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AS M S - T F / R E G                                   Date    : May 22, 2001
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ASMS-TF
Regulatory Issues

Date:                      May 2001
Source:                    Vice Chairman
Title:                     Regulatory Issues
Agenda item:
Document for:




                              Decision        X
                              Discussion      X
                              Information


This document contains the Regulatory Issues to be drafted during the activity of the Steering
Panel of ASMS-TF.

This document was updated with the various contributions received from different sources in
order to finalise the drafting of its content.
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                    Internal Report
              On Regulatory Issue of the
      Advanced Satellite Mobile System Task Force

  REGULATORY FRAMEWORK FOR
FUTURE MOBILE SATELLITE SYSTEMS
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                                                      Table of Contents
1     Introduction ........................................................................................................................ 5
    1.1 Intellectual property rights .............................................................................................. 5
    1.2 Scope of the document .................................................................................................. 5
    1.3 Definitions, symbols and abbreviations .......................................................................... 6
      1.3.1 Definitions ............................................................................................................... 6
      1.3.2 Symbols .................................................................................................................. 6
      1.3.3 Abbreviations .......................................................................................................... 6
    1.4 Reference Documents ................................................................................................... 6
2     Spectrum and Orbit Resources ......................................................................................... 7
    2.1 Frequency Band Allocations .......................................................................................... 7
    2.2 Orbits ............................................................................................................................. 8
    2.3 Capacity Issues .............................................................................................................. 9
3     Regulatory Requirements ................................................................................................ 10
    3.1 Regulatory framework for UMTS satellite component .................................................. 10
      3.1.1 Frequency bands harmonisation ........................................................................... 10
      3.1.2 One-Stop-Shopping Procedure ............................................................................. 11
    3.2 A possible regulatory framework applicable to S-DAB systems ................................... 12
      3.2.1 Frequency bands harmonisation ........................................................................... 12
      3.2.2 ITU Frequency Bands Allocations For BSS(S) / S-DAB Use ................................ 13
      3.2.3 The Development of Competitive S-DAB Service In Europe Will Be Prevented ... 14
      3.2.4 No Justification for Additional Allocation of L-band Spectrum to T-DAB ............... 15
      3.2.5 Re-Use of Existing L-band T-DAB Blocks & Access To Additional VHF Spectrum
      Can Satisfy T-DAB Requirements ................................................................................... 16
    3.3 Licensing Conditions and Procedures .......................................................................... 18
      3.3.1 International Circulation of Terminals .................................................................... 18
      3.3.2 Fees and Charges ................................................................................................ 18
    3.4 International Harmonization of Regulatory Regimes .................................................... 18
      3.4.1 Mutual Recognition of Licensing ........................................................................... 18
      3.4.2 Mutual Recognition of Terminal Certification......................................................... 19
    3.5 Numbering and Addressing .......................................................................................... 19
    3.6 Lawful interception ....................................................................................................... 19
      3.6.1 User localization.................................................................................................... 20
      3.6.2 Security and Safety ............................................................................................... 20
      3.6.3 Completeness ....................................................................................................... 20
      3.6.4 (possibly: Inter-working requirements with GSM) ................................................. 20
4     Spectrum requirements ................................................................................................... 21
5     History ............................................................................................................................. 22
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                          Table of Figures

                Error! No table of figures entries found.
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1 Introduction
1.1    Intellectual property rights

[Source : CG Rapporteur]

IPRs essential or potentially essential to the present document may have been declared to
ASMS-TF. The information pertaining to these essential IPRs, if any, is publicly available for
ASMS-TF members and non-members, and can be found in Reference [TBD].

Pursuant to the ASMS-TF IPR Policy, no investigation, including IPR searches, has been
carried out by ASMS-TF. No guarantee can be given as to the existence of other IPRs not
referenced in [TBD] which are, or may be, or may become, essential to the present document.

1.2    Scope of the document

[Source: Astrium]

The Commercial Group (CG) and the Technical Group (TG) of the Advanced Mobile Satellite
Task Force (ASMS-TF) have developed this document in accordance with their respective
mandate. Among the others

     Regulatory requirements are also introduced in order to foster the use of such systems;

     Finally spectrum requirements have been identified in order to define the need for
      bandwidth.
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1.3   Definitions, symbols and abbreviations

1.3.1 Definitions

1.3.2 Symbols

1.3.3 Abbreviations

[Source: all]

ASMS-TF             The Advanced Satellite Mobile Systems Task Force
CG                  The Commercial Group of the ASMS-TF
TG                  The Technical Group of the ASMS-TF


1.4   Reference Documents

[Source: all]
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2     Spectrum and Orbit Resources
[Source: TG]

2.1   Frequency Band Allocations

Frequency band allocations to the space services can be found in Article 5 of the ITU Radio
Regulations.
Available frequency bands for Mobile Satellite Services are listed in the table below.

