Frequently_Asked_Questions by HC111123032345

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									Frequently Asked Questions:
  High School Mathematics




                        October 2005
Contents
Courses

What are the course options, course codes, and prerequisites? .......................................................3
How many students should we anticipate will take courses at the different levels? .......................4
What courses must be offered to students and which are optional for schools to offer? .................5
What courses could be combined within one classroom, if necessary? ..........................................5
Can high school mathematics courses be taught through the whole year? ......................................5
What are the differences between Mathematics 10 and Mathematics 10 Plus? ..............................6
How do the two credits work in Mathematics 10 Plus and
      Mathematics Foundations 10 Plus? .....................................................................................6
Can Mathematics 10 Plus be taught as separate courses?................................................................6
What credit options are there for students who take Mathematics 10 Plus all year and
      then fail?...............................................................................................................................6
May schools continue to offer locally developed mathematics courses? ........................................7
What is the recommended sequence of grade 11 and grade 12 courses? ........................................7
What are the IB and AP options in high school mathematics? ........................................................7


Pathways

What are the possible course pathways through high school mathematics? ...................................7
When a student is entering grade 10, what should he or she consider when registering
for math courses? .............................................................................................................................8
How does a student’s mathematics course choices influence his or her post-secondary options? ..8
How should recommendations regarding student placement be communicated from the
junior to the senior high school? ......................................................................................................8
If a student chooses a course against the recommendations of the school and teacher, should
resource support be made available to the student? .........................................................................8
What are the course codes for students following an IPP? ..............................................................9
In which courses should a student following an IPP be placed? ...................................................10
What is the profile of a student in each course? ............................................................................10
How can attendance or lack of attendance affect a student’s ability to complete a course? .........11




Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics                    October 2005                                                           1
Assessment and Evaluation

How should students in high school mathematics be evaluated by the classroom teacher? ..........11
Can a student earn an exam exemption in a mathematics course? ................................................12
Which high school mathematics courses have a Nova Scotia Examination (NSE)? .....................12
Can students rewrite NSE without retaking the course? ................................................................12
Do students doing summer school or correspondence write an NSE? ..........................................12
Do students who take correspondence or summer school write NSE in Mathematics? ................12
Who marks NSE in mathematics? .................................................................................................12
May schools provide adaptations for NSE in mathematics? .........................................................12



Teaching and Learning

What resources are needed for high school mathematics courses? ...............................................13
What should student learning look like in the classroom? ............................................................13
What are some things teachers should do to support student learning? ........................................14
Why does small-group learning play such an important role in the mathematics courses? ..........15
What can school administrators do to ensure effective implementation of
mathematics courses?.....................................................................................................................16



Appendices

Appendix A: Active Course Codes for High School Mathematics ...............................................17

Appendix B: Suggested Student Pathways through High School Mathematics ............................19




Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics                  October 2005                                                        2
Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics
Courses

What are the course options, course codes, and prerequisites?

Mathematics Essentials 10 (graduation, 1 credit) Course Code: 008189
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics: Grade 8 and recommendation from the
Mathematics: Grade 9 teacher

Mathematics Foundations 10 (graduation, 1 credit) Course Code: 008009
Prerequisite: Successful completion Mathematics: Grade 9

Mathematics Foundations 10 Plus (graduation, 2 credits) Course Codes: 008009/008158
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics: Grade 9

Mathematics 10 (academic, 1 credit) Course Code: 008008
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics: Grade 9 and demonstrated good to excellent
performance in relation to the expected learning outcomes prescribed by Mathematics: Grade 9

Mathematics 10 Plus (academic, 2 credits) Course Code: 008008/008157
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics: Grade 9 and recommendation from the
Mathematics: Grade 9 teacher

Mathematics Essentials 11 (graduation, 1 credit) Course Code: 008191
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics Essentials 10

Mathematics Foundations 11 (graduation, 1 credit) Course Code: 008011
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics Foundations 10 or Mathematics 10

Mathematics 11 (academic, 1 credit) Course Code: 008067
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics 10

Note: In exceptional cases, those who have demonstrated very good to outstanding performance in
relation to the curriculum outcomes prescribed for Mathematics Foundations 10, have
demonstrated initiative and willingness to complete required independent study to address some
Mathematics 10 outcomes, and are recommended by the school principal and/or teacher, may
enroll in Mathematics 11.

