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									English
American Literature                                                         Recommended Grade(s)                           11,12
American Literature will begin with an intensive writing unit, in which students will have the opportunity to explore a variety
of writing topics and styles and to review vital grammar concepts. Each of the subsequent quarters will consider opposing
themes depicted in our body of literature. Our first opposition is the Dream and the Betrayal of the Dream, in which
students examine the founding principles of our society and explore the complications that face a democratic nation. Our
second unit will consider Equality and Intolerance, in which students explore a variety of writers who had to fight for
equality in an at times intolerant society. Finally, students will examine the Individual and the Community, in which
Americans search for national and personal identities. Each unit is designed to enhance students’ study of American
history by aligning studies across curriculums.
Requirements          Juniors not taking AP Lit/Language                   Semester(s)          2

AP Language and Composition                                                 Recommended Grade(s)                          11,12
This AP English course is designed to offer ambitious students a chance to access a college-level English course while
still in high school. Drawing mainly upon nonfiction and upon American Literature as its core content, AP Language
focuses on how a writer creates. The wide range of fiction and nonfiction demands that students analyze and interpret
language in a variety of forms. The class features frequent writing assignments and guided discussion. Special attention
is paid to rhetorical form as students learn and write in a variety of expository and analytical modes. Furthermore,
students improve critical thinking skills through timed drills of multiple choice and essay questions. Designed for students
who possess self-motivation and maturity, AP Language prepares pupils to read widely, analyze with confidence, write in
a variety of modes, and create strong arguments regarding literature and language.
Requirements           B- in honors or AP, A- in regular                     Semester(s)         2

Archetypal Mythology                                                        Recommended Grade(s)                           11,12
This elective course is based upon the understanding of mythic patterns that run through life and literature. Early in the
20th century, scholars of literature, myth, comparative religion and the like recognized that certain ideas and images
reoccur in many cultures all over the globe. For example, there are myths about a great flood in at least eighty separate
cultures. Students will examine such patterns in works like Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby and Malamud’s The Natural
and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.
Requirements         NA                                                    Semester(s)         1

Creative Writing                                                            Recommended Grade(s)                   09,10,11,12
This course is open to all students who have an interest in creative writing. Students will be encouraged to observe,
record, and explore as they create their own works of poetry and prose. Desire to share work within a workshop setting
and ability to work independently on writing projects are required. Students who have taken creative writing before are
eligible to take the course with an advanced option. See instructor for information regarding this option.
Requirements          NA                                                  Semester(s)         1

English Literature                                                          Recommended Grade(s)                          11,12
English Literature will begin with an advanced writing unit, in which students will continue their exploration of various
writing techniques. Utilizing a thematic approach, students will then study a variety of writers from the British empire,
including Geoffrey Chaucer, William Shakespeare, Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, Robert Louis Stevenson, James Joyce,
Graham Greene, and Margaret Atwood. Through the investigation of different genres within this body of literature,
students will look closely at form as well as function. These studies will hone students’ critical thinking skills and exercise
their higher order cognition as they learn to synthesize their abilities in all aspects of literature. A focus of this course will
be to encourage insightful articulation of independent ideas.
Requirements          Seniors not taking AP Lit/Language                     Semester(s)            2

European Literature                                                         Recommended Grade(s)                               10
Ranging from classical beginnings to modern day, this course will take students on an exploration of literature of
European descent. Students will follow a thematic approach to their study by tracing the ideas of the Quest, Storytelling
and Narration, The Individual v. Society, and The Consequences of Self-Realization. Throughout the year, students will
also examine their own journey of self-knowledge through creative writing and self-reflection on their individual learning
styles. This course will emphasize writing as a process as well as focus on how to closely interpret and analyze literary
text. Exploring different genres, students will read authors ranging from Homer and Sophocles to Dante and Shakespeare
to Henrik Ibsen and Muriel Spark. This course should enhance a student’s course of study in European History.
Requirements          NA                                                 Semester(s)         2

Fabulous Flicks: Now and Then                                               Recommended Grade(s)                           11,12
This course is designed for movie buffs that want to learn more about landmark films past and present. After viewing
some classics from the silent and early ―talkies‖ eras, students preview part or all of at least thirty famous films from
different genres, including gangster, screwball comedy, western, noir, drama, action-adventure, sci-fi, romantic comedy,
musical, suspense, and animation. The class will take a close look at some of the legendary actors and directors, and
relate some of the movies to the eras in which they were made. Students also compare the movies from one era to those
of other eras.
Requirements          NA                                                 Semester(s)             1

Great Thriller and Suspense Movies                                          Recommended Grade(s)                          11,12
This English elective examines a wide array of thriller and suspense films in depth. From classics of the genre such as
Psycho, Jaws, Alien, Blade Runner, and The Matrix, to contemporary, such as Silence of the Lambs, Kill Bill, L.A.
Confidential, The Usual Suspects, The Sixth Sense, Minority Report, The Bourne Identity, and Seven, students examine
how various filmmakers assemble visual images to achieve desired effects. The course is designed to sharpen student’s
cinematic literacy and improve their critical thinking skills in visual media. Course requirements include keeping a weekly

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movie journal, posting reviews on the Internet, attending movies outside school, and reading and writing film essays and
criticism. Extended films-clips from the following films are also examined: The Fifth Element, The Manchurian Candidate,
Mystic River, Kiss the Girls, The Third Man, Night of the Hunter, Cape Fear, Memento, Blood Simple, The Exorcist,
Strangers on a Train, The Shining, Notorious, Signs, and Speed.
Requirements         NA                                                  Semester(s)        1

Honors European Literature                                                Recommended Grade(s)                              10
Ranging from the classical beginnings to modern day, this course will take students on an exploration of literature of
European descent. Students will follow a thematic approach to their study by tracing the ideas of the Quest, Storytelling
and Narration, The Individual v. Society, and The Consequences of Self-Realization. Throughout the year, students will
also examine their own journey and self-knowledge through creative writing and self-reflection on their individual learning
styles. This course will emphasize writing as a process as well as focus on how to closely interpret and analyze literary
text. Exploring different genres, students will read authors ranging from Homer and Sophocles to Dante and Shakespeare
to Henrik Ibsen and Muriel Spark. This course should enhance a student’s course of study in European History. Students
pursuing honors level work should be prepared for the high level of rigor involved in reading some rather difficult, yet
rewarding works of literature.
Requirements          B- in honors, A- in regular                        Semester(s)         2