     Frequency Band                   Direction                        Comments
       137 – 138 MHz                Space-to-Earth
      148-150.05 MHz                Earth-to-space
        312-315 MHz                 Earth-to-space
        387-390 MHz                 Space-to-Earth
     399.9-400.05 MHz               Earth-to-space
      400.15-401 MHz                Space-to-Earth
      406-406.1 MHz                 Earth-to-space
        608-614 MHz                 Earth-to-space
      1492-1525 MHz                 Space-to-Earth                 ITU Region 2 only
      1525-1559 MHz                 Space-to-Earth
     1610-1626.5 MHz
    1626.5—1660.5 MHz               Earth-to-space
      1675-1710 MHz                 Earth-to-space                 ITU Region 2 only
      1930-1970 MHz                 Earth-to-space                 ITU Region 2 only
      1980-2010 MHz                 Earth-to-space
      2010-2025 MHz                 Earth-to-space                 ITU Region 2 only
      2120-2170 MHz                 Space-to-Earth                 ITU Region 2 only
      2170-2200 MHz                 Space-to-Earth
     2483.5-2500 MHz                Space-to-Earth
      2500-2520 MHz                 Space-to-Earth               Available after 1/1/2005
      2670-2690 MHz                 Earth-to-space               Available after 1/1/2005
        14-14.5 GHz                 Earth-to-space
       19.7-21.2 GHz                Space-to-Earth
        29.5-31 GHz                 Earth-to-space
       39.5-40.5 GHz                Space-to-Earth
       50.4-51.4 GHz                Earth-to-space
         71-74 GHz                  Earth-to-space
         81-84 GHz                  Space-to-Earth
                         Table 1.   Frequency Bands Allocated to MMS
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Frequency bands allocated to the broadcasting satellite service are shown below.

                                                                        Frequency Band                                           Comments
                                                                         1452-1492 MHz
                                                                         2520-2670 MHz
                                                                          11.7-12.5 GHz                                  Region 1 (App S30)
                                                                          12.2-12.7 GHz                                  Region 2 (App S30)
                                                                          11.7-12.2 GHz                                  Region 3 (App S30)
                                                                          17.3-17.8 GHz                                       Region 2
                                                                           21.4-22 GHz                                     Region 1 & 3
                                                                          40.5-42.5 GHz
                                                                            84-86 GHz
                                                                                                       Table 2.

2.2   Orbits
Four different types of orbits can be proposed for satellite communication : LEO, MEO, HEO
and GEO. From each altitude, a different earth coverage is obtained, in function of the desired
minimum user elevation, as shown in the example below.
                                                                                    Earth Visibility from Various Altitudes

                                            45


                                            40


                                            35
                                                                                                         Geo
          Percentage of Earth Covered (%)




                                            30


                                            25

                                                                                                      ICO -like
                                            20


                                            15


                                            10
                                                                               Globalstar-like
                                            5
                                                     Iridium-like

                                            0
                                                 0                  5         10                 15               20               25        30       35       40
                                                                                                 Minimum elevation to satellite (degs)



                                                                    Percentage of Earth’s surface covered from Various Altitudes



A variety of HEO orbit types can be proposed. The major ones are described in the following
table.
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                                                                                           Molniya                  Loopus                   Tundra
                                                                Orbital                      12                       12                       24
                                                                Period
                                                                Semi-major               26566 km                  26566 km                42164 km
                                                                axis
                                                                e                       0.6 to 0.75                0.6 to 0.75            0.6 to 0.75
                                                                Inclination                63.4°                      63.4°                  63.4°
                                                                Typical                   1200 x                     1250 x                24500 x
                                                                perigee,                  39500                      39100                  47100
                                                                apogee
                                                                Visibility                        8                 8                              8
                                                                Comment                                          Satellite
                                                                                                               handover at
                                                                                                                crossover


2.3                                      Capacity Issues
Each type of orbit has different implications due to the corresponding distance from the
satellite at its given orbital altitude to the user on the Earth‘s surface. For a given link quality
requirement, the satellite EIRP requirement varies, for example as shown in the graphic
below.