Advanced Mathematics 11 (advanced, 1 credit) Course Code: 008145
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics 10 and have demonstrated outstanding
performance in relation to the learning outcomes prescribed by Mathematics 10

Mathematics Foundations 12 (graduation, 1 credit) Course Code: 008013
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics Foundations 10 or Mathematics 10
Recommended Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics Foundation 11 or

Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics   October 2005                          3
Mathematics 11

Mathematics 12 (academic, 1 credit) Course Code: 008073
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics 10
Recommended Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics 11

Advanced Mathematics 12 (advanced, 1 credit) Course Code: 008015
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mathematics 10 and have demonstrated outstanding
performance in relation to the learning outcomes prescribed by Mathematics 10
Recommended Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Mathematics 11

Pre-Calculus Mathematics 12 (advanced, 1 credit) Course Code: 008156
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Advanced Mathematics 11 and Advanced
Mathematics 12
OR
Successful completion of Mathematics 11 and Mathematics 12 and have demonstrated very good
to outstanding performance in relation to the learning outcomes prescribed by Mathematics 11 and
Mathematics 12

Calculus 12 (advanced, 1 credit) Course Code: 008190
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus Mathematics 12


How many students should we anticipate will take courses at the different levels?

It is anticipated that approximately 30–40% of grade 10 students will enrol in graduation-level
courses and approximately 60–70% of grade 10 students will enrol in the academic mathematics
course.

It is anticipated that in grades 11 and 12, 30–40% of students will enrol in graduation level
courses, 40–55% of students will enrol in academic-level courses, and 15–20% of students will
enrol in advanced-level courses.




Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics   October 2005                              4
What courses must be offered to students and which are optional for schools to offer?

The core course in mathematics are Mathematics 10, Mathematics Foundations 10, Mathematics
11 / Advanced Mathematics 11, Mathematics Foundations 11, Mathematics 12 / Advanced
Mathematics 12, Mathematics Foundations 12, and Pre-Calculus Mathematics 12. Schools must
offer all core courses as options for students. Mathematics Foundations 10 Plus, Mathematics 10
Plus, Mathematics Essentials 10, and Mathematics Essentials 11 are options that schools may
choose to offer. Calculus 12 is also optional.

Mathematics 10 and Mathematics Foundations 10 can be offered as semestered courses, year-long
courses, or as part of the 220-hour year-long Plus courses.


What courses could be combined within one classroom, if necessary?

Mathematics 10 and Mathematics Foundations 10 address many of the same outcomes and offer
similar learning experiences and activities; therefore, these courses could be taught in a combined
classroom. Mathematics Foundations 10 and Mathematics Essentials 10 address completely
different sets of curriculum outcomes; therefore, it is not recommended that these courses be
taught in a combined classroom.

In grade 11, Mathematics 11 can be combined with either Advanced Mathematics 11 or with
Mathematics Foundations 11 depending on enrollment and other issues. However, Mathematics
Essentials 11 should not be combined with Mathematics Foundations 11 as these courses address
completely different sets of outcomes.

In grade 12, Mathematics 12 can be combined with either Advanced Mathematics 12 or
Mathematics Foundations 12 depending on enrollment and other issues.


Can high school mathematics courses be taught through the whole year?

Schools may provide year-long options for students in high school mathematics through creative
timetabling. School may also wish to consider Mathematics 10 Plus and Mathematics Foundations
10 Plus as year-long 220-hour course options for grade 10 students. It is important that scheduling
of grade 12 courses reflect prerequisites and provide for students who wish to earn more than three
mathematics credits.




Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics   October 2005                               5
What are the differences between Mathematics 10 and Mathematics 10 Plus?

Mathematics 10 Plus is an academic, two-credit course providing successful students with a
Mathematics 10 credit (008008) and one elective credit, Mathematics 10 Plus (008157).
Mathematics 10 Plus follows the Mathematics 10 curriculum but is presented over 220 hours to
allow additional time to support and/or extend the learning to meet the needs of all students.


How do the two credits work in Mathematics 10 Plus and Mathematics Foundations 10
Plus?

Students taking Mathematics 10 Plus should be enrolled in both Mathematics 10 (course code
008008), a mathematics credit, and Mathematics 10 Plus (course code 008157), an elective credit.
Students taking Mathematics Foundations 10 Plus should be enrolled in both Mathematics
Foundations 10 (course code 008009), a mathematics credit and Mathematics Foundations 10 Plus
(course code 008158), an elective credit.


