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									                                                                      Appendix A



                                                               Report
                                            Standards for Developmental Education in the
                                                Virginia Community College System



                                                 Recommendations from the
                                         VCCS Developmental Education Implementation
                                                       Task Force



                                                       Dr. Ann C. Bartholomay, Chair



                                                                        February




                                                            TABLE OF CONTENTS



                                                                                                                                                    Page
ABSTRACT


STANDARDS FOR DEVELOPMENTAL EDUCATION ............................................................... 1

           Mission ................................................................................................................................. 1

CHARGE NUMBER ONE: GUIDELINES FOR COURSE

PLACEMENT ................................................................................................................................... 1


                                                                              1
 Guidelines for Course Placement .................................................................................................... 1

   CHARGE NUMBER'IWO: COURSE OBJECTIVES ................................................................. 3

                Developmental Writing Objectives ................................................................................. 3

                Exit Criteria - Developmental Writing ............................................................................ 4

                Developmental Reading Objectives ................................................................................ 4

                Exit Criteria - Reading..................................................................................................... 5

                Developmental Mathematics Objectives ......................................................................... 6

                Exit Criteria - Developmental Mathematics .................................................................... 8

CHARGE NUMBER THREE: PERFORMANCE INDICATORS AND ASSESSMENT

METHODS TO MONITOR SUCCESS OF PROCEDURES ........................................................... 8


 Quantitative Evaluation ...................................................................................................................

 Qualitative Evaluation ..................................................................................................................... 9

 .........................................................................................................................................................




                                                                                 2
                                                 Abstract

                              Standards for Developmental Education in the

                                  Virginia Community College System




      On July 29, 1998, Dr. Arnold R. Oliver, Chancellor of the Virginia Community College System,
issued a charge to Dr. Ann C. Bartholomay to work with the VCCS Developmental Education Task Force
to develop recommended standards for developmental education-for the Virginia Community College
System. The charge consisted of three tasks:

1.   To develop common systemwide guidelines for interpreting the results of the standardized test

2.   To develop systemwide measurable objectives and exit criteria for developmental reading, writing,
     and mathematics

3.   To make recommendations concerning performance indicators and assessment methods that can be
     implemented systemwide for the purpose of monitoring the success of these new procedures.

       This report consists of responses to each charge. A second report, aftached to this one, provides
details for each charge with recommendations to the colleges for good practices.

      As a response to Charge Number 1, guidelines for placement using COMPASS and ASSET tests
appear as ranges for placement in target developmental and credit courses. The Task Force highly
recommends that colleges use multiple measures to assure correct placement of students in courses and
that they continually monitor the placement guidelines.

      Charge Number 2 includes course objectives for writing, reading, and mathematics. The Task
Force also designed exit criteria for each content area. The second report provides additional
information vital to instructors in the implementation of the objectives and assessment of the programs.

      Charge Number 3 consists of proposed assessment methods for the VCCS,
including both quantitative and qualitative methods.

      The Task Force recommends that all colleges adopt practices that will ensure the continuous
improvement of developmental education teaching -learning seftings. In addition, each college should
consider adopting the Task Force's model of planning and evaluation to guide its efforts to increase
success of developmental Students.




                                                    3
                        STANDARDS FOR DEVELOPMENTAL EDUCATION



MISSION

        On July 29, 1998, Dr. Arnold R. Oliver, Chancellor of the Virginia Community College System,
appointed Dr. Ann C. Bartholomay to chair the Developmental Studies Implementation Task Force, to be
comprised of developmental faculty, deans, division chairs, and representatives from student services.
He also directed the staff from Academic Services & Research to assist the work of the committee. (See
Appendix for the list of Task Force members and VCCS staff members assisting with the report.)

Dr. Oliver's charge to the committee was the following:

(1) to develop common systemwide guidelines for interpreting the results of the standardized test; (2) to
develop systemwide measurable objectives and exit criteria for developmental reading, writing, and
mathematics; and (3) to make recommendations concerning performance indicators and assessment
methods that can be implemented systemwide for the purpose of monitoring the success of these new
procedures.

