E Educate them
N Nurture them as they begin to
   practice
E Educate them again as the need for
   change develops
W Watch them and learn
EARTH SYSTEMS FOR
UNDERGRADUATES
  EARTH SYSTEMS COURSE FOR UNDERGRADUATES TAUGHT BY
ST. THOMAS AQUINAS (STAC) FACULTY AND LAMONT-DOHERTY
SCIENTISTS

PURPOSES AND ACTION COMPONENTS
  SHARED RESEARCH DATA
  SHARED INSTRUCTIONAL DATA–BASED ACTIVITIES WITH
   CONCURRENT COLUMBIA COURSE
  SMALL GROUP MEETINGS WITH TEACHING CANDIDATES


FINDINGS:
    STUDENT INTEREST IN LEARNING SCIENCE OR SCIENCE AS A
     LIFE ENDEAVOR IS WEAK
    STUDENT ATTITUDES SEEM UNRELATED TO SCHOOLS ATTENDED
     OR PREVIOUS LEVELS OF SUCCESS AS STUDENTS
    STUDENTS SEEM UNINTERESTED IN LEARNING SCIENCE AS
     INQUIRY
            STUDENT ATTITUDES TOWARD
                LEARNING SCIENCE



Item                                            COLUMBIA STAC
Taking science classes                             1.9     1.9
Learning new science ideas                         1.2     1.5
Working in science labs                            2.4     1.8
Talking about science with classmates              2.2      2
Pursuing a career related to science               2.9     2.7
Taking more science classes                        2.5     2.4
Reading articles or books about science            1.8     2.1
Looking at scientific data                         2.4     2.1
Sharing my own science observations with others    2.2     2.1
              LOOKING AT STUDENT DATA
          ATTITUDES ABOUT LEARNING SCIENCE

                                 COLUMBIA and STAC STUDENT ATTITUDES




 3


2.5


  2
                                                                           COLUMBIA
                                                                           STAC
1.5


  1
                                                                  DEPTH OF INTEREST

 0.5


      0
          1   2   3                                               STAC
                      4      5
                                      6                         COLUMBIA
                      ITEM                  7
                                                   8
                                                          9
 EARTH2CLASS
    LDEO-COLUMBIA AND STAC PROGRAM FOR
            INSERVICE TEACHERS
PURPOSES:
  Trainselected cohorts of teachers from the New York
  metropolitan area and elsewhere to:
        enhance content knowledge in the Earth Sciences
     develop skills to incorporate improved electronic and
     hands-on investigations
     increase student achievement on elementary,
     middle,and high school mandated assessment tests
    EARTH2CLASS
    Action Components
 Develop and revise www.earth2class.org web resources and curricular
materials to serve as a more effective basis for teacher-scientist interactions.
 Train and support research scientists to develop additional instructional
materials (print and electronic) correlated to state and national science education
standards.
 Select and train approximately thirty-five participating teachers from New
York City and other districts in Westchester and Rockland Counties in NY as
well as Bergen, Essex, and Hudson Counties in NJ.
 Create two follow-up programs for curricular development based on E2C
workshops.
 Design and carry out formative evaluation plans.
 Expanded dissemination of curricular materials through professional
conferences, DLESE, and other venues.
        EARTH2CLASS
2003 - 2004 Earth2Class Program

Sept 20, „03 Gerard Bond & Rusty Lotti: “Studying Climate Change Using the LDEO Deep
Sea Sample Repository”
Oct. 4, „03 LDEO Open House
Oct. 25, „03 Arthur Lerner-Lam: “Living with Earthquakes”
Nov. 15, „03 Martin Visbeck: "What Can Ocean Temperatures Tell Us about Climate in the
Southern Hemisphere?" & Michael Studinger: "Uncovering the Secrets of Lake Vostok"
Dec. 13, „03 Nicole Davi: “Learning from Tree Rings”
Jan. 24, „04 Gerardo Iturrino: “Structure and composition of the oceanic crust ”
Feb. 14, „04 Dorothy Peteet: “Marsh Archives of the Hudson Estuary”
Mar. 20, „04 Christopher Small: “Exploring the Southern Oceans with Ships and
Satellites” & Gregory Mountain: “Beneath the Ocean Floor: What Do We Know and How
Do We Know It?”
Apr. 17, „04 Dallas Abbott: “Historical Impact Craters” & Dee Breger: “Exploring the
Microworld”
May 8, „04 Jeffrey Weissel: “Using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to Map Natural
Hazards and Disasters.”
       Teacher Participant Comments