                                                    Incremental EIRP Requirement Relative to GEO Satellite (C/No constant)

                                    5


                                    0


                                    -5
  Relative EIRP Requirement (dB)




                                   -10


                                   -15


                                   -20


                                   -25


                                   -30


                                   -35


                                   -40
                                         0   5000       10000      15000     20000     25000      30000    35000      40000     45000      50000
                                                                                     Range (km)
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3 Regulatory Requirements
This section identifies the regulatory environment that is in place or should be put in place:

[Source: Telespazio]

3.1   Regulatory framework for UMTS satellite component


3.1.1 Frequency bands harmonisation

Within CEPT, a regulatory scenario had been envisaged for S-PCS systems. Basically, a set
of three ERC and ECTRA Decisions had been adopted concerning aspects related to the
harmonised use of frequency bands, the harmonisation of authorisation conditions and co-
ordination procedures and to the free circulation and use of earth stations.

Notably, the ERC and ECTRA MRC (Milestones Review Committee) procedure had been
established for 1st generation S-PCS within the framework of ERC Decision 97 (03) on the
harmonised use of frequency bands and of ECTRA Decision 97 (02) on the harmonisation of
authorisation conditions and co-ordination procedures in order to meet the concerns on
spectrum shortage also due to the existence of ‗paper‘ satellites.

Indeed, due to the limited spectrum available to MSS it has been decided that spectrum
should be made available to those S-PCS systems that were likely to offer services within
CEPT before the beginning of the year 2001. The MRC procedure provided for the
monitoring of each system‘s fulfilment of a number of milestones criteria and advised
administrations and informed ERC and ECTRA accordingly, thus removing the possibility of
the existence of ‗paper‘ satellites.

In view of the foregoing, it has been proposed within the context of the UMTS Forum that the
frequency harmonisation process which has been set up within CEPT for 1st generation S-
PCS with ERC Decision 97 (03) could be usefully maintained and extended so as to take into
account the UMTS satellite component and thus the UMTS Forum, in its Report on
‗Considerations of Licensing Conditions for UMTS Network Operations‘ published in 1998,
recommended that the CEPT reviewed the milestone criteria and the date of 1/1/2001 for
satellite systems that would have been implemented later in bands 1980 – 2010 MHz and
2170 – 2200 MHz, noting that satellite systems meeting all milestone criteria before 1/1/2001
should not have priority with regard to access to the available spectrum over other systems
meeting all the criteria later but also before 1/1/2001.

To this aim it is worth recalling that the ERC Decision 97 (03) on the harmonised use of
1.6/2.5 and 1.9/2.1 GHz frequency bands fixed the deadline of 1 January 2001 to establish
which systems had fulfilled all the Milestones criteria and could rightfully operate in the bands
assigned to each of them on a provisional basis before the year 2001. The above-mentioned
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Decision covers the 1st generation S-PCS systems, while a new deadline needed to be
established for the UMTS satellite component, for which 1.9/2.1 GHz frequency bands have
been identified in ITU Resolution 212 (Rev. WRC-95) and which were planned to be
implemented at a later stage.

However, although the MRC procedure, appropriately modified as explained above, could be
adopted to cope with the frequency harmonisation issues for the UMTS satellite component
within CEPT, it is extremely important, due to the global nature of satellites, that UMTS
systems will use harmonised bands on a global level. This goal, should be achieved possibly
extending the MRC decisions beyond Europe, using appropriate fora.

At present, within CEPT (notably within JPT SAT) a review of ERC and ECTRA base
Decisions (97-03 and 97-02) is underway and it is suggested to abrogate these Decisions and
to replace them by a new one since it is stated that the Milestone Review Procedure should
no longer be applied to S-PCS.

However, the satellite industry does not support the abrogation of these Decisions since it
would be counterproductive and would significantly reduce confidence on the regulatory
framework which the industry itself helped to create. What is more, also the majority of CEPT
Administrations have not requested to amend the current regulatory framework.

As a result, the SAP REG, which is a group bringing together the satellite industry in Europe
in order to deal with regulatory matters and market access barriers, prepared a
Communication to the CEPT JPT SAT not supporting the abrogation of the Decisions and
recognising that if a review of them may be desirable in the future, it shall occur in the second
half of 2003, prior to 31st December 2003 the date upon which the EU S-PCS Decision
710/97/EC expires.