Can Mathematics 10 Plus be taught as two separate courses?

The 220 hours afforded to this course will allow the teacher to get to know each student’s strengths
and needs in mathematics very well. This enables the teacher to address the appropriate
Mathematics 10 Plus outcomes for that student. For this reason Mathematics 10 Plus should be
viewed as a single course, ideally taught over two semesters by the same teacher.


What credit options are there for students who take Mathematics 10 Plus all year and
then fail?

Teachers may use their professional judgement in situations where a student fails. If the student
has achieved the outcomes for Plus elective credit, a teacher may give credit for this course
(008157) and not for the Mathematics 10 course. The student will need to be counselled regarding
options for earning the two required mathematics credits. Schools may also decide that a student’s
performance is sufficient to satisfy the Mathematics Foundations 10 credit (008009) and may
assign this credit, making the appropriate changes to the student’s record/transcript. In this case,
options, should review with students and parents, for further mathematics credits that would best
meet the needs of the student.




Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics   October 2005                               6
May schools continue to offer locally developed mathematics courses?

Principals and guidance counsellors are advised to check the approved status and end dates for
locally developed courses in the course code list. See also Appendix A for a list of active course
codes.


What is the recommended sequence of grade 11 and grade 12 courses?

While it is possible for these courses to be taught in either order, this should only happen in special
circumstances. Whenever possible students should take Mathematics 11 before Mathematics 12
and Advanced Mathematics 11 before Advanced Mathematics 12 and Mathematics Foundations 11
before Mathematics Foundations 12. Schools should make every effort to arrange schedules that
will allow this sequence of courses.

While the content of grade 11 courses is not prerequisite to grade 12 courses, students naturally
benefit from the 110 hours of mathematics learning in grade 11 courses and have a stronger
background on which to build as they address requirements of grade 12 courses.


What are the IB and AP options in high school mathematics?

The IB Diploma Program is currently being offered in two Nova Scotia schools. The program is
being expanded to include several more high schools over the next few years.

The Department is currently working with boards to expand opportunities for students to prepare
for and take Advanced Placement Examinations.


Pathways

What are the possible course pathways through high school mathematics?

See Appendix B.




Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics   October 2005                                   7
When a student is entering grade 10, what should he or she consider when registering for
math courses?

Students and their parents should consider many things when exploring high school mathematics
course options, including previous mathematics achievement, interest, attitude, ability to work
independently, work habits, and future plans, as well as the appropriate level of challenge of the
course.


How does a student’s mathematics course choices influence his or her post-secondary
options?

Post-secondary programs have different mathematics prerequisites and should be carefully
investigated during the course selection process. It is important to note that many post-secondary
programs do not have a mathematics prerequisite and that graduation-level mathematics credits
will satisfy admissions requirements. See the Mathematics: Career Pathways poster.

Selecting courses on the premise of “keeping all doors opened” without considering the above, is
not in the best interest of students. Doing well in the appropriate course gives students many more
options than struggling through an ill chosen course.


How should recommendations regarding student placement be communicated from the
junior to the senior high school?

Protocols should be established within school boards to ensure effective communication between
the junior high school and senior high school regarding recommendations made to students and
their parents about selection of mathematics courses and appropriate placement of students.


If a student chooses a course against the recommendations of the school and teacher,
should resource support be made available to the student?

Allocation of resource support must be prioritized by program planning teams and the school
principal. PPTs and principals must consider many factors when determining a priority list,
including whether or not the student is in the appropriate course. However, principals and guidance
counsellors should ensure that students and parents understand potential issues related to resource
support before decisions are made regarding selection.




Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics   October 2005                               8
What are the course codes for students following an IPP?

For students in grade 10 who require individualized outcomes and who have had Individualized
Program Plans (IPPs) developed specifically to meet their strengths and needs, there is a specific
course code.

The use of the course code (008102) for Mathematics 10 IPP indicates that a student has an
Individualized Program Plan in which outcomes have been deleted or the general curriculum
outcomes are being taught at a significantly different specific curriculum outcome level. It could
also indicate that a student is working on additional or extended outcomes. See the Special
Education Policy Manual and Supporting Student Success: Resource Programming and Services
for information on the individualized program planning process. An outline of the student’s
individualized program plan must be attached to the transcript so that the nature of the
individualized program plan is clear.