I will definitely use the power point, the Hudson river links and the
Stevens institution lesson of water resources
I would like to see a quick time movie of a few minutes of the guest
scientist sharing what they do and what they love about their work.
It would be great to share with students to inspire them and show
them that scientists are real people
Resources: I loved the Stevens Institution curriculum!!!!!
Interaction: Dr. Peteet was enthusiastic and knowledgeable about her
topic. She would make a great role model for students.
Please get a movie link to her talking about what she loves to study.
EARTH2CLASS
Teacher Participant Comments




 Workshops are organized and well planned
 Presenters are good and content knowledgeable
 Student learning activities that included physical
 oceanographic information were newly discovered
 Level of materials presented was difficult, but discussion
 session made it understandable.
 Teacher’s guide and activities would be used with their
 students
 Workshops would be recommended to other teachers.
      EARTH2CLASS
      Teacher Participant Comments


    I plan on teaching by using many aspects of the Hudson river and link
to earth2class for this marsh presentation. This topic is great for showing
effects that people have had on the environment (deforestation, marsh
reduction, climate change). I think it would fall under standard 7.

 I was amazed to see how much of the marsh environment has
been destroyed by development. The map of the historical location
of marshes was most useful. It is difficult to select an item that is
least useful.

Interdisciplinary problem solving - key idea: consider
environmental and social implications of various solutions to an
environmental earth resource problem.
  PROJECT STEF

  PROJECT STEF (SCIENCE TEACHERS ENSURE THE
                     FUTURE)
Action Components:
  ENCOURAGING TEACHERS TO BE ROLE MODELS
  FOR FUTURE TEACHERS

     SUMMER INSTITUTE
     PLANNING MEETINGS
     JOINT CONFERENCE: NAGT AND NEW YORK STATE
      SCIENCE CONGRESS
PROJECT ERAP
EAST RAMAPO ASSESSMENT PROJECT
Purposes
   To improve the student achievement in
    mathematics, K-8, in the East Ramapo
    schools
    To reorganize curriculum and make it more
    specific
   To prepare and administer curriculum-
    matched proximal assessments.
   To help teachers use the results of these tests to
    diagnose and respond to student needs.
Action components:
In order to achieve a useful match between the curriculum,
   instruction and assessments:
      2001
            Specific designed-down Grade Level Objectives, organized
             by Key Ideas, were created from more general State
             curriculum documents.

      2002
            These were then organized for each grade into curriculum
             maps (units with timeframes and specific objectives).

      2002-2004
            For each unit, the essential performance objectives were
             sequenced into test specifications for each assessment.
            Groups of teachers wrote assessments.
            Each test item was matched to a specific content-based
             expectation.
    2002-2004
     Each assessment includes a group performance
      component, as well as an assortment of
      questions that require different levels of
      cognitive demand.
     The group performance and individual
      assessment contain extended response items
      are graded with carefully constructed rubrics.
     The tests were constructed by 44 grade-level
      teachers working in pairs.

   Editing:
        1. Math coordinators and consultant, Pearl
           Solomon
        2. Dr. Solomon and Assistant Superintendent
           David Fried
Dissemination and Evaluation:


 Each test is disseminated
 electronically as a draft to
 grade level teachers, who are
 asked for revisions and
 feedback.
 Following administration the
 results are recorded,
 analyzed and shared.
PRODUCTS AND FINDINGS
By the end of April, 2004 we will have
completed approximately 75 of these in
grades K-8.
Test construction and analyses has
revealed specific deficiencies that are
being addressed.
Two of the district’s elementary schools
were on the list of most improved
schools in the state. Only four
elementary schools in the county were
on the list for math.
                                East Ramapo Test Results
                                New York State Math Tests

                       Percent of Students Performing at Each Level


4=Exceeding standards 3=Meeting standards 2= Just below standards 1= Far below standards