3.1.2 One-Stop-Shopping Procedure

[The Licensing Directive 97/13/EC in its Article 13 urges the Commission, in conjunction with
CEPT, to take all the necessary steps for the operation of a One-Stop-Shopping procedure
(OSS) for telecommunications services. Also the satellite industry stressed the need to
develop such a procedure in the Report produced by the SAP RWG (now called SAP REG)
and presented to the Satellite Action Plan Meeting with Industry held on 29th January 1998
and the UMTS Forum recommended in its aforementioned Report that European Commission
encourages the CEPT to work towards the extension of the OSS procedures to satellite
services.

The OSS procedure means the procedure co-ordinating applications for and the issuing of
national authorisations for telecommunications services. It consists of the following main
entities/elements: the applicant, a focal point of contact (the Shop), the National Regulatory
Authority (NRA), a uniform application form for all networks/services/technologies or for
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certain groups of networks/services/technologies, a regulatory data-base containing details on
licensing regimes in different countries and a final output document produced for the applicant
by the Shop summarising results of all national applications with any licences granted by
different NRAs attached.

The OSS is aimed at facilitating the work of operators as well as NRAs involved in the
process of obtaining/granting authorisations. Notably this procedure simplifies the
complicated process of gaining information on the licensing regimes in different countries and
on the limitations involved in the provision of that service; it also reduces the work-load
involved in obtaining a licence. As for the NRAs, they will be easily provided with useful
information regarding the regulatory regimes in other countries and will also be enabled to
avoid the duplication of specific tasks within their staff.

At the moment the OSS, which is administrated by ETO on behalf of ECTRA, does not cover
satellite services, but such an extension of the project is currently under study within CEPT. It
is believed that a properly designed OSS procedure for licences in the satellite area could be
a very useful instrument to facilitate the development of satellite services, including UMTS
applications, in a number of countries.]


3.2   A possible regulatory framework applicable to S-DAB systems


3.2.1 Frequency bands harmonisation

Satellite systems, due to their global nature, will play an important role in the development of
the DAB technology in areas where terrestrial coverage is not economically or technically
viable or possible.

Thus, it is of major importance to avoid creating regulatory barriers to the deployment of S-
DAB systems and a harmonised approach, preferably on a global basis but at least on a
regional level, to frequency management will be key in order to avoid technical and
operational difficulties in the systems‘ management.

 To this aim, it is extremely important that Europe takes timely decisions on the designation of
spectrum for S-DAB systems to ensure that European interests are duly considered by other
Administrations.

The creation of a new CEPT ERC and ECTRA MRP (Milestones Review Procedure) for S-
DAB systems could be seen as a regional European process aiming at a global agreement
using appropriate fora (e.g.: the extension of the ITU GMPCS MoU Arrangements so as to
include the possibility of reaching multilateral agreements).
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In particular, since the MRP is a consolidated process created for 1st generation S-PCS
within the context of ERC Decision 97(03) on the harmonised use of frequency bands and
ECTRA Decision 97(02) on the harmonisation of authorisation conditions and co-ordination
procedures, it could be usefully reproduced and appropriately modified so as to be applicable
to S-DAB systems.

This procedure, an extension to the due diligence process for satellites systems, includes a
monitoring mechanism based on the fulfilment of a number of milestone criteria by a fixed
deadline in order to assess the progress of each system requiring spectrum towards the
offering of a commercial service. Thus, together with the ITU due diligence procedure, it aims
at selecting and identifying systems which should be authorised to operate and shall advise
administrations and inform ERC and ECTRA accordingly, thus removing as far as possible
the possibility of the existence of ‗paper‘ satellites.

In view of the foregoing, it is highly recommended that the procedures explained above will be
taken in due account while creating an appropriate regulatory scenario for the introduction of
S-DAB systems.

[Source: SAP REG]


3.2.2 ITU Frequency Bands Allocations For BSS(S) / S-DAB Use


In 1992, the World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC-92) allocated 40 MHz in L-band (1452 -
1492 MHz) to BSS (S-DAB) and complementary terrestrial broadcasting services in accordance with
ITU Resolution 5281. This introduction had furthermore been supported by the CEPT at WARC-92.
According to ITU Resolution-528 (WARC-92), the upper 25 MHz (1467-1492 MHz) are designed for
the introduction of S-DAB / BSS(S) services.


