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					Kirtland
Community
College




Catalog     2007-2008
WELCOME

                                           President




                                           Dr. Thomas Quinn




                             BOARD OF TRUSTEES




              Roy Spangler                   Patricia Webb                  Roberta Werle
                Chair                         Vice Chair                 Secretary-Treasurer




  MaryAnn Ferrigan           Sally Galer             Richard Silverman              Denis Weiss
      Trustee                 Trustee                    Trustee                      Trustee
                                      TABLE OF CONTENTS

     INTRODUCTION                                                               PROGRAMS OF STUDY
     Welcome                                                                    Arts
     Vision and Values                                                          Automotive
     Assurance of Quality                                                       Business
     College Overview                                                           Computer Information Systems
     M-TECSM at Kirtland-Gaylord                                                Construction Technologies
     Student Profile                                                            Cosmetology
     2007-2008 College Calendar                                                 Criminal Justice
     Directory of Services                                                      Customized Training
     Phone Numbers to Know                                                      Education
     Maps                                                                       Health Careers
                                                                                Honors
                                                                                Industrial Technologies
     ADMISSIONS AND FINANCIAL AID                                               Office Information Systems
     Getting Started                                                            Science
     Paying for College                                                         Technology Management
     Registration and Academic Policies                                         Transfer


     ACHIEVING SUCCESS                                                          COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
     Exploring Educational Choices
     Supporting Academic Success
     Recognizing Excellence                                                     PERSONNEL AND COMMITTEES
     Getting Involved                                                           KCC Administration
     Safety, Security, and Emergencies                                          Full-time Faculty and Counselors
     Protecting Student Rights                                                  Full-time Classified Staff
                                                                                KCC Foundation
                                                                                KCC Advisory Committees
     ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
     Community Support Services
     Communication with the College Community
     Glossary of College Terms




        The contents of the catalog are subject to change. Check the class schedule for the most current information.
                          The catalog cannot be considered as a contract or agreement between the
                           individual student and Kirtland Community College or its administrators.




Kirtland Community College is an equal opportunity institution, encourages diversity, and does not discriminate against race,
color, religion, national origin or ancestry, age, sex, marital status, sexual orientation, disability, or other protected category
under Michigan and federal law. Compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and with the Americans with
Disabilities Act (ADA) is a priority of the college. Dale Shantz, Director of Human Resources, is the 504 Coordinator and the
ADA Compliance Officer. Doty Latuszek is the 504 Coordinator and the ADA Compliance Officer for M-TECSM at Kirtland-
Gaylord.
                  VISION, MISSION, AND GUIDING PRINCIPLES
Kirtland Community College Vision
Kirtland Community College provides open access to education, as well as cultural opportunities, to enrich the lives of the people in Northern
Michigan.

Kirtland Community College Mission
Kirtland offers higher education in a student-focused environment, providing transfer and career technical programs; developmental studies;
workforce development; personal enrichment and cultural opportunities. We focus resources on our local service area, while maintaining a
welcoming climate for our neighbors in Northern Michigan.

Kirtland Community College Guiding Principles
Student learning is Kirtland’s commitment-
    1. We use continuous-improvement processes to ensure currency and relevancy of programs, services, and facilities.
    2. We strive for consistent use of appropriate data in all decision making.
    3. We ensure that all decisions are effectively communicated and contribute to student success.
    4. We are open and welcoming to all, while recognizing a special responsibility to young adults.
    5. We recognize the value of our employees by striving for a high quality of work life and providing opportunities for professional
         development.
    6. We participate in community partnerships, based on shared values and mutual goals, with a focus on K-12 and Economic
         Development.
    7. We seek optimum size based on community needs, available resources, financial responsibility, and College capabilities.



                                          ASSURANCE OF QUALITY
Kirtland Community College is committed to graduating students of high quality, fully capable of performing the skills specified in the student's
major, and in the area of the college's general degree requirements. Kirtland Community College offers assurance to its students, prospective
employers, and transferring institutions that individuals holding degrees or certificates are fully capable of competent performance.

1.   Transferring students who meet the admission criteria of the four-year college or university would be able to perform at a level equal to or
     better than those students who were admitted as freshman at the transferring institution.

     The college will, upon recommendation from the institution to which the student transferred, permit the student to retake any course or
     courses previously completed at Kirtland in areas deemed deficient. This retake shall result in no tuition or fee charges for the student. If a
     retake at Kirtland is not preferred and the student shows proof of enrollment in an equivalent course at another college, the college will
     refund the tuition and fees paid by the student for the Kirtland course or courses in question.

2.   Non-transferring students who earn a degree or certificate can be expected to perform competently in the area in which they were
     instructed. Any employer who views a Kirtland Community College graduate as not possessing appropriate entry-level skills and can
     specify such deficiencies may request remediation. The student will be permitted to retake a specified course or courses without an
     additional tuition or fee charge. If a retake at Kirtland is not preferred and the student shows proof of enrollment in an equivalent course at
     another college, the college will refund the tuition and fees previously paid by the student for the Kirtland course or courses in question.
     The college recognizes that unused skills decay rapidly. The assurances offered herein are made for individuals who transfer or gain em-
     ployment within a year of receiving a degree or certificate and are limited to courses numbered 100 or above completed at Kirtland Com-
     munity College with a C grade or better. Furthermore, this assurance does not apply toward performance on licensing or civil service
     examinations. Finally, Kirtland Community College graduates must have initiated their program of study after May 1989.

Kirtland Community College graduates who are eligible to apply for compensation in accordance with Kirtland's Assurance of Quality policy
must have their employer or transferring institution submit a completed Assurance of Quality Compensation Request form to the student
services office.

GENERAL EDUCATION
Kirtland Community College is committed to the belief that all graduates should possess the skills and breadth of knowledge necessary to
realize their potential to live full and productive lives. This belief forms the foundation of Kirtland’s commitment to the process and goals of
general education.
General education is the heart of the educational experience at Kirtland. General education seeks to make people intellectually well-rounded,
whole, and complete. It comprises that core of knowledge and skills that educated people need regardless of what career or vocation they enter.
The pursuit of general education provides learners with the broad intellectual foundation necessary for continuing growth to achieve their
potential and become successful lifelong learners in a changing world. General education provides the common knowledge and skills that enable
us to understand one another, interact, collaborate to solve problems, and build an effective community.
Kirtland Community College seeks to achieve the aims of general education in three ways:
1.     The General Education Core
       Every degree-seeking student completes a core of courses that nurture foundational competencies in critical reasoning, writing and
       communication, scientific inquiry, mathematical reasoning, computer literacy, and other areas.
2.     General Education Across the Curriculum
       All of Kirtland’s degree courses, regardless of discipline, are designed to build upon, apply, and continue to nurture the development of
       the knowledge and skills acquired in the general education core.
3.     Extracurricular Programs and Events
       Kirtland seeks to extend, foster, and enrich the general education experience for its students through a variety of extracurricular
       programs and events, such as those listed below:
                Kirtland Art Gallery                                       Controlled Burn Reading Series          Performing Artists Series
                Brown Bag Lunch Series                                     Cultural Events                         Service Learning Program
                Center for the Performing Arts                             Global Awareness Program                Student Writing and Art Competitions
                Community Education Program                                Kirtland Youth Theatre                  Kirtland’s Warbler Festival
       These and other cultural activities and programs at Kirtland help to foster intellectual curiosity, cultural enrichment, communication,
       critical thinking, diversity, lifelong learning, social and cultural awareness, and other general education goals.


                                                          COLLEGE OVERVIEW
ESTABLISHMENT OF THE COLLEGE
On March 7, 1966, in accordance with provisions of Public Act 188 of the Michigan Public Acts of 1955, Kirtland Community College was
created by a vote of the electorate from six local K-12 school districts (Crawford-AuSable, Fairview Area, Gerrish-Higgins, Houghton Lake,
Mio-AuSable and West Branch-Rose City). With this approval, the largest Michigan community college district was formed. The college's
district totals 2,500 square miles and consists of all or part of nine counties. Approximately 65,000 people reside within the college's district.

LOCATION
Kirtland Community College, located close to the geographic center of the college's district, is accessible by F-97 from the north and south and
by M-18 to County Road 603 from the west. The location is very rural and is approximately 170 miles north of Detroit, Michigan. Kirtland is
surrounded by the following communities (approximate distances from the college are listed):
      Grayling.......................................................... 30 miles                      Mio.......................................................... 30 miles
      Fairview.......................................................... 40 miles                      Roscommon…..………………………….11 miles
      Frederic........................................................... 35 miles                     Rose City……..………………………….35 miles
      Houghton Lake ............................................... 30 miles                           St. Helen……...…………………………...8 miles
                                                                                                       West Branch…...………………………...25 miles
ACCREDITATION
Kirtland Community College is accredited by the Michigan Commission on College Accreditation and The Higher Learning Commission, a
commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools at 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, IL 60602 (800-621-
7440). The college also holds membership in the Michigan Community College Association and the American Association of Community and
Junior Colleges.

The Commission on Institutions of Higher Education of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools granted Kirtland Community
College status as candidate for accreditation in 1972, and the college has been accredited as an associate degree-granting institution since 1975.

Students wishing to view documents pertaining to the accreditation and licensing of Kirtland Community College should submit their request in
writing to the President’s office. The request will be processed within five (5) business days of receipt. Any request requiring the copying of
more than 50 pages will be assessed a copy fee of .10 cents per page.
CALENDAR
Kirtland operates on a semester calendar. There are two 15-week semesters, starting in late August and mid-January. A shorter session is offered
during the summer and begins in May.

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES
Kirtland offers over seventy occupational (technical career oriented) certificate and degree programs and ten transfer degree programs. Transfer
programs are designed for students planning to complete up to half of a bachelor's degree prior to enrollment at a university.

ENROLLMENT
Approximately 3,600 students are served annually by Kirtland through college level and community service classes. While 39 percent of
Kirtland's students are under the age of 24, the average age is 27. Sixty-six percent of the students attend on a part-time basis. Most are
employed at least part-time.

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS
The mission of the athletic program is to provide men and women with the opportunity to learn and grow as a result of participating in a high-
quality intercollegiate program. The program also attempts to improve student life and, in turn, improve the recruitment and retention of
students. The athletic program also seeks to increase community involvement with Kirtland by providing sports entertainment at a level that
previously has not been offered in the Kirtland region.

Kirtland competes in intercollegiate athletics as a member of the Eastern Conference of the Michigan Community College Athletic Association.
Kirtland also competes in the National Junior College Athletic Association as a member of Region XII (Michigan, Ohio, and Indiana). The
Kirtland Firebirds compete in men’s and women’s basketball, men’s and women’s golf, and men’s and women’s cross-country. For more
information, call the athletic director’s office at 989- 275-5000, ext 385.



M-TECSM AT KIRTLAND GAYLORD
Michigan Technical Education Center

 The mission of the M-TECSM is to provide educational programs and services to individuals in preparation for employment. In addition,
through workforce development, business and industry partners in the Northern Michigan Region and their employees are provided with
educational opportunities specifically designed to upgrade and/or enhance the job skills necessary to compete in a local, state, national, and
global economy.

Programs and Services
Programs and services have been developed in response to locally and regionally defined needs as determined by representatives of business and
industry. Emphasis is placed on providing programs that lead to preparation for employment. To ensure that graduates are well prepared for
entry into the workforce, special emphasis is placed on the ongoing assessment of student learning as each individual progresses through the
various courses within each program.

Core Curricula
The M-TECSM serves postsecondary students who are interested in apprenticeship training, postsecondary degree programs, and job skills
development. The specific programs at the M-TECSM include the following:

                              Certificate of Completion                           Associate in Applied Science
                         Carpentry                                             Cardiovascular Sonography
                         Electrical Technology                                 Carpentry
                         Heating/Ventilation/AC/Refrigeration                  Electrical Technology
                         Industrial Maintenance                                Heating/Ventilation/AC/Refrigeration
                         Industrial Processes Technician                       Industrial Maintenance
                         Outdoor Power Engines                                 Outdoor Power Engines
Workforce Development
Workforce development programs serve specific employers in the region and their current employees who are seeking job skills upgrades
and/or personal growth. A key component of the mission of the M-TEC is to provide to business and industry partners educational
opportunities through customized training and contracted education. These educational opportunities are specifically designed to upgrade
and enhance the job skills necessary to compete in a local, state, national, and global economy. Workforce development courses are
custom designed to fill a specific need and include but are not limited to: welding, manufacturing, construction, and information
technology; human resources; leadership and supervisory skills; and MIOSHA safety training and business practices. For additional
information about workforce development educational opportunities, please call 989-705-3601.

Placement Testing
Compass tests are used to determine a student’s placement in English, reading, and math. WorkKeysR tests are to assess the core competency
levels of reading, math, locating information, and writing. Students seeking a certificate of completion or associate degree are required to take
one or both of these tests. For more information, please call 989-705-3600.

Career Readiness Course Offerings
Individuals with identified learning needs will enroll in custom-designed courses provided through the use of PLATOR Software. PLATOR
Software has been designed to interface with the WorkKeysR test and will automatically navigate a student to learning modules designed to meet
their individual learning needs.

Dual Enrollment
Kirtland Community College partners with area high schools to provide career and technical dual-enrollment opportunities to qualified high
school students. For additional information, please call 989-705-3605.

Program Delivery
The M-TECSM delivers programs and training through traditional classroom delivery and open learning, allowing the student to use printed
materials, computer-aided instruction, and hands-on training activities to support self-directed, instructor-guided, student-centered learning. The
emphasis on the open learning environment at the M-TECSM promotes flexible scheduling and individualized learning opportunities to better
meet the needs of the student, as well as employers in the region.

The M-TECSM Facility
Construction of this facility began in July 2000 and was completed in time to begin offering a full complement of programs and services
beginning in January 2002. The M-TECSM facility has been designed by business and industry for business and industry. Using the expertise and
input of local and regional manufacturing, building trades, and technology professionals, architects and engineers have created a 28,000 square-
foot facility capable of supporting the current and future workforce development training needs of the region.

The M-TECSM facility contains both a precision tool and general manufacturing lab, a construction technology lab, a welding lab, a computer-
aided drafting and manufacturing design lab, and a nursing lab as well as classrooms that support general and computerized instruction. A
Learning Resource Center is available to students enrolled at the M-TECSM as a result of the partnership with the University Center at Gaylord.
For information, contact the M-TECSM at Kirtland-Gaylord at 989-705-3600.

Residency Rules
Residents of Otsego County or the Kirtland Community College district should bring proof of residency in order to prove eligibility for in-
district tuition rates.

In those instances when classes may be canceled due to inclement weather or other unusual circumstances, students should call the M-TECSM
weather line at 989-705-3696. A pre-recorded message will indicate whether classes are being held that particular day.
                                      STUDENT PROFILE (2006 Fall Semester)
                                                                           Total enrollment: 2,299
Student Gender:                                                                                     Student Credit Hour Load:
Males ............................................................................ 49%              Personal Interest ........................................................... 10%
Females......................................................................... 51%                Part-Time: 1-11.99 credit hrs ................................. 60%
                                                                                                    Full-Time: 12 & over credit hrs. ............................ 30%
Student Age Distribution:
24 and under ................................................................. 40%
                                                                                                    Student Status:
25 to 39......................................................................... 34%
                                                                                                    FTIAC (first time in any college)................................. 24%
40 to 59......................................................................... 23%
                                                                                                    Returning to KCC ........................................................ 70%
60 and older .................................................................. 2%
                                                                                                    First-time Transfer ....................................................... .. 6%
Unknown ............................................................. under 1%
                                                                                                    Guest ............................................................................ 1%
County of Residence:
Crawford....................................................................... 10%                 Student Program Areas:
Ogemaw........................................................................ 17%                  Criminal Justice.......................................................... ...... 5%
Oscoda .......................................................................... 7%                Health Careers........................................................... …..23%
Roscommon .................................................................. 23%                    Transfer .....................................................................…...20%
Other............................................................................. 43%              Personal Interest ....................................................……....32%

                                                                                                    Other .....................................................................……....20%




                                                2007-2008 COLLEGE CALENDAR
                           Approved by Board of Trustees. Dates are subject to change. Please check the current class schedule.

                                                                       FALL 2007 SEMESTER
                     Fall 2007 Semester Begins....................................Saturday ................................................. August 25, 2007
                     Labor Day Break................................. Saturday – Tuesday ...........................................September 1-4, 2007
                     Thanksgiving Break ......................... Wednesday – Sunday .......................................November 21-25, 2007
                     Fall 2007 Semester Ends.........................................Sunday .............................................December 16, 2007


                                                                   WINTER 2007 SEMESTER
                     Winter 2008 Semester Begins...............................Saturday ................................................ January 12, 2008
                     Spring Break ..........................................Monday – Sunday ................................................. March 3-9, 2008
                     Easter Break............................................. Friday – Sunday ............................................. March 21-23, 2008
                     Commencement ....................................................... Friday ....................................................... May 2, 2008
                     Winter 2008 Semester Ends....................................Sunday ....................................................... May 4, 2008



                             NOTE: Dates are subject to change. Please check the current class schedule.
                                                          DIRECTORY OF SERVICES

                                        MAIN SWITCHBOARD                                                                                               989-275-5000
                                        Telecommunication Device for the Deaf (TDD)                                                                    989-275-6721

Offices                                                                                                                                                                                Extension
ADMISSIONS........................................................................................................................................................................................... 284
This office is responsible for admission of all new students, new student recruitment activities, and admissions advising.

BOOKSTORE........................................................................................................................................................................................... 273
Located in the student center, the bookstore provides textbooks, reference books, classroom supplies, clothing, gift items and souvenirs,
some snacks, and miscellaneous sundries.

CAFETERIA............................................................................................................................................................................................. 268
Located in the student center and is open Monday - Friday. Hours and specials are posted in the student bulletin.

CAREER AND EMPLOYMENT SERVICES....................................................................................................................................... 450
This office helps students research specific careers and career opportunities. Assistance with job search strategies, résumé writing, and
interviewing techniques is also provided.

COUNSELING OFFICE ......................................................................................................................................................................... 280
Michigan-licensed professional counselors are available in the student services office in the administration center to provide Kirtland students
with academic, personal, and career counseling. The counseling staff will make use of a variety of test instruments when they work with
students in order to help them learn more about their academic abilities, interests, personality type, and current level of self-esteem. The
counseling process, aided often by such testing information, can help students make more informed personal, academic, and career decisions.

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY................................................................................................................................................. 355
The Department of Public Safety is located in room 127 in the administration center. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 11 p.m., Monday through
Friday. Public Safety services include the following:
•    After-dark escort service from buildings to vehicles
•    Response to criminal behavior complaints
•    Preventative workshops/seminars on drug/alcohol awareness, rape awareness, use of weapons, etc.
•    The addressing of parking and traffic violations
•    Provision of vehicle emergency assistance (keys locked inside vehicle, jump-starting vehicle, etc.)

FINANCIAL AID ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 257
This office helps students apply for financial assistance including grants, loans, scholarships and student employment.

LIBRARY.................................................................................................................................................................................................. 246
The library is open to the general community as well as all students. A variety of services are available, including full reference service,
term-paper counseling, interlibrary loan, and online search service. See library for library hours and more information.

SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES ......................................................................................................................... 252
This office assists students who need supportive services to succeed in their college courses. Examples of services include scribes, note-
takers, readers, textbooks on tape, and sign language interpreters.

INSTRUCTION OFFICE ........................................................................................................................................................................ 270
This office is located in the instructional center and is responsible for instructional matters that include the class schedule, cancellation of
classes, selection and supervision of career and technical faculty, and related grade appeals.