                                  Level         2001         2002         2003

                 Grade            3/4           57%          55%          67%
                   4
                                  2             28%          33%          24%

                                  1             14%          12%          9%

                 Grade            3/4           32%          34%          37%
                   8
                                  2             34%          40%          39%

                                  1             34%          26%          25%
            East Ramapo Test Results
Districtwide Standardized Math Test (TerraNova)
           Median National Percentile




     Grade     2001      2002      2003


     3         53.3      59.7      67.3


     5         50.0      54.6      55.1


     6         52.4      55.1      59.3


     7         50.6      53.9      49.9
PARK RIDGE
Purposes:
   To improve student achievement in
  mathematics
   To provide professional development
  opportunities for teachers that:
     Improve their own math knowledge
     Concentrate on teaching math with understanding

     Call attention to the expectations of the curriculum
PARK RIDGE
Action Components
 Analyses of state test results
 Identification of specific needs such as problem
  solving and explanations of concepts
 Curriculum revision

 Demonstration lessons
Products and Findings
Curriculum is reorganized into teacher-
friendly units
Curriculum includes designed down
embedded concepts and skills needed to
achieve expectations
Time is allocated to cover all needed topics
Teachers respond to demonstration lessons
by incorporating observed strategies
          State Disaggregated Data vs. Park Ridge




                Partially Proficient Adv.
                Proficient           Proficient
Statewide           32%          42.8%             25.2%
White             21.4%          47.1%             31.5%
Students
Park Ridge        11.8%          48.2%              40%

  Source: NJ Assessment of Skills and Knowledge – Cycle 1-
  Preliminary Reports
Comparing Statewide and Park Ridge Distributions
      Total Points and Just-proficient Scores



            Number       Geometry and Patterns/
            Sense        Measurement Algebra
            Numerical
            Operations
Total       13.0         10.0          9.0
possible.
points.
Statewide   7.7          4.5           4.8
Average
Park Ridge 9.9           6.2           6.6
Average
Comparing Statewide and Park Ridge Distributions
       Total Points and Just-proficient Scores


              Data /         Problem        Knowledge
              Probability/   Solving
              Discreet
              Math
Total            10.0            20.0           42.0
possible
points
Statewide         5.0            5.0            22.0
Average
Park Ridge        7.4            7.4            30.0
Average
 Source: NJ Assessment of Skills and Knowledge – Cycle 1-
 Preliminary Reports
Score Range Comparison – NJASK – Grade 4 East Brook



   Score Range      2001-2002          2002-2003

     240-249             3%                10%

     230-239            15%                10%

     220-229            11%                5%

     200-219            11%                18%

        Source: NJ Assessment of Skills and Knowledge –
        Cycle 1- Preliminary Reports
Score Range Comparison – NJASK – Grade 4 West
Ridge


   Score Range      2001-2002         2002-2003

     240-249            17%               22%

     230-239            11%               31%

     220-229            22%               14%

     200-219            44%               33%

         Source: NJ Assessment of Skills and Knowledge –
         Cycle 1- Preliminary Reports
           Staff Development Demonstration Lessons



“University-based professional development schools (PDS)
may be a remedy. University-based professional
development schools are inching closer to a better or more
equitable outcome for schools involved in well conceived
partnerships. McConnell, Bruneau, Barbour & Ambrose
(1991) define the professional development school in its
broadest interactive sense as one “in which classroom
teachers and university faculty work collaboratively to better
understand teaching and learning.”

                                     Source: “Project Smart”
       Staff Development Demo Lesson Advantages



•Long Term, sustained professional development
•Conceptual v. Skills based approach
•Teacher Friendly
•Teacher ownership of the process of change
•Teachers become an integral part of the process
•Supported administrative assistance
•Conducted in a real classroom setting
•Training and curriculum Standards based
•Expose teachers to training conducted by experts
              Curriculum Development Process


Review the State Standards
Define that to be taught at each grade level
Develop the indicators to address Standards at each level
Uncover the “embedded concepts”
Develop classroom activities to support the indicators
Develop the assessment
Provide increased Manipulative materials
On-going training

				
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posted:11/24/2011
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