The frequency band 1467-1492 MHz is the only spectrum globally allocated in the 1-3 GHz range at
ITU level for BSS(S) services intended for digital audio radio services. This band is certainly the only
band available for BSS(S) / S-DAB use in ITU Region 1.

Given the existing congestion and competing spectrum requirements for other terrestrial services (e.g.
Fixed Services, IMT-2000 services, MSS, RNSS, ARNS) etc, it will not be feasible to allocate at an
ITU WRC level any other spectrum in the 1-3 GHz range to accommodate BSS(S) services.

The potential planning of additional T-DAB blocks within the 1467.5-1492 MHz range could be viewed
as inconsistent with the decisions of WARC-92 to make available at least 25 MHz of spectrum for
BSS(S) / S-DAB services in the range 1467-1492 MHz, noting that the WARC-92 decisions were
1
  “Introduction of the broadcasting-satellite service (sound) systems and complementary terrestrial broadcasting
in the bands allocated to these services within the range 1-3 GHz ”
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supported not only by CEPT countries but also promoted actively and supported by countries in Africa
and the Middle East. Consistent with the spirit of ITU Resolution 528, the new T-DAB planning
exercise being prepared in L-band should therefore ensure that European S-DAB services be allowed
to fully access the upper 25 MHz of the band 1452 – 1492 MHz

Conclusion: There is no other spectrum in the 1-3 GHz range other than at 1467-1492 MHz
internationally allocated by the ITU to support the viable provision of S-DAB / BSS(S) digital radio
services in Europe.



3.2.3   The Development of Competitive S-DAB Service In Europe Will Be Prevented

Today, several S-DAB / BSS(S) systems are in various stages of implementation around the world and
the competitive development of S-DAB in Europe is at a important threshold.

At a global level, WorldSpace already offers via the AfriStar and AsiaStar GEO satellite systems
advanced BSS(S) services in Europe / Middle-East / Africa and Asia respectively within the 1467-1492
MHz range. A third WorldSpace satellite will be launched later this year to offer services in Latin
America.

In the USA, the FCC has allocated 25 MHz of spectrum for BSS(S) or S-DARS. Two systems, namely
the GEO-based XM Satellite Radio and the HEO-based Sirius Satellite Radio, plan to start their
commercial operation late this year, by introducing a range of advanced S-DARS services in the USA.
It should be noted that 25 MHz of spectrum was considered by the FCC to be the minimum necessary
to support the competitive delivery of S-DAB services in the USA.

In Europe, the Luxembourg-based Global Radio SA and a partnership between Alcatel and
WorldSpace have recently announced their intentions to implement S-DAB and complementary T-DAB
services in Europe via HEO (GLOBAL RADIO) and GEO (FSAT-DAB) based systems respectively, on
the basis of European ITU filings. Germany and UK have filed at the ITU for the HEO-based
(MEDIASTAR) and GEO (EAST) BSS(S) / S-DAB satellite networks respectively. Poland has also filed
for a GEO BSS(S) satellite network.

S-DAB service, which was made possible by WARC-92, is an example of the kind of satellite service
that can immediately enhance a country or region’s existing information infrastructure. This service
will bring with it numerous benefits, including the ability to provide a country’s entire population with
access to vital information. Economic benefits in Europe will flow from the industrial return related to
the manufacturing of all segments, including satellites, terrestrial infrastructure and receivers, as well
as in the broadcasting market.

It might be noted that several of the European S-DAB players are already in active discussions in
developing a common radio air interface standards for delivery of S-DAB services in Europe. The
adoption of common S-DAB receiver standards will encourage the development of a vibrant S-DAB
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receiver industry, will reduce end user receiver cost and will maximise choice for consumers, whilst
still enabling different S-DAB operators to compete for market access.

The continued availability of spectrum for S-DAB use in the 1467-1492 MHz range will undoubtedly
facilitate the overall delivery of national, supra-national and pan-European digital radio programmes
and ancillary services to a very wide market base of eventually hundreds of millions of fixed and
mobile consumers and so assist in kick-starting the wider digital radio business in Europe. Indeed S-
DAB opens the door for pan European coverage. Many public and private broadcasters have a
growing need for extending their reach for linguistic, cultural and to enable their customers to receive
their main national radio programs while travelling to or living in other European countries.

