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									                                          Teacher‘s Guide
                           Response to Reading for Unit One-Coming of Age


                                  Information About the Texts

Genre          Type                        Titles                                    Word Count
Literary       Expressive narrative        ―Thank You, M‘am‖                               1377
Expository:    Magazine article            ―Granny Down the Hall‖                          1339
                                           Total Word Count (2500-3000)                    2716


                               Multiple Choice Question Analysis

              TAKS Objective                Obj. 1             Obj. 2            Obj. 3
              MC Questions                    1                  5                 3


                           Information About the Assessment Task
This response to reading assessment task has three open-ended questions. The first question addresses
the literary text, the second question addresses the informative text, and the third question addresses
the paired texts (crossover question). Students are required to respond to the questions by stating their
own ideas (brain) to answer the question and support them with textual reference (book).

In addition to the open-ended questions, the multiple-choice questions should be completed with
justifications that explain why the answer choice is the most reasonable. An optional written
composition that is linked to the paired texts is included. If assigned, it should be completed on a
different day in order for the students to maximize their performance on the open-ended and multiple-
choice questions.


                                      Directions for Students
Explain to the students that they will read two passages and answer the questions that follow them.
Notes for the literary passage should be complete in the column provided, and notes for the expository
text should be written in the margins.

Direct students to the open-ended questions and remind them to:
 focus on what the question is asking them to do
 reread and analyze the texts to answer the question
 develop an analysis or idea statement
 match each idea with textual support

Direct students to the multiple-choice questions and remind them to:
 write the paragraph number from the text that supports the answer choice
 place the question number by the paragraph in the text that matches the answer choice
 write a justification of why the answer choice is the most reasonable



PSJA v3                                         9th Grade                                          Page 1
                                          Teacher‘s Guide
                           Response to Reading for Unit One-Coming of Age

      Read the next two selections. Then answer the questions that follow them.


                                      Thank You, M’am
                                             by Langston Hughes

 1        Langston Hughes was an African-American author and poet. He set           Notes about what I am
     this story in Harlem in the late 1950s. The main characters are two                   reading
     strangers—a troubled youth and an older woman. Late one night, they meet
     in an unusual way.

 2        She was a large woman with a large purse that had everything in it but
     hammer and nails. It had a long strap, and she carried it slung across her
     shoulder. It was about eleven o‘clock at night, and she was walking alone,
     when a boy ran up behind her and tried to snatch her purse. The strap broke
     with the single tug the boy gave it from behind. But the boy‘s weight and
     the weight of the purse combined caused him to lose his balance, instead of
     taking off full blast as he had hoped, the boy fell on his back on the
     sidewalk, and his legs flew up. The large woman simply turned around and
     kicked him right square in his blue-jean sitter. Then she reached down,
     picked the boy up by his shirt front, and shook him until his teeth rattled.

 3       After that the woman said, ―Pick up my pocketbook, boy, and give it
     here.‖

 4       She still held him but she bent down enough to permit him to stoop and
     pick up her purse. Then she said, ―Now ain‘t you ashamed of yourself?‖

 5        Firmly gripped by his shirt front, the said, ―Yes‘m‖

 6        The woman said, ―What did you want to do it for?‖

 7        The boy said, ―I didn‘t aim to.‖

 8        She said, ―You a lie!‖

 9      By that time two or three people passed, stopped, turned to look, and
     some stood watching.

10        ―If I turn you loose, will you run?‖ asked the woman.

11        ―Yes‘m,‖ said the boy.




PSJA v3                                           9th Grade                                    Page 2
                                           Teacher‘s Guide
                            Response to Reading for Unit One-Coming of Age


12          ―Then I won‘t turn you loose,‖ said the woman. She did not release       Notes about what I am
     him.                                                                                   reading

13          ―I‘m very sorry, lady, I‘m sorry,‖ whispered the boy.