How to “Read” a Film                                                      Recommended Grade(s)                       11,12
This elective is designed to sharpen students' cinematic literacy and improve their critical thinking skills in visual media.
It is both a film history and a film criticism course where students de-construct noteworthy movies from the silent era to the
present. They learn how to ―read‖ a movie from both technical and esthetic perspectives while developing a visual
vocabulary to use in critical debate. A wide array of film genres, including crime, screwball comedy, western, noir, and
action-adventure to science fiction, romantic comedy, musicals, suspense-thriller, animation, and documentary are
examined. Course requirements include keeping a weekly movie journal, attending films at Cinematique and other movie
venues, reading and writing film criticism, analyzing TV newscast and commercials, and ―shooting‖ a short video that
mimics or parodies film segments discussed in class.
Requirements           NA                                                 Semester(s)           1

Humanities 9                                                              Recommended Grade(s)                              09
Through studying works of literature from Africa, India, the Middle East, and China, students will develop an
understanding of the variety of life experiences of individuals in other cultures. Works from numerous genres will be
covered, including the following: autobiography, folklore (including creation myth and folk epic), film, novels, short stories,
and poetry. Students will be expected to read critically and respond thoughtfully to their reading through a variety of
assignments including reflection journals, projects, essays, class discussion, and formal evaluations. Humanities 9
English is an interdisciplinary course aligned with Humanities 9 social studies. Students should anticipate possible
crossover between these classes and may be expected to submit joint evaluations and projects.
Requirements          NA                                                   Semester(s)         2

Moonlight and Magnolias                                                   Recommended Grade(s)                          11,12
With an emphasis on twentieth century literature, students will examine the Old South vs. the New South, the myths
behind the South, and the stereotypes that have evolved and are being broken. At the end of the course, they will decide
if there still is a unique South or if it is becoming assimilated into the rest of the nation. Students will read works from
authors such as Faulkner, Welty, Hurston, Angelou, O’Connor, and Williams. 10th graders are allowed with permission.
Requirements            Humanities & European Literature                      Semester(s)          1

Shadows and Fog: Film Noir and the dark side of American movies
                                                  Recommended Grade(s)                                                 11,12
Film Noir is a uniquely American film genre that grew up after WW II that tells dark and often sinister stories about
unsavory characters who participate in shady or criminal activities usually resulting in murder or betrayal. Sound like fun?
The class watches a number of classic noir and neo-noir films including Scarlet Street, The Postman Always Rings Twice,
Double Indemnity, The Maltese Falcon, Sunset Boulevard, Night of the Hunter, The Third Man, Touch of Evil, The Asphalt
Jungle, Cape Fear (both versions), Chinatown, Body Heat, Blade Runner, La Femme Nikita, L.A. Confidential, To Live
and Die in L.A., and The Last Seduction.
Requirements         NA                                                 Semester(s)           1

Shakespeare in Hollywood                                                  Recommended Grade(s)                         11,12
If Shakespeare-- the most successful and popular entertainer of his time—were alive today, he would surely be an Oscar-
winning Hollywood Director. Without the benefit of a motion picture camera, the playwright used the power of words to
invoke a dazzling array of visual images in his plays. This English elective explores current filmmaker’s efforts to translate
Shakespeare’s verbal images into screen images. Working directly from his ―shooting scripts,‖ students dissect a wide
range of film-clips drawn from Shakespeare’s most popular ―screenplays,‖ including Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer
Night’s Dream, Hamlet, Much Ado About Nothing, Macbeth, As You Like It, Othello, and Twelfth Night to determine,
among other things, how effectively contemporary film versions render the playwright’s original ―treatments.‖
Requirements          NA                                                 Semester(s)          1

The Short Story                                                           Recommended Grade(s)                      10,11,12
This elective course introduces students to the short story as a literary form, exploring not only the various elements that
make up the short story (plot, characterization, setting, point of view) but also its development in historical, cultural, and
thematic contexts. Participants will develop interactive and analytical skills by engaging in interpretive reading and shared
inquiry. In addition, to this, students will engage in regular creative exercises on the elements of the short story and will,
finally, produce an original story of their own.
Requirements          NA                                                    Semester(s)        1


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Through your Eyes- Media Studies I                                       Recommended Grade(s)                         09,10
Media literacy is more vital in our world than it ever has been. From our understanding of current events and popular
culture to our preferences as consumers, the media plays a powerful role in shaping the way we interpret our world. This
course will encourage students to critically examine various forms of media, to understand how these forms are
constructed, and to investigate the effects they have on culture and society. The emphasis of this elective course will be
discussion, reflection, and interpretation. Media Studies I is designed for ninth and tenth graders. Students DO NOT
have to take Media Studies I before taking Media Studies II - the course is not a prerequisite.
Requirements         NA                                                  Semester(s)           1

Through your Eyes- Media Studies II                                      Recommended Grade(s)                         11,12
Media literacy is more vital in our world than it ever has been. From our understanding of current events and popular
culture to our preferences as consumers, the media plays a powerful role in shaping the way we interpret our world. This
course will encourage students to critically examine various forms of media, to understand how these forms are
constructed, and to investigate the effects they have on culture and society. The emphasis of this elective course will be
discussion, reflection, and interpretation. Media Studies II is designed for eleventh and twelfth graders. Students DO
NOT have to take Media Studies I before taking Media Studies II – the course is not prerequisite.
Requirements         NA                                                   Semester(s)         1


