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Divorce overheads

VIEWS: 6 PAGES: 20

									      Divorce
Carolyn R. Fallahi, Ph. D.
     Divorce Statistics
• Changes in divorce from 1960s until
  now.
• Following a divorce, 84% of children
  reside with their mothers.
• Changes in the methods in which we
  do research in divorce.
    Research in Divorce
• Past: assumed 2-parent family
  structure necessary for successful
  child socialization.
• Many early studies flawed.
• Many did not investigate significant
  mediating factors.
    Research in Divorce
• Current researchers: take a life
  course, risk and resilience
  perspective.
• Divorce is one step in a series of
  family transitions that affect family
  relationships & children’s adjustment.
    Effects of Divorce
• Immediately following the divorce.
• Symptoms most commonly seen.
• After the divorce….children are less
  socially, emotionally, and academically
  well adjusted than are children in
  non-divorced families.
    Problems related to
          divorce
• Adolescence – more likely to drop out of
  school
• More likely to become pregnant.
• More likely to engage in antisocial /
  delinquent behavior.
• More clinical problems.
• Young adulthood – level of achievement,
  quality of close personal relationships,
  fewer financial resources.
   Can anything positive
   come out of divorce?
• Girls: lots of conflict before divorce,
  more competent after divorce.
   Factors that mediate
         divorce
• Age – early studies indicated younger,
  better.
• Recent studies – no.
• Gender – early studies – negative
  adjustment for boys; remarriage
  problematic for girls.
• Recent studies: behavior problems
  increase in adolescence – greater risk for
  girls.
     Factors that mediate
           divorce
•   Personality
•   Intelligence
•   Competency
•   Easy temperament
•   High self-esteem
•   Internal locus of control
•   Good sense of humor
   Should parents stay
  together for the kids?
• The effects of high conflict.
• Personality profile.
 What can parents do to
         help?
• Children’s adjustment = quality of
  parenting.
• Warm, supportive, communicative,
  responsive to needs, firm &
  consistent control, positive discipline,
  MONITOR closely.
 What can parents do to
         help?
• Non-custodial parent MUST be
  involved.
• Supportive
• Child not feel in the middle
• Economics
• coparenting
         Father Absence
           Literature
•   Meta analysis 67 studies
•   Stevenson & Black
•   60% of all marriages end in divorce
•   90% of all cases, mom gets custody
•   1/6th children see dad 1x/week
•   50% do not see dad at all
•   2/3rds have no relationship with dad 10
    years post divorce
     Is dad necessary for a
    good outcome with kids?
•   YES!
•   The role of child support.
•   Issues of poverty.
•   Why aren’t dads more involved?
•   The role of mom’s attitudes towards
    dad.
     Why isn’t dad around
            more?
•   Employment
•   Women’s attitudes
•   Depression
•   Workplace issues
•   Fatherhood programs
•   Start with our sons early on.
    Effects on children
• More aggression …. Why?
• More antisocial behaviors.
• Hetherington – before 5 years old
• Adelson – sex role development of
  boys
• Armsden – attachment & adolescents
    Effects on children
• Stevenson & Black – stereotypical
  sex-typed toys.
• Conceptions of masculine & feminine
  roles.
• Block – sex roles & socialization
• Lamb – the role of the peer group
    Effects on children
• Biller & Bahm – masculine behavior
• Beaty – adolescent males & peers
• Father absence & daughters
  – Early sexual activity
  – More likely to be sexually abused
  – Early pregnancy
    Effects on children
• Newcomer & Udry – minor
  delinquencies
• Ballard et al – sexually abused; early
  sexual relations; multiple sex
  partners
• Daughters & “caring” dads
    Father absence &
 African American Males
• Paschall et al –
  – Cernkovich & Giordano – parental control
    & supervision
  – Griffin et al – parental monitoring &
    substance use & delinquency
  – Paschall et al – attachment & violence
  – Single moms

								
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