Dr. Oliver requested that the Task Force provide him with a set of "standards for developmental
education in the VCCS." He stated that the standards would be a combination of operative sections from
the 1989 Joint Task Force report and the current Task Force's responses to the charge.

               CHARGE NUMBER ONE: GUIDELINES FOR COURSE PLACEMENT

        Guidelines for course placement for COMPASS and ASSET test score ranges are presented on
the next page. The following points should be considered in implementing the placement guidelines:

1.   The ASSET scores were derived from American College Testing (ACT) research, linking
     COMPASS and ASSET scores.

2.   Each college should establish any requirements for test scores for enrollment in geometry (Math 06)
     or Trigonometry (Math 07).

3.   Each college should observe prerequisites for entry into credit courses.

4.   Each college may adjust placement ranges by adding or subtracting three (3) points in the
     COMPASS scores where appropriate.

5.   Each college should determine ranges within the range given for placement in English 0 1 or 03
     when appropriate.

6.   Each college should determine ranges within the range given for placement in English 04 or 05
     when appropriate.

7.   Use of multiple measures is recommended for placement of students whose scores reside in the
     decision zones. (Please refer to the attached report on good practices for suggested measures.)

                                                    4
8.   The Task Force understands that limited exceptions to using scores for COMPASS and . ASSET
     tests for placement may be necessary. Substitutes for the C'.OMIIASS and ASSET tests, however,
     will be the responsibility of each college, and should be made only where colleges have clear and
     documented evidence that students are prepared to enter credit ,courses.




                             GUIDELINES FOR COURSE PLACEMENT

                                            ASSET Scores




Content Area

Writing Skills

Reading Skills



Numerical Skills



Elementary Algebra




Intermediate Algebra



College Algebra




Content Area

Writing Skills
                                                   5
Reading Skills



Pre Algebra
 Scores

 23-40
 41-42
 43-55

 23-38
 39-41
 42-55

 23-35
 36-37
 38-55

 23-35
 36-37
 38-40
 41-42
 43-55

 23-37
 38-40
 41-55

 23-33
 34-36
 37-55


 COMPASS Scores

 Scores

 0-68
 69-75
 76-99
 0-75
 76-80
 81-99
 0-29
 30-33
 34-99

 Recommended
                  6
 Courses
 English 01 or 03
 Decision Zone
 Credit English

 English 04 or 05
 Decision Zone
 Credit English

 Math 02
 Decision Zone
 Math 03*

 Math 02
 Decision Zone
 Math 03
 Decision Zone
 Math 04

 Math 03, 04
 Decision Zone
 Credit Math

 Math 04
 Decision Zone
 Credit Math




 Recommended Courses

 English 0 1 or 03
 Decision Zone
 Credit English
 English 04 or 05
 Decision Zone
 Credit English
 Math 02
 Decision Zone
 Math 03*

I Content



Algebra


                       7
College Algebra



Scores



0-31
32-35
36-38
39-43
44-99



0-35
36-40
41-99



Recommended Courses

Math 03
Decision Zone
Math 04
Decision Zone
Credit Math



Math 04
Decision Zone
Credit Math



*or other math course requiring only arithmetic skills as prerequisite




                                                     8
        CHARGE NUMBER TWO: COURSE OBJECTIVES AND EXIT CRITERIA

DEVELOPMENTAL WRITING OBJECTIVES

     Objective 1: Upon completion of developmental writing, students will be able, at minimum levels of
             proficiency, to write a variety of texts that meet all of the following criteria:

           applying strategies in the processes of starting, composing, revising, and editing their texts

           developing a focus that is appropriate for the audience and is the controlling force
            throughout the piece of writing

           containing relevant examples, explanations, evidence, or other fon -ns support

           demonstrating organizational pattern appropriate to the writer's purpose

           demonstrating logic and coherence in sentence and text construction
           demonstrating an ability to produce syntactic variety and complexity in sentences

           using words appropriately and precisely in context

           containing few errors in grammar, usage, mechanics, and spelling

           responding appropriately to reading prompts

Objective 2: Upon completion of developmental writing, students will be able to evaluate the rhetorical,
        grammatical, and mechanical effectiveness of texts created by themselves and others.

