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Lesson Plans 23 - 27 August

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Lesson Plans 23 - 27 August Powered By Docstoc
					Monday August 23, 2010 and Tuesday August 24, 2010            - Early Civilizations

The Rise of Sumerian City-States
Overview
In this Response Group activity, students learn about and respond to key problems faced
by ancient Mesopotamians to understand how Neolithic farming villages evolved into
complex Sumerian city-states. Working in groups of three, students address four issues
faced by ancient Mesopotamians—food shortages, uncontrolled water supply, irrigation
system maintenance, and attacks by neighboring communities—and then read about how
people actually responded to each issue. Students illustrate and label a flowchart of each
historical issue they investigate.

Objectives

ACOS
2. Analyze the characteristics of early civilizations in respect to technology, division of
labor, government, calendar, and writings.

   A. Comparing the significant features of civilizations that developed in the Tigris-
      Euphrates.
   B. Identifying the locations of cultural hearths of early civilizations.

Students will
• identify how the physical setting contributed to the development of city-states in
Mesopotamia.
• describe the development of agricultural techniques—such as irrigation systems—and
other factors that led to the emergence of city-states in Mesopotamia.
• list the key features of a Sumerian city-state.

Materials
• History Alive! The Ancient World
• Interactive Student Notebooks
• Transparencies 4A–4D
• CD Tracks 2–5
• Poster paper (2 sheets per group of 3)
• Colored markers or pencils

Preview

Ask students to complete Preview 4 in their Interactive Student Notebooks. Lead a
discussion about their challenges and solutions. Explain to students that in the following
activity, they will learn about a series of problems faced by the people of ancient
Mesopotamia and the solutions that helped transform Neolithic farming villages into
complex Sumerian city-states.




Graphic Organizer
1 Introduce Chapter 4 in History Alive! The Ancient World
Have students read Section 4.1. Make sure they understand the meanings of the boldfaced
key terms, which are defined in the Glossary. Tell them they will now learn more about
the changes in Mesopotamia. (Note: You may want to have students use the Pre-reading
Handout on page xvii of this Lesson Guide to conduct a pre-reading of the chapter.)

2 Introduce the graphic organizer. Have students examine the graphic organizer at the
bottom of page 33. Ask, what do you see? What differences do you see between the two
communities? Tell students that these images are of the same region but many years
apart. Then ask, what do you think might explain the differences? Explain that students
will use a similar flowchart to learn about four problems the ancient Mesopotamians
encountered, their solutions to those problems, and the dramatic changes that occurred in
Mesopotamia as a result.

Response Group
1 Read and discuss Section 4.2 in History Alive! The Ancient World to give students
background information on the environment of Mesopotamia.
Answer any questions they have.

2 Introduce the activity. Tell students that they will be taking on the role of ancient
Mesopotamians to experience the changes that occurred in this period—changes that
were a result of a series of problems that people faced and solved. As Mesopotamians,
students will be asked to solve four key problems to better understand the changes that
occurred.

3 Place students in mixed-ability groups of three
If necessary, prepare a transparency with a seating chart

4 Project Transparency 4A: Zagros Mountains and play CD Track 2, “Problem A:
Food Shortages.”
Tell students to pretend they are Neolithic farm families sitting around the dinner table,
their stomachs growling, and it has just been announced that dinner has been canceled.
Have them listen to the recording, and then review the details of the problem as described
on the transparency.
Les
5 Have groups discuss the first critical thinking question.
Encourage them to examine the image closely and use the information to discuss the four
options listed. They should choose the option they think will best solve the food-shortage
problem and prepare to justify their choice with two reasons. Allow groups adequate time
to discuss and jot down their ideas.

6 Appoint a Presenter for each group, and have groups share their answers.
Ask Presenters to share their group’s answer to Critical Thinking Question A with the
class. Encourage them to point out details from Transparency 4A to support their
answers.

7 Have students read Section 4.3 and complete Reading Notes 4 in their Interactive
Student Notebooks for that topic.
Clarify any questions they have about the reading.

