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Local Development Strategy for The Waveney Valley

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					         Rural Development Programme for England


                        2007 – 2013


                     Leader Approach



              Local Development Strategy
                            for
                   The Waveney Valley




                    Prepared by NRBAS
on behalf of the Local Action Group and the Accountable Body
                      Easton College
                          Easton
                     Norfolk NR9 5DX


                      November 2008
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England                                         Page 1 of 72


                         Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy


                    “To support the businesses and communities of the Waveney Valley
           in building its identity as a sustainable destination and vibrant place to live and work”


Contents
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy ................................................................1

       1       Description of the Waveney Valley Local Action Group Area ....................................... 2
               1.1        Details of the (Local Action Group) LAG .......................................................... 2
               1.2        Details of the area chosen ............................................................................... 7
       2       What the LAG proposes to do .................................................................................... 22
               2.1        Detailed proposals for the activities the LAG will support ............................... 22
       3       How the LAG will use RDPE funding to support its activities ...................................... 27
               3.1        How the LDS supports the delivery of Axes 1, 2 & 3 by mapping of the activities
               proposed onto the RDPE ........................................................................................... 27
               3.2        How the LDS will address priorities in the national and regional RDPE plans 35
               3.3        Inclusiveness and equal opportunities ........................................................... 42
               3.4        A sustainability appraisal for the LAG activities proposed .............................. 43
               3.5        Plans to co-operate with other LAGS ............................................................. 45
               3.6        Breakdown of match funding sources to be used .......................................... 46
               3.7        Details of the accountable body and its track record ...................................... 47

Appendices ......................................................................................................................49

       1       Workplan for year 1 .................................................................................................... 49
       2       A completed output table and budget ......................................................................... 53
       3       OS map of area including wards ................................................................................ 56
       4       Measures Budget ....................................................................................................... 57
       5       LAG Output Targets & Milestones .............................................................................. 58
       6       Waveney Valley Local Action Group - Terms of Reference (March 2008) .................. 60
       7       Equality Impact Assessment Toolkit ........................................................................... 61
       8       LAG Members ............................................................................................................ 70
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England                   Page 2 of 72


1            Description of the Waveney Valley Local Action Group Area

1.1          Details of the (Local Action Group) LAG

The Waveney Valley LAG brings together an excellent representation of the social, economic and
environmental organisations across the Waveney Valley area. Their primary role is to put
Waveney Valley on the map and improve the partnerships and communication across the area.

1.1.1        Membership of the LAG

                                Organisation                               Non Public Social Economic Environmental
 Action with Communities for Rural England                                     x        x       x          x
 All Hallows Hospital                                                                   x
 Breckland District Council                                                             x       x          x
 Broads Authority                                                                               x          x
 Bungay Community Partnership                                                  x        x       x          x
 Business Link East                                                                             x
 Diocese of Norwich                                                            x        x
 Diss Business Forum                                                           x                x
 Diss Community Partnership CIC                                                x        x       x          x
 Diss, Thetford & District Citizens Advice Bureau                              x        x       x
 East Anglia Food Link                                                         x        x       x          x
 East of England Farming and Wildlife Advisory Group (FWAG)                    x        x       x          x
 East of England Rural Forum                                                   x                x          x
 Easton College                                                                x        x       x          x
 Farm Crisis Network                                                           x        x       x
 Halesworth and Blyth Valley Partnership                                       x        x       x          x
 Harleston Information Plus (formerly Harleston Development Partnership)       x        x       x          x
 Ladies in Pigs                                                                x                x
 Lowestoft College                                                             x                x
 Mid Suffolk District Council                                                           x       x          x
 Mow and Grow Social Enterprise                                                x        x       x          x
 National Farmers Union                                                        x        x       x          x
 Norfolk County Council                                                                 x       x          x
 Norfolk Rural Business Advice Service                                                          x          x
 Norfolk Rural Community Council                                               x        x       x          x
 Norfolk Rural Forum                                                           x        x       x          x
 Norfolk Tourist Attractions Association Ltd                                   x                x
 Market Towns East                                                             x                x          x
 Redenhall with Harleston Town Council                                                  x       x          x
 South Norfolk District Council                                                         x       x          x
 Suffolk Coast and Heaths AONB                                                          x       x          x
 Suffolk County Council                                                                 x       x          x
 Tastes of Anglia Ltd                                                          x                x
 The Bungay Joint Tourism Group (representing Bungay Town Council              x        x       x          x
 and Bungay Chamber of Trade)
 The Deer Initiative                                                           x                x          x
 The Old Bakery                                                                x                x
 The Waveney Rural Community Partnership Four Towns                            x        x       x          x
 Public Transport Group
 Thornham Field Centre                                                         x        x                  x
 Upper Waveney Valley Partnership                                                       x                  x
 Waveney Community Forum                                                       x        x       x          x
 Waveney District Council                                                               x       x          x
 Waveney Learning Community                                                    x        x       x

Further details on the members of the LAG can be found in Appendix 8.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England      Page 3 of 72

1.1.2       Structure of the Partnership


              EEDA                                        Local Development Strategy




  Programme Management
          NCC
    Programme management,
  monitoring, appraisal, evaluation
               finance
                                                                Local Action Group



     Programme Delivery
           NRBAS
   LDS management; facilitation,                                Management Group
         administration




                                                                   Working groups



The Waveney Valley partnership will have four levels:

1. The Local Development Strategy will be the framework from which the other levels take their
   lead.

2. The Local Action Group will make the overall strategic decisions about the direction of the
   project. They will meet four times a year.

3. The Management Group will deal with ongoing management, reducing the commitment that
   LAG members have to make and reducing the unwieldy nature of a large committee when
   making management decisions. The management group will meet at least once a quarter.

    Working with the Local Action Group will be a Programme Manager, Partnership Facilitator and
    Programme Administrator, employed by NRBAS.

    The Programme Manager will be shared between the 3 proposed LAGs whose accountable
    body is Norfolk County Council (Waveney Valley, Brecks and Norfolk Coast & Broads).

    The Partnership Facilitator will be full time for the Waveney Valley LAG.

    The Programme Administrator will be shared between the 3 proposed LAGs.

    Appraisal of other LAGs grant proposals will be carried out by Norfolk County Council.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England           Page 4 of 72



    Likewise the monitoring of projects funded through the Waveney Valley LDS will be carried out
    by Norfolk County Council.

4. Working groups will be setup to develop aspects of the LDS. These working groups will be
   chaired by a member of the Management Group and have members from the LAG, but can
   also co-opt useful members from outside the LAG. Further working groups could be setup if
   required. Through the use of working groups, the delivery of interventions by the LAG and its
   partners will be focused and timely.

1.1.3       Management of the Partnership

The Management Group will take the major decisions. On this group will sit the chair and vice-
chair of the LAG, representatives from the Accountable Body, NRBAS and EEDA, and other
members of the LAG. This Management Group will still reflect the mix of social, economic and
environmental and have more than 50% non public body members.

The Leader Manager will work at least 3 days a week, giving leadership to facilitators and
appropriate time to each of the proposed LAGs whose accountable body is Norfolk County
Council. The Leader Manager will be based at the Norfolk Rural Business Advice Service offices
at Easton College, along with the Project Administrator.

The Partnership Facilitator will be based within the Waveney Valley LDS area, probably in the
Upper Waveney Valley Partnership office, to make facilitation easier and to reduce travel and
therefore their carbon footprint.

1.1.4       Roles of LAG Members

The LAG will meet four times a year; one meeting will be the annual review meeting. Volunteers
from the LAG will be sought to join the Management Group (in which the balance between private
and public sectors will be maintained as will a spread of experience in economic, environmental
and social fields) and Working Groups as required. The partners represented on the LAG bring a
range of experience, particular skills and excellent representation of the Waveney Valley LDS area.

The LAG will review its membership at each meeting, adding and replacing members as
appropriate and in line with the constitution. There is no maximum size of the LAG, so more
partners may join over time. Note that the LAG is a partnership of organisations from the Waveney
Valley. The partnership wants to be as inclusive and diverse as possible, so the more members
the better, which will lead to wider involvement and ownership of the LAG by those living and
working in the Waveney Valley.

LAG members will guide the overall direction of the project within the Waveney Valley, by
reviewing the progress to date, selecting the Chair and Vice Chair and possibly developing bids to
aid the development of the Waveney Valley in line with the LDS.

Partners in the LAG represent a range of organisations and will feedback to those organisations on
the progress of the LAG. They will also bring information to the LAG from their own organisations
and help shape the direction and projects of the LAG to fit with the requirements of the Waveney
Valley.

1.1.5       Decision making body

The Management Group will meet at least once a quarter. The Project Manager and Project
Facilitator will report to this group. Major decisions, including the funding approval of projects, will
be made by this Management Group.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England        Page 5 of 72

Currently the Regional Development Agencies Act restricts the powers to fully delegate investment
decision making to the Management Group, and thus a nominated EEDA representative (Fiona
Bryant, Head of Sustainable and Rural Development) must be present at the Management Group
meetings if decisions are to be taken there and then (the alternative is for the Management Group
to make a recommendation which would then have to be forwarded to EEDA for consideration).
This is an interim measure pending the laying of a Statutory Instrument which will allow delegation
of project approval.
Once the Management Group is able to approve projects, each member will have equal roles and
representation, with one vote, when decisions are taken. The Chairman will aim to reach a
consensus on decisions taken, however, should the need arise; they will have a casting vote.
Working groups will direct and develop various aspects of the project, for example marketing and
communication of the LDS and LAG to as many people living and working in the Waveney Valley
as possible. Chairs of working groups will sit on the Management Group and report to that group
at each of its meetings.

More information on the Decision Making Body is available in the Terms of Reference in the
appendices.

1.1.6       Administrative support

Administrative and research support will be one member of staff shared between the 3 proposed
LAGs. This member of staff will be centrally based in the Norfolk Rural Business Advice Service
(NRBAS) office at Easton College. Their time will be divided equally between the 3 proposed
projects (Waveney Valley, Norfolk Coast and Broads and the Brecks).

The aim of sharing staff between the 3 LDSs is to improve the efficiency and delivery of the
facilitator and the LAG.

1.1.7       Monitoring and review arrangements

Arrangements for monitoring and review are included in the Operations Manual for Local Action
Groups, issued by EEDA, and the procedures of the Accountable Body and the LAG will be
governed by those.
Part of the Appraisal and Monitoring Officer’s role is to ensure the ongoing monitoring of projects,
including the outputs and outcomes emanating from the projects as well as the financial elements.
After a project has been approved by the Management Group, the Appraisal and Monitoring Officer
will draw up an offer letter, which will outline all the standard conditions as well as any special
conditions that have been agreed by the Management Group, differentiating between those that
are required before the project can formally commence and those that need evidencing during
implementation.

The offer letter will also include milestones, a schedule breakdown of the implementation of the
project detailing the expected financial expenditure, the expected outputs and the timeframe for
reporting. This schedule is incorporated into the Project Agreement, which is sent to the applicant
(signed on behalf of the Management Group by the Accountable Body). The applicant will also
receive a visit from the Appraisal and Monitoring Officer; to receive an explanation of what will be
expected from them and to answer any queries the applicant may have. The applicant is required
to sign both copies and return one copy to the Appraisal and Monitoring Officer.

Throughout the duration of the programme, all revenue projects will receive quarterly ‘light touch’
monitoring, with monthly monitoring for capital projects during their implementation phase. This
will enable the programme to closely monitor the activity of each project, to ensure that activity is
delivered according to the funding agreement and to assist projects to overcome issues that might
arise. Should a matter arise that cannot be resolved, it will be raised with the Programme
Manager, who will seek a resolution, and raise it with the Management Group, if needed.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England        Page 6 of 72

Project claims are submitted to the Appraisal and Monitoring Officer according to the payment
schedule set out in the offer letter. All payments will be paid in arrears (advance payments are not
permitted for any capital items), and only if accompanied with the appropriate claim form and all
appropriate invoices. Failure to submit the claim form or the appropriate invoices will result in the
payment being withheld. Alterations to the delivery of a project must be raised by the applicant to
the Appraisal and Monitoring Officer at the earliest possible time.

All payments are prepared by the Appraisal and Monitoring and independently checked within the
Accountable Body. If there is a deviation of more than 10% (down) on the projected outputs or (up
or down) on the projected costs of a project, a written explanation will need to be given by the
applicant. The Management Group can withdraw the offer of funding if a project is not performing
to the required standard and if revisions cannot be agreed.

1.1.8       Evaluation

One aspect of the Programme will be an annual evaluation of activity, including a review of
supported interventions, together with a review of the membership and effectiveness of the LAG,
Programme Management Group and Working Groups. This information will be collated to form an
Annual Report, with a series of recommendations, which will be presented to the LAG at their
Annual Partnership Meeting. This process will be used to ensure that the Programme learns from
previous activity and takes any external recommendations into account, including those from the
annual audit. The evaluation process will also examine the lessons learnt from other LAGs across
the region through regional networks. The evaluation will be shared with EEDA.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England         Page 7 of 72

1.2         Details of the area chosen

The Waveney Valley is a coherent and distinctive rural area, its unique identity transcending
county loyalties. The river, and the contiguous county boundary, both define and divide the area.

Relatively distant from the main regional service centres, though close to the economically
challenged urban areas of Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft, the area is serviced by a string of
historic and vital market towns.

The quality of the valley’s landscape is at least the equal of better known locations such as the
Dedham Vale and contains a wealth of semi natural features and historic buildings. Landscape
historian Oliver Rackham singles out the Waveney in his History of the Countryside, stating that it
“has resisted being tamed and, alone among East Anglian rivers, still has miles of meadow”.

Despite its clear identity and landscape, the Waveney Valley is divided by statutory boundaries:
bisected by the county boundary, further fragmented by district boundaries, and covered in part by
the Broads Authority.

There are clear social, environmental and economic challenges and opportunities that can be
addressed by all parties working together with a single vision. There has been some partnership
working, such as the four local authorities supporting the Upper Waveney Valley Partnership, but
the whole of the Waveney Valley from source to sea has never received the joined-up support it
requires to develop and prosper.

1.2.1       Why the area was chosen

The Waveney Valley area has been submitted as a Leader area because its social, economic and
environmental features are consistent across the whole area.

1.2.2       Social - Why the area was chosen:

The area has a dense pattern of villages and a number of small market towns – Diss, Harleston,
Eye, Halesworth, Bungay, Beccles and Loddon. These towns act as local service centres for
surrounding villages, centres for employment, leisure, recreation and tourism. The community
engagement with market towns shows good community connection to the area.

Many of the villages are small with limited facilities and services and there is a sense of isolation
for young people and the elderly. Public transport is limited although community based schemes
such as Borderhopper do meet the needs of some older and disabled people.

For many the car is a primary form of transport and long distance commuting is common, north to
Norwich, south to Ipswich and east to Lowestoft and Yarmouth. The A140 and A143 provide south-
north and east-west road transport links though both roads are busy and slow making east west
travel difficult. Many of the smaller villages have lost their shop, post office, pub, and school.

The village hall and church are often the only remaining community facilities and as across much
of rural Norfolk and Suffolk small communities struggle to maintain these important community
assets, with a heavy burden falling upon a small number of volunteers.

There are many examples of communities addressing local issues and developing activities that
involve local people such as the Denton Composting Scheme and the Metfield Community Shop.

Housing is expensive in many villages and the availability of affordable housing is a key issue, with
many low paid families finding it difficult to find a home. Significant social divisions exist even if
masked by the appearance of relative affluence.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England       Page 8 of 72

The population of Waveney Valley experience a below average income per household which is
12% below the national average.

The Waveney Valley has tremendous potential for both economic and community prosperity. It
has a unique combination of natural resources and attractive conservation areas, as well as
important economic assets both established and in development.

Overview by town

•   Beccles

    Beccles is situated on the River Waveney with a popular quay that links to the Broads
    extensive network of waterways. The proximity of Beccles to the Broads places some
    constraints on future development in the area. Rural parishes around Beccles suffer from
    relatively poor access to shops and services, with limited public transport available, and
    increasing dependency on car travel.

    With a population of 9,746 (2001) Beccles is the largest of the four market towns in the
    Waveney District. A relatively high proportion of these (25%) are aged 65 and over.

    Unemployment here is relatively low (1.8%) compared to the other market towns and to
    Lowestoft at 4.8%. Similarly, only 1.95% are in receipt of Job Seekers Allowance compared to
    3.7% in Lowestoft. Almost a third of people in employment (28.3%) are defined as working in
    semi-routine/routine occupations.

•   Bungay

    Bungay is situated in a loop of the river Waveney, in close proximity to the Broads. The town
    benefits from interesting historical and architectural features and has some popular tourist
    attractions.

    With a population of 4,895 (2001) Bungay is the second largest market town in the District,
    after Beccles. It also has the lowest rate of unemployment out of the four towns, at 1.7%,
    compared to 3.6% in Waveney as a whole. Similarly, only 1.6% of the population are on Job
    Seekers Allowance.

    In terms of educational levels attained, a third of the population entered Higher Education after
    year 13 in 2006, which is the lowest of the four market towns. However, the proportion of
    people with NVQ 4/5 educational qualifications attained stood at 14.1% in 2001, which was well
    above the Lowestoft average of 10% and the District average of 11.9%.

    In recent times, Bungay has been suffering from falling shop numbers in the town centre which
    is one of the main issues affecting the attractiveness of the town for visitors and business
    relocation.

•   Halesworth

    Halesworth is situated in North-East Suffolk within the Blyth Valley. Steeped in the history of
    brewing, malting and agriculture, Halesworth in modern times is a mix of old and new buildings
    with a vibrant pedestrianised town centre and a weekly market.

    Halesworth is the second smallest market town in the District with a population of 4,637 (2001).
    With 29.5% of people being 65 years or older, the town has a relatively high proportion of
    elderly people living in the area.

    The rate of unemployment is 2% which is in line with the other market towns of Beccles and
    Bungay and below the District average at 3.6% (2006). Halesworth suffers from the lowest
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England                           Page 9 of 72

       proportion of pupils continuing education after year 11 in Waveney which may be a reflection of
       the availability of educational opportunities in the area. However, more than two thirds (69%)
       of year 13 pupils go on to Higher Education, which is higher than the District average (42%).


