Genesis Chapter 1- 10

					Bro. Virgil L Killebrew Men's  Leadership Training Class Minister Robert L Turner, Instructor Assignment 1;  July 12, 2009 Completed: July 19, 2009

Summary of Genesis Chapters 1 ­ 10

Chapter 1:    When the Spirit of God moved upon the dark waters of The Deep He said, “Let there be  Light,” thereby bringing forth Good out of Evil as his first act on the first day of Creation.  On the second  day God created the firmament in the midst of the waters to divide the waters from the waters and called it  Heaven.  Then God gathered together all the waters that were under the Heaven and called them Seas, and  the dry land He called Earth.  God created celestial bodies: the Sun and the Moon and the Stars on the  fourth day.  On the fifth day He created all things avian and aquatic.  Then, on the sixth day God created all  manner of land animals including man, and gave man dominion over all the other creatures of the earth and  of the seas and of the skies.  Then he gave all creatures herbs and fruits for meat, all creatures then being  vegetarian.  Then God looked at all that he had created and called it 'Very Good.' Chapter 2:    Though created on the same days as the Beast of the Field, man became a Living Soul after  receiving the 'Breath of Life' from God.  Then God created a Paradise on Earth and placed man in ti.  It  must have been like a theme park for the soul.  But as in the first day, when Good was found in the middle  of Evil, now we find Evil – The Tree of The Knowledge of Good and Evil­ in the midst of Good.  Thus are  we to understand that Good and Evil is ever before us and it is up to us to choose.  When God said, “Let us  make man. . .” he created them male and female for He knew that “It is not good that man should be  alone.”  So he instituted the sacrament of marriage between men and women.  Chapter 3:     The serpent had placed the thought of self­empowerment in Eve's mind then followed that  with temptations: “And when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was pleasant to the   eyes, and a tree to be desired to make one wise . . .” ­ Lust of the Flesh; Lust of the Eyes; Pride of Life –  The same with which Satan tempted Jesus in the wilderness.  However, after satisfying their lusts Adam and  Eve experienced the guilty shame of Sin and tried to hide themselves by weaving together fig leaves to cover  their nakedness.  Then they started trying to shift the blame, but God wasn't having none of that.  He  pronounced judgment upon the serpent first, then the woman, and finally the man.  If God said it, it must be  law – thus the death sentence came upon Adam and Eve.  However God chose a substitute to die in their  stead, the life and blood of innocent animals (from whence He made 'coats of skins' for Adam and Eve) as a  propitiation for the  guilty.  Here the principle of substitutionary sacrifice is initiated foreshadowing Jesus'  ultimate sacrifice upon the cross. Chapter 4:    After the events in the Garden of Eden Adam would have certainly continued the practice of  making sacrifices for sin and would no doubt have taught his sons to do the same.   Therefore, when  Cain  brought a sacrifice of the fruit of the ground God would not accept this bloodless offering as an atonement  for sin.  In murdering Abel Cain was rejecting God's authority over him, which is why he is able to answer  God so arrogantly, “Am I my Brother's keeper?”  Thus God caused Cain to become a fugitive and a  vagabond in the earth.  Six generations later we see the tendency of Cain toward murder and violence  manifested in his descendant, Lamech who was boastfully living up (or down) to his patriarchal creed.  Enos, the son of Seth, the son Eve bore to replace Abel, became ion the first organized religion – the ritual  worship of God. Chapter 5:    Two things stand out immediately in this genealogy of Adam.  First, neither Cain or Abel is  mentioned as a son of Adam.  Secondly, Adam is spoken of both as an individual and as a nation or race of  people.  The next notable aspect of the genealogy is the longevity of  the people.  These listed life­spans  might best be considered in terms of families or clans of people.  The time span for the ten generations from  the creation of Adam until the time of Shem, Ham, and Japheth (The 500th year of Noah [or the people of 