For students who require individualized outcomes and who have had Individualized Program Plans
(IPPs) developed specifically to meet their strengths and needs, there are specific course codes
which apply as follows:

    Mathematics 11 IPP (008109)
    Mathematics 12 IPP (008110)
    Advanced Mathematics 11 IPP (008193)
    Advanced Mathematics 12 IPP (008108)
    Pre-Calculus Mathematics 12 IPP (008194)

The use of the course codes for Mathematics 11 IPP or for Mathematics 12 IPP indicates that a
student has an Individualized Program Plan in which outcomes have been deleted or the general
curriculum outcomes are being taught at a significantly different specific curriculum outcome
level. See the Special Education Policy Manual and Supporting Student Success: Resource
Programming and Services for information on the individualized program planning process.

The use of course codes for Advanced Mathematics 11 IPP, Advanced Mathematics 12 IPP, or
Pre-Calculus Mathematics 12 IPP indicates that a student has an Individualized Program Plan in
which the individualized outcomes developed exceed or extend the course as a result of the
student’s exceptionally strong abilities in Mathematics.




Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics   October 2005                               9
In which courses should students following an IPP be placed?

Students should be placed in settings where they will receive the appropriate support depending on
the nature of the IPP. Things to consider include the strengths and needs of the student, the
learning environment that will offer the student the appropriate challenge and support, class sizes,
the ability of the teacher to address the individual’s program and learning needs, and student
access to learning experiences and resources identified in the IPP. See the Special Education
Policy Manual and Supporting Student Success: Resource Programming and Services for
information on the individualized program planning process.


What is the profile of a student in each mathematics course?

Mathematics 10 is designed for those who plan to enter into fields requiring further post-secondary
study of mathematics. Examples include, but are not limited to, the sciences, engineering, and
business administration at university, college, or private institutions. Mathematics Foundations 10
is designed for students who want to maintain a high standard of mathematics but who do not
intend to enter post-secondary programs that require academic mathematics as a prerequisite.
Please check with the institution to obtain accurate information on entrance requirements.

Most of the specific curriculum outcomes designated for Mathematics Foundations 10 are the same
as those designated for Mathematics 10. The significant difference between the two courses lies in
the levels of performance expected in regard to some outcomes.

Mathematics Foundations 10 is characterized by a greater focus on concrete activities, models, and
applications with less emphasis given to formalism, symbolism, computational or symbolic-
manipulating ability, and mathematical structure. Mathematics 10 involves greater attention to
abstraction and more sophisticated generalizations, while in Mathematics Foundations 10 less time
is spent on complex exercises and connections to advanced mathematical ideas.

Mathematics Essentials 10 is designed for students who do not intend to pursue post-secondary
study, or who plan to enter programs which do not have any mathematics prerequisite.

Typically, students who enrol in Mathematics Essentials 10 will have a history of difficulty in
achieving the outcomes of the junior high mathematics program.




Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics   October 2005                                10
How can attendance or lack of attendance affect a student’s ability to complete a course?

With the learning outcomes framework we have in Nova Scotia, attendance should not be a factor,
per se, in the evaluation of a student’s achievement. While students clearly benefit from regular
attendance and uninterrupted learning, what matters is the extent to which the student can
demonstrate achievement of the prescribed outcomes. A provincial attendance committee is
currently investigating options for improving student attendance.


Assessment and Evaluation

How should students in high school mathematics be evaluated by the classroom teacher?

Teachers should develop assessment and evaluation plans in the same way they develop learning
plans for their courses. These plans must be matched to the curriculum outcomes of each of the
mathematics courses.

The assessment plan describes the types of assessments that teachers will employ to gather
evidence of student learning. Examples include paper-and-pencil tests (quizzes and exams),
projects, assignments, and portfolios. The assessment plan should articulate the relationship
between the design of each assessment type and the mathematics curriculum outcomes.

The evaluation plan shows how information about student learning, gathered during each
assessment, will be evaluated by the teacher, using his or her professional judgement. The
evaluation plan, which may be a marking guide, a rubric, or descriptive criteria, will assist teachers
in evaluating their students’ learning. It will also assist students in determining their progress and
their achievement of the curriculum outcomes.

It is not acceptable to use marks that are not linked to course outcomes, such as homework
completion, attendance, or having the proper materials in class. Efforts should also be taken to
minimize the value of individual assessments that students may have completed with help from
others.




Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics   October 2005                                 11
Which high school mathematics courses have a Nova Scotia Examination (NSE)?

Mathematics 12 and Advanced Mathematics 12 require students to write a Nova Scotia
Examination.


Can a student earn an exam exemption in a mathematics course?

There may be no exemptions in courses with Nova Scotia Examinations. While practising formal
examination procedures, in grades 10 and 11, can only help a student when writing an NSE and
future exams, exemption policies, as a reward for academic achievement or attendance, are the
responsibility of the boards. For evaluation guidelines see above.


Can students rewrite NSE without retaking the course?

No, a supplementary is not available at the present time. Students must be enrolled in Mathematics
12 or Advanced Mathematics 12 to receive an examination.


Do students taking summer school or correspondence write an NSE?

All student receiving a credit for Mathematics 12 or Advanced Mathematics 12 should be writing
an NSE. Dates of these exams are published well in advance, and arrangements can be made for
students taking correspondence courses to write them. In some cases arrangements cannot be
made, and an alternative will need to be used. The calculation of summer school marks is
determined by school boards.


Who marks NSE in mathematics?

The department provides examinations in Mathematics 12 and Advanced Mathematics 12. These
are administered and marked by the students’ teachers following guidelines prepared by the
department. The department collects a random representative sample of student booklets and
marks these centrally providing board and provincial statistics.


May schools provide adaptions for NSE in mathematics?

Students who have documented adaptations in mathematics (in their cumulative record file) may
be provided these adaptations when writing the examination. See Adaptations: Strategies and
Resources published by the department.




Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics   October 2005                             12
Teaching and Learning

What resources are needed for these courses?

    Foundation for the Atlantic Canada Mathematics Curriculum
    The curriculum guide for the course
    Textbooks have been provided for all students, and the corresponding series of teacher
    resources for all teachers.
    It is recommended that all teachers have access in the classroom to technology and a large
    screen for classroom demonstrations.
    All students need access to manipulatives (alge-tiles, cube-a-links, etc.) and technology
    (graphing calculators and computers). It is important that students learn how and when to use
    these resources as problem-solving tools.
    An item bank of mathematics questions is available at www.itembank.ednet.ns.ca
    A number of professional and supplementary texts are listed in Authorized Learning Resources
    (ALR).


What should student learning look like in the classroom?

    Students should have frequent opportunities to interact with one another in pairs and small
    groups, as well as opportunities to work independently.
    Students should be applying mathematics to real-life problems rather than practising skills in
    isolation. In this way, students learn skills and procedures in a context that helps them to see
    the relevance and necessity of learning them.
    Students should have access to a range of resources.
    Students should have frequent opportunities to explain the different ways they reach a solution,
    to defend the choice of strategy, and justifying their ideas orally and in writing. Keep in mind
    that some strategies are more efficient then others, and students should be building an efficient
    strategy toolkit.
    This interaction and engagement should involve students in communicating mathematical ideas
    to one another; explaining, challenging, and defending possible strategies and solutions; and
    helping one another to learn. Students should be communicating mathematical ideas to one
    another through examples, demonstrations, class presentations, models, drawings, and logical
    arguments.




Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics   October 2005                               13
What are some things teachers do to support student learning?

    Teachers create learning environments that are participatory, interactive, and collaborative.
    Teachers and Students use a variety of resources.
    Teachers guide students in making appropriate use of manipulatives and technology.
    Teachers design varied learning experiences and use a variety of grouping arrangements,
    balancing whole group activities with individual, partner, and small-group activities.
    Teachers effectively balance direct instruction, demonstrations, and modelling of strategies
    with student investigations, discussions, and presentations.
    Teachers provide opportunities for students to construct their own understandings. For
    example, the teacher might begin by posing a problem for students to solve using previously
    learned strategies. The teacher would then engage the students in discussion or pattern
    searching to develop a generalized approach that involves more sophisticated skills or
    procedures. Sometimes this would be done with investigations, in which students study
    patterns and make conjectures about new ideas. Then, in small-group and large-group
    discussion, these ideas would be explored further, described, discussed, and generalized. This
    discussion would provide opportunity for the teacher to monitor the extent to which students
    can see patterns and describe them.
    When students are working in groups or independently, teachers move around the room,
    monitoring students’ engagement in productive work, challenging students to think deeply, and
    assessing students’ understandings.
    Teachers encourage students to raise and discuss questions about mathematics and help
    students to gain mathematical competence and confidence by finding their own answers to
    these questions.
    Teachers promote student use of inquiry and creativity, encouraging students to move to higher
    levels of learning by pursuing alternative approaches to solving a problem or by proposing new
    problems that are variations on, or extensions of, a given problem.
    Teachers use a variety of assessment strategies that focus on problem solving and
    understanding.
    Teachers use assessment information to provide students with useful feedback an a regular,
    ongoing basis to guide students’ efforts toward improvement.
    Teachers provide opportunities for enrichment, such as opportunities for students to participate
    in mathematics contest and/or competitions, like Math League.




Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics   October 2005                               14
Why does small-group learning play such an important role in the mathematics courses?

    Small groups provide a social support mechanism for learning. Students exchange ideas, ask
    questions, seek and offer explanations to clarify ideas and concepts and to help one another
    understand the ideas.
    Co-operative small group learning offers opportunities for success for all students in
    mathematics. Students in groups are not competing against one another to solve problems.
    Group interaction is designed to help all members learn the concepts and problem-solving
    strategies.
    Mathematics problems can often be solved by several different approaches. Students in groups
    can discuss the merits of different proposed solutions and perhaps learn several strategies for
    solving the same problem.
    The field of mathematics is filled with exciting and challenging ideas that merit discussion.
    One learns by talking, listening, explaining, and thinking with others, as well as by oneself.
    Small groups provide a forum for asking questions, discussing ideas, making mistakes,
    learning to listen to others’ ideas, offering constructive criticism, and summarizing discoveries.
    Students in groups can often handle challenging situations that are well beyond the capabilities
    of individual students.




Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics   October 2005                                 15
What can school administrators do to ensure effective implementation of mathematics
courses?

    Administrators can make sure that teachers have the curriculum guide and the resources they
    need and that they are using them.
    Administrators support teachers in teaching to and assessing the outcomes prescribed for a
    course (curriculum and assessment alignment) in both pedagogy and content.
    Administrators should know what to look for in a math classroom.
    Administrators should have a copy of Administrator’s Guide: How to Support and Improve
    Mathematics Education in Your School by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
    Administrators offer support to all teachers, especially new teachers, in developing and
    implementing their professional growth plans.
    Administrators can work with teachers to identify needs and opportunities for professional
    growth and to ensure their access to professional development resources and activities.
    Administrators can encourage teachers to participate in summer institutes.
    Administrators can ensure that teachers and guidance counsellors are aware of prerequisites
    and recommended prerequisites for mathematics courses.
    Administrators can work with teachers to ensure that the variety of materials and experiences
    available meet students’ learning needs and that learning environments, instructional
    approaches, assessment strategies, evaluation practices, and the use of resources are consistent
    with those described in Foundation for the Atlantic Canada Mathematics Curriculum and
    curriculum guides.
    Administrators can ensure that students and teachers have equitable access to the materials and
    technology the courses require (manipulatives, chart paper and markers, overhead acetate and
    markers, overhead graphing technology, etc.), and consider space and furniture requirements to
    facilitate delivery of mathematics curriculum.
    Administrators can seek ways to optimize opportunities for mathematics teachers to work
    collaboratively in planning instruction and assessment, to reflect on what is working well and
    what is not, and to identify ways in which curriculum delivery can be enhanced.
    Principals, guidance counsellors, and teachers can support students by helping them to consider
    the courses for which they are prepared mathematically to have success and to make wise and
    realistic decisions about course selections and appropriate sequences of courses to meet their
    learning needs and their educational and career plans.
    Principals can monitor enrolments in graduation, academic, and advanced courses. It is
    anticipated that approximately 30–40% of grade 10 students will enrol in graduation-level
    courses and approximately 60–70% of grade 10 students will enrol in the academic
    mathematics course. It is anticipated that in grades 11 and 12, 30–40% of students will enrol in
    graduation level courses, 40–55% of students will enrol in academic-level courses, and 15–
    20% of students will enrol in advanced-level courses.