14        ―Um-hum! And your face is dirty. I got a great mind to wash your face
     for you. Ain‘t you got nobody home to tell you to wash your face?‖

15          ―No‘m,‖ said the boy.

16        ―Then it will get washed this evening,‖ said the large woman starting
     up the street, dragging the frightened boy behind her.

17       He looked as if he were fourteen or fifteen, frail and willow-wild, in
     tennis shoes and blue jeans.

18       The woman said, ―You ought to be my son. I would teach you right
     from wrong. Least I can do right now is to wash your face. Are you
     hungry?‖

19       ―No‘m,‖ said the being-dragged boy. ―I just want you to turn me
     loose.‖

20          ―Was I bothering you when I turned the corner?‖ asked the woman.

21          ―No‘m‖

22        ―But you put yourself in contact with me,‖ said the woman. ―If you
     think that that contact is not going to last awhile, you got another thought
     coming. When I get through with you, sir, you are going to remember Mrs.
     Luella Bates Washington Jones.‖

23        Sweat popped out on the boy‘s face and he began to struggle. Mrs.
     Jones stopped, jerked him around in front of her, put a half nelson about his
     neck, and continued to drag him up the street. When she got to her door,
     she dragged the boy inside, down a hall, and into a large kitchenette-
     furnished room at the rear of the house. She switched on the light and left
     the door open. The boy could hear other roomers laughing and talking in
     the large house. Some of their doors were open, too, so he knew he and the
     woman were not alone. The woman still had him by the neck in the middle
     of her room.

24          She said, ―What is your name?‖

25          ―Roger,‖ answered the boy.



PSJA v3                                           9th Grade                                     Page 3
                                          Teacher‘s Guide
                           Response to Reading for Unit One-Coming of Age


26       ―Then, Roger, you go to that sink and wash your face,‖ said the           Notes about what I am
     woman, whereupon she turned him loose at last. Roger looked at the                   reading
     door—looked at the woman—looked at the door—and went to the sink.

27        ―Let the water run until it gets warm,‖ she said.

28        ―Here‘s a clean towel.‖

29        ―You gonna take me to jail?‖ asked the boy, bending over the sink.

30       ―Not with that face, I would not take you nowhere,‖ said the woman.
     ―Here I am trying to get home to cook me a bite to eat and you snatch my
     pocketbook! Maybe you ain‘t been to your supper either, late as it be.
     Have you?‖

31        ―There‘s nobody home at my house,‖ said the boy.

32       ―Then we‘ll eat,‖ said the woman. ―I believe you‘re hungry—or been
     hungry—to try to snatch my pocketbook.‖

33        ―I wanted a pair of blue suede shoes,‖ said the boy.

34       ―Well, you didn‘t have to snatch my pocketbook to get some suede
     shoes,‖ said Mrs. Luella Bates Washington Jones. ―You could of asked
     me.‖

35        ―M‘am?‖

36       The water dripping from his face, the boy looked at her. There was
     long pause. A very long pause. After he had dried his face and not
     knowing what else to do dried it again, the boy turned around, wondering
     what next. The door was open. He could make a dash for it down the hall.
     He could run, run, run, run, run!

37       The woman was sitting on the day-bed. After a while she said, ―I were
     young once and I wanted things I could not get.‖

38        There was another long pause. The boy‘s mouth opened. Then he
     frowned, but the woman said, ―Um-hum! You thought I was going to say
     but, didn‘t you? You thought I was going to say but I didn’t snatch
     people’s pocketbooks. Well, I wasn‘t going to say that.‖ Pause. Silence. ―I
     have done things, too, which I would not tell you, son—neither tell God, if
     he didn‘t already know. So you set down while I fix us something to eat.
     You might run that comb through your hair so you will look presentable.‖




PSJA v3                                          9th Grade                                    Page 4
                                             Teacher‘s Guide
                              Response to Reading for Unit One-Coming of Age


39        In another corner of the room behind the screen was a gas plate and an      Notes about what I am
     icebox. Mrs. Jones got up and went behind the screen. The woman did not                 reading
     watch the boy to see if he was going to run now, nor did she watch her
     purse which she left behind her on the day-bed. But the boy took care to sit
     on the far side of the room where he thought she could easily see him out of
     the corner of her eye, if she wanted to. He did not trust the woman not to
     trust him. And he did not want to be mistrusted now.

