NCAAA ESD BSc in Geol Prg Specification Reformatted by wuyunyi

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									                   Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

 National Commission for Academic Accreditation & Assessment




         PROGRAM SPECIFICATIONS
for KFUPM EARTH SCIENCES DEPARTMENT




            Compiled by Professor Gabor Korvin




                      February, 2010
Geology Undergraduate Program Specification



Institution: King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals

College/Department: Earth Sciences Department

A. Program Identification and General Information


 1 Program title and code: B.S.   Degree in Geology

                                                          (hundred twenty four)
 2. Total credit hours needed for completion of the program: 124
    3. Award granted on completion of the program: Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) degree in
    Geology


4. Major tracks/pathways or specializations within the program (eg. transportation or structural
engineering within a civil engineering program or counselling or school psychology within a psychology
program)
None

5. Intermediate Exit Points and Awards (if any) (eg. associate degree within a bachelor degree program)

None

    6. Professions or occupations for which students are prepared. (If there is an early exit point from
        the program (eg diploma or associate degree) include professions or occupations at each exit
        point): Geologist




7. (a) New Program                   Planned starting date

   (b) Continuing Program YES           Year of most recent major program review 2009 and
2009/2010 (British Geol. Survey Accreditation, in progress)

      Organization involved in recent major review:      Accreditation review by British Geol.
Survey (in progress), and Assessment by American Team (June, 2009)
8 Name and position (eg department chair person) of faculty member managing or coordinating the
program. Department Chair, Assistant Professor Dr. Abdulaziz Al-Shaibani



9. Location if not on main campus or locations if program is offered in more than one
location: Only offered in main Campus



B Program Context

                                            Earth Sciences, which include Geology and
         1 Explain why the program is needed.
Geophysics, are an integral part of the basic science education in most universities and
colleges worldwide. Realizing their importance in the development and advancement
of Saudi Arabia, KFUPM established the Department of Geology in 1963. By the
addition of a geophysics option in 1976, the name was changed to the Department of
Earth Sciences. The scope of Earth Sciences is quite broad and diverse, beginning with
the ground we walk on, extending inward to the center of the earth, and outward to the
other planets in the solar system. While the scope of Geology and Geophysics is
closely related, there are some major differences. Geologists study the composition,
structure and history of the Earth’s crust. Geophysicists use the principles of physics
and mathematics to study not only the Earth’s surface but its interior, as well as its
magnetic, electrical, and gravitational fields. Both disciplines, however, can be applied
to solve environmental problems and to search for natural resources, such as oil,
natural gas, minerals, and groundwater.

 a. Summarize economic reasons, social or cultural reasons, technological developments, national policy
developments or other reasons.

 See above
b. Explain the relevance of the program to the mission of the institution.

Following is the Mission of the Earth Sciences Department:
1. To prepare students who are competent in theory and applications of Geosciences.
2. To provide solutions to problems resulting from natural hazards and human
     activities in arid regions through focused research. Our graduates will be prepared
     equally for industrial and post-graduate careers.
3. To serve the community by providing expertise in the fields of Petroleum
     Geology, Groundwater, Environment, and Exploration Geophysics.
2. Relationship (if any) to other programs offered by the institution/college/department.
a. Does this program offer courses that students in other programs are required to take? Yes
No
                                                                                                Y
   If yes, what should be done to make sure those courses meet the needs of students
   in the other programs? Geophysics students, Civil Engng students, Architecture students, Petroleum
Engng take some of the Geology courses.

b. Does the program require students to take courses taught by other departments?   Yes
No                                                                                                Y
   If yes, what should be done to make sure those courses in other departments meet
   the needs of students in this program? Our Geology students take some Computer
Science, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Islamic & Arabic Studies and Phys. Ed.
courses. No effort has been seen from the Depts offering these courses to tailor them to
our students' needs.


3. Do the students who are likely to be enrolled in the program have any special needs or characteristics
that should be considered in planning the program? (eg. Part time evening students, limited IT or
language skills)   Yes YES            No
                                      Y
If yes, what are they? Physical fitness, computer literacy and English skills are necessary
(as all teaching is in English)


4. What should be done in the program to respond to these special characteristics?
The program assumes some initial skills mentioned above, and develops them further.


C. Mission and Goals of the Program

1. Program Mission Statement
1: To reflect in our teaching, research, and service the breadth and importance of Earth
Sciences to society.
2: To prepare the students for the job market and provide them with the technical
expertise and skills needed to gather and interpret Earth Sciences data in a scientific
manner.
3: To provide students with the necessary tools to effectively communicate the results of
geological investigations to other professionals and the public.
 2. List any major changes or strategic new developments planned for the program within the next three to
 five years to help achieve its mission. For each change or development describe the major strategies to be
 followed and list the indicators that will be used to measure achievement.
   Major Changes or Developments                      Strategies                      Indicators

  Emphasizing Computational           Develop the Personal computer        Equipment and software
  Techniques                          Lab, get new software                catalogues


  Teaching modern Lab. techniques     Summer training, Lab.                Written and oral reports
                                      Developments, Seminars




D. Program Structure and Organization
1 Program Description.


                REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN GEOLOGY
(a) General Education Courses (61 credit hours)                                          Credit Hours

     Chemistry                                             CHEM 101, 102                            8
     Information and Computer Science                      ICS 103                                  3
     English                                               ENGL 101, 102, 214                       9
                     Islamic and Arabic Studies                           IAS 101,111, 201, 211, 301,
                                                                311, 4xx                           14
     Mathematics                                           MATH 101, 102, 201, STAT 201            14
     Physical Education                                    PE 101, PE 102                           2
     Physics                                               PHYS 101, 102                            8
     Social Sciences                                       One approved course                      3
                                                                                                   61

(b) Core Courses (46 Credit hours)

Physical Geology                                      GEOL 201                                  3
Historical Geology                                    GEOL 203                                  3
Paleontology and Biostratigraphy                      GEOL 214                                  3
Mineralogy and Optics                                 GEOL 216                                  4
Structural Geology                                    GEOL 305                                  3
Sedimentation and Stratigraphy                        GEOL 307                                  4
Regional Geology                                      GEOL 318                                  3
Petrology                                             GEOL 320                                  4
Geology Seminar                                       GEOL 409                                  1
Petroleum Geology                                     GEOL 415                                  3
Hydrogeology                                          GEOL 423                                  3
Field Geology                                         GEOL 430                                  6
Environmental Geology                                 GEOL 446                                  3
Introduction to Geophysics                               GEOP 202                                     3
                                                                                                     46

(c) Geology Elective Courses (6 Credit Hours)


Each student must take two additional geology courses to a total of six credit hours from the following:


Remote Sensing and GIS Applications in Geology               GEOL 312                                      3
Geological Mapping Techniques                                GEOL 328                                      3
Engineering Geology                                          GEOL 341                                      3
Geochemistry                                                 GEOL 355                                      3
Geotectonics                                                 GEOL 420                                      3
Geomorphology                                                GEOL 431                                      3
Marine Geology                                               GEOL 434                                      3
Petroleum Geochemistry                                       GEOL 435                                      3
Oceanography                                                 GEOL 436                                      3
Sedimentology                                                GEOL 440                                      3
Techniques in Sediment Analysis                              GEOL 441                                      3
Computational Methods in Geology                             GEOL 454                                      3
Economic Geology                                             GEOL 456                                      3
Mining Geology                                               GEOL 460                                      3
Mineral Economics                                            GEOL 461                                      3
Carbonate Geology                                            GEOL 464                                      3
Special Topics                                               GEOL 480                                      3

(d) Free Elective Courses (9 credit hours)


Each student must take three free electives to a total of nine credit hours, after consultation with his
advisor. The free elective courses should be 200-level or higher.