Appendices


Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics   October 2005                               16
Appendix A

Active Course Codes for High School Mathematics Courses


 Course      Abbreviation                  Course name                Grade   Credit   Credit   Status
  Code                                                                                 Type

 8009      MAT FND 10          Mathematics Foundations 10             10      1        GRAD     PSP

 8143      MAT FND10A          Mathematics Foundations 10A            10      0.5      GRAD     PSP

 8144      MAT FND10B          Mathematics Foundations 10B            10      0.5      GRAD     PSP

 8158      MTH FD10PS          Mathematics Foundations 10 Plus        10      1        GRAD     PSP

 8189      MATH-E 10           Mathematics Essentials 10              10      1        GRAD     PSP

 8008      MATH 10             Mathematics 10                         10      1        ACAD     PSP

 8141      MATH 10A            Mathematics 10A                        10      0.5      ACAD     PSP

 8142      MATH 10B            Mathematics 10B                        10      0.5      ACAD     PSP

 8157      MTH 10PLUS          Mathematics 10 Plus                    10      1        ACAD     PSP

 8154      MAT P-IB10          Mathematics Pre-IB 10                  10      1        ACAD     ALC

 8102      MAT 10 IPP          Mathematics 10 IPP                     10      1        ACAD     PSP

 8011      MAT FND 11          Mathematics Foundations 11             11      1        GRAD     PSP

 8134      MAT FND11C          Mathematics Foundations 11 Co-op       11      1        GRAD     ALC

 8150      MAT FND11A          Mathematics Foundations 11A            11      0.5      GRAD     PSP

 8151      MAT FND11B          Mathematics Foundations 11B            11      0.5      GRAD     PSP

 8191      MATH-E 11           Mathematics Essentials 11              11      1        GRAD     PLT

 8067      MATH 11             Mathematics 11                         11      1        ACAD     PSP

 8136      MATH 11C            Mathematics 11 Co-op                   11      1        ACAD     ALC

 8148      MATH 11A            Mathematics 11A                        11      0.5      ACAD     PSP

 8149      MATH 11B            Mathematics 11B                        11      0.5      ACAD     PSP

 8109      MAT 11 IPP          Mathematics 11 IPP                     11      1        ACAD     PSP

 8145      ADV MAT 11          Advanced Mathematics 11                11      1        ADV      PSP

 8166      AD MAT 11C          Advanced Mathematics 11 Co-op          11      1        ADV      ALC


Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics    October 2005                                      17
 Course      Abbreviation                    Course name                Grade   Credit   Credit   Status
  Code                                                                                   Type

 8147      ADV MAT11B          Advanced Mathematics 11B                 11      0.5      ADV      PSP

 8146      ADV MAT11A          Advanced Mathematics 11A                 11      0.5      ADV      PSP

 8193      AMA 11 IPP          Advanced Mathematics 11 IPP              11      1        ADV      PSP

 8087      MAT-IB 11           Math (Int'l Baccalaureate)11             11      1        ADV      ALC

 8013      MAT FND 12          Mathematics Foundations 12               12      1        GRAD     PSP

 8135      MAT FND12C          Mathematics Foundations 12 Co-op         12      1        GRAD     ALC

 8073      MATH 12             Mathematics 12                           12      1        ACAD     PSP

 8137      MATH 12C            Mathematics 12 Co-op                     12      1        ACAD     ALC

 8110      MAT 12 IPP          Mathematics 12 IPP                       12      1        ACAD     PSP

 8015      ADV MAT 12          Advanced Mathematics 12                  12      1        ADV      PSP

 8133      ADV MAT12C          Advanced Mathematics 12 Co-op            12      1        ADV      ALC

 8108      AMA 12 IPP          Advanced Mathematics 12 IPP              12      1        ADV      PSP

 8088      MAT-IB 12           Math (Int'l Baccalaureate)12             12      1        ADV      ALC

 8156      PRE-CAL 12          Pre-Calculus Mathematics 12              12      1        ADV      PSP

 8194      PCM 12 IPP          Pre-Calculus Mathematics 12 IPP          12      1        ADV      PSP

 8190      CAL 12              Calculus 12                              12      1        ADV      PSP

 08195     CAL AP 12           Calculus Advanced Placement 12           12      1        ADV      PSP

 8165      CAL IB 12           Calculus (Int'l Bacc)12                  12      1        ADV      ALC




Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics      October 2005                                      18
Appendix B
Suggested Student Pathways through High School Mathematics




The above pathways should be provided to students and their parents when preparing to register
for high school mathematics courses. Exceptions to this guideline should involve careful
discussions with the student, his or her parents, guidance counsellors, and tea




Frequently Asked Questions: High School Mathematics   October 2005                               19

								
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