On the other hand, the reduction of spectrum available for S-DAB from the 14 block presently
available in the approximate range 1467-1492 MHz (i.e. circa 25 MHz less guard bands) would in
effect deny the ability for competitive provision of S-DAB service in Europe via multiple (at least two)
satellite systems. It might be noted that the competitive provision of MSS / SPCS services in Europe
in the 1-3 GHz range is facilitated by the availability of over 2  80 MHz of spectrum at a CEPT
harmonised level in the 1.5/1.6 GHz, 1.6/2.4 GHz and 2 GHz MSS bands.

Conclusion: The frequency band 1467.5-1492 MHz should be identified for BSS(S) use
consistent with the relevant ITU allocations. A harmonised frequency resource should be
identified in the band 1467.5-1492 MHz for S-DAB use in Europe in the time frame of the
CEPT preparation of the new planning for accommodating T-DAB requirements. Such action
would facilitate the competitive provision of S-DAB digital radio services to consumers on a
national, supra-national and pan-European basis. This in turn will facilitate or kick-start and
enable the viable development and mass market acceptance of European wide digital radio
services offered by both terrestrial and satellite platforms on a complementary basis.



3.2.4 No Justification for Additional Allocation of L-band Spectrum to T-DAB

In 1995, the CEPT at Wiesbaden agreed on a Special Arrangement concerning the introduction and
planning of Terrestrial DAB in the 47-68 MHz, 87.5-108 MHz, 174-230 MHz and 230-240 MHz ranges
as well as at L-band (1452-1467.5 MHz) in the territories of the signatory Administrations with a view
to providing two complete national coverage of their territory. The Wiesbaden plan uses the Eureka
147 standard (also known as ―DAB‖) as a technical reference for the purpose of identifying protection
criteria from frequency interference.

Since 1995, in various CEPT countries (in particular in the EU /EEA countries), efforts have been
made to roll-out and deploy T-DAB networks and digital radio and ancillary services. Virtually all
commercial T-DAB networks have been developed in the VHF bands, and to date only 2 countries
seem to maintain some limited T-DAB operation in the L-band range. In general most European
governments have taken pro-active steps to promote the development and introduction of T-DAB
Eureka-147 based services.
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Nevertheless, it is widely recognised today that T-DAB has not been successful from a market
standpoint. The reasons for this are complex; but undoubtedly driven by range of issues revolving on
cost of DAB digital radios, lack of adequate coverage, lack of high quality programming choice and
lack of mass-market receiver availability and take-up. In some EU countries the roll-out of T-DAB is
more advanced than others. For example, the UK has probably the most developed T-DAB VHF band
terrestrial networks in Europe with two competing national T-DAB networks; however the total number
of T-DAB customers in the UK is estimated today at about only 35,000 ! In Germany, the number of
DAB receivers sold in the last year is reported as only 10,000. It appears that some German T-DAB
operators have returned their L-band T-DAB licences, due to lack of viable market demand !

It is as a result of this situation that the EC has for example initiated a study to determine how digital
radio services (both satellite and terrestrial) can be more effectively developed and promulgated in
Europe.

It has been argued by some T-DAB proponents that the commercial failure to date of T-DAB roll-out
will be solved by allocating yet more spectrum at L-band for T-DAB services. On the other hand, it
has been argued reasonably by S-DAB proponents that if T-DAB requires more spectrum (which is
commercially questionable), the T-DAB EU-147 MPEG-II based audio-coding standards should be
evolved to make use of currently available more spectrally efficient audio-coding schemes (such as
AAC as already used in DRM digital AM radio standards or AAC+); this could lead to at least two-to-
three fold increase in the number of offered T-DAB digital radio programmes.

It is noted that the identification of additional spectrum to IMT-2000 at WRC-2000 and the ongoing
efforts of CEPT Administrations to identify additional spectrum for T-UMTS in Europe was driven by
the commercial success and mass consumer (e.g. in the order of tens of million consumers) acceptance
of digital mobile cellular services such as GSM-900 and DCS-1800. There is however no such
commercial success or mass consumer acceptance for T-DAB in Europe which can reasonably justify
the allotment of more spectrum for T-DAB in the 1467-1492 MHz range to the final detriment of the S-
DAB industry. On the other hand ensuring the continued availability of spectrum for S-DAB use in the
1467-1492 MHz range to complement existing and planned T-DAB networks can facilitate the delivery
of national, supra-national and European digital radio programmes to a very wide market base and so
assist in kick-starting the digital radio business in Europe.

