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Stepping Up to a Healthy Lifestyle: Make Drinks Count by 5w1D4Gk

VIEWS: 4 PAGES: 9

									                  Stepping Up to a Healthy Lifestyle
                 What’s in Your Drink? It’s on the Label
                     Display Set-Up and Activities



      OBJECTIVES
A. Participants will compare the nutrients in four common drinks – low fat milk, orange
   juice, soda and water.
B. Participants will recognize that they can look at the label to determine the ingredients
   and the amounts of nutrients in each beverage.




  
       PREPARATION
       Download the files containing the display pieces.
      Materials needed: color printer; scissors or paper cutter; heavy paper for backing;
       Velcro; optional: laminating machine or clear contact paper.
          o Print out the display board pieces (5 files) and assemble. Review the photo
              of the display board from the materials section of the webpage to help you
              with layout. You may substitute a small low-fat milk carton, soda can, small
              orange juice container and a glass of water to make your display three
              dimensional.
          o For group activity: containers with Nutrition Facts labels from a variety of
              beverages to include milk of various types, flavored milk, soda, diet soda,
              100% juice, juice drink, sports drink, water. One for each participant.




  
         START UP
       Assemble the display




          WNEP education is supported by the USDA Food Stamp Program, UW-Extension, FoodShare Wisconsin, and local partners. In
          Wisconsin, FoodShare can help provide a healthy diet. To find out more about FoodShare, call your local FoodShare office.
          12/04
What’s in Your Drink? Activities                                                                               page 2




            WHAT TO SAY
        ALL: Why are beverages important? Beverages are important because they are
        mostly water, a nutrient that’s essential to your life. In fact, 55-75% of your total body
        weight is water. In one way or another, every body function depends on water. You
        can only live a few days without it!

        On an average day, you need to replace the water you lose through sweat, urine, and
        your breath. When you sweat a lot, you need even more water. Why sweat? It’s your
        body’s natural way to cool down – especially on a hot day or when your body gets a
        real physical workout. Without fluids to replace your sweat, your body just overheats.

        Drinking plenty of water and perhaps juice or milk before, during, and after physical
        activity replaces fluid loss. And these fluids help keep you from dehydration and the
        tiredness that goes with it. Thirst is one sign that you need fluids. But don’t wait to
        feel thirsty before you drink something. Sometimes your brain doesn’t get the thirst
        signal.

        Objective A: All beverages are not created equal! Let’s look at the first panel on our
        display board to compare milk, juice, soda and water. Sometimes we need to choose
        between beverages when we are thirsty. When it comes to drinks, some contain
        vitamins and minerals in addition to water.
             Low-fat milk contains calcium for building strong bones, natural milk sugars and
               calories for energy. Some calories are from the protein in milk.
             Orange juice contains vitamin C for health, natural sugars and calories. Water
               provides the necessary fluids for the body.
             Soda contains added sugar and calories. An extra-large soft drink or several
               soft drinks throughout the day can have more calories than a meal and more
               sugar than most of us need in an entire day! Sugar-free fruit drinks and sugar-
               free soft drinks still don’t provide much nutrition – so why not just drink water?
             Water provides the fluids that our body needs.

        Objective B:
        You can use the Nutrition Facts label to see what different drinks contribute to your
        daily needs so you can make good choices.

        Let’s look at the Nutrition Label to find the calories in a serving. Sometimes containers
        contain more than one serving of a drink so you must be careful to note the number of
        servings in your drink. Pay attention to the serving size and then ask yourself “how
        many servings am I getting if I drink the whole thing?”

        Drinks can contain natural sugars, like in milk and orange juice, or added sugars in
        soda. Can you find the part of the label where it tells the amount of sugar? Then look
        at the ingredient list at the bottom of the label to see if the sugars are natural or added.
        Some common added sugars are: high fructose corn syrup, sucrose, fructose, glucose
                WNEP education is supported by the USDA Food Stamp Program, UW-Extension, FoodShare Wisconsin, and local partners. In
                Wisconsin, FoodShare can help provide a healthy diet. To find out more about FoodShare, call your local FoodShare office.
                12/04
What’s in Your Drink? Activities                                                                               page 3

        or maltose.