Fine Arts/Electives
2-D Art Fundamentals                                                     Recommended Grade(s)                 09,10,11,12
This course introduces students to basic techniques in drawing, painting, and printmaking while improving observational
skills. The curriculum will emphasize exploration in pencil, charcoal, pastel, ink, marker, acrylic paint and canvas board,
watercolor, silkscreen, and relief print. Emphasis will be placed on spatial illusion (depicting a two-dimensional object on
a three-dimensional surface). Units of study include still life, portraiture, figures, perspective and landscape. The student
will be acquainted with the elements (line, shape, form, texture, color, and space) and principles (pattern, rhythm,
emphasis, movement, balance, contrast, and unity) and design.
Requirements         NA                                                     Semester(s)           1

3-D Art Fundamentals                                                     Recommended Grade(s)                 09,10,11,12
This course introduces students to basic techniques in sculpture, ceramics, and other fine crafts. The sculpture
curriculum will emphasize exploration in wood, clay, plaster, paper-mache’, plastic, metal and fibers. Students will
experience both additive and subtractive processes (building, casting, and carving). In ceramics, students will mast hand-
building techniques (pinch, coil, slab), and move on to simple wheel construction. Projects may include lidded boxes,
vases, bowls, mugs, and tiles. Students will experience all aspects of clay creation: from preparation of the clay for
construction (wedging), to decorating and glazing. Other fine crafts to be explored may include weaving, batik,
papermaking, paper marbling, stained glass, and jewelry design. The student will become acquainted with the elements
(line, shape, form, texture, color, and space) and principles (pattern, rhythm, emphasis, movement, balance, contrast, and
unity) of design.
Requirements          NA                                                   Semester(s)       1

AP Music Theory                                                          Recommended Grade(s)                         11,12
The goal of the AP Music Theory course is to develop a student’s ability to recognize, understand and describe the basic
materials and process of music that are heard or presented in a score. The achievement of these goals may best be
approached by initially addressing fundamental aural, analytical and compositional skills using both listening and writing
exercises. Building on this foundation, the course will progress to include creative tasks such as harmonization of melody
by selecting appropriate chords, composing a musical bass line to provide two-voice counterpoint or realization of figured
bass notation. Minimum requirements include ability to read and write music notation and basic performance skills on
voice or an instrument.
Requirements        B in honors or AP, A in regular                      Semester(s)          1

Art History                                                              Recommended Grade(s)                     10,11,12
Art History provides students with an introduction to Western art. Students will learn about major periods and trends in art
starting with ancient Egypt and ending with Modern art. Instruction will be augmented by viewing the series Art of the
Western World with Michael Wood as host. We will use a version of Janson’s History of Art. Students should find this
course an enjoyable way to learn more about art and link art to their studies of literature and/or history.
Requirements          NA                                                 Semester(s)           1

Art Studio in Ceramics                                                   Recommended Grade(s)                 09,10,11,12
This class will provide an opportunity for students to continue their studies in ceramics. With the help of the teacher,
students will develop and complete seven to eight projects.
Requirements          Three-dimensional Art Fundamentals                   Semester(s)        1

Art Studio in Drawing & Printmaking                                      Recommended Grade(s)                 09,10,11,12
This class will provide an opportunity for students to continue their studies in drawing and printmaking. With the help of
the teacher, students will develop and complete a series of projects.
Requirements          Two-dimensional Art Fundamentals                     Semester(s)         1

Art Studio in Painting & Drawing                                         Recommended Grade(s)                 09,10,11,12
This class will provide an opportunity for students to continue their students in drawing and painting. With to help of the
teachers, students will develop and complete a series of projects.
Requirements          Two-dimensional Art Fundamentals                    Semester(s)         1



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Art Studio in Sculpture                                                   Recommended Grade(s)                  09,10,11,12
This class will provide an opportunity for students to continue their studies in sculpture. With the help of the teacher,
students will develop and complete seven to eight projects.
Requirements          Three-dimensional Art Fundamentals                   Semester(s)         1

Band                                                                      Recommended Grade(s)                  09,10,11,12
Band is open to any woodwind, brass or percussion student. It seeks to improve the student’s technical and musical
proficiency on a musical instrument, while enhancing the student’s ability to play with other as an ensemble. It includes
the study of major scales and technical studies in those keys, as well as learning concert overtures for public
performance.
Requirements         NA                                                  Semester(s)           2

Honors Band                                                               Recommended Grade(s)                  09,10,11,12
This course is a sub-section of Band. In addition to band, honors students are required to participate in All District
auditions in 1st and 2nd Trimester. They must prepare all requirements for this audition and meet regularly for individual
help sessions. In 3rd trimester, performing in the pit band for the spring musical fills the honors requirement.
Requirements         NA                                                   Semester(s)           2

Independent Study in Theatre Arts                                         Recommended Grade(s)                  09,10,11,12
Students can earn a partial or full Fine Arts Credit in acting or technical theater through an independent study.
Independent studies in Theater Arts require a signed contract between the student and instructor, and are subject to
approval by the Upper School Director.
Requirements       US Director Approval                                     Semester(s)          1

Independent Study in Visual Art                                           Recommended Grade(s)                  09,10,11,12
Students can earn a partial or full Fine Arts credit in visual art through an independent study. Independent study in Visual
Art requires a signed contract between the student and instructor, and is subject to approval by the Upper School Director.
Requirements         Teacher & Upper School Director approval               Semester(s)        1

Introduction to Photography                                               Recommended Grade(s)                          11,12
This course will provide students with a basic overview of the fundamentals of photography. While course work will
primarily be conducted with digital cameras and Photoshop, students will have also have an opportunity to work with
chemically processed film and paper. Topics will include manual camera operation, composition, and presentation.
Assessments will include photo assignments, critiques, and the development of a portfolio.
Requirements         Drawing or Fundamentals course                    Semester(s)         1

Modern Dance                                                              Recommended Grade(s)                  09,10,11,12
This course introduces students to modern day jazz and hip-hop dance styles. A variety of techniques will be explored,
including across the floor work and technique turns. Projects will include group and individual work. This course is also
designed for both the beginner and advanced 9-12 grade students.
Requirements         NA                                                  Semester(s)         1