RECORDS/REGISTRATION OFFICE................................................................................................................................ ................ 251
The responsibilities of this office include course registrations, schedule adjustments, program changes, enrollment and graduation verifications,
grade reporting, official graduation audits, maintain permanent academic records, issue academic transcripts upon student request, and transfer
credit evaluations.
                                               PHONE NUMBERS TO KNOW

                     MAIN SWITCHBOARD                                                               989-275-5000
                     Telecommunication Device for the Deaf (TDD)                                    989-275-6721


Accounting ............................................. 262, 337, 238           Journalism Office ................................................ 308
Admissions ............................................................. 284
Allied Health Lab ................................................... 421        KCC Foundation.................................................. 253
Auditorium ............................................................. 401     Kirtland House ..............................................418, 224
Automotive Lab...................................................... 215
                                                                                 Law Enforcement ................................................ 283
Biology Lab............................................................ 417      Library.................................................................. 246
Boardroom .............................................................. 314
Bookstore........................................................ 273, 342       Mailroom............................................................. 227
Business Conference Room .................................... 292                Maintenance ..........................................381, 214, 223
Business Office....................................................... 239       Massage Therapy ................................................. 281
                                                                                 M-TEC at Kirtland-Gaylord....................... 705-3600
Cafeteria......................................................... 268, 343
Career and Employment Services................... 440, 450                       Newspaper ........................................................... 308
Ceramics Lab.......................................................... 258       Nursing................................................................. 281
Chemistry Prep Room............................................. 417             Nursing Lab.......................................................... 332
Children's Learning Center ..................................... 232
Community Education ............................................ 210             Payroll ................................................................. 244
Conference Center/Kirtland House................. 418, 224                       Performing Arts Center ................................ 397, 311
COOR ..................................................................... 432   Personnel Office................................................... 271
Cosmetology Lab.................................................... 274          Photo Lab ............................................................. 409
Counseling...................................................... 280, 231        Placement Testing ................................................ 280
Courtesy Phone - Academic Building..................... 317                      President's Office ................................................. 253
Courtesy Phone - Administration Center ................ 400                      Print shop ......................................................243, 272
Courtesy Phone - Art Building ............................... 409                Public Relations ................................................... 242
Courtesy Phone - Conference Center...................... 224
Courtesy Phone - Library ....................................... 373             Records, Registration, Registrar ...................251, 291
Courtesy Phone - Student Center............................ 269                  Receivables .......................................................... 238
Criminal Justice ...................................................... 283
Cultural Events ....................................................... 397      Security .............................................355, 0, 283, 390
                                                                                 Special Populations .............................................. 252
Day Care................................................................. 232
                                                                                 Special Needs ....................................................... 252
DEV Office............................................................. 354
                                                                                 Student Senate Office........................................... 288
Employment Services............................................. 450             Student Services .................................................. 284
eServices................................................................. 499   Student Support Services...................................... 252
                                                                                 Switchboard...................................................... 0, 227
Emergency-Sheriff’s Dept.................................... 911
                                                                                 TDD..................................................(275-6721), 721
Faculty Office ................................................ 279, 210         Testing Center ...................................................... 213
Faculty Lounge ....................................................... 319       Theatre Arts.......................................................... 375
Financial Aid ........................................ 257, 260, 310             Ticket Office ......................................(275-6777) 777
FLEX Lab............................................................... 213      Transfer Credit Evaluation ................................... 280
                                                                                 Tutoring............................................................... 379
Health Careers........................................................ 281
Hearing Impaired (LTD)..................... 1-800-649-3777                       Veteran's Office ................................................... 257
Honors Program...................................................... 359
Human Resources ................................................... 271          Warbler Festival Office ................................735, 266
                                                                                 Welding Lab......................................................... 294
Instruction Office ................................................... 270       Writing Center...................................................... 338
                                   COLLEGE MAPS




A - H - Parking lots.                               INS - Instructional Center - Faculty offices;
ADM - Administration Center - Administrative        General and computer classrooms; Biology lab;
offices;     Accounting;    Athletics;  Business    Chemistry lab; Developmental classrooms;
Conference Room; Business Office; Career &          Engineering Design Technologies lab; Health
Employment Services; Computer Labs; Criminal        Careers offices; Honors Program Office; Nursing
Justice Program offices; DEV classrooms;            lab; Physics lab; Tutoring center.
Disability Services Office; Financial Aid Office;   KIR – Kirtland House - Conference Center; Art
FLEX Lab; General, computer, and multimedia         Gallery.
classrooms; Institutional Services; President’s     LIB - Library - Computer labs; eServices; ITV
Office;        President’s      Board     Room;     Room, Library facilities; Telecommunications
Records/Registration Office; Special Populations    Center.
Office, Student Services (including admissions,     PAC - Performing Arts Center - Kirtland Center
counseling, housing, placement testing); Testing    for the Performing Arts; G.I. Stewart Auditorium.
Center.                                             PHY - Physical Plant - Printshop; Maintenance and
ART - Fine Arts Center - Art Department Office;     Grounds Department; Shipping & Receiving.
Art Gallery; Art lab; Sculpture lab.                STU - Student Center - Bookstore; Cafeteria;
CLC - Children’s Learning Center                    COOR offices; Game Room; Music lab; Student
CTC - Career Technology Center - Automotive         Senate Office; Switchboard; Public Safety &
lab; Cosmetology lab; Manufacturing lab; Welding    Security Office; Student Newspaper Office.
lab; Faculty offices.
                    ADMISSIONS AND FINANCIAL AID
                                                 GETTING STARTED
ADMISSIONS POLICY
Kirtland Community College adheres to the "open door" policy of granting general admission primarily to all persons above the twelfth-grade
age level. Depending upon the applicant's situation, either "regular" or "special" admission status will be granted.
Regular Admission
Regular admission will be granted to high school graduates and successful completers of the General Education Development (GED) test.
Individuals who do not meet this requirement may also be granted regular admission by meeting "ability to benefit," as defined by federal
regulations.
International students may be granted regular admission provided they meet certain English proficiency and financial requirements, as
determined by the designated school official in the President’s office.

Special Admission
Special admission will be granted to anyone who does not qualify for general admission. Persons admitted under this category will be restricted
to non-degree/certificate-seeking status. The special admission category includes the following two groups:
1.   Dual-Enrolled Student: a K-12 student who is also attending college. Dual-enrolled students are required to submit a Dual Enrollment form
     for each semester or session of enrollment. All dual-enrolled students must have written authorization to attend Kirtland from their school's
     principal or counselor. Dual enrollees must also take Kirtland’s Placement Tests.
2.   Non-High-School Completer: is a person who has withdrawn from high school, has not earned a GED certificate, and has not met the
     ability-to-benefit requirement.
Any person who desires either special or regular admission to Kirtland must complete an Application for Admission form. All students under the
age of 18 must have parental or legal guardian consent.
Students being granted regular admission are encouraged to provide one of the following: (1) a high school transcript (with graduation date
indicated), or (2) an official report of GED test results, verified by the college, showing test scores achieved by the applicant.
If regular admission was granted on the basis of the "ability to benefit" requirement, an official report showing test scores achieved by the
applicant must be received and verified by the college.

Admission of Home Schooled Students
Most students attending college have earned a diploma from a public or private high school. Some students, however, have completed their
high-school-level studies through a home school program. Parents of home schooled children are encouraged to register their program with the
State of Michigan’s Department of Education.

When a student attends a public or private high school, an official transcript (list of courses completed and grades earned by a student) is kept by
the high school and made available to colleges upon a student’s written request. In lieu of an official transcript, home schooled students are
expected to provide a list of high-school-level courses completed and the grades earned in each course. If a home school diploma was awarded,
a copy should also be sent to Kirtland’s admissions office.

The Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards (MCOLES) requires that criminal justice students complete a GED or a high school
or adult education diploma, in addition to their home school diploma, in order to become certified.

Additional admissions requirements must be met by those students planning to enroll in one of the following programs of study:
      ●   Criminal Justice Administration                                      ● Emergency Medical Services/Paramedic/EMT
      ●   Criminal Justice Pre-Service                                         ● Nursing Level I - Practical Nursing
      ●   Corrections Administration                                           ● Nursing Level II - Associate Degree in Nursing
      ●   Correctional Officer

Additional information about admissions requirements may be requested from an advisor or from the admissions office.

This admission policy will also be applied to returning students, regardless of their past admission status.
ADMISSIONS ADVISING
All students interested in being admitted to Kirtland for the first time are encouraged to make an appointment to see an admissions advisor. The
advisor will help guide the student in completing all the steps necessary for a smooth entry into college. Tours, program requirements, and stu-
dent services information are available for both students and their families.

TRANSFER OF CREDITS
Regionally Accredited Colleges and Universities
Credit may be given for courses transferred from regionally accredited colleges and universities. Credits only, not grades, are transferred for
courses in which a grade of C or better has been earned. Students who received credit by departmental exam may be required to pass a Kirtland
examination prior to the awarding of credit. Normally, a C- grade will not be accepted for credit when transferring to Kirtland. However,
students may appeal to the dean or associate dean of their program to have the C- grade accepted. Students must appeal to the dean or associate
dean in writing, stating reasons for acceptance of the grade. The dean or associate dean will consider the student’s GPA from the previous
institution as well as the student’s Kirtland GPA in making the decision. Acceptance of the grade is at the dean’s or associate dean’s discretion,
and his/her decision will be final. Courses on transcripts are evaluated by the registrar or designee according to the student's selected program.

The student's academic advisor will determine whether the awarded transfer credit may be applied toward the student's program of study.
Students who want a transfer credit evaluation must request an official copy of their previous academic transcripts to be sent directly to the
student services office.

Non-Regionally Accredited Colleges and Universities
Credit may be given for courses transferred from non-regionally accredited colleges and universities. The policy is the same as described above
for "Transfer of Credit from Regionally Accredited Colleges and Universities," with the following exceptions:
1.   The Registrar’s office may choose to request a recommendation of transfer credit for the transcript in question from the academic advisor
     for the program in which the student has enrolled.
2.   The student may be requested to demonstrate knowledge and/or skills commensurate with the performance required for satisfactory
     completion of existing courses.
3.   Credit may not be granted.

Other Transfer Credits
Kirtland Community College recognizes the following opportunities for awarding transfer credits:

1.   College Board Advanced Placement Program (APP)
     College course credit will be granted to students who participate in the APP and pass the Advanced Placement examinations with a score of
     three, four, or five. Students must submit a College Action Report to the student services office for consideration of granting college credit.

2.   College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)
     College course credit will be granted to students who take a CLEP Examination and achieve the minimum passing score as recommended
     by the American Council on Education (ACE). Kirtland Community College does not award credit for all CLEP Examinations. A list is
     available in the counseling office that shows the CLEP Examinations acceptable for credit. Students must submit a CLEP transcript to the
     student services office for consideration of granting college credit.

3.   DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSSTs)
     College course credit will be granted to students who participate in the DSSTs and achieve the minimum passing score as recommended by
     the American Council on Education (ACE). A list is available in the counseling office that shows the DANTES Examinations acceptable
     for credit. Students must submit an official transcript to the student services office for consideration of granting college credit.

4.   Educational Experiences in the Armed Services
     Veterans may be awarded college credit for the service schools they attended and their work experience while in the U.S. military. The
     college awards credit based on recommendations provided by the American Council on Education (ACE). Students must have their
     official transcripts sent to the student services office for evaluation of military credit. Transcript request forms are available in the
     admission office.

5.   United States Armed Forces Institute (USAFI) Program
     College course credit will be granted to students who participated in the USAFI Program and achieved the minimum passing score as
     recommended by the American Council on Education (ACE). Students must submit an official transcript to the student services office for
     consideration of granting college credit.
6.   Articulation
     College course credit will be granted to students who have met the requirements of formal articulation agreements between the college and
     secondary educational institutions. Students must submit an Application for Articulation Credit form to the records office at Kirtland
     Community College for consideration of granting college credit. College policies concerning the transferability of articulated credit vary.
     Students should check with the college to which they plan to transfer to determine if the articulated credit will be accepted by that college.

     Currently Kirtland has articulation agreements with the following secondary educational institutions: Alcona, Boyne City, Cheboygan,
     COOR-ISD, Crawford-AuSable, East Jordan, Fairview, Gaylord, Gerrish- Higgins, Hale, Hillman, Houghton Lake, Huron Area Technical
     Center, Iosco RESA Tech Center, Johannesberg-Lewiston, Mio, Onaway, Oscoda, Vanderbilt, West Branch-Rose City, Whittemore-
     Prescott, and Wolverine. For further information, students should consult with their high school counselor or contact the dean or associate
     dean of their program.

PROFICIENCY IN BASIC ACADEMIC SKILLS AND PLACEMENT TESTING
Kirtland Community College requires prospective students to demonstrate basic academic skill proficiencies in English, reading, and
mathematics before they will be permitted to enroll in college-level courses. Acceptable ways in which a student may demonstrate proficiency
in one or more of the basic academic skills include the following:
1.   Submitting ACT test results. The ACT must have been taken within four years of enrollment at the college. Test results can be presented
     in person or mailed to the admissions office.
2.   Submitting test results from the Advanced Placement Program, CLEP, or DANTES. Official transcripts must be sent to the admissions
     office. An Application for Admission must be on file for a credit evaluation to be completed.
3.   Transferring credit for courses taken in English and mathematics at another college or university. Courses must be completed with a C
     grade or better. Official transcripts must be sent to the admissions office. An Application for Admission must be on file for a credit
     evaluation to be completed.
4.   Enrolling as a “Personal Interest” student. A student is permitted to take one occupational-technical course, developmental education
     course(s), business seminar(s), and studio art course(s) without being required to test for such placements.
5.   Taking developmental courses offered by the college in the basic academic skills of English, reading, and mathematics.
6.   Taking the COMPASS Test within four years of enrollment at the college. The COMPASS Test will consist of tests for English, reading,
     and mathematics.
Further exceptions to the Proficiency in Basic Academic Skills and Placement Testing policy may be granted by the associate dean responsible
for testing, or the dean of student services.

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION
Practical information about campus procedures and college services are explained in the Student Orientation Guide, which is provided to new
students when they take the COMPASS Test. New students, both new to the college experience and transferring from another college, find this
information vital to their success at Kirtland. Please call the admissions office at 989-275-5000, extension 284, for more information.



                                             PAYING FOR COLLEGE
TUITION AND FEES

Tuition
For current tuition and fee rates please refer to our website at http://kirtland.edu/accounting/tuitionsummary.htm.
Tuition and fees for M-TEC classes are available at http://mtec.kirtland.edu/schedule, or students may call (989)705-3600 for more information.
NOTE: Tuition and fees are subject to change without notice.

Payment for Classes
Upon registration, it is the ultimate responsibility of the student to pay tuition, fees, and other debts incurred at Kirtland by the appropriate due
date listed in the current class schedule and on http://www.kirtland.edu/accounting. When registering in person, each student will be given a
statement of account, with his/her class schedule. For students registering via myKirtland, it is the student’s responsibility to view and print their
charges from the “Account Detail” window on the Student Tab at MyKirtland. Statements will only be mailed upon request. Students with
questions concerning their accounts are encouraged to contact the accounting office in the administration center at 989-275-5000, extension 218.
If payment in full is not received by the due date, the student’s classes may be dropped. Once the semester begins, the student will be invoiced
via the United States Postal Service if there is a reduction to aid, additions to class schedule, etc. Delinquent accounts will be turned over to a
collection agency and the cost of such action will be added to the student’s account. Students are not allowed to register for classes or receive
transcripts until all financial obligations to Kirtland have not been met.

Methods of Payment
Cash, Check, or Money Order - Payment may be made in person or by mail. The student ID number needs to be included with the payment. A
$25.00 charge will be assessed for all NSF checks returned by the bank.

VISA, MasterCard, Discover - Students have the option of paying by telephone by calling 989-275-5000, extension 218, or online via
myKirtland at: my.kirtland.edu

Employer or Sponsoring Agency - The accounting office can bill a student’s employer or a state agency if a signed authorization or letter is
submitted prior to the payment due date or at the time of registration. Written authorizations need to be submitted each semester.

Financial Aid/Loans/Scholarships - When a student’s financial aid award is approved, the amount will automatically be credited to his/her
account. If the award does not cover the balance in full, the student is responsible for paying the difference by the due date. Also, if a student
applies late for financial aid and the award has not been approved by the due date, the student must be prepared to pay. He/she may be
reimbursed after the award has been posted to the account.

FACTS Payment Plan
Students with a tuition and fee balance of $100.00 or more may be eligible for the FACTS Payment Plan. This plan enables students to make
interest-free payments for tuition and fees via automatic transactions from a checking or savings account, American Express, DiscoverCard, or
MasterCard. The cost to enroll is $25.00 per semester. Tuition and fees may be budgeted for up to four months per semester. The earlier a
student registers, the smaller the monthly payments can be. If a student plans to make payments through FACTS, an online application
must be submitted by the payment due date or on the day of registration. Otherwise, the student’s classes will be canceled. After
registering for classes, students can apply online by logging into myKirtlandWeb at: my.kirtland.edu. Once you are logged in click on the
student tab, click on submit in the e-cashier window at the bottom of the page. Then, click the e-cashier icon at the bottom of the charges
windows and follow t he application directions. Once the application is submitted, the student will receive an e-mail notification verifying the
agreement. More information is available online on the accounting web pages at: www.kirtland.edu/accounting.

Residency
In-District Residency
A new student will be classified as in-district if he/she can prove that he/she has lived in the Kirtland college district for a period of five months
immediately prior to attending Kirtland. Acceptable proof includes the following:
    • Driver’s license                    • Place of residence property tax receipt              • 5 months Rental receipts with address
    • Voter registration card             • Secretary of State identification card

A returning in-district student will continue to be considered in-district if he/she can prove he/she continues to reside in the district.

Out-of-District Residency
A new student will be considered out-of-district if he/she can prove residency within Michigan at least one month prior to attending Kirtland,
but cannot prove in-district residency. Acceptable proof includes the following:

          •     Driver’s license                                •    Place of residence property tax receipt
          •     Rental receipt with address on it               •    Secretary of State identification card
          •     Voter registration card

A student who resides outside the district can be assessed an in-district tuition rate if he/she provides the college with tax receipts showing tax
payments to the college, as long as the property is owned by the student or the student is a dependent of the person who owns the property.

A returning out-of-district student will be considered in-district if he/she can prove in-district residency as a non-student for a period of five
months immediately prior to attending.

Out-of-State Residency
A student who cannot prove in-district or in-state residency will be considered out-of-state if he/she is a U.S. citizen, or if he/she is a registered
alien who resides in the U.S.

An out-of-state student can change his/her classification to in-district in the same way that is described for out-of-district students.
International Student Status
A student who is not a U.S. citizen and who is attending Kirtland Community College under an F-1, J-1, or J-2 visa will be considered an
international student.

REFUNDS
Tuition and fee refunds are based on the following schedule:

Full-semester courses
•    100 percent refund through and including the census date for the semester.

Open Entry/Open Exit Courses
•  100 percent refund prior to the start date indicated on the student’s FLEX contract.
•  No refunds as of the start date indicated on the student’s FLEX contract.

All other courses
•    100 percent refund through and including the census date for the course.

Registration fees are nonrefundable. The college will follow any federally mandated refund schedules. Contact the accounting office for more
information. Exceptions to the stated refund policy may be granted by the dean of student services.

Cancelled Class
Students registered for a course cancelled by the college will be refunded ALL tuition and fees for the cancelled course.

Federal Return of Funds/Repayment Policy
Under changes made by the Higher Education Reconciliation Act of 2005 (HERA), this policy focuses on the amount of Title IV program funds
to be returned when a student withdraws from college prior to completing the semester. This policy applies only to students receiving Title IV
aid (federal PELL grants, federal SEOG, Academic Competitiveness Grant and federal subsidized and unsubsidized Stafford Loans).

During the first 60% of the enrollment period, a student “earns” Title IV funds in direct proportion to the length of time he or she remains
enrolled.
Students who withdraw totally from the college without completing 60% of the enrollment period will be required to repay a portion of the aid
received within 45 days. For example, a student withdrawing after completing 10% of the enrollment period may need to repay up to 90% of the
federal funds that were awarded to him or her.

A student’s withdrawal date is:
•    The date the student began the institution’s withdrawal process, or
•    The midpoint of the period for a student who leaves without notifying the school.

The institution has the option of using the student’s last date of attendance at a documented academically-related activity in lieu of any other
withdrawal date.

The responsibility to repay unearned aid is shared by the school and the student in proportion to the aid each is assumed to possess.

The institution’s share is the lesser of:
•     The total amount of unearned aid, or
•    Institutional charges multiplied by the percentage of aid that was unearned.

The student’s share is:
•   The difference between the total unearned amount and the institution’s share.

Under the HERA, the amount of a grant overpayment due from a student is limited to the amount which the original grant overpayment exceeds
half of the total Title IV grant funds received by you. Students do not have to repay a grant overpayment of less than $50 to the U.S.
Department of Education.

NOTE: Kirtland will bill students for any balance owed due to the College’s return of funds to the Department of Education. A student who
withdraws may have charges not covered by financial aid, such as non-classroom-related items charged at the bookstore, which must be paid by
the student.
FINANCIAL AID
The Kirtland Community College financial aid office endorses the philosophy that the primary source of support for a student should come from
his/her own family. However, to the extent funding will allow, Kirtland will try to assist a student with financial aid when the family is unable to
meet college expenses. Approximately two out of three students receive financial assistance through scholarships, grants, loans, and/or student
employment.

Financial aid is a privilege, not a right. Therefore, it is the student’s responsibility to: (1) obtain and file the appropriate forms; (2) maintain the
correct address on file; (3) respond promptly and fully to all requests for information; and (4) understand and comply with the rules governing
the aid received.

HOW TO APPLY FOR FINANCIAL AID
All students wishing to be considered for federal financial assistance (including student loans and work study) must complete and file the Free
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) available from Kirtland’s office of financial aid. An electronic application may also be accessed
at www.fafsa.ed.gov. This is not an application for any particular form of aid; rather, it is an application for needs analysis, on which many
federal and state aid programs are based.

Within 30 days after submitting the FAFSA, the student will receive his/her copy of the Student Aid Report (SAR). If there are any problems,
errors, or questions, the student should contact the financial aid office. The SAR will be used to determine which programs the student is eligible
for and how much can be awarded. The student may need to provide supporting documentation for information provided on the FAFSA.

A student's application for aid at Kirtland will not be considered finalized until the following items are completed:

1.   The applicant has been officially admitted to Kirtland Community College.

2.   The financial aid office has on file the following documents:
     •     Student Aid Report (SAR) from the federal processor and, KCC Financial Assistance Form;
     If selected for verification:
     •     Verification Worksheet
     •     Income documentation: federal income tax returns and/or other sources of income
     •     Other information as requested

3.   The applicant has been packaged for aid and mailed a letter by the financial aid office listing the award(s) he/she is expected to receive.

HOW THE FINANCIAL AID FORMULA WORKS
Most federal and state financial aid is awarded on the basis of demonstrated financial need. The formula used to determine who has need and
who does not is actually quite simple. The following equation is used:

Student Budget - Expected Family Contribution = Financial Need

Student Budget is the cost of attending college (tuition, fees, room and board, transportation, books, supplies, etc.).

Expected Family Contribution is taken from the student’s Student Aid Report.

Financial Need is the maximum dollar amount of need-based aid from the various sources for which the student is eligible.

