SIXTH GRADE by jH6euSg

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									Curriculum Reference
 Guide for Parents
     Sixth Grade




      2011 – 2012
                             Sixth Grade Standards of Learning
                              2011-2012 Scope and Sequence

  Nine                                Mathematics                Semester Courses
  Week
 Marking          English          Grade 6    Grade 6E       Science       Social Studies
 Period
   First      6.3b                6.19a-c     6.19a-c      6.1a-k        USII.1a-h
              6.4bcdfh            6.1         7.16a-e      6.6a-g        USII.2a-c
              6.6a-e              6.2a-d      6.1          6.4a-g        USII.3a-c
              Description         6.4         6.2a-d       6.2a-e        USII.4a-e
              6.7bde              6.6a-b      6.4                        USII.5a-c
                                  6.7         6.6a-b                     USII.6a-d
                                              6.7
 Second       6.3acd              6.16 a-b    6.16 a-b     6.1a-k        USII.1a-h
              6.4abeg             6.5         7.9          6.3a-e        USII.2c
              6.6a-e              6.17        7.10         6.5a-g        USII.7abc
              Narrative           6.8         6.5          6.7a-g        USII.8a-e
              6.7a                6.10        6.17         6.9a-d        USII.9a-d
              6.7f                6.18        6.8          6.8a-i
                                              6.10
                                              7.5
                                              6.18
   Third      6.1a-d              6.20        6.20         6.1a-k        USII.1a-h
              6.2 a-f             6.3 a-c     7.15 a-b     6.6a-g        USII.2a-c
              6.5 efg             6.11 a-b    6.3 a-c      6.4a-g        USII.3a-c
              6.6a-e              6.12        7.3 a-b      6.2a-e        USII.4a-e
              Persuasive          6.13        6.11 a-b                   USII.5a-c
              6.7c                6.15 a-b    7.8                        USII.6a-d
                                              6.12
                                              6.13
                                              7.7
                                              6.15 a-b

  Fourth      6.5a-d              6.14 a-c    6.14 a-c     6.1a-k        USII.1a-h
              6.6a-e              6.9         7.11 a-b     6.3a-e        USII.2a-c
              Explanation                     6.9          6.5a-g        USII.7abc
                                                           6.7a-g        USII.8a-e
                                                           6.9a-d        USII.9a-d
                                                           6.8a-i