                        Socio economic indicator     Beccles    Bungay     Halesworth   Waveney   East of
                                                                                                  England
                            Population (2001 for
                         towns, 2005 for district
                           and county, 2004 for       9,746      4,895       4,637      114,700   5,491,300
                            region and 2006 for
                                   country )
                           Rate (%) unemployed
                                                       1.8        1.7          2          3.6       2.61
                               persons (2006)
                        Economic activity rate (%)
                                                        -          -           -         76.3       80.9
                                    (2006)
                           Household Income (£)
                                                     24,134.3   24,968.4    24,229.8    24,703        -
                                    (2005)
                         Gross weekly pay for full
                                                        -          -           -         372.9      470
                        time employees (£) (2006)
                          Job Seekers Allowance
                                                      1.95        1.6         1.8         3.6        1.8
                            Claimants (%) (2004)
                           People aged 16 - 74 in
                         employment who usually
                          travel to work by means     38.8       36.7         37.3       36.1       25.8
                           other than the car (%)
                                    (2001)
                         People aged 16 - 74 with:
                            Highest qualification
                                                      12.5       14.1         12.3       11.9      18.14
                            attained level 4/5 (%)
                                    (2001)
                            People aged 16 - 74:
                            Large employers and
                              higher managerial
                                                        4         4.9         3.7         4.5        9.1
                          occupations and higher
                         professional occupations
                                  (%) (2001)


Agriculture is important to the maintenance of Waveney’s biodiversity and for providing economic
and physical wellbeing, as well as a sense of local identity, all key to achieving the vision for
Waveney. Diversifying this sector, which makes up 1.2% of the economy, could provide new
opportunities to rural communities.

A long term joint approach to building a strong brand should be adopted, rather than a series of
dispersed local approaches.

Population

In the Waveney Valley 83.7% of people live in rural areas, compared with 31% in the Government
Office Region. Within the rural areas all people live in less sparse areas.




1
    People 16-74 economically active: Unemployed (%) (2001)
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England                   Page 10 of 72


                                        W aveney Valley                             East of England
                                 Male          Female        Total          Male           Female            Total
Urban                           9,722          10,515       20,237    1,812,091         1,904,428       3,716,519
Rural                          51,047          53,108      104,155      826,244           845,377       1,671,621
    Less S parse               51,047          53,108      104,155      785,328           801,861       1,587,189
        Town                   19,080          20,822       39,902      359,564           375,106         734,670
        Village                22,396          22,787       45,183      320,104           322,590         642,694
        Dispersed               9,571           9,499       19,070      105,660           104,165         209,825
    Sparse                           -               -           -         40,916          43,516          84,432
        Town                         -               -           -         20,159          22,619          42,778
        Village                      -               -           -         17,315          17,330          34,645
        Dispersed                    -               -           -          3,442           3,567           7,009
Total                          60,769          63,623      124,392    2,638,335         2,749,805       5,388,140
Percentage rural                 84.0             83.5        83.7           31.3             30.7            31.0
Source table from the Census: UV03 Gender


The vast majority of the Waveney Valley lives in rural areas, so issues like transport to and from
work and leisure are key to the success of any development of the Waveney Valley area.

Household Income Profile

                    £ per annum                           Waveney Valley     East of England
                    Rural Hamlet and Dispersed                    33055                36505
                    Rural Town                                    29250                34150
                    Rural Village                                 32005                35170
                    Urban                                         28820                34245
(source CACI Household Income Paycheck Data 2006)


Age

In the Waveney Valley 9.4% of the population live in rural areas and are under 10 years old.
19.3% of the LAG’s population live in rural areas and are under 19 years of age. 12% are aged 70
or over and live in rural areas.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England                                          Page 11 of 72

Total population within the LEADER/LAG, broken down by age

                                  Total             Totals                             Rural breakdown
                                                                           Towns            Villages             Dispersed
                        Age                                                                                                   % Rural
                                               Urban         Rural    Less              Less                   Less
                                                                              Sparse              Sparse               Sparse
                                                                     sparse            sparse                 sparse
Under 10                         14,145        2,480       11,665     4,442      -      5,024        -         2,199      -    82.5
10 to 19                         14,685        2,354       12,331    4,549       -      5,308         -       2,474         -       84.0
20 to 29                         11,168        2,078       9,090     4,116       -      3,462         -       1,512         -       81.4
30 to 39                         16,675        2,972       13,703    5,419       -      5,812         -       2,472         -       82.2
40 to 49                         17,117        2,455       14,662    4,932       -      6,747         -       2,983         -       85.7
50 to 59                         18,482        2,587       15,895    5,267       -      7,295         -       3,333         -       86.0
60 to 69                         13,954        2,170       11,784    4,301       -      5,305         -       2,178         -       84.4
70 to 79                         11,385        1,935       9,450     4,084       -      4,006         -       1,360         -       83.0
80 to 89                         5,680         1,025       4,655     2,349       -      1,790         -        516          -       82.0
90 and over                      1,055          189         866       379        -      387           -        100          -       82.1
                                124,346        20,245     104,101    39,838      -     45,136         -       19,127        -       83.7
Source table from the Census: UV04 Age


Percentage of people aged 16 to 74 with each level of qualification in the LEADER/LAG and
the rural part of the Government Office Region

                         35

                         30

                         25
 Percentage of people




                         20

                         15

                         10

                          5

                          0
                                    No                 Level 1         Level 2         Level 3            Level 4/5            Other
                              qualifications                                                                              qualifications /
                                                                                                                          level unknown

                                          Urban Waveney Valley         Rural Waveney Valley      Rural Eas t of England
Source table from the Census: UV24 Qualifications

Footnotes
None: No academic, vocational or professional qualifications
Level 1: 1+ ‘O’ levels/CSE/GCSE (any grade), NVQ level 1, Foundation GNVQ
Level 2: 5+ ‘O’ levels, 5+ CSEs (grade 1), 5+ GCSEs (grade A to C), School Certificate, 1+ ‘A’ levels/AS levels, NVQ level 2,
Intermediate GNVQ
Level 3: 2+ ‘A’ levels, 4+ AS levels, Higher School Certificate, NVQ level 3, Advanced GNVQ
Level 4/5: First degree, Higher degree, NVQ levels 4-5, HND, HNC, Qualified Teacher Status, Qualified Medical Doctor, Qualified
Dentist, Qualified Nurse, Midwife, Health Visitor
Other: Other qualifications or level unknown e.g. City and Guilds, RSA/OCR, BTEC/Edexcel, other professional qualifications.


These figures show that there is a broad range of qualifications in the Waveney Valley area,
meaning there is capacity to cope with new business opportunities.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England                                             Page 12 of 72

Percentage of people in the LEADER/LAG aged 16 to 74 by NS-SeC classification

                                       100%
                                                                                                             Not Clas s ified
                                       90%
                                                                                                             Never worked and long-
  Percentage of people aged 16 to 74




                                       80%                                                                   term unem ployed

                                       70%                                                                   Routine occupations

                                       60%
                                                                                                             Sem i-routine occupations
                                       50%
                                                                                                             Lower s upervis ory and
                                       40%                                                                   technical occupations

                                       30%                                                                   Sm all em ployers and own
                                                                                                             account workers
                                       20%
                                                                                                             Interm ediate occupations
                                       10%
                                                                                                             Lower m anagerial and
                                        0%                                                                   profes s ional occupations
                                              Urban         Rural      Urban                Rural
                                                                                                             Higher m anagerial and
                                                W aveney Valley               East of England                profes s ional occupations

Source table from the Census: UV31 National Statistics Socio-economic classification


Number of people aged 16 to 74 in employment by industry type

                                                                                      W aveney Valley
                                                                    Urban                       Rural                     East of England
                                                                    Total       Total    Towns    Villages Dispers ed     Urban     Rural
Agriculture, hunting and fores try                                      125      3,077       618      1,361     1,098      15,447    33,642
Fishing                                                                  12          24        3         21           -       307        319
Mining and quarrying                                                    135        232       107         86         39      3,438      2,020
Manufac turing                                                        1,799      7,760     3,182      3,271     1,307     257,105   116,062
Electricity, gas and water supply                                       132        308       138        118         52     11,105      5,152
Construction                                                            665      4,017     1,442      1,767       808     130,690    65,730
W holesale and retail trade; repairs                                  1,649      8,407     3,584      3,456     1,367     315,780   130,112
Hotels and restaurants                                                  445      2,203       974        864       365      72,609    34,720
Transport, s torage and com munications                                 513      2,669     1,126      1,127       416     140,776    50,471
Financ ial Intermediation                                               255      1,928       665        911       352     113,132    36,685
Real estate, renting and business activities                            765      5,289     1,840      2,342     1,107     237,379   105,898
Public administration and defence, social security                      396      1,772       640        833       299      86,580    46,440
Education                                                               505      3,389     1,022      1,676       691     128,071    61,240
Health and social work                                                  985      5,143     1,860      2,274     1,009     170,908    78,846
Other community, soc ial & personal service activities                  402      2,271       834        981       456      83,321    37,258
Private households with employed persons                                 12          91       12         55         24      1,345      1,239
Extra-territorial organisations and bodies                                -          36       15         18          3      2,191      3,384
Source table from the Census: UV34 Industry


Car ownership

13.8% of households in rural Waveney Valley do not have a car or van available for private use. In
urban parts of the Leader/LAG it is 21%.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England                                   Page 13 of 72

Number of households by car/van availability to the household & the total number of cars*

                                                                                                               Leader/L
                                            W aveney Valley                            East of England                     GOR
                                                                                                                 AG
                                                                        4 or more                1 or more
                        No car     1 car or 2 cars or 3 cars or                      No car or                 Total number of cars
                                                                         cars or                   cars or
                        or van       van      vans      vans                           van                            or vans
                                                                           vans                     vans
Urban                      1,816      4,475        1,967         315            88      48,319      257,640       9,760     419,308
Rural                      6,046     19,362       14,043       3,124         1,132   1,168,666    2,218,734      61,974   3,209,778
    Less Sparse            6,046     19,362       14,043       3,124         1,132      36,579      322,199      61,974     575,910
        Town               3,518      8,826        4,279         778           223      26,176      232,661      20,727     413,467
        Village            2,007      7,791        6,789       1,510           606       5,990       74,388      28,652     140,819
        Dispersed            521      2,745        2,975         836           303       4,413       15,150      12,595      21,624
    Sparse                     -          -            -           -             -   1,132,087    1,896,535           -   2,633,868
        Town                   -          -            -           -             -       1,841       13,076           -      20,787
        Village                -          -            -           -             -         408         2,695          -       4,327
        Dispersed              -          -            -           -             -   1,129,838    1,880,764           -   2,608,754
Total                      7,862     23,837       16,010       3,439         1,220   1,216,985    2,476,374      71,734   3,629,086
Percentage rural            76.9       81.2         87.7        90.8          92.8        96.0          89.6       86.4        88.4
Source table from the Census: UV62 Cars or Vans
*(includes any company car or van if it is available for private use)


1.2.3           Environmental - Why the area was chosen:

The Waveney Valley bisects the claylands of Norfolk and Suffolk. In its lower reaches the valley is
a typical Broads landscape of drained marsh grazed by mainly beef cattle.

Drainage dykes, often with rich assemblages of wetland plants, form the boundaries of the fields.
Areas of fen, reed swamp, alder carr and open water also survive, now protected as Sites of
Special Scientific Interest.

The upper reaches of the river, to the west of Bungay, extend a finger of Broads deep into the clay
uplands. Redgrave and Lopham Fen, at the headwaters of the Waveney, is the largest surviving
valley fen in Britain.

The surrounding clay uplands are characterised by an ancient landscape of irregular fields,
bounded by hedges and hedgerow oaks, now almost entirely arable. Large grass commons
survive in this arable landscape and support diverse grassland communities. There are a few
ancient woodlands, often with hornbeam as the dominant tree.

The area also supports one of the densest concentrations of ponds in the country. The clay
uplands have formed an integral part of land management within the valley for hundreds of years,
supporting the grazing in the valley by providing winter feed for the cattle. Farms characteristically
include land on the valley floor, the sides and the surrounding plateau.

The Waveney has good examples of where the community connects with the environment.

1.2.4           Economic - Why the area was chosen:

The Waveney Valley is dominated by a number of small market towns traditionally forming the
economic backbone to the area, in their traditional market town role. However, the change in
shopping patterns has resulted in economic decline in these towns. Recent support has focused
on the social issues of the towns and very little has been focused on the economic viabilities of the
towns or their hinterland.

The land based sector across the valley is unusually varied. Dominated by intensive pig, poultry
and arable farming, but with a regionally significant number of remaining beef and dairy farms.
Recent animal disease issues have reduced the financial security of the livestock businesses.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England             Page 14 of 72

The clay soils of the valley sides support arable farming while the valley bottom is characterised by
water meadows which support grazing animal production and homes a small cluster of dairy farms.

The Waveney Valley houses a number of supply chain businesses related to the land based
sector, such as Bramfield Meats, Lamberts abattoir, C&K Meats, D Laurie and Sons, Frozen Herbs
Ltd amongst many others.

The area has a number of tourism businesses. These businesses lack cohesiveness and have
limited collaborative working.

The market towns also homes significant clusters of electronic and manufacturing businesses.
Manufacturing is the single largest employer in the area while land based business account for the
third highest number of businesses.

Businesses

                                                                          Total Businesses
                                                                            Rural Rural Rural
    Waveney Valley                                                  Urban
                                                                            Town Village Hamlet
   Agriculture Hunting Forestry and Fishing                             10      60    395   465
   Construction                                                         80     190    320   150
   Education and Health and Social Work                                 55     165    145    60
   Financial Intermediation                                             10      45     15    10
   Hotels and Restaurants                                               40     120     95    45
   Manufacturing                                                        35     165    155   155
   Mining Quarrying and Electricity Gas and Water Supply                 0       5      5     5
   Public administration and defence; compulsory social
   security and Other community social and personal                      50       195    165        105
   service activities
   Real Estate Renting and business activities                          145       365    515        315
   Transport Storage and Communication                                   20        80    110         55
   Wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles,
                                                                        140       460    330        200
   motorcycles and personal and household goods
                                                                          Total Employment
                                                                            Rural Rural Rural
    Waveney Valley                                                  Urban
                                                                            Town Village Hamlet
   Agriculture Hunting Forestry and Fishing                              ~      375 1,355 1,460
   Construction                                                        255      825   895   430
   Education and Health and Social Work                              1,395 2,985 1,795      765
   Financial Intermediation                                              ~      280     ~     ~
   Hotels and Restaurants                                              225 1,365      675   270
   Manufacturing                                                       900 4,040 1,205 2,510
   Mining Quarrying and Electricity Gas and Water Supply                 ~        ~     ~     ~
   Public administration and defence; compulsory social
   security and Other community social and personal                     265    1,260     700        255
   service activities
   Real estate Renting and business activities                          470    2,205    1,155     1,055
   Transport Storage and Communication                                    ~      715      585       355
   Wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles,
                                                                      1,220    3,680    1,610       905
   motorcycles and personal and household goods
   source : IDBR Local Unit Data 2005
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England                      Page 15 of 72



The business figures above show the cross section of businesses in the Waveney Valley. They
highlight the fact that the Waveney Valley has a sustainable number of businesses in a broad
range of industries. They need help in developing relationships throughout the supply chains.

Economic activity and average number of hours worked

In rural Waveney Valley 32.3% of people aged 16 to 74 are economically inactive. 52.3% of those
people are retired, 8.3% are students and 21.1% are looking after the home or family.

In comparison 34.2% of people aged 16 to 74 are economically inactive in urban Waveney Valley
and 31% are economically inactive in rural parts of the Government Office Region.

Number of people aged 16 to 74 by economic activity

                                                             W aveney Valley                       East of England
                                             Urban                     Rural
                                               Total     Total    Towns Villlages     Dispersed       Urban     Rural
Economically active                           9,276    50,589     18,853     21,985       9,751   1,853,291   836,272
    Employee                                  7,518    37,864     15,120     16,146       6,598   1,498,764   640,866
          Part-time                           2,125     9,902      3,944      4,181       1,777     331,265   153,475
          Full-time                           5,393    27,962     11,176     11,965       4,821   1,167,499   487,391
    Self-employed with employees                336     3,383        850      1,592         941      69,566    52,976
          Part-time                               53      550        132        268         150       9,422     8,045
          Full-time                             283     2,833        718      1,324         791      60,144    44,931
    Self-employed without employees             662     6,245      1,645      2,941       1,659     142,773    93,568
          Part-time                             184     1,818        470        865         483      38,002    27,724
          Full-time                             478     4,427      1,175      2,076       1,176     104,771    65,844
    Unemployed                                  466     1,768        722        741         305      76,095    24,944
    Full-time Students                          294     1,329        516        565         248      66,093    23,918
Economically inactive                         4,815    24,104      9,037     10,636       4,431     818,491   375,727
    Retired                                   2,489    12,599      4,927      5,643       2,029     355,001   188,194
    Student                                     297     2,011        633        853         525     103,595    36,694
    Looking after home/family                 1,014     5,087      1,752      2,283       1,052     179,900    81,974
    Permanently sick/disabled                   677     2,753      1,083      1,195         475     110,475    41,193
    Other                                       338     1,654        642        662         350      69,520    27,672
% economically active                          65.8      67.7       67.6       67.4        68.8        69.4      69.0
% economically inactive                        34.2      32.3       32.4       32.6        31.2        30.6      31.0
Source table from the Census: UV28 Economic activity


For the Census part-time working is defined as working 30 hours a week or less. Full-time is
defined as working 31 or more hours a week.

Employment by industry type

The three most common industries employing people aged 16 to 74 in rural Waveney Valley are:
• Wholesale and retail trade: repairs
• Manufacturing
• Real estate, renting and business activities

1.2.5         Lack of consistent message:

The Waveney Valley has a clear and distinct identity within its own communities. However, due to
the number of different council boundaries which operate over the area there has never been a
consistent brand for the valley. This has limited the potential of the area and subsequently of the
businesses within the area. Working in collaboration the businesses of the Waveney Valley will be
able to appeal to the customers of the tourism honey pots such as the Suffolk Coast and the North
Norfolk Coast and reduce the pressure on those areas.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England        Page 16 of 72

1.2.6       Market town and hinterland development:

The Waveney Valley is characterised by a number of market towns – Diss, Harleston, Halesworth,
Bungay, Beccles and Loddon. These towns have active Community Town Partnerships.
Community participation has been a key element in both the development and operation of these
partnerships. Local knowledge, skills and support have all been key priorities of the partnerships
and this provides a sound base for programme delivery. The nature of the settlement patterns in
this area which consists of many scattered hamlets, small and larger villages, means that the
market towns themselves have been, and will continue to be a key focus of sub-regional
regeneration and economic development as well as providing key services and the potential for
exchange of best practice where appropriate. The market towns are providing many of the basic
services for residents of the towns and the surrounding hinterland.

The Leader programme will enable the towns to harness the capacity of the partnerships to
develop a cohesive working relationship, to act as a focus for programme delivery and to share
best practice on working with the hinterland.

The added value is that each town has its area of expertise and this experience can be
disseminated further and used to identify future projects.

The market town partnerships already add support to their economy through project delivery.
Examples of this are shown below:
• BASE Training – Harleston and Loddon hosted this training for local businesses from their
   towns and hinterland. It was delivered locally over several weeks after work covering topics
   such as visual merchandising, marketing, web design etc. Over 150 people took part from over
   40 different businesses.
• RENS – this scheme is currently being delivered in the South Norfolk Leader + area supporting
   independent Shops, Post Offices, Restaurants, Pubs and Garages, providing consultancy
   support and Grant funding. To date nearly 50 businesses have been supported.
• Websites – most of the towns have their own websites that are promoting their area and the
   businesses within them. A new website for Cittaslow Diss is about to be launched.
• Four Towns Bus – covers Bungay, Beccles, Halesworth and Southwold. The bus travels to
   these towns and their surrounding villages offering training advisors etc. (www.wrcw.org.uk/bus.asp)
• Cittaslow Diss LEADER plus 2007 programme – focusing on sustainable tourism and re-
   branding Diss as a Cittaslow Town working mainly with retail and tourism businesses, but also
   includes a Clay Lump Heritage building project and Cittaslow community grant fund

1.2.7       Increasing the value of current access:

Over the last few years more opportunities for outdoor recreation have been developed in the
Valley.

