SYLLABUS by ivq1Cu

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									                                           SYLLABUS

DATE OF LAST REVIEW: 4/30/2005

CIP CODE:                     24.0101

SEMESTER:                     Departmental Syllabus

COURSE NAME:                  Ethics

COURSE NUMBER:                PHIL-0206

CREDIT HOURS:                 3

INSTRUCTOR:                   Departmental Syllabus

OFFICE LOCATION:              Departmental Syllabus

OFFICE HOURS:                Departmental Syllabus

TELEPHONE:                   Departmental Syllabus

PREREQUISITES:                None

REQUIRED TEXT AND MATERIALS: Please check with the KCKCC bookstore,
http://www.kckccbookstore.com/, for the required texts for your particular class.

DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:
This branch of philosophy is primarily concerned with the values and principles which underlie
human acts and purposes. Multicultural philosophical contributions to solving ethical problems
are examined for critical understanding. Ethics focuses on evaluating theories about what
constitutes the good life.

METHOD OF INSTRUCTION: A variety of instructional methods may be used depending on
content area. These include but are not limited to: lecture, multimedia, cooperative/collaborative
learning, labs and demonstrations, projects and presentations, speeches, debates, panels,
conferencing, performances, and learning experiences outside the classroom. Methodology will
be selected to best meet student needs.

Honors Sections: An honors section of this course provides a non-traditional environment for
learning that incorporates active student participation, critical reflection, use of primary sources
and innovative teaching methods. Classes are designated as honors on the transcript. Enrollment
in the honors section of this class requires the permission of the Director of Honors Education.

Online Sections: Online courses rely on the use of the Internet and a course management system
for content delivery. Courses are accessible both on campus and from most remote sites.
Specific information regarding computer skills and system requirements can be found at
http://www.kckcc.edu/online/index.html.


COURSE OUTLINE:
A. Who Cares About Ethics?
   1. Philosophy
   2. Organized Religion
   3. Medicine
   4. Science
   5. Business
   6. The Law
   7. Journalism
   8. Entertainment Industry
   9. Internet
   10. Ethics in Narratives

B. Stories With Morals
   1. Moral Lessons
   2. Telling Stories
   3. Stories as Role Models
   4. Heroes
C. Contemporary Moral Problems Conveyed in Stories
   1. Stories to Live and Die By
   2. Stories to Change the World
   3. Life as a Story

D. Ethical Relativism
   1. Moral Differences
   2. Lessons of Anthropology
   3. Is Tolerance All We Need?
   4. Refuting Ethical Relativism

E. Myself or Others?
   1. Psychological Egoism
   2. Ethical Egoism
   3. Altruism

F. Utilitarianism
   1. Bentham and Hedonism
   2. Mill’s Higher Pleasures
   3. Act and Rule Utilitarianism

G. Kant’s Deontology
    1.   Good Will
    2.   Categorical Imperative
    3.   Kant’s Critics
    4.   Rational Beings are Ends in Themselves

H. Personhood, Rights, and Justice
   1. Personhood
   2. Persons and Rights
   3. The Question of Rights

I. Socrates, Plato, and the Good Life
   1. Virtue
   2. Character
   3. The Forms and the Good

J. Aristotle’s Virtue Theory
   1. Aristotle, the Scientist
   2. Aristotle and the Virtues

K. Modern Perspectives
   1. Have Virtue, Then Go Ahead
   2. The Quest for Authenticity

L. Different Gender, Different Ethic?
   1. Feminism and Virtue Theory
   2. The Two Facets of Gender Equality

M. Virtues, Values and Religion
   1. Two Asian Traditions
   2. Virtues, Values and Conduct in Three Monotheistic Religions
   3. Tribal Virtues and Values

N. Case Studies in Virtue
   1. Compassion: Are We Born with It?
   2. Gratitude: How Much and When?
   3. Virtue and Conduct: Ethical Pluralism?