Objective 3: Upon completion developmental writing, students will to collaborate in the creation and
analysis of texts.

Objective 4: Upon completion of developmental writing, students will be able to demonstrate use of
technology in support of the writing process.

NOTE:       Texts are defined as any piece of writing, either formal or informal, and include letters,
            paragraphs, essays, and journal entries.

EXIT CRITERIA - DEVELOPMENTAL WRITING

      Students' successful completion of developmental writing course work will be determined by
evaluation of multiple indicators using the Developmental Writing Objectives defined in this report.
Indicators will include at least two of the following or other indicators that measure the stated objectives:

           Holistic evaluation of a writing sample

           Holistic evaluation of portfolios of students' writing that include evidence of the writing
            process

           Evaluation of students' performance on writing tasks throughout the semester
                                                      9
             Objective score earned on ASSET or COMPASS using established ranges

DEVELOPMENTAL READING OBJECTIVES

            Objective 1: Upon completion of developmental reading, students will be able to comprehend
            material explicitly stated in a passage demonstrated by

             recognizing the explicitly stated main idea of a passage

             locating explicit information in a passage that answers the questions “Who, what, when,
              where, why, and how”

             recognizing organizational relationships in writing and reading

             recognizing explicit evidence presented in support of a claim

             recognizing stated assumptions

Objective 2: Upon completion of developmental reading, students will be able to make appropriate
        inferences, develop a critical understanding of the text, and determine the specific meanings of
        difficult, unfamiliar, or ambiguous words based on the surrounding context (known as reasoning
        items) demonstrated by

             inferring the main idea of a passage

             showing how details are related to the main

             drawing conclusions from the facts given

             making comparisons and generalizations

             recognizing logical fallacies, stereotypes, and various points of view

             recognizing the scope of application of hypothesis, explanations, or

             recognizing the structure of an argument

             inferring word meaning in a particular context

Objective 3: Upon completion of developmental reading, students will be able to integrate their reading,
         writing, speaking, and listening skills to promote thinking and learning demonstrated by

         defining their reading processes

             comprehending the literal meaning in different types of reading for different purposes

             paraphrasing and summarizing basic material without plagiarizing or changing the
              substantive meaning
                                                      10
           using a study method to improve their comprehension and master

           using a study method to improve their comprehension and master information in a textbook

           exhibiting effective test taking strategies

Objective 4: Upon completion of developmental reading, students will b able to understand the role of
        reading and writing in their academic professional and personal lives demonstrated by

           comprehending and appreciating a variety of written materials

           identifying the basic kind of information needed for researching particular topic, locating the
            necessary resources, retrieving the information, and synthesizing it in an organized way

EXIT CRITERIA - READING

      Students successful completion of developmental reading course work will be determined by
evaluation of multiple indicators using the Developmental Reading Objectives defined in this report.
Indicators will include at least two of the following other indicators that measure the stated objectives:

           Evaluation of portfolios of students' reading activities that include evidence of mastery of the
            reading objectives

           Demonstrated comprehension and analysis of a content text selection

           Objective score earned on ASSET or COMPASS and/or other standardized measures using
            established ranges

DEVELOPMENTAL MATHEMATICS OBJECTIVES

      Objective 1: Upon completion of developmental arithmetic, students will be able to demonstrate
          basic numeracy concepts by

           performing operations on whole numbers, including reading, writing, identifying place
            values, and rounding

           performing operations on decimal numbers, including reading, writing, identifying place
            values, and rounding

           performing operations on fractions and mixed numbers

           describing and comparing data using ratios

           using proportions to practical problems

           performing operations combining numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, and proportions

                                                      11
           applying appropriate geometric formulae for area, perimeter, and volume

           appropriate geometric formulae for circumference and area of circles

           solving problems involving measurement length, weight/mass, liquid capacity, and
            temperature

           using the concepts of prime and composite numbers.