Interim Dates for All Subjects:       Additional Interim Dates for Science and Social Studies:
October 5, 2011                              September 20, 2011             February 15, 2012
December 14, 2011                            October 20, 2011               March 20, 2012
March 2, 2012                                November 29, 2011              April 25, 2012
May 8, 2012                                  January 10, 2012               May 24, 2012
ENGLISH                                                   b) Use knowledge of narrative and poetic
                                                             structures to aid comprehension and predict
The sixth-grade student will be an active participant        outcomes.
in classroom discussions. The student will present        c) Describe the images created by language.
personal opinions, understand differing viewpoints,       d) Describe how word choice and imagery
distinguish between fact and opinion, and analyze            contribute to the meaning of a text.
the effectiveness of group communication. The             e) Describe cause-effect relationships and their
student will begin the study of word origins and             impact on plot.
continue vocabulary development. The student will         f) Use information stated explicitly in the text to
read independently a variety of fiction and nonfiction,      draw conclusions and make inferences.
including a significant number of classic works, for      g) Explain how character and plot development are
appreciation and comprehension. The student will             used in a selection to support a central conflict
also plan, draft, revise, and edit narratives,               or story line.
descriptions, and explanations, with attention to         h) Paraphrase and summarize the main points in
composition and style as well as sentence formation,         the text.
usage, and mechanics. The student will also
demonstrate correct use of language, spelling, and        6.5 The student will read and demonstrate
mechanics by applying grammatical conventions in          comprehension of a variety of informational
writing and speaking. In addition, reading and writing    selections.
will be used as tools for learning academic concepts,     a) Identify questions to be answered.
and available technology will be used as                  b) Make, confirm, or revise predictions.
appropriate.                                              c) Use context to determine meanings of unfamiliar
                                                              words and technical vocabulary.
Oral Language                                             d) Draw conclusions and make inferences based
                                                              on explicit and implied information.
6.1 The student will analyze oral participation in        e) Organize the main idea and details to form a
small-group activities.                                       summary.
a) Communicate as leader and contributor.                 f) Compare and contrast information about one
b) Evaluate own contributions to discussions.                 topic contained in different selections.
c) Summarize and evaluate group activities.               g) Select informational sources appropriate for a
d) Analyze the effectiveness of participant                   given purpose.
    interactions.
                                                          Writing
6.2 The student will listen critically and express
opinions in oral presentations.                           6.6 The student will write narratives, descriptions,
a) Distinguish between fact and opinion.                  and explanations.
b) Compare and contrast viewpoints.                       a) Use a variety of planning strategies to generate
c) Present a convincing argument.                             and organize ideas.
d) Paraphrase what is heard.                              b) Establish central idea, organization, elaboration,
e) Summarize what is heard.                                   and unity.
f) Use grammatically correct language and                 c) Select vocabulary and information to enhance
    vocabulary appropriate to audience, topic, and            the central idea, tone, and voice.
    purpose.                                              d) Expand and embed ideas by using modifiers,
                                                              standard coordination, and subordination in
Reading                                                       complete sentences.
                                                          e) Revise writing for clarity.
6.3 The student will read and learn the meanings of
unfamiliar words and phrases.                             6.7 The student will edit writing for correct grammar,
a) Identify word origins, derivations, and inflections.   capitalization, punctuation, spelling, and sentence
b) Identify analogies and figurative language.            structure.
c) Use context and sentence structure to determine        a) Use a variety of graphic organizers, including
    meanings and differentiate among multiple                 sentence diagrams, to analyze and improve
    meanings of words.                                        sentence formation and paragraph structure.
d) Use word-reference materials.                          b) Use subject-verb agreement with intervening
                                                              phrases and clauses.
6.4 The student will read and demonstrate                 c) Use pronoun-antecedent agreement to include
comprehension of a variety of fiction, narrative              indefinite pronouns.
nonfiction, and poetry.                                   d) Maintain consistent tense inflections across
a) Identify the elements of narrative structure,              paragraphs.
    including setting, character, plot, conflict, and     e) Choose adverbs to describe verbs, adjectives,
    theme.                                                    and other adverbs.