There is a good network of footpaths and bridleways, including the Angles Way long-distance
footpath along the length of the Valley that has been selected as the “best waterside walk in
Britain”. The Munnings Trail is a 26 mile horse-riding route through the Saints villages near
Bungay.

The area is ideal for cycling and new routes have been developed including Regional Route 30
along the Valley. Most of the market towns have circular walking and cycling routes in the
surrounding countryside and they are linked by the regional routes.

The Waveney is one of the few rivers in England with negotiated access for canoes, and fishing is
popular in the river.

The recreation opportunities are not being used to their full potential, as the connection with
business opportunities has not generally been made.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England      Page 17 of 72

Through collaborative and innovative working, the amount and quality of public access can be
improved and with it the potential for business and community growth. By focusing the work of
organisations such as the Broads Authority, the Upper Waveney Valley Partnership and Natural
England there will be improved business and community opportunities.

1.2.8       Livestock farming challenges:

The Waveney Valley plays host to a range of land based sectors, most significantly poultry, pigs
and grazing livestock. The caricature of the area is very much defined by its land use. The
traditional use of grazing animals along the river valley has resulted in the diversity and range of
grassland habitats. The pig and poultry industries have developed through the close proximity to
the feed source produced by the arable farmers. Over recent years there has been a distinct
increase in economic pressure placed on these sectors, this has now reached a point where these
sectors are now in severe decline.

1.2.9       Grazing Animals:

The Waveney Valley has seen a continued decline in livestock numbers over recent years. This is
having a negative effect on how grassland, heaths, commons, and marshes are managed. These
areas support habitats of high environmental importance; many are SSSIs and BAP priorities.

They are also an important asset to the economic and social sustainability of the area by providing
highlights of landscape quality and accessible green space which are used by local communities
and visitors to the region.

The cost of management to achieve optimal environmental condition can be high. The declining
profitability of livestock farming also increases the difficulty of maintaining appropriate
management.

A recent report by the East of England Grazing Forum concluded that the key challenges facing
beef, sheep and dairy farmers are:

•   Low product prices were one of the three most frequently cited constraints relating to grazing
    sheep / cattle listed by farmers, land managers and graziers (cited by 46% of respondents) and
    the East’s dairy industry, which once dominated Suffolk’s economy, is now particularly
    vulnerable to the persistence of low milk prices.
•   Furthermore, the availability of cheap imports is a major challenge for farmers – indeed over
    half of current UK beef imports are from Ireland and 20% from Brazil and Argentina where
    prices per kg of cattle are around a third of those in the EU.
•   Cost pressures include the costs of boundary maintenance and public liability (listed as
    constraints by 47% and 29% of our sample of farmers, land managers and graziers in the
    region respectively), as well as compliance with increasing amounts of regulation and rising
    input prices.
•   In addition, beef cattle and sheep farmers in the East are also suffering as a result of the UK-
    wide closure of local abattoirs. Without access to a local abattoir, livestock farmers either
    transport their animals great distances (an average of 37 miles in our farmers’ survey),
    resulting in significant haulage costs and potential livestock weight loss (caused as a result of
    animal stress), as well as having implications for the environment; or they risk going out of
    business.

1.2.10      Pigs and Poultry:

The pig sector in the East of England which is heavily focused in the Waveney Valley has seen
significant downscaling in breeding numbers. The long term drivers for this decline include
increased legislation in production, world competition in production costs and customer pressure
through the supermarkets. Short term pressure has focused on animal healthy issues and
increased production costs. World prices for grain due to market failures in key production areas of
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England        Page 18 of 72

the world and increased demand from emerging economies such as India and China, has seen
grain prices more than double.

1.2.11      Community use of the open space:

Linkage between the population of the urban areas and market towns to the landscape and
environment; the Waveney Valley abuts the urban areas of Great Yarmouth, Lowestoft and
Norwich. The inhabitants of these areas and the market towns do not have a strong relationship
with their rural areas. These rural areas offer great potential to be used more extensively for
exercise, enjoyment, recuperation, local food and training.

1.2.12      Local Food:

In some areas of the valley re-engagement with local food culture is already underway such as
through the Diss Cittaslow project and the Slow Food Waveney Valley Convivium.

However, there are other areas which have not fully engaged with this opportunity. There is
potential to expand the range of outlets, products and associated businesses, supply and
opportunities from local food for both community benefit and economic benefits

Cittaslow and the Slow Food movement promote a shortening of the supply chain with the
promotion of local produce and goods sold locally to strengthen and grow the local economy.
Through special events, meals, development of farmers markets, directories, visits to producer’s
etc Cittaslow has been able to start the process of linking producers with consumers.

Cittaslow is an International movement with philosophy of supporting and encouraging: appropriate
pace of life, what is distinctive about a town or area, diversity not standardisation, local culture,
heritage, traditions, local products, modern technology but in line with Cittaslow principles.

Key values that Cittaslow promotes include: community decision making and consultation, creation
of a mix volunteering opportunities, encouraging a strong local economy, encouraging young
people, good services for visitors, valuing the elderly, caring for the environment, healthy lifestyle,
preserving heritage and a good quality of life for all.

The Cittaslow philosophy is a broad based sustainable development model offering communities a
practical framework covering sixty goals which focus on the following key areas:

•   Hospitality and Tourism – Cittaslow encourages sustainable tourism with trails, walks, cycling
    routes and local events, and training for those who provide services to tourists
•   Environment – Cittaslow has a strong environmental message and promotes maintaining high
    standards of the quality of air, use and distribution of water, saving resources, promoting
    recycling, tackling light and noise pollution, promoting environmental management quality
    systems, getting local businesses to go greener, saving energy and using alternative sources
    of energy, promotion of eco tourism and development of climate change strategies.
•   Encouragement of Local Produce and Products – Cittaslow advocates giving support for
    local independent businesses and better promotion of locally made goods and produce.
•   Quality of Urban fabric – Cittaslow encourages the maintenance, conservation and
    enhancement of historic areas, buildings and artefacts of cultural and local significance and
    their sympathetic re-use for visitors and tourists alike.
•   Infrastructure – Cittaslow encourages well kept green spaces, developing integrated traffic
    management and access strategies including community transport systems and initiatives to
    benefits wildlife and landscape.

The Cittaslow model dovetails in with other sustainable development tools such as the Egan Wheel
for sustainable communities promoted by EEDA and NEF’s Plugging the Leaks
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England       Page 19 of 72

There have been excellent benefits that Diss has gained by becoming a Cittaslow town. Improved
access to funding focused the town, giving it a positive sense of purpose, reinforced the local
agenda, local Cittaslow action plan, successful community engagement tool, fostered partnership
working and self reliance.

1.2.13      Built Heritage:

The area contains a wealth of historic and architectural interest that has received little promotion.
Villages are little altered with many timber-framed and thatched houses, round-towered churches,
moated farms and a sprinkling of castles e.g. Eye, Wingfield, Darrow Wood (a National Trust site)
and Bungay. Town trails have been developed in some of the market towns but there is scope for
more high quality interpretation and promotion.

1.2.14      Public Transport issues:

The market towns in Waveney have a key role to play in acting as service centres for the
surrounding populations, scattered rural villages and hamlets. Improving transport accessibility to
the market towns from the surrounding rural areas is essential in helping them to recover from the
decline they are currently facing due to competition from out of town supermarkets, centralised city
services, and other economic and social factors.

There is a strong road network and mainline train services. However these mainly service people
travelling north or south, not usually along the valley. There is a good local bus service along the
Valley (route 580).

An important element to consider is that it often tends to be the poorest and most disadvantaged
sections of the community who have to rely on public transport to access vital services – students,
young mums, the elderly and the disabled. It is clear that they are not being adequately catered for
at present.

In recent years there have been initiatives to help disadvantaged sections of the community, who
may need to rely on public transport. Government schemes introduced in June 2006, allowed SCC
to issue free bus passes for the over 60’s, in addition to subsidised travel schemes for students,
but the services available fail to keep track with the demand, or user’s needs. In addition, many
buses at present are still unsuitable for disabled access.

Public transport providers argue that bus use can be spasmodic and unpredictable and that they
can only afford to subsidise services that they know will be well used. An alternative, increasingly
being perceived as more sustainable, is the introduction of “Dial-a-Ride” and Community Car
services, which in pilot schemes are proving an asset in getting people to their destinations in the
rural hinterlands. The SCC “Pathfinder” a seven-seater minibus was introduced in 2006 to serve
the scattered rural parishes between Bungay and Halesworth. Now similar “Dial-a Ride” vehicles
are needed in other parts of the Waveney region, as a fill-the-gap service when standard services
are not available. In addition, park and ride schemes, improved facilities for pedestrians and
cyclists, and integrated rail and bus services must contribute to a sustainable way of dealing with
car reduction in the 21st century.

The market towns would also benefit from a Tourist Bus which could circulate regularly in the
summer months, for example between the four Waveney market towns of Bungay, Halesworth,
Southwold and Beccles. A regular daily circuit throughout the week would allow tourists to visit all
the towns in turn, sample their distinctive attractions, and linger longer in those with greatest
appeal. As a result, the shops, sports facilities, theatres, heritage sites, and other amenities they
offer will be boosted, improving the local economy.

A well supported public transport system is also essential in preserving the unique environment of
the Waveney region. Many of the rural roads remain unsuitable for heavy traffic, and towns such
as Bungay are being devastated by the constant stream of vehicles which damage the ancient
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England       Page 20 of 72

fabric of the town, and make the town centre a less attractive area to live, work, and shop in.
Creating new roads to reduce the impact of traffic in town centres is counter-productive, because it
results in greater decimation of the surrounding countryside. The Waveney area is particularly rich
in biodiversity and valuable wildlife habitats, which cannot be sustained if the present level of road
use increases.

Establishing a strong and dependable transport system is essential to the economic prosperity,
community cohesion, and environmental sustainability of the Waveney Valley.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England         Page 21 of 72

Population of the area

                  Ward                               2001     District            County
                  West Guiltcross                    2,130    Breckland           Norfolk
                  East Guiltcross                    2,225    Breckland           Norfolk
                  Buckenham                          1,765    Breckland           Norfolk
                  Burgh and Haverscroft              3,740    Breckland           Norfolk
                  Lothingland                        5,605    Great Yarmouth      Norfolk
                  Bradwell South and Hopton          6,170    Great Yarmouth      Norfolk
                  Beck Vale                          2,185    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Bressingham and Burston            2,550    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Brooke                             2,490    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Chedgrave and Thurton              2,615    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Dickleburgh                        2,635    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Diss                               6,750    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Ditchingham and Broome             2,380    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Earsham                            2,450    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Gillingham                         2,790    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Harleston                          4,055    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Hempnall                           2,535    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Loddon                             2,630    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Rockland                           2,740    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Roydon                             2,295    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Scole                              2,265    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Thurlton                           2,645    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Bunwell                            2,495    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Forncett                           2,460    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Stratton                           4,625    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Tasburgh                           2,285    South Norfolk       Norfolk
                  Eye                                1,810    Mid Suffolk         Suffolk
                  Fressingfield                      1,840    Mid Suffolk         Suffolk
                  Gislingham                         2,310    Mid Suffolk         Suffolk
                  Hoxne                              1,910    Mid Suffolk         Suffolk
                  Palgrave                           1,980    Mid Suffolk         Suffolk
                  Rickinghall                        2,650    Mid Suffolk         Suffolk
                  Stradbroke                         1,600    Mid Suffolk         Suffolk
                  Walsham-le-Willows                 2,100    Mid Suffolk         Suffolk
                  Weybread                           1,770    Mid Suffolk         Suffolk
                  Beccles Town                       7,350    Waveney             Suffolk
                  Beccles Worlingham                 5,770    Waveney             Suffolk
                  Bungay                             4,870    Waveney             Suffolk
                  Carlton Colville                   6,240    Waveney             Suffolk
                  Mutford                            1,890    Waveney             Suffolk
                  Halesworth                         4,637    Waveney             Suffolk
                  South Elmham                       1,930    Waveney             Suffolk
                  Wainford                           1,840    Waveney             Suffolk
                  Lothingland                        6,590    Waveney             Suffolk
                  Bramfield and Cratfield            1,820    Suffolk Coastal     Suffolk
                                                   140,417
                  Norfolk                           79,510                 57%
                  Suffolk                           60,907                 43%

This list of wards shows the mix of Norfolk and Suffolk wards that make up the Waveney Valley
LAG area. There are also 6 different district councils covered by the area, which in part explains
the lack of joined up support for the area.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England        Page 22 of 72


2             What the LAG proposes to do
2.1           Detailed proposals for the activities the LAG will support

2.1.1         A Vision for the Waveney Valley

“To support the businesses and communities of the Waveney Valley in building its identity as a
sustainable destination and vibrant place to live and work”

To make the Waveney Valley accessible to all people who wish to use it.
• The aim is to develop opportunities to reduce the gap between the urban and rural areas. This
   may be through the development of care farming, diversifying, or the development of social
   enterprise.

To work in partnership with local businesses and communities to help them benefit from the
distinctiveness and special character of the area.
• This programme will work to increase economic opportunities for the market towns, this focus
    will include looking at developing markets for local food, developing supply chain options
    between towns and their rural hinterlands.

To encourage the development and promotion of local supply chains.
• The aim is to increase the range and use of local supply chains and improve people’s
   connection to the food of the area. This will reduce food miles, improve understanding of the
   rural environment while also creating real economic opportunities for land based businesses.
• The aim is to work with the poultry, pig and grazing animals sectors to reduce risk through
   diversification, improve skills through direct training or linking with regional projects and through
   the development of added value and improvements in supply chains.

To increase the use of the landscape and environment for social benefits.
• The programme will encourage business development across the land based sector through
    diversification and tourism which link to and encourage increased use of the countryside.

To develop meaningful and effective collaboration across the business and community sectors to
improve the prosperity of the area.
• The aim is to work with businesses and communities to develop the area’s identity and wider
   awareness of it. This will create economic opportunities for tourism, local food and artisan
   businesses.

2.1.2         Proposed activities

To achieve the above vision and objective the LDS has identified the following core work areas:

      •   Communication between LAG partners and developing partnerships across the Waveney
          Valley
      •   Developing a distinct identity for the Waveney Valley
      •   Facilitating a quality standard as part of the Waveney Valley’s distinct identity
      •   Developing the area’s capacity to sustain increased levels of business activity
      •   Developing links between sectors and different levels of supply chains
      •   Improving the sustainability of existing producers and services in the Waveney Valley
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England        Page 23 of 72

2.1.3       Communication between LAG partners and developing partnerships across the
            Waveney Valley


The key to success with the Waveney Valley LDS is communication between the social, economic
and environmental organisations around the area. Just by developing this LDS, communication
has been started and the building blocks are in place to realise the vision.

2.1.4       Developing a distinct identity for the Waveney Valley

The communication will continue to develop, bringing closer partnership working between the
network of organisations in the Waveney Valley and the growth of the Valley’s distinct identity.
This closer partnership will give long-term life and sustainability to outputs from the LDS.

By creating a Waveney Valley distinct identity and enhancing the awareness of that identity, the
LAG are meeting the objectives laid out in the Expression of Interest.

If more people know where and what the Waveney Valley is, then more people by definition will be
able to visit and use it. The branding of the area can include footpaths, bridleways and other forms
of access. Social, economic and environmental enterprises can link in with the Waveney Valley
LAG and generate a sense of ownership for those living and working in the area, and a sense of
connection for those visiting or doing business in the area. The area can lead with projects like
care farming, which opens up the area to access far beyond leisure and work activities.

As mentioned in the section 1.2.1, Why the area was chosen, the Waveney Valley is rich in
environmental and landscape properties. However, because of its geographical location and being
on the edge of county and district boundaries it isn't recognised regionally, nationally or
internationally in the way it should be. The development of a Waveney Valley distinct identity will
help existing and new businesses link into a local brand and the associated marketing. It can also
work in partnership with existing individual brands in the area adding more depth to the brand by
giving it a geographical connection.

The LAG will work towards the facilitation of projects that draw businesses to join and expand its
identity scheme, through the creation of a 'brand' which serves to connect the extensive and
comprehensive range of products and services that exist in the Waveney Valley. Basically putting
Waveney Valley on the map as a name to look for when searching out quality and a place to visit.

2.1.5       Improving the sustainability of existing producers and services in the Waveney
            Valley

Communities within the Waveney Valley are already beginning to address issues of sustainability.
Mindful of issues of climate change and social responsibility, they are seeking to reduce their
environmental impact. In doing so and in raising their profile for these approaches, they create
business opportunities for existing producers as well as new ones. Those already in business can
adapt, diversify or expand and the LAG will seek to support them in doing so where the need for
that support can be justified. In particular, a number of market towns, led by local activists and with
the growing support of their communities, have sought to join national and international networks
with a number of approaches towards humanising lifestyles.

The LAG will work with businesses to help ensure their sustainability, and they are likely to align
themselves with their local communities, who are normally their immediate customers. There are
opportunities for farm diversification, for local food production, marketing and processing and for
tourism in these developments.

Diss, for example, is one of four UK towns that have achieved Cittaslow status. The Cittaslow
approach involves living life at a human scale, respecting and supporting the environment and
local traditions and preserving them for current and future generations to enjoy.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England       Page 24 of 72

Meanwhile Bungay is moving towards becoming a Transition Town, joining a growing network of
600 parishes in towns and villages and cities in the UK and globally. Transition Towns represent a
dynamic, evolving and inclusive approach to a future where oil and coal are at a premium and
climate change is a reality, re-building community resilience to economic and environmental
shocks and fostering ways of living that are more connected. Transition Towns propose an
alternative future through co-operation between businesses, re-skilling the community, localising
resources and encouraging knowledge transfer between communities locally, national and globally.

There is further information about Cittaslow and Transition Towns in Appendix 9.

It is likely that the ethos behind both of these movements will inform developments in the Waveney
Valley area in the near future and the Local Area Group will be prepared to assist businesses to
react to the situation where circumstances justify this approach.


2.1.6       Facilitating a quality standard as part of the Waveney Valley’s distinct identity

The LAG will facilitate the inclusion of a level of quality standard supplied by members of the brand
scheme through training, information sharing, partnerships and raw material to final product
linkage. Rather than being a tick box exercise, checking every level of the member company, the
LAG will help businesses and organisations to acquire an understanding of the rest of the
Waveney Valley, the products and services available and the way in which these can link together.