A student will not necessarily receive financial assistance up to the maximum dollar amount for which he/she may be eligible. The various
sources of aid have maximum award amounts and may be further affected by limitations in the availability of funds. Loans may be available if
grant aid is insufficient. Inquire at the financial aid office if additional funding is needed.

Applicants’ answers to certain questions will determine whether they are considered “dependent” (still part of a parent’s family unit) or whether
they are “independent” (has formed their own family unit). Students are classified according to family unit because federal student aid programs
are based on the idea that students and their parents or spouses (if applicable), have the primary responsibility for paying for their postsecondary
education. To be considered “independent,” at least one of the following must apply to the student:

•    turns 24 before January 1 of the academic year for which aid is sought.
•    is a veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces.
•    is an orphan or ward of the court until age 18.
•    is married.
•    financially support dependent children.
HOW DO STUDENTS PAY FOR CLASSES IF THEY HAVE FINANCIAL AID?
At time of registration, and if and only if all financial aid paperwork has been received and processed by the financial aid office, a student may
charge college costs (tuition, books, supplies, and certain fees) up to the amount the student has been awarded in aid. If a student does not have
all paperwork completed at time of registration, the student will be obligated to make other arrangements for payment and may be required to
pay in full. Students must be aware that financial aid is always subject to change without prior notice if changes occur in the student's
enrollment status, class attendance, personal circumstances, or in federal or state guidelines.

The student is responsible for all college bills not covered by financial aid. All charges incurred during a semester that are not covered by
financial aid must be paid by the student before the student will again be allowed to register.

FINANCIAL AID AND WITHDRAWALS
A student who withdraws, ceases attendance, or is expelled may have charges and financial aid adjusted according to the time and circumstances
of cessation of enrollment. Students should refer to the refund schedules, which are published in the current class schedule. Failure to attend
class without officially withdrawing may void financial aid, leaving the student responsible for all charges. Students must advise the student
services office in writing in order to withdraw.

OVERAGES AND REFUNDS
Overages, or payments due the students from their awards after charges have been deducted, will be start to be made available approximately
the fifth week of class. Thereafter, additional overage checks are run approximately twice a month throughout the semester. Exceptions are for:
student loan borrowers whose checks are generally distributed 30 days into the enrollment period; work-study pay checks, which are issued
biweekly; and those students who are enrolled in modular coursework programs.

STANDARDS OF SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS
To be eligible for financial aid, students must be in Good Academic Standing and making Satisfactory Academic Progress, as defined below,
toward the completion of a one-year certificate or degree program. This policy applies to all students receiving assistance from any financial aid
program administered by the Kirtland Community College financial aid office. This policy is separate from the college's general probation
policy and is monitored at the completion of each semester of enrollment. The following standards must be met to continue to receive financial
aid:

Good Academic Standing
Good Academic Standing means maintaining a current grade point average (GPA) of 2.00 or better. In addition, once the student has completed
a cumulative total of 45 credit hours, the student must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.00.

Satisfactory Academic Progress
Satisfactory Academic Progress means that the student is making reasonable progress toward completion of a degree or certificate program. For
each semester of enrollment, students must satisfactorily complete 66% of the credits for which they were awarded aid.

A student shall not receive financial aid for credit hours taken beyond a maximum of 150 % of the published length of their declared program of
study. Upon completion of a program of study, a student may be considered for financial assistance up to a maximum of 150 % of a new
program of study. Kirtland Community College limits financial aid eligibility to a maximum of three eligible certificates (without completing an
associate degree) and no more than three associate degrees. In addition, the following rules also apply:

•    Classes taken for audit will not be considered when determining eligibility.
•    Incomplete (I) grades are considered as failures to complete unless and until changed to passing grades.
•    No more than 30 credit hours of remedial classes will be approved for financial aid.
•    Repeated courses will be allowed only if the previous course grade was less than a 1.00.

PROBATION/TERMINATION
Any student failing to meet the above standards will be placed on financial aid probation for the student's next actual period of enrollment
(unless a period of at least four calendar years has elapsed, in which case the student may be considered for a one-time-only waiver). A student
will continue to receive financial aid during the probationary semester. The student must complete a minimum of six credit hours to be
considered for removal from probation. Failure to do so will result in termination from future financial aid. In the case of a student who has
exceeded the allowable semester limit, all requirements for graduation should be met during the probationary semester as no further financial aid
will be granted.

REINSTATEMENT
Except for students exceeding the time limitations within a degree or certificate program, a student may regain eligibility for financial aid by
enrolling for a semester and satisfactorily completing, at his/her own expense, a minimum of six credit hours. It is the student’s responsibility to
notify the financial aid office when satisfactory academic progress has been met.
Students should be aware, however, that all of the above listed requirements are applicable whenever financial aid is being considered, whether
or not any previous courses were taken at the student's expense. The only exception to this policy shall be in the instance where a student
applying the first time for financial aid, who has a prior record of unsatisfactory progress but has been allowed by the college to enroll, may be
considered for financial aid for one probationary semester. As stated previously, satisfactory completion of probationary requirements will
remove the probationary status.

APPEALS/SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES
All students have the right to appeal any decision or action taken regarding their financial aid. Appeals may be made in written form to the
director of financial aid. The student must explain any mitigating circumstances and be prepared to provide all reasonable proof or
documentation requested. A committee decision is final. The result of an appeal will be recorded and kept on file.

Any student who feels his/her family has special circumstances that might affect the amount the family can contribute, may request, in writing,
a professional judgment analysis by the financial aid office. Special circumstances include unusual medical or dental expenses; tuition for
children attending private school; or recent unemployment of the student, his/her spouse, or parents. The director of financial aid will review the
request to determine if circumstances meet professional judgment guidelines. Any decision made in this regard is final and cannot be appealed
to the Department of Education.

CONFIDENTIALITY OF RECORDS
Information contained in the financial aid file is strictly confidential and will not be released without the prior written approval of the student.
However, departments within the college may be provided information on a "need-to-know" basis. Files are generally destroyed after five years.

STATEMENT OF COMPLIANCE
Financial aid is awarded in compliance with all pertinent federal and state laws and regulations, without regard to race, creed, color, religion,
national origin, sex, age, or handicap, except as provided under federal and state laws and regulations.

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
Part-time student employment is offered both on and off campus. The federal and state government and Kirtland Community College provide
work-study dollars which fund the student employee program. Off-campus employers may be obligated to contribute matching funds. The goals
of the program are to provide employment experience, the opportunity for community service, and additional financial assistance to students.
Students are paid an hourly rate for the work they perform.

Students must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid form (FAFSA) before consideration for student employment and attend a
student employee orientation.

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT HANDBOOK
The purpose of the Student Employee Handbook is to inform students of the general provisions and regulations of work study, a financial aid
program that provides valuable job experience through student employment. This booklet includes responsibilities of student employees and
their supervisors, how to complete a time sheet, office conduct, student employee evaluation process, and forms. Contact the financial aid office
for a copy.

SOURCES OF FINANCIAL AID
There are many different types of student financial aid. Almost all, including state and federal grants, student loans, work-study, and even many
scholarships, require the filing of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid form (FAFSA) for a determination of “financial need.” Financial
aid is classified in the following manner:
Grants - do not have to be repaid; awarded on the basis of demonstrated financial need.

Scholarships - do not have to be repaid; based upon academic performance and/or special circumstance. Demonstrated financial need may be
considered.

Student Loans - must be repaid. Interest rates and repayment options are regulated by federal law and may change year to year.

Work-Study - is part-time work during the school year and vacation periods. Demonstrated financial need is typically considered.
GRANTS
ACADEMIC COMPETITIVENESS GRANT
This grant program is available only to Pell eligible students that graduated from high school on or after January 1, 2005 and completed a
rigorous high school program. Students must complete the FAFSA and acknowledge completion of a rigorous program of study. The College
is required to obtain a final high school transcript and evaluate before an award can be made. Freshman may receive up to $750 and
sophomores may receive up to $1300.
BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS (BIA)
The student must be a registered member of a federally recognized American Indian tribe, be enrolled in a public college or university, and
demonstrate financial need. For more information, contact Bureau of Indian Affairs, Federal Square Office Plaza, Box 884, Sault Ste Marie, MI
49783. Phone: 906-732-6809.

MICHIGAN TUITION INCENTIVE PROGRAM (TIP)
The student must be from a low-income family and must have graduated from high school or completed a GED prior to age 20.
If the student is eligible, the state will pay tuition and mandatory fees at Michigan community colleges and some universities. TIP does not
cover course fees and coverage is limited to 24 credits per academic year. Applications should be submitted to the state no later than the senior
year in high school, although eligibility may be established as early as grade seven.
This Pell Grant is awarded to undergraduate students demonstrating financial need. For the 2007-2008 academic year an annual award of up to
$4310 is possible. Awards are pro-rated based on the actual enrollment level of the student each semester.

MICHIGAN ADULT PART TIME GRANT
This is a State of Michigan grant designed to provide assistance to part-time adult undergraduate students. Students must complete the FAFSA
and meet other eligibility requirements. The maximum full year award is $600.

MICHIGAN EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANT
This is a State of Michigan Grant designed to provide assistance to undergraduate students. Students must complete the FAFSA and meet other
eligibility requirements. The maximum full year award is $1000.

FEDERAL SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANT (SEOG)
This grant is awarded as a supplement to the PELL Grant to students showing exceptional need. Priority is given to students with the lowest
expected family contribution as determined by the FAFSA. The typical award at Kirtland Community College is $200 a year.


SCHOLARSHIPS
MICHIGAN COMPETITIVE SCHOLARSHIP
This is a state scholarship awarded to eligible Michigan high school graduates. Applicants must have a qualifying score from the ACT and have
financial need as determined by the FAFSA. The maximum full year award is $1300.

MICHIGAN MERIT AWARD SCHOLARSHIP
The student must score well on the MEAP exams while in high school. The state makes the award, and it is disbursed by the college.

MICHIGAN NURSING SCHOLARSHIP
This is a state scholarship restricted to students pursuing nursing. The maximum full year award is $4000. The state allocates the funds and the
College selects recipients. Students must repay the scholarship if they do not work as a nurse in Michigan.

MICHIGAN PROMISE SCHOLARSHIP
This new state funded scholarship is available to students graduating from high school beginning 2007. Similar to the Merit award, students
must have met certain scores on the MEAP exams. Annual award is $1000 for a possible program maximum of $4000.

SCHOLARSHIPS/GRANTS OFFERED BY KIRTLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE
ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIP
This scholarship is awarded to select students participating in Kirtland’s athletic programs. Contact the athletic director for details.

DEPARTMENTAL SCHOLARSHIP
This scholarship is limited to Kirtland students who have completed, or are in the process of completing, at least 24 college credits, of which at
least 12 must have been taken at Kirtland. Consideration is given to the student’s overall GPA, the program GPA, and the program advisor or
instructor’s recommendation.

GILBERT I. STEWART SCHOLARSHIP
Students must have graduated from high school within the past academic year with a minimum GPA of 3.50.
KIRTLAND HONORS SCHOLARSHIP
Students must have been accepted into the Kirtland Honors Program.

KIRTLAND INDIAN TUITION WAIVER
The student must have been a Michigan resident for at least 12 months and be certified by his/her tribal association as not having less than 1/4
blood quantum.
MICHIGAN ARMY AND AIR NATIONAL GUARD TUITION WAIVER
A 25% tuition waiver is available to degree-seeking members of the Michigan Army or Air National Guard.

PRESIDENT’S SCHOLARSHIP
Students must have graduated from high school within the past academic year with a minimum GPA of 3.00.

SENIOR CITIZEN SCHOLARSHIP
Students must be residents of the Kirtland district, age 60 or over. Students should refer to the current class schedule for details.

SCHOLARSHIPS/GRANTS SPONSORED BY THE KIRTLAND FOUNDATION
ANN AND LAWSON CHAMBERS SCHOLARSHIP
This scholarship is limited to students who are residents of Rose City and Lupton.

AUTOMOTIVE EXCELLENCE SCHOLARSHIP
This scholarship is limited to sophomore level students pursuing a certificate or degree in automotive technology.

CARL J. DARLING JR. MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
This scholarship is limited to criminal justice pre-service students entering the Police Academy. Students must have a GPA of 2.5 or better.

MILDRED DEBOLT SCHOLARSHIP
This scholarship is limited to students majoring in English.

DONALD N. FENTON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
This scholarship is limited to sophomore level students planning to transfer to a university/college to study environmental science, teaching of
environmental sciences or teaching of science. Minimum GPA of 2.5.

JAMES D. FRYFOGLE MEMORIAL
This scholarship is limited to Kirtland Level II Associate Degree Nursing students who maintain a minimum 3.00 GPA in their core courses and
a minimum 2.50 GPA for all other courses. They must also be residents of the college district.

MARGUERITE GAHAGEN SCHOLARSHIP
Students applying for this scholarship must be majoring in journalism at Kirtland. They must have earned a 3.00 GPA. Preference is given to
those who reside in Roscommon County and/or show financial need.

WILLIAM INGLESON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
This scholarship is limited to students pursuing a career in counseling.

JEAN KING MEMORIAL
This scholarship is limited to students majoring in fine arts or commercial arts at Kirtland. They must be residents of the college district. First
preference will be given to residents of Ogemaw County.

OTTO AND MARTHA KRAUSS HONORS SCHOLARSHIP
Students must be admitted to the Kirtland Honors Program.

RON & MELANIE MARINO MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
Students must be seeking a degree or certificate on at least a half-time basis. Applications will be reviewed based upon a Statement of Goals, an
instructor’s recommendation, and an evaluation of financial need. Employees or immediate family members of Weyerhaeuser Company shall
receive first consideration.

HERBERT AND EVELYN MILLER SCHOLARSHIP
This scholarship is limited to Kirtland Level I LPN students who maintain a minimum 3.00 GPA in their core courses and a minimum 2.50 GPA
for all other courses.
HERBERT F. POEHLE MEMORIAL
This scholarship is limited to students majoring in fine arts at Kirtland Community College.

THE KEITH RICH TRUST
This scholarship is limited to students enrolled in nursing or other medically related programs at Kirtland. Applicants or their parents/guardians
must be residents of Lyon Township, Roscommon County, Michigan.

PATRICK J. TRAHAN MEMORIAL
This scholarship is awarded in recognition of academic performance in chemical science, with preferential treatment given to those students
pursuing a career in conservation or natural resources.

MARGUERITE D. WILTSE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
This scholarship is limited to students from Crawford, Ogemaw, Oscoda and Roscommon Counties pursuing health careers. Preference is given
to those students with financial need.

SCHOLARSHIPS SPONSORED BY OUTSIDE AGENCY
JANET SIEB MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
This scholarship is limited to full-time students in a business or office information systems program. Applicants must be residents of the college
district and demonstrate financial need.

OTHER SCHOLARSHIPS
Many other particular and unique scholarships may be available from corporations, associations, agencies, clubs, churches, and foundations. It is
recommended that interested students make inquiries of their high school counselor, their local Chamber of Commerce, their place of
employment (or their parent's), any organizations to which they or their parents may belong, and the financial aid office.

STUDENT LOANS
NOTE: Loan eligibility criteria are subject to revision. Contact the financial aid office for current procedures.

FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOANS - FFEL
Subsidized Stafford Loan
This loan is for students enrolled at least half-time who demonstrate financial need beyond what is met by other financial aid. The federal
government covers interest payments during periods of deferment. Students must file the FAFSA to have financial need determined.

Unsubsidized Stafford Loan
This is identical to the subsidized loan, except that the federal government does not pay the interest while a student attends classes.

PARENT LOAN PROGRAM (PLUS)
This loan is for parents of dependent students who have obtained the maximum financial assistance from other sources, including the PELL
Grant and Stafford Loan.

ALTERNATIVE STUDENT LOAN PROGRAMS
Students showing need over and above all other sources of financial aid for which they have been determined eligible may apply for an
alternative loan.

OTHER PROGRAMS AVAILABLE AT KIRTLAND
SPECIAL POPULATIONS GRANTS
Attendance costs such as tuition, fees, books, supplies, uniforms, transportation, and/or dependent care may be covered for special population
students enrolled in approved occupational programs or courses. Grants may be available to students with disabilities, students who are
economically or academically disadvantaged, students with limited English proficiency, and also to the following students:
1. Single Parents, including single pregnant women, who are unmarried or separated from a spouse and have a minor child or children for
     whom the parent has either custody or joint custody, or who are unmarried or separated from a spouse and pregnant.

2.   Displaced Homemakers, who have worked primarily without pay to care for the home and family and for that reason have diminished
     marketable skills, are also unemployed or underemployed, and have experienced difficulty in obtaining or upgrading employment. They
     must also have been dependent on the income of a family member but are no longer supported by that income or must be a parent whose
     youngest dependent child will become ineligible to receive Social Security assistance not later than two years after applying for the Title
     IV Social Security assistance.
3.   Nontraditional Training and Employment Participants, who are preparing for occupations or fields of work, including careers in computer
     science, technology, and other emerging high-skill occupations, for which individuals from one gender comprise less than 25 percent of the
     individuals employed in each such occupation or field of work.

Students participating in these programs must apply for other appropriate federal financial assistance by completing the Free Application for
Financial Student Aid form (FAFSA). Priority is given to those with the greatest financial need.

COMMUNITY SERVICE
Opportunities are available for students who wish to perform community service. Examples include, but are not limited to: welfare, social
services, transportation, public safety, crime prevention and control, recreation, work in service opportunities or youth corps, specified services
for agencies identified by the National and Community Service Act of 1990, mentoring activities, support services for disabled individuals,
health care, child care, literacy training, education, housing and neighborhood improvement, rural development, and community improvement.
For further information, contact the financial aid office.

VA EDUCATIONAL BENEFITS
Entitlement and Eligibility
Veterans, dependents, and selected reservists should contact Kirtland's financial aid office in the administration center to obtain accurate,
complete, and current information concerning educational benefits.

Educational Benefit Programs available are the following:

1.   Chapter 30, Montgomery GI Bill
     Active Duty Educational Assistance Program

2.   Chapter 31, Vocational Rehabilitation
     Veterans with a compensatory service-connected disability that impairs employability

3.   Chapter 32, VEAP
     Non-contributory VEAP (Section 903)
     Service beginning on or after January 1, 1977, through June 30, 1985

4.   Chapter 35, Educational Assistance for Veterans' Dependents
     Children and spouses of veterans who died of a service-connected disability or who are totally and permanently disabled from a service-
     connected disability

5.   Chapter 1606, Montgomery GI Bill Selected Reserve Educational Assistance Program

6.   Chapter 1607, Reservists called to active duty in response to war.


VA Application Process
VA application forms are available online at www.gibill.va.gov, or from the financial aid office located in the administration center. The
application is submitted to the VA with copy 4 of DD-214 (separation papers), preferably certified by a county clerk.
If the student has previously drawn educational benefits elsewhere, the student needs to complete a Request for a Change of Place and/or
Program form and have transcripts from other colleges sent to Kirtland for evaluation as soon as possible. Benefits can be suspended if credit
evaluations are not reported to the VA before the student completes two semesters.

Pay Rate
Monthly rates vary according to which VA program is providing the assistance and the student's course load status: full-time (minimum of 12
credit hours); three-quarter time (9-11 credit hours); half-time (6-8 credit hours); less than half but more than one-quarter (4-5 credit hours); one-
quarter time (3 credit hours).

Advance Pay
Students eligible for VA benefits may request an advance payment if they carry at least a half-time course load and the VA receives the
enrollment certification at least 30 days before classes start. The advance check covers the initial month or partial month of the semester, plus
the following month. This check is sent to the college, and the student receives it at registration. Subsequent checks are mailed to the student's
mailing address or can be directly deposited to the student’s financial institution.
Guidelines and Responsibilities

1.   Generally, classes certified must fulfill graduation requirements.

2.   VA payment is not ordinarily allowed for repeating a previously passed course.

3.   Any changes in program of study, course load, address, etc., must be reported to the financial aid office.

4.   If any eligible student certified for benefits fails to enter a course or withdraws officially or unofficially from classes, the VA will be
     notified.

5.   Students having problems with receiving their education benefits should contact the VA at their toll-free number: 1-888-442-
     4551.

6.   Monthly verifications are required by Ch. 30 students. Attendance may be verified by calling 1-877-823-2378 at any time on the last day of
     the month or later, or use WAVE Internet access: www.gibill.va.gov

Consequences of Dropping Classes
If a student receiving VA benefits drops a class after the first 30 days of a regular semester and the drop changes the student's status, the student
may have to repay the money received for the class. If the student receives a failing grade in the course dropped, the student is paid until the last
date of attendance. However, if the student receives a W grade, the student must repay the benefits received for that course unless the drop was
due to circumstances beyond the student's control.

The first time a student withdraws from up to six credits, the VA will excuse the withdrawal and pay benefits for the period attended. A VA-
eligible student must always contact the financial aid office before dropping courses to prevent payment problems.

Satisfactory Progress
A student receiving VA benefits needs to understand the college's policy regarding academic probation. When this policy allows, a VA student
placed on probation may have a maximum of two consecutive semesters to raise the cumulative grade point average to a 2.0. Failure to do so
will make the student ineligible for recertification, and unsatisfactory progress will be reported to the VA in writing.

The student may be recertified in the future under one of two conditions: (1) the cumulative grade point average is raised to 2.0, or (2) a request
for resumption of VA educational benefits is submitted to the VA and the VA reinstates benefits based on evidence supporting the student's
claim. The director of financial aid will assist the student in submitting a claim for reinstatement of benefits if there were mitigating
circumstances that led to the unsatisfactory progress.

