ENGLISH 450, The Romantic Age by ecPy2fo

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                                  ENGLISH 450/550, The Romantic Age
                                        2006 Winter Trimester
                                       Tuesday and Thursday
                                             8:00 to 9:55

INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Rebecca Jordan            OFFICE LOCATION: Third Floor Tatum Court

OFFICE HOURS: Monday, 12:00 to 5:00; Tuesday and Thursday, 2:30 to 5:00

OFFICE TELEPHONE: 601 318.6150                        HOME TELEPHONE: 601.545.8370

OFFICE E-MAIL: rebecca.jordan@wmcarey.edu

TEXTS:
Everyone purchases the following anthology:
Damrosch, David, ed. The Longman Anthology of British Literature: The Romantics and Their
         Contemporaries. New York: Longman, 2003. ISBN: 0.321.10578-6
Purchase only one of the following:
Austin, Jane. Pride and Prejudice: A Norton Critical Edition. ISBN: 0-393-97604-1
Bronte, Charlotte. Jane Eyre: A Norton Critical Edition. ISBN: 0-393-97542-8
Shelly, Mary. Frankenstein: A Norton Critical Edition. ISBN: 0-393-96458-2

CATALOG DESCRIPTION: A study of British prose and poetry of the early 19th century.

NATURE OF COURSE CONTENT:
         English 450/550 is a survey of Romantic literature. For the most part, we will be reading,
discussing, and studying the works of the six major Romantic poets (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron,
Shelley, and Keats), but we will also examine some of the novels written during this period. I hope to
devote most of our class periods to the critical discussion of a relatively few individual texts, but they will
be works which, in the opinion of many critics and scholars, are absolutely central and essential to an
understanding of the period.
         At the end of the course, I hope that you will have acquired a broad familiarity with the whole
period and a deeper knowledge of some of its most important works; I also hope you will have identified
and studied some of the period's major concerns and themes and acquired the background, the knowledge,
and the critical tools to continue your study of the Romantic period. Finally, I hope you will acquire some
sense of the relation (and importance) of the Romantic period and Romantic literature to our own time.

SPECIFIC STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
At the end of the trimester, students will be able
      To read and understand poetry, satire, the beginning of the novel, essays, journals, and letters
         during the Romantic Age as reflected in selected writings
      To engage in meaningful class discussions of selected writings
      To use writing as a means of learning and reflection
      To communicate acquired knowledge of the Romantic Age through formal writing—expository
         and creative

CLASS PARTICIPATION:
    ENG 450 is an interactive class; therefore, you have a responsibility not only to yourself, but also
      to the class members to be at all class meetings on time and prepared for the class. Your presence,
      punctuality, preparation, and participation are crucial to success in this class. Be prepared to
      discuss reading assignments on the day they are due. Good participation--pertinent questions,
      constructive comments, observations, and contributions--enhances your grade.
                                                                                                           2



ATTENDANCE:
    Successful completion of this course requires regular and prompt attendance. The catalog states
     that students must attend 75% of the class meetings in order to receive cr3dit for the course.
    Attendance will be taken at the beginning of class.
    All absences are counted the same. All absences are unexcused including those classes missed for
     adding the course late and classes missed due to college-related trips.
    Three tardies will count as one absence.
    If a student does come in late, the student is responsible for giving the instructor a sheet of
     notebook paper with his/her name, the date, and a statement of tardiness.
    Getting up to leave temporarily or early is not acceptable except with prior permission before class
     or in an extreme emergency. Two instances of leaving temporarily or early will equal one
     absence.
    Reading I.Ds or oral presentations missed because of tardiness or absence cannot be made up.
    Excessive tardies, leaving in the middle of class, and absences will affect one’s grade.

CLASS DEMEANOR:
    Avoid eating/drinking during class
    Turn off pager and cell phones. Please do not leave class to answer cell phones.
    Avoid intimidating speech to students or faculty.
    Avoid conducting private conversations during class.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:
    Consult the college’s policy regarding academic dishonesty in The Lance.
    Students are expected to uphold the Academic Honor Pledge signed on the first day of class.
    All incidents of academic dishonesty will be considered as the most serious offense, resulting in a
     grade of zero for the assignment and may (at the instructor’s discretion) result in immediate
     failure of the course and further actions according to college policy.

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES:
    Students with disabilities who are protected by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and
     require special accommodations should contact MS Brenda Waldrip at 601.318.6188.

CATASTROPHIC RELIEF PLAN:
In case of a catastrophic event, the following procedures will be followed:
      In case of a closed campus with internet access, all courses will shift to Desire2Learn or e-mail
         delivery of assignments.
      In the case of a closed campus with no internet access, follow all syllabus directions for the
         completion of all course assignments. Completed assignments should be packaged in due date
         order for delivery to the campus once the campus has reopened. These assignments may also be
         sent by mail in care of your professor.