This will be a collaborative exercise between producers and service providers, including tourism
businesses.

2.1.7       Developing links between sectors and different levels of supply chains

The Waveney Valley has many businesses and organisations at all levels of supply chains,
however there is a shortage of organisations working together to create local supply chains. The
LAG will work to develop these local supply chains and to expand the offering in the area from
diversification and improvement of skills.

2.1.8       Developing the area’s capacity to sustain increased levels of business activity

The LAG will focus on developing the area’s capacity to sustain increased business arising from
the promotion of its distinct identity. This work will focus on training; diversification into non-
agricultural activities; the creation and development of micro-enterprises; and the encouragement
of tourism activities.

This activity will provide the opportunity to look at new types of business which make use of new
customer groups or the environment. LAG members have already identified the development of
care farming as one option and certain micro- business options arising from environmental
resources.

Training: the LAG will support the development of business management skills, especially
marketing, tying that in with the creation of the Waveney Valley identity and the opportunities that
will provide for delivering consistent messages to the public. We will support the development of
mentoring schemes that will assist newcomers to businesses and business sectors to establish
themselves more efficiently, using the experience of successful entrepreneurs to fast track them
past avoidable mistakes to towards positive outcomes.

Diversification: the branding of the Waveney Valley will lead to diversification opportunities for
farmers. These will not be limited to tourism and food processing. For instance, care farming is a
partnership between farmers, health & social care providers, and service users. The starting point
is an existing farm or small holding where the farmer allows people from a disadvantaged
background to experience the benefits of working outdoors as part of their recovery, rehabilitation
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England         Page 25 of 72

and/or progression into (mainstream) education or employment. The care farmer, with his honest
desire to help and to support people, will receive a reward for his contribution towards addressing
social and health imbalances in society. We anticipate developing and supporting 10 care farms
allowing 100+ (self) referrals from Health & Social Care providers. The cluster of care farms would
contribute to tourism, health & social wellbeing, further sustainable agricultural practices and a
future for those who are living on the very edge of society. There is room for a separate
federation/co-operative of care farmers which shares friendship, support, resources, learning and
experience. The care farming project is not an end in itself but will hopefully prepare the route for
others and demonstrate the potential for imaginative diversification.

Creation and development of micro-enterprises: establishing the Waveney Valley with a distinct
identity will open up many opportunities that will be taken by new, small businesses; established
businesses will also be affected and will see prospects for growth. The LAG will support these
processes, providing seed corn capital where it is required and justified.

Between Diss and Bungay the valley landscape is very attractive and there is scope to further
develop and promote recreation in this area. It already has a good network of footpaths and
bridleways, one of the few rivers in England with canoe access, many fishing sites and well-
developed cycling routes. The artist, Sir Alfred Munnings, is associated with this stretch of the river
so, with effective promotion, it could begin to rival Dedham Vale. The Angles Way links the whole
valley and there are many circular routes off it. Better promotion is needed including tying in with
bus route 580 that links Diss to Great Yarmouth and more or less follows the route of the Angles
Way. These environmental assets, well promoted, can lead to the establishment of new
businesses allied to them and their interpretation.

Encouragement of tourism activities: this is fundamental to the exploitation of the area’s identity
and will lead to support designed to improve services and the sustainability of local tourism
businesses. Links between businesses and the local environment and cultural assets will be
established and improved. There are also opportunities to invest in recreational infrastructure.

The area to the west of Diss has many important nature reserves: Wortham Ling (Suffolk Wildlife
Trust), Roydon Fen (South Norfolk Council), Redgrave & Lopham Fen (SWT) and Little Ouse
Headwaters Fens (LOHP). There is scope here to extend habitats, link reserves by footpaths/cycle
routes and generally promote the area. A riverside path between Diss and Wortham Ling or
beyond has been a priority for many years.

With the use of other measures, the LAG will continue to monitor regional RDPE projects and
identify local connections. The LAG will support community based projects which connect with
these regional projects but fall outside regional RDPE funding, for example community woodfuel
projects.

2.1.9       Consideration of which funding route to use

The overall aim of the Waveney Valley LAG is to develop a broad range of support for the distinct
identity to have real impact.

For each of the measures adopted by the LAG, there will be maximum rates of support; these will
generally be lower than the maximum permitted by the regulations. The proportion of the LAG
maximum rate of support will be guided by the budgeted IRR of the project, broadly an inverse
relationship in that the higher the IRR, the lower the rate of grant. This will be applied flexibly on a
case by case basis.

The LAG considers that RDPE funding should be that of last resort and will encourage the
business and community sectors to invest from their own resources wherever and whenever a
project appraisal demonstrates that a reasonable Internal Rate of Return can be achieved. RDPE
funding will be contingent on a rigorous assessment of the rate of return and will be on a sliding
scale that will reflect the risk and commercial robustness of the project.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England       Page 26 of 72



The working group, drawing together the LDS, have had discussions with many organisations
about ways in which match funding can be achieving. The conclusion is that a major route should
be a membership scheme for a Waveney Valley brand, which will allow buy in from a large number
of private, social and public bodies.

As the LAG expects to have a long life span, an important role will be to encourage and facilitate
bids to other sources of funding beyond RDPE.

The LAG realise that there is a lot of value to connecting with work being done by mainstream
public sector bodies like the LSC, not least to avoid reinventing the wheel or breaking funding
rules.

Due to the short time frame for writing the LDS, it’s not been possible to confirm any funding from
the public sector. There is serious interest from the various local authorities and both county
councils, especially because the overall aim of the LAG is to create a Waveney Valley distinct
identity, which fits with the local strategies. Ongoing discussions will continue with all the local
authorities to identify possible funding.

As detailed, one of the major outputs of the LAG will be to facilitate a project to create and market
a Waveney Valley brand, which needs early priority and takes time and consideration. After the life
of this RDPE funding, a Waveney Valley brand organisation can continue, funding itself from
membership fees and where possible other grant opportunities for specific projects.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England         Page 27 of 72


3            How the LAG will use RDPE funding to support its activities
3.1          How the LDS supports the delivery of Axes 1, 2 & 3 by mapping of the activities
             proposed onto the RDPE

3.1.1        Integration across the RDPE axes

The proposal aims to maximize the potential of the Waveney Valley area, by developing a
Waveney Valley distinct identity. For this to be achieved a balanced programme will be needed
which strengthens the economy through development of a Waveney Valley brand, new exciting
businesses and improved efficiencies within all businesses. These must link with the
environmental quality and the social needs of the area and the neighbouring wards and districts.

This vision fits with the three RDPE axes, by:
   • Axis 1 (Improving the competitiveness of agricultural and forestry sector). Pursuing
        competitiveness means improving the economic performance of agriculture by, for
        example, reducing production costs, increasing the economic size of holdings, promoting
        innovation and more orientation towards the market. Increasing competitiveness must also
        take advantage of the opportunities offered through diversification of economic activities, a
        focus on food quality and safety, value-added products that consumers demand, including
        non-food products and biomass production, and on cleaner and more environmentally
        friendly production techniques.
   • Axis 2 (Improving the environment and the countryside). The main drive of this axis is to
        support landowners to improve their land for environmental and social benefit. The
        Waveney LAG will work with natural England and the Forestry Commission to ensure that
        their scheme are suitable targeted in this area. The LAG will also ensure that the benefits of
        this work are felt through increased use and understanding of the environment and the
        goods from the environment.
   • Axis 3 (quality of life in rural areas and diversification of the rural economy). A central
        objective of Axis 3 is to have a ‘living countryside’ and to help maintain and improve the
        social and economic fabric, in particular in the more remote rural areas facing depopulation.
        Making rural areas more attractive also requires promoting sustainable growth and
        generating new employment opportunities, particularly for young people and women, as
        well as facilitating the access to up-to-date information and communication technologies.
        On-farm diversification towards non-agricultural activities, assistance for off-farm activities,
        and strengthening the links between agriculture and other sectors of the rural economy play
        an important role in this.

The LDS has been developed to ensure focus across the RIP themes. The programme will use
the strength of the environmental and access themes to ensure that the business and community
themes are maximized. However, this LDS will focus on some of the themes in more depth than
others. The main focus will be on:

•     New Markets and Products
•     New Businesses and Enterprises in the Rural Economy
•     Rural Community Capacity

3.1.2        Alignment with the RDPE themes and measures

Business Efficiency

By focusing on knowledge transfer, skills development and collaboration the project will work to
improve the local supply chains. Focus will be placed on key areas such as the red meat supply
chain and the pig and poultry supply chains linking them with all levels of services and suppliers,
from feed producers to restaurants where the products can be sold. This will focus on looking at
the local systems and opportunities.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England       Page 28 of 72



There will be opportunities to develop and support businesses which make use of agricultural
waste products or food processing waste, such as on farm composting and biogas creation. All
applications will be supporting in their take up (where relevant) of renewable technologies and
systems. In addition there will be opportunities for both commercial and community enterprises
which aim to earn from sustainable energy options.

New Markets and Products

By supporting new product development and marketing the project will help develop market
opportunities by encouraging partnership working and collaboration. One of the areas to be
targeted is to improve market penetration for local food and rural services both into the market
towns and urban areas within the Waveney Valley, but also further afield, building new market
opportunities and drawing in visitors wanting to enjoy the produce of the Waveney Valley.

New products will be encouraged where possible. Encouraging innovative thinking is a key
objective of Leader. For example supporting the creation of a care farming system which provides
social benefits through diversification, or supporting the pig, poultry and red meat sectors to
explore new product lines and opportunities.

New Businesses and Enterprises in the Rural Economy

By supporting the development of new businesses in the land based sector the project will create
new opportunities for the rural population.

The creation of businesses which link between the rural areas and the market towns will be a key
target area of business creation. Focusing on young entrepreneurs and linkage with business
support systems such as Business Link East and Fresh Start is key to this objective.

Diversification is a key risk management system for land based businesses and helps counteract
the increasing risks of disease issues such as Blue Tongue and Avian Flu.

Resource Protection

While this is not a key area of Leader the proposal aims to ensure the links and joined up working
are maximised.

Addressing diffuse pollution, improving the management of water and wastes and improving the
management of soils in the agricultural and forestry sectors will help to maintain the assets of the
Waveney Valley.

Making use of the environment as an asset for business development is key to developing a
Waveney Valley distinct identity. The management of waste products and applications aiming to
find an economic use for this waste will be encouraged. Developing links with initiatives such as
Catchments Sensitive Farming ensure that joined up working is achieved.

All applications will have to demonstrate how they will support the ecological and landscape quality
of the area and help to take forward BAP targets and further the county wide ecological networks.

Conservation of the Natural Built and Historic Environment

While this is not a key area of Leader the proposal aims to ensure the links and joined up working
are maximised.

The project will support land management regimes which balance production with the needs of the
landscape, habitat and bio-diversity.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England      Page 29 of 72

For the vision of this application to be achieved the ecological condition of the area must be
supported and where possible improved. All applications will have to demonstrate how they will
support the ecological and landscape quality of the area.

If a business case can be made to create new private nature reserves, visitor attractions or
community resources this project will aim to encourage and support their creation, through linkage
with the Waveney Valley brand.

Access and Recreation

While this is not a key area of Leader the proposal aims to ensure the links and joined up working
are maximised.

Opening up new areas of the rural landscape to public access is key to the project. It must
improve the social use of the rural environment. The programme will look to develop a number of
projects to test new ideas and to expand existing activity.

The Waveney Valley has been identified as a possible location to become a centre for care
farming. This is an example of the type of opportunity being explored in the area to increase the
use of the area by people who traditionally have no access to it.

If a business case can be made to create new private nature reserves, visitor attractions or
communities to make better use of their own resources this project will aim to encourage and
support their creation, through linkage with the Waveney Valley brand.

Through the development of the area as a destination the project aims to improve people’s
understanding of what makes the area beautiful and unique.

Rural Community Capacity

Activities which facilitate the improvement of access to services will help develop links between the
market towns and the countryside. The project will support projects which build on the viability of
rural communities. This will include the creation of social enterprises and social benefits from
businesses.

The encouragement of business development and skills development, which fits with local people’s
needs, will help make the Waveney Valley a place where young people wish to be. This work will
link to the Fresh Start Initiative.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England             Page 30 of 72

3.1.3       The Waveney Valley Leader budget

Total LDS programme budget

Total LDS              2008-13        2008       2009       2010        2011           2012      2013
Budget


RDPE funding            3,259.2        5.5       492.7      778.5      791.2          801.1      390.2
Private &               3,799.9        0.0       559.5      946.5      948.3          953.6      392.0
Voluntary sector
Match funding
Public sector
match funding
Total                   7,059.1        5.5      1,052.2    1,725.0    1,739.5         1,754.7    782.2

Measures budget
To enable EEDA to manage the detailed budget please provide an indicative year on year
measure-by-measure breakdown for grant aid to be utilised (in £ ‘000s) in calendar years
Measure                               2008       2009        2010        2011          2012      2013
Support for the creation &             0.0       58.8        98.0        98.0          98.0      39.2
developm of micro-enterprises

Adding value to agricultural           0.0       46.2        77.0        77.0          77.0      30.8
and forestry products
Encouragement of tourism               0.0       71.3        118.8      118.8         118.8      47.5
activities
Diversification into non-              0.0       89.3        151.9      151.9         151.9      62.6
agricultural activities
Infrastructure related to the          0.0        0.0         0.0         0.0           0.0       0.0
development and adaptation
of agriculture
Basic services                         0.0       58.5        97.5        97.5          97.5      39.0
Conservation and upgrading             0.0       32.0        80.0        80.0          80.0      48.0
of rural heritage
Vocational training for the            0.0       13.4        18.2        22.3          26.7       8.5
food, farming and forestry
sectors
Training and information for           0.0       12.0        16.0        16.0          24.0      12.0
economic actors
Implementing cooperative               0.0       16.8        28.0        33.6          28.0       5.6
projects
Running the LAG &                      5.5       92.7        93.2        96.2          99.3      98.8
developing LAG skills for
delivery of Leader
Total annual grant                     5.5       490.9       778.5      791.2         801.1      392.0
expenditure


The full measures budget is in Appendix 4.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England             Page 31 of 72

The encouragement of tourism activities measure has been weighted in the budget because the
vast majority of the development work for the Waveney Valley brand work will be carried out under
this measure, which will happen early on in the lifetime of the LAG. However, that work will then
roll out to sectors across the Waveney Valley and the delivery of that brand will then come into
other measures including Training and Adding value to agricultural and forestry products.

The running costs have been calculated to reflect an annual inflation rate of 3%.

3.1.4       LAG output targets and milestones

The programme is designed to deliver a broad range of outputs. The Outputs Proforma
(Appendix 5) includes a breakdown of recordable targets to be delivered through the LDS by
measure and year. The totals over the life of the project are summarised below:

                                                                                      TOTAL
                 Measure                                                              2008-13
                 Vocational training & information for agricultural, food and
                 forestry sectors
                 Number or participants in training                                       424
                 Number of training days received                                         847
                 Support contributing to competitiveness of the livestock sector
                 (number of participants                                                   85
                 Support to livestock sector contributing to enhancing on-farm
                 management of nutrients (number of participants)                          85
                 Support contributing to animal health & welfare (number of
                 participants)                                                             85
                 Adding value to agricultural and forestry products
                 Number of enterprises supported                                           14
                 Total volume of investments (£m)                                        1.14
                 Support contributing to competitiveness of the livestock sector
                 (number of farm holdings)                                                  7
                 Diversification into non agricultural activities
                 Number of beneficiaries                                                   22
                 Total volume of investments (£m)                                        1.73
                 Number of jobs created or sustained through this measure                  33
                 Support for the creation and development of micro enterprises
                 Number of micro enterprises supported                                     14
                 Number of jobs created or sustained through this measure                  21
                 Encouragement of tourism activities
                 Number of new tourism actions supported                                   53
                 Total volume of investments (£m)                                        1.05
                 Number of jobs created or sustained through this measure                  35
                 Basic services
                 Number of supported actions                                               22
                 Total volume of investments (£m)                                        0.65
                 Number of jobs created or sustained through this measure                  11

                 Conservation & upgrading of the rural heritage
                 Number of rural heritage actions supported                                13
                 Total volume of investments (£m)                                        0.53
                 Number of jobs created or sustained through this measure                   7
                 Training and information for economic actors operating in the
                 fields covered by Axis 3
                 Number of participating economic actors to supported activities          106
                 Number of days training received by participants                         762
                 Implementing cooperative projects
                 Number of cooperative projects                                            15
                 Running the LAG and developing LAG skills for delivery of
                 Leader
                 RDPE funding (£)                                                      485.65
                 private & voluntary match                                                  0
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England       Page 32 of 72

                 public sector match                                                  0




Levered-in Investment: The total value of the Waveney Valley Leader programme will be in the
region of £6.8 million. This funding will provide a significant boost to the local economy and lead to
both environmental and social benefits. Some £3.5m of private investment will be generated.

Job Creation: The LDS has set a job creation target of 106 FTE. In line with job creation, the LAG
are keen to see investment in these job to ensure that skills are developed and opportunities for
development and growth of individuals is achieved.

Businesses Supported: through farm diversification, tourism and micro business development the
LDS will work to create new economic activity through both new businesses and expansion and
development of existing. The LDS has set a target of 124 businesses directly supported. However
with the development of the brand and the improvement in quality activity, it is probable that there
will be a significantly larger number of businesses supported through this LAG.

Farm Diversification: diversification of existing businesses to create new enterprises which
reduce risk and diversify the rural economy.

Greater recognition of the area: The Waveney Valley has the potential and community feel of a
coherent area but has never received coordinated support. A key output from the programme will
be to establish the area as a recognised destination which offers opportunities for a whole host of
new business, social and leisure activities.

Social enterprises: Developing new social enterprises to stimulate the economy in the
countryside and rural environment is a key objective of the programme. The programme will be
looking to establish a number of social enterprises throughout the area and wherever possible they
will be located close to or within the communities they serve. Making better use of existing and
under-utilised assets to accommodate these social enterprises will also enable a significant
amount of added value to be brought to this element of the programme.

Skills: A key part to business success is ensuring that correct skills are available within the
business or group developing and delivering the project. All projects will be encouraged to
complete a training needs analysis (TNA) and include relevant training as part of their application.
This will lead to approximately 106 people trained and over 700 training days delivered.

Stand alone training programmes will be encouraged where they fit with local needs. It is hoped
that a strong correlation between the Leader area and the regional RDPE training applications can
be achieved. Training organisations will be invited to tender for training contracts, delivering
innovative training not only in core skills, but beyond these to understanding the offering from the
Waveney Valley as a whole and ways to link with those products and services. This training will
lead to 423 individuals trained and 846 training days. Due to the significance of the livestock
sectors in this part of the region, the LAG expect that a significant level of the training will be
directed toward these individuals and businesses.

New job creation will focus on generating jobs which demonstrate clear and direct benefits for the
local community, socially, culturally and economically. The emphasis will therefore be on year-
round employment and flexible working conditions.

Local food: a key output will be the development of local food systems and opportunities.