MICHIGAN ARMY AND AIR NATIONAL GUARD TUITION WAIVER
A 25% tuition waiver is available to degree-seeking members of the Michigan Army or Air National Guard. Applications are available from the
office of Financial Aid in the administration center or by mail by calling 989-275-5000, extension 257.

SERVICEMEMBERS OPPORTUNITY COLLEGES (SOC)
Kirtland Community College is designated as an SOC. SOC is a network of more than 1,400 colleges and universities whose policies and
programs are designed especially to help meet the higher education needs of service-members. Contact the student services office for more
information.

CHILDREN OF VETERANS TUITION GRANT
Children of Michigan veterans whose death or total disability is connected with wartime service should also inquire about the Michigan
Veterans Trust Fund. If they are Michigan residents and not over 25 years of age, they may be eligible for full or partial coverage of tuition and
fee charges. Contact the Michigan Office of Scholarships and Grants at 1-888-447-2687 for details.



                     REGISTRATION AND ACADEMIC POLICIES
REGISTRATION PROCEDURES
All students are required to complete admissions requirements and procedures before registration for classes. Students register for classes
according to instructions published each semester in the class schedule. Students may register online at specified times by using myKirtland at
the following web site: www.kirtland.edu, in addition to registering in person.
A registered student is one who has completed the registration process, including arranging for payment of all financial commitments. A
student must be registered for a class before he/she may attend the class. Questions concerning these procedures should be directed to the Office
of the Registrar in student services.

Early registration is held just before the end of the fall and winter semesters and in the summer for the fall semester. This is an opportunity for
students to secure their classes before the busier time of regular registration.

Regular registration is held just before the beginning of the semester or session. Both new and returning students may register for classes
during this period.
Late registration is held during the first one or two days of a semester or session. Both new and returning students may register for classes
during this period.
Online registration (myKirtland) is available to students during open registration periods. If a registration period is more than one week,
although the registration office would be closed for walk-in registration over the weekend, students can register online throughout the weekend.
 You may access myKirtland through our home page at: www.kirtland.edu.

CREDIT HOUR LIMIT
Students enrolling for more than 18 credit hours for the fall or winter semester, or more than eight credit hours for the summer session, must
receive permission from their dean, associate dean, or designee. In the instance where the college catalog lists more than 18 hours as a suggested
semester load, students may register without additional permission.

COURSE ADJUSTMENTS (ADDS AND DROPS)
Add/Drop forms for adding and dropping courses can be secured from the student services office. Adds and drops should be approved by the
instructor or advisor and are to be used only to improve the student's instructional program.

Adding a class
Students are expected to complete their registration during the regular registration period. However, if a student must add a course, it should be
done before the end of the first week of the semester. No student will be allowed to add a class after the class has met more than two times
without written authorization from the instructor of the course.

Dropping a class
Students are permitted to drop any class in which they are enrolled, provided they submit a request to officially drop the class to the
Records/Registration office during the published drop period. Exact dates of the drop period are published in each semester's class schedule.
(Please refer to the information listed in this catalog under "Withdrawal from Courses.").

COURSE REPETITION
A student may repeat any course previously taken or an equivalent at Kirtland Community College to improve his/her grade. Only the higher
grade is credited when computing the grade point average, although both grades appear on the transcript.

If the student has achieved a C grade or better on the first repeat of a course, a second repeat will not be permitted. A student may not repeat a
course more than twice. Exceptions to this policy may occur when a student desires reentry or progression within a particular program that
requires current competency. These exceptions may be authorized by the program advisor. Other exceptions may only be authorized by the dean
or an associate dean.

Students receiving financial assistance should check with the financial aid office before registration. Students should be aware that financial aid
will not generally cover a repeated class if the prior grade was a C or better.

AUDITING OF COURSES
A student who wants to attend a course regularly, but does not wish to receive a grade or credit may register to audit the course. A student who
audits a course is required to officially register, indicate the class is for audit on the registration form, and pay all tuition and fees.

A change from audit to credit or credit to audit must be approved by the instructor of the course. A Change in Audit Status form can be secured
from the student services office; the form must be properly completed, signed by the instructor, and submitted to the records office in student
services for processing.

Financial aid is not available for a course taken for audit. Students receiving financial assistance should check with the financial aid office to
determine what effect the audit may have on their financial aid package.

GRADE REPORTING SYSTEM
Grades are issued at the end of each semester or session and become a permanent part of the student's record. Kirtland operates on two 15-week
semesters and an 8-week summer session.
Students must go online to view or print grades each semester, grades are not mailed. Students should log into myKirtland at www.kirtland.edu,
and select “Course History” link. Students can select specific semester grades, or by selecting “All Divisions, All Terms” students can view or
print a complete unofficial transcript showing all grades earned, and prerequisites met by placement testing. Students who do not have access to
a computer or the Internet can use the computers on the Kirtland campus, or they may request unofficial or official transcripts (see “Transcripts”
for ordering information).

The following grades are computed in the semester/term and cumulative/career grade point average (GPA): A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D,
D-, and E.
                                             Academic achievement is recorded as follows:
                                Honor Point
                                Grade Definition                                                                                  Value
                                A............................ Excellent performance ..................................... 4.0
                                A- .......................... Excellent performance ..................................... 3.7
                                B+.......................... Above average performance ............................ 3.3
                                B............................ Above average performance ............................ 3.0
                                B-........................... Above average performance ............................ 2.7
                                C+.......................... Above average performance ............................ 2.3
                                C............................ Average performance ..................................... 2.0
                                C-........................... Below average performance ............................ 1.7
                                D+ ......................... Below average performance ............................ 1.3
                                D............................ Below average performance ............................ 1.0
                                D- .......................... Below average performance ............................ 0.7
                                E ............................ Failure.............................................................. 0.0
                                I ............................. Incomplete ..................................................... N/A
                                W........................... Withdrawal ................................................... N/A
                                AU......................... Audit.............................................................. N/A
                                CR ......................... Transfer Credit............................................... N/A
                                R............................ Registrar Grade.............................................. N/A
                                S ............................ Satisfactory .................................................... N/A
                                SA ......................... Satisfactory - Grade A ................................... N/A
                                SB.......................... Satisfactory - Grade B ................................... N/A
                                SC.......................... Satisfactory - Grade C ................................... N/A
                                SD ......................... Satisfactory - Grade D ................................... N/A
                                U............................ Unsatisfactory................................................ N/A
                                IP ........................... Denotes class in progress............................... N/A

The number of honor points received for a course is determined by multiplying the honor point value of the course by the number of credit
hours. Therefore, a grade of B in a 4 credit-hour course is 12 honor points (3 x 4).

A grade point average is obtained by dividing the total number of honor points by the total number of credit hours graded. For example, a total
of 32 honor points earned in a semester by a student enrolled for 16 credit hours equals a grade point average (GPA) of 2.00 for that semester.

TRANSCRIPTS
Unofficial transcripts are available online via myKirtland at www.kirtland.edu. Students can print an unofficial transcript by logging into
myKirtland, then selecting “Course History” link.

Official transcripts are available from the records office in student services at no charge. Official transcripts include the college seal and are sent
directly from Kirtland to the college, employer, or other location the student indicates. Unofficial transcripts do not have the college seal and
can be given to the student.

A student requesting a transcript must do so in writing, include his/her student identification number and/or Social Security number, signature,
and to whom and where (including address) the transcript is to be sent. Transcript requests can be sent by fax to (989-275-6789) and, if a FAX
number is provided by the student, an unofficial copy may be faxed to another location.

NOTE: No transcripts will be issued to any student who has not met all of his/her financial obligations to Kirtland.
STUDENT RECORDS
In addition to academic transcripts, students' records are maintained by the records office in student services. A student record may include the
application for admission, high school transcript, other college transcripts and the transfer credit evaluation, test results, correspondence, student
progress reports, and other student information. Students may review their own student record any time during office hours with proper
identification.

PROGRESS REPORTS
A progress report is initiated by an instructor to notify a student of poor academic performance or lack of attendance in the instructor’s course.
The progress report is submitted to student services offices (counseling, student support services, and financial aid), and copies are sent to the
student and placed in the student’s file.


STUDENT ATTENDANCE POLICY
Students are expected to attend every class and laboratory period for which they have registered. Regular class attendance is necessary for
students to receive maximum benefits from their classes. Excused absences for participation in authorized campus activities shall in no way
lessen student responsibilities for meeting the requirements of the class. Excessive absence may affect financial aid awards.

Regular attendance is expected of each student in each course. Instructors are required to determine reasonable attendance and satisfactory
academic progress during the semester. Progress reports will be filed for students with poor attendance records. Financial assistance, whether
Veterans Administration, federal and state grants and scholarships, student loans, work-study, or private funding, may be cancelled or reduced if
attendance is unsatisfactory.

Since attendance is a legitimate basis for grading by instructors, students will receive progress reports for lack of attendance (see "Progress
Reports"). If absent from class, students should explain the reason for their absence to their instructors.

INCOMPLETE GRADES
A student may request an incomplete (I) grade when he/she has found it impossible for reasons beyond his/her control to complete all required
course work by the close of the semester. Upon the instructor's discretion, an incomplete grade may be granted.

If granting an incomplete grade, the instructor shall submit an Incomplete Grade Request form to the records office. If the course work is
completed within the period prescribed by the instructor, the incomplete grade will be changed to the letter grade the student has then earned. If
course work is not completed within the prescribed period, the incomplete grade will be changed to a failing grade.

WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES
Students may withdraw from courses for which they are registered.

FULL SEMESTER COURSES
If a withdrawal is made before or on the census date for the semester, no grade will be recorded. However, for withdrawals made after the
census date and through the twelfth week of the semester or through the sixth week of the summer semester, a grade of "W" will
automatically be issued.

SHORT COURSES (Courses that are scheduled for less than a full semester)
A withdrawal must be made before the final exam is issued for the course. If a withdrawal is made on or before the census date for the
course, no grade will be recorded. However, for withdrawals made after the census date of the course, a grade of "W" will automatically
be issued.

FLEX COURSES
A withdrawal must be made before the final exam is issued or before the coursework is completed for the course. If a withdrawal is made
before the course begins, no grade will be recorded. However, for withdrawals made after the course begins, a grade of "W" will
automatically be issued.

Generally, a withdrawal from a course is the student's option. However, students who are enrolled in a program that has additional
requirements may be required to withdraw from a course by their program advisor. As part of a disciplinary action, following due process,
an "administrative withdrawal" may be authorized by the dean of student services.

WITHDRAWAL FROM COLLEGE
Students withdrawing from all classes (withdrawal from college) shall follow the same procedure as withdrawal from courses.

ACADEMIC PROBATION AND ACADEMIC DISMISSAL
Good academic standing is a status achieved by students who have an earned a cumulative/career grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 and above.
Cumulative/career credit hours attempted/graded and cumulative/career GPA will determine a student’s good academic standing, probation, and
dismissal status. The following schedule reflects probation and dismissal status:

                                         0-5       Cumulative/Career Credit Hours Graded
                                                   Probation Status: None
                                                   Dismissal Status: None

                                         6-11      Cumulative/Career Credit Hours Graded
                                                   Probation Status: 0.00-1.99
                                                   Dismissal Status: None


                                         12-17     Cumulative/Career Credit Hours Graded
                                                   Probation Status: 1.00-1.99
                                                   Dismissal Status: 0.99 or less

                                         18-23     Cumulative/Career Credit Hours Graded
                                                   Probation Status: 1.26-1.99
                                                   Dismissal Status: 1.25 or less

                                         24-29     Cumulative/Career Credit Hours Graded
                                                   Probation Status: 1.53-1.99
                                                   Dismissal Status: 1.52 or less

                                         30-Plus Cumulative/Career Credit Hours Graded
                                                 Probation Status: 1.80-1.99*
                                                 Dismissal Status: 1.79 or less

NOTE: *Should the student not show academic progress (increasing cumulative/career GPA toward a 2.00) after completion of the next
enrolled semester/session, he/she will be dismissed.

If a student is dismissed from the college and wishes to re-enter, he/she must submit an Application for Reinstatement form to the director of
guidance and counseling for permission to re-enter as a limited probationary student. If permission is granted, the student will be allowed to
reenter with enrollment restrictions as stated in a signed contract between the student and the director of guidance and counseling. Any
adjustments to the limited probationary student's schedule must be approved by the director of guidance and counseling.

A limited probationary student will be dismissed again from the college if he/she is not showing academic progress (increasing the
cumulative/career grade point average toward a 2.00), or if he/she does not meet all requirements as listed in the contract. Students being
dismissed for a second time will automatically be required to sit out at least one semester.

Students being placed on academic probation or academic dismissal will be notified of their status by letter. The letter will be from the dean of
student services.

ACADEMIC AMNESTY
Kirtland Community College understands that a student may "get off to a bad start" due to circumstances beyond his/her own control. Also, a
student may enroll in a program that he/she later finds does not suit his/her needs. Both situations may result in a student experiencing poor
academic performance. Academic amnesty is an action of forgiveness provided to certain students who have experienced poor academic
performance at Kirtland Community College. Through academic amnesty, a student will be awarded a "second opportunity" to achieve success
at Kirtland by removing the negative effect of less-than-C grade courses on the student's academic transcript.

To be eligible to apply for academic amnesty, a student must meet the following criteria:
1.   Have a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of less than 2.00.
2.   Complete at least six credit hours or more toward a new program of study while maintaining a 2.00 GPA or higher since beginning the new
     program.
3.   Allowed one year to elapse between the poor academic performance period and requirement #2.

Once eligible, a student may petition the academic amnesty committee by requesting an Application for Academic Amnesty form from the
counseling office, completing it, and returning it to that office. The applicant must meet with the director of guidance and counseling and agree
to the conditions of academic amnesty.
The academic amnesty committee will review all requests for academic amnesty. Academic amnesty will only be granted for one continuous
period of enrollment in a program at Kirtland Community College, as indicated by courses taken by the student that are directly attributable to
that program.

Once amnesty has been approved by the committee, and applied by the registrar to the student's (petitionee's) transcript, the student will not be
permitted to rescind the application of amnesty on his/her academic record. Other conditions include the following:

1.   No course work will be removed from a transcript.

2.   A special notation explaining amnesty approval will be placed on the student's transcript.

3.   Honor points and credit hours attempted during the amnesty period will be subtracted from the current cumulative honor points and credit
     hours attempted. A new cumulative grade point average will then be established.
4.   Courses successfully completed with a grade of C or better during the amnesty period can be used toward the student's certificate or degree
     requirements but do not count toward the student's GPA.
5.   A student receiving academic amnesty will not be allowed to graduate with honors.

6.   Academic amnesty, when granted, applies only to Kirtland Community College courses. There is no guarantee, expressed or implied, that
     academic amnesty will be recognized by any other college or university.

7.   Academic amnesty can be granted only once to any student.

The registrar has the responsibility of implementing amnesty, as stated in the academic amnesty policy, when it is granted to a student.

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION
Students who believe they have achieved the equivalent knowledge and/or skills of a particular Kirtland Community College course may choose
to take a competency credit examination.

A Kirtland student may request credit by examination by using the following procedure:

1.   Contact the counseling office for a list of nationally recognized standardized tests that are equivalent to the Kirtland course the student
     desires. Information regarding testing fees and date, time, and location of the testing will also be provided to the student.

2.   If a nationally recognized standardized test is not available, the student may contact the dean or associate dean of his/her program for an
     Institutional Credit by Examination Request form and the cost for the testing. The student will complete and submit the form to the senior
     instructor in the subject area of the examination requested. The instructor will review the request and submit his/her recommendation back
     to the dean or associate dean, who may approve or disapprove the request. If approved, a test will be developed, and testing will be
     scheduled.

3.   Credit by examination scores will be handled in the following manner: If a passing score is achieved, credit will be noted on the student's
     Kirtland transcript. Cumulative grade point average, credit hours attempted, and honor points will not be affected.

COURSE SUBSTITUTION
Certificate and degree program requirements are listed in the college catalog. These requirements include all courses needed for completion.
Any alteration to a degree or certificate (substitution of one course for another) must be made in the following manner:

1.   To initiate a course substitution, a student must meet with his/her advisor. During the meeting, a Course Substitution Request form must be
     completed by the student and the advisor. The student's advisor will forward the form to the dean or associate dean of the student’s
     program for possible approval. If approved, the form will be sent to the records office and placed in the student's file.

2.   Required courses within a program may only be substituted under very unusual circumstances. No class may be substituted for POL-
     10100, Introduction to American Government.

3.   Course substitutions should be submitted and approved before the student's registration for the semester in which the course substitution is
     to be made. If a student has received credit for courses transferred from another institution and desires a course substitution of the transfer
     credit for a required course, approval should be gained during the student's first semester at Kirtland.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Each candidate for graduation must fulfill the following requirements for an associate degree or certificate of completion:

1. Be granted admission to Kirtland Community College

2. Have completed a minimum of 15 semester hours of credit (100-level or above) at Kirtland

3. Have earned a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 at Kirtland

4. Have completed all program requirements as listed in Kirtland's college catalog

     NOTE: The date of the catalog by which a student's credits are audited for graduation may not be more than four years earlier than the date
     of the issuance of the degree or certificate. Student records may not be audited by a catalog dated earlier than the time of entrance.
     Exceptions may be authorized by the dean or associate dean of the student’s program.

5.   Have filed a Request to Graduate form with the records office at the beginning of the semester in which they plan to finish their required
     course work. Students should also check with their advisors when they register for that semester to be sure that all requirements have been
     met.
Graduation (commencement) ceremonies for students completing associate degree and certificate programs are held once a year on the last
Friday of the winter semester. Participation in the graduation ceremonies is strongly encouraged, but not required. Cap and gown for graduation
must be ordered before March 1. For more information about graduation fees, contact the registrars office at 989-275-5000, extension 251.

Students not wanting to participate in the ceremony, but who want a copy of their diploma, may contact the records office at 989-275-5000,
extension 251, for ordering information. Payment must be received before a diploma will be ordered, then mailed to the student.



                                      ACHIEVING SUCCESS
                          EXPLORING EDUCATIONAL CHOICES
COUNSELING SERVICES
College is a time of many changes and decisions and at times students may feel the need for help in coping with those changes and making those
decisions. Kirtland’s staff of Michigan-licensed professional counselors is trained to help students deal with the college experience.

Services provided include the following:
•    Personal, career, and academic counseling
•    Academic advising to assist a student in completing his/her educational plan, including transferring to another college
•    Administering and interpreting interest and personality test instruments for students seeking career and educational information (no charge)
•    Administering standardized tests for college credit (proctor fee and test publisher fee charged)
•    Referral information for other available counseling services

Personal Counseling is helpful in situations where problems are persistent and bothersome to the point that discussion with another person is
needed. Personal counseling on campus is available through the director of guidance and counseling. Long-term counseling is available through
referral to community agencies that provide this service. The college maintains a referral list of local crisis centers and mental health clinics
qualified and available for personal counseling.

CAREER AND EMPLOYMENT SERVICES
The career and employment services office, which is located in the administration center, offers a wide variety of services to individuals who
desire assistance with career planning and preparation. Help is available with career exploration, job search strategies, résumé and cover letter
writing, interview techniques, and employability skills. A number of resources are available in the form of books, magazines, videos, computer
programs, and Internet access.

For individuals seeking employment, the Job List is published every week. The Job List contains postings from the local area newspapers, plus
positions that employers call in and list with the career and employment services office. The Job List is posted in the career and employment
services office or can be found on the Internet at: http://kirtland.edu/employ.
Career counseling is available to help determine employment possibilities based on an individual’s abilities, aptitudes, and interests. Both
written and computerized tests can be administered to assist with making sound career decisions. All of these services are free and available to
students and community members.

NONTRADITIONAL CAREER CHOICES
If a student is considering a career field in which his or her gender comprises less than 25% of the workers in the field, there may be funds
available to assist in paying for educational-related expenses. For more information, please call 989- 275-5000, extension 252. Examples of
nontraditional areas for males are cosmetology, nursing, and office information systems. Nontraditional areas for females include automotive,
engineering design technology, and welding.

SERVICE LEARNING
Service learning combines relevant community service experiences with academic courses. Service learning activities are academically
meaningful. Kirtland Community College offers four courses as part of its commitment to service learning: Volunteerism in the Community
(CAR-11500), Learning Styles (CAR-11600), Service Learning Lab (CAR-12600), and Service Learning Project (CAR-20000). Service
learning projects are also offered as part of some classes at Kirtland. Seminars and classes relevant to service learning issues will also be offered
through the Community Education Center. Additional service learning opportunities are tracked and made available by contacting the service
learning coordinator at 989-275-5000, extension 412. A Service Learning Library has been established as part of the main collection in the
library. A bibliography of material available in this collection is available.
PREPARING TO TRANSFER (From Kirtland to the senior institution)

Transfer students need to be aware of all deadlines, such as payment for tuition and fees, residence hall reservations, financial aid and
scholarships, placement testing, etc.

Admission
Transfer students must apply early for admission to the senior institution they have selected. An application fee may be required. Many schools
have application deadlines, as well as a limit on the number of new students to be admitted. To assist transfer students, representatives from
many universities and some private colleges visit community college campuses every semester to talk with transferring students about their
college or university.

A certain cumulative grade point average earned at the community college and/or the SAT or ACT test will usually be admission requirements
at senior institutions. There may also be additional admission or program requirements. For example, a specific program may have fall
admissions only.