40        Do you need somebody to go to the store,‖ asked the boy, ―maybe to
     get some milk or something?‖

41       ―Don‘t believe I do,‖ said the woman, ―unless you just want sweet milk
     yourself. I was going to make cocoa out of this canned milk I got here.‖

42        ―That will be fine,‖ said the boy.

43        She heated some lima beans and ham she had in the icebox, made the
     cocoa, and set the table. The woman did not ask the boy anything about
     where he lived, or his folks, or anything else that would embarrass him.
     Instead, as they ate, she told him about her job in the hotel beauty-shop that
     stayed open late, what the work was like, and how all kinds of women came
     in and out, blondes, red-head, and Spanish. Then she cut him a half of her
     ten-cent cake.

44        ―Eat some more, son,‖ she said.

45        When they were finished eating she got up and said, ―Now, here, take
     this ten dollars and buy yourself some blue suede shoes. And next time, do
     not make the mistake of latching onto my pocketbook nor nobody else‘s—
     because shoes come by devilish like that will burn your feet. I got to get my
     rest now. But I wish you would behave yourself, son, from here on in.‖

46      She led him down the hall to the front door and opened it. ―Goodnight!
     Behave yourself, boy!‖ she said, looking out into the street.

47        The boy wanted to say something else other than ―Thank you, ma‘m‖
     to Mrs. Luella Bates Washington Jones, but he couldn‘t do so as he turned
     at the barren stoop and looked back at the large woman in the door. He
     barely managed to say ―Thank you‖ before she shut the door. And he never
     saw her again.

from Elements of Literature Third Course. Holt, Rinehart, Winston.




PSJA v3                                                9th Grade                                 Page 5
                                          Teacher‘s Guide
                           Response to Reading for Unit One-Coming of Age


     Granny Down the Hall
     by Glenn Plaskin
 1        Some of the best things that happen in
     life are purely accidental. A friendship
     sometimes develops when you least expect it.
     That‘s just what happened to me.

 2        There I was, living alone in apartment
     22G in a New York City high-rise. Just 45
     feet down the hall in 22D was a 76-year-old
     woman named Pearl and her husband,
     Arthur. One day I bumped into Pearl in the
     hall and we introduced ourselves. I
     mentioned I was thinking of buying my first
     dog. Pearl said their dog, Brandy, had just
     died, and she offered a bit of advice to get      melon and apples, and has become an expert 6
     me started. Over the next 12 years, that brief    at eating corn on the cob (side to side without
     encounter blossomed into a loving friendship      missing a kernel) and watermelon (avoiding
     nurtured by proximity and mutual chemistry.       the seeds).

                   Getting to Know Her                     After her various snacks, Katie jumps
                                                       onto Pearl‘s bed and snoozes soundly on her
 3         A few months after meeting Pearl, I got     nightgown. Although I never intended for my
     my dog, a blonde cocker spaniel I named           dog to become part of Pearl‘s household, our
     Katie. I took the mischievous runt of the         routine evolved quite naturally.
     litter straight to Pearl‘s apartment, where the
     puppy climbed right up into her arms and                           The Way She Is
     licked her face. It was the first of the daily
     visits that continue to the present.                   ―Granny,‖ as I nicknamed Pearl, is now a
                                                       spry 88, sturdily built, rarely sick, and she still 7
 4        Each morning, as I leave for work, Katie     does all her own shopping, cooking and
     pads down the carpeted hall to 22D. When          cleaning. Granny can be feisty one moment,
     Pearl opens the door, Katie scoots between        girlish the next. She‘s conservative about
     her legs into the cozily cluttered apartment.     money, clipping store coupons, yet
                                                       immensely generous, whether she‘s taking
 5       ―How‘s my girl?‖ asks Pearl, a smile in       clothes to the homeless or making dinner for
     her hazel eyes. Oblivious to the greeting,        friends at loose ends. Prim about her personal
     Katie leaps onto a chair in order to reach the    business, she has a crisp sense of humor and
     piece of toast always waiting for her at the      relishes a risqué joke. She has compassion for
     corner of the dining room table. At Pearl‘s,      people‘s frailties and a cautious realism born
     Katie has also acquired a taste for honeydew      of the Great Depression.