           simplifying expressions by using order of operations, mental mathematics, and appropriate
            tools

           identifying and representing integers on a number line

           using information displayed in graphs, tables, and charts

           finding the range, mean, median, and mode of a set of data

           solving practical problems


Objective 2: Upon completion of developmental algebra, students will be able to demonstrate algebra
    concepts by

           performing operations required for Objective one

           representing and evaluating verbal quantitative situations

           applying the laws of exponents

           performing operations on polynomials

           analyzing a given set of ordered pairs for the existence of a pattern and representing the
            pattern appropriately

           solving linear equations and inequalities in one variable and literal evaluations for a given
            variable

           performing operations involving graphing linear functions in two variables

           performing operations on rational expressions

           solving equations containing rational expressions

           analyzing a relation to determine existence of direct or inverse variation and performing
            appropriate operations for practical use
           performing operations involving square roots and radical expression

                                                    12
           solving quadratic equations in one variable

           performing geometric operations using algebraic techniques

           recognizing various representations of functions and converting among a graph, a table, and
            an algebraic form

           performing algebraic operations on functions

           solving absolute value equations graphically and algebraically

           determining the domain and range of a relation and performing algebraic and graphing
            operations

           classifying arguments either deductive or inductive reasoning

           solving problems involving symmetry and transformation

EXIT CRITERIA - DEVELOPMENTAL MATHEMATICS

        Students 'successful completion of developmental mathematics course work will be determined
by evaluating student achievement the developmental mathematics objectives defined in this report.

Guidelines for measuring the stated objectives are the following:

         Achievement of the college-established passing score on the uniform exit arithmetic or
           algebra exam, developed and certified by each college as testing basic competencies.

           The purposes of this exit testing are to certify the attainment of the required basic skills, to
            justify the final passing grade, to verify preparedness for the next course, to parallel the
            original placement decisions for the next course, and to provide assessment of the
            developmental course.

           Allowing a second opportunity to take the test during a semester should be a campus-level
            decision.

Guidelines for the contents of the uniform exit arithmetic or algebra exam, developed
and certified by each college are the following:

           Faculty may include additional content requirements for passing the course. They may tailor
            exams by adding questions from topic areas on which they place more emphasis as long as
            the exit exam includes material from required competencies.



           In the case of algebra, the exit exam may be given in two parts, with the first part given at the
            end of Algebra I and second part given at the end of Algebra II.

                                                     13
           The geometry competencies may be tested at the end of a geometry course, or incorporated
            into the algebra exit exam.


                CHARGE NUMBER THREE: PERFORMANCE INDICATORS AND
              ASSESSMENT METHODS TO MONITOR SUCCESS OF PROCEDURES

QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION

       The quantitative evaluation process should provide data to evaluate performance and persistence
as follows:


           Performance

            - students' successful completion of developmental courses

            - students' successful completion of subsequent developmental courses

            - students' successful completion of subsequent college-level courses

           Persistence

            - completion of the first semester in developmental course/s

            - enrollment in the subsequent semester after completion of developmental course/s

QUALITATIVE EVALUATION

      The qualitative evaluation process should include varied research methods that enable colleges to
determine both faculty and student opinions of student preparation as well as their opinions concerning
the appropriateness of developmental objectives.

Colleges should evaluate the opinions of

           non-developmental faculty about preparation in curricular classes

           developmental students after entry into regular curricular courses for information regarding
            their preparedness for credit courses

           faculty and students for appropriateness of developmental objectives




                                                   14
                                            APPENDIX

                        DEVELOPMENTAL EDUCATION IMPLEMENTATION
                                      TASK FORCE

             Name                                    Title                       College

Dr. Ann C. Bartholomay          Coordinator, Learning Assistance Center   SWVCCC

 Dr. Robert L. Bashore          Dean of Student Services                  CVCC

 Mr. James E. Burns             Assistance Professor, English             MECC

 Dr. John S. Capps              Interim Division Chair, Humanities,       VWCC
                                Professor, English

 Dr. Barbara F. Chambers        Professor, Mathematics                    NVCC (WO)