EXPECTED LEARNER OUTCOMES:
A. The student will be able to know major figures in the history of moral discourse, some of the
   standard terms found in ethical theory, and basic areas of philosophical controversy.
B. The student will be able to define facts and values, moral obligation and moral freedom,
   autonomy in moral judgements, consequentialist, deontological and human nature theories of
   ethics.
C. The student will be able to develop understanding for various criteria that have been taken as
   standards for ethical criticism, i.e. for distinguishing moral for non-moral values.
D. The student will be able to know the pluralism in ethical traditions within Western and non-
   western societies.
E. The student will be able to investigate the anthropological and sociological evidence that
   suggests that value orientations are fundamentally socio-cultural in origin and consequence,
   and the implications this has for both ethical theory and our sense of personal ethical
   responsibility.
F. Permit students to explore an academic treatment of a wide range of ethical problems, issues.
G. Exam ethics and problems of social inequality/social justice.
H. Benefit from community-based service learning.

COURSE COMPETENCIES:
1. The student will be able to identify Ethics within the Discipline of Philosophy
2. The student will be able to relate Ethics to Religion
3. The student will be able to locate Ethics within the various Professional Fields
4. The student will be able to explain why Rules of Conduct are Important
5. The student will be able to illustrate the Use of Ethics in Narratives
6. The student will be able to analyze the Moral Lessons in Stories
7. The student will be able to identify the Use of Role Models in Stories
8. The student will be able to contrast Cultural Relativism with Ethical Relativism
9. The student will be able to evaluate Ethical Relativism
10. The student will be able to define Inclusive and Exclusive Multiculturalism
11. The student will be able to define the Theory of Ethical Egoism
12. The student will be able to compare and Contrast Ethical Egoism with Psychological Egoism.
13. The student will be able to compare and Contrast Ideal and Reciprocal Altruism
14. The student will be able to explain Bentham’s Hedonistic Ethics
15. The student will be able to review Mill’s Higher and Lower Pleasures
16. The student will be able to compare and Contrast Act and Rule Utilitarianism
17. The student will be able to discuss Kant’s “Good Will”, “Categorical Imperative”, and
    “Kingdom of Ends”
18. The student will be able to interpret what a Human Being is According to Ethical Theory
19. The student will be able to analyze Human Rights
20. The student will be able to apply Rights to Punishment and the Issue of the Death Penalty
21. The student will be able to define and Apply Virtue
22. The student will be able to define Character as it Applies to Ethics
23. The student will be able to explain what Socrates Believed the Good Life to Be.
24. The student will be able to relate Aristotle’s Theory of Virtues
25. The student will be able to explain Aristotle’s Definition of Happiness
26. The student will be able to explain Three Different Theories of Authenticity
27. The student will be able to distinguish traditional male values from traditional female values.
28. The student will be able to review the different issues relating to gender equality.
28. The student will be able to review the moral philosophy in Confucianism and Buddhism.
29. The student will be able to distinguish virtues, values, and conduct in Three Monotheistic
    Religions.
30. The student will be able to identify Tribal Virtues and Values.
31. The student will be able to interpret the role of Compassion in Various Applications.
32. The student will be able to evaluate the place of Gratitude to Parents, Friends, and
    Acquaintances.

ASSESSMENT OF LEARNER OUTCOMES:
Participation in group and class discussions.
Passing scores on four exams and a short term paper/service learning projects.

SPECIAL NOTES:
This syllabus is subject to change at the discretion of the instructor. Material included is intended
to provide an outline of the course and rules that the instructor will adhere to in evaluating the
student’s progress. However, this syllabus is not intended to be a legal contract. Questions
regarding the syllabus are welcome any time.

Kansas City Kansas Community College is committed to an appreciation of diversity with
respect for the differences among the diverse groups comprising our students, faculty, and staff
that is free of bigotry and discrimination. Kansas City Kansas Community College is committed
to providing a multicultural education and environment that reflects and respects diversity and
that seeks to increase understanding.

Kansas City Kansas Community College offers equal educational opportunity to all students as
well as serving as an equal opportunity employer for all personnel. Various laws, including Title
IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, require the college’s policy on non-discrimination
be administered without regard to race, color, age, sex, religion, national origin, physical
handicap, or veteran status and that such policy be made known.