PSJA v3                                         9th Grade                                         Page 6
                                          Teacher‘s Guide
                           Response to Reading for Unit One-Coming of Age


 8        Although 40 years separate us, I always       movies. We traded apartment-building gossip
     feel that Granny is a contemporary. She‘s up-      and shared major holidays.
     to-date on tennis, golf, baseball, showbiz
     gossip and the stock market. She avidly listens        One day, after we‘d all had dinner
     to radio and TV news, talks about the wonders      together, a pleasant thought dawned on me:
     of the Internet and ―the magic‖ of the fax,        Granny and Arthur, Ryan and John, and Katie 11
     while also reminiscing, with carefully             and I had formed our own little ―family‖ right
     preserved programs in hand, about Broadway         in the building. In 1990 I‘d lost my
     plays she saw in the 1920s and ‘30s. She‘s a       grandmother, Essie, with whom I‘d been
     shrewd judge of character and, on occasion,        extremely close. Now Pearl was, in essence,
     has given me the thumbs up or down on a            my new Granny. And Ryan, with no
     prospective date or friend. Overall, she‘s just    grandparents of his own, had quickly adopted
     a great gal!                                       Pearl and Arthur. It was touching to see him
                                                        throw his arms around Granny‘s neck. ―He‘s a
 9        Born in New York City in 1912, Pearl          great hugger; he‘s my boy!‖ beamed Pearl.
     was a bright, vivacious girl who had little        Ryan‘s dad, John, also adopted Granny, and
     interest in her studies but a lot of interest in   loved talking with her about the challenges of
     boys. In fact, in 1935 she married Arthur, ―the    raising a young son. As for Pearl, with no
     boy next door.‖ During their early years           children of her own, she simply adopted us all!
     together, Pearl worked as a secretary (―I
     earned $12 a week and sent my mother $5‖)                     Through Thick and Thin
     while Arthur sold women‘s apparel wholesale.
     A close couple who rarely argued, Pearl and            Then one day in the fall of ‘94 Arthur was
     Arthur remained active travelers and               hospitalized with pneumonia and a cardiac
     theatergoers, even after retirement, and           condition. Now his chair was empty at our 12
     surrounded themselves with young people.           ―family dinners,‖ and we missed the sound of
     Indeed, a 3-year-old boy named Ryan, who           his baritone voice and his commonsense
     lived down the hall in apartment 22P, became       remarks. Every night Ryan asked about
     one of their best friends. Ryan, now 10, is the    ―Artur‘s‖ condition. Katie obviously missed
     son of my friend John, a single dad.               him too, as she napped alone on his lounge
                                                        chair, looking forlorn.
                     The Good Group
                                                            In January of ‘95, Pearl came home from
10        And so, we all began having spontaneous       the hospital late one afternoon and said it was
     breakfasts and dinners together. During the        over. They had been married for 59 years; now 13
     day Arthur sometimes watched cartoons with         Arthur was dead. We all were bereft. I went
     Ryan and fed his ―girl,‖ Katie, chunks of          with Pearl to a Westchester cemetery in the
     apple as they both stretched out on his lounge     teeming rain and mud slides, holding her arm
     chair. In the evenings Granny fried up her         as she made her way to the grave. ―That,‖
     wickedly delicious paprika chicken cutlets         Pearl recalls, ―was the worst day of my life.‖
     and put out her home-baked apricot-and-plum        Saying goodbye to Arthur was the only time I
     tarts or chocolate pie. Our little band also       ever saw Pearl cry.
     went out to dinner occasionally and to the




