TeacherWeb by benbenzhou

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									December 6, 2010          Peer Resource
Write in journal-They need to be collected Friday, December 10 since
grades are due:
    Tomorrow morning we are going to provide breakfast for Mr. Daw’s
    Class. I need to bring ________________ (check with Felipe). If I am
    helping, I need to get a permission slip so my teacher(s) are aware.
    Some of the class helped at the Ventura County Rescue Mission on
    Friday…I did/did not help (write one). I wish that….
    I should think about going to the PFSO meeting tonight. It starts at
    6:30 and lasts about an hour. It is in the cafeteria. I know I need to
    attend at least one meeting. And I need to join…it is $5.00. This
    organization supports ME!
    Sunday, Dec. 13, 2010 at 5:30 am Santa to the Sea! Scholarships
    available (next year) if I volunteer. $500.00!!! It will be fun and worth my
    time.
Movie: The Elephant Man-questions on TeacherWeb…
December 6, 2010            English Periods 1 and 4
CA Standards: 10RL3.10 Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text:
  Identify and describe the function of dialogue, scene designs, soliloquies,
  asides, and character foils in dramatic literature
Language and Learning Objectives: Today I will share my answers to the
   drama quiz with my classmates. I will know the differences between an ACT
   and a Scene and dialogue and monologue.
Closure: I need to make flashcards of all the drama terms for homework-due
   Wednesday. There are 22 of them. (See next slide for examples)
Agenda:
1. SSR-Read background of play..
2. Continue with drama pretest
3. Begin reading Crucible
4. Homework: Make the note cards
    1. Extra Credit-go to the PFSO meeting tonight at 6:30-7:30 (Wolfe will
       be there)
When there is a problem between either:
Person to person “I don‟t like you”
Person against society: “I can‟t drive legally
because I haven‟t taken drivers‟ training behind
the wheel.” or “Skateboarding is not legal on
school property.”
Person against nature: “I can‟t go
snowboarding because there is no snow yet in
the mountains
Person to himself: “I can‟t go swimming
because I am afraid of the water and can‟t swim”
      One side of the note card-just write the bold words
These are called   CONFLICTS
Which conflicts are these:
A.“I can‟t go snowboarding because there is no
snow yet in the mountains
B.“I can‟t go swimming because I am afraid of
the water and can‟t swim”
C.“I don’t like you”
D. “I can’t drive legally because I haven’t taken
drivers’ training behind the wheel.” or
“Skateboarding is not legal on school property.”
Which conflicts are these:
A.“I can‟t go snowboarding because there is no
snow yet in the mountains Person vs. nature
B.“I can‟t go swimming because I am afraid of
the water and can‟t swim” Person vs Himself
C.“I don‟t like you” Person vs. Person
D. “I can‟t drive legally because I haven‟t taken drivers‟
training behind the wheel.” or “Skateboarding is not legal
on school property.” Person vs Society
December 6, 2010            English Period 2


CA Standard:11RL3.4 Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text: Analyze ways in
   which poets use imagery, personification, figures of speech, and sounds to evoke
   readers’ emotions.
Language and Learning Objectives: Today I will learn about some new poems. I
   will be practicing my listening and speaking as well as my ability to analysis
   poetry.
Closure: Today, before leaving, I will be able to say 3 things about Emily
   Dickinson and I will know what an allusion is.
Agenda:
1. SSR- Catcher in the Rye
2. Write for 5 minutes about Emily Dickinson-you may look at your textbook book
   to remind you-but I would expect you could write at minimum a half a page
   about this award winning poet.
3. Continue with poetry sharing
4. Homework: Read about Robert Frost-be prepared to write about him
5. Extra Credit: Go to the PFSO meeting tonight. 6:30-7:30ish (Wolfe will be
   there)
December 6, 2010             English Period 3


CA Standard:11RL3.4 Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text: Analyze ways in
which poets use imagery, personification, figures of speech, and sounds to evoke readers’
emotions.