(e) Summer Training (GEOL 399, 2 credit hours)


Each student must work as a trainee geologist for a period of a total of eight weeks in an
organization/company that conducts geological activities, after which he must submit a written report and
make an oral presentation, based on his training in the organization.

(f) Total Requirements (124 credits)

The total required credits for the B.S. degree in Geology is 124 semester-credit-hours.



GEOL
GEOL 201 Physical Geology                                                                     (2-3-3)

        Introduction to the fundamentals of physical geology. Composition and
structure of the Earth, mineral and rock identification, plate tectonics, mountain
building, geological structures, earthquakes, volcanism, erosion and sedimentation
processes. Laboratory exercises concentrate on mineral and rock identification and the
interpretation of topographic and geologic maps. At least one field trip to a nearby
locality is required.

Prerequisite: None

GEOL 202 Applied Geosciences for Scientists and Engineers                              (2-3-3)

        Introduction; geologic processes; rocks and minerals; natural resources:
hydrocarbons, minerals and, ground water; aspects of environmental and engineering
geology; geophysics principles and practices; case histories. The Earth Sciences majors
for credit cannot take this course.

Prerequisite: None

GEOL 203 Historical Geology                                                  (2-3-3)

         Introduction to principles useful in studying the Earth's history, and to examine
the physical and biological evolution of the Earth from the viewpoint of global
tectonics. Laboratory exercises include examination of stratigraphic rock samples,
index fossils and their identification, lithostratigraphic correlation, paleoenvirnoments,
interpretation of paleogeographic and geological maps and cross-sections. At least one
field trip to a nearby locality is required.

Co requisite: GEOL 201

GEOL 214 Paleontology and Biostratigraphy                                    (2-3-3)


Introduction to macrofossils and microfossils, including basic aspects of taxonomic
theory, classification and principles of nomenclature; a review of the major
palynomorphs, such as pollen, spores, chitinozoans and acritarchs; particular emphasis
will be placed on the industrial application of these forms to aid palaeoenvironmental and
biostratigraphic determinations as applied primarily to oil and gas exploration and
production.

Prerequisite: GEOL 203

GEOL 216 Mineralogy and Optics                                               (3-3-4)

       Systematic mineralogy including detail study of major rock-forming minerals
with emphasis on their physical and optical properties, chemical composition,
occurrences, and associations. Principles of crystallography, crystal systems, symmetry
classes and crystal forms. Crystal chemistry. Structures of minerals. Optical
mineralogy. Laboratory exercises include studies of common rock forming minerals
using polarizing microscope, morphological crystallography using crystal models, and
determination of mineral specimens by physical properties and using hand lens, and
recalculations of chemical analysis.

Prerequisite: GEOL 201


GEOL 305 Structural Geology                                                (2-3-3)

        Principles of structural geology. Concepts of true and apparent dip of strata,
folds, structural contours for homoclinal and complex surfaces, geological cross-sections,
block diagrams, isopachs, faults, intrusive and extrusive igneous structures, impact
structures, landslides and sinkholes. Laboratory exercises focus on the interpretation of
geological maps and cross-sections and stereographic projection using Schmidt net.
Computer software will be used in directional data interpretation, manipulation, and
diagram and graph construction. At least one field trip to a nearby locality is required.

Prerequisite: GEOL 201

GEOL 307 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy                                    (3-3-4)

        Sediments and their properties, processes of sedimentation; depositional
environments; facies and facies analyses; provenance; principles and fundamentals of
stratigraphic units, Walther’s law; correlation; overview of seismic and sequence
stratigraphy. Laboratory exercises on types, texture and composition of common
sedimentary rocks; core description; lithofacies map; facies analyses; correlation.
Computer software will be used in startigraphic column construction and data
interpretation. One field trip to nearby area is required.

Prerequisites: GEOL 201 and GEOL 203

GEOL 312 Remote Sensing and GIS Applications in Geology                    (2-3-3)

        Introduction and principles of remote sensing; aerial photography and other
remote sensing techniques; principles of photogrammetry and image interpretation for
geological information; introduction to the GIS (Geographic Information Systems) and
its application in geosciences. Computer software will be used in data processing and
interpretation.

Prerequisite: GEOL 305

GEOL 318 Regional Geology                                                  (3-0-3)

        Major tectonic elements of the Arabian Peninsula. Rocks and the sedimentary
cover in Arabia. Geological, structural and geomorphological evolution of Arabia with
emphasis on hydrocarbon potentials, mineral wealth and underground water resources.
At least one field trip is required.

Prerequisites: Geology 201 and Junior Standing

GEOL 320 Petrology                                                           (3-3-4)

         Nature, origin, differentiation and crystallization of magma; Phase relations in
silicate melts. Mode of occurrence, textures, petrography and minerals of igneous rocks.
Texture, structure, composition, provenance, digenesis and classification of sedimentary
rocks. Distribution and origin of sedimentary rocks in relation of plate tectonics and basin
developments. Processes and types of metamorphism. Facies, textures, mineralogy of
metamorphic rocks. P-T paths. Relations of rocks to plate tectonics.
Laboratory studies of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks in hand specimens
and under microscope. At least one field trip is required.

Prerequisite: GEOL 216

GEOL 328 Geological Mapping Techniques                                       (2-3-3)

        Elementary methods of field observation and geological mapping as applied to
various geological terrains. Principles of remote sensing and aerial photography.
Emphasis will be on those aspects of rocks, geological structures and stratigraphic
principles that are demonstrated in their natural setting in the Eastern Province of Saudi
Arabia. Several laboratory exercises will be conducted in the field. Two weekend field
trips to nearby localities are required. Computer software will be used in data
processing and interpretation.

Prerequisite: GEOL 305


GEOL 341 Engineering Geology                                                 (3-0-3)

        Modern concepts of engineering geology. Impact of geology on siting and
structures design of engineering projects. Geological and mechanical fundamentals as
related to engineering practices, emphasis on parameters of rock mass classification
systems and on techniques relevant to site investigation programs. Case histories.

Prerequisite: GEOL 201 or Consent of the Instructor (for non Earth sciences Majors)

GEOL 355 Geochemistry                                                        (2-3-3)

        Composition of the Earth and nature of geochemical data. Geochemical
classification of elements.    Crystal-chemical controls of element distribution.
Thermodynamics, partial pressure and Eh-pH diagrams. Geochemical cycle and isotope
geochemistry.
Prerequisites: CHEM 102 and GEOL 216

GEOL 399 Summer Training                                                             (0-0-2)

        A total period of eight weeks of internship in the industry to gain practical
experience in the field of geology. The student is required to submit a written report and
make an oral presentation at the department based on the experience of the training
program.