PSJA v3                                         9th Grade                                     Page 7
                                            Teacher‘s Guide
                             Response to Reading for Unit One-Coming of Age


14 I believe that having young neighbors was                    Sometimes I wonder, What if I hadn’t 17
   healing for Pearl, and soon she was making               wound up in the only vacant apartment on the
   dinner and sitting for Ryan again. She and               22nd floor? Would I ever have known Pearl?
   Ryan grew ever closer. Today she picks him               Each of us has joined together to form a family
   up after school, walks him to play dates or              circle. Through bad health, accidents,
   soccer practice, helps with his homework,                electrical outages, harsh winters, happy
   teaches him card games, spoils him with                  birthdays, holidays and everydays, we share a
   Krispy Kreme doughnuts, watches TV with                  bond of love that brings us comfort, support,
   him, then sends him on home.                             security— and fun.

15        ―Some days, when Ryan gets off the                    When Granny turned 85, I invited 30 18
      school bus,‖ Pearl muses, ―he runs over and           people over to celebrate. That day I
      hugs me. His friends just stand there looking         renicknamed Pearl ―Oldest Granny,‖ and amid
      kind of cockeyed, and I say, ‗Do any of you           the chocolate cake and helium balloons, I
      have a Granny?‘ They shake their heads no             asked ―Oldest‖ if she‘d ever had such a big
      and come over to me. I hug them all.‖ Do              birthday party. ―I‘ve never had a birthday
      they like it? ―Yes, they do!‖                         party,‖ she said. ―Don‘t do it again!‖ We will
                                                            anyway, on her 90th.
16 Granny and I have grown closer too. When
   one of us is sick, the other gets groceries.
   When the snow and ice make walking
   impossible for her, I bring in the food. When
   I had a back injury, she brought ice packs
   and soup. When Katie was mysteriously
   bleeding one night, she went with me to the
   animal hospital. And when I had a bike-
   riding accident and was taken to a hospital
   emergency room, it was Granny who came
   immediately. Likewise, when she was struck
   by a taxi, but was miraculously unharmed, I
   picked her up at that same emergency room
   and took her home.

     from the 9th Grade TAKS Student Study Guide, Texas Education Agency: Reprinted with permission of FAMILY
     CIRCLE Magazine.




PSJA v3                                              9th Grade                                             Page 8
                                              Teacher‘s Guide
                               Response to Reading for Unit One-Coming of Age

DIRECTIONS:
Answer the following questions in the space provided.

                                                 Literary Question

1   In ―Thank You, M‘am,‖ what does Roger learn from his experience with Mrs. Luella Bates
    Washington Jones? Support your answer with evidence from the selection.

1st Passage Title: ―Thank You, M‘am‖ by Langston Hughes
Genre: Short story: expressive narrative
Word Count: 1,377
TEKS (7) Reading/comprehension. The student comprehends selections using a variety of strategies.
(H)* draw inferences such as conclusions, generalizations, and predictions and support them from text
TAKS Objective 3: The student will demonstrate the ability to analyze and critically evaluate culturally diverse
written texts and visual representations
Item Type: Drawing conclusions
Copyright: Elements of Literature Third Course. Holt, Rinehart, Winston; page 120-122
Possible Response: Roger learns the difference between right and wrong when he attempts to steal Mrs. Jones‘ pocket
book. Roger learns that stealing from any person is morally unacceptable and according to Mrs. Jones, ―shoes that come by
devilish like that will burn your feet."