FINAL GRADING SCALE:
93-100 = A
83-92 = B
73-82 = C
63-72 = D
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CLASS REQUIREMENTS:
30 pts. Oral presentations and participation
        10 pts.      Literature circle participation
                       Each person signs up for one literature circle participation group.
                       Each group will be responsible for class discussions on designated literary
                           selections.
                       Each person must have thoroughly read the assigned material, reflected on it
                           through writing, and researched aspects of the reading material.
                       Each person must bring a copy of research material.
                       Each person in the discussion group must contribute to a lively, informed, and
                           interesting discussion of the assigned reading material.
                       Being absent on a day scheduled for literature circle participation will result in a
                           deduction of points.
        10 pts.        Perspective collaborative presentation
                       Evidence of close reading, reflection, and understanding of the perspective
                           section (2 pts.)
                       Presentation or teaching of the perspective well organized, clear, and
                           understandable to an audience who has not read the material (4 pts.)
                       Effective use of audio visual aids to enhance the presentation: handouts and
                           PowerPoint (3 pt.)
                       Effective oral presentation: eye contact, effective uses of body, clear enunciation
                           and pronunciation, volume loud enough, rate of speaking not too fast (1 pt.
                       Oral presentations can not be made up due to absences.
        10 pts.        Novel collaborative presentation
                       Evidence of close reading, reflection, and understanding of the novel (2 pts.)
                       Presentation or teaching of the novel well organized, clear, and understandable
                           to an audience who has not read the novel (4 pts.)
                                 Coverage of the plot, characters, theme
                                 Background and context or contemporary reviews and reactions (back
                                     of novel)
                                 Essays in criticism (back of novel)
                                 Multiple intelligence
                       Effective use of audio visual aids to enhance the presentation: handouts and
                           PowerPoint (3 pts.)
                       Effective oral presentation: eye contact, effective uses of body, clear enunciation
                           and pronunciation, volume loud enough, rate of speaking not too fast (1 pt.)
                       Oral presentations can not be made up due to absences.
20 pts.     Reading I.D’s (cannot be made-up due to absences or tardies)
              A quiz consisting of identifying quotes, symbols, or characters from assigned readings
20 pts.     Final exam
              An essay exam on literature covered in literature circles, perspectives, and novels
              Absence from the final exam will result in a zero unless prior arrangements are made by
                 the student. Makeup final exams are given only under special circumstances.
                                                                                                      4


30 pts.   Writing portfolio
           Write-ups
                    Journal like writings completed in class or outside of class on perspective
                        readings and coverage of a focused subject discussed in class
                    Place your name and the date on the unlined, upper left hand corner of the
                        notebook paper.
                    Write the subject of the write-up on the first line(s).
                    Using a pen, write on the subject for a minimum of one page. Do not skip every
                        other line.
                    Write on the back of the paper if necessary. However, do not use a second sheet
                        of paper.
                    Write-ups are not evaluated as formal writing is. Grammar and organization are
                        not a consideration. I want to see what you have learned. Write-ups are like
                        notes taken in class.
                             o Pre-Write Ups
                                       Completed by literature circle group members only
                                       Consists of reflections on the reading assignment or questions
                                           regarding the reading
                                       Includes a significant quote (include page number) and an
                                           explanation of the context and significance of the quote
                                       A copy of research on the author or reading selection; only
                                           high academic quality—Proquest, project MUSE, Gale
                                           Literary Index JSTOR EBSCO, etc. No Cliff Notes, Pink
                                           Monkey, etc.
                                       Turned in on the day of discussion
                             o Post Write Ups
                                       Completed by everyone in the class, including the literature
                                           circle discussion group
                                       Determine a topic sentence related to the reading and develop
                                           or develop a predetermined thesis sentence
                                       Turned in on the class day after discussion
           A tentative proposal in letter form of what the two components--literary analysis and
               multiple intelligence-- of your portfolio will be
           Literary analysis first draft
                    A three to five page paper using three sources and dealing with a literary aspect
                        of selection(s) covered in class—literature circle discussion, perspectives, or
                        novels
                    Your reading and reflection on class readings plus our class discussion will
                        determine your interest and possible subject on which to write.
           Self response, peer, and professor responses using the William Carey University Writing
               Response Sheet.
           Portfolio letter of analysis and reflection
           Literary analysis final draft
           Multiple intelligence
                    A creative response to the literary selection you used for your literary analysis
                        (multiple intelligences)
                                                                                                     5