Prerequisite: ENGL 214 and Approval of the Department

GEOL 409 Geology Seminar                      (1-0-1)

Preparation and presentation of selected geological topics. Each student is expected to
submit a written report on his topic and make an oral presentation at the class.

Prerequisite: Geology Senior Standing

GEOL 415 Petroleum Geology                                                   (3-0-3)

        Definition and properties of petroleum and natural gas. The origin, migration and
accumulation of hydrocarbons as related to source, reservoir and seal rocks and reservoir
properties. Structural, stratigraphic and combination traps. Survey of exploration
methods. Concept of petroleum province and basin analysis. Computer software will be
introduced for basin analysis and data interpretation. At least one field trip is required to
investigate the outcrop section of a major reservoir in Saudi Arabia.

Prerequisites: GEOL 318 and consent of the instructor.
GEOL 420 Geotectonics                                                        (3-0-3)

      Characteristics and origin of the oceanic and continental crust. Major structural
elements of lithosphere. Plate tectonic theory. Mountain building and magmatic
activities. Tectonic provinces of the continental crust. Transpression and transtension.
Basin subsidence mechanisms. Global tectonics and Earth's resources, with special
emphasis on the Middle East region.

Prerequisite: GEOL 305

GEOL 423 Hydrogeology                                                        (3-0-3)

       Theory and geology of groundwater occurrence and flow. Introduction to the
hydrology of surface and groundwater supplies; water bearing properties of rocks;
hydrodynamics of flow through porous materials; flow nets, well hydraulics, analysis and
evaluation of pumping test data. Groundwater quality, occurrence of groundwater in
various rock types and sediments; field techniques used in groundwater exploration and
survey. Computer software will be used in data interpretation, simulation, manipulation,
and graphs construction. At least one field trip to a nearby locality is required.

Prerequisite: GEOL 201 or consent of the instructor (for non Earth Sciences
Majors).

GEOL 430 Field Geology1                                                            (0-18-6)

           Six weeks of systematic fieldwork for training in geological techniques. After a

brief introduction and rehearsal of basic field procedures and mapping techniques

including applications of remote sensing and aerial photography, a specific area will be

mapped in detail. The course requires each student to prepare a complete field notebook,

geological map, stratigraphic successions, cross-sections, and a comprehensive

geological report. The participants of the course are also required to make an oral

presentation based on the field report.


Prerequisites: GEOL 305, GEOL 307 and GEOL 320

GEOL 431 Geomorphology                                                              (3-0-3)

        Introduction to internal and external earth processes, and resulting landforms on
the earth’s surface. Classification, description, and evolution of landforms. The fluvial
and Aeolian domain. Analysis of geomorphic features using maps and aerial
photographs. At least one field trip to a nearby locality is required.

Prerequisite: GEOL 201 and Junior Standing

GEOL 434 Marine Geology                                                            (3-0-3)

       Introduction to the continental margin geological processes and features:
continental shelf, barrier island, reef, atoll, slope, rise, and abyssal plains, submarine
canyons and plate-tectonic activity. Worldwide sea level changes through time, oxygen
isotope stratigraphy, and paleoceanic circulation. Marine sedimentary rocks of the
Arabian Peninsula. At least one field trip to a nearby locality is required.

Prerequisite: GEOL 201 and Junior Standing



1
    A more detailed description of this important course is found in Appendix K.
GEOL 435 Petroleum Geochemistry                                    (3-0-3)
        Overview of the origin of petroleum, its chemical composition, and the methods
used in petroleum geochemistry; carbon cycle; composition of biomass; kerogen and coal
formation; maturity assessments; biomarkers and molecular geochemistry; geochemical
correlation techniques; geochemical prospecting.

Prerequisites: GEOL 203 and GEOL 415

GEOL 436 Oceanography                                                       (3-0-3)

        Fundamental oceanographic principles. Distribution of terrigenous and biogenic
ocean sediments. Historical overview of seawater formation. Tidal influence,
geostrophic force, storms, surface and deep ocean water circulation, photic and aphotic
zones, total dissolved solids and formation of manganese nodules. Concept of CCD,
lysocline, thermocline, oxygen-minimum layer, pycnocline, nepheloid concentration
layer, salinity and temperature gradient, Pleistocene glaciations and worldwide carbon
dioxide budget. At least one field trip to a nearby locality is required.

Prerequisite: GEOL 201 and Junior Standing

GEOL 440 Sedimentology                                                    (2-3-3)

        Elements of sedimentary basin formation, style of sedimentation, provenance,
associated facies, and subsequent physicochemical changes through time. Plate-
tectonic, climatic, allo- and auto-cyclic constraints on sedimentary rocks. Emphasis on
convergent and rifted margin sedimentary record. Usage of several macroscopical and
microanalytical tools for detailed sedimentary basin analysis. . Computer software will
be introduced for basin analysis and data interpretation. At least one field trip is
required.

Prerequisite: GEOL 307

GEOL 441 Techniques in Sediment Analysis                                  (2-3-3)

        Macro- and micro- analysis of geological materials. Fundamental principles and
sample preparation techniques for detailed geochemical studies. Determination of bulk
and trace element composition, fluid inclusion study, homogenization, pressure-
temperature, and Eh-pH of the mineralizing solution. Laboratory exercises include:
grain-size analysis, heavy mineral and magnetic separation, petrographic slide
preparation, staining techniques, vacuum impregnation, peels and slices, scanning
electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, X-ray florescence, electron probe
microanalyzer (EPMA), ICP, and gas chromatography. Individual research project
report is required. At least one field trip to a nearby locality is required.

Prerequisite: GEOL 216
GEOL 446 Environmental Geology                                            (3-0-3)

        Environmental problems, hazards and their mitigation. Critical evaluation of
geological processes: volcanic activity, earthquakes, slope failures and landslides,
flooding, groundwater movement, solution cavities and sinkholes. Environmental
problems associated with human interaction: groundwater pollution, groundwater
withdrawal, acid rain, solid waste disposal, land development and urbanization,
agricultural activity, soil erosion, and desertification. Current environmental issues.
Selected case studies. Computer software related to the subject will be introduced At
least one field trip to a nearby locality is required.

Prerequisite: GEOL 201 and Junior Standing.

GEOL 454 Computational Methods in Geology                                      (2-3-3)

        Introduction to the modern concepts of quantifying geologic variables.
Integration, analysis, and interpretation of geologic data. Application of statistical,
spatial, and numerical techniques to characterize oil reservoirs, groundwater aquifers,
mineral resources and environmentally contaminated sites. Computer packages are
introduced for modeling purposes.

Prerequisite: Junior standing and consent of the instructor (for non Earth Sciences
Major)

GEOL 456 Economic Geology                                                  (2-3-3)
        Introduction, historical development of economic geology.               Origin,
classification, occurrences and association of mineral deposits. Metallogenic provinces
and epochs. Study of important economic mineral deposits. Laboratory exercise
includes ore microscopy and hand specimens’ identification of common ore minerals
and gemstones. Computer software will be introduced for data processing and
interpretation. At least one field trip is required.