Personal Fitness                                                          Recommended Grade(s)                  09,10,11,12
Students in this class will work with a trainer to set goals and work on improving their strength, endurance, and flexibility.
Students will be evaluated on the progress they make towards their personal goals. Activities will include weight training,
running, and stretching. Students may enroll in this course for a single semester or repeat it multiple times. Successful
completion of two semesters fulfills Cape Fear Academy’s physical fitness requirements for graduation.
Requirements         NA                                                    Semester(s)         1

Publications                                                              Recommended Grade(s)                  09,10,11,12
Combining elements of graphic arts, writing, and marketing, students on the Publications staff work together to design,
produce, finance, and maintain three publications – the Shoreline yearbook, the Currents alumni magazine, and The
Hurricane upper school newspaper. Students learn to apply journalistic standards of writing, design, and photography
while using a variety of programs as Adobe PageMaker, Photoshop, Adobe InDesign, and Publisher. With individual roles
that contribute to a team goal, students also explore the nuances of team management, community relations, and the
fundamentals of production organization.
Requirements          NA                                                Semester(s)         2

Theatre Arts                                                              Recommended Grade(s)                  09,10,11,12
The theatre elective is a performance-based class in which students will work on staging scenes from modern and
classical texts. Students will also devise and script original theatre pieces, and develop skills such as directing, theatre
mask, physical theatre, acting for camera and dance. Students will perform publicly on a regular basis, in assemblies,
evening performances and other off campus festivals and competitions. Offered after school for the Upper School.
Requirements         NA                                                     Semester(s)          1

Video Production                                                          Recommended Grade(s)                  09,10,11,12
This arts elective is designed for both beginning and advanced video students who want to improve their skills in digital
video making. Working at their appropriate skill level, students develop ―treatments‖ and ―scenarios,‖ ―scripts‖ and
―storyboards,‖ before actually ―shooting‖ a movie or video segment with a digital camcorder. After shooting is complete,
students edit the raw footage on computers using state-of-the-art software, adding titles, credits, and music. Students will
also video school events and have the opportunity to enter local film festivals.
Requirements          NA                                                 Semester(s)          1


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Vocal Ensemble/ Honors Vocal Ensemble                                     Recommended Grade(s)                 09,10,11,12
The Vocal Ensemble is a small group of selected singers in grades 9-12 who study and perform vocal chamber music
from madrigals to jazz to current popular tunes. Students develop vocal techniques, music reading skills, and effective
presentation. Course admission is through audition at the end of the previous year or at the beginning of the new school
year. An honors option is available each trimester, based on additional solo or small ensemble preparation.
Requirements        Audition                                            Semester(s)         2


Foreign Language
Conversational Spanish                                                    Recommended Grade(s)                     10,11,12
This elective is intended to increase ability and confidence in conversational Spanish. Students will continue to
strengthen speaking and listening skills through frequent in-class discussions on various topics. Course materials will
include Spanish-language materials from daily life, the internet, and other media. This course may be taken concurrently
with another Spanish course.
Requirements          B in Spanish II                                     Semester(s)        2

Honors Spanish History and Culture                                        Recommended Grade(s)                         11,12
This class includes the study of Spanish history from prehistoric times to the present day. It also covers a geographic
study of Spain. Also included is a brief study of Spanish artists and musicians.
Requirements         NA                                                  Semester(s)          2

Honors Spanish V                                                          Recommended Grade(s)                         11,12
Honors Spanish V includes a detailed study of Spanish grammar. The course stresses the four primary language skills:
reading, writing, listening and speaking. The goal of the course is to teach students to read and listen with sensitivity, to
write cogently and persuasively and to speak as fluently and correctly as possible. Literature, authentic media sources,
and history are included in the class tools to help teach the four primary language skills.
Requirements           B+ in Honors Spanish IV                            Semester(s)         2

Honors Spanish IV                                                         Recommended Grade(s)                         11,12
The focus of this course is reading. The reading of short stories, excerpts from novels and plays, poems, and magazine
articles enable students to increase their ability to read with a high degree of comprehension. Oral conversations,
structured oral exercises and the unique textbook treatment of vocabulary provide opportunities for students to maintain
and develop their listening and speaking skills.
Requirements         B- in Spanish III                                     Semester(s)       2

Spanish III                                                               Recommended Grade(s)                     10,11,12
This course refines the students’ understanding of cultural and linguistic differences. Students express themselves
through both written and oral means with a high level of accuracy using basic tenses while learning more advances in
grammar skills. Reading may include short stories, poetry, legends, newspaper articles, and magazine articles and
information about the history, geography, and culture of the countries where Spanish is spoken.
Requirements         Spanish II                                           Semester(s)        2

Spanish II                                                                Recommended Grade(s)                 09,10,11,12
Spanish II emphasizes the grammatical system of the language with an intensive study of structure and verb usage.
Vocabulary is built on reading and listening skills and is thematically based. Students will increase oral communication
through dialogues.
Requirements         Spanish I                                            Semester(s)          2

Spanish I                                                                 Recommended Grade(s)                 09,10,11,12
Beginning Spanish includes vocabulary, writing, reading, and the building of oral narrative skills. A strong emphasis is
placed on grammar, sentence structure, and audio-lingual skills.
Requirements       NA                                                  Semester(s)           2


Math
Algebra I                                                                 Recommended Grade(s)                             09
This course is intended for students who have not taken Algebra I, or have had a year of algebra but are not ready to
move on to Geometry or Algebra II. Fundamentals of algebra will be stressed. Placement will be based upon test scores
and previous course work for new students, and teacher recommendations for returning students.
Requirements         Teacher Recommendation                            Semester(s)          2

Algebra II                                                                Recommended Grade(s)                         10,11
This course begins with a review of linear equations and inequalities, linear functions, and polynomials. Students will then
study irrational and complex numbers, quadratic and polynomial functions and conics.
Requirements          Algebra I & Geometry                                Semester(s)         2

AP Calculus                                                               Recommended Grade(s)                             12
The Advanced Placement course in Calculus adheres to the stated purpose of the College Entrance Examination Board.
The program enables students to earn college-level credit in math while still in high school. It also provides students with
the experience of college-type instruction in terms of materials, methods and expectations.