        The label will also show how much of some vitamins and minerals are in the drink.
        The vitamins that are listed on the label are Vitamin C and Vitamin A. The minerals
        that are shown on the label are calcium and iron. The percent tells you how much of
        your daily need is in a serving of the drink. The % daily value makes it easy to
        compare products or brands.

        Evaluation: We have now looked at four drinks to see what they contain in addition to
        water. Now you can use what you learned to try to match the drink with label on the
        third panel of the board.



        Additional comments for activities with pregnant women: Getting enough fluid is
        especially important while you’re breastfeeding. Getting enough fluid while you’re
        pregnant can help with constipation. Getting enough calcium is important for your
        baby’s growing bones.

        Additional comments for activities with seniors: Getting enough fluid can help
        with constipation and dry skin. Getting enough calcium is especially important for
        seniors to help prevent bone loss.



           WHAT TO DO

        Choose the activity that fits your teaching setting:

        Unattended, walk-by display: People walking by the display can match the drink
        containers to the label (third panel of display). You may want to leave actual drink
        containers, with labels, or an answer key, available so people can see if they matched
        correctly.

        Attended display, one-on-one short teaching session:
        Discuss the left and center panels as directed in the “what to say” section. Ask
        participants to match the drink container to the label on the third panel. Ask them why
        they made the choices they did and explain any incorrect matches.

        Evaluation: record how many of the individuals were able to match 0-1, 2-3, or all 4
        drinks to the correct label.




                WNEP education is supported by the USDA Food Stamp Program, UW-Extension, FoodShare Wisconsin, and local partners. In
                Wisconsin, FoodShare can help provide a healthy diet. To find out more about FoodShare, call your local FoodShare office.
                12/04
What’s in Your Drink? Activities                                                                               page 4

Small or medium sized group:
      This is an active lesson that can be used along with a more sedentary activity.
          Brink a collection of drink products or empty containers. After you have
             presented the information in this lesson, give one container to each person.
          Review food label basics and point out where to find information about calories,
             fat, sugar, protein and calcium.
          Have participants spread out in a large circle. Ask:
             o If your beverage contains protein and vitamins, hold the container over your
                 head. (Milk is a nutrient-dense beverage that is a great part of a balanced
                 eating plan)
             o If your beverage contains calcium, hop up and down. (Calcium and weight-
                 bearing exercise work together to build strong bones.)
             o If your beverage contains calories, but no protein or vitamins, stand on one
                 foot. (Soft drinks and sports drinks provide calories with few nutrients.
                 Drinking too much of these can upset your nutritional balance!)
             o If your beverage contains at least 10% sugar, sit on the floor. (Regular soft
                 drinks contain few nutrients while providing calories and sugar. They usually
                 contain about twice as much sugar as sports drinks.)
             o If your beverage contains no calories, protein or vitamins, lie on the floor.
                 (Diet soft drinks offer little for your body – some fluid, imitation sweeteners,
                 and often caffeine. Why not drink water instead?)

           Next, ask the group to line up in order from most to least amount of sugar in their
            beverage. Line up again from most to least amount of calcium. (explain that
            removing the fat from milk doesn’t remove the calcium).

           Discuss: Everyone needs to get enough fluid every day, and there are many
            beverages we can choose to accomplish this. Beverages can make a big
            contribution to the amount of calcium and sugar we get each day, and the amount
            of vitamins and protein we get each day. Making good beverage choices can have
            an important effect on our health.

           Evaluation: While the group is having a snack or taking a break, encourage
            participants to come up and match the beverages and labels on the third panel.
            Record how many correct matches are made.

Small or medium sized group: Drink More/Drink Less
       Print and cut apart Drink More/Drink Less cards. Copy the handout for each
         participant. Have 4 baskets or a sheet of newsprint with labels:
         o I won’t do this
         o I am going to start doing this
         o I do this sometimes but will try to do it more often
         o I always do this.
       Discuss the following:
         Sugared drinks are readily available and inexpensive, but they don’t provide
         vitamins and minerals (like calcium) like milk or juice. Do you and your family drink
         a lot of sugared drinks? Do you want your family to drink less? Some changes will
                WNEP education is supported by the USDA Food Stamp Program, UW-Extension, FoodShare Wisconsin, and local partners. In
                Wisconsin, FoodShare can help provide a healthy diet. To find out more about FoodShare, call your local FoodShare office.
                12/04
What’s in Your Drink? Activities                                                                               page 5