Financial Aid
Students transferring during the current academic year will need to have a duplicate copy of their Student Aid Report (SAR) forwarded to the
college/university. Transfer students should check with their new financial aid advisor to determine what other information may be required.

Transfer scholarships to senior institutions may be available to students transferring from a community college. Scholarship application
deadlines usually fall between December and March each year.

NOTE: Some schools have separate scholarship application forms.

Campus Visit
Before transferring, students should visit the institution to which they plan to transfer, preferably during daytime campus hours. When visiting
the campus, it is important that students talk to an advisor in their program of study.

Student Housing at the Senior Institution
Students in need of off-campus housing at the school to which they will be transferring should start looking at least four to five months in
advance for the best selection. Most senior institutions have on-campus or family housing available. In some cases, transfer students must
qualify to live off-campus.

Transferring Credit
Students must submit a written request for an official copy of their Kirtland transcript from the records office. This copy must be sent directly
from the records office to the college or university of their choice. Upon the student’s admission, the senior institution will perform a credit
evaluation of his/her transcript.

When students transfer to a senior institution that operates on terms or quarters rather than semesters, they need to be aware of possible credit
hour differences. For example, two (2) semester credits = three (3) term or quarter credits.
MACRAO Transfer Agreement
Kirtland Community College is a participating member of the MACRAO Transfer Agreement. Member colleges and universities participate in a
state-wide transfer agreement proposed by the Michigan Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (MACRAO).

The intent of the MACRAO Transfer Agreement is to ensure that a student who completes a transfer degree will have satisfied the basic two-
year requirements of the four-year college or university. This agreement can also be fulfilled if a student completes the following 30 credit hours
of course work (100-level or above):

A.   English composition - 6 credits

B.   Science and Mathematics - 8 credits
     (Courses may include but are not limited to the following: biology, chemistry, geology, mathematics or physics. At least one course must
     have a laboratory. Courses taken must be in more than one subject area.)

C.   Social Science - 8 credits
     (Courses may include but are not limited to the following: anthropology, economics, geography, psychology, political science, or
     sociology. Courses taken must be in more than one subject area.)


D.   Humanities - 8 credits
     (Courses may include but are not limited to the following: art, foreign language, history, literature, music, philosophy or theatre. Courses
     taken must be in more than one subject area.)

Transcripts of Kirtland Community College students graduating with a transfer degree will automatically have the "MACRAO Agreement
Satisfied" designation added to the end of their transcript. Students just completing the 30 credit hour program, as stated above, must request
that the designation be added to their transcript. Please contact the student services office for more information.

NOTE: Not all credits that are considered transferable to a senior institution’s general education requirements may be used for specific
programs of study. Students must be careful in researching credit transferability. More information regarding MACRAO can be obtained at
MACRAO’s website: www.macrao.org


                               SUPPORTING ACADEMIC SUCCESS
LEARNING RESOURCES
Library
The library exists to serve the information needs of the Kirtland community and the public in the Kirtland service area. These needs are met by a
professional staff who are able to help patrons find information in a variety of formats, including print and electronic. Academic reference
services are available in-house or by phone. In-depth reference assistance for term papers, speeches, and business plans, along with library
instruction for classes and individuals, is available by appointment. For more information, call 989-275-5000, extension 246.

Resources available in the library include a 30,000-volume print collection and over 15,000 e-books, accessible through the online catalog
(www.kirtland.edu/library). The library subscribes to over 200 magazines, journals, and newspapers, with an additional 1,000 available in
electronic format. These can be found through the online indexes. Materials not available in the library can be obtained by inter-library loan
from an international consortia of libraries. Internet connections and a variety of programs are available in the computer lab, which is also
located in the library.

Open Hours for the Library
Fall and Winter Semesters                                Breaks and Summer Session
8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday through Thursday                8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Friday

Term-Paper Counseling
Term-paper counseling is available in the library during library hours, and after hours, by appointment. This service helps students with topic
formulation and research. Call the director of the library, extension 246, for an appointment.
eServices Department
              The eServices department, located in the library building, consists of the eLearning and eTechnology divisions. We provide a
              single point of contact for a wide range of services delivered via internet, telephone, or in person. Our services include network
              operations, telecommunications, computer maintenance/installation and technical support, audio/video dubbing, media services
support, and system account maintenance for email, course delivery, and student information systems.
For more information on eServices, eTechnology, and eLearning visit our web site: http://eservices.kirtland.edu or if you have any questions
please feel free to either email us eservices@kirtland.edu, or call 989-275-5000 ext. 499 Monday-Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 4:30p.m. and Fridays
8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

     •    eLearning
          Primary responsibilities include support for distance education and technology enhanced courses including online internet classes,
          satellite video-teleconferences and interactive television. Additional duties include training and technical support for students and
          faculty using our course delivery system as well as maintenance of accounts for email, course delivery, and student information
          systems.
     •    eTechnology
          Responsibilities include support and maintenance of all networks, telecommunications, and personal computer systems including
          technology enhanced classrooms, computer labs, printers, media services. Additional duties include general software support and
          technical support or “helpdesk” services.

FACULTY ADVISING
Faculty advisors assist students prior to and during registration with the selection of classes to meet individual educational needs. Faculty
advising assignments are listed in the class schedule by program of study. Faculty advisors are available throughout the year for consultation
and assistance with academic problems that may be interfering with a student's progress (see "Faculty Office Hours").

FACULTY OFFICE HOURS
All faculty maintain office hours. Students are encouraged to take advantage of this time for discussion of future class selection, academic
problems, or class assignments. Faculty office hours are posted in the hallway outside the faculty office area in the instructional center.

TUTORIAL CENTER
Tutors are available in most subject areas, and tutoring is free for any Kirtland Community College student. Individual appointments can be
scheduled for two hours per week for an entire semester (or for as long as tutoring is needed) at a time convenient to both tutor and tutee. In
addition, the following services are offered:
•    Drop-in math tutoring by a paraprofessional tutor is provided to those students needing occasional help in math classes; check with the
     tutorial center for days and times.
•    Study groups (Supplemental Instruction or SI) are available for students in the same class who can benefit by studying together under the
     guidance of a student leader.
•    Study skills workshops are available covering such topics as note-taking, test-taking, textbook reading and time management; help is also
     available with spelling, vocabulary building, and memory improvement.
•    Classes in English as a Second Language are offered through the tutorial center.
•    EDU 12500 (Learning Theory) is offered, as well as workshops for tutors, supplemental instruction leaders, and other interested people on
     learning styles, learning disabilities, and tutoring techniques.
•    Online tutoring, as well as off campus tutoring, are available in some subject areas.

Need for Tutors
Any student who is above average academically, can relate sensitively to other students, and has the recommendation of an instructor, may
apply to be a paid tutor. For an application or more information about becoming a tutor, contact the tutorial office in room 18 of the instructional
center, call extension 211.

WRITING CENTER
The writing center is staffed by specially-trained members of the Kirtland faculty and offers guided instruction to students seeking to improve
their writing skills. The self-paced writing course ENG-10000 (Writing Lab) is taught here. Because the skills taught in Writing Lab support
those taught in English Composition, most students take ENG-10000 concurrently with ENG-10300 or ENG-10303.

Drop-in services to help with specific questions or specific pieces of writing are also provided to Kirtland students, faculty, and staff in the
writing center, room 134, in the administration center. For further information, call extension 386 or 338.

Online services (similar to the on-campus drop-in services) are available through the Kirtland HOWL (Helpful Online Writing Lab) located at:
http://services.kirtland.edu/howl/
STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES
The college, with partial funding from the Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Growth, provides support services to meet the needs of
certain populations. Members of special populations include students who are economically or academically disadvantaged, students with
disabilities, those with limited English proficiency, single parents (including single pregnant women), displaced homemakers, and students who
are pursuing careers that are nontraditional for their gender. Support services and assistance to help them reach their career goals include the
following:
•    Education Development Plan (EDP)                                           •    Referrals to other departments or community agencies
•    Free individual and group tutoring                                         •    Attendance costs
•    Workshops on study skills, test taking, and time management                •    Services for students with disabilities
•    Personal, career, and academic counseling

SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
Students who qualify for services are identified under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of
1990. Students must provide the special populations office with documentation of disability from an appropriate licensed professional, such as a
medical doctor, psychologist, or psychiatrist. Verification of disability forms and a request form for auxiliary aides or services, academic
adjustment or other accommodations are available in the student support services office. Some examples of services and accommodations
follow:

•    Instructional accommodations—scribes, readers, sign language interpreters
•    Testing adaptations—extended time, oral examinations
•    Technological assistance—wireless amplification devices, a reading machine
•    Liaison with Michigan Rehabilitation Services and Michigan Commission for the Blind.

STUDENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
Kirtland Community College's Student Assistance Program has been developed in response to U.S. Department of Education directives and
through the cooperation of local health care agencies. The program is designed to provide Kirtland students with help in dealing with emotional,
medical, social, family, alcohol and/or drug abuse problems. Since such problems are considered treatable, students are urged to seek help
before personal problems seriously damage academic performance or the future quality of their life.

The Student Assistance Program can help by:
•   Providing the opportunity to discuss a personal situation with a caring professional
•   Offering referral information on local agencies or specialized treatment services
•   Suggesting a local support group sharing the same concern
•   Providing information on the use and abuse of drugs including alcohol
•   Providing information on how to deal with emotional, medical, social, or family problems
For a copy of the Student Assistance Program brochure, contact Kirtland's director of guidance & counseling at 989-275-5000, ext. 280.


                                     RECOGNIZING EXCELLENCE
SCHOLARSHIPS
Scholarships that recognize academic excellence are available for both new and returning students. Please refer to "Scholarships" in this catalog.

HONORS PROGRAM
The Kirtland Honors Program is designed to meet the needs of students of high academic standing who are seeking additional challenges and
rewards in both general education and occupational programs.

Honors students may earn honors credits in Kirtland “honors option” courses and in individually designed honors and service learning projects.
Students who complete 12 honors credits may be awarded an honors degree.

Admission to the Honors Program is competitive, and enrollment is limited. Honors students enjoy a number of benefits, including the
following:
•    More challenging and stimulating course work                          service learning projects
•    Interaction in a community of scholars                           •    All honors courses noted on transcript
•    Honors options in regular Kirtland courses                       •    The opportunity to earn an honors degree
•    New courses with an interdisciplinary focus                      •    Eligibility for honors scholarships
•    An opportunity for independent study in special honors and       •    Recognition at commencement

Interested students should contact the honors secretary at 989-275-5000, extension 359. The office is located in the dean’s office of the
Instructional Building (INS).
HONOR LISTS
Each fall and winter semester, a President’s honor list and dean’s honor list will be issued. The President’s and dean’s honor lists shall consist of
names of full-time (12 or more credit hours earned, excluding developmental courses) students whose current/term grade point averages are
3.800 to 4.000 (President’s list) and 3.400 to 3.799 (dean’s list) at the time grade reports (see “Grade Reporting System”) are processed.
Credits earned in developmental courses will not be used when determining a student’s full-time status. In addition, students receiving an
incomplete grade (“I”) for the semester will not be considered for either list. (However, honors notations will be posted to transcripts when
completion of “I” grades results in grade point averages that meet honor list criteria.)

GRADUATION HONORS
Students may graduate with honors from Kirtland Community College providing they have met the following criteria:
•   Completed all the requirements needed for a certificate or an associate degree
•   Earned at least 15 credit hours at Kirtland if receiving a certificate or associate degree
•   Achieved the cumulative grade point average (determined by the last completed semester) required for one of the following honors:
                              3.800-4.000 cumulative GPA           Summa Cum Laude
                              3.600-3.799 cumulative GPA           Magna Cum Laude
                              3.400-3.599 cumulative GPA           Cum Laude

The registrar will review transcripts of all candidates for graduation. Authorization to wear honor cords will be given by the registrar to
candidates who have achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.40 prior to the semester in which commencement ceremonies are
held. The commencement program will list candidates who have been authorized to receive the honors. Final grades will determine the honors
appearing on the student’s transcript and diploma.

PHI THETA KAPPA, ALPHA OMICRON GAMMA
Phi Theta Kappa is an international honor society for students enrolled in two-year colleges. Since 1918, it has recognized academic excellence
by inducting more than 1.2 million members at over 1,200 colleges in the United States, Canada, Japan, U.S. territorial possessions, and military
installations abroad.

Membership in Phi Theta Kappa is based primarily upon academic achievement. Invitation to membership is extended to students who have
completed 12 credit hours, 100-level or above, or more with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.5.

In 1989, Kirtland Community College began its Phi Theta Kappa chapter, Alpha Omicron Gamma. Immediately, the chapter won many regional
and national awards and became known as one of the finest in the nation. In 1995, the chapter became inactive. In the fall of 1998, Alpha
Omicron Gamma was reactivated and currently has a membership of 80 students. Each year, Alpha Omicron Gamma engages in projects and
services related to scholarship (study topics) and community service. In 2006-07, the study topic is “Gold, Gods and Glory: The Global
Dynamics of Power Pop Culture: Shaping and Reflecting Who We Are”, and the service project theme is “Operation Green: Improving our
Communities.” The themes for the study topic and service project are provided by the International Phi Theta Kappa Headquarters.

For more information about membership in Kirtland Community College’s local chapter, Alpha Omicron Gamma, contact Kathy Koch by
calling 989-275-5000, extension 253, or e-mail: kochk@kirtland.edu. Additional information about Phi Theta Kappa can also be obtained at the
following web site address: www.ptk.org



                                                GETTING INVOLVED
STUDENT ACTIVITIES
The college encourages student activities that supplement the instructional program by providing recreational activities that will add to the
student's enjoyment of life and stimulate personal growth and social development. Opportunities for development of constructive leadership,
cooperative planning, and special interests will be fostered through participation in student activities.

Cultural events include lectures, films, art exhibits, and concerts made available by the college. Students interested in art, drama, and journalism
may further their experiences, training and talents in art shows, theatre productions, and newspaper production. Recreational and social events
might include picnics, intramural sports, travel excursions, and dances. Some clubs also sponsor activities.

STUDENT I.D. CARD
Each Kirtland student is entitled to a student identification card. The career and employment services office in the administration center will
issue cards upon request to all students who register for classes. The identification cards are nontransferable and are valid for one semester. The
card permits the student's entry to many college- or student-senate-sponsored functions at no charge or at a reduced rate. The card is also used
for checkout privileges for borrowing recreational equipment from the game room (see "Game Room"). In addition, some area businesses offer
student discounts to cardholders.
STUDENT SENATE
The student senate is the student government organization at Kirtland. The senate is the means through which students can participate in
institutional governance by representation on college standing committees. Also, senate members assist in planning a variety of extracurricular
and co-curricular activities held throughout the year.

The officers and senators who comprise the student senate are elected each year by the student body. Senate meetings are held regularly during
the year and are announced on the monitors located around the campus. These meetings are open to all who are interested. For a copy of the
senate's constitution, for a petition for nomination, or for other information, contact the student senate office or student services.

STUDENT CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS
There are many special interest clubs and organizations that offer opportunities for students to broaden the scope of their educational
experiences. Students are encouraged to participate in the activities sponsored by the clubs and organizations listed or to contact any member of
the student senate, or faculty members, with suggestions for forming new organizations. Membership in all organizations is open to any
interested student.


Establishment of Student Clubs and Organizations
No student club or organization may be established, conduct business, solicit funds, or sponsor activities unless the organization has been
approved by the student senate and has been authorized by the college. Students who wish to form a student organization should contact the
student senate at 989-275-5000, extension 288.

GAME ROOM
Pool and ping pong tables, foosball and air hockey machines are located in the game room in the student center. Equipment for volleyball,
soccer, basketball, tennis, etc., is also available for checkout. Student identification cards are required for equipment checkout (see "Student I.D.
Card").

KIRTLAND CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS
Kirtland Center for the Performing Arts exists as the cultural and entertainment establishment at Kirtland Community College. Its purpose is to
present a variety of performing arts events catering to the diversity of interests among the members of the Kirtland Community College service
district and beyond. Kirtland Center for the Performing Arts presents an annual performing arts series that brings world-class entertainment to
the campus of Kirtland Community College.

Kirtland Youth Theatre presents an annual youth theater series that introduces the students of the area to the live performing arts.

Kirtland Theatre Arts Department is the academic organization that offers classes in performance and technical theatre. It also produces plays
using Kirtland Community College students and area citizens.

Kirtland Center for the Performing Arts, Kirtland Youth Theatre, and Kirtland Theatre Arts Department are all located in the Performing Arts
Center on campus, and rely on the talents and abilities of many volunteers in all areas. Volunteers are always welcome.

For more information on scheduled events, tickets, classes, and/or becoming a Kirtland Center volunteer, please call 989-275-5000, extension
311.

SERVICE LEARNING
Service learning combines relevant community service experiences with academic courses. Service learning activities are academically
meaningful. Kirtland Community College offers four courses as part of its commitment to service learning: Volunteerism in the Community
(CAR-11500), Learning Styles (CAR-11600), Service Learning Lab (CAR-12600), and Service Learning Project (CAR-20000). Service
learning projects are also offered as part of some classes at Kirtland. Seminars and classes relevant to service learning issues will also be offered
through the Community Education Center. Additional service learning opportunities are tracked and made available by contacting the service
learning coordinator at 989-275-5000, extension 412.

A Service Learning Library has been established as part of the main collection in the library. A bibliography of material available in this
collection is available.
                        SAFETY, SECURITY, AND EMERGENCIES
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY
The personal safety and security of those on campus are the primary concerns of the department of public safety. The goal is to ensure a safe
environment in which all of the campus community members can work and learn. In order to attain this goal, cooperation is needed. Members of
the campus community must take responsibility for the safety and security of themselves, their neighbors, and their belongings.

PUBLIC SAFETY SERVICES
The department of public safety is located in room 127 in the administration center. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 11 p.m., Monday through Friday.
Public Safety services include:
•    After-dark escort service from the buildings to students’ vehicles
•    Response to criminal behavior complaints
•    Preventative workshops/seminars on drug/alcohol awareness, rape awareness, use of weapons, etc.
•    The addressing of parking and traffic violations
•    Provision of vehicle emergency assistance (keys locked inside of vehicle, jump-starting vehicle, etc.)

CRIME REPORTING
If anyone witnesses a crime or is a victim of any criminal activity, he or she should take immediate action by contacting the public safety office
at extension 355, 390, 283, or 0, or by contacting the Roscommon County Sheriff's Department at 911.
NOTE: Upon request, data can be obtained from the department of public safety or the student services office regarding incidents reported,
during 2005/06.

PARKING AND TRAFFIC ON CAMPUS
Through enforcement of parking and traffic policies, it is Kirtland's desire to provide a safe means for entry and departure from campus lots. It is
also hoped that fire, safety, and maintenance vehicle access lanes, handicap spaces, and loading/unloading opportunities can be provided with
the least amount of inconvenience.

Parking on campus is free and allowed in approved areas only. Parking is not allowed in fire lanes, on or beside walking paths, on grass, or next
to buildings. In addition, parking in the lot adjacent to the career technology center is reserved for patrons of automotive and cosmetology
services. Students should park in designated areas only. A Vehicle Identification sticker is required. Students should call 989-275-5000,
extension 348, for more information.

Parking spaces for service vehicles and the handicapped are posted. A permanent or temporary handicapped sticker from the Secretary of State’s
office is needed to park in the handicapped areas.

Parking and traffic violators on campus will be ticketed by Kirtland's public safety officers. The following fines are imposed on violators:
     $40.00 Parked in handicap space         $25.00 Parked within 15 feet of fire hydrant        $25.00 Blocking emergency exit
     $25.00 Parking in fire lane             $10.00 All other parking violations

FIRE SAFETY AND FIRE ALARMS
Students and employees of the college are encouraged to know where fire alarms, fire extinguishers, and emergency exits are located in each
building.

If a fire alarm sounds, get out of the building! Treat all fire alarms as real, even if there is reason to believe the alarm is a false alarm. Do not
reenter the building until given permission to do so by college officials.

NOTE: A false alarm is dangerous and a felony. Anyone sounding a false alarm will receive the minimum sanction of suspension from college.

POLICY ON USE OF ALCOHOL/DRUGS
Unauthorized possession or use of alcoholic beverages on the college campus or at a college-sponsored event, and use, possession, or
distribution of narcotic or other dangerous drugs (including look-alike drugs) are strictly prohibited. Violation of these regulations could lead to
removal from college property, suspension, or dismissal from the college, and/or liability for legal prosecution.

NOTE: For a more detailed position on the possession/use of illicit drugs and alcohol, please refer to “Rights and Responsibilities of Students”
and “Student Code of Conduct” sections in this catalog.
POLICY ON WEAPONS (FIREARMS, KNIVES, EXPLOSIVES)
Possession or use of knives (blade in excess of 3-1/8 inches), firearms, firecrackers, explosives, other lethal weapons, and/or toxic or dangerous
chemicals on campus or at any college- sponsored events, unless specifically authorized in writing by a college administrator for
educational/safety purposes, is prohibited. However, possession in a locked vehicle may be permitted according to state laws. Law enforcement
officers are exempt from this policy.

CAMPUS SAFETY AND SECURITY
The campus is nestled in a beautifully wooded setting. The surroundings are tranquil and peaceful. Yet, although Kirtland is a relatively safe
place to be, it is certainly not exempt from many of the same crime problems that exist in the surrounding communities. Kirtland has
implemented measures to promote safety awareness and strives to ensure that the campus is a safe environment for the campus community. The
department of public safety in room 127 in the administration center can provide more information about the ways Kirtland works toward this
goal.

