Purpose: The purpose should explain why you have chosen this

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					                         Title of Your Experiment               Your last name




Purpose: The purpose should explain why you have chosen this experiment. Explain the

problem you are trying to solve. Relate your project to the real world. For example, if

you are testing to see if color affects memory, explain why it is beneficial to find ways to

improve memorization.



Hypothesis: State what you predict will happen in your experiment. For example, I think

that words colored red will be remembered most often by the test subjects.
                        Title of Your Experiment            Your last name


Materials:

       10 test subjects (female, age 12)           markers (red, blue, green, yellow)

       index cards




Procedure:

1. Type a numbered, step-by-step, procedure that explains what you did.

2. This should be exact, so that someone else could repeat your experiment.

3. You should indicate the independent variable, dependent variable, constants, and

   controls.

4. You should be able to show that you have completed more than one trial.
                            Title of Your Experiment           Your last name


Review of Literature:

 This is your actual research paper. It should be at least 5 pages, typed, and double-

spaced. The margins should not exceed 1 ½ inches on any side of the page. The font can

be either 12 or 14 point.

 The paper should include background information about your experiment. For

example, if you are testing color and memory, your research can be about human

memory, the brain, how we recognize colors, etc. You should have an introduction that

links the research with your experiment. You should write a strong ending. Explain how

your experiment is important. Explain how you might expand your experiment.

 You must cite a reference when you copy words from someone else. If you are copying

word for word, it will look like this, “scientists agree that most people will remember

colored objects better” (Author’s last name, year). Even if you only change a few words,

you will not need quotes, but you must still add the source (Gray, 2005). In research, it is

ok to have many citations.
                          Title of Your Experiment              Your last name


Results:

This section will have your data. It is better if you can arrange your data in a data table.

A generic one is here for you to use. Judges also like to see graphs and pictures. Include

them in this section.




Make sure your data table has headings. You will also need to calculate averages for

your data if you did more than one trial.



Conclusions: Analyze the data. Does the data support your hypothesis? If your

hypothesis was wrong, that’s ok. Discuss what you think happened. Explain anything

that might have went wrong. What does the data mean for the real world? How would

you change this experiment? How could you expand this experiment?

The next page shows what your reference list should look like. Many students will use

websites, and that is ok. However, you must reference that exact site. Do not list

www.google.com as   a reference.
                       Title of Your Experiment            Your last name


                                    Reference List

Acosta, L. (1997). How to Do a Science Project Paper. New York, NY: Dow Press.

Bilonic, A. (1995, May). Why is she making us do this. Seventeen, p.5.

Bilonic, A. (1995, May). Why is she making us do this. Seventeen [online], p.5.

Case, M. (2000). [Interview with Angela Shear, Doctor of Pediatrics].

Liquid measurement. (1998). Encyclopedia Nathan Hale (Volume 18). Springfield,
       IL: The Bart Simpson Press.

Liquid measurement. (1998). Encyclopedia Nathan Hale Online [online]. Encyclopedia
       Nathan Hale. Available: www.hale.com

Lopez, J. (1997). The Complete Program on Measuring Liquids. [Computer program].
       Chicago, IL: Media Experts, Inc.

Vega, J. (1996). Measuring in the Lab Home Page. [online]. Available:
       http://www.measure.com

				
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