            be easier than others for us, and for our families, to make.
            Possible related topics to discuss: Have you already made any changes to your
            diet? Was it easy or hard? Would you like to make any other changes? How
            would your family react if you started to change the foods and drinks you have
            available at home? How would your family react if you made more healthy choices
            available for drinks?
           Activity:
            Pass around the cards or let participants draw from a hat until all are distributed.
            Go around the room, asking each person to drop one card in the basket (or stick to
            the poster) that matches their response to the statement.
           Ask:
            Does anyone in the group do this? Have you always done this? Was it hard to
            change? When/where/how do you do this? What did your family think when you
            started to do this? Would anyone else consider starting to do this? Can you think
            of any other ways to change that aren’t listed on the cards?
           Wrap-up:
            Let’s look in each basket and see what changes our group is willing to make. Can
            everybody remember one or two things they said they could do? Take a minute
            and go through your handout and circle one or two things you can start doing this
            week – those will be the things you think are easiest to change. As you’re reading
            through the list, put a check by any other things you think you can start to do soon
            – those things might be a little harder, but you still plan to do them. Take this sheet
            home and hang it on your fridge to remind yourself of your plan.

                o Notes to the Educator Be careful not to make participants feel bad if they
                  say they won’t adopt a particular behavior. Remind the group that there are
                  lots of ways we can change our habits and some people will find some
                  behaviors easier than others. Remind everyone that the best way to make
                  changes is a little at a time.




                WNEP education is supported by the USDA Food Stamp Program, UW-Extension, FoodShare Wisconsin, and local partners. In
                Wisconsin, FoodShare can help provide a healthy diet. To find out more about FoodShare, call your local FoodShare office.
                12/04
What’s in Your Drink? Activities                                                                               page 6


EVALUATION TALLY for attended display or display used as part of a lesson.

Educator should observe and record how many learners correctly match the drinks with the
labels in the third panel of the display.

                                                       Number of participants
Matched all four correctly.

Matched 2 or 3 correctly.

Matched 1 or none correctly.




                WNEP education is supported by the USDA Food Stamp Program, UW-Extension, FoodShare Wisconsin, and local partners. In
                Wisconsin, FoodShare can help provide a healthy diet. To find out more about FoodShare, call your local FoodShare office.
                12/04
                                      Stepping Up to a Healthy Lifestyle
                               What’s in your drink? It’s on the label Tally Sheet
Topic: What’s in Your Drink?

Location/Agency Site:______________________________                                            Date of Event: _________________

Educational Strategy/Type of educational programming offered (select one):
___ One-time groups                                                                ___ Multi-session groups
___ One-on-one (individual learner)                                                ___ Other
___ Learn-while-you-wait


Primary audience contact/Learners reached (select one):
___ 1. Youth, 5 to 11 years                                                        ___ 4. Pregnant women/caretakers of infants
___ 2. Youth, 12 to 17 years                                                       ___ 5. Families with young children
___ 3. Adults, 18 to 64, without children                                          ___ 6. Older adults


Teaching Topic (record number of learners choosing each answer)

                                                     Matched all       Matched                  Matched                   TOTAL LEARNERS
                                                     four                2 or 3                 1 or none                 IN THIS TEACHING
                                                     correctly         correctly                correctly                     ACTIVITY
 How many individuals matched the drink
 correctly to the label?



Educational Project (select one):
    ___A. School Day                                     ___G. Gardens                                      ___M. Sheltered Housing
    ___B .After-School                                   ___H. Health Clinics                               ___N. Treatment Programs
    ___C. Job Center                                     ___I. Incarcerated                                 ___O. Disabled Adults
    ___D. WIC                                            ___J. Senior Dining                                ___P. Home Visits
    ___E. Head Start                                     ___K. Food Pantries, free meal site                ___Q. Other
    ___F. Family Resource Center                         ___L. Adult Ed Programs

    Number           By Gender              By Ethnicity                                          By Race
       of                                                          American     Asian/       Black/      Hawaiian/
    Learners                                                                                                                                     Disabled
                   Male        Female    Hispanic/       Not        Indian/     Asian        African       Pacific       White       Other
     (Total)                              Latino       Hispanic     Native     American     American      Islander
                                                                   American




   Impact Statement: Educators taught XX [choose one or more: older adults, adults ages 18-64, adults with children or pregnant
   women] about the importance of [insert subject of lesson]. After the lesson, XX% (of X) participants were able to [insert behavior
   measured by evaluation question].