SCHEDULE:
WEEK 1
November 7    Syllabus discussion & class organization

November 9    William Blake
              Biographical , 112 Literature Circle 1
              Songs of Innocence Literature Circle 2
                      “The Lamb,” 1120
                      “The Chimney Sweeper,” 122
                      “Infant Joy,” 124
              Songs of Experience Literature Circle 3
                      “Thy Tyger,” 129
                      “The Chimney Sweeper,” 130
                      “Infant Sorrow,” 133
              The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, 135 Literature Circle 4

WEEK 2
November 14    Mary Wollstonecraft
              Biographical, 227 Literature Circle 2
              A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Introduction, 231 Literature Circle 3
              A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, from Chapter 1, “The Rights and Involved
                      Duties” Literature Circle 3
              A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, from Chapter 2, “The Prevailing Opinion of a
                      Sexual Character Discussed,” 237 Literature Circle 4
              A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, from Chapter 3, “ The Same Subject Continued,”
                      249 Literature Circle 4
              from Maria or The Wrongs of Woman, 257 Literature Circle 1

November 16   No Class

WEEK 3
November 28   Perspective presentation 1, The Romantics and Their Contemporaries, 2-30

November 30   William Wordsworth
              Biographical, 336 Literature Circle 3
              Preface to Lyrical Ballads (1800, 1802) 356 Literature Circle 4
              “The Thorn,” 343 Literature Circle 1
              “Michael,” 369 Literature Circle 1
              from The Prelude, or Growth of a Poet’s Mind Literature Circle 2
                       “Book First, Introduction Childhood, and School Time,” 389-403
WEEK 4
December 5    Perspective presentation 2: The Rights of Man and the Revolution Controversy, 56-111

December 7    Samuel Taylor Coleridge
              Biographical, 520 Literature Circle 4
              The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere (1798), 528-543 Literature Circle 1
              Christabel, 547-562 Literature Circle 2
              Biographia Literaria, 570-582 Literature Circle 3
WEEK 5
December 12   Perspective presentation 3: The Abolition of Slavery and the Slave Trade, 159-213

December 14   George Gordon, Lord Byron
              Biographical, 600 Literature Circle 1
              from Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, Canto 3, 654 Literature Circle 2
              from Don Juan, Canto 1, 672 Literature Circle 3
              from Don Juan, Canto 2, 717 Literature Circle 4
                                                                                                     6


WEEK 6
December 19   Perspective presentation 4: The Wollstonecraft Controversy and the Rights of Women,
              269-308

January 4      Percy Bysshe Shelley
              Biographical, 752 Literature Circle 2
              From “A Defence of Poetry,” 800 Literature Circle 3
              “Mount Blanc,” 754 Literature Circle 4
              “Ozmandias,” 760 Literature Circle 4
              “Sonnet: England in 1819,” 761 Literature Circle 1
              “Ode to the West Wind,” 771 Literature Circle 1
WEEK 7
January 9     Perspective presentation 5: The Sublime, the Beautiful, and the Picturesque, 496-519

January 11     John Keats
              Biographical, 852 Literature Circle 3
              “On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer,” 854 Literature Circle 4
              “Ode to a Nightingale,” 879 Literature Circle 4
              “Ode on a Grecian Urn,” 882 Literature Circle 1
              “To Autumn,” 886 Literature Circle 1
              “The Eve of St Agnes,” 865 Literature Circle 2
WEEK 8
January 16    Literary analysis and multiple intelligence proposal due
              Perspective presentation 6: Popular Prose and the Problems of Authorship, 916-1006
WEEK 8
January 18    Anna Laetitia Barbauld Literature Circle 1
                       Biographical, 31
                       “Eighteen Hundred and Eleven,” 37
              Charlotte Smith Literature Circle 2
                       Biographical, 49
                       “To Melancholy,” 50
              Mary Robinson Literature Circle 3
                       Biographical, 214
                       From Sappho and Phaon, 217
              Dorothy Wordsworth Literature Circle 4
                       Biographical, 465
                       “Grasmere—a Fragment,” 467
                       from The Grasmere Journals, 478
WEEK 9
January 23    Collaborative novel presentation: Pride and Prejudice

January 25    Collaborative novel presentation: Jane Eyre

WEEK 10
January 30    Collaborative novel presentation: Frankenstein

February 1    Final exam

WEEK 11       Writing portfolio due
              Oral presentation of literary analysis paper and multiple intelligence
              Final exam results
                                                                                                7


                                           ENG 450, The Romantic Age

NAME________________________________________________________________________________________
              (Last Name)             (Middle Name)           (First Name)

Home Telephone Number___________________________Work Telephone Number___________________________

E-mail Address___________________________________________________________________________________