Conclusion: The lack of commercial or mass-market market take-up for T-DAB in Europe does not
reasonably justify urgent allocation of more dedicated spectrum for T-DAB in the 1467.5-1492 MHz
range to the detriment of the S-DAB industry. In particular, all steps should therefore be taken in order
to ensure that frequency resource be maintained for S-DAB use in the band 1467.5-1492 MHz. The
situation could then be reviewed in a subsequent timeframe taking into account the market
developments of S-DAB and T-DAB in Europe.


3.2.5 Re-Use of Existing L-band T-DAB Blocks & Access To Additional VHF Spectrum
      Can Satisfy T-DAB Requirements

The use of the VHF bands for T-DAB systems, especially for national networks, is in general
technically preferable to L-band, given that, at L-band, T-DAB network roll-out cost is much higher due
                                                           Ref     : Doc ASMS_02_T11_0
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to increased propagation losses. As indicated above, very few CEPT countries have yet rolled out a L-
band T-DAB network for offering full-time commercial services.

The basic premise of the 2002 CEPT Planning Conference to provide of Third Priority layer (i.e only
another 10 radio channels) on top of the already allocated Wiesbaden-95 blocks (providing an
average of 20 radio channel) for use everywhere in the country is not really valid. No country
anywhere in Europe maintains more than 20 full coverage terrestrial radio networks on its territory.
There may be anywhere between 5 to 10 national networks, and after that, the demand for more
spectrum revolves around the needs of local radio stations. The use of L-band for T-DAB inherently
results in small coverage areas and may therefore be more suitable for local T-DAB local broadcast
programming. This in turn means that the basic premise of the T-DAB 2002 Planning Conference
should not account for the provision of full coverage between cities. In CEPT WG-FM PT-32 the ‗islet
concept‘ was introduced to accommodate local terrestrial T-DAB requirements. Use of the ‗islet‘
planning approach would allow the already allocated T-DAB 9 blocks in the 1452-1467 MHz range to
be re-used more efficiently to accommodate local T-DAB needs. It seems already clear that, in a large
number of cases, more than one block could be made available by this means in most local markets in
major cities without using any additional blocks sought in the 1467.5-1492 MHz range.

Furthermore, CEPT has taken recently (at March 2001 ERC Meeting) pro-active steps to propose to
the 2001 ITU Council the scheduling of an ITU Regional Regulatory Conference (RRC) in 2005 to plan
accommodation of both T-DAB (in the band 174-230 MHz) and DVB-T (in the bands 174-230 MHz
and 470-862 MHz) in the VHF bands as an evolution of the 1961 Stockholm European Broadcasting
Service Plan. It may be noted that DVB-T systems are inherently capable of carrying digital radio
programmes to at least fixed users and possibly with evolution to mobile users.

If T-DAB genuinely requires additional spectrum, CEPT efforts should perhaps be focussed at
accommodating that requirement more efficiently within the 1452-1467.5 MHz range as well in new
spectrum in the VHF range, rather than removing spectrum allocated to BSS(S) / S-DAB in the 1467-
1492 MHz range. It would perhaps be in the interests of all parties to seek an advancement of the
proposed ITU RRC to end 2003 / early 2004 and to focus CEPT resources towards that goal and in
the necessary technical preparations.

Conclusion: Consideration should be given to advancing the proposed ITU RRC for DVB-T
planning for the European Broadcasting Area to end year 2003 / early 2004, with inclusion of
T-DAB planning. In addition, already allocated T-DAB spectrum in the 1452-1467.5 MHz
range should be more efficiently re-used using for the Islets Concept to help satisfy the
apparent demand.


There are several proposals to introduce 1.4 GHz BSS(S)/S-DAB services in Europe.
Unlike the regulatory framework which exists at a CEPT level for introduction of such
pan-European services as S-PCS, UMTS etc, there is a general lack of an appropriate
common or harmonised framework for in particular spectrum access at a CEPT level to
facilitate the introduction of pan-European S-DAB/BSS(S) services. It is recommended
that ERC/ECTRA consider this issue within JPT SAT with a view to taking appropriate
action. [CSI Report – May 2001]
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[Source: Astrium]

These requirements apply to those networks offering point-to-point services (i.e. defined in
opposition with respect to broadcasting-satellite services where they are currently no
regulatory requirements).

3.3   Licensing Conditions and Procedures


3.3.1 International Circulation of Terminals

[Source: Astrium]
See Reference [5].

Circulation of terminals shall be endeavored by the necessary mutual recognition of standards
type approving the terminals.