   Goal: By [Date}, xx individuals who participate in the "Stepping Up to a Healthier Lifestyle" campaign in (insert name) County
   will report that they intend to increase the frequency that they implement at least one of the nutrition or physical activity behaviors
   targeted in the campaign.




                     WNEP education is supported by the USDA Food Stamp Program, UW-Extension, FoodShare Wisconsin, and local partners. In
                     Wisconsin, FoodShare can help provide a healthy diet. To find out more about FoodShare, call your local FoodShare office.
                     12/04
DRINK MORE/DRINK LESS

Circle one or two things you will try to do THIS WEEK to make healthier drink choices.
Put a check mark beside a few other things you will start to do SOON to make healthier
drink choices.

Drink less sugared drinks:
        Buy a smaller cup when you buy fountain drinks.
        Don’t go back for a refill.
        Buy a bottle instead of a can, and save half for tomorrow.
        Don’t refrigerate your soft drinks. Pour over lots of ice in a smaller glass.
        Limit yourself to one can of soda per day.
        Cut back – drink one less can per day this week. Cut back more later.
        Don’t keep sugared drinks in the house. Make milk, water and 100% juice
          available at home.
        Stop drinking soft drinks in the car.
        Do you buy cases of soda to bring to school or work for lunch? Buy cases of
          water or juice instead.
        Instead of bringing soda to school or work for lunch, buy a plastic beverage
          container and fill it with milk or juice.
        Store soda out of sight. If you can’t see it, you might forget you have it.
Drink more milk, water and 100% juice:
       Pour your milk or water in a larger glass.
       Add ice if you enjoy it cold. If you enjoy what you’re drinking, you’ll drink more.
       Keep nutritious drinks at the front of the fridge, in plain sight.
       Choose milk with meals away from home.
       Drink milk with all your meals.
       Keep a container of water in the fridge.
       If your tap water doesn’t taste good, try adding a small amount of juice to your
         glass.
       Buy calcium fortified orange juice.
       Freeze bottles of water or juice to take with you so you’re not tempted to buy a
         soft drink.




             WNEP education is supported by the USDA Food Stamp Program, UW-Extension, FoodShare Wisconsin, and local partners.
             In Wisconsin, FoodShare can help provide a healthy diet. To find out more about FoodShare, call your local FoodShare
             office. 12/04
Buy a smaller cup when you buy
                                                           Don’t go back for a refill.
fountain drinks.

                                                           Don’t refrigerate your sugared
Buy a bottle instead of a can, and
                                                           drinks. Pour over lots of ice in a
save half for tomorrow.
                                                           smaller glass.

                                      Don’t keep sugared drinks in the
Limit yourself to one can of soda per
                                      house. Make milk, water and 100%
day.
                                      juice available at home.

                                                           Do you buy cases of soda to bring to
Stop drinking soft drinks in the car.                      school or work for lunch? Buy cases
                                                           of water or juice instead.
Instead of bringing soda to school or
work for lunch, buy a plastic         Store soda out of sight in the garage
beverage container and fill it with   or at the back of a closet.
milk or juice.
                                                           Add ice if you enjoy it cold. If you
Pour your milk or water in a larger
                                                           enjoy what you’re drinking, you’ll
glass.
                                                           drink more.

Keep nutritious drinks at the front of                     Choose milk with meals away from
the fridge, in plain sight.                                home.


                                                           Keep a container of water in the
Drink milk with all your meals.
                                                           fridge.

If your tap water doesn’t taste good,
try adding a small amount of juice to                      Buy calcium fortified orange juice.
your glass.

Freeze bottles of water or juice to                        Bring a water bottle. If you have a
take with you so you’re not tempted                        drink available, you’ll be less likely to
to buy a soft drink.                                       go to the vending machine.



            WNEP education is supported by the USDA Food Stamp Program, UW-Extension, FoodShare Wisconsin, and local partners.
            In Wisconsin, FoodShare can help provide a healthy diet. To find out more about FoodShare, call your local FoodShare
            office. 12/04

								
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