                                                          f) Use correct spelling for frequently used words.
MATH 6, 2009 Standards of Learning                      6.3 The student will
    The sixth-grade standards are a transition from         a) identify and represent integers;
the emphasis placed on whole number arithmetic in           b) order and compare integers; and
the elementary grades to foundations of algebra.            c) identify and describe absolute value of
The standards emphasize rational numbers.                      integers.
Students will use ratios to compare data sets;          6.4 The student will demonstrate multiple
recognize decimals, fractions, and percents as              representations of multiplication and division of
ratios; solve single-step and multistep problems,           fractions.
using rational numbers; and gain a foundation in the    6.5 The student will investigate and describe
understanding of integers. Students will solve linear       concepts of positive exponents and perfect
equations and use algebraic terminology. Students           squares.
will solve problems involving area, perimeter, and
surface area, work with π (pi), and focus on the        Computation and Estimation
relationships among the properties of quadrilaterals.   Focus: Applications of Operations with Rational
In addition, students will focus on applications of     Numbers
probability and statistics.                             6.6 The student will
    While learning mathematics, students will be            a) multiply and divide fractions and mixed
actively engaged, using concrete materials and                 numbers; and
appropriate technology such as calculators,                 b) estimate solutions and then solve single-
computers, and spreadsheets. However, facility in              step and multistep practical problems
the use of technology shall not be regarded as a               involving addition, subtraction, multiplication,
substitute for a student‟s understanding of                    and division of fractions.
quantitative concepts and relationships or for          6.7 The student will solve single-step and multistep
proficiency in basic computations. Students will also       practical problems involving addition,
identify real-life applications of the mathematical         subtraction, multiplication, and division of
principles they are learning and apply these to             decimals.
science and other disciplines they are studying.        6.8 The student will evaluate whole number
    Mathematics has its own language, and the               numerical expressions, using the order of
acquisition of specialized vocabulary and language          operations.
patterns is crucial to a student‟s understanding and
appreciation of the subject. Students should be         Measurement
encouraged to use correctly the concepts, skills,       Focus: Problem Solving with Area, Perimeter,
symbols, and vocabulary identified in the following     Volume, and Surface Area
set of standards.                                       6.9 The student will make ballpark comparisons
    Problem solving has been integrated throughout           between measurements in the U.S. Customary
the six content strands. The development of                  System of measurement and measurements in
problem-solving skills should be a major goal of the         the metric system.
mathematics program at every grade level.               6.10 The student will
Instruction in the process of problem solving will           a) define π (pi) as the ratio of the
need to be integrated early and continuously into               circumference of a circle to its diameter;
each student‟s mathematics education. Students               b) solve practical problems involving
must be helped to develop a wide range of skills and            circumference and area of a circle, given the
strategies for solving a variety of problem types.              diameter or radius;
                                                             c) solve practical problems involving area and
Number and Number Sense                                         perimeter; and
Focus: Relationships among Fractions,                        d) describe and determine the volume and
Decimals, and Percents                                          surface area of a rectangular prism.
6.1 The student will describe and compare data,
    using ratios, and will use appropriate notations,   Geometry
             a                                          Focus: Properties and Relationships
    such as b , a to b, and a:b.
                                                        6.11 The student will
6.2 The student will                                         a) identify the coordinates of a point in a
    a) investigate and describe fractions, decimals,            coordinate plane; and
        and percents as ratios;                              b) graph ordered pairs in a coordinate plane.
    b) identify a given fraction, decimal, or percent   6.12 The student will determine congruence of
        from a representation;                               segments, angles, and polygons.
    c) demonstrate equivalent relationships among       6.13 The student will describe and identify properties
        fractions, decimals, and percents; and               of quadrilaterals.
    d) compare and order fractions, decimals, and
        percents.
Probability and Statistics
Focus: Practical Applications of Statistics
6.14 The student, given a problem situation, will
     a) construct circle graphs;
     b) draw conclusions and make predictions,
        using circle graphs; and
     c) compare and contrast graphs that present
        information from the same data set.
6.15 The student will
     a) describe mean as balance point; and
     b) decide which measure of center is
        appropriate for a given purpose.
6.16 The student will
     a) compare and contrast dependent and
        independent events; and
     b) determine probabilities for dependent and
        independent events.