Language and Learning Objectives: Today I will be learning about two poems
and analysis them with annotation.
Closure: Today I will fill out a status sheet about my newsletter article.
Agenda:
1. Fill out status sheets-
2. Begin reading poetry-analyze
3. Create Venn-Diagram to compare contrast the two poems
4. Poetry test tomorrow on the poems from today
        POETRY FORM

                         A word is dead
• FORM - the
  appearance of the      When it is said,
  words on the page        Some say.
• LINE - a group of
  words together on       I say it just
  one line of the poem   Begins to live
                           That day.
• STANZA - a group
  of lines arranged
  together
Allusion Definition:

An allusion is a reference, within a literary work, to another work of fiction, a
film, a piece of art, or even a real event.

An allusion serves as a kind of shorthand, drawing on this outside work to
provide greater context or meaning to the situation being written about.

 Readers who get the allusions gain a richer understanding of the work, but
those who don't can still follow the story and be entertained or enlightened by it
        NARRATIVE POEMS
• A poem that tells a      Examples of Narrative
  story.                          Poems
• Generally longer than
  the lyric styles of          “The Raven”
  poetry b/c the poet       “The Highwayman”
  needs to establish
  characters and a plot.     “Casey at the Bat”
                           “The Walrus and the
                                 Carpenter”
                 REFRAIN
• A sound, word,          “Quoth the raven,
  phrase or line          „Nevermore.‟”
  repeated regularly in
  a poem.
         CONCRETE POEMS
• In concrete poems,                      Poetry
                                          Is like
  the words are                          Flames,
                                      Which are
  arranged to create a             Swift and elusive
                                  Dodging realization
  picture that relates to     Sparks, like words on the
  the content of the         Paper, leap and dance in the
                             Flickering firelight. The fiery
  poem.                     Tongues, formless and shifting
                            Shapes, tease the imiagination.
                                Yet for those who see,
                                 Through their mind‟s
                                    Eye, they burn
                                     Up the page.
                  Allusion
• Allusion comes from     A tunnel walled and overlaid
  the verb “allude”       With dazzling crystal: we
  which means “to refer      had read
  to”                     Of rare Aladdin‟s wondrous
                             cave,
• An allusion is a
                          And to our own his name we
  reference to               gave.
  something famous.
                            From “Snowbound”
                            John Greenleaf Whittier
           ASSONANCE
• Repeated VOWEL sounds in a line or lines
  of poetry.

 (Often creates near rhyme.)

   Lake Fate          Base           Fade
       (All share the long “a” sound.)
     ASSONANCE cont.

Examples of ASSONANCE:
 “Slow the low gradual moan came in the
                 snowing.”
                        - John Masefield

 “Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet
                  sleep.”
                   - William Shakespeare
          ALLITERATION
• Consonant sounds repeated at the
  beginnings of words

 If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled
 peppers, how many pickled peppers did
 Peter Piper pick?
         ONOMATOPOEIA
• Words that imitate the sound they are
  naming
             BUZZ
• OR sounds that imitate another sound

     “The silken, sad, uncertain, rustling of
       each purple curtain . . .”
SAMPLE RHYME SCHEME
     The Germ by Ogden Nash

    A mighty creature is the germ,      a
 Though smaller than the pachyderm.     a
     His customary dwelling place       b
    Is deep within the human race.      b
  His childish pride he often pleases   c
  By giving people strange diseases.    c
   Do you, my poppet, feel infirm?      a
     You probably contain a germ.       a
            NEAR RHYME
• a.k.a imperfect            ROSE
  rhyme, close rhyme         LOSE

• The words share       Different vowel
  EITHER the same      sounds (long “o” and
  vowel or consonant       “oo” sound)
  sound BUT NOT        Share the same
  BOTH                   consonant sound
        INTERNAL RHYME
• A word inside a line rhymes with another
  word on the same line.

    Once upon a midnight dreary, while I
        pondered weak and weary.

                 From “The Raven”
                 by Edgar Allan Poe
            END RHYME
• A word at the end of one line rhymes with
  a word at the end of another line

            Hector the Collector
          Collected bits of string.
     Collected dolls with broken heads
     And rusty bells that would not ring.
      FREE VERSE POETRY
• Unlike metered         • Free verse poetry is
  poetry, free verse       very conversational -
  poetry does NOT          sounds like someone
  have any repeating       talking with you.
  patterns of stressed
  and unstressed         • A more modern type
  syllables.               of poetry.
• Does NOT have
  rhyme.
RHYTHM
   • The beat created by
     the sounds of the
     words in a poem

   • Rhythm can be
     created by meter,
     rhyme, alliteration
     and refrain.

								
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