The programme will expand the opportunities for existing and new local food producers and
downstream business through improved supply chains, new business creation, training, support for
new producers and new products, and through building links between market towns and villages,
the countryside and neighbouring urban areas.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England        Page 33 of 72



Increased business and community use of the natural and built heritage: the programme will
build on landscape, wildlife and built heritage of the area by working closely with partners seeking
to increase the sustainable use of these assets by local businesses and community enterprises.

•   Better promotion of recreation opportunities linked to local tourism providers.
•   Better links from market towns to surrounding countryside
•   Joint marketing of assets such as nature reserves and historic buildings

The baseline information will be identified through working in close partnership with a range of local
and regional economic, social and environmental partners. The economic development officers
from the relevant County and District Councils will be key partners for the development of the
baseline information. This will be supported through the countryside and demographics teams
within the councils and Norfolk Rural Community Council and Suffolk ACRE. These partners will be
consulted in the production of the full application and subsequently in regard to the annual
targeting plan.

The Waveney Valley area has never been supported through a joined up partnership covering the
whole area. Therefore through the work undertaken to date and through the development of the
LAG a large range of organizations will need to be involved. However three key organizations do
provide some level of information; the Broads Authority, the Upper Waveney Valley Partnership
and the Great Yarmouth and Waveney funding partnership. These three organizations and their
strategies and documents will be used in the development of the LDS and its delivery.

Linkage with local initiatives and events will also be used to ensure that priorities and objectives
are in line with local needs. This will include Local Area Agreements and localized strategies as
well as work by local partnerships such as the Market Town Partnerships.

Through the management group and the full LAG the project priorities will be set and then baseline
information and targets will be placed aside them. This process will be reviewed each year.

The impact and outputs from the programme will be measured through the completion of
monitoring reports. The monitoring work will look at both hard targets such as training days, jobs
created as well as soft targets such as community engagement and skills used. There will be a
yearly progress report produced for the area.

Partnership feedback will be sought at the annual review meeting and used to ensure partnership
satisfaction with the quality of delivery and accountability.

Environmental outputs the Waveney Valley is rich in environmental and landscape properties;
the LAG will act to ensure that these are maintained and enhanced wherever possible. Since
making use of the environment as an asset for business development is seen as key to developing
a Waveney Valley distinct identity, conserving that resource is vital to the programme’s success.
The Waveney is a constituent of the Broads, with National Park status, as is some of the rest of the
project area to the east. The area to the west of Diss has many important nature reserves.
All grant applications will have to demonstrate how they will support the ecological and landscape
quality of the area. While they will be subject to scrutiny through the Excellence Framework (see
3.4), the LAG will also consider the East of England Toolkit developed by Sustainability East - the
East of England's independent sustainable development champion. The broad aim of the East of
England Toolkit is to highlight the economic, environmental and social impacts of policies,
development proposals and other new initiatives within the region and provide information which
can help to improve them. There are a number of strands within the toolkit that are relevant to the
environment: biodiversity – landscape; rural; buildings - heritage; transport; consumption –
lifestyles; etc..
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England            Page 34 of 72

Through the development of the area as a destination, the project aims to improve the
understanding of what makes the area beautiful and unique.

The management of waste products and applications aiming to find an economic use for this waste
will be encouraged.

Reduced energy consumption from the use of efficient building design; transport and logistic
systems will be expected and supported. The programme also expects to influence and support
the development of the appropriate supply and use of renewable sources of energy.
Tourism development and promotion is a key objective of the LDS and the project will work hard to
deliver an increased awareness of the requirements and methods of delivering responsible
tourism. Projects will demonstrate that they have no detrimental environmental impact, and ideally
will make a positive contribution.
Supporting the development of local food markets and sustainable local food systems will,
especially where they help to maintain grazing livestock production, encourage mixed farming
systems with a variety of enterprises and increase biodiversity. This also contributes towards
maintaining the landscape qualities of the area and thus to its tourism potential. Support for local
foods will also create more efficient supply chains, reducing transport and energy costs, and waste.
Specific outputs proposed are:
                                                                                                    TOTAL
                                                                                                    2008-
                                                        2008   2009    2010   2011    2012   2013   13

Environmental sustainability and enhancement
Number of projects improving their environmental
sustainability by having an environmental
management plan                                                    5     10      10     15      5       45
Number of projects improving their environmental
sustainability by investing in environmental
technology                                                         3      6       6      6      3       24
Number of businesses improving their economic
advantage from proximity to the National Park or
other environmental designations                                   2      4       4      4      2       16
Sustainable tourism awareness training (e.g.
approaches to leisure transport; significance of
landscape maintenance, etc.) – number of trainees
(included in Measures 111 and 331 above):                         20     20      20     10              70
Sustainable awareness training – number of days
(included in Measures 111 and 331 above):                         60     60      60     30             210
Number of projects facilitating an improved
appreciation and enjoyment of the rural environment                5     10      10     10      5       40




3.1.5       Community involvement at developmental stage

Following on from the work to develop the EOI, the Waveney Valley working group had members
from a wide range of economic, social and environmental areas within and around the Waveney
Valley. At the first working group meeting public consultation was discussed and it was felt that the
most effective way to hold meaningful public consultation would be for each of the members to
send out an email to their list of contacts. They would request that those contacts forwarded that
email to maximise the distribution.

Therefore a huge email campaign, contacting businesses and organisations based within the
Waveney Valley area was undertaken. This email included a summary of the Expression of
Interest and explained the input needed at the LDS stage - feedback on the content of the EOI,
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England         Page 35 of 72

help to build a comprehensive list of organisations, strategies and initiatives that already exist in
and around the Waveney Valley area and lastly volunteers for the LAG. The email was distributed
to hundreds of organisations, councils, parish news and voluntary bodies.

Press and online media were also used to contact businesses and organisations around the
Waveney Valley area, such as the Waveney Valley Blog and the Eastern Daily Press and East
Anglian Daily Times. The Norfolk Rural Business Advice Service website also publicised the
development of the LDS and held copies of the EOI for download by individual readers and entries
under the briefings section explaining what was happening with the development of the LDS and
the potential for the area.

This email and press campaign have hugely increased the awareness of the LDS development
and lead to excellent feedback from all over the Waveney Valley area, and groups who haven’t
worked with each other before are communicating about how they can work together through the
LAG, but also in other ways beyond the potential LDS.

The Waveney Valley LAG plan to be around for many years to come, developing the Waveney
Valley brand and its membership. Therefore a long term approach is being considered. As 2008,
the first year of RDPE funding, will only actually be 6 months, it was felt that it wouldn’t be sensible
to consider projects during that time. Instead that first 6 months will be used to find a suitable
facilitator and to hold public meetings to explain the concept of a Waveney Valley distinct identity
and develop a workable framework to build the identity around.

These public meetings will be for specific sectors, such as meat producers. However there will
also be cross sector meetings, for example meat producers and restaurants, to make sure that any
brand is attractive to organisations at all levels of the supply chain, from raw material to finished
product.

3.2         How the LDS will address priorities in the national and regional RDPE plans

The LDS has referenced a range of local and regional strategies in its development. This has
resulted in the proposal demonstrating a strong fit to them.

3.2.1       Key strategies

The LDS illustrates that the programme will build on the environmental objectives of Natural
England through encouraging understanding and use of the countryside and the economic goals of
the RES. The programme will see the creation of environmentally sensitive businesses,
sustainable jobs and the development of the economic prosperity of the area.

Regional Economic Strategy – 2004

These five goals support the stated objectives of the Waveney Valley LAG, helping fit the LAG to
the overall regional strategy. The LDS sets out how the Waveney Valley can add value and vitality
to it’s local communities through Economic Growth, which specifically support Goal 2.

GOAL 1
• Increasing employment rates in disadvantaged communities
• Supporting wider career choices for young people
• Developing skills that better meet business needs
• Developing higher level skills to support the knowledge economy
The Waveney Valley has identified the need to focus skills development on the business needs of
the area, such as the livestock sector. Localised delivery as opposed to a regional approach will
ensure that the businesses have a say in how the training is delivered.
GOAL 2
• Building a more enterprising culture
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England       Page 36 of 72


•   Supporting the accelerated and sustained growth, productivity and competitiveness of the
    region’s businesses
• Ensuring business development adds value and vitality to local communities
The Waveney Valley LDS focuses on the need to raise the aspiration of the businesses within the
area. Through building an identity, an enterprise culture will be created which will lead to sustained
business growth.
GOAL 3
• Stimulating demand for research and development and knowledge transfer among the region’s
    SMEs
• Ensuring strong links between regional universities, research institutes and the private sector
The LAG will draw on the research and skills of its members and partner organisations to improve
knowledge transfer between them and the business community.
GOAL 5
• Supporting disadvantaged communities and groups to access sustainable employment
    opportunities
• Improving prospects for better quality employment
• Tackling discrimination experienced by communities or individuals
The LDS has a clear objective “to making the place accessible to all people who wish to use it”;
this work will include focusing on how we can support new groups to enjoy this area of the region.
GOAL 8
• Promoting the adoption of resource efficiency and environmental good practice principles
• Capturing the advantages of the renewable energy potential of the region
• Establishing the region as an exemplar of environmentally sustainable development
The LDs aims to support the development of local food and shortened supply chains. This will lead
to a reduction in food miles.

Regional Woodland Strategy – 2003

Although this strategy isn’t at the heart of the Waveney Valley LAG’s objectives, the LAG are keen
to connect with regional schemes that come from the forestry sector.

ED1     Encourage an increase in woodland-based tourism.
RE1     Promote the use of wood for heat generation.

Natural England Strategic Objectives

• To conserve and enhance England’s natural environment
For an environment to achieve its true potential, it needs to be a living and breathing place. The
project aims to breathe this life into the Waveney Valley.
• Increase the number, diversity and frequency of people enjoying the natural environment.
A key focus of the LDS is to encourage more people to make use of the Valley for recreation,
health and business purposes.
• Improve places for people to enjoy the natural environment.
The project will link with Environmental Stewardship and the Broads Authority to create the
opportunities for people to have access to the natural environment.
• Environmentally sustainable farming, fishing and forestry with protection of natural resources,
     reductions in diffuse pollution and enhancement of the natural environment.
Links with the Catchment Sensitive Farming work of the Environment Agency and Natural England
will aim to improve farmers’ understanding of pollution issues. Connection with the Regional
Under-grazing work will aim to improve the sustainability of the livestock farmers in the area.
• To influence markets and supply chains to develop and adopt more sustainable practices and
     cut greenhouse gas emissions.
A key focus of the LDs is to support the development of local supply chains.
• To increase investment in environmental enhancement and thereby the contribution of the
     natural environment to national, regional and local economies.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England          Page 37 of 72

Through the development of a thriving business community which makes use of the natural
environment, the LAG will encourage the development of new environmental assets.
• Ensure society lives within the limits of the natural environment, growing and developing the
   evidence base to support this.
The LDS is looking at the lessons which can be learnt from both Cittaslow and Transition Towns to
see how they can be adopted across the area.

A strategy for the food and drink industry in the East of England

Local food and sustainable supply chains are at the heart of the LDS and the LAG have already
started to identify ways in which all of the following elements of the Regional Food Strategy will be
taken forward.

• CC 1: Improve networking and connectivity.
• CC3: Resources for food and dink.
A key focus will be the development of collaboration across the food sector in and outside the area
to ensure that there is better connectivity and understanding of the resources available to
businesses.
• SP 1: Skills of competitive food and drink businesses
• SP 2: “Space for ideas” in food and drink
• SP 4: Consumer, customer connection
• SP 5: Whole supply chain
Tourists and local people to the Waveney Valley value the food they eat. The LDs aims to improve
the availability and access to healthy food for all people and to develop new ideas and thinking
among food businesses. Connection with other LAGs regionally, nationally and across the EU will
help to identify new ideas and opportunities for food producers.

Integrated Regional Strategy

Waveney Valley LAG will look at innovative uses of the environment to improve health and well
being of local people and visitors. Focus is being placed on activities which will incorporate
disadvantaged people to the landscape and local environment.

•   Crucial Regional Issue 3 – Building the knowledge economy:
•   Crucial Regional Issue 4 – Skills and labour supply:
•   Crucial Regional Issue 6 – Health and well-being:
•   Crucial Regional Issue 7 – Rural issues:
•   Crucial Regional Issue 8 – Resources issues

Sustainable Development Framework

This should be at the heart of any LAG’s aims.

•   The Economy
•   Agriculture, food and forestry
•   Global impact

As described in the Sustainability section of the LDS, all activity undertaken through the
programme will fit with the concept of sustainable development.

Broads Plan

Although the Waveney Valley is only partially within the Broads Authority area, it is vital that the
two organisations work in partnership both where their areas overlap and where joint partnerships
benefit the local population and businesses.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England                   Page 38 of 72

LL7 – Retain historically important buildings and features in the Broads, and avoid further
degradation of their character and contribution to the integrity of the landscape.
LL11 – Support opportunities for investment in innovation, regeneration and diversification for
sustainable futures.
LL12 – Promote the development of a sustainable transport infrastructure.
TR13 – Improve physical access to facilities and services for all, including people with disabilities.
TR14 – Introduce and develop initiatives that foster improvements in visitor services and facilities.
The Broads Plan and the LDS have many areas in common and it is planned that, through close
working with the Authority, the LDS will ensure maximum benefits are achieved.

Agricultural, Food And Drink Industries In The East Of England: A Clear Way Ahead 2006
A report integrating the Food and Drink Industry Strategy with the Sustainable Farming and Food
Delivery Plan leading to identification of strategic priorities and their delivery

Commissioned by the National Farmers Union (NFU), the East of England Development Agency
(EEDA) and Government Office for the East of England (GO-East) - March 2006

Helps further pin support for the objectives of the Waveney Valley LDS.

The key objectives for providing public support to the agricultural, food and drink industries within
the region are to:
• Help the food and drink industry adapt to changing and new market conditions
• Develop a cutting edge food industry that uses innovation and technology to develop products
    that meet consumer needs
• Improve the economic and environmental sustainability of food supply chains
• Improve the links between agriculture, food and the consumer
• Improve the links between agriculture, land use and the environment
• Improve the image of food and farming as a career
• Enable individual businesses to make informed choices about their future
• Help small businesses adapt, develop skills and exploit available and emerging opportunities
• Take advantage of increasing consumer interest in food provenance and in local and regional
    food
Provide industry support that is based on co-ordination and not replication of existing initiatives


Framework for the Future of Market Towns in the East of England (Tribal Consultants)
www.eastspace.net/investingincommunities-
understanding/documents/Framework_for_the_Future_of_Market_Towns_in_the_East_of_England_May_2005%5B1%5D.pdf


Tribal HCH were appointed by the East of England Market Towns Advisory Forum (MTAF) in
partnership with EEDA to prepare a paper on “The Strategic Framework for the Future of Market
Towns”. The purpose of the document was to present a thought provoking assessment relating to
how market towns and market town partnerships might be reflected in future regional policy,
particularly that relating to economic development and planning, in the East of England. The study
sets out recommendations relating to how market town partnerships can be integrated into the
policy and delivery environment, again with a particular focus on economic development and
planning.

The Regional Rural Delivery Framework
www.eera.gov.uk/Documents/About%20EERA/Policy/Rural/RRDF.pdf


This has been developed as a ‘means of embedding rural needs within wider regional strategic
aims, and enabling decision-making and prioritisation to be devolved to regional and local level.’
The draft Framework identifies a number of regional rural priorities for the region, and will help to
shape delivery and ensure needs can be addressed. One priority relates to market towns. Its focus
is to “re-establish market towns and other service centres as genuine hubs for the rural economy
and for private and public service provision.”
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England        Page 39 of 72



The East of England Plan or Regional Spatial Strategy (to be published Spring 2008)

The East of England Plan includes policies to support economic diversity and Business
development, that support the actions outlined in the Regional Economic Strategy until the year
2021.

It covers economic development, housing, the environment, transport, waste management, culture,
sport and recreation, mineral extraction. It sets a vision, objectives and core strategy for the longer
term. In particular it seeks to reduce the region’s impact on, and exposure to, the effects of climate
change and to put in place a development strategy with the potential to support continued
sustainable growth beyond 2021. It incorporates the Regional Transport Strategy (RTS).
It has identified 10 priority themes for the region and the principles of approach. The focus on
market towns as places for investment and service development and the importance of developing
social capital both feature as priorities. It recognises the market towns as providing “small-scale
local employment opportunities and supporting the needs of agriculture”.


The England Forestry Strategy (ETWF) sets out a four-fold role for woodlands and forestry in
England, encompassing forestry for rural development; economic regeneration; recreation, access
& tourism; & environment & conservation. In this context, the development of woodfuel is
recognised as providing a number of crosscutting benefits and the EFS draws specific reference to
assisting diversification through encouraging the use of woodfuel for energy production. See
England Forestry Strategy – England's Trees Woods and Forests Forestry Commission 2007
www.forestry.gov.uk



3.2.2         Local Strategies

All local district and county councils in the Waveney Valley area have been fully engaged in the
development of this LDS. The officers have used their strategies to ensure that the LDS will move
forward the views of their tax payers. The councils have viewed the development of the Waveney
Valley distinct identity as a major step forward in improving collaborative strategic delivery.

Waveney Local Development Framework
www.waveney.gov.uk/planning/planning+policy


A portfolio of local planning documents which will guide and control development in the District.
Some of the documents within the Local Development Framework will become part of the statutory
Development Plan. The remaining documents will be used to support the production and
management of the Framework, or, will assist in the delivery of the Development Plan documents.

The LAG must have a thorough understanding of the Local Development Framework as capital
projects which seek funding will require planning consent. Close working with the Council will be
undertaken to ensure that projects coming forward have a smooth progress through the planning
process.

Waveney Prospectus – A Platform for Growth
Section 3 – Marketing
AI-9 Joint branding & marketing to attract inward investment

“Make sure there is a long term joint approach to building a strong brand rather than a series of
dispersed local approaches” (Stakeholder comment)

Actions to improve the investor offer are very important, but they must be accompanied by parallel
measures to promote Waveney as an investment location and to engage existing and potential
investors about the merits of investing here.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England       Page 40 of 72



The LAG includes a representative from the Waveney Community Partnership. This close
relationship will build on the aims of the prospectus. Approaches such as SWOT analysis have
been used in the development of the LDS.

South Norfolk Economic Strategy 2004-2009

"To be an area where economic opportunity and development is diverse, sustainable and
accessible to all the community".

Objective A - Stimulate the creation and retention of quality employment in South Norfolk
Objective B - Raise learning expectations and achievement, meeting the needs of the economy.
Objective C - Break down the barriers to economic success in rural areas

In addition, South Norfolk have launched their “Community Strategy for South Norfolk”; in both their
strategies South Norfolk Council aim to improve the business environment across their area with a
view to improve start up rates. The LDS aims to create an environment which support business
development and growth and the three documents are strongly aligned.