Kansas City Kansas Community College complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act. If
you need accommodations due to a documented disability, please contact Valerie Webb, in Rm.
3354 or call at: 288-7670 V/TDD.
                                                                                Fall – year _____

                                                                             Spring – year _____

                                                                            Summer – year _____

KANSAS CITY KANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE


COMPETENCY INDEX


Course Number/Section/Title: __________________________________________________

Student Name: ___________________________________ Student Number: ____________

Instructor: _______________________________________ Division:             Social Science____


RATING SCALE for Competency Achievement

4 – Superior
3 – Good
2 – Average
1 – Inferior
0 – Failure
NA – Not addressed

DIRECTIONS:

Evaluate the student by checking or highlighting the appropriate number to indicate the degree of
competency achieved.

COURSE COMPETENCIES:

Rating                 Course Competency
4 3 2 1 0 NA   1. The student will be able to identify Ethics within the Discipline of Philosophy
4 3 2 1 0 NA   2. The student will be able to relate Ethics to Religion
4 3 2 1 0 NA   3. The student will be able to locate Ethics within the various Professional Fields
4 3 2 1 0 NA   4. The student will be able to explain why Rules of Conduct are Important
4 3 2 1 0 NA   5. The student will be able to illustrate the Use of Ethics in Narratives
4 3 2 1 0 NA   6. The student will be able to analyze the Moral Lessons in Stories
4 3 2 1 0 NA   7. The student will be able to identify the Use of Role Models in Stories
4 3 2 1 0 NA   8. The student will be able to contrast Cultural Relativism with Ethical Relativism
4 3 2 1 0 NA   9. The student will be able to evaluate Ethical Relativism
4 3 2 1 0 NA 10. The student will be able to define Inclusive and Exclusive Multiculturalism
4 3 2 1 0 NA 11. The student will be able to define the Theory of Ethical Egoism
4 3 2 1 0 NA 12. The student will be able to compare and Contrast Ethical Egoism with
               Psychological    Egoism.
4 3 2 1 0 NA 13. The student will be able to compare and Contrast Ideal and Reciprocal
Altruism
4 3 2 1 0 NA 14. The student will be able to explain Bentham’s Hedonistic Ethics
4 3 2 1 0 NA 15. The student will be able to review Mill’s Higher and Lower Pleasures
4 3 2 1 0 NA 16. The student will be able to compare and Contrast Act and Rule Utilitarianism
4 3 2 1 0 NA 17. The student will be able to discuss Kant’s “Good Will”, “Categorical
               Imperative”, and “Kingdom of Ends”
4 3 2 1 0 NA 18. The student will be able to interpret what a Human Being is According to
Ethical Theory
4 3 2 1 0 NA 19. The student will be able to analyze Human Rights
4 3 2 1 0 NA 20. The student will be able to apply Rights to Punishment and the Issue of the
Death Penalty
4 3 2 1 0 NA 21. The student will be able to define and Apply Virtue
4 3 2 1 0 NA 22. The student will be able to define Character as it Applies to Ethics
4 3 2 1 0 NA 23. The student will be able to explain what Socrates Believed the Good Life to
Be.
4 3 2 1 0 NA 24. The student will be able to relate Aristotle’s Theory of Virtues
4 3 2 1 0 NA 25. The student will be able to explain Aristotle’s Definition of Happiness
4 3 2 1 0 NA 26. The student will be able to explain Three Different Theories of Authenticity
4 3 2 1 0 NA 27. The student will be able to distinguish traditional male values from traditional
female values.
4 3 2 1 0 NA 28. The student will be able to review the different issues relating to gender
equality.
4 3 2 1 0 NA 29. The student will be able to review the moral philosophy in Confucianism and
Buddhism.
4 3 2 1 0 NA 30. The student will be able to distinguish virtues, values, and conduct in Three
               Monotheistic Religions.
4 3 2 1 0 NA 31. The student will be able to identify Tribal Virtues and Values.
4 3 2 1 0 NA 32. The student will be able to interpret the role of Compassion in Various
Applications.
4 3 2 1 0 NA 33. The student will be able to evaluate the place of Gratitude to Parents, Friends,
               and Acquaintances.

Please check one of the following:

_____ I certify that the student completed the course and the competencies indicated as
       indicated.

_____ I certify that the student completed 25% of the course competencies, as indicated.

Instructor Signature: _________________________________________________________

								
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