8 Repeat Steps 4–7 for Critical Thinking Questions B–D. Make these modifications:
Problem B: Uncontrolled Water Supply
• Project Transparency 4B: Euphrates River and play CD Track 3, ―Problem B:
Uncontrolled Water Supply.‖ While students listen to the recording, have them pretend
they are standing ankle deep in water and staring out at flooded fields.
• Have groups discuss the critical thinking question on Transparency 4B. Distribute
poster paper for teams to draw their water-control systems. Give them a limited amount
of time, about 5 to 15 minutes, to complete their designs.
• Rotate the role of Presenter to a new student.
• Ask the first group’s Presenter to share their water-control system. Ask all subsequent
groups to share one thing about their design that is similar to that of a previous group and
anything that is different from the others.
• After the discussion, have students read Section 4.4 and complete the Reading Notes for
that topic.

Problem C: Building and Maintaining a Complex Irrigation System
• Project Transparency 4C: Irrigation Canal near the Euphrates and play CD Track 4,
―Problem C: Building and Maintaining a Complex Irrigation System.‖ While students
listen to the recording, have them pretend they are standing in an irrigation canal, holding
shovels under the hot sun.
• Follow the procedure for Problem A, having students conclude by reading Section 4.5
and completing the Reading Notes for that topic.

Problem D: Attacks by Neighboring Communities
• Project Transparency 4D: Attacks by Neighboring Communities and play CD Track 5,
―Problem D: Attacks by Neighboring Communities.‖ While students listen to the
recording, have them pretend they are holding a weapon (a spear or sword) and looking
out the windows of their homes.
• Follow the procedure for Problem B, having students conclude by reading Section 4.6
and completing the Reading Notes for that topic.

9 Have students read Section 4.7 in History Alive! The Ancient World
As they read, they can check their Reading Notes to make sure they have accurately
summarized the information.

10 Hold a class discussion. Ask:
• What were the major problems faced by the Mesopotamians?
• What were the short-term effects of each solution the Mesopotamians devised in
response to their problems?
• What were the long-term effects of these solutions?
• The Sumerians are credited with the invention of the wheel as early as 3500 B.C.E. Is
there any connection between this invention and the sequence of problems and solutions
that you just studied?



Processing
Have students complete Processing 4 in their Interactive Student Notebooks.
Wednesday August 25, 2010 and Thursday August 26, 2010

Was Ancient Sumer a Civilization?

Overview
In this lesson, students first read about characteristics of civilization in a Social Studies
Skill Builder. They use their new knowledge to analyze artifacts from ancient Sumer to
determine whether ancient Sumer was a civilization. Then, in a Processing assignment,
they find contemporary artifacts to use as evidence of civilization today.

Objectives
ACOS
2. Analyze the characteristics of early civilizations in respect to technology, division of
labor, government, calendar, and writings.

   C. Comparing the significant features of civilizations that developed in the Tigris-
      Euphrates.
   D. Identifying the locations of cultural hearths of early civilizations.

Students will
• identify characteristics of civilization.
• analyze artifacts from ancient Sumer and explain how they are examples of the various
characteristics of civilization.
• identify modern-day artifacts that are examples of characteristics of civilization.

Materials
• History Alive! The Ancient World
• Interactive Student Notebooks
• Transparencies 5A and 5B
• Information Master 5A (several copies on card stock)
• Information Master 5B (1 transparency)
• Placards 5A–5H (2 sets)
• CD Track 6
• Transparent tape

Was Ancient Sumer a Civilization?

Preview
Have students turn to Preview 5 in their Interactive Student Notebooks. Review the
directions with them, and answer any questions they have. After they have completed
their diagrams describing characteristics of a ―highly civilized‖ society, have them share
their ideas with a partner, or have several volunteers briefly share their work with the
class. Explain to students that in the following activity, they will investigate whether
ancient Sumer had the characteristics of civilization.

Graphic Organizer

1 Have students read Section 5.1 of History Alive! The Ancient World
Have them identify what they will learn about in this chapter. Make sure they understand
the meanings of the boldfaced key terms, which are defined in the Glossary. (Note: You
may want to have students use the Pre-reading Handout on page xvii of this Lesson
Guide to conduct a pre-reading of the chapter.)


2 Introduce the graphic organizer.
Have students examine the graphic organizer on page 41. Ask, what kind of diagram is
this? What is the main topic of this spoke diagram? What characteristics of civilization
are shown on this spoke diagram?