CAMPUS CRIME OCCURRENCE STATISTICS
The Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990 requires colleges to collect and share occurrence statistics for certain crimes reported
as occurring on the college campus. Kirtland’s on-campus occurrence statistics (reported offenses; does not infer alleged offenders were
convicted) are listed below:
Reported Offenses            2003     2004      2005                   Arrests                        2003        2004       2005
Murder                         0        0         0                    Liquor Law Violations            2           5          26
Sex Offenses-Forcible          0        0         0                    Drug Abuse Violations             1          0           1
Sex Offenses-Non-forcible      0        0         0                    Weapons Possessions               0           0          0
Robbery                        0        0         0
Aggravated Assault             0        0         2
Burglary                       1        0         0
Motor Vehicle Theft            0        0         0

NOTE: For more information regarding the college’s compliance with the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990, contact the
director of criminal justice.

EMERGENCIES
Sometimes emergencies arise on campus that require the services of the fire department, county sheriff's office, Michigan State Police, or an
ambulance. The services can be reached by calling extension 355 or 390. The public safety department can assist with these situations and refer
them to the proper authorities. Battery jumps and assistance in unlocking car doors are performed by the public safety office and campus
security.

ACCIDENT REPORTING
Students having an accident or needing medical assistance while on campus should call public safety office at ext 355.

CLASS CANCELLATIONS AND COLLEGE CLOSINGS
INDIVIDUAL CLASS CANCELLATION
When an instructor cancels a class it is immediately posted on the website in the Urgent Announcements section. You can view this at
www.kirtland.edu and click on “Urgent Announcements + Class Cancellations”. Cancellations are also posted in designated areas in the campus
buildings, and you can call a local telephone number listed for your area to find out.

                                         KIRTLAND CLASS CLOSING MESSAGES XXX-2498
                                         (For example: in Houghton Lake you would call 910-2498)

                                                          Selected Area prefixes:
          City                        Prefix       City                   Prefix           City                        Prefix
          Roscommon                   563          Houghton Lake          910              Merritt                     219
          Grayling                    688          Gaylord                688              Lewiston                    243
          Atlanta                     243          Hillman                419              Alpena                      419
          Oscoda                      764          East Tawas             764              Hale                        223
          Fairview                    333          Mio                    333              West Branch                 516
          Rose City                   507          Lupton                 782              Alger                       825
          Prescott                    676          Bay City               509              Saginaw                     393

Local numbers for all areas are available at: http://www.m33access.com under Access Numbers on the left menu. Enter your code and prefix or
city and the system will provide local numbers for your use.
When classes are cancelled due to inclement weather or other unusual circumstances, the procedure below is followed.
MAIN CAMPUS CLASSES: When it is necessary to cancel classes due to inclement weather or other unusual circumstance, please DO NOT
CALL THE COLLEGE. Announcements of college closings will be made on the radio and TV stations listed below. Visit the Kirtland website
for urgent announcements such as class or event cancellations, room changes, or anything that is different than expected at: www.kirtland.edu.

EVENING CLASSES: Announcements that refer to evening classes mean any class beginning at 5 p.m. or later.

SATURDAY CLASSES: Cancellations will not be announced on radio or TV. The decision to cancel a Saturday class will be communicated
through a student telephone fan-out list that will be established in each class.

OFF-CAMPUS CLASSES: If the radio/TV announcement states that Kirtland classes are cancelled, that announcement includes Kirtland off-
campus classes (Houghton Lake, Roscommon, Grayling, Mio, West Branch, Gaylord).
M-TEC AT KIRTLAND-GAYLORD CLASSES: Students should call the M-TECSM weather line at 989-705-3696. A pre-recorded
       SM


message will indicate whether or not classes are being held.

LOCAL SCHOOL CLOSINGS: If local schools which are sites of off-campus classes are closed due to inclement weather, Kirtland classes
will also be cancelled at that site.

NURSING CLINICAL:
•  Students having classes on campus should listen to the radio for campus closing announcements.
•  Students scheduled for clinical sites will not hear announcements regarding clinical site closings on the radio. The instructor of the clinical
   site will decide the cancellation of a class and students will receive word by means of a predetermined clinical phone tree. (For more
   information, refer to the nursing student handbook.)




                                              TV:          Cadillac WWTV - TV 9 & 10
                                                           Cadillac FOX 33
                                                           Bay City WNEM - TV 5
                                                           Traverse City WPBN - TV 7 & 4
                                                           Traverse City WGTU - TV-29
                                              RADIO:
                                              Houghton Lake ....WHGR-WUPS.............98.5 FM
                                              Grayling...............WGRY ..........................101 FM
                                              Grayling...............WQON Kool .................100 FM
                                              Gaylord................WKPK...........................107 FM
                                              Gaylord................WPHN..........................90.5 FM
                                              Gaylord................WMJZ Magic .............101.5 FM
                                              Tawas City...........WIOS-WKJC .............104.7 FM
                                              Tawas City...........NEW BAY 108 ..........107.3 FM
                                              Traverse City .......WTCM.......................103.5 FM
                                              Alpena .................WHSB........................107.7 FM
                                              Mt. Pleasant .........WCMU (NPR) .............89.5 FM
                                              Alpena .................WCML (NPR) .............91.7 FM
                                              Petoskey ..............WKHQ ............................96 FM
                                              West Branch……..WBMI…………….Kool 105.5

COLLEGE CLOSINGS
In the event of impending severe weather, prolonged utility failure, or any condition jeopardizing the safety or well-being of students, the
college President may find it necessary to suspend classes or cease college operations until such threatening conditions are corrected. After such
a decision has been made, radio stations within the college's district and service area will broadcast several announcements about the closing
decision. For information, see the previous section entitled “Class Cancellations.”
                             PROTECTING STUDENT RIGHTS
STUDENT’S RIGHT TO KNOW
Upon request, the college is required to disclose the following information to both prospective and enrolled students:

Rights Under Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
•   Right to and procedures for inspecting and reviewing student’s education records. Some records are available in the Student
    Services office for the student to review any time during office hours. Students should contact the registrar and identify the
    record(s) they wish to inspect. If the records are not maintained by the registrar, he/she will advise the student of the correct
    official to whom the request should be addressed. This official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the
    time and place where the records may be inspected.

•    Right to and procedures for requesting amendment of students’ education records that student/parent believes to be inaccurate,
     misleading, or in violation of student privacy rights. Students should write to the registrar and clearly identify the part of the
     record they want changed and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If Kirtland decides not to amend the record as
     requested by the student, the College will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing
     regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student
     when notified of the right to a hearing.
•    Right to the criteria used to determine what constitutes a school official and a legitimate educational interest if school’s or
     educational agency’s policy is to disclose personally identifiable information from student’s education records without prior
     consent.

•    Right to consent to disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in student’s education record, except to the extent
     that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. Kirtland Community College will disclose information from a student’s
     education record only with the written consent of the student except:
     1.   To school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the
          official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. A school official is: A
          person employed by Kirtland Community College, a member of the Board of Trustees who is empowered by the board, a
          person employed by or under contract with the college to perform a special task, such as the attorney or auditor or a student
          serving in an official capacity.
     2.   To Federal, State, and local authorities involving an audit or evaluation of compliance with educational programs.
     3.   In connection with Financial Aid.
     4.   To State and local authorities pursuant to a State law adopted before November, 1974 requiring the disclosure.
     5.   To organizations conducting studies for or on behalf of educational institutions.
     6.   To accrediting organizations.
     7.   To comply with a judicial order or a lawfully issued subpoena.
     8.   In a health or safety emergency.
     9.   For directory information so designated by Kirtland Community College. (see below).
     10. As a result of any disciplinary proceeding conducted by Kirtland Community College to an alleged victim of a crime of
         violence

•    Right to file a complaint with U.S. Department of Education for alleged school or educational agency failure to comply with
     FERPA requirements

Directory Information Disclosure
•   Kirtland Community College designates the following items as Directory Information: Student Name, whether a student is or
    has been registered, Degrees and Awards Received. This enables Kirtland to use the student’s name for various publications,
    electronic bulletin boards, newspaper articles regarding academic achievements, graduation programs, or phone inquiries.
    Kirtland may disclose any of these items without prior written consent, unless notified in writing to the contrary.
•   The student must notify the Records office by the end of the first week of each semester if he/she does not wish to have any
    information disclosed. This notification must be in writing; forms are available in the Records office.
FFEL/Direct Loan Deferments for Peace Corps or Volunteer Service
•  Terms and conditions of deferments for service in the Peace Corps, service under the Domestic Volunteer Service Act of 1973,
   or comparable volunteer service for a tax-exempt organization of demonstrated effectiveness in the field of community service

Available Financial Assistance
●   Description of all available federal, state, local, private, and institutional financial need-based and non-need-based assistance
    programs and, for each program, a description of application form and procedures, student eligibility requirements, selection
    criteria, and criteria for determining the amount of a student’s award
●   Rights and responsibilities of students receiving Title IV and other financial aid

Institutional Information
•    Cost of attending the school
•    Any applicable refund policy
•    Requirements for officially withdrawing from the school
•    Summary of requirements for the return of Title IV grant or loan assistance by withdrawn students
•    Information regarding school’s academic programs
•    Entities that accredit, license, or approve the school and its programs, and procedures for reviewing school’s accreditation,
     licensing, or approval documentation
•    Description of any special services and facilities for disabled students
•    Title and availability of employee(s) responsible for dissemination of institutional and financial assistance disclosure information
     and how to contact designated employees
•    Statement that enrollment in a study abroad program approved for credit may be considered enrollment at the school for the
     purpose of applying for Title IV assistance

Completion/Graduation Rates
•  Completion or graduation rate of cohort of certificate or degree-seeking, full-time undergraduates who graduated or completed
   their program within 150% of the standard time for graduation or completion.

Campus Security Report
•  Statistics for three most recent calendar years concerning the occurrence on campus, in or on non-campus buildings or property,
   and public property of certain offenses reported to campus security authority or local police.

Athletic Program Participation Rates and Financial Support Date
•   Number of male and female full-time undergraduates
•   Varsity teams that compete in intercollegiate athletic competitions
•   Unduplicated number of students, by gender, who participated on at least one varsity team as of the date of the first scheduled
    contest
•   Institutional revenues
•   Total spent on athletically related student aid awarded to men and to women
•   Aggregate total recruiting expenses for men’s teams and for women’s teams
•   Average annual institutional salary of non-volunteer coaches of all men’s teams and of all women’s teams on a per person and
    per full-time basis
•   Average annual institutional salary of non-volunteer assistant coaches of all men’s teams and of women’s teams on a per person
    and a per full-time basis

NOTE: While much of this information can be found in the class schedule and in the college catalog, a full report of disclosure
information may be obtained at the following web site: www.kirtland.edu. (Kirtland Community College will also provide, upon
request, a paper copy of the disclosure information.)

NONDISCRIMINATION
Kirtland Community College complies with all general laws and regulations prohibiting discrimination and with all requirements and
regulations of the U.S. Department of Education. It is the policy of Kirtland Community College that no person shall, on the basis of
race, color, religion, sex, disability, marital status, age, height, weight, national origin or ancestry, Vietnam-era veteran status, or other
protected category under Michigan and federal law, be discriminated against, excluded from participation in, or denied the benefits of
any program or activity for which it is responsible or for which it receives financial assistance from the U.S. Department of
Education.
All educational, employment, and business opportunities, as well as community services are offered without regard to individual
circumstance, except as otherwise restricted by law. The college Title IX and Section 504 coordinator is Dale Shantz, Kirtland
Community College, 10775 N. St. Helen Road, Roscommon, Michigan 48653, 989-275-5000, extension 271. Doty Latuszek is the
Section 504 coordinator for M-TECSM at Kirtland-Gaylord.

Compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a priority of Kirtland Community College. An individual seeking
accommodation or redress under the provisions of the act should contact Dale Shantz, Kirtland Community College, 10775 N. St.
Helen Road, Roscommon, Michigan 48653, 989-275-5000, extension 271, or the college business office at extension 239. For the M-
TECSM at Kirtland-Gaylord campus, Doty Latuszek may be contacted at 989-705-3600.

HARASSMENT
It is the policy of Kirtland Community College, consistent with its efforts to foster an environment of respect for the dignity and
worth of all members of the college community, that harassment, in any form, of students, employees, or other individuals at Kirtland
Community College is unacceptable and impermissible conduct which will not be tolerated. Harassment is any statement or conduct
which constitutes an illegal quid pro quo (an unwelcome demand for an exchange of favors), or otherwise creates or fosters an
intimidating, hostile, or offensive campus environment. Anyone facing an immediate physical threat should contact the department of
public safety at extension 283 (emergency extension, 355). For more information, or to file a harassment complaint, please contact the
business office, located in rooms 226 - 228 of the administration center, or call 989-275-5000, extensions 239 or 271.

Kirtland’s policies on nondiscrimination and harassment are consistent with federal and state statutes that prohibit discrimination
against employees and require fair and equal treatment of students, including Titles VII and IX of Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the
Michigan Elliot-Larsen Civil Rights Act, 1976, which prohibit discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, disability, marital
status, age, height, weight, national original or ancestry, Vietnam-era veteran status, or other protected category under Michigan and
federal law.

SMOKE-FREE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
In compliance with state and federal law, Kirtland Community College has reduced exposure to tobacco products by taking the
following steps:
1.   Smoking or use of any tobacco products will be prohibited in all leased or owned college facilities.
2.   Smoking or use of any tobacco products will be prohibited in vehicles owned, leased, or operated by the college.
3.   Smoking or use of any tobacco products may occur no closer than 10 feet from outer door entrances. In some circumstances,
     other standards will apply and will be posted.
4.   The sale of tobacco products will be prohibited on college premises.
The responsibility for implementing this policy lies with each individual in the Kirtland Community College community. Successful
implementation requires the understanding, consideration, and cooperation of students, staff, and visitors to the campus.

DRUG-FREE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
Kirtland Community College recognizes that the use of illicit substances is wrong and harmful to the physical, social, and emotional
well-being of its students and directly affects their ability to learn, function, and be successful in school. Therefore, the college has
adopted and implemented policies which promote drug prevention and education, and which prohibit the unlawful possession, use,
distribution, or being under the influence of illicit substances by all students on school premises or as part of any school business,
activity, or function. Specific information on standards of conduct, disciplinary sanctions, and other aspects of this policy are
available in other sections of this catalog (please refer to the “Student Code of Conduct”), other appropriate publications, and from the
counseling office. For more detailed information about drug and alcohol counseling, rehabilitation, and/or re-entry programs, please
contact the counseling office.

PRIVACY OF STUDENT RECORDS
The college complies fully with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, also known as FERPA, which is designed to
protect the privacy of student educational records. For more information regarding the confidentiality of records or release of student
information contact the records office located in the student services office in the administration building, or call 989-275-5000,
extension 291. For details of the rights, please refer to “Student’s Right to Know” (page 32).

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER
The college requests the student's Social Security number at time of admission to verify identification. The Social Security numbers
of students accepted for admission prior to April 1996 are their student identification numbers (I.D.). Due to new software used for
record keeping, a separate I.D. number is issued to new students admitted after April 1996. The student I.D. is used for grade
reporting, class list identification, transcript services, and additional services, such as financial aid and VA benefits for those who are
eligible.
 As a part of the college’s instructional program improvement efforts, and to meet the requirements of the Carl D. Perkins Vocational
 and Technical Education Act, Section 113, and the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998, Section 122, student Social Security
 numbers will be used to compile certain data for the purpose of instructional program improvement and Perkins and WIA reporting.

 RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENTS
 Kirtland Community College recognizes those enrolled in a course or program of study as being students and, therefore,
 members of the academic community. As members of this community, they are subject to the obligations which accrue to them
 by virtue of this membership. While enjoying freedoms of speech, peaceful assembly, right of petition, and the right of due
 process, all students are expected to conduct themselves in a manner that will reflect favorably on them, the community and
 Kirtland Community College.

 Academic Freedom
 The student in the classroom and in conference should enjoy free discussion, inquiry and expression. Student performance shall
 be evaluated on an academic basis, as defined in the syllabus for each course.

 A.   Protection of Freedom of Expression:

      Students shall be free, and be encouraged to offer opinions and insights in any course of study and be allowed to reserve
      judgment about matters of opinion expressed by the instructor or other students. Also, students are responsible for learning
      the content of any course of study for which they are enrolled.

 B.   Protection Against Improper Academic Evaluation:

      Students shall have protection through due process against prejudiced or capricious academic evaluation. At the same time,
      they are responsible for maintaining standards of academic performance established for each course in which they are
      enrolled. Students may use the procedures outlined under "Procedure for Academic Due Process" when a dispute over grades
      occurs.

 Freedom of Assembly

 No person or persons shall assemble in a manner which obstructs the free movements of persons about the college or the free
 normal use of the college buildings and facilities, or prevent or obstruct the normal operations of the college.


 Right to Due Process

 An individual charged with a violation of the student code of conduct has the right to due process. A student who is dissatisfied
 with an academic decision also has the right to due process. Due process at Kirtland Community College means that a student is
 assured that his/her rights as a student will be protected. Further, and specifically, a student has the right:

A.    To be informed in writing of the specific charges and the grounds for such charges.

B.     To have a chosen advisor or counselor or lawyer (at the student's own expense) present for advice before, during and/or
      after the hearing. The role of this individual is limited to an advisory capacity with no right of cross-examination.

C.    To be present at the hearing, if desired.

D.    To exercise the privilege against self-incrimination.

E.     To hear or examine evidence presented to the committee reviewing the case and to present evidence by witnesses or
      affidavit of any defense the student desires. Further, the student shall be given the opportunity to cross-examine witnesses.

F.    To be informed in writing of the Committee's recommendation to the appropriate dean.

G.    To appeal the Committee's decision to the President.

H.    To waive the right of a formal hearing before the Committee and to have the case heard by the appropriate dean.
Laws, Regulations and College Policy

Students shall obey the laws enacted by federal, state and local governments, as well as the policies and regulations of Kirtland
Community College. If a student is charged with a misdemeanor or felony, the college will fully cooperate with civil authorities
while recognizing the student's rights under the Family Educational Rights to Privacy Act ("FERPA").

Note: Under FERPA, an educational institution, including a community college, may not disclose personally identifiable
information found in a student's education record to law enforcement officials, unless such disclosure is "to comply with a
judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena." In such a situation, the college must make a reasonable effort to notify the parent or
student of the order or subpoena in advance of compliance.

Student Code of Conduct

College student conduct expectations are essential to the establishment of an environment conducive to learning, to the
protection of Kirtland Community College's educational purpose and to the maintenance of a reasonable level of order on the
campus. The college strives to maintain these standards through educational programs, services to the students and the promotion
of student conduct standards.

Enrollment as a student at Kirtland Community College carries with it behavioral obligations inside and outside the classroom.
Students are responsible for obeying municipal, state and federal laws which govern the community, as well as for the rules and
regulations of the college. If a student participates individually or as a member of a group in any of the "Forms of Misconduct"
(listed below), he or she can be subject to disciplinary action. Further, sanctions may be imposed upon student groups or
organizations, including the sanction of deactivation which entails the loss of all the privileges and/or college recognition for a
specified period of time.

Generally, college jurisdiction and discipline shall be limited to conduct which occurs on college premises or which adversely
affects the college community and/or the pursuit of its objectives. The student code of conduct is in effect for students while they
are on any campus property, as well as other property in the possession of or owned, used or controlled by the college.
The code of conduct also applies to off-campus activities, such as field trips, off-campus classes and college-sponsored events.
On a case-by-case basis, the dean of student services or the appropriate instructional dean will determine whether jurisdiction
should be asserted to address the adverse effects of an off-campus activity.

A.    Disciplinary Actions
     Violations of the student code of conduct are subject to disciplinary action and will be given immediate attention by the
     college. The appropriate dean may impose any of the following disciplinary actions:

         1.      Warning: A "WARNING" is an official reprimand which expresses college dissatisfaction with the student's
         conduct and which clarifies expected behavior in the future. Such action is in effect for the duration of the semester in
         which the warning was issued. Normally, a warning does not include any restrictions. If the same offense is repeated
         after a warning is given, probation will be the minimum sanction awarded.

          2.    Probation: "PROBATION" status indicates that any violation of the code of conduct within the probationary
         period shall result in more severe disciplinary action against the student that could include suspension or dismissal from
         the institution. Usually, the probationary period extends for a specified period of time or until completion of a specific
         requirement.

         Probation in itself does not carry with it any restrictions; but, in addition to probation, it is possible for a student to be
         expected to complete a work assignment, pay a fine or be prohibited from holding an office or representing the college
         in any activity.

         3.     Removal from a Course: If "REMOVAL FROM A COURSE" occurs, a student may continue to attend other
         classes, but may not resume attendance in the course from which he or she has been removed for the remainder of the
         semester in which the removal occurs. In the event a student is removed from a course, he or she will be given either a
         withdrawal or a failure in accordance with the college's "Withdrawal From Classes" policy.

          4.    Suspension: "SUSPENSION" is an action that separates the student from the institution for a definite period of
         time (days, weeks, semesters, etc.) and is to be appropriate with the circumstances of the violation. Such action will
         specify the conditions required for readmission, as well as the date the student will be eligible to return.

         5.     Expulsion: "EXPULSION" is an action that permanently separates the student from the institution.
     6.     Specific Orders: "SPECIFIC ORDERS" is an action which may stand alone or be issued with another sanction.
     Specific orders may include, but are not limited to, performance or non-performance of specific acts, loss of certain
     privileges, payment of fines, restitution and work assignments.