 Dr. Gayle F. Childers          Professor of Mathematics                  JSRCC

 Ms. Mary M. Dubbe              Assistance Professor of Reading           TNCC

 Ms. Nuala M. Glennon           Instructor, Developmental Mathematics     RCC

 Mr. James A. Grigsby           Counselor                                 GCC

 Ms. Sally Harrell              Coordinator of Assessment &               TCC
                                Developmental Education

 Dr. Tom Hyder                  Professor of Developmental Reading &      PVCC
                                English

 Ms. Patricia Leonard           Associate Professor of Reading            cvcc

 Ms. Glenda S. W. Lowery        Assistant Professor of English and        RCC
                                Reading

 Ms. Donna Mayes                Assistant Professor, Reading/English      BRCC

 Dr. Carolyn S. Mayfield        Program Head, Developmental Studies,      PDCCC
                                Associate Professor, English

 Dr. Edward C. Polhamus         Professor of Mathematics and Chair,       DCC
                                Division of Arts and Sciences

 Ms. Edith M. Ruben             Associate Professor of Mathematics        NRCC

 Dr. Barry M. Selinger          Professor, Reading                        NVCC (AL)

                                               15
 Dr. Richard F. Thompson     Professor, English                        NVCC (AN)
Mr. Patrick Thompkins        Associate Professor, English              JTCC

Ms. Kathleen L. Wax          Associate Professor, Assistant Division   NVCC (AL)
                             Chair, ESL/Developmental Studies

Dr. Pansy Waycaster          Professor, Mathematics                    SWVCC

Mr. Warren E. Wise           Assistant Professor, Mathematics          BRCC



                        VIRGINIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE SYSTEM
                       ACADEMIC SERVICES AND RESEARCH STAFF



Dr. Anne-Marie McCarton       Vice-Chancellor, Academic Services
                              & Research

Ms. Linda Carr                Director, Educational Planning

Dr. Earl McHewitt             Director, Research




                                            16
17
                                                        New Development Asset Scores



        Writing                  Reading                  Numerical                           Ele Algebra                   Int Algebra                 College Algebra
                           Lo                      Lo                            Lo                                                                Lo
Low    High        Place   w     High    Place     w    High       Place         w     High           Place         Low   High       Place         w      High     Place
 23     32        ENG 01   23     34    ENG 04     23    35      MTH 02          23     35       MTH 09              23    30     MTH 03           23      33    MTH 04
 33     40        ENG 03   35     38    ENG 05     36    37      DZ              36      37      DZ                 31     32     DZ               34      36    DZ
 41     42        DZ       39     41    DZ         38    55      MTH 09 or       38      40      MTH 03             33     37     MTH 04           37      55    Credit Math
                                                                 MTH 120
                                                                 depending
                                                                 on program

 43     55        ENG      42     55    On-Level                                 41      42      DZ (MTH 03 or      38     40     DZ
                  111 or                                                                         MTH 04)
                  ENG
                  137
                                                                                 43      55     MTH 04; MTH 06;     41     55     MTH 163 or
                                                                                                MTH 115 (if MTH                   MTH 151
                                                                                                06 is completed);
                                                                                                or MTH 121
Writing DZ:   <80 place in ENG 03                  Reading DZ:      < or = 10th grade place in ENG 05               MTH   DZ:     Student advised individually based on
Writing DZ:   >80 dev writing waived               Reading DZ:      = or > 11th grade dev reading waived                          background & curriculum to place in either
                                                                                                                                  lower or upper level.
                                                                                                                                                                 Rev.
Prerequisite for MTH 121 is MTH 03. Students must meet both developmental reading and writing requirement before on-level English.                               11/01
FYI: Shading indicates changes.