Prerequisite: GEOL 216

GEOL 460 Mining Geology                                                   (3-0-3)

         Basic concepts and historical developments. Geological principles of ore
exploration and appraisal. Methods of ore body sampling, estimation and classification
of reserves. Methods of mining and mineral processing. Computer software related to
data processing ore reserve estimation, and interpretation will be used.

Prerequisite: GEOL 216

 GEOL 461 Mineral Economics                                               (3-0-3)
         Basic concepts. Significance of the mineral industries in the economy.
Examination and valuation of mineral properties, mine organization and
administration, and mine management.

Prerequisite: GEOL 216

GEOL 464 Carbonate Geology                                                                   (2-3-3)

        Carbonate rocks, their characteristics, classification, and distribution.
   Environments of deposition, associations, and economic importance. Relationship to
   petroleum deposits with special emphasis on shoals and reefs. Study of outcrops, hand
   specimens and thin sections. At least one field trip is required.

Prerequisite: GEOL 307

GEOL 480 Special Topics                                                                     (3-0-3)

          Contents to be arranged.

Prerequisite: To be set by the Earth Sciences Department.



2. Development of Special Student Characteristics or Attributes

 List any special student characteristics or attributes beyond normal expectations that the institution, college
 or department is trying to develop in all of its students. ( Normally one or two, up to a maximum of four
 that directly reflect the program mission and distinguish this program from others in the same field and
 make it exceptional. Eg. Graduates particularly good at creative problem solving, leadership capacity,
 commitment to public service, high level of skills in IT). For each special attribute indicate the teaching
 strategies and student activities to be used to develop it and the evidence to be used to assess whether it
 has been developed in all students.
          Special Attributes               Strategies or Student Activities to be Used throughout theGeology
                                                      Program to Develop These Special Attributes

 Computational skills                   Two elective course are devoted to this (GEOL 312
                                        Rem. Sensing & GIS; 454, Comp. Methods in Geology)
                                        where the homeworks require program writing and/or
                                        data processing
                                        Evidence: class work, quizzes, Homeworks, Exams

                                        Most GEOL courses include using in the LAB
 Familiarity with modern                microscopes and different equipments.
 laboratory equipments
                                        Evidence Class    work, quizzes, Homeworks, Exams
 Ability to identify minerals,
 fossils, describe and                  This is taught in GEOL201, 214, 216,
 interpret geological                    Evidence Class   work, quizzes, Homeworks, Exams
 formations



 Preparation of geological               Taught in the Course GEOL328, practised in other
 maps                                    courses as well, part of the GEOL 430 Field Geology
                                         Evidence Field Geol. Rept.


3. Required Field Experience Component (if any) (Eg. internship, cooperative program, work experience)

 Summary of practical, clinical or internship component required in the program.
 Note that a more detailed Field Experience Specification comparable to a course specification should also
 be prepared in a separate document for any field experience required as part of the program.

 a. Brief description of field experience activity

 Most courses (GEOL201, 203, 214, 305, 307, 318, 320, 415 etc.) contain at least one field trip. GEOL 430
 Field Geology requires six weeks on the field.
 b. List the major intended learning outcomes for the program to be developed through the field experience

         Familiarity with field techniques
         Mapping, interpretation of remotely sensed data and aerial photography
         Identification of minerals, fossils
         Petrographic analysis
         Report writing skills

 c. At what stage or stages in the program does the field experience occur? (eg. year, semester)
 In the Summer before Fifth year


 d. Time allocation and scheduling arrangement. (Eg. 3 days per week for 4 weeks, full time for one
 semester)
 Six weeks in the summer


 e. Number of credit hours Six


4. Project or Research Requirements (if any)

 Summary of any project or thesis requirement in the program. (Other than projects or assignments within
 individual courses) (A copy of the requirements for the project should be attached.) NONE

 a. Brief description

 b. List the major intended learning outcomes of the project or research task.

 c. At what stage or stages in the program is the project or research undertaken? (eg. year, semester)
 d. Number of credit hours

 e. Summary description of provisions for student academic advising and support.

 f. Description of assessment procedures (including mechanism for verification of standards)


5. Development of Learning Outcomes in Domains of Learning
 For each of the domains of learning shown below indicate:

         The knowledge or skill the program is intended to develop and the level of that knowledge and
          skill. (as a guide see general descriptions of knowledge and skills in the National Qualifications
          Framework for the qualification level of this program;
          The teaching strategies to be used in courses in the program to develop that knowledge and those
          skills. (This should be a general description of the approaches taken throughout the program but
          if particular responsibility is to be assigned to certain courses this should be indicated.);
         The methods of student assessment to be used in courses n the program to evaluate learning
          outcomes in the domain concerned.


 a. Knowledge

 (i) Summary description of the knowledge to be acquired
     1. Students shall have an ability to apply mathematics, science, and fundamental
         geology to explorational or engineering geological problems.
     2. Students shall have an ability to identify, formulate, and solve practical
         explorational or engineering geological problems.
     3. Students shall have an ability to describe and interpret geological formations, to
         prepare geological maps.
     4. Students shall have an ability to conduct laboratory measurements, use basic
         laboratory instruments, equipments and computers to analyze and interpret data.
     5. Students shall have an ability to work in a professional environment, either in the
         field, the lab, or the office.
     6. Students shall have an ability to communicate effectively in written and spoken
         English, including by means of multimedia tools.
     7. Students shall have an ability to work effectively in teams, including
         interdisciplinary teams, in order to solve problems relevant to Geology.
     8. Students shall have an understanding of their professional and ethical
         responsibilities.
     9. Students shall have an understanding of the impact of mineral exploration and
         exploitation on the society and environment.
     10. Students shall have the ability to engage in lifelong learning in their selected
         field.

 (ii) Teaching strategies to be used to develop that knowledge

 No special strategies are necessary

 (iii) Methods of assessment of knowledge acquired
 Quiz, Exams, Field Reports
b. Cognitive Skills)
Students shall have an ability to apply mathematics, science, and fundamental geology
   and to explorational or engineering geological problems.
Students shall have an ability to identify, formulate, and solve practical explorational or
   engineering geological problems.

(i) Cognitive skills to be developed and level of performance expected
Mathematics, science, and fundamental geology at the level of understanding lectures,
textbooks, solving homeworks, identifying common rock types and formations,
recognizing structural styles

(ii) Teaching strategies to be used to develop these cognitive skills

Lectures, Labs, field work, spec. reading assignments


(iii)       Methods of assessment of students cognitive skills   Quiz, exams, homeworks, lab
                 assignments

        c. Interpersonal Skills and Responsibility
        Students shall have an ability to work in a professional environment, either in the
        field, the lab, or the office.
        Students shall have an ability to work effectively in teams, including interdisciplinary
        teams, in order to solve problems relevant to Geology.
        Students shall have an understanding of their professional and ethical responsibilities.
        Students shall have an understanding of the impact of mineral exploration and
        exploitation on the society and environment.
        Students shall have the ability to engage in lifelong learning in their selected field.