At the European level this may be implemented by the definition and approval of the
necessary European Norms and their regulatory implementations through the Common
Technical Regulations tools. European Recommendations should also be developed within
the framework of ERC in order to allow for the implementation of these regulations.

At the international level, mechanisms such as those already implemented through the
GMPCS-MoU shall be developed in order to allow for the international recognition of the
standards and to allow the circulation of the terminals.

3.3.2 Fees and Charges


3.4   International Harmonization of Regulatory Regimes


3.4.1 Mutual Recognition of Licensing
[Source: Astrium]
Mutual recognition of licensing shall be implemented at least at the European level through
the CTR mechanisms. Actions shall be taken to foster this implementation.

Actions shall also be undertaken at the international level (for instance through the ITU World
Policy Forum or within the GMPCS-MoU forum) in order to expand this mutual recognition of
licensing.

WTO agreements should also be taken into account.
                                                           Ref     : Doc ASMS_02_T11_0
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 AS M S - T F / R E G                                      Date    : May 22, 2001
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3.4.2 Mutual Recognition of Terminal Certification
[Source: Astrium]
See section 6.1.1.

3.5 Numbering and Addressing
[Source: Astrium]
Numbering and addressing decisions shall be determined primarily by the commercial
implementation of the satellite mobile systems. This issue shall therefore be left open for the
implementation of the considered system.

However, one can identify two main classes of networks that could be used as reference
cases for deriving requirements on numbering and addressing, with the need to apply in any
case the format specified in ITU-T Recommendation E.164:

     Case 1: Those satellite networks that will be operated as fully integrated infrastructures in
      the third generation and beyond mobile networks such as UMTS or IMT-2000. In this
      case, the numbering issue is more for the service provider to be solved, with the need for
      the infrastructure to support this numbering. For instance ITU-T Recommendations E 212
      (Mobile Global Title) & IMSI numbers for S-PCN & Dual-mode satellite-terrestrial
      terminals) & Q.708 (International transfer of Signal Point Codes) of may be applied in this
      case;

     Case 2: Those satellite networks that can be considered as self-standing networks. In
      this case there shall be means to identify the networks. It is proposed in this document
      that the existing approach of delivering an international country code corresponding to the
      network to be operated be followed. A solution would be the allocation of a Country Code
      (CC) to each S-PCN operator, or the allocation of one or more network codes within each
      country where the service is offered.



3.6    Lawful interception

[Source: Astrium]
The satellite network infrastructure shall provide all the means in order to allow the
implementation of the lawful interception requirements whenever necessary and in
compliance with the local governmental requirements where the service is to be offered by
the network.

[Source: Alenia Spazio]
S-UMTS Systems have the capability to cover a wide area of territory. This area is always
larger than an area delimited by national boundaries. As consequence, the S-UMTS systems
cover territories belonging to several administrations. One of the key issues to operate within
a territory is the permission, released by the National Administrations, to use the frequency
                                                           Ref     : Doc ASMS_02_T11_0
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 AS M S - T F / R E G                                      Date    : May 22, 2001
                                                           Page    : 20




spectrum. And this permission is usually released only when the S-UMTS Operator is able to
guarantee the legal interception of any target within the territory under the jurisdiction of any
Administration. From an S-UMTS Operator point of view, this general requirement can be
translated in the following.


3.6.1 User localization
The S-UMTS system shall be able to locate a target user within the territory under the
jurisdiction of the requesting administration. Therefore, the mobility management of any user
acquires more and more importance


3.6.2 Security and Safety

All the intercepted calls, either voice or data, shall be correctly routed to the Legal Authorities
without the possibility, from a third party, to intercept the intercepted call.


3.6.3 Completeness

All the administrations require not only the simple voice call to be intercepted, they also
require information related to the history and the position location of the intercepted user.


3.6.4 (possibly: Inter-working requirements with GSM)
……………..……………………
…………………………………..
                                                        Ref     : Doc ASMS_02_T11_0
                                                        Issue   : 1       Rev. : 0
AS M S - T F / R E G                                    Date    : May 22, 2001
                                                        Page    : 21




4 Spectrum requirements
This section is certainly to be established in conjunction between the commercial and
technical groups, based on the coverage, aggregate peak bit rate to be delivered, and
spectral efficiency of the physical layer.

This section will give an estimate on the need for spectrum.
                                                                 Ref     : Doc ASMS-TF/REG(01)/T/001
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AS M S - T F / R E G                                             Date    : May 22, 2001
                                                                 Page    : 22




5 History
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