Any disciplinary action imposed on a student will be recorded in the student's confidential file in the student services office.
A disciplinary action can not be recorded on a student's transcript.

B. Forms of Non-Academic Misconduct: The following forms of misconduct will not be tolerated by the college.
Minimum sanctions, disciplinary actions, normally taken by the college are indicated in parenthesis following each violation.

Note: This list is not inclusive of all possible forms of misconduct. The college's administration may add to this list if
needed.
College disciplinary proceedings may be instituted against a student charged with violation of a law which is also a violation
of the student code of conduct, i.e., if both violations result from the same factual situation, without regard to the pendency
of civil litigation in court or criminal arrest and prosecution. Such proceedings under this student code of conduct may be
carried out prior to, simultaneously with or following civil or criminal proceedings off-campus.

1.    Arrest for or conviction of any civil or criminal laws committed while on campus or at college sponsored events.
     (Probation)

2.   Threatening, attempting, or using physical force or intimidation (including stalking) against any person on the college
     properties or at any off-campus college sponsored events. This includes the interference with the freedom of movement
     of any person. (Suspension)

3.   Deliberate interference with academic freedom or freedom of speech, including disruption of a class, or interference
     with the freedom of any speaker invited by the college to express his/her views. (Warning)

4.    Discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin or ancestry, age, sex, marital status or handicap.
     (Probation)

5.   Sexual harassment in the educational environment, as defined by the Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act. (Suspension)

     Note: The Elliott-Larson Civil Rights Act defines sexual harassment in the educational environment as "unwelcome
     sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct or communications of a sexual nature
     when...such conduct or communication has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual's
     education...or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive...educational...environment."

6.   Conduct or expression which is disorderly, lewd, indecent or obscene on college property or at a college sponsored
     event. (Warning)

     Note: To determine conduct or expression which is disorderly, lewd, indecent or obscene, the U.S. Supreme Court has
     set forth the following three-prong test to determine obscenity:
                The basic guidelines for the trier of fact must be: (a) whether the average person applying contemporary
                community standards would find that the work/action, taken as a whole, appeals to the prurient interest; (b)
                whether the work/action depicts or describes, in a patently offensive way, sexual conduct specifically defined
                by the applicable state law; and (c) whether the work/action, taken as a whole, lacks serious literary, artistic,
                political, or scientific value.

7.   Engaging in any kind of hazing action on or off campus that endangers the mental health, physical health or safety of a
     student or which destroys or removes public or private property for purpose of initiation or admission into, affiliation
     with, or participation in any student organization. (Suspension)

8.   Failure to comply with reasonable requests and orders by authorized college officials or representatives acting in behalf
     of the college. (This requirement includes reasonable requests for students to meet appointments in administrative or
     faculty offices and at investigative/disciplinary hearings.) (Warning)

9.   Initiate false alarms which endanger the health and safety of any person on college properties or at any off-campus
     college sponsored events. (Suspension)
     10. Possession or use of knives (blade in excess of 3 1/8"), firearms, firecrackers, explosives, other lethal weapons, and/or
         toxic or dangerous chemicals on campus or at any college sponsored events, except when specifically authorized in
         writing by a college administrator for educational/safety purposes. Further, possession in a locked vehicle may be
         permitted according to State laws. Law enforcement officers are exempt from this policy. (Suspension)

     11. Unauthorized distribution or sale of items on campus. (To be eligible for authorization, students must follow the steps
         outlined in Board policy/procedures 3.015, Community Use of College Facilities.) (Warning)

     12. Manufacture, possession, control, sale, transmission or use:
              a.    Any controlled substance (illegal drugs) in violation of state or federal laws; or
              b.    Substances purported to be illegal, abusive or performance enhancing, i.e., look-alike drugs.
         The college has the policy of full cooperation with law enforcement agencies in such cases. (Suspension)

     13. Possession (outside of State laws), distribution, consumption or abuse (including intoxication) of any alcoholic
         beverages on any college owned or rented facility, except in employee rented dwellings on campus. (Suspension)

     14. Consumption of food or beverages in unauthorized areas on campus. (Warning)

     15. Smoking in classrooms or other designated non-smoking areas. (Warning)

     16. Gambling with money or anything else of value on campus or any college sponsored event. (Probation)

     17. Dress that fails to meet established safety or health standards in specific on or off-campus classes or at college
         sponsored events. (Warning)

     18. Parking of vehicles in unauthorized areas. (Warning)

     19. Unauthorized presence of pets on campus. (Animals who assist students with disabilities are permitted on campus.)
         (Warning)

     20. Misrepresentation, alteration, forging or misuse of college documents, records, or identification cards. (Students are
         required to present identification when requested by authorized college officials.) (Expulsion)

     21. Unauthorized representation or contracting in the name of Kirtland Community College. (A student may not claim to be
         an official representative of the college for any commercial purpose.) (Suspension)

     22. Use and/or misuse of the college computer system, facilities, hardware, software and all computerized information is
         prohibited in the following circumstances, including, but not to be limited to:
 .    Unauthorized entry into a file, whether to use, read, change or for any other purpose.
a.    Unauthorized transfer of a file.
b.    Unauthorized use of another individual's identification and password.
c.    Use of computing facilities to interfere with the work of another student, faculty member or college official.
d.    Use of computing facilities to send obscene or abusive messages.
e.    Use of computing facilities to interfere with normal operation of the college's computing system.
        f. Use of computing facilities in a manner which violates state or federal copyright laws, e.g., unauthorized duplication of
             copyrighted or licensed software. (Suspension)

     23. Unauthorized entry to and/or use of college facilities and equipment. Also, the possession of keys or duplication of the
         college's keys without proper authorization. (Suspension)

     24. Attempted or actual theft from, damage to or the defacing of college property or to the property of other students,
         faculty or staff while on the campus or at any college sponsored event. (Expulsion)

     25. Littering of college facilities and grounds. (This includes the disposal of cigarette butts in locations other than ashtrays
         or trash receptacles.) (Warning)

     26. Dishonesty, including knowingly furnishing false information to the college or a college officer, whether verbally, in
         writing, or completing required forms. (Probation)

     27. Violation of college policies and regulations not already addressed in the previously listed forms of misconduct.
         (Warning)
     C.      Academic Misconduct

     1.     Kirtland Community College considers academic dishonesty to be a serious offense. It is the policy of the college that
           determination of and appropriate action in respect to academic dishonesty by a student shall be a matter of individual
           judgment by the instructor, with departmental guidelines.

           Cheating, plagiarism or other forms of academic dishonesty including the unauthorized acquisition of tests or other
           academic materials. This includes students who aid and abet, as well as those who attempt such behavior. (An instructor
           may administer a penalty up to and including failure in a particular course. In some cases, such as in nursing and
           criminal justice programs, the student handbook outlines the appropriate action. If a student fails two classes as a result
           of academic dishonesty, he or she is dismissed from the college for the remainder of the semester in which the second
           violation occurs and the following academic semester that is required for that student's program of study, i.e. some
           programs require students to take classes during the summer semester, most programs do not.)

           Note: Cheating includes, but is not limited to:

.     The use of any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes, tests or examinations;

           a. Dependence upon the aid of sources beyond those authorized by the instructor in writing papers, preparing reports,
                solving problems, or carrying out other assignments;

           b. The acquisition, without permission, of tests or other academic material belong to a member of the college faculty or
                staff.

           Plagiarism includes, but is not limited to, the use, whether by paraphrase or direct quotation, of the published or
           unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment. It also includes the use of materials
           prepared by another person or agency.

     2.    Deliberate interference with academic freedom or freedom of speech, including disruption of a class, or interference
           with the freedom of any speaker invited by the college to express his/her views. (Warning)

The deans will decide whether the conduct will be considered academic (section C) or non-academic (section B) and will follow
the appropriate procedure.

Disclosure of Student Rights and Responsibilities:

Both policy and procedure for "Student Rights and Responsibilities" will be made available to all students and employees. To
ensure this occurs, any college catalog, student handbook or faculty handbook printed after December 31, 1990, must include
this information.

DUE PROCESS PROCEDURE

At Kirtland Community College, two procedural forms of due process exist; Academic Due Process and Non-Academic Due
Process. As conditions permit, either form of due process is provided to the student within a reasonable amount of time. In
certain circumstances, the dean, or his/her designee, may impose a suspension prior to the hearing before the committee.

A.    Interim suspension may be imposed only:

      1.        To ensure the safety and well-being of members of the college community or preservation of college property;

      2.        To ensure the student's own physical or emotional safety and well-being;

      3.        If the student poses a definite threat of disruption or interference to the normal conduct of operations of the college.

B. During the period of interim suspension, the student shall be denied access to the campus (including being barred from
classes) and/or all other college activities or privileges for which s/he might otherwise be eligible as the director of student
services dean may determine to be appropriate.

C. The interim suspension shall continue until the student's due process procedures are complete. The hearing for this matter
should follow the dean’s actions as soon as practicable.
Procedure for Non-Academic Due Process:

Any member of the college community may file charges against a student for an alleged violation of the student code of conduct.
These charges must be filed in writing by completing a "Student Conduct Complaint Form" and be submitted to the dean of
student services as soon as possible after the incident. These forms can be obtained from the student services office. Once
charges have been formally filed, the following procedure for Non-Academic Due Process must be observed:

A. The director of guidance and counseling shall meet with the person (complainant) who has filed a charge against another
person or student organization. During this meeting, the director will review the charge and procedure with the complainant. The
director will also meet with the individual(s) charged with the violation and attempt to resolve the situation between the two
parties. If the complainant elects to withdraw the charge, a complaint withdrawal form will be completed and signed by the
complainant. If the charge stands, the dean of student services will notify the student (in writing) of the charges filed against
him/her and the college's policy regarding due process.

B. The dean of student services will appoint a student judiciary committee composed of three full-time college employees and
two students. The dean will appoint one of the employees to chair the hearing. The members of this committee must have no
vested interest in the matter. The dean of student services cannot serve on this committee.

C. The person filing the complaint and the person or student organization charged with violating the student code of conduct
are responsible for providing statements from witnesses and other evidence. Witness statements can be provided verbally during
the hearing or in written (signed and dated) form. Both parties may have other individuals at the hearing. These individuals are
limited to an advisory capacity with no right of cross-examination.

D. The student judiciary committee has the responsibility of hearing the charges against the student and reviewing the
evidence. The hearing will take place within ten working days following the student's receipt of the written charges. A verbatim
record, such as a tape recording, will be made of all hearings. This record remains the property of the college and must be
maintained for a period of two years. Within one working day following the hearing, the committee will submit (in writing) its
recommendation to the dean of student services.

E. The dean of student services will render a decision on the case, which may include sanctions imposed on the student. The
dean will then inform (in writing) all parties involved of his/her decision within three working days of the receipt of the student
judiciary committee's recommendation.

F. If the student wishes to contest the dean of student services' decision, s/he may appeal to the President within three working
days following notification of the dean’s decision (refer to "Appeal Process"). The President's decision will be final.

Note: A student who commits a drug or alcohol related infraction (Forms of Misconduct #13 or #14), will be immediately
referred to the dean of student services. The dean may provide the student with a choice of the following options:

Option #1: Referral to the Kirtland's student assistance program and/or to a substance professional for a substance abuse intake
interview and assessment. The dean will also give a formal "warning" to the student.

Option #2: Referral to the student judiciary committee for a hearing. If found in violation by the committee, the student may be
suspended for the remaining portion of the current semester with no refund of tuition and fees. Further, if suspended, the student
must show evidence of an intake interview and assessment with a substance abuse professional in order to return to Kirtland.

Procedure for Academic Due Process:

A. If an instructor fails a student in a course for academic dishonesty, the instructor must immediately notify, in writing
(Academic Student Conduct Complaint Form), the student and the dean of instruction. The dean of instruction shall maintain a
record of all such notifications.

B. If a student wishes to appeal a grade or academic decision, s/he must first meet with the faculty member to discuss his/her
grievance.

C. If the student and faculty member do not come to a satisfactory agreement, or if charged with academic misconduct, the
student may appeal to the appropriate associate dean. If the problem is not resolved at this level, the student may appeal to the
dean of instruction.
D. If the student chooses to appeal to the dean of instruction, a written request (which includes a brief summary of the
grievance) must be submitted. The dean will review the appeal. Within three working days after receiving the appeal, the dean
shall render a decision.

E. Should the student wish to pursue the matter further, the dean will refer the complaint to the academic appeals committee.
The instructional dean will appoint an academic appeals committee composed of three full-time faculty members and two
students. The dean will appoint one of the faculty members to chair the hearing. The members of this committee must have no
vested interest in the matter. The dean cannot serve on this committee.

F. The academic appeals committee has the responsibility of hearing the grievance and reviewing the evidence. The hearing
will take place within ten working days following the student's request for a hearing. A verbatim record, such as a tape recording,
will be made of all hearings. This record remains the property of the college and must be maintained for a period of two years.
Within one working day following the hearing, the committee will submit (in writing) its recommendation to the dean.

G. The dean will render a decision on the case. The dean will then inform (in writing) all parties involved of his/her decision
within three working days of the receipt to the academic appeals committee's recommendation.

H. If the student wishes to contest the dean's decision, he/she may appeal to the President within three working days following
notification of the dean's decision (refer to "Appeal Process"). The President's decision will be final.

Appeal Process(es):

An appeal shall be limited to review of the verbatim record of the initial hearing and supporting documents for one or more of
the following purposes, except as required to explain the basis of new evidence:

A. To determine whether the original hearing was conducted fairly in light of the charges and evidence presented, and in
conformity with prescribed procedures giving the complaining party a reasonable opportunity to prepare and present evidence
that the student code of conduct was violated and giving the accused student a reasonable opportunity to prepare and to present
his or her rebuttal of those allegations.

B. To determine whether the decision reached regarding the accused student was based on substantial evidence, i.e., were the
facts in the case sufficient to establish whether there was, or was not, a violation of the student code of conduct?

C. To determine whether the sanction(s) imposed was appropriate to the violation of the student code of conduct which the
student was found to have committed.

D. To consider new evidence, sufficient to alter a decision, or other relevant facts not brought out in the original hearing
because such evidence and/or facts were not known to the person appealing at the time of the original hearing.

SUBSTANCE ABUSE INFORMATION ON ALCOHOL AND DRUGS
Information regarding the misuse and abuse of alcohol and drugs can be found in the student center near the entrance or by contacting
the director of guidance and counseling in the student services office.

STATEMENT/GUIDELINES REGARDING AIDS
In response to the epidemic of infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), which causes the Acquired Immunodeficiency
Syndrome (AIDS), Kirtland Community College has adopted these guidelines based upon the recommendation of the American
College Health Association.
AIDS is a serious illness, a public health problem, and an immediate concern to the college community. AIDS is characterized as a
defect in natural immunity against disease. People who have AIDS are vulnerable to critical illnesses that are not a threat to anyone
whose immune system is functioning in a standard and typical fashion.
AIDS is caused by a virus commonly called HIV. Presently, there is no known cure or effective vaccine. However, the consensus of
authoritative medical opinion, as reflected by the Center for Disease Control and Public Health Service, is that AIDS is not a readily
communicable disease.
There are no known cases of AIDS transmission by food, water, insects, or casual social contact, and no spread of the virus has been
found within family groups in which one or more persons have been diagnosed with AIDS, except from sexual and/or intravenous
transmission. The current scientific understanding is that the AIDS virus is transmitted only through an exchange of infected body
fluids, blood, or blood products. Such exchanges may occur when the needle of an infected person (in most cases, a drug addict) is
used by someone else, through a blood transfusion from an infected person, or through intimate contact involving the transfer of
semen and vaginal fluids.
     NOTE: The use of condoms can significantly reduce spread of this virus. AIDS has not been shown to be transmitted by saliva, tears,
     nasal secretions, vomitus, urine, or feces. Considering current authoritative medical opinion, there is no basis for routinely excluding
     or dismissing employees or students because they have AIDS, ARC (AIDS-Related Complex), or AIDS virus antibodies. Since these
     conditions have been designated as handicaps and are treated as such by the Elliott-Larson Civil Rights Act, it is also against the law
     to dismiss someone on this basis. Depending on the medical circumstances of each situation, the college may require the monitoring
     of the medical condition of an infected person, which includes the counseling of that person on the nature of the disease and the
     importance of not engaging in behavior that could transmit it, if that is appropriate. No broad blood screening test will be required.
     The right to privacy of all individuals will be respected and protected, and the confidentiality of any required records that may be
     required will be maintained. Because the virus is not transmitted by ordinary contact, it is neither necessary nor appropriate for the
     protection of roommates, classmates, or employees to share with them any information regarding a student or employee with AIDS
     and AIDS-related conditions.
     Kirtland Community College will comply with all federal and state laws and regulations, including those of the United States Public
     Health Service and the guidelines from the Center for Disease Control and the American Health Association, which bear on the
     welfare of persons within the college community who test positively to that antibody. It has also adopted the safety guidelines as
     proposed by the United States Public Health Service "for the handling of blood and body fluids of all persons.... " All appropriate
     college personnel will be trained in and will follow these procedures.
     The college will continue to provide information programs designed to acquaint the community with current information about AIDS
     and how to avoid or minimize the risks of transmission of the virus.
     Anyone with questions about AIDS may contact Jacquelyn Smith, nursing instructor. Materials on AIDS will be available in
     information-dispensing units on campus.
     In addition, any student who is concerned or has questions about AIDS or HIV may contact the Grand Traverse, Leelanau, Benzie
     District Health Department (Tri-County) in Traverse City, P.O. Box 905, Traverse City, MI 49685-0905, 616-922-4381 or the District
     Health Department #1 in Cadillac for free counseling and/or HIV testing.


                           ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
                               COMMUNITY SUPPORT SERVICES
COMMUNITY BASED STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
Part-time student employment with off-campus employers is an option for eligible Kirtland students. Off-campus employers considering
participation in this program should contact financial aid at 989-275-5000, extension 257. Since financial aid may not cover 100% of the
student's wages, off-campus employers may be obligated to contribute matching funds.

M-TECSM AT KIRTLAND-GAYLORD
The M-TECSM at Kirtland-Gaylord is a state-of-the art facility offering technical education in a unique, flexible, student-friendly manner. The
       SM
M-TEC campus is located in Gaylord and features state-of-the-art equipment, pedagogy, and curriculum taught by experienced faculty.
Students can choose a course of study and build it from hundreds of skill-specific modules, resulting in a dynamic, flexible program preparing
graduates to enter into high-paying jobs.

The mission of the M-TECSM is to provide educational programs and services to individuals in preparation for employment in high-skill, high-
wage, high-demand occupations. In addition, through customized training and contracted education, business and industry partners in the
Northern Michigan Region and their employees will be provided with educational opportunities specifically designed to upgrade and/or enhance
the job skills necessary to compete in a local, state, national, and global economy.

For information, contact the M-TECSM at Kirtland-Gaylord at 989-705-3600. Additional information is also available in the Programs of Study
section of this catalog.
           COMMUNICATION WITH THE COLLEGE COMMUNITY
COLLEGE CATALOG
The college catalog is the official publication issued by the college, and is available online at: www.kirtland.edu. The catalog includes detailed
information concerning programs of study, course descriptions, admission and graduation requirements, and services for students. The contents
of the college catalog are subject to change. The catalog is not to be considered as a contract or agreement between the student or the college.
For the most current information, check the student class schedule.

CLASS SCHEDULES
A class schedule is a list of courses offered by the college during a semester. This publication provides day, time, and location of each class.
Also included is information concerning testing, advising, registration, and other services provided by the college.

The class schedule is available in early April for both summer and fall semesters and in early November for the winter semester. Class schedules
are mailed to all households in the college district, and are available online at www.kirtland.edu by selecting “Class Schedule”.

INFORMATION MONITORS
Monitors that display information that is important to students are stationed in the administration center, the instructional center, the career
technology center, library, and the student center. Information includes cafeteria specials, registration dates, athletic highlights, scholarship
deadlines, commencement details, class cancellations, and other information that is updated regularly.

CAMPUS NEWSPAPER
The Paper is a college newspaper published bi-weekly and produced by Kirtland students. It includes news stories, feature articles, columns and
opinion pieces, sports, and photography of interest to the college community.

Most, but not all, students helping to produce The Paper are enrolled in journalism classes in which students can learn reporting, editing,
photography, graphic design, and advertising skills while earning up to three humanities credits toward their associate degree. Opinions
expressed in The Paper do not reflect the policy of the Kirtland Board of Trustees, administration, faculty, or staff. For more information about
joining The Paper’s staff, contact the advisor at 989-275-5000, extension 308.