                                                Expository Question

2   In ―Granny Down the Hall,‖ why is the author‘s friendship with his neighbors so important to him?
    Support your answer with evidence from the selection.

2nd Passage Title: ―Granny Down the Hall‖ by Glenn Plaskin pg. 12-15
Genre: Periodical
Word Count: 1,339
TEKS (7) Reading/comprehension. The student comprehends selections using a variety of strategies.
(H)*draw inferences such as conclusions, generalizations, and predictions and support them from text
TAKS Objective 3: The student will demonstrate the ability to analyze and critically evaluate culturally diverse
written texts and visual representations.
Item Type: Inference: drawing conclusions
Copyright: from 9th Grade TAKS Student Study Guide, Texas Education Agency
Possible Response: Glenn Plaskin‘s friendship with Pearl was deep and loving; it was one that he treasured and depended
on as a real family. ―One day ... a pleasant thought dawned on me: ... had formed our own little ‗family‘ right in the
building.‖ Pearl, nicknamed ―Granny,‖ takes the place of his real grandmother who died. Glenn and Granny share life
experiences and tribulations that family members share—great discussions, meals, bad times like illnesses and Arthur‘s
death. They also share happy times like Granny‘s birthday. Plaskin validates this unity when he says, ―We share a bond of
love that brings us comfort, support, security and fun.‖



                                                Crossover Question

3     What do ―Thank You M‘am‖ and ―Granny Down the Hall‖ illustrate about relationships?
      Support your answer with evidence from both selections.

TEKS (10) Reading/literary response. The student expresses and supports responses to various types of texts.
(B)* use elements of text to defend his/her own responses and interpretations


PSJA v3                                                 9th Grade                                                Page 9
                                              Teacher‘s Guide
                               Response to Reading for Unit One-Coming of Age
TAKS Objective 3: The student will demonstrate the ability to analyze and critically evaluate culturally diverse written
texts and visual representations.
Item Type: Compare theme between texts
Copyright: Elements of Literature Third Course. Holt, Rinehart, Winston; page 120-122; from 9th Grade TAKS Student
Study Guide Texas Education Agency
Possible Response: Pearl and Mrs. Jones‘ relationships with others illustrate the women‘s love and concern for younger
people like Roger and Pearl‘s neighbors. Pearl‘s proximity and mutual chemistry nurtured the relationship developed with
Glen Plaskin and his neighbors. Like Pearl, Mrs. Jones suggests that Roger‘s looks and actions are shameful to her and
advises him to ―clean up‖ just as a mother would tell a son.



                                          Multiple Choice Questions

                       Use “Thank You, M’am” to answer questions 4-7.

4      In ―Thank You M‘am,‖ the conflict begins as –

       A     the boy falls on his back on the sidewalk
       B*    the boy runs up behind Mrs. Jones and tries to snatch her purse
       C     Mrs. Jones drags the boy inside, down a hall
       D     the boy picks up the pocketbook

TEKS: (11) Reading/literary concepts. The student analyzes literary elements for their contributions to meaning in literary
texts.
(D)*identify basic conflicts
 TAKS Objective 2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the effects of literary elements and techniques in
 culturally diverse written texts.
 Justification: Actions between Mrs. Jones and Roger in paragraph 2 suggest that the conflict begins as Roger tries to
 snatch her pocketbook.
 Thinking Skill or Item Type: Plot development and conflict
 Level of Difficulty: Medium
 Copyright: P.S.J.A. I.S.D.



5   Read the following dictionary entry.

    frail \frāl\ adj. 1. physically weak 2. easy to break or damage
    3. easily led into evil 4. imperfect

    Which definition best matches the meaning of the word frail as it is used in paragraph 17 of the
    story?