Patterns, Functions, and Algebra
Focus: Variable Equations and Properties
6.17 The student will identify and extend geometric
     and arithmetic sequences.
6.18 The student will solve one-step linear equations
     in one variable involving whole number
     coefficients and positive rational solutions.
6.19 The student will investigate and recognize
     a) the identity properties for addition and
          multiplication;
     b) the multiplicative property of zero; and
     c) the inverse property for multiplication.
6.20 The student will graph inequalities on a number
     line.
MATH 6 Enrichment, 2009 Standards of Learning           6.3 The student will
    The sixth-grade standards are a transition from         a) identify and represent integers;
the emphasis placed on whole number arithmetic in           b) order and compare integers; and
the elementary grades to foundations of algebra.            c) identify and describe absolute value of
The standards emphasize rational numbers.                      integers.
Students will use ratios to compare data sets;          6.4 The student will demonstrate multiple
recognize decimals, fractions, and percents as              representations of multiplication and division of
ratios; solve single-step and multistep problems,           fractions.
using rational numbers; and gain a foundation in the    6.5 The student will investigate and describe
understanding of integers. Students will solve linear       concepts of positive exponents and perfect
equations and use algebraic terminology. Students           squares.
will solve problems involving area, perimeter, and
surface area, work with π (pi), and focus on the        Computation and Estimation
relationships among the properties of quadrilaterals.   Focus: Applications of Operations with Rational
In addition, students will focus on applications of     Numbers
probability and statistics.                             6.6 The student will
    While learning mathematics, students will be            a) multiply and divide fractions and mixed
actively engaged, using concrete materials and                 numbers; and
appropriate technology such as calculators,                 b) estimate solutions and then solve single-
computers, and spreadsheets. However, facility in              step and multistep practical problems
the use of technology shall not be regarded as a               involving addition, subtraction, multiplication,
substitute for a student‟s understanding of                    and division of fractions.
quantitative concepts and relationships or for          6.7 The student will solve single-step and multistep
proficiency in basic computations. Students will also       practical problems involving addition,
identify real-life applications of the mathematical         subtraction, multiplication, and division of
principles they are learning and apply these to             decimals.
science and other disciplines they are studying.        6.8 The student will evaluate whole number
    Mathematics has its own language, and the               numerical expressions, using the order of
acquisition of specialized vocabulary and language          operations.
patterns is crucial to a student‟s understanding and    7.3 The student will
appreciation of the subject. Students should be             a) model addition, subtraction, multiplication,
encouraged to use correctly the concepts, skills,              and division of integers; and
symbols, and vocabulary identified in the following         b) add, subtract, multiply, and divide integers.
set of standards.
    Problem solving has been integrated throughout      Measurement
the six content strands. The development of             Focus: Problem Solving with Area, Perimeter,
problem-solving skills should be a major goal of the    Volume, and Surface Area
mathematics program at every grade level.               6.9 The student will make ballpark comparisons
Instruction in the process of problem solving will           between measurements in the U.S. Customary
need to be integrated early and continuously into            System of measurement and measurements in
each student‟s mathematics education. Students               the metric system.
must be helped to develop a wide range of skills and    6.10 The student will
strategies for solving a variety of problem types.           a) define π (pi) as the ratio of the
                                                                circumference of a circle to its diameter;
Number and Number Sense                                      b) solve practical problems involving
Focus: Relationships among Fractions,                           circumference and area of a circle, given the
Decimals, and Percents                                          diameter or radius;
6.1 The student will describe and compare data,              c) solve practical problems involving area and
    using ratios, and will use appropriate notations,           perimeter; and
             a                                               d) describe and determine the volume and
    such as b , a to b, and a:b.
                                                                surface area of a rectangular prism.
6.2 The student will                                    7.5 The student will
    a) investigate and describe fractions, decimals,         a) describe volume and surface area of
        and percents as ratios;                                 cylinders;
    b) identify a given fraction, decimal, or percent        b) solve practical problems involving the
        from a representation;                                  volume and surface area of rectangular
    c) demonstrate equivalent relationships among               prisms and cylinders; and
        fractions, decimals, and percents; and               c) describe how changing one measured
    d) compare and order fractions, decimals, and               attribute of a rectangular prism affects its
        percents.                                               volume and surface area.
Geometry                                                  6.20 The student will graph inequalities on a number
Focus: Properties and Relationships                            line.
6.11 The student will                                     7.15 The student will
     a) identify the coordinates of a point in a               a) solve one-step inequalities in one variable;
         coordinate plane; and                                     and
     b) graph ordered pairs in a coordinate plane.             b) graph solutions to inequalities on the
6.12 The student will determine congruence of                      number line.
     segments, angles, and polygons.                      7.16 The student will apply the following properties
6.13 The student will describe and identify properties         of operations with real numbers:
     of quadrilaterals.                                        a) the commutative and associative properties
7.7 The student will compare and contrast the                      for addition and multiplication;
     following quadrilaterals based on properties:             b) the distributive property;
     parallelogram, rectangle, square, rhombus, and            c) the additive and multiplicative identity
     trapezoid.                                                    properties;
7.8 The student, given a polygon in the coordinate             d) the additive and multiplicative inverse
     plane, will represent transformations                         properties; and
     (reflections, dilations, rotations, and                   e) the multiplicative property of zero.
     translations) by graphing in the coordinate
     plane.