                                                               18
 Developmental Prerequisites
Students may not enroll in the following courses until they have demonstrated proficiency on the placement
examination or completed the appropriate developmental course.
Course #                                   Course Name                                 Developmental Requirement
ACC --           All ACC courses                                              MTH 02
ART 201-202      History of Art I-II                                          ENG 05
AST 101          Keyboarding I                                                AST 80
BIO 101-102      General Biology I-II                                         ENG 05
BIO 141-142      Human Anatomy & Physiology I-II                              ENG 03    ENG 05
BUS --           All BUS courses                                              ENG 03 ENG 05
CHD --           All CHD courses                                              ENG 01 and ENG 04
CHM 111-112      College Chemistry I-II                                       MTH 04 MTH 06 ENG 03 ENG 05
ECO 201-202      Principles of Economics I-II                                 ENG 03 ENG 05
ENG 111          College Composition I                                        ENG 03 ENG 05
ENG 131          Technical Report Writing I                                   ENG 03 ENG 05
ENG 136          Analytical Reading and Logical Thinking                      ENG 03    ENG 05
ETR--            All ETR courses                                              MTH 03

HCT 101-102      Health Care Technician I-II                                  ENG 01 ENG 04 MTH 02
HCT 110          Therapeutic Communication                                    ENG 01 ENG 04
HIS 101-102      History of Western Civilization I-II                         ENG 01
HIS 121-122      United States History I-II                                   ENG 01

HLT 121          Drug Use and Abuse                                           ENG 05

HLT 143          Medical Terminology I                                        ENG 03 ENG 05

HLT 180          Therapeutic Massage I                                        ENG 05

HLT 261          Basic Pharmacy                                               ENG 05 MTH 03
IND--            All IND courses                                              MTH 03
IST 100          Introduction to Information Systems                          ENG 03 ENG 05 IST 102
IST              It is important that you see your advisor prior to registering for any of these courses.
                 Three-digit IST courses require ENG 03 and ENG 05. Many of these courses require MTH 03 and IST 102.
IST 117          Introduction to Microcomputer Software                       MTH 02 ENG 03 ENG 05 IST 102
LGL 115          Real Estate Law for Legal Assistants                         ENG 03 ENG 05
MKT 100          Principles of Marketing                                      ENG 03 ENG 05
MTH 115          Technical Mathematics I                                      MTH 03 MTH 06      or MTH 04
MTH 120          Introduction to Mathematics                                  MTH 02
MTH 121          Fundamentals of Mathematics I                                MTH 03
MTH 151-152      Mathematics for the Liberal Arts I -II                       MTH 04 MTH 06
MTH 163          Precalculus I                                                MTH 04 MTH 06
NAS 150          Human Biology                                                ENG 05
NUR 111          Nursing I                                                    ENG 03 ENG 05 MTH 04
NUR 135          Drug Dosage Calculations                                     MTH 04
NUR 230          Pharmacology                                                 ENG 05
PLS 211-212      U.S. Government I-II                                         ENG 01
PSY 126          Psychology for Business & Industry                           ENG 03 ENG 05
PSY 235          Child Psychology                                             ENG 03 ENG 05
PSY 201-202      Introduction to Psychology I-II                              ENG 03 ENG 05
SOC 201-202      Introduction to Sociology I-II                               ENG 03 ENG 05
SOC 215          Sociology of the Family                                      ENG 03 ENG 05
TEL --           All TEL courses                                              ENG 03 ENG 05



                                                           19
                                             Appendix C
                          Grade Distribution for Developmental Courses
                                      (Fall 1999-Fall 2001)

                                                  ALL Math

         F    Total         S                R                   U                W            X
         a   Grades   N         %      N         %           N       %      N         %       N         %
         l
         l
         1    341     213       62.4   75        21.9    16          4.6    34        9.9     3         .
         9                                                                                              8
         9
         9
         2    384     200       52     97        25.2    28          7.2    54        14      5         1
         0                                                                                              .
         0                                                                                              3
         0
         2    429     252       58.7   102       23.7    20          4.6    51        11.8    4         .
         0                                                                                              9
         0
         1
         T   1154     665       57.6   274       23.7    64          5.5    139       12      12        1
         o
         t
         a
         l


Spring        Total         S                R                   U                W                         X
             Grades    N         %      N         %      N            %      N          %          N            %
1999           248    128       51.6   60        24.1    36          14.5    23         9.2        1            .4
2000           367    238       64.8   73        19.8    32          8.7     20         5.4        4             1
2001           266    141        53    74        27.8    31          11.6    15         5.6        5            1.8
Total          881    507       57.5   207       23.4    99          11.2    58         6.5        10            1