(i) Description of the level of interpersonal skills and capacity to carry responsibility to be developed
Reasonable level for their age and education

(ii) Teaching strategies to be used to develop these skills and abilities
Continuous emphasis on these aspects

(iii)       Methods of assessment of students interpersonal skills and capacity to carry responsibility
Observing them in class, lab, field work, during extracurricular activity.
Ask their summer traing supervisor's opinion

d. Communication, Information Technology and Numerical Skills

(i) Description of the communication, IT and numerical skills to be developed
Students shall have an ability to communicate effectively in written and spoken English,
   including by means of multimedia tools.
Must be able to run geological software

(ii) Teaching strategies to be used to develop these skills
Student must present their reports in front of class and/or invited faculty
Whenever possible, computer software should be used
 (iii) Methods of assessment of students numerical and communication skills
 Wherever appropriate, this is part of the total grade




 e. Psychomotor Skills (if applicable)

  (i) Description of the psychomotor skills to be developed and the level of performance required
         Students shall have an ability to use standard field equipments, (GPS, compass, etc.),
         use the microscopes, carry out on their own simple lab. analyses

  (ii) Teaching strategies to be used to develop these skills
 Mainly through Lab Exercises, Homeworks and Field Geology


 (iii)      Methods of assessment of students psychomotor skills

 Lab Assignments, observing students in lab and in the field



6. Admission Requirements for the program

Attach handbook or bulletin description of admission requirements including any course or experience
prerequisites.
Admission Process

The process of admitting the students to the program is regulated and clearly documented
by the Deanship of Admission and Registration. The process consists of well-defined
procedures and steps executed at the University, college, and departmental levels.
    Based upon the recommendation of the College Councils and the Deanship of
       Admission and Registration in coordination with the Deanship of Educational
       Services, the number of new students to be admitted in the following Academic
       Year is determined by the University Council.
    Each admitted student is assigned a unique identification number that reveals the
       year of his admission.
    The students admitted to the University must have satisfied the following
       conditions:
           1. Obtained the secondary school certificate or its equivalent from inside or
               outside the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
           2. Obtained the secondary school certificate less than 5 years prior to the date
               of application;
           3. Have a record of good conduct;
           4. Have successfully passed examinations or personal interviews as
               determined by the University Council;
          5. Have physical fitness and good health;
          6. Have approval from employers in case he is employed.
    The students are evaluated according to their marks in the secondary school
      examinations, the interviews, and the admission examinations. Only students who
      have satisfied all the admission requirements with sufficiently high scores are
      enrolled.
    The names of the enrolled students along with their identification numbers, total
      scores of the secondary school certificate with the scores of the science and
      English subjects, and scores of the admission exams are stored electronically.
    Generally, newly admitted students are enrolled in the preparatory year program
      before thery can start their undergraduate program. The courses covered in the
      two-semester preparatory year include English, mathematics, and physical
      education.
    Students may be exempted from the preparatory year program if their proficiency
      in English and mathematics in the promotion exam has been established. Students
      who pass the requirements of either English or mathematics part, are partially
      promoted to the next academic level, but are required to fulfill the remaining
      requirement in the same year.
    The preparatory year requirement is fulfilled by completing all the required
      courses with grade C or better in the first and the second level courses of English,
      and grade C or better in the first or the second level course of mathematics.
    The Deanship of Admission and Registration and the Colleges in the University
      jointly determine the majors for the students who are completing the preparatory
      year program. The major of each student is determined according to his own
      choice, provided the required criteria of the major are satisfied. Students select
      their majors immediately after they complete the preparatory year program.
    Qualified students are admitted directly into the selected majors of the
      undergraduate program as freshmen. Lists of the new freshmen students of each
      major are communicated to the concerned departments at the beginning of each
      semester by the Deanship of Admission and Registration.
    Students are required to earn a prescribed minimum grade in English and in
      mathematics in the first and second levels of the preparatory year to select majors
      in the College of Sciences.
Transfer from outside KFUPM
    The transfer of a student from outside the University may be accepted under the
      following conditions:
   1. The student should have been enrolled at a recognized college or university.
   2. The student must not have been dismissed from that university for disciplinary
      reasons.
   3. The student must satisfy the transfer provisions as determined by the University
      Council.
    All transfer applications are submitted to the Admission and Academic Standing
      Committee which studies the application and ensures that the applicant fulfills the
      above requirements 1 – 3.
    The Council of the College of Sciences shall review the courses taken by the
      applicant outside the University, based on the recommendations of the
        department which offers equivalent courses. The courses are usually evaluated by
        the Curriculum Committee in the department and approved by the Chairman. The
        courses evaluated as equivalent will be transferred to the student’s record but will
        not be included in the calculation of his cumulative GPA.
       In order to get transfer of credit for any course taken outside the University, the
        student should:
   1.   Have obtained a grade of C or higher in that course;
   2.   Have taken the course at a recognized college or university;
   3.   Have taken a course equivalent in all respects to one of the courses which are
        included in the KFUPM degree requirements;
   4.   The grade earned by the student in the course is not included in the student’s
        cumulative GPA.

      If, after his transfer, it is discovered that a student had been dismissed from his
       previous university for disciplinary reasons, his enrollment will be considered
       canceled as from the date of acceptance of his transfer to the University.
     The transfer of a student from one university to another during any semester takes
       place in accordance with the procedures and the dates announced by the
       university to which the student is transferring, under the general transfer rules.
Transfers to the program from another College in the University
               A student may be transferred from another College to the program inside
       the university in accordance with University Council rules as follows:
 A student may transfer from one college to the program within the University before he
completes the sixth academic level.
Transfer to the program from another major within the college
     With the approval of the Dean of the College of Sciences, a student may transfer
       from one major to the program within the College according to the following
       rules:
    1. A student may transfer from one major to the program at any time before he
       completes the sixth academic level.
    2. The Council of the College of Sciences may consider exceptional cases where
       students have already completed the sixth level.
    3. The transfer will be recorded in the academic record of the student at the
       beginning of the term following the transfer.
    4. A student is allowed a maximum of two transfers from one major to another
       within the same college. The College Council may consider exceptional cases.
    5. The academic record of a student transferring from one major to another will
       include all the courses the student has taken, including the grades and the
       semester- and cumulative GPA’s obtained throughout his period of study at the
       University.
     The detailed policies and regulations regarding credit transfer of students are
       described in the KFUPM Undergraduate Study and Examinations Regulations,
       and the Rules of their Implementation booklet.
7. Attendance and Completion Requirements