    F*      Definition 1
    G       Definition 2
    H       Definition 3
    J       Definition 4

TEKS: (7) Reading/comprehension. The student comprehends selections using a variety of strategies
(B)* rely on context to determine meanings of words and phrases such as figurative language, [idioms,] multiple meaning
     words, and technical vocabulary

PSJA v3                                                 9th Grade                                                Page 10
                                              Teacher‘s Guide
                               Response to Reading for Unit One-Coming of Age
TAKS Objective 1: The student will demonstrate a basic understanding of culturally diverse written texts.
Justification: If Mrs. Jones was able to grab and drag Roger without difficulty, Roger must have been a very physically
weak boy. (Paragraph 2)
Thinking Skill or Item Type: Context clue
Level of Difficulty: Easy
Copyright: P.S.J.A. I.S.D.


6      Mrs. Jones was motivated to help Roger because she –

       A     thought he was hungry
       B     was rich, and money didn‘t matter to her
       C*    had also been a troubled youth
       D     had always wanted children

TEKS: (7) Reading/comprehension. The student comprehends selections using a variety of strategies
(H)*draw inferences such as conclusions, generalizations, and predictions and support them from text
TAKS Objective 3: The student will demonstrate the ability to analyze and critically evaluate culturally diverse written
texts and visual representations.
Justification: Mrs. Jones states in paragraph 37 that she was young once and wanted things she could not get just as Roger
had attempted to steal from her to purchase his blue suede shoes. In paragraph 38 she continues, ―I have done things, too,
which I would not tell you, son—neither tell God, if he didn‘t already know.‖
Thinking Skill or Item Type: Character motivation
Level of Difficulty: Hard
Copyright: P.S.J.A. I.S.D.



7      The turning point in this passage occurs when –

       F     Mrs. Jones captures Roger
       G     Roger gets the $10.00 for the blue suede shoes
       H     Mrs. Jones calls the police
       J*    Roger does not take advantage of the open door

TEKS: (11) Reading/literary concepts. The student analyzes literary elements for their contributions to meaning in literary
texts.
(E)* analyze the development of plot in narrative text
 TAKS Objective 2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the effects of literary elements and techniques in
 culturally diverse written texts.
 Justification: Roger has the option of making a run for it but decides to stay and is no longer a prisoner; instead, he
 allowed Mrs. Jones to treat him as a son.
 Thinking Skill or Item Type: Interpretation: turning point
 Level of Difficulty: Hard
 Copyright: P.S.J.A. I.S.D.



                   Use “Granny Down the Hall” to answer questions 8-10.

8      A primary message expressed in this selection is that —

       A     people in big cities are often friendly
       B     animals are excellent companions for people who live in apartments

PSJA v3                                                 9th Grade                                                Page 11
                                               Teacher‘s Guide
                                Response to Reading for Unit One-Coming of Age
       C      cooking is an educational activity
       D*     people can form families even though they are not related

TEKS: (11) Reading/literary concepts. The student analyzes literary elements for their contributions to meaning in literary
texts.
 (A)*recognize the theme (general observation about life or human nature) within a text
 TAKS Objective 3: The student will demonstrate the ability to analyze and critically evaluate culturally diverse written
 texts and visual representations
 Justification: In paragraph 17, the author indicates that the neighbors have ―joined together to form a family circle.‖
 Thinking Skill or Item Type: Theme interpretation
 Level of Difficulty: Hard
 Copyright: P.S.J.A. I.S.D.



9      The author‘s point of view is important because —

       F      the author can tell Pearl‘s story better than she can
       G      all neighbors are able to share their memories
       H*     it reveals the depth of the author‘s feelings for his ―family‖
       J      it shows that only a few of the neighbors belong to the ―family‖

TEKS: (11) Reading/literary concepts. The student analyzes literary elements for their contributions to meaning in literary
texts.
 TAKS Objective 2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the effects of literary elements and techniques in
 culturally diverse written texts.
 Justification: The first-person point of view allows the author to express his thoughts and feelings, as well as report on the
 events that have occurred among the group members. (Paragraphs 11, 14, 16, 17)
 Thinking Skill or Item Type: Perspective
 Level of Difficulty: Medium
 Copyright: P.S.J.A. I.S.D.

