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HAZWOPER hr Refresher Course

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					                        OSHA
           HAZARD CONTROL
International Environmental Technology and Training Center




            “Working safely with hazardous materials”
               Vincent J. Giblin, General President
                1293 Airport Road, Beaver, WV 25813
              Phone: (304) 253-8674 - Fax: (304) 253-7758
                    E-mail: hazmat@iuoeiettc.org
This material was produced under grant
      number 46C5-HT16 from the
    Occupational Safety and Health
   Administration, U.S. Department of
Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the
views or policies of the U.S. Department
  of Labor, nor does mention of trade
    names, commercial products, or
organizations imply endorsement by the
            U.S. Government.

Hazard Control
      Hazard Control:
      AN INTRODUCTION


      Hazardous waste sites
      pose safety and health
      concerns which could
      result in serious injury
      or death.




Hazard Control
      Hazard Control:
      AN INTRODUCTION

  Additional hazards are created by:
   Heavy equipment;
   PPE reducing movement,
      hearing, and vision;
   Unpredictability
    of the site.


Hazard Control
      Safety hazards that may exist at
      hazardous waste sites.


                      Holes or ditches.
                      Objects that may fall.
                      Sharp objects.




Hazard Control
      Safety hazards that may exist at
      hazardous waste sites.


   Slippery surfaces.
   Steep grades.
   Uneven terrain.
   Unstable surfaces.




Hazard Control
      What are the electrical hazards that can
      pose a danger to workers?

   Overhead power lines.
   Fallen electrical wires.
   Buried cables.
   Electrical equipment (use low-voltage
      equipment with ground-fault interrupters
      and watertight, corrosion-resistant,
      connecting cables).


Hazard Control
      What are the electrical hazards that can
      pose a danger to workers?


   Lighting.
   Weather conditions.
   Capacitors that retain a charge.




Hazard Control
      How do lockout/tagout procedures protect
      employees from electrical hazards?


      Before servicing and
      maintenance of power
      equipment or machines,
      OSHA regulations
      require lockout/tagout
      procedures.


Hazard Control
      How do lockout/tagout procedures protect
      employees from electrical hazards?


  Lockout device (lock, chain, valve, etc.):
   Prevents flow of energy from a power
   source to power equipment to keep it
   from operating.




Hazard Control
      How do lockout/tagout procedures protect
      employees from electrical hazards?


  Tagout:
   Tag the power
   source; acts as a
   warning, not a
   physical restraint.



Hazard Control
      What is the employer’s responsibility regarding
      lockout/tagout procedures?

   Establish a program.
   Utilize procedures for affixing
      appropriate lockout/tagout devices to
      power sources.
   Otherwise disable
      equipment/machine to prevent
      unexpected start-up or release
      of stored energy.

Hazard Control
      What effects can noise have on the worker?



  Noise = Unwanted Sound.
   Work around large equipment often
    creates excessive noise.
   Effects can vary.




Hazard Control
      What is the unit used to measure sound?



  Sound intensity = decibels (dB).
  For example:
   Ticking watch = 20 dB (barely audible).
   Jet engine = 130 to 160 dB (painful).




Hazard Control
      When must an employer begin a Hearing
      Conservation Program?

  OSHA Hearing Conservation Standard requires:
      A continuing, effective program
      whenever noise levels equal or
      exceed an 8-hour time-weighted
      average (TWA) sound level of 85 dB,



Hazard Control
      When must an employer begin a Hearing
      Conservation Program?


      Administrative or engineering
      controls must be used if workers are
      subject to noise exceeding an 8-hour
      TWA sound level of 90 dB, then




Hazard Control
      What can be done to minimize worker
      exposure to noise?


   Noise monitoring.
   Audiometeric testing.
   Engineering controls (sound-
      absorbing rooms, substitution,
      carpet, resilient floors/pads,
      sound-dampening walls).



Hazard Control
      What can be done to minimize worker
      exposure to noise?


   Administrative controls (rotate
      employees, operate noisy machinery on shifts
      with fewer employees).
   PPE (earplugs, earmuffs).
   Training.



Hazard Control
      When is eye and face protection required?


  Reasonable probability of injury from:
   Flying objects;
   Glare;
   Liquids;
   Injurious radiation;
   Combination of the above hazards.


Hazard Control
      When is eye and face protection required?



      When projectiles are a
      potential hazard,
      workers must use eye
      protection that provides
      side protection.




Hazard Control
      What are the requirements of eye
      and face PPE’s?

  Must be:
   Distinctly marked to facilitate
      identification of the manufacturer;
   Capable of being disinfected
      and easily cleaned.



Hazard Control
      What are the requirements for prescription and
      contact lens wearers?

  Prescription lens wearers need:
   Eye protection incorporating
      the prescription in its design;
   Or eye protection worn
      over the prescription lenses
      without disturbing the proper
      position of either.


Hazard Control
      What are the requirements for prescription and
      contact lens wearers?

  The use of contact lenses should:
   Be considered carefully;
   Comply with the site-specific HASP.




Hazard Control
      Describe the correct way to use the
      eye-wash water solutions.

  When chemical hazards are present:
   Eye wash stations - readily
      available and accessible;
   Water/eye solutions - aimed
      at base of nose to prevent
      particles from being driven into
      the eyes further.


Hazard Control
      When must head protection be worn?

      Where potential hazards are present
       from:
       Impact and penetration of
        falling/flying objects;
       Limited electric shock/burn.




Hazard Control
      When must head protection be worn?



   Head protection must meet all safety
      requirements.
   Caps, elastic bands, or hairnets-
      prevent hair from contacting instruments,
      machinery parts, or flame-producing sources.
   Fabric hats (baseball caps) should not
      be worn where contaminant can be absorbed.


Hazard Control
      When is protective footwear required?


  Where potential hazards are present from:
   Falling or rolling objects.
   Objects piercing the sole.
   Corrosive chemicals.
   Electrical shock.
   Wet floors.

Hazard Control
      What are the recommended types of footwear?



   Safety toe shoes (steel-toe).
   Treated shoes.
   Rubber boots or plastic shoe covers.
   Insulated shoes.
   Rubber boots with wooden soles.



Hazard Control
      When is hand protection required?


  When there are hazards from:
   Skin absorption;
   Cuts, abrasions, punctures;
   Chemical or thermal burns;
   Harmful temperature extremes.



Hazard Control
      When is hand protection required?



      Employers must require
      employees to use
      appropriate hand
      protection that meets all
      safety requirements.




Hazard Control
      When is hand protection required?


  Select gloves on the basis of:
   Material being handled;
   Hazard involved.




Hazard Control
      When is hand protection required?


  Check before using:
   In good condition;
   Free from holes, punctures, or tears.
  When removing:
   Keep contaminated surface from
    contacting skin.

Hazard Control
      :
      Update Worker on Recent Developments




Hazard Control
This material was produced under grant
      number 46C5-HT16 from the
    Occupational Safety and Health
   Administration, U.S. Department of
Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the
views or policies of the U.S. Department
  of Labor, nor does mention of trade
    names, commercial products, or
organizations imply endorsement by the
            U.S. Government.

Hazard Control
                      END
         •This publication was made possible by
         grant numbers 5 U45 ES06182-13 AND
          5 U45 ES09763-13 from the National
            Institute of Environmental Health
          Sciences (NIEHS), NIH. Its contents
            are solely the responsibility of the
             authors and do not necessarily
            represent the official views of the
                       NIEHS, NIH.
Hazard Control

				
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