Address:_____________________________________________________________________

          _____________________________________________________________________

Major:__________________________________Minor:_____________________________

_______________Reading I.D’s (20 pts.)

_______________Oral presentation/participation (30 pts.)

                   _____________Literature circles preparation and participation (10 pts.)

                   _____________Perspective collaborative presentation (10 pts.)

                   _____________Novel collaborative presentation (10 pts.)

_______________Final Exam (20pts.)

_______________Writing portfolio (30 pts.)

______________Total         ________Final grade                     __________Absences


Week 1                                          Week 6
______Tuesday, November 7                       ______Tuesday, December 19
______Thursday, November 9                      ______Thursday, January 14

Week 2                                          Week 7
______Tuesday, November 14                      ______Tuesday, January 9
______Thursday, November 16                     ______Thursday, January 11

Week 3                                          Week 8
______Tuesday, November 28                      ______Tuesday, January 16
______Thursday, November 30                     ______Thursday, January 18

Week 4                                          Week 9
______ Tuesday, December 5                      ______Tuesday, January 23
______ Thursday, December 7                     ______Thursday, January 25

Week 5                                          Week 10
_______Tuesday, December 12                     `______Tuesday, January 30
_______Thursday, December 14                     ______Thursday, February 1
                                                                                                          8




LITERATURE CIRCLES Sign up for one literature circle group. Put your name, telephone number, and e-mail
address.

GROUP 1
1. ____________________________________________________________________________________

2. ___________________________________________________________________________________

3. ____________________________________________________________________________________

4. ____________________________________________________________________________________



GROUP 2
1.____________________________________________________________________________________

2. ___________________________________________________________________________________

3. ____________________________________________________________________________________



GROUP 3
1.____________________________________________________________________________________

2. ___________________________________________________________________________________

3. ____________________________________________________________________________________


GROUP 4
1.____________________________________________________________________________________

2. ___________________________________________________________________________________

3. ____________________________________________________________________________________
                                                                                                9



Perspective Collaborative Presentations: Put your name, telephone number, and e-mail address.

Perspective 1: The Romantics and Their Contemporaries

1.____________________________________________________________________________________

2.____________________________________________________________________________________


Perspective 2: The Rights of Man and the Revolution Controversy

1.____________________________________________________________________________________

2.____________________________________________________________________________________


Perspective 3: The Abolition of Slavery and the Slave Trade

1.____________________________________________________________________________________

2.____________________________________________________________________________________


Perspective 4: The Wollstonecraft Controversy and the Rights of Women

1.____________________________________________________________________________________

2.____________________________________________________________________________________


Perspective 5: The Sublime, the Beautiful, and the Picturesque

1.____________________________________________________________________________________

2.____________________________________________________________________________________

Perspective 6: Popular Prose and the Problems of Authorship

1.____________________________________________________________________________________

2.____________________________________________________________________________________

3.____________________________________________________________________________________
                                                                                                         10



COLLABORATIVE NOVEL PRESENTATION
Sign up for one collaborative novel presentation. Put your name, telephone number, and e-mail address.

Jane Austin’s Pride and Prejudice
1.___________________________________________________________________________________

2.___________________________________________________________________________________

3.__________________________________________________________________________________

4. .__________________________________________________________________________________

5. .__________________________________________________________________________________



Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre
1.___________________________________________________________________________________

2. ___________________________________________________________________________________

3.__________________________________________________________________________________

4. .__________________________________________________________________________________




Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein
1.___________________________________________________________________________________

2.___________________________________________________________________________________

3.__________________________________________________________________________________

4. .__________________________________________________________________________________
                                                                                                                    11


Perspective Collaborative Presentation (10 pts.)

NAME____________________________________________SCORE______________


 Evidence of close reading, reflection, and understanding of the perspective section
    (2 pts.)

 Presentation or teaching of the perspective well organized, clear, and understandable to an audience who has not
    read the material (4 pts.)

 Effective use of audio visual aids to enhance the presentation: handouts and/or PowerPoint (3 pt.)
 Effective oral presentation: eye contact, effective uses of body, clear enunciation and pronunciation, volume loud
    enough, rate of speaking not too fast (1 pt.

 Oral presentations can not be made up due to absences or tardies.




Novel Collaborative Presentation (10 pts.)

NAME_____________________________________________SCORE_____________


 Evidence of close reading, reflection, and understanding of the novel (2 pts.)
 Presentation or teaching of the novel well organized, clear, and understandable to an audience who has not read
    the novel (4 pts.)

                Coverage of the plot, characters, theme
                Background and context or contemporary reviews and reactions (back of novel)
                Essays in criticism (back of novel)
                Multiple intelligence
 Effective use of audio visual aids to enhance the presentation: handouts and/or PowerPoint (3 pts.)
 Effective oral presentation: eye contact, effective uses of body, clear enunciation and pronunciation, volume loud
    enough, rate of speaking not too fast (1 pt.)