Suffolk's Sustainable Community Strategy 2008/28
(encompassing the Greenest County Initiative as a main element)
http://www.onesuffolk.co.uk/ssp/CommunityStrategy/


Seeks under the local food, drink and tourism objectives to....

•   Encourage the formation of food distribution hubs in Suffolk. The purpose will be to link various
    initiatives, such as reducing food miles, promoting the availability of good quality local food
    from Suffolk livestock, sustaining traditional grazing areas and encouraging sustainable
    tourism. Support by public sector organisations through procurement of food from local
    sources, forward commitment to the market and financial support to sustainable tourism
    activities, would be hugely beneficial.

•   Support to sustainable tourism initiatives will encourage greater sustainability in the modes of
    travel, accommodation and activities of visitors and residents alike. Central to this is access
    improvement through the rights of way network and initiatives, such as Discover Suffolk.
    Particular emphasis should be placed upon communities that have minimal access to their
    surrounding countryside, and improved safety for horse riders through off road routes.
    Innovative projects promoting and linking healthy lifestyles and the quality of Suffolk's
    distinctive landscapes and green space are central to the Sustainable Community Strategy.

Both the objectives above fit with the LDS and close relationships with Suffolk County Council will
ensure that all possible linkages are achieved.

Norfolk Tourism Strategy – Under development

The strategy is under development and should be completed in the next couple of months.
Representatives on the LAG are involved with the development process and will feed into the LAG
as objectives and delivery becomes clearer.

South Norfolk Tourism Strategy

Naturally the whole document is pertinent to the development of a Waveney Valley distinct identity,
specifically the section titled:

Promoting local distinctiveness, celebrating the built and natural environment, without detrimental
effects on those resources.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England        Page 41 of 72

This covers Survival of Tourism Businesses, Sustainability, Tourism Infrastructure and Visitor
Information Provision, which would all be important to the Waveney Valley LDS and the
development of a distinct identity.

In the action plan of the South Norfolk Tourism Strategy it specifically mentions the promotion of
the Waveney Valley, working in partnership with other Local Authorities and agencies with
influence on the valley.

Suffolk - Creating the Greenest County
http://www.onesuffolk.co.uk/ssp/CommunityStrategy/Creating+the+Greenest+County.htm


Suffolk's environment is one of the finest in Britain. Suffolk is making an important contribution to
tackling global environmental issues, and we must do more. The Suffolk Strategic Partnership
(SSP) is committed to making this ambition a reality.

Therefore a group of individuals with relevant experience and local influence has been set up to act
as a "Think Tank" to establish a vision for the initiative.

Aims of the project:
• To clearly identify themes and subsequent actions for the initiative
• These themes and actions to be communicated through the Suffolk Strategic Partnership
• Actions identified by the initiative to be implemented by organisations across Suffolk

Suffolk Strategic Partnership
http://www.onesuffolk.co.uk/ssp


The SSP brings together key stakeholders and agencies in the county to co-ordinate their work on
behalf of the people of Suffolk more effectively. All partners play an active part in developing
working relationships for the benefit of the community and ensuring a focus on improving the
quality of life and governance in a particular locality. Put simply, the SSP seeks to bring together
everyone with an interest in the well being of Suffolk and its communities.

South Norfolk Leisure, Culture and Countryside Strategy
www.south-norfolk.gov.uk/democracy/media/Leisure_Culture_Countryside_Strategy.pdf


Again all aspects of this strategy apply to the Waveney Valley LDS. These include:
• Encourage Tourism by developing tourism businesses and environmental improvement
    schemes
• Promote South Norfolk as a good place to live and work
• Build on our links with the Broads Authority to develop Leisure, Culture and Countryside
    opportunities
• Improve levels of customer satisfaction
• Encourage people to use and value their surroundings
• Provide a focus and stimulus for tourism
• Market the areas cultural assets, environment and leisure facilities
For the Waveney Valley LAG to succeed in developing a Waveney Valley distinct identity, then all
of these areas must be addressed.

Specifically under the Countryside & Heritage Action Plan, there is mention of developing an
Integrated Waveney Valley promotion in partnership with other town, parish, district and county
councils, which is exactly the aim of the Waveney Valley LAG and shows buy in from South Norfolk
District Council.

The SCC Bus Strategy (March 2006)

Aimed at maintaining viable communities in market towns and villages. The Waveney Prospectus:
A Platform for Growth (Waveney District Council, January 2008), argues that public transport
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England           Page 42 of 72

improvements are a key long term priority to reduce Waveney car-dependence, and improve
access to employment, education, and health provision as well as other services.

The East of England Plan (October 2007)

Includes a regional transport strategy which aims to reduce the rate of road traffic growth, in
particular the use of the car. At present, although there have been some recent improvements,
public transport systems in most Waveney rural areas remain poor, so even those who are keen to
use their cars less frequently are discouraged from doing so. The LDS outlines that improved
transport solutions are key to the improvement of economic opportunities.

The Greenest County Initiative (Suffolk)

Ambition statement: “Maintaining and enhancing the “natural capital” of historic landscape and
diverse wildlife as a unique and attractive combination in Suffolk is essential. Landscape character
areas and key wildlife species are now recognised and should be widely celebrated as part of
Suffolk’s local distinctiveness. It is now apparent that these play a central role in Suffolk’s quality of
life, and they are a major contributor to why people choose to live and work in Suffolk.“ It is clear
that the Waveney Valley project fits with this ambition and will make use of it in developing the
identity of the Valley.

Planning for an Integrated ‘Green’ Economy in the County of Suffolk (2007)

A proposal for the interlinking of local food trade, Information Communication Technologies [ICTs],
Renewable Energy [RE] resource use, conservation, education and community based
development, anchored to high value landscape assets as economic amplifiers and activators.

3.3         Inclusiveness and equal opportunities

All aspects of the Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy, Action Plans, strategies and
approaches will actively promote equality of opportunity, irrespective of sex, race, colour, ethnic or
national origin, marital status, disability, sexual orientation, religious beliefs or age, with the
development of interventions as well as operational activity being implemented in accordance with
this principle.

To ensure this is the case, the Waveney Valley LAG will formally adopt and operate according to
the Equalities Policy set out by Norfolk County Council with all members of the Management
Group, Working Groups, and Programme Staff, required to undertake equality training, to ensure
that they have a robust understanding of the subject and are able to apply this across the operation
of the programme. The training provided will focus on the range of legislation that must be
complied with, together with practical ways and best practice, to ensure compliance is achieved
effectively and simply. Training will be provided throughout the lifetime of the programme, to
ensure that knowledge and skills on the subject are kept up to date and in line with changes in
legislation and/or best practice.

The Programme will operate according to a Procedures Manual, which will clearly set out how
inclusiveness and equal opportunity issues are dealt with by the programme. This includes how
the programme addresses equality issues, how it issues are taken into account in the development
of programme activity, as well as ensuring that inclusiveness and equal opportunity issues are part
of the day to day management and operation of the programme.

3.3.1       Development, Approval and Monitoring of Interventions

All interventions supported by the Programme will be required to clearly demonstrate how they
tackle inclusiveness and equal opportunity issues in line with the guiding principles outlined above.
To aid this process and to ensure that interventions apply this approach, an Equality Impact
Assessment (EQIA) process has been developed in line with EEDA’s current best practice. This
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England         Page 43 of 72

process will take the form of a simple toolkit, which will guide applicants through a series of
questions to ensure that all interventions supported by the Programme comply with the procedures
set out by the programme and complies with all UK and EU legislative requirements.

The toolkit approach enables equality issues to become an integral part of the development
process, with the individuals involved being able to clearly see how the intervention can be
improved and developed to ensure it does not have a negative impact on a particular group(s) of
individuals and is fully compliant with legislative requirements. By using a toolkit, applicants to the
programme will gain a greater understanding of inclusiveness and equal opportunity issues, thus
improving the way in which an intervention is developed and delivered. This approach will also
equip applicants with a working knowledge and understanding of the issues involved, which they
can apply to other circumstances.

At the meeting of the Management Group, the EQIA will be made available to all members of the
committee, who using the skills gained through their EQIA training, will be able to check that the
proposed intervention complies with the requirements of the Programme. If an intervention does
not pass the EQIA or is unable to clearly demonstrate that it has undertaken all reasonable steps
to comply with appropriate legislation then the intervention will not be supported.

A copy of the Equality Impact Assessment Toolkit can be found in the Appendix 7.

Once an intervention has been approved, the Appraisal and Monitoring Officer takes responsibility
for ensuring that the intervention complies with all equality policies set out by the programme. This
monitoring of activity will continue throughout the life of the programme to ensure that it fulfils any
legal duties.

It is hoped that the processes adopted by the Waveney Valley Programme will provide examples of
best practice that can be replicated in other areas of the EU, and demonstrate best practice which
can be incorporated into the Waveney Valley Programme and its associated interventions.

3.4         A sustainability appraisal for the LAG activities proposed

The principles of sustainable development are integral to this LDS. For effective delivery of this
Leader programme clear understanding and agreement of the principles of sustainable
development are required. These principles are in line with the shared UK principles of sustainable
development in the UK, which have been adopted by the national and devolved administrations
(UK Government, Scottish Executive, Welsh Assembly Government and the Northern Ireland
Administration).
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England                    Page 44 of 72




             Agreed Shared Principles of Sustainable Development: www.sustainable-development.gov.uk


These principles set the core criteria for the development and implementation of the LDS and will
also play a key role in the development of the interventions delivered through the LDS framework.

Through the development of these principles the UK government also identified the following key
priority areas:
• Sustainable consumption and production - working towards achieving more with less.
• Natural resource protection and environmental enhancement - protecting the natural resources
    on which we depend.
• From local to global: building sustainable communities and creating places where people want
    to live and work, now and in the future.
• Climate change and energy - confronting the greatest threat.

The effectiveness of the LDS’ sustainability can only be achieved through effective management
systems. The Waveney Valley LDS has identified the benefits of using a proven and existing
system to ensure that projects adhere to the core principles of sustainable development.
Therefore the interventions delivered through the LDS will be appraised and developed using the
Excellence Framework – an appraisal system being adopted by EEDA for all projects.

The Excellence Framework is based on the eight components of a sustainable community:
• Social and Cultural
• Governance
• Transport and Connectivity
• Services
• Environmental
• Equity
• Economy
• Housing and the Built Environment

The Excellence Framework requires projects to progress through a structured decision making
process, which looks at each of the key topic areas both in relation to a quick appraisal based on
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England        Page 45 of 72

answering three key questions and then a detailed appraisal of each area. This is illustrated
through the Excellence Framework Wheel:




All members of the project staff will undergo thorough training by EEDA in the use of this system to
ensure that there is a clear understanding of the tool and the concepts behind it.

The standard set within this process is that all interventions delivered through a project will have to
achieve at least one Excellent Standard in each of the eight segments.

The target standard will be reached by ensuring that the facilitator is well-trained in the use of the
Excellence Framework and that they work to proof intervention proposals at the earliest stage in a
project’s development. The facilitator will then continue to review a project’s development in line
with the eight competences.

During the delivery of interventions, the monitoring officer will ensure that the project remains
faithful to its appraisal through the Excellence Framework. If the project appears to be failing to
fulfil its excellent standard under any of the eight competences, then the issue will be raised with
the management group and the facilitator will renew their working relationship with the project to
support the project in raising its standards to the required level.

Through adopting this level of appraisal in all interventions, the LAG is confident that the Leader
programme will have a positive affect on all five of the core principles of sustainable development.

The LDS has been tested through the first tier of the Excellence Framework and scores highly in all
areas.


3.5         Plans to co-operate with other LAGs

A degree of staff-sharing, or more properly, experience-sharing, will take place with the Brecks and
Norfolk Coast and Broads LAGs. This will lead to improved partnership performance and
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England       Page 46 of 72

information exchange between these three LAGs, reducing running costs and helping to prevent
duplication of effort. Having a Leader Manager and a Programme Administrator centrally-based
will result in improved co-ordination, cost savings and better sharing of resources and information.

A number of Waveney Valley LAG member organisations will be members of other LAGs around
the region. These members will help to link the LAGs, helping develop a regional and sometimes
national vision.

A regional network of LAGs will be run and co-ordinated by EEDA; this regional network will link in
with national and international networks.

Where the Waveney Valley area meets other LAG areas - Norfolk Coast and Broads, The Brecks –
there will naturally be a need for cooperation. As the Waveney Valley distinct identity becomes
recognised, areas around the Waveney Valley but outside the actual LAG area will no doubt want
to connect with its success and lessons can be learnt by other areas in the region. Specific
opportunities include:
    • Norfolk: tourism and access: there are two national trails in Norfolk; the Peddars Way is
       one and it links all three of the proposed NRBAS-led Leader areas. There are opportunities
       to develop shared approaches to enhancing tourist and visitor offerings associated with this
       National Trail and with the Round Norfolk Way (combining Peddars Way, the Norfolk Coast
       Path, Weavers Way and Angles Way). These opportunities can be extended to other
       aspects of the project, including the development of micro-enterprises and farm
       diversification.
    • Local food: this an interest of both Norfolk Coast and Broads and the Brecks projects.
       While the Waveney Valley will be looking to align local food with other work on developing
       the area’s identity, there will be joint interests, experience and possibilities of development
       that will make sharing those aspects valuable and productive.
    • Energy: limiting carbon emissions, enhancing fuel efficiency and developing alternative
       energy sources are all issues of interest and concern to the Waveney Valley LAG and it will
       seek ways of incorporating innovative approaches wherever possible. It is likely that the
       Eastern Plateau project will be at the forefront of such developments and we will
       collaborate closely with them.

The Waveney Valley LAG will be an outward-looking organisation, keen to learn from the
experience of others. We expect there to be other Leader groups nationally and on mainland
Europe that will have valuable experience of creating area identities based on their distinctive
features, be they landscapes, products or history. We will be keen to learn lessons from them, to
fast-track some of our approaches and to avoid pitfalls.


3.6         Breakdown of match funding sources to be used

This LDS sets out the ways in which the LAG will use RDPE funding through the Leader approach
to deliver it objective. Careful consideration has been placed in to the use of other public funds to
achieve these aims. In line with the declaration in the application form which is signed by the chair
of the LAG no other Defra or European funding will be sourced to deliver these objectives.

However there are areas which are felt in need of support which RDPE funding is unable to
support. The LAG will work through the programme facilitator and manager to identify possible
alternative funding options to deliver these complimentary aims. Key focus of this will be through
funding routs such as the Investors in Community programme and local Government systems of
support.

Due to the short time frame for writing the LDS, it’s not been possible to confirm any funding from
the public sector. There is serious interest from the various local authorities and both county
councils, especially because the overall aim of the LAG is to create a Waveney Valley distinct
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England         Page 47 of 72

identity, which fits with the local strategies. Ongoing discussions will continue with all the local
authorities to identify possible funding.

Therefore at this stage, the match funding from Local Authorities has been set to zero in the
budget. As discussions continue with local authorities, the LAG will amend the budget taking into
account the funding rules set in the RDPE Leader guidance notes.

Each intervention will be based at appropriate intervention rates based on economic activity
assessed through IRR. Each intervention will have to raise sufficient funding through private
business and charity routes to secure the Leader investment.

Individual interventions will have to secure their match funding in order to secure the RDPE
funding. For example a large part of match funding will be received from membership fees as
organisations join the proposed branding scheme project. The fees will be charged to member
organisations, private, public or social, who wish to use the Waveney Valley branding and receive
the other benefits of membership.

3.7         Details of the accountable body and its track record

3.7.1       Accountable body

Norfolk County Council, the countywide local authority for Norfolk, has been nominated to act as
the administrative and financial on behalf of the Local Action Group. The authority has bee chosen
as it is a significant public body, with an annual budget of over £1.5 billion, and has an excellent
track in administering public funds on behalf of a range of partnerships, including the Broads and
Rivers Leader+ Programme (EU), Norfolk Rural Development Programme (EEDA), Norfolk
Investing in Communities Programme (EEDA), and a range of other European, national and
regional schemes.

3.7.2       Skills required to deliver LDS

As the Accountable Body, Norfolk County Council will be responsible for the administrative
functions of the Partnership; support staff; financial responsibility for making/paying claims;
bankrolling; monitoring and evaluation procedures and all other related administrative tasks, to
ensure that the delivery of the Programme complies with appropriate regulations. This function will
be led by the Economic Development Unit (EDU) within the Planning and Transportation
Department, and supported by a number of departments, including Human Resources, Finance,
and Legal Services. The authority’s financial procedures are currently audited by District Audit on
an annual basis, and meet all legislative requirements.

The Accountable body in partnership with NRBAS will be responsible for recruiting programme
staff on behalf of the LAG, which will be undertaken according to Norfolk County Council
procedures, to ensure that the recruitment process is fair and open. Programme posts will be
advertised locally through the Eastern Daily Press and the Eastern Daily Times (county wide
newspapers), at a national level in the Guardian, and through a range of partnership networks.
Norfolk County Council will undertake the short-listing and interviewing of the candidates, together
with representatives of the LAG. The job descriptions and salary scales of Programme staff have
been approved by Norfolk County Council’s Human Resources Team and are in line with existing
council staff.

On a day-to-day basis, the Facilitator, Administrator, and the Appraisal and Monitoring Officer will
be independently line managed by the Programme Manager, to ensure the separation of roles and
to maintain accountability. The Programme Manager will report to the LAG and a member of the
EDU’s Management Team, see section on ‘Administrative support’.

All programme payments will be made according to the authorities financial procedures, which
include an authorisation process to ensure that inappropriate payments cannot be made. All
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England          Page 48 of 72

payments will be made according to an agreed schedule and will be signed off by a member of the
Unit’s Management Team.

Programmes finances will be audited on an annual basis by the Audit Commission, to ensure that
there is full compliance with all European, national and regional regulations. Any issues raised by
this process will be reported to EEDA and the LAG, to ensure that lessons learnt can be
incorporated into Programme systems and best practice adopted at all times.

A risk register will be developed and held by the Programme Team, on behalf of the LAG, and with
the support of the Accountable Body. This will ensure that the programme is not exposed to
unnecessary levels of risk, and that extensive mitigation is in place to ensure that risk levels are
kept to a minimum.

The Head of Economic Development will take responsibility for ensuring that the Programme
complies and fulfils all appropriate procedures and regulations set out by the Regional Programme.

3.7.3       Operational cost budget

As outlined under the heading ‘Administrative Support’, the administrative functions of the
partnership will be shared with the Brecks and Norfolk Coast & Broads LAGs to reduce operating
costs and maximise the levels of public funds targeted at supporting interventions. These savings
will be passed directly onto beneficiaries and into the local economy. The table below shows a
breakdown of the costs associated with delivering the Waveney Valley Programme.

Operational Costs

The LDS has set out the issues facing the area and the proposed work areas which RDPE funding
can help to address. However these actions can only be brought about through a robust and
secure delivery system. This will be achieved by a partnership between Norfolk County Council as
the Accountable Body and NRBAS. The administrative functions of the partnership will be shared
with the Norfolk Coast & Broads and the Brecks LAGs to reduce operating costs and maximise the
levels of public funds targeted at supporting interventions. The joint management model has been
chosen as the most appropriate as it will achieve both economies of scale and improved efficiency
of delivery.