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The course covers broad topics, including elementary functions, differential calculus and integral calculus. Prerequisites
are math courses through Math Analysis and Trigonometry. Qualified seniors may take AP Statistics and AP Calculus
concurrently.
Requirements       Permission of the instructor                        Semester(s)           2

AP Statistics                                                            Recommended Grade(s)                         11,12
The Advanced Placement course in statistics adheres to the stated purpose of the College Entrance Examination Board.
The program enables students to earn college-level credit in math while still in high school. It also provides students with
the experience of college-type instruction in terms of materials, methods and expectations. Finally, it gives students an
introductory, non-calculus based course in statistics.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing
conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: 1) exploratory analysis, 2) planning a
study, 3) probability, 4) statistical inference. Students in this course will observe patterns and departures from patterns,
decide what to measure and how to measure it, produce models using probability and simulation and confirm models
through inference from data.

In addition to the AP Statistics teacher's approval, students must have successfully completed, or be currently enrolled in
Math Analysis.
Requirements         Permission of the instructor                        Semester(s)        2

Discrete Mathematics                                                     Recommended Grade(s)                         11,12
Discrete Mathematics introduces students to the mathematics of networks, social choice, and decision-making. The
course focuses on applications of matrix arithmetic and probability. Applications and modeling are central to this course
of study. Appropriate technology, from manipulatives to calculators and application software, will be used regularly for
instruction and assessment. Honors credit available.

Prerequisites include: 1.) Describe phenomena as functions graphically, algebraically and verbally; identify independent
and dependent quantities, domain, and range, input / output, mapping. 2.) Translate among graphic, algebraic, numeric,
tabular, and verbal representation of relations. 3.) Define and use linear and exponential functions to model and solve
problems. 4.) Operate with matrices to model and solve problems. 5.) Define complex numbers and perform basic
operations with them.
Requirements         Completed/concurrently with Math Analysis          Semester(s)          2

Geometry                                                                 Recommended Grade(s)                         09,10
In this course, geometry and algebra reinforce each other through multiple tie-ins. Inductive and deductive reasoning are
introduced. Students progress gradually from informal arguments to more formal presentations of proof. Coordinate and
transformational geometry are interwoven through the text. Triangle relationships, measuring in the plane and measuring
in space are topics fully explored as well as reasoning and parallel lines, proving triangles congruent, working with
quadrilaterals, similarity, right triangle trigonometry, and chords, secants, and tangents.
Requirements          Algebra I                                            Semester(s)         2

Honors Algebra II                                                        Recommended Grade(s)                         09,10
This course covers the same material as described in Algebra II. The course goes into greater depth in each of the
concept areas and follows a more rigorous pace. Additional topics that are covered include linear programming, sequence
and series, and statistics and probability.
Requirements         A- in Algebra I, B- in H Geometry or A in Geometry Semester(s)        2

Honors Geometry                                                          Recommended Grade(s)                         09,10
This course covers the same material as described in geometry. It goes into greater depth in each of the concept areas
and follows a more rigorous pace. Applications to the physical and mathematical world are stressed.
Requirements        B- in Honors Algebra I or A in Algebra I          Semester(s)          2

Honors Math Analysis                                                     Recommended Grade(s)                        11,12
This course covers the same material as described in Math Analysis. It goes into greater depth in each of the concept
areas and follows a more rigorous pace. In addition, students will study parametric equations and polar coordinates.
Throughout the course, students are confronted with challenging applications of the mathematical concepts learned.
Students must have the approval of the Math Department to enroll in this course.
Requirements        B- in Honors Algebra II or A in Algebra II          Semester(s)         2

Math Analysis                                                            Recommended Grade(s)                        11,12
This course begins with a review of algebra concepts, followed by an in-depth analysis of functions, their graphs, and their
inverses, including linear, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Students will then be exposed to a thorough
examination of Trigonometry. They will learn to manipulate the basic trigonometric functions and identities to solve a
variety of "real world" problems. They will also study the graphs of the trigonometric functions.
Requirements          Algebra II                                          Semester(s)          2


Science
AP Biology                                                               Recommended Grade(s)                         11,12
The purpose of this course is to develop the student’s knowledge and application of advanced biological concepts. This
comprehensive study includes biochemistry, structure and function of cells, genetics, evolution, energy transformation,
plant and animal (human) anatomy, physiology, behavior and/or response, ecology, and bioethics. The required


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laboratories have an experimental and quantitative format. This course will follow the Advanced Placement Biology
guidelines. At the completion of the course, the student will take the AP exam.

The student electing to take this course should be self-disciplined and should schedule additional time for extensive
reading and research. Successful completion of Biology I and Chemistry are prerequisites. Students must have the
approval of the AP Committee to enroll in this course. Students will also be required at times to use their study hall for lab
work.
Requirements        B- in honors, A- in regular                          Semester(s)          2

AP Chemistry                                                              Recommended Grade(s)                          11,12
The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first
college year. AP Chemistry will contribute to the development of the students’ abilities to think clearly and to express their
ideas, orally and in writing, with clarity and logic. This course is designed to provide a solid, first-year college chemistry
experience, both conceptually and in the laboratory. The labs serve to supplement the learning in the lecture section of
the course. Problem solving skills, both on paper and in the lab, are emphasized. The following topics will be covered
during this AP course: atomic theory and structure, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, gas laws, kinetic theory,
solutions, reaction types, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamics.
Requirements          A in Chemistry and Algebra II                         Semester(s)           2

AP Environmental Science                                                  Recommended Grade(s)                         11,12
The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and
methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental
problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine
alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.

Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. Yet there are
several major unifying constructs, or themes, that cut across the many topics included in the study of environmental
science. Among these are energy flow, natural systems, human impact including growth in technology and human
population, and social/cultural/economic factors. Sustainability, resource management, development, conservation, and
ethics.
Requirement          B- in honors Biology, A- in regular                 Semester(s)           2

Biology                                                                   Recommended Grade(s)                             09
This course focuses on the nature of life from a molecular and cellular basis. The continuity of life is included in the study
of genetics. The chemical processes, structures, and functions of cells to organisms are studied. The diversity and
adaptive responses of life from the simplest protozoan to the complex human body are evaluated. Lab work is correlated
with reading assignments. Examples range from microscopic study of cells to field work in ecology.
Requirements        NA                                                   Semester(s)         2

Chemistry                                                                 Recommended Grade(s)                              10
The goal of this course is to teach students to quantitatively apply their understanding of chemical structures and
concepts. This is achieved by an approach based on the problem-solving nature of chemistry. The main topics covered
include atomic theory, stoichiometry, chemical formulas and equations, molecular structure, periodicity of the elements,
gas law relationships, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction reactions, and equilibrium. Laboratory activities play an
important role in the process of discovery and learning.
Requirements          Biology & had or concurrently taking Algebra II      Semester(s)         2

Earth and Space Science                                                   Recommended Grade(s)                     10,11,12
In earth and space science, students study the origin, structure, and physical phenomena of the earth and the universe.
Studies include concepts in geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy. These studies integrate previously or
simultaneously gained understandings in physical and life science with the physical environment. Through the study of
earth and space, students learn about the nature and interactions of oceans and the atmosphere, and of earth processes,
including plate tectonics, changes in topography over time, and the place of the earth in the universe.
Requirements         NA                                                 Semester(s)           1

Environmental & Marine Science                                            Recommended Grade(s)                         11,12
This course is designed to study marine organisms and the interrelated processes within the marine environment.
Geological, physical, and chemical oceanography influence the biology and ecology of marine life. Hydrothermal vents,
mid-oceanic ridges, beaches marshes, waves, tides, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, etc. all affect the diversity of marine
organism on the "Blue Planet". The evolution and classification of marine invertebrates, vertebrates, and algae/seaweeds
will be investigated. Students will be responsible for setting up and maintaining several salt-water aquariums. The
positive and negative effects of human activity on our coastal environment will be examined by class discussions,
construction of models and on field trips.
Requirements          Biology and Chemistry                              Semester(s)          2

Honors Biology                                                            Recommended Grade(s)                             09
The goals of this course are similar to the goals of biology. Biochemical processes in cells and the role of genetics in the
continuity and evolution of life on earth are dealt with in greater depth. The diversity of adaptations of life from bacteria,
protozoa, invertebrate, and vertebrate are discussed in terms of structure and function. The human anatomy and its
interconnected organ systems are studied, as well as plant diversification and ecology. Independent reading expectation
and vocabulary acquisition for this course are high.
Requirements         B- in honors or AP, A- in regular                     Semester(s)          2



                                                            -7-
Honors Chemistry                                                         Recommended Grade(s)                             10
The goals of honors chemistry are similar to the goals of chemistry. However, a strong background in mathematics is
essential. The pace of Honors Chemistry and the mathematical content is more rigorous. Laboratory activities play a vital
role in reinforcing concepts with extensive use of computer technology for obtaining, evaluating, and manipulating data.
Requirements          Algebra II recommended; B-or higher in Biology Semester(s)             2

Introduction to Geology                                                  Recommended Grade(s)                     10,11,12
This course is an introduction to processes within and at the surface of the earth. Topics of study include but not limited
to: description, classification, and origin of minerals and rocks and the rock cycle. Internal processes: volcanism,
earthquakes, crustal deformation, mountain building, and plate tectonics. External processes: weathering, mass wasting,
streams, glaciers, ground waters, deserts, and coastal landforms. Lab work is correlated to the topics of study and is
used to reinforce concepts. Students will have the option of earning honors distinction in this course
Requirements         NA                                                   Semester(s)          1

Physics                                                                  Recommended Grade(s)                         11,12
The goal of this course is to impart to the student an understanding of the fundamental laws of physics and the
quantitative ability to apply those laws. The laws studied include those in the areas of motion, phase changes, heat,
work, waves, electricity, and magnetism. The quantitative application of these laws is demonstrated using realistic
problem solving both in the classroom and in the laboratory. Students will have the option of earning honors distinction in
this course.
Requirements           Algebra II; B or higher                           Semester(s)          2

Zoology                                                                  Recommended Grade(s)                         11,12
Zoology is the branch of biology concerned with the members of the animal kingdom and with animal life in general. It
embraces the anatomy and physiology of all animal life. It also encompasses the relationships between individual
animals or animal groups with one another and the environment. Zoology is a diverse field with concentrations that range
from the study of cells to the study of large populations. Lab work will be an important part of the class.
Requirements         NA                                                   Semester(s)         1


Social Studies
AP Comparative Government                                                Recommended Grade(s)                         11,12
The Advanced Placement course in Comparative Government and Politics adheres to the stated purpose of the College
Entrance Examination Board. The program enables students to earn college-level credit in political science while still in
high school. It also provides students with the experience of college-type instruction, both in methods and materials.
Finally, this course introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and
outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings.

The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain
differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate to students the importance of global political and
economic changes. Comparison assists both in identifying problems and in analyzing policymaking. In addition to covering
the major concepts that are used to organize and interpret what we know about political phenomena and relationships, the
course will cover six specific countries and their governments: China, Great Britain, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia. By
using these six core countries, the course can move the discussion of concepts from abstract definition to concrete
example, noting that not all concepts will be equally useful in all country settings.
Requirements         B- in honors or AP, A- in regular                        Semester(s)            2

AP European History                                                      Recommended Grade(s)                             10
The Advanced Placement course in European History adheres to the stated purposes of the College Entrance
Examination Board. The program enables students to obtain college-level credit in European history while still in high
school and provides 10th grade students with the experience of college-type instruction, both in methods and materials.
Finally, the program represents a thorough survey of Modern European History.