 Oral presentations can not be made up due to absences or tardies.
                                                                                         12


Hattiesburg, MS 39401


January 16, 2007

Dr. Rebecca Jordan
William Carey College
498 Tuscan Avenue
Hattiesburg, MS 39401

Dear Dr. Jordan:

Paragraph 1: Identify the piece(s) of literature to be covered in your literary analysis and
multiple intelligence. Express your personal response to the literature and author. Explain
why the topic was chosen, what you hope to gain from an in-depth look into this area, etc.
Indicate your tentative thesis for your literary analysis—your opinion, conclusion,
assertion, or hypothesis. Discuss what you presently envision the content for your
literary analysis to be—maybe the tentative organization of the literary analysis essay.

Paragraph 2: Explain which multiple intelligence project you plan to complete, giving
as much detail and explanation as possible at this planning stage

Paragraph 3: Discuss your process for completing the assignments--completing your
research, drafting your paper, completing the multiple intelligences project, etc.


Sincerely,

(Your signature)

Bill Smith
                                                                                                                                  13


                         WILLIAM CAREY UNIVERSITY WRITING RESPONSE SHEET

WRITER___________________________________________________________________________________________________

PEER or PROFESSOR READER______________________________________________________________________________

ORGANIZATION AND DEVELOPMENT
Self     Peer/ Professor
Y/N            Y/N       The title attracts attention and gives a forecast of the subject matter of the essay.
Y/N            Y/N       The essay demonstrates that the writer understood his/her purpose, audience, and occasion
                         HB 32a
Y/N            Y/N       The thesis statement asserts one clearly focused idea/opinion. HB 32c
Y/N            Y/N       The essay has adequate details, examples, and/or illustrations to support the thesis sentence.
                         HB 31c
Y/N            Y/N       The introduction/lead-in entices readers to read on. HB 33b(1)
Y/N            Y/N       Clearly arranged ideas and effective transitions foster the essay's coherence. HB 32b
Y/N            Y/N       All sentences and paragraphs develop or add to the thesis sentence? (Unity) HB 31a
Y/N            Y/N       The concluding paragraph provides a suitable ending for the essay. HB 33b(2)

WORD CHOICE, SENTENCE STYLE, AND STRUCTURE
Y/N            Y/N   The essay consists of accurate and precise word choice that conveys meaning effectively. The paper
                     presents ideas with depth, stylistic force (the imaginative use of language), and a spark of creativity.
                     HB20
Y/N            Y/N   The essay expresses information in a concise style, avoiding wordiness and needless repetition.
                     HB21
Y/N            Y/N   The sentences reflect variety—simple, compound, complex sentences. The sentences also reflect
                     variety by using grammatical constructions other than the subject to begin sentences.
                     HB30
Y/N            Y/N   The essay contains a rhetorically effective use of active and passive voice. Forceful verbs make
                     sentences more emphatic. The active voice is more emphatic than passive voice. PASSIVE
                     VOICE: The race was won by Sylvia. ACTIVE VOICE: Sylvia won the race.
                     HB29d
Y/N            Y/N   The essay contains a rhetorically effective use of verbs. Forceful linking verbs are more emphatic
                     than forms of have or be (be, am, is, are, was, were, been, being). WORDINESS DUE TO
                     VERB: Rain is symbolic of death in this novel. REVISED: Rain symbolizes death in this novel.
                     HB29d
Y/N            Y/N   The essay contains a rhetorically effective use of the “dummy subjects” it and there. DUMMY
                     SUBJECT: There are several good reasons he dropped out of school. REVISED: He dropped out of
                     school for several good reasons. DUMMY SUBJECT: It is important for a student to remember to
                     apply for spring graduation. REVISED: A student must remember to apply for spring graduation
                     HB21a(3)



MECHANICS AND USAGE
Y/N           Y/N              The essay avoids comma splices. (COMMA SPLICE: I ran over some broken glass, it did not
                               puncture my tires. COMMA SPLICE CORRECTIONS: (1) I ran over some broken glass; it did not
                               puncture my tires. (2) I ran over some broken glass, but it did not puncture my tires. (3) I ran over
                               some broken glass. It did not puncture my tires. (4) I ran over some broken glass; however, it did
                               not puncture my tires. (5) Although I ran over some broken glass, it did not puncture my tires.
                               HB3
Y/N                  Y/N       The essay avoids fused or run-on sentences. (FUSED OR RUN-ON SENTENCE: I ran over some
                               glass it did not puncture my tires. FUSED OR RUN-ON SENTENCES CORRECTION: (1) I ran
                               over some broken glass; it did not puncture my tires. (2) I ran over some broken glass, but it did not
                               puncture my tires. (3) I ran over some broken glass. It did not puncture my tires. (4) I ran over some
                               broken glass; however, it did not puncture my tires. (5) Although I ran over some broken glass, it
                               did not puncture my tires.
                               HB3
Y/N                  Y/N       The essay is free of unacceptable fragments. (FRAGMENT: At Liz’s most recent wedding,
                               the photographer used an instant camera. Because her marriages break up so fast. CORRECTION:
                               Because her marriages break up so fast, the photographer used an instant camera at Liz’s most recent
                               wedding.)
                               HB2
                                                                                                                          14