10     The author uses contradictions in paragraph 7 to show —

       A      the challenges of a busy life
       B      his ability to use precise language
       C*     the many aspects of Pearl‘s personality
       D      his confusion about Pearl‘s habits

TEKS: (7) Reading/comprehension. The student comprehends selections using a variety of strategies.
(E)*analyze text structures such as compare and contrast, cause and effect, and chronological ordering
TAKS Objective 3: The student will demonstrate the ability to analyze and critically evaluate culturally diverse written
texts and visual representations.
Justification: The contradicting examples are all used to describe Granny‘s characteristics.
Thinking Skill or Item Type: Analysis
Level of Difficulty: Hard
Copyright: P.S.J.A. I.S.D.




                     Use “Thank You, M’am” and “Granny Down the Hall”
                                 to answer questions 11-12.

PSJA v3                                                   9th Grade                                                 Page 12
                                              Teacher‘s Guide
                               Response to Reading for Unit One-Coming of Age


11     Based on the selections, both Granny and Mrs. Jones can be described as —

       F     temperamental
       G     outgoing
       H     sentimental
       J*    nurturing

TEKS: (11) Reading/literary concepts. The student analyzes literary elements for their contributions to meaning in literary
texts.
 (C)* analyze characters and identify time and point of view
 TAKS Objective 2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the effects of literary elements and techniques in
 culturally diverse written texts.
 Justification: Mrs. Jones appears to be nurturing when she refers to Roger as a son by advising him to wash up before
 offering him warm supper. (Paragraph 26) Granny is nurturing as she treats all of the apartment tenants as family by
 babysitting pets, children, and making them warm meals. (Paragraphs 10, 14, 16, 17)
 Thinking Skill or Item Type: Character analysis
 Level of Difficulty: Hard
 Copyright: P.S.J.A. I.S.D.


12     The personalities of Granny and Mrs. Jones are best revealed —

       A     by the struggles they endured
       B*    through their relationships with younger people
       C     through the thoughts of the narrator
       D     through dialogue with others

TEKS: (11) Reading/literary concepts. The student analyzes literary elements for their contributions to meaning in literary
texts.
(C)*analyze characters and identify time and point of view
TAKS Objective 2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the effects of literary elements and techniques in
culturally diverse written texts.
Justification: The nurturing characteristics of Granny and Mrs. Jones suggest that their personalities reflect the
relationships they develop with younger generation.
Thinking Skill or Item Type: Character analysis
Level of Difficulty: Hard
Copyright: P.S.J.A. I.S.D.




PSJA v3                                                 9th Grade                                                Page 13
                                              Teacher‘s Guide
                               Response to Reading for Unit One-Coming of Age

                                              Written Composition

                      Write a composition explaining the impact another person
                      can have on your life.


The information in the box below will help you remember what you should think about when you
write your composition.

                  REMEMBER—YOU SHOULD

                   write an explanation about the impact another person can have on your
                    life.
                   make sure that each sentence you write helps the reader understand your
                    composition
                   write about your ideas in detail so that the reader really understands
                    what you are saying
                   try to use correct spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and
                    sentences

                                                  Graphic Organizer

TEKS: (1) Purposes. The student writes in a variety of forms, including business, personal, literary, and persuasive texts,
for various audiences and purposes. The student is expected to
(B) write in a voice and a style appropriate to audience and purpose; and
TAKS:
Objective 4: The student will, within a given context, produce an effective composition for a specific purpose.
Objective 5: The student will produce a piece of writing that demonstrates a command of the conventions of spelling,
capitalization, punctuation, grammar, usage, and sentence structure.




PSJA v3                                                  9th Grade                                                 Page 14

								
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