Probability and Statistics
Focus: Practical Applications of Statistics
6.14 The student, given a problem situation, will
     a) construct circle graphs;
     b) draw conclusions and make predictions,
          using circle graphs; and
     c) compare and contrast graphs that present
          information from the same data set.
6.15 The student will
     a) describe mean as balance point; and
     b) decide which measure of center is
          appropriate for a given purpose.
6.16 The student will
     a) compare and contrast dependent and
          independent events; and
     b) determine probabilities for dependent and
          independent events.
7.9 The student will investigate and describe the
     difference between the experimental probability
     and theoretical probability of an event.
7.10 The student will determine the probability of
     compound events, using the Fundamental
     (Basic) Counting Principle.
7.11 The student, given data for a practical situation,
     will
     a) construct and analyze histograms; and
     b) compare and contrast histograms with other
         types of graphs presenting information from
         the same data set.

Patterns, Functions, and Algebra
Focus: Variable Equations and Properties
6.17 The student will identify and extend geometric
     and arithmetic sequences.
6.18 The student will solve one-step linear equations
     in one variable involving whole number
     coefficients and positive rational solutions.
6.19 The student will investigate and recognize
     a) the identity properties for addition and
         multiplication;
     b) the multiplicative property of zero; and
     c) the inverse property for multiplication.
SCIENCE                                                i) data are organized and communicated through
                                                          graphical representation (graphs, charts, and
The sixth-grade standards continue to emphasize           diagrams);
data analysis and experimentation. Methods are         j) models are designed to explain a sequence; and
studied for testing the validity of predictions and    k) an understanding of the nature of science is
conclusions. Scientific methodology, focusing on          developed and reinforced.
precision in stating hypotheses and defining
dependent and independent variables, is strongly       Force, Motion, and Energy
reinforced. The concept of change is explored
through the study of transformations of energy and     6.2 The student will investigate and understand
matter. The standards present an integrated focus      basic sources of energy, their origins,
on the role of the sun‟s energy in the Earth‟s         transformations, and uses. Key concepts include
systems, on water in the environment, on air and       a) potential and kinetic energy;
atmosphere, and on basic chemistry concepts. A         b) the role of the sun in the formation of most
more detailed understanding of the solar system and        energy sources on Earth;
space exploration becomes a focus of instruction.      c) nonrenewable energy sources (fossil fuels
Natural resource management, its relation to public        including petroleum, natural gas, and coal);
policy, and cost/benefit tradeoffs in conservation     d) renewable energy sources (wood, wind, hydro,
policies are introduced.                                   geothermal, tidal, and solar); and
                                                       e) energy transformations (heat/light to
The sixth-grade standards continue to focus on             mechanical, chemical, and electrical energy).
student growth in understanding the nature of
science. This scientific view defines the idea that    6.3 The student will investigate and understand the
explanations of nature are developed and tested        role of solar energy in driving most natural
using observation, experimentation, models,            processes within the atmosphere, the hydrosphere,
evidence, and systematic processes. The nature of      and on the Earth‟s surface. Key concepts include
science includes the concepts that scientific          a) the Earth‟s energy budget;
explanations are based on logical thinking; are        b) the role of radiation and convection in the
subject to rules of evidence; are consistent with           distribution of energy;