Attach handbook or bulletin description of requirements for:
a. Attendance.
ATTENDANCE AND WITHDRAWAL
FROM STUDY
1. A regular student should attend all classes and laboratory sessions. A student may be
discontinued from a course and denied entrance to the final examination if his attendance
is less than the limit determined by the University Council. This limit cannot be less than
75% of classes and lab sessions assigned to each course during the semester. A student
who is denied entrance to the examination due to excessive absences will be considered
as having failed that course (A9).
Implementation Rules
(i) A regular student will not be allowed to continue in a course and take the final
examination and will be given a DN grade if his unexcused absences are more than 20%
of the lecture and laboratory sessions scheduled for the course.
(ii) A regular student will not be allowed to continue in a course and to enter the final
examination
if his attendance is less than 66.7% of the lecture and l a b sessions scheduled for the
course. This applies to both excused and unexcused absences. The student will be given a
W grade in that course provided his unexcused absences do not exceed 20% of the
scheduled lecture and laboratory sessions. If the unexcused absences exceed 20%, the
provisions of the previous paragraph will apply.
2. The college council - or whatever body it delegates its authority to - may exempt a
student from the provisions of Attendance and allow him to attend the final examination
if he provides an excuse acceptable to the council. For such an exemption provided by the
University Council, the minimum attendance requirement is not less than 50% of the
lecture and laboratory sessions scheduled for the course (A10).
Implementation Rules
The college council - or whatever body it delegates its authority to - may exempt a
student from the provisions of Attendance and allow him to attend the final examination
if he furnishes an excuse acceptable to the council, provided that his total attendance in
the lecture and laboratory
sessions is not less than 66.7% of the lecture and laboratory sessions scheduled for the
course.
3. A student who fails to attend the final examination will be given zero in that
examination. In this case, his course grade will be calculated on the basis of the class
work score he earned in the
course (A11).
4. If a student fails to attend the final examination of any of his scheduled courses due to
circumstances beyond his control, the college council, in exceptional cases, may accept
the excuse and arrange a make-up examination for the student within a period not
exceeding the end of the next semester. In such cases the course grade will be given to
the student after the make-up examination
(A12).
Implementation Rules
(i) The student must furnish the excuse to his instructor and request a make up
examination before the end of the next regular semester.
(ii) The course instructor submits his report to the department chairman for presentation
to the departmental and, then, the college council.The dean of the college informs the
student of the council’s decision, i.e., as to whether his petition has been accepted or
rejected. If the petition is accepted, the student will be informed of the date of the make-
up examination.
(iii) Under exceptionally pressing circumstances, the college council may accept the
student’s excuse and give him a make-up examination before the end of the next
semester. The final grade will be given to the student after that make-up examination.
5. A student may be allowed to withdraw from the University for a semester and not be
considered as having failed if he furnishes an acceptable excuse to the authorized body as
determined by the University Council, at least 5 weeks before the commencement of the
final examinations (A13).
Implementation Rules
(i) The Deanship of Admissions & Registration studies all applications for withdrawal for
one semester, and submits its recommendations to the relevant Vice Rector of the
University.
(ii) If a student has received any course grades before submitting an application to
withdraw for a
semester, all such grades are retained in his academic record and he will be given a W
grade
in the remaining courses.
(iii) A student may submit an application to discontinue study in a particular semester and
withdraw from all courses during the stipulated period (after the 10th week and before
end of the 14th week) provided he has an acceptable excuse and his grade in each course
is determined as
“Withdrawn with Pass” or “Withdrawn with Fail” according to his performance. The
grade will be assigned by the instructor, with the approval of the department chairman, in
the light of the student’s performance before his application to discontinue his studies.
6. A student may submit an application for suspension of enrollment, for reasons
acceptable to the college council, provided the suspension period does not exceed two
consecutive semesters, or a maximum of three non-consecutive semesters, during his
entire course of study at the University. Otherwise his enrollment status will be canceled.
However, the University Council may, at its discretion, make exceptions to this rule
(A14).
7. If a student interrupts his studies for one semester without submitting an application
for suspension of enrollment, his enrollment status at the University will be canceled.
The University Council however, may at its discretion, cancel a student’s enrollment
status if he discontinues his studies for a period of less than one semester (A15).
8. A student is not considered to have interrupted his studies during the terms he spends
as a visiting student in other universities (A16).
RE-ENROLLMENT
A student whose enrollment status has been canceled, may apply for reenrollment with
the same University ID number and academic record he had before his suspension (A17),
provided:
1. he applies for re-enrollment within four regular semesters from the date of cancellation
of his enrollment status;
2. he obtains the approval of the relevant college council and related departments for the
re-enrollment;
3. that five or more semesters have lapsed since cancellation of his enrollment, in which
case the student can apply to the University for admission as a new student without
considering his old academic record, if he fulfills all the admission requirements for new
students;
4. that he has not been re-enrolled previously; 5. that he was not on probation prior to the
cancellation of his enrollment.
Implementation Rules
(i) A suspended student should submit his re-enrollment application to the Deanship of
Admissions & Registration at least one month before the beginning of the semester in
which he intends to resume study.
(ii) The Deanship of Admissions & Registration coordinates with the relevant college
council in order to arrive at a decision regarding the application.
(iii) A student who interrupts his studies for more than five semesters may apply for
admission as a new student if he fulfills all admission requirements for new students. The
student will be assigned a new University ID number and no credits will be transferred
from his previous record, though such credits will appear in his new academic record.
 (iv) Re-Enrollment does not apply to dismissed students. A student who has been
dismissed from the University for academic or disciplinary reasons - or from other
universities for disciplinary reasons - will not be reenrolled at the University. If it
becomes known later that a student has been dismissed for such reasons, his enrollment
will automatically be considered null and void as of the reenrollment date (A18).
b. Progression from year to year.
The academic levels system divides the academic year into two regular semesters. There
may be a summer session, the duration of which is considered as half a regular semester.
The degree requirements are divided into various levels in accordance with the degree
plan approved by the University Council (A7).
The University Council sets up the detailed regulations which govern promotion from
one academic level to another bearing in mind the following considerations (A8).
a. The courses of each major are spread over the academic levels. A number of credit
hours is assigned for each level, as required by the approved degree plan.
b. Students who have not failed in the course of their studies are successively promoted
from lower to higher academic levels, according to their approved degree plan.
c. Students who have failed some courses, are registered in courses with the minimum
allowed semester course load bearing in mind that:
• there should be no conflict in their study schedule;
• they should satisfy all prerequisite requirements;
• they will not be allowed to take more courses from the next academic level other than
the number required to complete their minimum course load.
c. Program completion
A student graduates after successfully completing the graduation requirements according
to the degree plan, provided his cumulative GPA is not less than “pass”. Following the
recommendation of the department council, the college council may determine certain
additional courses the student should take to improve his cumulative GPA if he has
passed the required courses, but with a low GPA (A19).
Implementation Rules
(i) Student is required to pursue his major degree plan and complete all requirements
before graduation.
(ii) The Deanship of Admissions & Registration will provide the relevant departments
with copies of the academic records of all candidates for graduation. The department will
then review these records to ensure that the students have satisfied all graduation
requirements and will provide the Deanship of Admissions & Registration with a list of
the students who qualify for graduation.
(iii) A student must attain a cumulative GPA and major GPA of 2.00 or above (out of
4.00) to
graduate.
(iv) If the cumulative GPA is lower than the required limit, it may be re-calculated at the
student’s
request,provided he has successfully completed all the courses required for obtaining the
degree. This will be based upon the recommendation of the department council in
coordination with the Deanship of Admissions & Registration and the approval of the
college council. However, at the time of graduation, the student’s cumulative GPA
should not be more than 2.00 (out of 4.00) after recalculation

E. Regulations for Student Assessment and Verification of Standards
1. Regulations or policies for allocation and distribution of grades

If the institution, college, department or program has policies or regulations dealing with the allocation or
distribution of students grades state the policy or regulation, or attach a copy.
    Depending on the nature of the course, the students' performance in courses are
    evaluated by a combination of written examinations, quizzes, seminars, term projects,
    homework assignments, laboratory- or field work, and final exams. All examinations,
    except the finals, are scheduled by the instructors themselves. The final examinations,
    which are mandatory for all courses, are scheduled by the Deanship of Admission and
    Registration. The duration of the final examinations are between one and three hours.