The costs may be categorised as programme management and programme delivery:
    •   Programme Management: the responsibility of the Accountable Body, Norfolk County
        Council, who will provide programme management; monitoring; evaluation and appraisal;
        financial management and payments; and
    •   Programme Delivery: to be provided by NRBAS, under the terms of a service agreement
        with NCC, and providing LDS management; facilitation and facilitator support such as
        travel, etc.; office premises; IT support; web site establishment and management;
        marketing; staff training; and sundries.
The table below shows a breakdown of the costs associated with delivering the Waveney Leader
Programme. Note that an annual inflation rate of 3% has been applied to most of the costs, with
the exception of rent, reviewed after 3 years. Allowance has been made for reduced marketing
towards the end of the project.


                 2008          2009            2010         2011           2012         2013       2008 - 13
NRBAS           £4,287        £71,080        £ 71,526      £73,591       £ 75,714     £ 74,256     £370,478
NCC             £1,180        £21,584        £ 21,705      £22,633       £ 23,578     £ 24,502     £115,167
Total           £5,467        £92,664        £ 93,230      £96,224       £ 99,292     £ 98,767     £485,645
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England            Page 49 of 72


                                             Appendices

1               Work plan for year 1
First Year Operating Plan for the Waveney Local Action Group
This document sets out how the LAG will operate during 2008. The key focus of the paper
includes:
      •How the LAG will develop the three year action plan for delivering the LDS, which sets out
       clear targets, priorities and dates.
    • Developing the skills and capacity of the LAG administration team.
    • Communication plans with the local community to ensure they are aware of the funding
       available and how to access it.
This management plan covers the period between project approvals (expected June 2008) until the
1st January 2009.
This plan has been approved and endorsed by the LAG and is based on the needs of the LDS, the
Prospectus and guidance on the use of Axis 1 and 3 in the East of England, 2007- 2013, EEDA;
the Leader Approach Prospectus, EEDA; and the Guidelines for the Production of a Local
Development Strategy 2007-2013, EEDA.


If any changes are made to the LDS during the project approval stage, then the relevant changes
will need to be made throughout this document.


Development of the Three Year Action Plan


The LDS is a strategic document which provides an explanation of the key issues which the area
faces and sets out plans for tackling these issues. However, for effective delivery and targeting of
the LDS a clear delivery plan needs to be created. This plan will cover a three year period of the
project and will be updated annually by the LAG to ensure that the LDS is being effectively and
efficiently delivered.


The first step in this process is to develop a delivery plan for the initiation phase of the programme.
This plan therefore sets out the delivery steps which will be taken forward between project
approval and January 2008. The end target of this plan will be to have a functioning LAG,
administration team and a work plan for the following three years of the programme.


Development of the Three Year Action Plan
Action               Responsibility      Activity               Target Date       Result
 st
1 LAG meeting        LAG Chairman        • Chair and vice       Mid July 2008     • Key LDS posts allocated.
                                           chair elected.                         • System for staff
                                         • Management                               recruitment in place
                                           Group elected.
                                         • Short term
                                           delivery plan
                                           agreed.
Short term           LAG Chairman        • Agree                Early August      • Programme Manager in
delivery plan                               partnership                              post.
created                                     relationship with
                                            NRBAS
                                         • Programme
                                            Manager
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England             Page 50 of 72

                                             recruited by
                                             NRBAS
 nd
2 LAG Meeting         LAG Chairman       •   Key objectives        Late August    • Key work areas for the
                                             set for facilitator                     facilitator agreed
                                         •   Facilitator                          • Training plan agreed
                                             Training
                                             programme
                                             Agreed
Recruitment of        Programme          •   Programme             October        • Key staff in post
key staff             Manager                Facilitator
                                             appointed
                                         •   Administrative
                                             support recruited
Delivery              Programme          •   Key staff in the      October        • Named contact in
agreement with        Manager                accountable                             accountable body
Accountable Body                             body identified.                        identified
in regard to                             •   Training                             • Training programme
appraisal and                                programme for                           implemented.
training                                     appraisal and
                                             monitoring
Production of draft   Management         •   Key objectives        October        • Draft 3 year plan produced
three year action     group                  identified from                         and presented to the
plan                                         LDS.                                    LAG
                                         •   Prioritising
                                             delivery actions
                                         •   Agree the
                                             objectives in line
                                             with budgets
Review of Three       Management         •   Accountable           November       • Action plan signed off by
Year Action Plan      group                  Body support                            all relevant partners.
                                             provided to
                                             action plan.
                                         •   EEDA support of
                                             Action plan
                                         •   Joined up
                                             Leader action
                                             negotiated with
                                             relevant LAG’s
First year            Facilitator        •   Raise key             December       • Local community fully
community                                    actions to be                           supportive and
conference held                              delivered                               committed to the
                                             through LDS and                         programme
                                             three year action
                                             plan.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England             Page 51 of 72

Development of Training and Skills Programme for LAG Administration and Members


One of the critical elements of effective and speedy project development and delivery will be the
quality of the staff employed and their skills. The “Development of the Three Year Action Plan”
element of the First Year Action Plan sets out the recruitment process.


This section of the First Year Development Plan focuses on the skills of both the staff employed
and the LAG members. From January 2009 the training plan will be rolled into the three year action
plan.


Development of Training and Skills Programme for LAG Administration and Members
Action                 Responsibility    Activity               Target Date       Result
Training for LAG       NRBAS             RDPE and Leader          September       LAG & staff understand RDPE
and all staff                            principles                               and Leader principles
                                                                                  especially as applied to
                                                                                  Waveney programme
Training for           EEDA              Project appraisal          October       LAG & staff understand
Appraisal officer                        processes                                appraisal process that projects
                                                                                  will undergo before approval
Training for LAG       EEDA              Equality impact            October       LAG & staff aware of
and staff                                assessment                               obligations and expectations
                                                                                  under equal opportunities
                                                                                  legislation
Training for Project   EEDA              State aid rules           November       Project staff know the
Facilitator and                                                                   constraints imposed by State
appraiser                                                                         Aid Rules on project design
                                                                                  and proposals
Training for           NCC               Finance, Information      November       Project staff involved with
Monitoring officer;                      and Management                           approving disbursement of
administrator                            Systems (NCC)                            funds understand NCC
                                                                                  systems of finance
                                         ORACLE
                                                                                  administration
Training for LAG,      EEDA              Excellence                November       All LAG and staff fully familiar
Facilitator,                             Framework                                with the East of England
Monitoring and                                                                    Excellence Framework and its
Appraisal Officer,                                                                implications for project design.
Leader
programme
manager and
administrator
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England             Page 52 of 72

Development of Community Communication Plan


The LDS has been created in partnership with local businesses and the community. This
relationship will need constant management to ensure that the community both remain committed
to the LDS and can access funding and support from it.


The First Year communication plan will both look at the early promotion and community
engagement issues, and at establishing long term systems of communication for the three year
Action Plan.


Development of Community Communication Plan
Action           Responsibilit      Activity                     Target Date      Result
                 y
Announceme       LAG                Issue press release          Late June        Funding opportunity raised
nt of                                                                             in local peoples’
approval                                                                          consciousness.
Recruitment      NRBAS and          Standard NCC                 Late August      Key staff of high quality in
of key staff     NCC                recruitment systems                           place.
                                    used to publicise the
                                    funding
Production of    Project            Work with all partners       October          Systems set up and in place
communicati      Manager            through the facilitator to                    for marketing and
on plan to                          produce three year                            communication during the
form part of                        plan.                                         first three years of the
the three                                                                         projects delivery.
year plan
Hold public      Project            Set up, promote and          December         Local community informed
conference       Manager            hold the 1st annual                           of the priorities and core
                                    conference.                                   actions of the LDS during its
                                                                                  first delivery year.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England             Page 53 of 72


2            A completed output table and budget
Area of action /        Measure code and         Description and source           How vfm will be
activity                description              of match funding                 achieved

Communication           m312 Support for         Primarily private and            Interview, business
between LAG             the creation and         voluntary match funding,         coaching and mentoring
partners and            development of           who will benefit from the        schemes
developing              micro enterprises        improved working
partnerships            m313                     relationships                    Number of businesses
across the              Encouragement of                                          created and developed
Waveney Valley          tourism activities
                        m321 Basic services                                       Training days delivered
                        sm421
                        Implementing                                              The LAG will set out,
                        cooperative projects                                      using full EEDA and
                        sm431 Running the                                         Accountable Body
                        LAG and developing                                        support, selection
                        LAG skills for                                            criteria for this area of
                        delivery of Leader                                        activity.
Developing a            m111 Vocational          Match funding will be            Value for money will be
distinct identity for   training &               produced through the             achieved through the
the Waveney             information for          membership of the scheme         development of the
Valley                  agricultural, food       and the licensing of the use     Brand through the
                        and forestry sectors     of the scheme.                   community with
                        m123 Adding value                                         tendering used for the
                        to agricultural and                                       creation of key delivery
                        forestry products                                         area.
                        m311 Diversification
                        into non-agricultural                                     Value for money will be
                        activities                                                demonstrated through
                        m312 Support for                                          the number of
                        the creation and                                          businesses, community
                        development of                                            groups and
                        micro enterprises                                         organisations which
                        m313                                                      singe up to the Brand.
                        Encouragement of
                        tourism activities                                        The LAG will set out,
                        m321 Basic services                                       using full EEDA and
                        m323 Conservation                                         Accountable Body
                        & upgrading of the                                        support, selection
                        rural heritage                                            criteria for this area of
                        m331 Training and                                         activity.
                        information for
                        economic heritage
                        sm421
                        Implementing
                        cooperative projects
                        sm431 Running the
                        LAG and developing
                        LAG skills for
                        delivery of Leader
                        There may be areas
                        of this which do not
                        fit under the
                        measures and the
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England             Page 54 of 72


                       ineligible funding
                       process will be
                       investigated with
                       EEDA.
Facilitating a         m111 Vocational           Match funding will be            Value for money will be
quality standard as    training &                achieved through business        achieved through the
part of the            information for           commitment and funding of        use of a working group
Waveney Valley’s       agricultural, food        the service.                     to work with tourism and
distinct identity      and forestry sectors                                       food businesses on the
                       m123 Adding value                                          quality criteria and then
                       to agricultural and                                        the tendering of the
                       forestry products                                          delivery.
                       m331 Training and
                       information for                                            The LAG will set out,
                       economic heritage                                          using full EEDA and
                       sm421                                                      Accountable Body
                       Implementing                                               support, selection
                       cooperative projects                                       criteria for this area of
                                                                                  activity.

Develop the area’s     m111 Vocational           Business capacity will be        Value for money will be
capacity to sustain    training &                developed through the            achieved through
increased levels of    information for           direct investment at both        allocation of funds
business activity      agricultural, food        capital and revenue levels       based on the level of
                       and forestry sectors      to businesses and groups         public good which will
                       m123 Adding value         of businesses. The direct        be created by the
                       to agricultural and       benefits which will be           project and the IRR
                       forestry products         achieved by the                  likely to be produced.
                       m311 Diversification      businesses will ensure that      Project will also have to
                       into non-agricultural     the they are willing and         fit with the Excellence
                       activities                able to provide                  Framework and the
                       m312 Support for          considerable match               Equality Impact
                       the creation and          funding.                         Assessment.
                       development of
                       micro enterprises                                          The LAG will set out,
                       m313                                                       using full EEDA and
                       Encouragement of                                           Accountable Body
                       tourism activities                                         support, selection
                       m321 Basic services                                        criteria for this area of
                       m323 Conservation                                          activity.
                       & upgrading of the
                       rural heritage
                       m331 Training and
                       information for
                       economic heritage
                       sm421
                       Implementing
                       cooperative projects
Developing links       m123 Adding value         Supply chain support will        Value for money will be
between sectors        to agricultural and       lead to both public good         achieved through
and different levels   forestry products         through business growth          allocation of funded
of supply chains       m311 Diversification      and improved business            based on the level of
                       into non-agricultural     performance. Due to the          public good which will
                       activities                improved business                be created by the
                       m312 Support for          performance businesses           project and the IRR
                       the creation and          will be willing and able to      likely to be produced.
                       development of            contribute to the match          Project will also have to
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England             Page 55 of 72


                       micro enterprises         funding.                         fit with the Excellence
                       m313                                                       Framework and the
                       Encouragement of                                           Equality Impact
                       tourism activities                                         Assessment.
                       m321 Basic services
                       m331 Training and                                          The LAG will set out,
                       information for                                            using full EEDA and
                       economic heritage                                          Accountable Body
                       sm421                                                      support, selection
                       Implementing                                               criteria for this area of
                       cooperative projects                                       activity.
                       sm431 Running the
                       LAG and developing
                       LAG skills for
                       delivery of Leader
Improving the          m111 Vocational           Improving sustainability of      Value for money will be
sustainability of      training &                organisations and                achieved through the
existing producers     information for           businesses in the Waveney        careful selection of
and services in the    agricultural, food        Valley will lead to high         projects to ensure
Waveney Valley         and forestry sectors      levels of public good.           maximum public good is
                       m123 Adding value         Therefore intervention           achieved with all
                       to agricultural and       rates will be set above          approved applications.
                       forestry products         those for purely economic
                       m311 Diversification      activity. However these          The LAG will set out,
                       into non-agricultural     improvements will also lead      using full EEDA and
                       activities                to business improvements         Accountable Body
                       m312 Support for          which will lever in match        support, selection
                       the creation and          funding from the                 criteria for this area of
                       development of            businesses and groups            activity.
                       micro enterprises         involved.
                       m313
                       Encouragement of
                       tourism activities
                       m321 Basic services
                       m323 Conservation
                       & upgrading of the
                       rural heritage
                       m331 Training and
                       information for
                       economic heritage
                       sm421
                       Implementing
                       cooperative projects
                       sm431 Running the
                       LAG and developing
                       LAG skills for
                       delivery of Leader
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England   Page 56 of 72


3           OS map of area including wards
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England              Page 57 of 72


4              Measures Budget

                                                                                                           TOTAL
Measure                                               2008    2009     2010     2011     2012     2013    2008-13
Vocational training & information for agricultural,
food and forestry sectors
RDPE funding                                          0.00    13.35    18.16    22.25    26.70     8.54     89.00
private & voluntary match                             0.00     5.72     7.78     9.54    11.44     3.66     38.14
public sector match                                                                                              0
Adding value to agricultural and forestry products
RDPE funding                                          0.00    46.20    77.00    77.00    77.00    30.80    308.00
private & voluntary match                             0.00   107.80   179.67   179.67   179.67    71.87    718.67
public sector match                                                                                             0
Diversification into non agricultural activities
RDPE funding                                          0.00    89.31   151.89   151.89   151.89    62.58     607.55
private & voluntary match                             0.00   165.86   282.08   282.08   282.08   116.22   1,128.32
public sector match                                                                                              0
Support for the creation and development of micro
enterprises
RDPE funding                                          0.00    58.80    98.00    98.00    98.00    39.20    392.00
private & voluntary match                             0.00   109.20   182.00   182.00   182.00    72.80    728.00
public sector match                                                                                             0
Encouragement of tourism activities
RDPE funding                                          0.00    71.25   118.75   118.75   118.75    47.50    475.00
private & voluntary match                             0.00    71.25   118.75   118.75   118.75    47.50    475.00
public sector match                                                                                              0
Basic services
RDPE funding                                          0.00    58.50    97.50    97.50    97.50    39.00    390.00
private & voluntary match                             0.00    30.14    50.23    50.23    50.23    20.09    200.91
public sector match                                                                                             0
Conservation & upgrading of the rural heritage
RDPE funding                                          0.00    32.00    80.00    80.00    80.00    48.00    320.00
private & voluntary match                             0.00    21.33    53.33    53.33    53.33    32.00    213.33
public sector match                                                                                              0
Training and information for economic actors
RDPE funding                                          0.00    12.00    16.00    16.00    24.00    12.00     80.00
private & voluntary match                             0.00     5.14     6.86     6.86    10.29     5.14     34.29
public sector match                                                                                             0
Implementing cooperative projects
RDPE funding                                          0.00    16.80    28.00    33.60    28.00     5.60    112.00
private & voluntary match                             0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00      0.00
public sector match                                                                                             0
Running the LAG and developing LAG skills for
delivery of Leader
RDPE funding                                          5.47    92.66    93.23    96.22    99.29    98.77    485.65
private & voluntary match                             0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00      0.00
public sector match                                                                                             0
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England                             Page 58 of 72


5              LAG Output Targets & Milestones


                                                                                                                            TOTAL
 Measure                                               2008       2009        2010        2011       2012       2013        2008-13

 Vocational training & information for agricultural,
 food and forestry sectors
 Number or participants in training                           0          57          87      95        114             71        424
 Number of training days received                             0      114         173        190        228         142           847

 Support contributing to competitiveness of the
 livestock sector (number of participants                                11          18      19         23             14         85

 Support to livestock sector contributing to
 enhancing on-farm management of nutrients
 (number of participants)                                                11          18      19         23             14         85

 Support contributing to animal health & welfare
 (number of participants)                                                11          18      19         23             14         85
 Adding value to agricultural and forestry products
 Number of enterprises supported                              0          2           3           4          4          1          14
 Total volume of investments (£m)                       0.000      0.171       0.285       0.285      0.285      0.114          1.140

 Support contributing to competitiveness of the
 livestock sector (number of farm holdings)                              0           2           2          2          1              7
 Diversification into non agricultural activities
 Number of beneficiaries                                                 3           5           5          5          4          22
 Total volume of investments (£m)                       0.000      0.260       0.433       0.433      0.433      0.173          1.730

 Number of jobs created or sustained through this
 measure                                                                                                                              0

 Support for the creation and development of micro
 enterprises
 Number of micro enterprises supported                                   2           2           3          4          3          14

 Number of jobs created or sustained through this
 measure                                                                 3           4           5          5          4          21
 Encouragement of tourism activities
 Number of new tourism actions supported                                 6           12      15         14             6          53
 Total volume of investments (£m)                       0.000      0.158       0.263       0.263      0.263      0.105          1.050

 Number of jobs created or sustained through this
 measure                                                                 4           8       10             9          4          35
 Basic services
 Number of supported actions                                             2           5           6          5          4          22
 Total volume of investments (£m)                       0.000      0.098       0.163       0.163      0.163      0.065          0.650

 Number of jobs created or sustained through this
 measure                                                                 1           2           3          3          2          11


 Conservation & upgrading of the rural heritage
 Number of rural heritage actions supported                              2           3           3          3          2          13
 Total volume of investments (£m)                       0.000      0.053       0.133       0.133      0.133      0.080          0.530

 Number of jobs created or sustained through this
 measure                                                                 0           2           2          2          1              7
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England                Page 59 of 72


 Training and information for economic actors
 operating in the fields covered by Axis 3
 Number of participating economic actors to
 supported activities                                           20       23       23         23        17          106
 Number of days training received by participants              114      153      153        229       113          762
 Implementing cooperative projects
 Number of cooperative projects                                  1        4           4       4         2           15

 Running the LAG and developing LAG skills for
 delivery of Leader
 RDPE funding (£)                                   5,467   92,664   93,230   96,224      99,292   98,767    485,645
 private & voluntary match                                                                                          0
 public sector match                                                                                                0
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England   Page 60 of 72


6           Waveney Valley Local Action Group - Terms of Reference
            (March 2008)
The Waveney Valley Local Action Group has been established to lead the development of the
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy and oversee the development of interventions under
the programme. Terms of reference will be developed in concert with EEDA and other LAGs to
ensure consistency of approach.
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England   Page 61 of 72


7           Equality Impact Assessment Toolkit
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England   Page 62 of 72
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England          Page 63 of 72

Equality Impact Assessment Toolkit
Step                         Process
1. Identify the aims of      To begin the assessment process, you must have a clear
your project/ initiative/    understanding of the initiative you want to develop.
strategy/ programme
(hereafter referred to
as “initiative”)                  What is the purpose of the proposed initiative (or the changes you
                                  want to make to an existing initiative)?
                                  What are the specific outcomes you hope to see from the
                                  proposed initiative?
                                  What criteria will you use to measure progress towards these
                                  outcomes?
                                  What impact will the initiative have on for example, jobs or the
                                  ways you deliver your services?
                                  How will the proposed initiative be put into effect?