observational, inferential, and experimental           c) the motion of the atmosphere and the oceans;
evidence; are open to rational critique; and are       d) cloud formation; and
subject to refinement and change with the addition     e) the role of heat energy in weather-related
of new scientific evidence. The nature of science           phenomena including thunderstorms and
includes the concept that science can provide               hurricanes.
explanations about nature, can predict potential
consequences of actions, but cannot be used to         Matter
answer all questions.
                                                       6.4 The student will investigate and understand that
Scientific Investigation, Reasoning, and Logic         all matter is made up of atoms. Key concepts
                                                       include
6.1 The student will plan and conduct investigations   a) atoms are made up of electrons, protons, and
in which                                                    neutrons;
a) observations are made involving fine                b) atoms of any element are alike but are different
    discrimination between similar objects and              from atoms of other elements;
    organisms;                                         c) elements may be represented by chemical
b) a classification system is developed based on            symbols;
    multiple attributes;                               d) two or more atoms may be chemically
c) precise and approximate measurements are                 combined;
    recorded;                                          e) compounds may be represented by chemical
d) scale models are used to estimate distance,              formulas;
    volume, and quantity;                              f) chemical equations can be used to model
e) hypotheses are stated in ways that identify the          chemical changes; and
    independent (manipulated) and dependent            g) a limited number of elements comprise the
    (responding) variables;                                 largest portion of the solid Earth, living matter,
f) a method is devised to test the validity of              the oceans, and the atmosphere.
    predictions and inferences;
g) one variable is manipulated over time, using        6.5 The student will investigate and understand the
    many repeated trials;                              unique properties and characteristics of water and
h) data are collected, recorded, analyzed, and         its roles in the natural and human-made
    reported using appropriate metric                  environment. Key concepts include
    measurements;                                      a) water as the universal solvent;
                                                       b) the properties of water in all three states;
c) the action of water in physical and chemical         Resources
   weathering;
d) the ability of large bodies of water to store heat   6.9 The student will investigate and understand
   and moderate climate;                                public policy decisions relating to the environment.
e) the origin and occurrence of water on Earth;         Key concepts include
f) the importance of water for agriculture, power       a) management of renewable resources (water, air,
   generation, and public health; and                       soil, plant life, animal life);
g) the importance of protecting and maintaining         b) management of nonrenewable resources (coal,
   water resources.                                         oil, natural gas, nuclear power, mineral
                                                            resources);
6.6 The student will investigate and understand the     c) the mitigation of land-use and environmental
properties of air and the structure and dynamics of         hazards through preventive measures; and
the Earth‟s atmosphere. Key concepts include            d) cost/benefit tradeoffs in conservation policies.
a) air as a mixture of gaseous elements and
    compounds;
b) air pressure, temperature, and humidity;
c) how the atmosphere changes with altitude;
d) natural and human-caused changes to the
    atmosphere;
e) the relationship of atmospheric measures and
    weather conditions;
f) basic information from weather maps including
    fronts, systems, and basic measurements; and
g) the importance of protecting and maintaining air
    quality.