Y/N           Y/N   Each verb agrees with its subject. (The actions of the new senator hasn’t [should be haven’t] been
                    consistent with his campaign promises.) HB6a

Y/N           Y/N   The essay is free of wrong verb forms. (I seen him yesterday. CORRECTION: I saw him
                    yesterday.) HB7a

Y/N           Y/N   The essay is free of pronoun agreement errors. (To get a temperamental actress to sign a
                    contract, the director would lock them [should be her]in their dressing room.) HB6b

Y/N           Y/N   The essay correctly uses pronoun case. (She gave the dinner for Mother and I. CORRECTION:
                    She gave the dinner for Mother and me.) HB5

Y/N           Y/N   The essay avoids dangling modifiers. (Slamming on the brakes, the car skidded. CORRECTION:
                    After he slammed on the brakes, the car skidded.) HB25b

Y/N           Y/N   The essay is free of misspelled words. The essay correctly used words such as affect/effect,
                    it’s/its,there/their, to/too/two. HB18

Y/N           Y/N   The essay correctly sets off with a comma an introductory phrase or clause. (After we had finished
                    our laundry, we discovered one sock was missing.) HB12b

Y/N           Y/N   The essay correctly uses a comma to separate two independent clauses joined by a coordinating
                    conjunction. (You can bury your savings in the backyard, but don’t expect Mother Nature to pay
                    interest). HB12a

Y/N           Y/N   The essay avoids unnecessary, misplaced, or omitted commas or other marks of punctuation. For
                    example, a writer should avoid placing a comma between a subject and verb or before a
                     coordinating conjunction connecting two verbs, two adjectives, or two nouns. HB13

Y/N           Y/N   The essay uses capital letters correctly: proper names; their abbreviations and acronyms; titles of
                    persons before their names; titles and subtitles of books, plays, essays, and other titled works; the
                    pronoun I and the interjection O; the first word of sentences and of directly quoted speech, etc. The
                    essay also avoids unnecessary capitals. HB9

Y/N           Y/N   The essay correctly uses the apostrophe for showing possession for nouns and indefinite pronouns,
                    contractions and numbers, and plurals formed with an apostrophe; the essay also avoids the
                    misuse of the apostrophe with personal pronouns. HB15

Y/N           Y/N   The essay is free of any garbled or incoherent or inconsistent sentence of any kind due to the
                    combination of unrelated ideas, mixed constructions, faulty predication, or shifts in grammatical
                    structure, tone, style, or viewpoint. (Did it ever occur to you of the enormous waste involved in our
                    public economy?) HB23

MANUSCRIPT FORM
Y/N           Y/N   The writer includes a correct title page if the paper is more than eight pages; and if the paper is less
                    than eight pages, the writer’s name, Dr. Jordan, ENG ____, and the date are doubled spaced in the
                    upper left hand corner of the paper. HB40b, pages 633-644

Y/N           Y/N   The writer uses a running head—name page number (Smith 1). HB40b, page 635

Y/N           Y/N   Borrowed material is either quoted, summarized, or paraphrased and is appropriately cited with in-
                    text citations. HB40b

Y/N           Y/N   The writer avoids just putting quotation marks around the material without blending or correctly
                    introducing. HB40b

Y/N           Y/N   The writer avoids stitching together quotes and summaries and instead uses sources as supporting
                    material for his/her ideas. HB40b

Y/N           Y/N   In-text citations follow correct MLA format. HB40b

Y/N           Y/N   The works cited page correctly uses MLA format. HB40b
                                                                              15



                      ENG 450, The Romantic Age
                Portfolio Letter of Analysis and Reflection

       Write this letter last, after you have completed revising and editing the
literary analysis and the multi intelligence. Begin the letter with the
salutation: Dear Reader. Despite the fact that I am your reader, I want you
to consider the "reader" as someone who is not familiar with your work in
this course from week to week as I have been.

In writing each of the following sections, compose general statements of
observation and analysis and support them with specific examples from your
written text or from your personal experience.