Page 1 of 2

Bro. Virgil L Killebrew Men's  Leadership Training Class Minister Robert L Turner, Instructor Assignment 1;  July 12, 2009 Completed: July 19, 2009

Summary of Genesis Chapters 1 ­ 10

Noah]) was roughly 7200 years.  Recorded history began in Egypt around 2500 BC. And this is the  beginning of the third Millennium, 2000 years after the death of Christ.  All that we know of history has  occurred during these 4500 years, yet the prehistoric genealogy of Adam is at least 2700 years longer than  all of recorded history. Chapter 6:    The men who began to multiply in the earth were the descendants of Cain, the Sons of God  were were the descendants of Seth and particularly of Enos.  Verse three seems to imply that man would no  longer enjoy the lengthy life­spans mentioned in chapter five but would instead be limited to a span of 120  years.  The giants in the earth were the Anakim and the Rephaim and the Zamzummims and such as King  Og of Bashan  and Goliath of Gath.   God found that “every imagination of their heart was only evil   continually. . .” the suggestion is that they did evil by design, so God purposed in his heart to destroy all life  from off of the face of the earth.  But Noah found favor in the eyes of God so God commissioned him to  build the Ark.   Chapter 7:     God provided that Noah and his family could continually make sacrifice for sin during the  time of their hibernation in the Ark by requiring Noah to take seven pairs of every clean beast and seven  pairs of every clean fowl into the Ark with him.  These clean beast  and clean fowl would be suitable for sin  offerings.  The two of every unclean beast and of unclean fowl were for the repopulating of their kind in the  earth and so that seed would stay alive upon the earth.  The Ark was 150' long and four stories high.  The  Lord shut them in on the 17th day of the 2nd month of Noah's 600th year.  The rains fell for forty days and the  flood waters were upon the face of the earth 150 days. Chapter 8:    On the 17th day of the 7th month the Ark rested upon the waters of Ararat; on the 1st day of the  10th month the mountain tops were seen.  After 40 days (11th month/11th day) Noah sent forth a Raven and a  Dove.  Seven days later (11/18) he sent the Dove out again and it returned with an olive leaf.  After seven  more days (11/25) he sent the Dove out again and she did not return.  On the 1st day of the 1st month of  Noah's 601st year the waters were dried up off of the face of the earth. On the 27th day of the second month  God spoke to Noah saying, “Go forth. . .” So Noah left the Ark which had been his home for exactly one  year and ten days.  Noah built an altar to the Lord and burnt a sacrifice.  This pleased the Lord, and He said  in His heart that He would not curse the ground again for man's sake. Chapter 9:     God blessed Noah and his sons Shem, Ham, and Japheth, through whom the whole earth  would be repopulated.  At this time man went from being a vegetarian to being a carnivore, and the fear and  the dread of him came upon all creatures.  God drew the line at spilling mans blood because “in the image  of God made he man. . .”  God made a covenant with all creatures and set the rainbow in the clouds as a  reminder.  Noah got drunk one day and lay naked in his tent.  His younger son saw his nakedness and told  his two brothers about it.  When Noah knew what Ham had done he cursed his younger son to be servant to  his brothers.  The bible is not clear as to whether Ham sinned in discovering his father's nakedness or in  telling it to his brothers. Chapter 10:    This chapter lists the roll of nations descended from Noah's sons.  Japhet had seven sons and  seven grandsons; Ham had four sons, twenty­four grandsons, and two great­grandsons; and Shem had five  sons, five grandsons, one great­grandson, two great­great grandsons, and thirteen great­great­great  grandsons.  The bible reads, “Unto Shem also, . . . the father all of the children of Eber . . .” to announce the  importance of Eber from whom all the tribe of the Hebrews, later called Jews, descended.  And by these  (sons of Noah) were the nations divided (in the days of Peleg) after the flood.

Page 2 of 2


				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Stats:
views:2990
posted:8/27/2009
language:English
pages:2