Reading for Understanding

Have students read Section 5.2 in their books. When they are finished, ask, what
characteristics of civilization will we learn about in this chapter? What everyday objects
might be examples of these characteristics? What kinds of things might ancient
Sumerians have left behind that could be examples of these characteristics?

Social Studies Skill Builder

1 Prepare your classroom for the activity. Follow these steps:
• Post the two sets of Placards 5A–5G: Artifacts from Ancient Sumer on the walls along
opposite sides of the room.
• Post the two copies of Placard 5H: Artifact from Ancient Sumer together. Place the CD
player near them, and cue the CD to Track 6, ―Essence Arabia.‖
• Create several dice for the activity using Information Master 5A: Die Template. Place
the dice in a central location.

2 Put students into mixed-ability pairs
You may want to create a class seating chart on a transparency to show students who
their partners are and where to sit.

3 Explain the objective of the activity.
Tell students that in this activity they will learn about characteristics of civilization. They
will determine whether ancient Sumer had each characteristic by analyzing and drawing
sound conclusions from artifacts that archeologists have unearthed.

4 Explain the activity.
Have students open their Interactive Student Notebooks to Reading Notes 5. Project a
transparency of Information Master 5B: Steps for Analyzing Artifacts and review the
steps for completing the activity.
Answer any questions students have.
(Note: You may want to review the definition of primary and secondary sources by
having students identify which type of source the artifacts represent, and which type of
source the information in their text represents. You might also briefly discuss the
credibility of these sources in learning about ancient Sumer.)

5 Practice the steps for analyzing an ancient Sumerian artifact as a class.
Ask students to read Section 5.3, which is about ensuring a stable food supply, and have
pairs complete the steps on Information Master 5B. Encourage them to find as many
artifacts as possible that are examples of this characteristic of civilization. Then have
volunteers share their ideas from their Reading Notes with the class.
6 Conduct the Social Studies Skill Builder.
Project Information Master 5B during the activity as reference. Have pairs come to you
to have their work checked for the first two sections of the Reading Notes they complete.
If they are following directions accurately, consider circulating around the room to spot-
check work rather than checking each pair’s work for every section of the Reading Notes.
Tell students to play CD Track 6 when they inspect Placard 5H.

7 Conduct a wrap-up activity.
This wrap-up activity will allow students to share their ideas and emphasize that a single
artifact can provide evidence for more than one characteristic of civilization. After most
pairs have learned about most of the characteristics of civilization, follow these steps for
the wrap-up activity ―Last One Standing‖: • Have each pair determine who will be their
first ―stander.‖
• Select one of the artifact placards at random and show it to the class.

• Have pairs check their Reading Notes to see if they used this artifact as evidence of one
or more of the characteristics of civilization. If so, their stander should stand up.

• Ask a couple of standers to share their explanation of how this artifact is evidence for
one characteristic of civilization.

• Next, ask the standers who used this artifact as evidence for two or more characteristics
to remain standing while the others sit down. Ask a couple of them to share how this
artifact is evidence for a different characteristic of civilization.

• Continue this process until one student is the ―last one standing.‖
• Select a new placard and repeat the activity. (Note: It is sufficient to do this for only a
few of the eight placards.)

Processing

Review the instructions for completing Processing 5 in the Interactive Student Notebook.
Answer any questions students have. When students have finished their spoke diagrams,
have them share some of their modern examples of characteristics of civilization in a
class discussion.

Assessment – Open Notebook Quiz
Friday August 27, 2010

Objectives

ACOS
2. Analyze the characteristics of early civilizations in respect to technology, division of
labor, government, calendar, and writings.

   E. Comparing the significant features of civilizations that developed in the Tigris-
      Euphrates.
   F. Identifying the locations of cultural hearths of early civilizations.

   -   Students will participate in a cooperative choral reading activity that
       focuses on mood and tone in order to enhance expressive reading skills
   -
Preview:

Read, Biography Hammurabi, page 22, and You Decide . . . Hammurabi’s Laws:
Fair or Cruel? Pages 24 and 25

Answer, you be the Historian, Checking for Understanding, 1 – 3

Fluency Activities

A Sumerian Poem
A Description of Mesopotamia
The Code of Hammurabi
Ten Babylonian Proverbs

Primary Source Readers and Primary Source Artifacts

Students will read about and analyze primary source on Mesopotamia

				
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