      (1) MY DEVELOPMENT AS A WRITER DURING THE
          PORTFOLIO:
             Describe your development as a writer as you have prepared
            this portfolio, including the challenges of the course, your
            strategies for completing the course work, what you got good
            at, and what you still need to work on.

      (2) MY WRITING STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES:
           Describe the strengths and weaknesses of your writing in this
           portfolio. Describe exactly how you revised your literary
           analysis after self, peer, and professor response.

      (3) WRITING AND ME:
            Explain where writing fits into your education and
           your view of yourself.

      (4) WRITER SELF-ASSESSMENT:
              First, using the criteria on the next page, assess your
           writing portfolio as a WRITTEN TEXT. In your discussion
           demonstrate the level of performance in your written text by
           pointing to examples in your text.
              Second, evaluate your writing process, specifying what
           aspects of the process you developed this term.
              Finally, assign a grade—20, 19, 17, etc. for your writing
           portfolio, based on your assessment and the criteria.
                                                                                                                       16


ENG 450 Portfolio Scoring Guide (30)

NAME_____________________________________________________________________________

SCORE: portfolio completion (5 pts.)______ + holistic score (1-25 pts.)___________ = __________

The following section must be in a loose leaf notebook with tabbed dividers for each bullet.
         8 Pre-write ups
        14 Post write ups
        Perspective presentation handouts
        Novel presentation handouts
        Typed essay/multiple intelligence proposal
        Typed first draft of literary analysis with 3 sources
               Self William Carey University Response sheet
               Peer(s) William Carey University Response sheet
               Professor William Carey University Response sheet
        Final typed draft of literary analysis
        Multi intelligence
        Portfolio letter of analysis and reflection

The portfolio contents will be read holistically and given a single comprehensive score from 1 to 25:

         20-25      A portfolio that is EXCELLENT in overall quality. The portfolio contains all components and is
          substantial in content and mature in style. It demonstrates ability to handle varied prose tasks--(1) expressive
          writing in the pre and post write ups and presentation handouts, (2) formal or expository writing in the
          literary analysis, and (3) creative writing in the multi intelligence. The excellent portfolio uses language
          effectively and creatively. Voice tends to be strong, and there is a clear sense of audience and context. Often
          there is a close connection between the writer's sense of self and the writing and a sense of thematic unity
          with the separate portfolio pieces. An excellent portfolio takes risks that work--either in content of form--and
          challenges the reader by trying something new or presenting traditional material in an interesting and
          effective manner.

         14-19      A portfolio that is GOOD in overall quality. The portfolio contains all parts. A good portfolio
          suggests the excellence that the 20 to 25 portfolio demonstrates. The writing is competent both in content
          and style. There are more strengths than weaknesses, but here may be an unevenness of quality or
          underdevelopment in some of the pieces. The reader may want "more" to be fully convinced of the writer's
          ability to handle varied prose tasks successfully and to use language effectively. There is a sense of audience
          and context, but some of the writing may seem formulaic or lack strong voice. There tend to be minimal risk-
          taking or originality.

         8-13       A portfolio that is FAIR in overall quality. The portfolio contains all parts. It suggests the
          competence that a good portfolio demonstrates. Strengths and weaknesses tend to be evenly balanced--either
          within or among the types of writing. One or more of the types of writing may be too brief or
          underdeveloped. There is some evidence of the writer's ability to handle varied prose tasks successfully and
          to use language effectively, but it is offset by recurring problems in content, style, or grammar. An 8 to 13
          portfolio often lacks a clear sense of audience, a thematic unity among the various pieces of writing, and a
          distinctive voice.

         1-7        A portfolio that is POOR/BELOW AVERAGE in overall quality. One or more of the component
          parts may be missing. It does not suggest the writing competence that a fair portfolio does. Weaknesses
          clearly predominate over strengths. The writing may be clear, focused, and error-free, but is usually thin in
          substance and undistinguished in style. Some of the types of writing may be either short and undeveloped or
          abstract and vague. Moreover, the writer rarely takes risks, relying instead on formulas and clichés. There is
          little evidence of the writer's ability to handle varied prose tasks successfully. The few strengths of a 1 to 7
          portfolio are more than overbalanced by significant weaknesses. The portfolio seems to have been put
          together with very little time and thought.
                                                                                                          17


ENG 450, The Romantic Age, Final Exam (2004 winter)

          Answer three questions. Answer one question from Class Readings, the one question from
Perspectives, and one question from Novels. Answer one question per blue book (you may use additional
blue books if necessary). Put your name and the number of the question on the front of the blue book. Skip
every other line, and write on the front and back. When finished with the final exam, turn in the blue books
and this final exam. You may write on this exam—making notes or an outline. Each question will be
evaluated according to the following criteria:
          _______1. Demonstrating reading and understanding of the selections (6)