2. Screening the             You now need to conduct an initial screening of your proposed initiative
proposed initiative          to asses the impact under your equality and diversity duties to eliminate
                             unlawful discrimination, promote equality of opportunity, promote good
                             relations between different racial groups, and promote positive attitudes
                             towards minority/under-represented groups.


                               To carry out this initial screening you must have a minimum amount of
                             up-to-date and reliable data on the groups relevant to the area/s
                             affected by the initiative
                             You need to answer the following questions:


                                  Is there any reason to believe that certain groups of people could
                                  be affected differently by the proposed initiative, for example in
                                  terms of access to a service, or the ability to take advantage of
                                  proposed opportunities?
                                  Is there any evidence that any part of the proposed initiative could
                                  discriminate unlawfully, directly or indirectly, against some groups –
                                  e.g. disabled people, ethnic minority groups etc?
                                  Is the proposed initiative likely to affect relations between certain
                                  groups, for example because it is seen as favouring a particular
                                  group or denying opportunities to another?

                                  If you have answered ‘yes’ to any of the questions above, the
                                  proposed initiative will be relevant to your responsibilities under the
                                  equality duties. Make sure you are clear about which equality
                                  strand(s) the initiative is relevant to. You should also consider
                                  whether the risk of adverse impact is sufficiently significant to
                                  warrant undertaking a full impact assessment (step 3).


                             If you conclude that the proposed initiative is not relevant to any equality
                             duty, you should make sure this is recorded. However, you should
                             monitor the initiative to ensure this is actually the case.


3. Gathering detailed         The validity of your full impact assessment will depend on the quality of
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England          Page 64 of 72


data                          the information you use. The aim should be to establish a reliable and
                              extensive database of information on racial groups


                                  Does the relevant data you have capture all the information you
                                  need about the areas upon which your initiative may impact? - e.g.
                                  the data may not reflect the ethnic diversity in the area sufficiently
                                  Do you need additional information about the different groups of
                                  people to help inform your initiative?
                                  Is the additional quantitative and qualitative information already
                                  readily available? - e.g. on the East of England Observatory
                                  Is the information up-to-date, relevant and reliable?
                                  Is the available information sufficiently detailed to permit analysis of
                                  differential impact on different groups?
                                  If you need further data to assess the likely impact, where will you
                                  get it from? e.g. specially commissioned qualitative or quantitative
                                  surveys or consultation exercises designed to fill gaps in the
                                  information about certain groups?
                                  Who will be responsible for pulling together all the information
                                  needed in the required format? i.e. in a way so that inferences can
                                  be drawn on the likely effects of the proposed initiative on different
                                  racial groups.

4. Assessing the            This stage lies at the heart of the impact assessment process. It involves
likely impact               systematically appraising the proposed initiative against all the
                            information and evidence and assessing whether the initiative is likely to
                            have significantly negative consequences for a particular group or
                            groups.


                                Does your analysis of the proposed initiative indicate possible
                                adverse impact on some groups?
                                If your analysis of the information shows that the disparities between
                                for example, racial groups or disabled people are statistically
                                significant, can this be explained by factors other than
                                race/disability?
                                Could the proposed initiative lead to unlawful direct discrimination,
                                i.e. people being treated less favourably purely on grounds of their
                                race/disability? If yes, you must abandon it straightaway and look for
                                different ways of achieving your initiative aims; direct discrimination
                                can never be justified.
                                Could the proposed initiative lead to unlawful indirect discrimination?
                                (e.g. the initiative is applicable to everyone but it inadvertently
                                disadvantages a particular racial group). If yes, does the initiative’s
                                potential for indirectly discriminating against some groups appear to
                                be justifiable at this stage? – remember your reasons must have
                                nothing to do with the equality strands -
                                race/disability/gender/age/sexual orientation/faith etc.

5. Consider                  If the proposed initiative is likely to be unlawfully discriminatory, you
alternative measures         should look for other ways of achieving your aims, or be sure you can
                             justify the decision to proceed with the initiative.


                                 Are there aspects of your initiative that could be changed to reduce
                                 or remove adverse impact on a particular group, without affecting
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England          Page 65 of 72


                                 the initiative’s overall aims?
                                 Will you seek to justify the initiative, as originally proposed, in spite
                                 of its potential for affecting some groups adversely, because of its
                                 importance? i.e. the reasons have nothing to do with
                                 race/gender/age/disability etc., and the social and economic benefits
                                 far outweigh any potentially discriminatory effect.

                               Note: if you choose the second option you should be satisfied that: (i)
                             you have a strong case; (ii) that your reasons cannot be construed as
                             contravening EEDA’s equality duties; (iii) that you were unable to find
                             other ways of achieving your initiative aims. You are also advised to
                             take legal advice.


6. Consulting on the          Consulting people who may be affected by your initiative provides an
initiative                    opportunity to obtain feedback on your proposals before final decisions
                              are made. Consultations must be proportionate and appropriate.


                              In deciding who to consult and the methods to be adopted, you should
                              ask the following questions:


                                  Who are the groups, organisations and individuals most likely to be
                                  affected by the proposed initiative, directly and indirectly?
                                  What methods of consultation are most likely to succeed in
                                  attracting the organisations and people you want to reach?

                              In reaching your decisions consider the following:


                                  The consultation methods should be tailored to the groups you
                                  want to reach; consider using focus groups to explore issues in
                                  greater detail with a few individuals, written questionnaires or
                                  interview surveys to access a wider audience, setting up
                                  representative lay advisory groups for regular discussion and
                                  consultation.
                                  The process should be properly planned with: (i) clear objectives;
                                  (ii) named person responsible; (iii) clear explanations of purpose
                                  and process for consultees, including translating the consultation
                                  materials, where necessary; (iv) the timescale should provide the
                                  consultees with sufficient time to digest the information they are
                                  being given and adequate time to respond; v) the arrangements for
                                  responding to the views put forward by the consultees.

7. Making a decision         With the results of the consultation in place, you will now be in a position
on the initiative            to decide whether to adopt the initiative and if so, in what format.


                             Your decision will be based on four important factors: (i) the aims of the
                             initiative; (ii) the evidence you have gathered; (iii) the results of your
                             consultations; and (iv) the relative merits of any alternatives put forward.


                             In making your final decision you should address the following
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England           Page 66 of 72


                             questions:


                             a. Does the full assessment show that the proposed initiative will have
                                an adverse impact on a particular group (or groups)?
                             b. Is the proposal likely to make it difficult to promote equal
                                opportunities or positive attitudes or foster good relations between
                                different groups?
                             c. If the answer to both (a) or (b) is 'yes', can the initiative be revised,
                                or additional measures taken, so that it achieves its aim but without
                                risking any adverse impact?
                             d. In considering revising the initiative, can any of the findings of the
                                consultation process be utilised?
                             e. Given the final picture, will you abandon the initiative or go ahead
                                with it? If you are going ahead, what will the final initiative look like?

                             If you are considering proceeding with a initiative which you know is
                             likely to have adverse impact on some groups, e.g. it is indirectly
                             discriminatory, you must first satisfy yourself of the following:


                                 the initiative is essential in order to carry out your functions
                                 you were unable to find another way of achieving the aims of the
                                 initiative that had a less discriminatory effect
                                 you believe that the means you have employed to achieve the aims
                                 of the initiative are proportionate, necessary and appropriate
                                 the benefits far outweigh any potential discriminatory effect

                             Make sure you keep a record of your conclusions at each stage of the
                             decision-making process, and bring your conclusions together in an
                             equality impact assessment report. The report should clearly show the
                             relative weight given to each type of evidence: monitoring data, research
                             findings, other statistics, and the results of your consultations. You can
                             then explain the reasons for the decision reached, and make
                             recommendations on how to put the initiative into practice, including
                             suggestions for training and monitoring.


8. Monitoring the             You will only know the actual impact of the initiative once it is put into
initiative                    operation. This means you will have to monitor it regularly to know what
                              is happening in reality. You must therefore make arrangements to
                              monitor initiatives for any adverse impact. Equality monitoring reports
                              should be published each year.


                              You need to decide:


                                  If the initiative should be given a trial run, to see how or whether it
                                  actually affects different groups.
                                  How the initiative will be monitored once it becomes operational,
                                  i.e. who will be responsible for the monitoring, what sort of data will
                                  be collected, how will it be collected, how often will it be collected
                                  and how often will it be analysed?
                                  How the effects of the initiative on promoting equality will be
                                  monitored, i.e. what assessment criteria will be used
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England          Page 67 of 72


                                  How will any concerns be taken into account in any review of the
                                  initiative, i.e. how will any problems be addressed?

9. Publishing the             A summary of the results of the assessments and any consultations
results                       carried out should be published by EEDA each year. The aim is to be
                              open about the way decisions are made and to be answerable to the
                              public.


                              In writing your full impact assessment, it is suggested you follow the
                              structure below:


                                  A description and explanation of the proposed initiative, putting it in
                                  its wider strategic and legislative context
                                  A brief explanation of how the initiative was assessed for its likely
                                  effects on different groups, with clear references to the information
                                  and research used as a benchmark
                                  A brief description of the consultation methods used, and a
                                  summary of the overall findings
                                  The conclusions reached through the assessment and consultation
                                  as to the likely effects of the proposed initiative, being clear about
                                  which equality strand(s) if relates to
                                  Any modifications of the initiative introduced as a result of the
                                  assessment and consultation, or alternative or additional measures
                                  An explanation of whether and how the revised initiative differs
                                  from the original proposal
                                  A statement of the plans for monitoring the initiative when it is put
                                  into effect
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England         Page 68 of 72




                           EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT TEMPLATE


Name of project/policy/strategy (hereafter referred to as “initiative”):




Provide a brief summary (bullet points) of the aims of the initiative and main activities:




Project Manager:                                  Date:


Stage 1: ‘Screening’
This stage establishes whether a proposed initiative will have an impact from an equality
perspective on any particular group of people or community – i.e. on the grounds of race
(incl. religion/faith), gender (incl. sexual orientation), age, disability, or whether it is
“equality neutral” (i.e. have no effect either positive or negative). In the case of gender,
consider whether men and women are affected differently.


Q 1. Who will benefit from this initiative? Is there likely to be a positive impact on specific
groups/community (whether or not they are the intended beneficiaries), and if so, how? Or is it
clear at this stage that it will be equality “neutral”?




Q 2. Is there likely to be an adverse impact on one or more minority/under-represented or
community groups as a result of this initiative? If so, who may be affected and why?
Or is it clear at this stage that it will be equality “neutral”?




Q 3. If the initiative is “equality neutral”, should there be monitoring and review to assess the
impact over a period of time?


Q 3. Is the impact of the initiative – whether positive or negative - significant enough to warrant a
more detailed assessment (Stage 2)? If not, will there be monitoring and review to assess the
impact over a period time? Briefly (bullet points) give reasons for your answer.




Guidelines: Things to consider
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England       Page 69 of 72




    •   An equality impact assessment (EQIA) relates to age, (i.e. young and old,); race and
        ethnicity, gender, disability, religion and faith, sexual orientation, or any particular
        disadvantaged or defined group which the initiative may be aimed at.
    •   The initiative may have a positive, negative or neutral impact, i.e. have no particular effect
        on the group/community.
    •   Where a negative (i.e. adverse) impact is identified, it may be appropriate to make a more
        detailed EQIA (see Stage 2), or take early action to redress this – e.g. by abandoning or
        modifying the initiative. NB If the initiative contravenes equality legislation, it must be
        abandoned or modified.
    •   Where an initiative has a positive impact on groups/community relations, the EQIA should
        make this explicit, to enable the outcomes to be monitored over its lifespan.
    •   Where there is a positive impact on particular groups, does this mean there could be an
        adverse impact on others, and if so can this be justified? - e.g. Are there other existing or
        planned initiatives which redress this?
    •   Sustainable communities will want to take into account how particular initiatives may
        promote and improve community relations and positive inter-action between groups within
        communities. Conversely, particular initiatives could have a negative impact on a particular
        community/group.
    •   It may not be possible to provide detailed answers to some of these questions at the start of
        the initiative. The EQIA may identify a lack of relevant data, and that data-gathering is a
        specific action required to inform the initiative as it develops, and also to form part of a
        continuing evaluation and review process.
        Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England             Page 70 of 72



        8              LAG Members

                                                                               Non-
Title       Name          Surname       Organisation                           Public   Social     Economic   Environmental
Mrs.        Gwen          Parsons       Principal, Lowestoft College                1                     1
                                        Redenhall with Harleston Town
Cllr        A             Brownsea      Council                                                1
                                        Redenhall with Harleston Town
Cllr        S             Kuzmic        Council                                                1
Mr.         Mark          Stanton       Breckland Council                                      1          1              1
                                        Mid Suffolk District Council / Upper
Mr.         Mark          Timms         Waveney Project                                        1          1              1
Mrs.        Marion        James         Diss Business Forum                         1                     1
Mr.         Steven        Falvey        The Old Bakery, B&B                         1                     1
Mrs.        Claire        Deamer        All Hallows Medical Facilities              1          1
                                        Norfolk Tourist Attractions
Mr.         Robert        Simmons       Association Ltd                             1                     1
                                        Diss, Thetford & District Citizens
Mrs.        Kate          Biles         Advice Bureau                               1          1
Mr.         Peter         Morrow        Bungay Town Council                                    1
            Ezra                        Halesworth and Blyth Valley
Mr.                       Leverett      Partnership                                            1
Mrs.        Didi          Ward          Bungay Community Partnership                           1
Mr.         David         Hooton        The Deer Initiative                         1                     1              1
Mrs.        Jean          Turnbull      Business Link East                                                1
Mr.         Ed            Stocker       Norfolk County Council                                 1          1              1
Mr.         Oliver        Hill          South Norfolk Council                                  1          1              1
Mrs.        Rachel        Carrington    NFU                                         1                     1
Mr.         Josiah        Meldrum                                                   1          1
Mrs.        Julie         West          Tastes of Anglia Ltd                        1                     1
Mr.         Christopher   Reeve         Waveney Community Forum                                1
Mrs.        Cynthia       Schears       Diss Community Partnership CIC                         1
Mrs.        Pat           Holtom                                                    1                     1
                                        Norfolk Rural Community Council             1          1
Mr.         John          Mullen        Suffolk County Council                                 1          1              1
                                        Waveney District Council                               1          1              1
                                        East of England Farming and
Mrs.        Caroline      Blew          Wildlife Advisory Group (FWAG)              1                                    1
Mr.         Ralph         Barnett       Diocese of Norwich                          1          1
Mr.         Neil          Lister        Suffolk Coast and Heaths AONB                                                    1
Mr.         Doeke         Dobma         Mow and Grow Social Enterprise              1          1
Mrs.        Sarah         Openshaw      Thornham Field Centre                       1                     1              1
                                        Harleston Information Plus
                                        (formally Harleston Development
Mrs.        Margot        Harbour       Partnership)                                           1
                                                                                  16          20         16             10
Waveney Valley Local Development Strategy – Rural Development Programme for England          Page 71 of 72


9           Cittaslow and Transition Town Information

        Cittaslow

        Communities within the Waveney Valley are already beginning to address issues of
        sustainability. As discussed in section 1.2.1 various sustainable development models are
        either being implemented (Cittaslow in Diss) or being investigated (Transition Towns in
        Bungay).

        Although full membership of Cittaslow is restricted to individual towns, 'Cittaslow Supporter
        status' a new form of membership for a geographical area, has been created by the
        International Cittaslow network. Cittaslow Diss aim to establish a new community interest
        company, Cittaslow Waveney Valley, to promote the Cittaslow principles and to achieve
        Cittaslow Supporter status for the Waveney Valley area.

        Given that support for local products and producers is a key element of Cittaslow there are
        a number of projects Cittaslow Waveney Valley could potentially develop, for example -
        Promotion of a "Buy Local, Eat Local" initiative, establishment of a Waveney Valley
        Organics Network to support local farmers, development of a Waveney Valley Slow Food
        and local Art and Heritage Trails, mapping the production and supply of local food along the
        Valley, events and training to help people appreciate and preserve local cultural and artistic
        traditions and skills. As well as increasing the awareness of good food, nutrition and
        traditional foodstuffs and encouraging schools, hospitals, councils and tourist outlets to use
        local produce.

        The Cittaslow vision would be to strengthen the Waveney Valley's reputation as a place
        where traditional crafts and skills are in use and where you can buy locally made goods and
        seasonal local produce. Achieving Cittaslow Supporter status would unite the 6 market
        towns and harness their capacity to effect positive change in the Valley.

        Furthermore there is considerable scope to make use of the national and international
        contacts forged through the Cittaslow Diss programme, for example linking with Italian
        LAGS who are working on Cittaslow related projects under the NEW LEADER programme.

        Transition Towns

        Initially conceived as an answer to the twin problems of peak oil and climate change
        through the creation of an 'energy descent plan' Transition Towns have developed to
        embrace linked but less specific community aspirations. These include intergenerational
        knowledge transfer, the re-localisation of production and supply chains and a sustainable,
        community based approach to local infrastructural / built environment issues.

        Bungay is in the early stages becoming a Transition Town, starting with some baseline
        assessments of the town's carbon footprint followed by town meetings, film screenings and
        visioning sessions leading to the creation of action groups focusing on a range of areas -
        from local food production and marketing through to the built environment.

        Though Bungay is at the early stages of this process it clearly dovetails with the Cittaslow
        initiative, is easily replicable by communities of any size and offers further opportunities for
        the market towns and their hinterlands to work together.

        It is the ethos behind both of these movements that will inform the Waveney Valley Local
        Area Group as it moves forward.

				
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