THE GRADING SYSTEM APPLICABLE AT KFUPM
A+ 95 – 100 4.00 Exceptional
A 90 – Less than 95 3.75 Excellent
B+ 85 – Less than 90 3.50 Superior
B 80 – Less than 85 3.00 Very Good
C+ 75 – Less than 80 2.50 Above Average
C 70 – Less than 75 2.00 Good
D+ 65 – Less than 70 1.50 High-Pass
D 60 – Less than 65 1.00 Pass
F Less than 60 0.00 Fail
IP – – In Progress
IC – – Incomplete
DN – 0.00 Denial
NP 60 or above – No grade-Pass
NF Less than 60 – No grade-Fail
W – – Withdrawn
WP – – Withdrawn with Pass
WF – 0.00 Withdrawn with Fail
AU – – Audit


2. What processes will be used for verifying standards of achievement (eg check marking of sample of tests or
assignments? Independent assessment by faculty from another institution) (Processes may vary for different courses
or domains of learning. )


None


F Student Administration and Support
1. Student Academic Counselling
Describe arrangements to be made for academic counselling and advice for students, including both
scheduling of faculty office hours and advice on program planning, subject selection and career planning
(which might be available at college level)

       Students at KFUPM have all means for knowing their own academic standing and
        the study requirements according to the University and College standards and
        regulations. The University publishes and distributes the Undergraduate Bulletin
        every two years where all University, College, and Program requirements are
        described. Among others, the mission, objectives, course requirements and course
        options for the Geology and Geophysics degrees offered by the ESD department
        are also provided in the Bulletin.
       The advising system at KFUPM has changed in the last years from an advisor-
        based to a student-based system. Students now can perform early-registration,
        registration, drop and add courses, without the need to consult their academic
        advisors. In specific circumstances however students must consult with their
        respective advisors or the Chairman to get approval for special requests. The ESD
        Faculty are asked to stay in their office during these activities in case their advice
        is needed.
       Similarly, Faculty are asked to stay in their office a full day after the final grades
        have been posted to discuss with the students their exam results.
       The University's Student Affairs Department offers several academic and social
        services from the date the student joins KFUPM until graduation. These include
        housing, student activities, cooperative program, and summer training program.
        Student Affairs also runs the Counseling and Advising Center (CAAC) where any
        student can participate in professional, academic, social or personal skills
        improvement programs. The Student Affairs organizes annual Career Days where
        students can meet local industry representatives, and observe the job market.
       Students are encouraged to join local and international professional societies (in
        case of ESD the relevant societies are: Dhahran Geoscience Society, SEG, AGU,
        AAPG, etc.) and are invited and urged to attend local technical meetings and
        departmental seminars.
2. Student Appeals

 Attach regulations for student appeals on academic matters, including processes for consideration of those
appeals.
Apparently not discussed in the Undergraduate Bulletin

G. Text and Reference Material
1. What process is to be followed by faculty in the program for planning and acquisition of text, reference
and other resource material including electronic and web based resources?

    The adopted textbooks for teaching are frequently evaluated by the course instructors.
    Proposed new textbooks, either as a replacement for an existing one or a book for a
    new course are first evaluated by the Textbook Subcommittee of the Curriculum
    Committee, and discussed and recommended by the Department Council before
    forwarding it to obtain College and University approval.

2. What processes are to be followed by faculty in the program for evaluating the adequacy of book,
reference and other resource provision?

Recommended textbooks are discussed at the Departmental Council Meeting.


H. Faculty
1. Appointments

Summarize the process of employment of new faculty to ensure that faculty are appropriately qualified and
experienced for their teaching responsibilities.

      All faculty members in the ES Department hold Ph.D. degrees and graduated
       from reputed universities. They have diverse backgrounds of academic and non-
       academic experiences.
    Faculty appointments are made from candidates of outstanding technical
       competence and on the basis of demonstrated achievement in teaching, research
       and industrial experience. The recruitment procedure is applied to all faculty
       positions that include professorial ranks, instructors, lecturers, and research
       assistants.
Professorial rank faculty and lecturers
The procedure for recruiting new professorial rank faculty and lecturers is the following:
    Advertisement of available faculty openings for professorial rank faculty
       members and lecturers is published in the University's web-page, the departmental
       web-page, local journals and professional international journals. The applicants
       are requested to provide complete resumes and application forms, along with
       photocopies of official transcripts/degrees, list of publications, especially those
       published in the refereed professional journals, and at least 4 referees with their
       complete address and email address.
     Application files for professorial rank, instructor and lecturer positions are
      reviewed by the Departmental Search Committee; for research assistants by an ad
      hoc Committee.
    The Department Council discusses the case, then the Chairman in consultation
      with the Dean of College of Sciences submits the request to the Vice Rector for
      Academic Affairs who will advise the Dean of the Faculty and Personnel Affairs
      to complete the recruitment process. The recommended application files along
      with the proposed academic ranks, salary ranges and teaching responsibilities are
      then forwarded to the Rector for final approval.
    The University might arrange personal interviews with the applicants in their
      locations. In this case the interview reports are sent to the Chairman.
Research/ Graduate Assistants
    Only excellent applicants who graduated with high academic records are
      evaluated by an ad hoc Committee for recruitment in the department. The
      Chairman forwards the recommended application files to the Dean of Graduate
      Studies for final approval.
    Graduating students with outstanding academic achievements are encouraged to
      join as graduate assistants.



2. Participation in Program Planning, Monitoring and Review

Explain the process for consultation with and involvement of faculty in monitoring program quality,
annual review and planning for improvement.
All faculty are involved in the different program planning, and self-assassment exercises


3. Professional; Development

What arrangements are made for professional development of faculty for:

(a) Improvement of skills in teaching?

       Most faculty attend lectures and Short Courses organized by the Academic
        Development Center (ADC) of the University, devoted to such topics as: effective
        teaching, use of instructional technology in teaching, peer consultation and
        effective research.
       There has been recent interest in the ADC grants and fellowships for research on
        enhancing teaching and student learning, and grants of developing online
        courses.
(b) Other professional development including knowledge of research and developments in their field of
teaching?