         _______2. Clarity and organization (7)

         _______3. Details, facts and illustrations to support general statements (10)

         _______4. Use of the appropriate tone for the specified audience addressed and
                 avoidance of a pattern of grammatical errors (10)

Class Readings

    1.   Discuss Blake’s doctrine of contraries as seen in his poetry.

    2.   Discuss aspects of A Vindication of the Rights of Women and Maria that illustrate Wollstonecraft’s
         trenchant critique of the ideologies of gender: the view of women’s subordination as a universal
         fact of nature, of human history, of rational philosophy, and divine ordination.

    3.   Establish the characteristics of William Wordsworth’s poetry using the “Preface to The Lyrical
         Ballads” and discuss how these characteristic are demonstrated in his poetry.

    4.   Discuss the astonishing variety and inventiveness of Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s poetry from the
         romantic witchery of The Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner and Christabel to the personal,
         descriptive, quietly meditative conversation poems such as “The Eolian Harp” and “Frost and
         Midnight.”

    5.   Byron’s life, Childe Harold Cantos 3 and 4, and Don Juan all represent Byron’s life-long search
         for a definitive hero. His Byronic hero was a proud, despairing, defiant, guilty rebel who resisted
         any institutional or moral system that threatens to rob the self of its autonomy, centrality, and
         independence. Discuss the Byronic hero as seen in Childe Harold, Cantos 3 and 4 and Don Juan.

    6.   Explain Shelly’s definition of the moral and social functions of poetry from “A Defense of Poetry”
         and discuss how these moral and social functions are reflected in three of the following: “Mount
         Blanc,” “Ozmandias,” “Sonnet: England in 1819,” “Ode to the West Wind,” and “To a Skylark.”

    7.   One of the themes of John Keats’ poetry is that the tragedy of the human condition—the
         dichotomy of pain and pleasure—can be borne or endured through a world of vision (imagination)
         represented by art or nature. Discuss Keats’ exploration of this theme through two of his poems.
         Include in your analysis his use of negative capability, “the camelion poet,” and an objective
         correlative.

    8.   The Romantic Age: Discuss the intimate self-revelation and the direct expressions of strong
         personal emotion found in romantic poetry and illustrate with a discussion of two to three poems.
                                                                                                            18


Perspectives
     The Romantics and Their Contemporaries
     The Rights of Man and the Revolution Controversy
     The Abolition of Slavery and the Slave Trade
     The Wollstonecraft Controversy and the Rights of Women
     The Sublime, the Beautiful, and the Picturesque
     Popular Prose and the Problems of Authorship

    9.   A nation’s literature reflects the frame of mind and events of a particular time period. Using two
         of the six Perspectives in The Longman Anthology of British Literature: The Romantic Age,
         characterize the Romantic Period. Use a minimum of three authors and their writings on the
         subject matter to support your thesis sentence. A sample thesis sentence could be the following:
         The writings surrounding the French Revolution and slavery help to characterize the Romantic
         Period.

Novels

    10. For the novel you read, list three to five episodes or events that make up the plot of the novel.
        Then write a diary entry in the voice of a character explaining why he or she behaved as he or she
        did in one of the episodes.

    11. We can often see why a text works as it does by contrasting it with alternatives. Examine the way
        a novel ended. If it ends happily, imagine how it could have ended less happily. If it ends
        tragically, imagine how it could have ended happily. Write a new ending for either the novel in
        which you imagine a conclusion that is exactly the opposite of what the author has provided.
        Indicate the work you are revising. After the revision of the ending, explain whether you think the
        revision works better or the original ending works better.
.
    12. When we write letters and talk to people we know, we most often listen carefully and then answer
        the story our friend has told us with a comparable story of our own. Imagine that one of the
        characters from one of the novels we studied has written you a letter describing things that has
        happened to him or her in the course of the story. In your letter to the character, describe
        something in your own life that is similar to the story you have just read. You could make this
        realistic or fictionalize your answer. You'll write two letters--one from the fictional character to
        you--and a fictional or realistic-based letter from you to the character from the novel.

    13. For the novel you read, select a character and write a characterization. For your thesis sentence,
        state the main character trait and explain this character trait through details from the novel such as
        a description of the character’s appearance, a description of the character’s actions, what others
        say about the character, and/or how others react to the character.

    14. For the novel you read, state a theme for your thesis sentence, and in your essay demonstrate with
        details from the novel how the theme is developed.

    15. For the novel you read, interpret the novel from a particular critical perspective: feminist, Marxist,
        psychoanalytical, cultural, historical, etc.

								
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