                                                   Math 02

 Fall         Total         S                R                   U                W                 X
             Grades    N         %     N          %      N           %      N          %      N         %
1999           94     71        75.5   10        10.6    6           6.3    7         7.4     0          0
2000           122    71        58.1   17        13.9    11           9     22         18     1         .8
2001           119    79        66.3   16        13.4    10          8.4    13        10.9    1         .8
Total          335    221       65.9   43        12.8    27           8     42        12.5    2         .5


Spring        Total         S                R                   U                W                X
             Grades    N         %     N          %      N           %      N         %       N         %
1999           75     49        65.3   13        17.3    4           5.3    9         12      0          0
2000           142    116       81.6    9        6.3     8           5.6    7         4.9     2         1.4
2001           67     40        59.7   18        26.8    5           7.4    3         4.4     1         1.4
Total          284    205       72.1   40         14     17          5.9    19        6.6     3          1




                                                        20
                                              MATH 03

 Fall     Total         S                R                   U                   W                          X
         Grades    N         %      N         %      N           %          N           %           N        %
1999       136    76        55.8   40        29.4    4           2.9        13          9.5         3        2.2
2000       132    71        53.7   38        28.7    7           5.3        14         10.6         2        1.5
2001       122    66         54    38        31.1    2           1.6        16         13.1         0         0
Total      390    213       54.6   116       29.7    13          3.3        43          11          5        1.2

Spring    Total         S                R                   U                   W                   X
         Grades    N         %     N          %      N            %         N        %          N        %
1999       75     26        34.6   25        33.3    18           24         6        8
2000       120    72         60    29        24.1    13          10.8        5       4.1        1        .8
2001       95     45        47.3   32        33.6    13          13.6        4       4.2        1         1
Total      290    143       49.3   86        29.6    44          15.1       15       5.1        2        .6

                                               Math 04
 Fall     Total         S                R                   U                   W                      X
         Grades    N         %     N          %      N           %      N             %         N           %
1999       99     54        54.5   25        25.2    6            6     14           14.1       0            0
2000       118    50        42.3   40        33.8    10          8.4    16           13.5       2           1.6
2001       124    69        55.6   31         25     4           3.2    18           14.5       2           1.6
Total      341    173       50.7   96        28.1    20          5.8    48            14        4           1.1

Spring    Total         S                R                   U                   W                  I/X
         Grades    N         %     N          %      N            %     N         %           N        %
1999       73     32        43.8   21        28.7    11           15    8        10.9         1       1.3
2000       93     41         44    33        35.4    11          11.8   7        7.5          1         1
2001       87     45        51.7   23        26.4    9           10.3   8        9.1          2       2.2
Total      253    118       46.6   77        30.4    31          12.2   23        9           4       1.5


                                               MTH 06
 Fall     Total         S                R                   U               W                      X
         Grades   N          %     N         %           N       %      N            %        N          %
1999       12     12        100
2000       12      8        66.6   2         16.6                       2        16.6
2001       21     16        76.1   3         14.2                       1        4.7          1         4.7
Total      45     36         80    5         11.1                       3        6.6          1         2.2


Spring    Total         S                R                   U            W                         X
         Grades   N          %     N          %          N        %     N  %                N            %
1999       25     21         84    1          4          3        12
2000       12      9         75    2         16.6                       1        8.3
2001       17     11        64.7   1         5.8         4       23.5   0         0         1           5.8
Total      54     41        75.9   4         7.4         7       12.9   1        1.8        1           1.8


                                               Math 09

 Fall     Total         S                R                   U               W                      X
         Grades   N          %     N          %          N       %      N        %          N            %
2001       43     22        51.1   14        32.5        4       9.3    3        6.9        0            0
Total      43     22        51.1   14        32.5        4       9.3    3        6.9        0            0



                                                    21
                                         ALL English

 Fall     Total         S                R                   U               W             X/I
         Grades    N         %      N         %      N           %      N        %     N      %
1999       255    210       82.3   26        10.1    8           3.1    11       4.3
2000       299    195       65.2   48         16     23          7.6    30       10    3        1
2001       333    233       69.9   49        14.7    29          8.7    20        6    2       .6
Total      887    638       71.9   123       13.8    60          6.7    61       6.8   5       .5