The course will focus in great depth upon the political, social, economic, and religious development of Europe from the
Middle Ages to the present day. Topics, which students will critically examine, include, the Renaissance, Reformation, the
―age of exploration‖, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution and its aftermath, the ―Concert of Vienna‖, Industrialization,
the rise of the Nation-State, Imperialism, the rise of Marxism, the Russian Revolution, the Weimar Republic, Nazism,
Fascism, World Wars I and II, and the Cold War.
Requirements          B- in honors, A- in regular                        Semester(s)          2

AP U.S. Government and Politics                                          Recommended Grade(s)                         11,12
The Advanced Placement course in U.S. Government and Politics adheres to the stated purpose of the College Entrance
Examination Board. The program enables students to earn college-level credit in political science while still in high
school. It also provides students with the experience of college-type instruction in materials, methods and expectations.
Finally, it gives students a good basic understanding of the political structures of the U.S. government and its practices.

This course is an introduction to the history and organization of the national institutions and domestic polices of the United
States government. Emphasis is placed on gaining a working understanding of the basic tenets of American politics, how
and to whose benefit the major political institutions operate and what direction and policies may be expected in the future.
This course can be taken to meet the U.S. Government requirement.
Requirements         B- in honors or AP, A- in regular                    Semester(s)           2



                                                            -8-
AP U.S. History                                                          Recommended Grade(s)                             11
The Advanced Placement course in U.S. History adheres to the stated purposes of the College Entrance Examination
Board. The program enables students to obtain college-level credit in American history while still in high school and
provides 11th grade students with the experience of college-type instruction, both in methods and materials. Finally, the
program represents a thorough general American history course.

The course combines grounding in the chronology of American history with a closer examination of selected periods of the
history. An effort is made to stress political, economic, cultural, social, and diplomatic history. Students learn to view
history from the perspective of the other disciplines of the social sciences.

Certain periods in history are selected for emphasis and greater depth of analysis. The Constitution and Supreme Court
decisions, American political parties, nationalism, reform movements, the changing role of the government in the free
enterprise system, history of minorities, demographic trends, and major developments in American arts and letters are
emphasized. This course can be taken to meet the U.S. History requirement.
Requirements         B- in honors or AP, A- in regular                  Semester(s)         2

European History                                                         Recommended Grade(s)                             10
This course will focus on the political, social, economic and religious development of Europe from the high Renaissance to
the Cold War. Some of the topics of study include the Renaissance and Reformation, the "age of exploration," the
Enlightenment, the French Revolution and Napoleonic era, the Industrial Revolution, the Age of Imperialism, World War I,
the Russian Revolution and the rise of fascism. The course will conclude with an examination of World War II and the
Cold War. It will examine history from the perspective of European world interaction and its effect on the world. This
course should enhance a student's course of study in European literature.
Requirements         NA                                                   Semester(s)        2

Humanities                                                               Recommended Grade(s)                             09
World Cultures is an interdisciplinary class exploring the significance of non-Western civilizations. The core values and
the history of cross-cultural influences of India, China, Indonesia, the Middle East, and sub-Saharan Africa will be studied.
Emphasizing the ―global links‖ that connect all nations, students will be encouraged to look upon all peoples as members
of a single species. Cross-cultural insights will be gained by an examination of cultural and political history, environmental
issues, literature, folk tales and myths, music, and other art forms. Examples of material (architecture, food) and non-
material (language, beliefs) culture help to distinguish differences influenced by habitat. Special emphasis will be placed
on geographic themes, research using primary sources, communication skills, and problem solving for future
development.
Requirements           NA                                                  Semester(s)         2

Service Learning                                                         Recommended Grade(s)                  09,10,11,12
This class will incorporate discussions of important social and ethical issues such as discrimination, drug abuse, poverty
and health care with actual community service in critical need areas, such as homeless shelters, elderly care homes,
hospitals and drug rehabilitation or counseling centers. Students will earn most of their community service hours while in
the class. They will be given the opportunity to enrich their community service by meeting in small groups to process and
reflect upon what they have experienced at their work site. Lastly, they will write reflection journals about their
experiences at their work site.
Requirements          NA                                                  Semester(s)           1

Psychology                                                               Recommended Grade(s)                  09,10,11,12
This one semester course provides a general introduction to the field of psychology with its problems, methods, basic
principles and points of view. Students will be introduced to the history of psychology, human development, personality,
abnormal behavior, social psychology, feelings and emotions, research methodologies, experimental psychology,
psychophysiology, learning and memory, altered states of awareness, sleep and dreams, and industrial and
organizational psychology. Students should anticipate regular discussions, independent research and writing
assignments in addition to course lectures.
Requirements         NA                                                   Semester(s)        1

U.S. Government                                                          Recommended Grade(s)                          11,12
This course will consider both the theory and practice of American government in order to examine its institutions,
influences, and processes. Topics will include the Constitution, public opinion and citizen participation, and the structure
and functions of the national government.
Requirements         NA                                                  Semester(s)          1

United States History                                                    Recommended Grade(s)                              11
This course surveys the history of the United States from 1600 to the present. The course begins with the arrival of
Europeans on the American continents and proceeds to the establishment of the colonies and their evolving democratic
character. Then the American Revolution, the formation of a working federal government, the influence of the factory
system and capitalism during the 1830’s and 1840’s, and the broad trends in United States history, which resulted in the
Civil War are examined. Study of industrialization during the latter half of the nineteenth century and deepening
involvement in overseas adventures, the upheaval of two world wars, and the economic miseries of the Depression give
depth to our understanding of the present post-war period, including the Korean and Vietnam conflicts, Watergate, and
the ensuing years of recovery.
Requirements        NA                                                    Semester(s)          2




                                                            -9-
Cape Fear Community College Courses
Students should be either 16 years old or a junior or senior in the Upper School. Students
must be recommended by their Upper School Director and must meet all prerequisites for
each class they select. Students must submit a new application each year. Students must
have taken the ACCUPLACER (which will be given before the end of the school year) or
made 470 on the SAT Verbal/Critical Reading section and made 450 in the SAT Math
section.