       The faculty members actively participate in the weekly seminar program of the
        Department (see Appendix E).
       The methods used by Faculty to keep themselves current in their discipline are
       shown in the next Table
   Table: Ways the ESD Faculty keep themselves current in their discipline. Listed in
                            order of decreasing popularity
 Way of self-education                                                 Per cent
 Reading technical papers                                                100
 Reading books                                                            92
 By internet                                                              92
 Attendig conferences                                                     75
 Attending Short Courses                                                  75
 Attending Seminars                                                       75
 Attending workshops                                                      67
 Other                                                                    33

4. Preparation of New Faculty

Describe the process used for orientation and/or induction of new, visiting or part time faculty to ensure full
understanding of the program and the role of the course(s) they teach as components within it.

There is no special procedure for this

5. Part Time and Visiting Faculty

 Provide a summary of Program/Department/ College/institution policy on appointment of part time and
 visiting faculty. (ie. Approvals required, selection process, proportion of total faculty etc.)

 Part time and visiting faculty mostly participate in Graduate teaching. In each case, this
 must be discussed and approved by the departmental, and College Council.

I. Program Evaluation and Improvement Processes

1. Effectiveness of Teaching

 a. What processes will be used to evaluate and improve the strategies planned for developing learning in
 the different domains of learning? (eg. assessment of learning achieved, advice on consistency with
 learning theory for different types of learning, assessment of understanding and skill of faculty in using
 different strategies)
 Analysis of student evaluations, questionnaires to graduating students and alumni

 b. What processes will be used for evaluating the skills of faculty in using the planned strategies?
 Analysis of student evaluations, questionnaires to graduating students and alumni

2. Overall Program Evaluation

 a. What strategies will be used in the program for obtaining assessments of the overall quality of the
 program and achievement of its intended learning outcomes:
 b. What key performance indicators will be used to monitor and report annually on the quality of the
 program?

 Grade distribution
 c. What processes will be followed for reviewing these assessments and planning action to improve the
 program?

 Dept. Chairman discusses these issues with individual faculty in connection with his Self evaluation.

Attachments.

1. Copies of regulations and other documents referred to in template preceded by a table of contents.
(All have been attached at the proper place)
2. Course specifications for all courses including field experience specification if applicable..

(It is included)
Allocation of Responsibilities for Learning Outcomes to Courses

Learning Outcomes                                                       GEOL Courses (in order of the Catalogue)
                                201    202    203    214   216    305    307    312   318    320    328    341   355   399   409   4
   Course Code and
   Number
Knowledge
   Facts                        √      √      √      √     √      x      x      √     √      √      √      √     √     √     √     √
   Concepts, theories           √      √      √      √     √      x      x      √     √      √      √      √     √     √     √     √
   Procedures                   √      √      √      √     √      x      x      √     √      √      √      √     √     √     √     √
Cognitive Skills
   Apply skills when asked      X      X      X      X     X      √      X      X     X      X      X      X     X     √     X     X
   Creative thinking and        √      √      √      √     X
                                                                  √      √      √     X      √      √      √     √           X     √
    problem solving                                                                                                    x
Interpersonal Skills
and Responsibility
  Responsibility for own        x      x      x      x     X      X      x      X     X      x      X      x     x     x     X     x
  learning
  Group participation and       x      x      x      x     X      X      x      X     X      x      X      x     x     √     X     x
  leadership
  Act responsibly-personal      x      x      x      x     X      X      x      X     X      x      X      x     x     √     X     x
  and professional situations
  Ethical standards of          x      x      x      x     X      X      x      X     X      X      X      X     x     √     X     x
  behaviour
Communication IT
and Numerical Skills
  Oral and written              x      x      x      x     X      X      x      X     X      X      X      X     x     √     √     x
  communication
                                x      x      X      x     x      √      x      √     X      X      √      √     x     √     √     x
  Use of IT

                                x      x      X      x     √      √      √      √     X      √      √      √     x     x     x     x
  Basic maths and statistics

                                x      x      x      √     √      √      √      X     X      √      √      x     √     √     x     x
Psychomotor Skills


 √    Major Responsibility x Minor Responsibility
(Note: Add additional sheets if necessary to provide for all required courses in the program including any courses
offered by other departments)
Learning Outcomes                                                  GEOL Courses (in order of the Catalogue
                               435   436   440   441   446   454   456 460 461 464  480  ICS   EN
  Course Code and                                                                        103   GL  IA GSxxx
  Number                                                                                           S 4
Knowledge
  Facts                        √     √     √     √     √     x     x     √     √   √     √   √   x   √   √
  Concepts, theories           √     √     √     √     √     x     x     √     √   √     √   √   x   √   √
  Procedures                   √     √     √     √     √     x     x     √     √   √     √   √   x   √   √
Cognitive Skills
  Apply skills when asked      X     X     X     X     X     √     X     X     X   X     X   X   X   X   X
  Creative thinking and        √     √     √     √     √
                                                             √     √     √     √   √     √   √   x   x   x
   problem solving
Interpersonal Skills
and Responsibility
 Responsibility for own        x     x     x     x     x     x     x     X     x   x     x   X   x   x   x
 learning
 Group participation and       x     x     x     x     x     X     X     X     x   x     x   X   x   x   x
 leadership
 Act responsibly-personal      x     x     x     x     x     x     √     X     √   x     x   X   x   x   x
 and professional situations
 Ethical standards of          x     x     x     x     x     x     √     X     √   x     x   X   x   √   √
 behaviour
Communication IT
and Numerical Skills
 Oral and written              X     x     x     x     x     x     √     X     √   x     x   X   √   x   x
 communication
                               √     x     √     x     √     √     √     √     √   x     x   √   x   x   x
  Use of IT
                               √     √     √     x     √     √     √     √     x   x     x   √   x   x   x
  Basic maths and statistics

                               X     x     √     √     x     x     √     X     x   √     √   X   x   x   x
Psychomotor Skills



        Allocation of Responsibilities for Learning Outcomes to Courses

Learning Outcomes                                                                      Courses
                               MA    MA    MA    STA   PHY   PHY   CHE   CHE
  Course Code and              TH    TH    TH    T     S     S     M     M
  Number                       101   102   201   201   101   102   101   102

Knowledge
  Facts                        √     √     √     √     √     √     √     √
  Concepts, theories           √     √     √     √     √     √     √     √
  Procedures                   √     √     √     √     √     √     √     √
Cognitive Skills
  Apply skills when asked      X     X     X     X     X     X     X     X
  Creative thinking and        √     √     √     √     √     √     √     √
   problem solving
Interpersonal Skills
and Responsibility
 Responsibility for own        x     x     x     x     x     x     x     X
 learning
  Group participation and       x      x      x      x     x      x      x      X
  leadership
  Act responsibly-personal      x      x      x      x     x      x      x      X
  and professional situations
  Ethical standards of          x      x      x      x     x      x      x      X
  behaviour
Communication IT
and Numerical Skills
  Oral and written              x      x      x      x     x      x      x      X
  communication
  Use of IT                     x      x      x      x     x      x      x      X
                                √      √      √      √     √      √      √      √
  Basic maths and statistics

                                x      x      x      x     x      x      x      X
Psychomotor Skills


 √    Major Responsibility x Minor Responsibility
(Note: Add additional sheets if necessary to provide for all required courses in the program including any
courses offered by other departments)

								
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