Spring    Total         S                R                   U               W             X
         Grades    N         %     N          %      N            %     N        %     N       %
1999       141    101       71.6   25        17.7    3           2.1    11       7.8   1        .7
2000       301    236       78.4   36        11.9    15          4.9    13       4.3   1        .3
2001       174    115        66    30        17.2    23          13.2   4        2.2   2       1.1
Total      616    452       73.3   91        14.7    41          6.6    28       4.5   4        .6


                                          ENG 01

 Fall     Total         S                R                   U               W             X
         Grades   N          %     N          %          N       %      N        %     N       %
1999       21     19        90.4    1        4.7                        1        4.7
2000       25     17         68     5         20         2        8     1         4
2001       32     23        71.8    5        15.6        3       9.3    1        3.1
Total      78     59        75.6   11        14.1        5       6.4    3        3.8


Spring    Total         S                R                   U               W             X
         Grades   N          %     N         %           N        %      N    %        N       %
1999       11      9        81.8                                         2   18.1
2000       37     29        78.3   3         8.1         3       8.1     2    5.4
2001       14      7         50    1         7.1         5       35.7                  1       7.1
Total      62     45        72.5   4         6.4         8       12.9    4       6.4   1       1.6

                                          ENG 03

 Fall     Total         S                R                   U               W             X
         Grades    N         %     N          %      N            %     N        %     N       %
1999       111    90         81    10         9      7           6.3    4        3.6
2000       145    101       69.6   18        12.4    13          8.9    13       8.9
2001       153    108       70.5   15        9.8     25          16.3   4        2.6   1       .6
Total      409    299       73.1   43        10.5    45           11    21       5.1   1       .2




                                                    22
Spring    Total         S               R                   U                   W                     X
         Grades    N         %     N         %      N            %         N        %         N           %
1999       67     51        76.1   11       16.4    2           2.9        3        4.4
2000       127    97        76.3   21       16.5    3           2.3        6        4.7
2001       81     59        72.8   12       14.8    9           11.1       1        1.2
Total      275    207       75.2   44        16     14           5         10       3.6

                                              ENG 04
 Fall     Total         S               R                   U               W                      X
         Grades    N         %     N         %          N       %      N         %        N               %
1999       51     43        84.3    5       9.8                        3        5.8
2000       52     27        51.9   13        25         3       5.7    7        13.4      2            3.8
2001       55     36        65.4   12       21.8        1       1.8    6        10.9
Total      158    106        67    30       18.9        4       2.5    16       10.1      2            1.2


Spring    Total         S               R                   U               W                     X/I
         Grades   N          %     N         %          N       %      N         %        N          %
1999       22     14        63.6    4       18.1                       3        13.2      1          4.5
2000       56     46        82.1    3       5.3         4       7.1    3        5.3       0           0
2001       25     13         52     8        32         3       12     1         4        0
Total      103    73        70.8   15       14.5        7       6.7    7        6.7       1               .9

                                              ENG 05
 Fall     Total         S               R                   U                   W                         X
         Grades    N         %     N         %          N       %      N         %                N            %
1999       72     58        80.5   10       13.8        1       1.3    3         4.1
2000       77     50        64.9   12       15.5        5       6.4    9        11.6              1            1.2
2001       93     66        70.9   17       18.2                       9         9.6              1             1
Total      242    174       71.9   39       16.1        6       2.4    21        8.6              2             .8


Spring    Total         S               R                   U               W                     X
         Grades    N         %     N         %      N            %     N        %         N               %
1999       41     27        65.8   10       24.3    1           2.4    3        7.3
2000       81     64         79     9       11.1    5           6.1    2        2.4       1            1.2
2001       54     36        66.6    9       16.6    6           11.1   2        3.7       1            1.8
Total      176    127       72.1   28       15.9    12          6.8    7        3.9       2            1.1




                                                   23

								
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