Business Law I (BUS 125-CFCC course)                                     Recommended Grade(s)                     10,11,12
This course introduces the ethics and legal framework of business. Emphasis is placed on contracts, negotiable
instruments, Uniform Commercial Code, and the working of the court systems. Upon completion, students should be able
to apply ethical issues and laws covered to selected business decision-making situations. This course has been
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a major and/or elective course
requirement.
Requirements         NA                                                Semester(s)          1

Constitutional Law (CJC 231-CFCC course)                                 Recommended Grade(s)                     10,11,12
The course covers the impact of the Constitution of the United States and its amendments on the criminal justice system.
Topics include the structure of the Constitution and its amendments, court decisions pertinent to contemporary criminal
justice issues, and other related topics. Upon completion students should be able to identify/discuss the basic structure of
the United States Constitution and the rights/procedures as interpreted by the courts.
Requirements         NA                                                 Semester(s)          1

Developmental Psychology (PSY 241-CFCC course) Recommended Grade(s)                                               10,11,12
This course is a study of human growth and development. Emphasis is placed on major theories and perspectives as
they relate to the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of development from conception to death. Upon
completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of development across the life span. This course has
been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in
social/behavioral sciences. This course may meet the SACS social/behavioral science requirements for AA, AS, AFA,
AGE, AAS, DIP, or CER degree programs.
Requirements         NA                                                  Semester(s)       1

General Psychology (PSY 150-CFCC course)                                 Recommended Grade(s)                     10,11,12
This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology,
biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social
psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of
the science of psychology. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general
education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. This course may meet the SACS social/behavioral science
requirements for AA, AS, AFA, AGE, AAS, DIP, or CER degree programs.

Intro to Criminal Justice (CJC 111-CFCC course)                          Recommended Grade(s)                 09,10,11,12
This course introduces the components and processes of the criminal justice system. Topics include history, structure,
functions, and philosophy of the criminal justice system and their relationship to life in our society. Upon completion,
students should be able to define and describe the major system components and their interrelationships and evaluate
career options. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or
elective course requirement.
Requirements         NA                                                   Semester(s)            1

Introduction to Sociology (SOC 210-CFCC course)                          Recommended Grade(s)                     10,11,12
This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization,
research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations.
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the
interplay among individuals, groups, and societies. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive
Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. This course may meet the
SACS social/behavioral science requirement for AA, AS, AFA, AGE, AAS, DIP, or CER degree programs.
Requirements        NA                                                   Semester(s)          1

Personal Finance (BUS 125-CFCC course)                                   Recommended Grade(s)                     10,11,12
This course provides a study of individual and family financial decisions. Emphasis is placed on building useful skills in
buying, managing finances, increasing resources, and coping with current economic conditions. Upon completion,
students should be able to develop a personal financial plan.
Requirements        NA                                                   Semester(s)        1

Social Psychology (SOC 240-CFCC course)                                  Recommended Grade(s)                     10,11,12
This course examines the influence of culture and social groups on individual behavior and personality. Emphasis is
placed on the process of socialization, communication, conformity, deviance, interpersonal attraction, intimacy, race and
ethnicity, small group experiences, and social movements. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and
analyze cultural and social forces that influence the individual in a society. This course has been approved to satisfy the
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. This course
may meet the SACS social/behavioral science requirement for AA, AS, AFA, AGE, AAS, DIP, or CER degree programs.
Requirements         NA                                                    Semester(s)         1


                                                           - 10 -
Survey of Economics (ECO 151-CFCC course)                              Recommended Grade(s)                     10,11,12
This course introduces basic concepts of micro- and macroeconomics. Topics include supply and demand, optimizing
economic behavior, prices and wages, money, interest rates, banking system, unemployment, inflation, taxes,
government spending, and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to explain alternative solutions
for economic problems faced by private and government sectors. This course has been approved to satisfy the
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. This course
may meet the SACS social/behavioral science requirement for AA, AS, AFA, AGE, AAS, DIP, or CER degree programs.
Requirements        NA                                               Semester(s)         1


Western Civilization I (HIS 121-CFCC course)                           Recommended Grade(s)                     10,11,12
This course introduces western civilization from pre-history to the early modern era. Topics include ancient Greece,
Rome, and Christian institutions of the Middle Ages and the emergence of national monarchies in western Europe. Upon
completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in early
western civilization. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general
education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. This course may meet the SACS social/behavioral science
requirement for AA, AS, AFA, AGE, AAS, DIP, or CER degree programs.
Requirements          NA                                                  Semester(s)        1

Western Civilization II (HIS 122-CFCC course)                          Recommended Grade(s)                     10,11,12
This course introduces western civilization from the early modern era to present. Topics include the religious wars, the
Industrial Revolution, World Wars I and II, and the Cold War. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze
significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments to modern western civilization. This course has been
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral
sciences. This course may meet the SACS social/behavioral science requirement for AA, AS, AFA, AGE, DIP, or CER
degree programs.
Requirements            NA                                              Semester(s)          1


Online Courses
There are a multitude of online courses (see partial examples below) available that can be
used for scheduling conflicts, electives, and just personal interest. All online courses
must be approved by the Upper School Director. You may peruse these sites to see what
is available and if you know of another site/resource for online classes, you may bring that
to the Upper School Director.
Anthropology                           Psychology
Masterpieces of Cinema                 Sociology
Greek Mythology                        Western Civilization
Principles of Microeconomics           Dance Appreciation
Physical Fitness                       Contemporary Moral Issues
Arabic                                 Chinese
C Programming                          Latin
French
Sites:
         Apex Learning: http://apexlearning .com
         University of Nebraska: http://nebraskahs.unl.edu/index.html
         Georgia Tech: http://www.modlangs.gatech.edu/courses/course_info/?CHIN1001
         Arab Academy: http://www.arabacademy.com/
         Stanford University: http://epgy.stanford.edu/
         University of Miami: www.umohs.org
         Most universities offer online courses: College Counselor must approve

Guidelines:
       Students must demonstrate the ability to succeed in an online environment and must have
        the permission of the Upper School Director.
       Students must purchase any books or supplemental materials.
       CFA will pay the cost of tuition and any core course materials.
       Students must submit work in a timely manner and earn a B or higher in order to continue
        with a course.
     The course will be listed as an independent study on the CFA transcript, but its grade will
        not be calculated into the CFA GPA. A copy of the transcript or course record will be
        attached to the final transcript.




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