Living Systems

6.7 The student will investigate and understand the
natural processes and human interactions that affect
watershed systems. Key concepts include
a) the health of ecosystems and the abiotic factors
    of a watershed;
b) the location and structure of Virginia‟s regional
    watershed systems;
c) divides, tributaries, river systems, and river and
    stream processes;
d) wetlands;
e) estuaries;
f) major conservation, health, and safety issues
    associated with watersheds; and
g) water monitoring and analysis using field
    equipment including hand-held technology.

Interrelationships in Earth/Space Systems

6.8 The student will investigate and understand the
organization of the solar system and the
relationships among the various bodies that
comprise it. Key concepts include
a) the sun, moon, Earth, other planets and their
     moons, meteors, asteroids, and comets;
b) relative size of and distance between planets;
c) the role of gravity;
d) revolution and rotation;
e) the mechanics of day and night and the phases
     of the moon;
f) the unique properties of Earth as a planet;
g) the relationship of the Earth‟s tilt and the
     seasons;
h) the cause of tides; and
i) the history and technology of space exploration.
UNITED STATES HISTORY: 1865 TO THE                       Reconstruction: 1865 to 1877
PRESENT                                                  USII.3 The student will demonstrate knowledge of
                                                         the effects of reconstruction by
                                                                                          th   th        th
Students will continue to use skills of historical and   a) analyzing the impact of the 13 , 14 , and 15
geographical analysis as they examine American               Amendments to the Constitution of the United
history since 1865. The standards for this course            States;
relate to the history of the United States from the      b) describing the impact of Reconstruction policies
Reconstruction era to the present. Students should           on the South and the North;
continue to learn fundamental concepts in civics,        c) describing the legacies of Abraham Lincoln,
economics, and geography within the context of               Robert E. Lee, and Frederic Douglas;
United States history. Political, economic, and social
challenges facing the nation reunited after civil war    Reshaping the Nation and the Emergence of
will be examined chronologically as students             Modern America: 1877 to the Early 1900s
develop an understanding of how the American             USII.4 The student will demonstrate knowledge of
experience shaped the world political and economic       how life changed after the Civil War by
landscape.                                               a) identifying the reasons for westward expansion,
                                                             including the impact on American Indians;
The study of history must emphasize the intellectual     b) explaining the reasons for the increase in
skills required for responsible citizenship. Students        immigration, growth of cities, new inventions,
practice these skills as they extend their                   and challenges arising from this expansion;
understanding of the essential knowledge defined by      c) describing racial segregation, the rise of “Jim
all of the standards for history and social science.         Crow,” and other constraints faced by African
                                                             Americans in the post-Reconstruction South;
Skills                                                   d) explaining the impact of new inventions, rise of
USII.1 The student will demonstrate skills for               big business, the growth of industry, and life on
historical and geographical analysis, including the          American farms;
ability to                                               e) describing the impact of the Progressive
a) analyze and interpret primary and secondary               Movement on child labor, working conditions,
     source documents to increase understanding of           the rise of organized labor, women‟s suffrage,
     events and life in United States history from           and the temperance movement.
     1877 to the present;
b) make connections between past and present;            Turmoil and Change: 1890s to 1945
c) sequence events in United States history from         USII.5 The student will demonstrate knowledge of
     1877 to the present;                                the changing role of the United States from the late
d) interpret ideas and events from different             nineteenth century through World War I by
     historical perspectives;                            a) explaining the reasons for and results of the
e) evaluate and debate issues orally and in writing;         Spanish American War;
f) analyze and interpret maps that include major         b) describing Theodore Roosevelt‟s impact on the
     physical features;                                      foreign policy of the United States;
g) use parallels of latitude and meridians of            c) explaining the reasons for the United States‟
     longitude to describe hemispheric location;             involvement in World War I and its leadership
     interpret patriotic slogans and excerpts from           role at the conclusion of the war.
     notable speeches and documents.
                                                         USII.6 The student will demonstrate knowledge of
                                                         the social, economic, and technological changes of
Geography                                                the early twentieth century by
USII.2 The student will use maps, globes,                a) explaining how developments in factory and
photographs, pictures, and tables for                        labor productivity, transportation (including the
a) explaining how physical features and climate              use of the automobile), communication, and
    influenced the movement of people westward;              rural electrification changed American life and
b) explaining relationships among natural                    standard of living;
    resources, transportation, and industrial            b) describing the social changes that took place,
    development after 1877;                                  including prohibition, and the Great Migration
c) locating the 50 states and the cities most                north and west;
    significant to the historical development of the     c) examining art, literature, and music from the
    United States.                                           1920s and 1930s, with emphasis on Langston
                                                             Hughes, Duke Ellington, and Georgia O‟Keeffe
                                                             and including the Harlem Renaissance;
                                                         d) identifying the causes of the Great Depression,
                                                             its impact on Americans, and the major features
                                                             of Franklin D. Roosevelt‟s New Deal.
USII.7 The student will demonstrate knowledge of
the major causes and effects of American
involvement in World War II by
a) identifying the causes and events that led to
    American involvement in the war, including the
    attack on Pearl Harbor;
b) locating and describing the major events and
    turning points of the war in Europe and the
    Pacific;
c) describing the impact of World War II on the
    home front.

The United States since World War II
USII.8 The student will demonstrate knowledge of
the economic, social, and political transformation of
the United States and the world between the end of
World War II and the present by
a) describing the rebuilding of Europe and Japan
    after World War II, the emergence of the United
    States as a superpower, and the establishment
    of the United Nations;
b) describing the conversion from a wartime to a
    peacetime economy;
c) identifying the role of America‟s military and
    veterans in defending freedom during the Cold
    War, including the wars in Korea and Vietnam,
    the Cuban missile crisis, the collapse of
    communism in Europe, and the rise of new
    challenges;
d) describing the changing patterns of society,
    including expanded educational and economic
    opportunities for military veterans, women, and
    minorities;
e) Describing how international trade and
    globalization have impacted American life.

USII.9 The student will demonstrate knowledge of
the key domestic issues during the second half of
the twentieth century by
a) examining the Civil Rights Movement and the
    changing role of women;
b) describing the development of new technologies
    and their impact on American life;
c) identifying representative citizens from the time
    period who have influenced „America
    scientifically, culturally, academically, and
    economically;
d) examining American foreign policy, immigration,
    the global environment, and other emerging
    issues.
Exploratory Course Offerings

Art 6 (nine week course)                                     Keyboarding 6 (nine week course)
The standards emphasize exploration. Using the               This course is designed for middle school students
elements of art and the principles of design as a            to develop and enhance touch skills for entering
framework, students will investigate a variety of            alphabetic, numeric, and symbol information on a
experiences and concepts. Students will explore              keyboard. Students compose and produce personal,
various two-dimensional and three-dimensional art            educational, and professional documents. This
media, using a variety of expressive and technical           course is the foundation for success in Keyboarding
approaches. Students will understand the factors             and Computer Solutions.
that distinguish artistic styles and that clarify the role
of art in American culture. Through critical                 Chorus 6 (nine week course)
examination, students will determine how artists             The beginning level standards are designed for
convey meaning through the use of forms, media,              students experiencing their first vocal/choral class.
and symbols. Students will test and develop their            Beginning choral students may be found at any
own ideas regarding the nature of art and will               grade level within the elementary, middle, and
encounter philosophical and ethical questions. Upon          secondary school setting, as prescribed by the local
the successful completion of the visual arts                 school district. The Beginning Level standards
standards, students will possess the skills that will        emphasize fundamental vocal development,
allow them to evaluate the effects of various                traditional notation, and the introduction to ensemble
influences on the discipline of the visual arts.             singing. These standards require performance,
                                                             creativity, and investigation at a fundamental level.
General Music 6 (nine week course)                           Opportunities are provided for students to explore
The general music standards involve students in a            the relationship between music and the other fine
higher level of music concepts and the further               arts and between music and disciplines outside the
development of music skills through singing, playing         arts.
instruments, moving, and listening. The standards
encourage the reading of music notation and the              Band 6 and Orchestra/Strings 6 (year-long course)
assimilation of previous music study toward                  Students will demonstrate proper care of the
understanding the mechanics of a music score.                instrument and will be familiar with the technology of
Students will explore the creative and expressive            the instrument. They will demonstrate basic
aspects of music through composing and arranging.            positions, tone production, and fingerings, and will
Evaluation of music performances will allow students         count, read, and perform the beginning level of
opportunities to apply music knowledge and                   music being studied (VBODA Solo Repertoire, Level
experiences to new situations.                               1-2). Teachers will use available standard method
                                                             books to deliver instruction in either homogeneous
Introduction to Technology 6 (nine week course)              or heterogeneous class settings with limited
This course provides students with the opportunity to        ensemble work.
study the elements of technology and explore
technological careers. Students study
tools/machines, material processing, energy,
information, and people. Students learn about at
least one of the four systems of technology:
construction, transportation, communication, and
production/manufacturing. They relate the impact of
technology on society, environment, and culture to
future consequences and decisions.

Exploring Work & Family Roles 6 – commonly
known as FACS (nine week course)
This course provides a foundation for management
of individual, family, work, and community roles and
responsibilities. Students focus on areas of
individual growth such as personal goal
achievement, responsibilities with the family, and
accountability for personal safety and health. They
also explore and practice financial management,
clothing maintenance, food preparation, positive and
caring relationships with others, and self-
assessment as related to career exploration.

								
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