GLOSSARY OF COLLEGE TERMS
Associate Degree - The degree given for completing college programs of at least two but less than four years of study (60 credit hours or more),
usually in a two-year institution such as a junior college or community college.
Certificate - An award for completing a particular program or course of study of 30 or more credit hours, sometimes awarded by two-year
colleges instead of the associate degree.
Contact Hours - The total hours of lecture and laboratory instruction for each class. (Fifty instructional minutes equal one contact hour.)
Corequisite - A required course which, if not taken ahead of time, must be taken at the same time as another class.
Developmental Class - A corrective course designed to assist students who need additional assistance in reading, mathematics, or English.
Elective - A subject or course which is open to choice, i.e., a subject which is optional and not required.
Freshman - Class level for students with less than 30 completed credit hours in their program of study.
Full-Time Students - A student who is enrolled for 12 or more credit hours during fall or winter semesters, or six or more credit hours during
summer session.
Humanities Elective - A course from the following subject areas: art, creative writing, foreign language, history, humanities, journalism,
literature, music, philosophy, and theatre.
Part-Time Student - A student who is enrolled for 11 or fewer credit hours during the fall or winter semester or five or fewer credit hours
during the summer session.
Prerequisite - A requirement for registration in a particular course. For example, Calculus I is a prerequisite for Calculus II.
Science Elective - A course from the following subject areas: natural science (biology, chemistry), or physical science (geology, mathematics
or physics).
Social Science Elective - A course from the following subject areas: anthropology, economics, geography, political science, psychology, and
sociology.
Sophomore - Class level for students with 30 or more completed credit hours in their program of study.
                               PROGRAMS OF STUDY
                           Key: AAS = Associate in Applied Science; AFA = Associate in Fine Arts;
                                  CC = Certificate of Completion; SC – Special Certificate


ARTS                                                           EDUCATION
Graphic Design, SC and CC                                      Associate in Teaching, Transfer
Graphic Design, AAS                                            Paraprofessional, AAS
Fine Arts: Studio Art, AFA                                     HEALTH CAREERS
AUTOMOTIVE                                                     Basic Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), SC
Automotive Chassis Specialist, SC                              Emergency Medical Services, AAS
Automotive Electrical Systems Specialist, SC                   Massage Therapy, CC and AAS
Automotive General, SC                                         Nursing - Associate Degree in Nursing - Level II, AAS
Automotive Powertrain Specialist, SC                           Nursing - Practical Nursing – Level I, CC
Automotive Technology, AAS                                     Nursing – RN from LPN/LVN, AAS
Automotive Technology Master Certification, CC                 Paramedic, CC
                                                               Radiography
BUSINESS                                                       Sonography, AAS (M-TEC Gaylord)
Associate in Business Administration, Transfer
Business Management, AAS                                       HONORS PROGRAM
Entrepreneurship, CC                                           INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES
General Business, CC                                           Engineering & Design Technologies, AAS (Main Campus)
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS                                   Industrial Maintenance, CC and AAS (M-TEC Gaylord)
Computer Technician, CC                                        Outdoor Power Engines, CC and AAS (M-TEC Gaylord)
Web Master, CC                                                 OFFICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Associate in Computer Information Systems, Transfer            Administrative Assistant, AAS
Associate in Computer Science, Transfer                        Advanced Word Processing Specialist, AAS
                                                               Legal Secretary, AAS
CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY                                        Medical Billing and Coding, CC
M-TECSM/GAYLORD                                                Medical Clerk, CC
Carpentry, CC and AAS                                          Medical Secretary, AAS
Electrical Technology, CC and AAS                              Medical Transcription, CC and AAS
Heating/Ventilation/AC/Refrigeration, CC and AAS               Office Assistant, CC
COSMETOLOGY                                                    Word Processing Specialist, CC
Natural Hair Cultivation, SC                                   TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT
Limited Specialist – Natural Hair Cultivation Instructor, SC   Technology Management, AAS
Limited Specialist – Manicure Instructor, SC
Limited Specialist – Skin Care Instructor, SC                  TRANSFER
Cosmetology, CC                                                Associate in Arts, AA
Cosmetology Instructor, CC                                     Associate in Business Administration, ABA
Nail Technician, CC                                            Associate in Computers
Skin Care Technician, CC                                       Associate in Criminal Justice - Generalist
Cosmetology, AAS                                               Associate in Fine Arts, AFA
                                                               Associate in Science, AS
CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                               Associate in Teaching
Associate in Criminal Justice: Generalist, Transfer            Pre-Engineering
Corrections Administration, AAS                                Pre-Natural Resources
Corrections Administration - Jail Administration, AAS          Pre-Optometry
Correctional Officer, CC                                       Pre-Pharmacy
Criminal Justice Administration, AAS                           Pre-Veterinary Medicine
Criminal Justice Pre-Service, AAS                              Pre-Chiropractic
       KIRTLAND PROGRAMS AND INSTRUCTIONAL ADMINISTRATORS
                         Karen Brown               Doty Latuszek            Jerry Boerema               Kathy Marsh
                        Associate Dean            Provost - MTEC            Associate Dean           Dean of Instruction
                        of Instruction                                      of Instruction
                      989-275-5000, ext. 298           989-705-3683       989-275-5000, ext. 283      989-275-5000, ext. 245

Programs and        Nursing (Central &          Carpentry                Criminal Justice            Chief Instruct Officer
Transfer                MTEC campuses)          Electrical Tech          Police Academy              Chair ID
Degrees:            EMT/Paramedic               Engin & Design Tech      Assoc in CJ                 Assessment Program
                    Massage Therapy             HVAC                     Assoc in Arts               Testing Services
                    Radiography                 Industrial Proc Tech     Assoc in Fine Arts          Perkins
                    Assoc in Science            Outdoor Power Engines                                MODAC
                    Assoc in Paraprofessional   Sonography                                           Secretarial Supervision
                    Assoc in Teaching           Technology Mgmt                                      Library
                    Business                                                                         EAGs
                    Assoc in Computer                                                                Global Awareness
                    Assoc in Business                                                                Honors
                    Medical Assist.                                                                  TSB FT faculty
                    Automotive                                                                       TSPS PT faculty
                    Office Info Sys                                                                  COOR
                    Cosmetology                                                                      HS Principals
Courses:            Accounting                  CAD/EDT                  Anthropology                HS Counselor
                    Allied Health               Carpentry                Art                         Retention
                    Astronomy                   Electrical               Communication               Tech Prep Oversight
                    Automotive                  HVAC                     Dev R/W                     Tutoring/ESL
                    Aviation                    Industrial Tech          Education (Pre-School)      AQIP/HLC
                    Biology                     Machine Tool             English
                    Business                    Outdoor Power Eng        Geography
                    Chemistry                   Sonography               History
                    Comp Inform. Sys            Welding                  Humanities
                    Cosmetology                                          Music
                    Dev Math                                             Philosophy
                    Economics                                            Physical Education
                    Education (Elementary)                               Political Science
                    Education (Secondary)                                Psychology
                    Geology                                              Sociology
                    Languages                                            Speech
                    Massage Therapy                                      Theater
                    Math
                    Nursing
                    Office Inform Sys
                    Physics
Other               TSB – FT faculty            Work Force Dev           Public Safety
Responsibilities:   Campus Wellness             Institutional Research   Campus Security
                    MLAD                        PLATO                    CIC Chair
                    Service Learning            TSB – FT faculty         Fitness Center
                    Community Ed                TSPS – Classified        TSPS – PT faculty
                                                MODAC Alternate          CJ Advising
                                                Work Keys                Academic Amnesty
                                                K-12 Assessment          Young Writers
                                                                         Controlled Burn
                                                                         The Paper
                                                                         Pre-Employ Testing for CJ
                                                                         Recognition of Prior
                                                                         Training
                                                                            & Experience for Law
                                                                            Enforcement Officers
                                                                         Theatre Advising
                                                                                                                          A
                                                                                                                          R
                                                                                                                          T
                                                                                                                          S
                         Special Certificates
                         • Graphic Design

                         Certificates
                         • Graphic Design

                         Associate in Applied Science
                         • Graphic Design

                         Associate in Fine Art
                         • Fine Arts: Studio Art

Foundation
Kirtland Community College recognizes the importance of students possessing basic academic skills in English, reading, and
mathematics in order to successfully complete college-level courses. Therefore, all entry-level students are required to
demonstrate their proficiency in basic academic skills. In the certificate programs there are no English, reading, or mathematic
requirements, however, these courses are the foundation for success in all programs. The student’s advisor will indicate which of
the following courses need to be taken based on ACT scores or COMPASS placement testing results. It is highly recommended
that students take these courses during the first semester in order to prepare for the road ahead, as well as possibly satisfying
prerequisites needed for more advanced courses. Specific courses needed may be tracked below. Students must plan additional
time to complete their program requirements if placement results require them to begin with DEV courses.

              ENG-10000 Writing Lab (if required)                       Mathematics:____________________
              English:________________________                          Reading: _______________________




                          For more information, please contact the Art Department.
                  Joe Donna                                            989-275-5000, extension 226
                  Scott Rice                                           989-275-5000, extension 300
GRAPHIC DESIGN
Special Certificate (SGRA0)                                                                         Minimum Credits: 19

Introduction
Kirtland’s Special Certificate - Graphic Design is designed to provide the student with the basic skills necessary to gain entry-
level employment in the graphic design and visual communication industry. The emphasis in the curriculum is comprised of the
six required studio art courses based upon traditional practices. Students may also elect to pursue a Certificate – Graphic Design,
an Associate of Applied Science – Graphic Design, or an Associate in Fine Arts – Studio Art at any point in this program.


 Course                       Title                      Cr          Course                        Title                       Cr
ART-10600      Fundamentals of Drawing I                 3          ART-25000       Illustration I                             3
ART-11500      Photography I                             3          ART-27545       DS-Computer Generated Images I             3
ART-19000      Digital Communications I                  3          ART-28000       Portfolio                                  3
                                                                    CIS-21900       MacIntosh O.S. X                           1




GRAPHIC DESIGN
Certificate of Completion (CGRA0)                                                                   Minimum Credits: 31

Introduction
Kirtland’s Certificate - Graphic Design is designed to provide the student with the advanced training that is necessary for entry
and continuing success in the graphic design and visual communication industry. The curriculum is based upon solid studio art
courses focusing on conceptual, practical, and technical skills. The major core curriculum is based upon traditional practices and
in-depth use of technology. Students may also elect to pursue an Associate of Applied Science – Graphic Design, or an Associate
in Fine Arts – Studio Art at any point in this program.


  Course                        Title                    Cr           Course                       Title                       Cr
ART-10500       Introduction to Design                   3         ART-25000        Illustration I                             3
ART-10600       Fundamentals of Drawing I                3         ART-27545        DS-Computer Generated Images I             3
ART-11500       Photography I                            3         ART-28000        Portfolio                                  3
ART-19000       Digital Communications I                 3         CIS-21900        MacIntosh O.S. X                           1

                                           and two electives from the following list:
ART-20600      Drawing II                               3        ART-23500        Digital Communications II                    3
ART-21500      Photography II                           3        ART-27546        DS-Computer Generated Images II              3



                                Credits                                        Courses
      Subject Area              Needed                        (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Life Skills                       3        • CIS-10500 – Introduction to Computers (3)
GRAPHIC DESIGN
Associate in Applied Science (DGRA0)                                                                Minimum Credits: 72

Introduction
Kirtland’s Associate in Applied Science - Graphic Design is designed to provide specialized instruction that is necessary for entry
and success in the graphic design and visual communication industry. The curriculum is based upon solid academic and studio art
courses focusing on conceptual, theoretical, practical, and technical skills. The major core curriculum is based upon traditional
practices and in-depth use of technology. After completing the second semester in the program, associate degree candidates need
to meet with an advisor to determine if they wish to continue in the program or pursue the Associate in Fine Arts – Studio Art
degree to transfer to an institution that grants four-year degrees.


  Course                           Title                Cr           Course                          Title                    Cr
ART-10000          Art History I                        3         ART-25000        Illustration I                             3
ART-10103          Art History II                       3         ART-27545        DS-Computer Generated Images I             3
ART-10500          Introduction to Design               3         ART-27546        DS-Computer Generated Images II OR
ART-10600          Fundamentals of Drawing I            3          ART-27550         Digital Darkroom                          3
ART-11500          Photography I                        3         ART-27571        DS-Computer Animation I                     3
ART-19000          Digital Communications I             3         ART-28000        Portfolio                                   3
ART-20600          Drawing II                           3         ART-             Studio Art elective                         3
ART-21500          Photography II                       3         CIS-21900        MacIntosh O.S. X                            1
ART-23500 or       Digital Communications II OR
 ART-26000           Illustration II                     3



                               Credits                                           Courses
    Subject Area               Needed                           (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications                   9         • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (0-1) (if required)
                                           • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)
                                           • ENG-10403 – English Composition II (3) OR ENG-106 – Technical Writing (3)
                                           • SPE-10500 – Fund of Speech (3) OR SPE-11400 – Interpersonal Comm (3)
Humanities/Social Science          9       • POL-10100 – Introduction to American Government (3)
                                           • Humanities Elective excluding ART (3)
                                           • Social Science Elective (excluding POL-10100 (3)
Math/Natural                       8       • MTH-12000 – Intermediate Algebra or higher (4)
                                           • Science with a lab (4)

NOTE: *This two for one option is suggested for Associate in Applied Science: Graphic Design students who wish to transfer or
for those who have already completed these courses in the Associate in Fine Arts degree.
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS
Studio Art (DAFA1)                                                                                    Minimum Credits: 64

Introduction
The Associate in Fine Arts: Studio Art degree is designed for students with an interest in studio arts such as sculpture or painting.
This degree program works to give students both practical experience in the art form of their choice, and the critical and
academic background necessary for further study of the fine arts while helping develop a personal sense of aesthetic and artistic
criteria. Because the artist's association with the world is stressed, a strong academic schedule is affiliated with the creative
discipline.
Students planning to transfer to a four-year college or university must consult with their advisor and carefully study the
requirements of the four-year institution from which they intend to secure a bachelor's degree. Appropriate course substitutions
may be made upon the recommendation of a student's advisor and with approval of the appropriate dean or associate dean. Sub-
stitutions are only made in accordance with the specific requirements of the baccalaureate degree-granting institution to which
the student intends to transfer.
Students who have previously attended other colleges or universities may apply earned transfer credit in subject areas (i.e.,
psychology elective, biology elective, etc.) where deemed appropriate. This degree satisfies the requirements of the MACRAO
Transfer Agreement as defined in the handbook section of this catalog.


                                                      STUDIO ART Option
ART-28000         Portfolio                               3         ART- ----     Any ART Electives (recommendation:            15
CIS-21900         MacIntosh O.S. X                         1                      see Studio Art advisor for guidance)



   Subject Area            Credits                         Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications              12-13      • CIS-10500 – Introduction to Computers (3)*
                                       • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (0-1) (if required)
                                       • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)*
                                       • ENG-10403 - English Composition II (3)*
                                       • SPE-10500 – Fund. of Speech (3)* OR SPE-11400 – Interpersonal Communication (3)*
Humanities                    12       • Select 3 credits from Art, Music, or Theater.*
                                       • Select 3 credits from Non-ART humanities. *
                                       • HIS Elective OR
                                           ART-10000 – Art History I (3) OR
                                           ART-10103 – Art History II (3)
                                       • Any Art Elective (3)
Social Science               9-10      • POL-10100 – American Government (3)*
                                       • GEO-10000 – World Geography (4)* OR
                                           POL-20000 – International Relations (3)* OR
                                           POL-20100 – Comparative Government* (3)
                                       • SOC-10100 – Introduction to Sociology (3)* OR
                                           PSY-10100 – Introduction to Psychology (3)*
Math/Natural Science        12-14      • MTH-13000 – College Algebra (4)* or higher
                                       • Select two science courses with a lab from BIO, CHE, GEL, or PHY (8-10)*

* Courses that meet General Education Core Competencies
                                                                                                                          A
                                                                                                                          U
                                All Automotive programs are NATEF certified.
                                                                                                                          T
                                                                                                                          O
                                                                                                                          M
                        Associate in Applied Science
                        ● Automotive Technology
                                                                                                                          O
                                                                                                                          T
                        Certificate
                        • Automotive Technology Master Certification                                                      I
                        Special Certificates                                                                              V
                        • Automotive Chassis Specialist
                        • Automotive Electrical Systems Specialist                                                        E
                        • Automotive General
                        • Automotive Powertrain Specialist


Foundation
Kirtland Community College recognizes the importance of students possessing basic academic skills in English, reading, and
mathematics in order to successfully complete college-level courses. Therefore, all entry-level students are required to
demonstrate their proficiency in basic academic skills. In the certificate programs there are no English, reading, or mathematic
requirements, however, these courses are the foundation for success in all programs. The student’s advisor will indicate which of
the following courses need to be taken based on ACT scores or COMPASS placement testing results. It is highly recommended
that students take these courses during the first semester in order to prepare for the road ahead, as well as possibly satisfying
prerequisites needed for more advanced courses. Specific courses needed may be tracked below. Students must plan additional
time to complete their program requirements if placement results require them to begin with DEV courses.

              ENG-10000 Writing Lab (if required)                       Mathematics:____________________
              English:________________________                          Reading: _______________________




                    For more information, please contact the Automotive Department.
                  Richard Bonk                                         989-275-5000, extension 329
 AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
 Associate in Applied Science (DAUT0)                                                        Minimum Credits: 80.02




 Introduction
 Kirtland's program in Automotive Technology is designed to provide instruction in manipulative skills, technical knowledge and
 related trade information. Students are given the opportunity to prepare for employment in the automotive industry as certified
 technicians, service salesmen, or service managers.
 This program is certified by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF), and graduates of this
 program will be prepared for the Michigan Bureau of Automotive Regulation Technician Certification and the National Institute
 for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Technician Certification. Graduates will demonstrate competence in all eight of the
 following areas: 1) engine repair, 2) automatic transmission and transaxle, 3) manual drivetrain, 4) suspension and steering, 5)
 brakes, 6) electrical/electronic systems, 7) heating and air conditioning, and 8) engine performance. It is recommended that
 students make an appointment for an interview with an automotive advisor prior to entering the program.
 Kirtland Community College has had an ongoing 2 + 2 transfer agreement with Ferris State University for students who want to
 pursue a bachelor’s degree. Both Kirtland and Ferris are currently revising curricula. The expectation is that the agreement will
 remain in place. Any Automotive Technology major who plans to acquire a bachelor’s degree after completion of the associate
 degree should contact his/her advisor during the first semester at Kirtland Community College.


    Course                        Title                  Cr           Course                        Title                     Cr
                      Semester I - Fall                                                  Semester III - Fall
 AUT-16302        Automotive Fundamentals                 4        AUT-21800       Automatic Transmissions                     4
 AUT-16401        Basic Electricity                       3        AUT-26601       Engine Performance & Diagnostics            4
 AUT-17703        Automotive Braking Systems              4        AUT-27000       Heating & Air Conditioning                  3
 WLD-10341-       Welding courses                       4.02       AUT-26500       Steering, Suspension & Alignment            4
 10354

                    Semester II - Winter                                              Semester IV - Winter
 AUT-16201        Fuel Systems & Emission Control        4         AUT-23104       Automotive Internship                       5
 AUT-16801        Automotive Electrical Systems          4         AUT-27900       Manual Transmission/ Drivelines/ Axles      4
 AUT-16100        Engine Fundamentals & Overhaul         4
 AUT-20404        Advanced Auto Service                  3
    OR            Management OR
 AUT-20402        Intro to Auto Service                  2
    and                          AND                     1
 AUT-20403        Advanced Auto Service


The following courses are also required for this degree:
                             Course                          Title                      Cr
                      SPE-10500 or             Fund. of Speech OR                       3
                      SPE-11400                Interpersonal Communication
                      xxx-xxxxx                Any humanities elective                  3
                      POL-10101                Intro to American Government             3
                      xxx-xxxx                 Any Social Science Course                3
                      ENG-10303                English Composition I                    3
                      ENG-10000                Writing lab (if needed)                 0-1
                      ENG-10403                English Composition II                   3
                      PHY-10501 and            Physical Science with lab                4
                      PHY-10502
                      MTH-12000                Intermediate Algebra or higher           4
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY MASTER CERTIFICATION
Certificate of Completion (CAUT1)                                                        Minimum Credits: 53.02




Introduction
Kirtland's Automotive Technology Master Certification program is designed to provide instruction in manipulative skills and
technical knowledge required for employment as an automotive technician. This program is certified by the National Automotive
Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF), and graduates will be prepared to take the Michigan State Certification and
National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) test. Graduates will demonstrate competence in all eight of the
following areas: 1) engine repair, 2) automatic transmission and transaxle, 3) manual drivetrain, 4) suspension and steering, 5)
brakes, 6) electrical/electronic systems, 7) heating and air conditioning, and 8) engine performance. Students wanting to continue
in this program may pursue the Associate in Applied Science – Automotive Technology.


 Course                        Title                    Cr            Course                         Title                     Cr
                    Semester I - Fall                                                     Semester III - Fall
AUT-16302     Automotive Fundamentals                    4         AUT-21800        Automatic Transmissions                     4
AUT-16401     Basic Electricity                          3         AUT-26601        Engine Performance & Diagnostics            4
AUT-17703     Automotive Braking Systems                 4         AUT-27000        Heating & Air Conditioning                  3
WLD10341      Welding                                  4.02        AUT-26500        Steering, Suspension & Alignment            4
-10354
                  Semester II – Winter
AUT-16201     Fuel Systems & Emission Control           4                              Semester IV - Winter
AUT-16801     Automotive Electrical Systems             4          AUT-27900        Manual Transmission/Drivelines/Axles        4
AUT-16100     Engine Fundamentals & Overhaul            4          AUT-23104        Automotive Internship                       5
AUT-20402     Intro to Auto Service Management          2
  OR
AUT-20404     Auto Service Management                    3
AUTOMOTIVE CHASSIS SPECIALIST
Special Certificate (SAUT0)                                                                        Minimum Credits: 22




Introduction
Kirtland's Automotive Chassis Specialist certificate program is designed to provide the student with the necessary skills to gain
employment in the automotive industry. This program is certified by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation
(NATEF). Successful completion of this program will qualify the student for the Michigan State Certification and National
Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) testing and certification. Students will demonstrate competence in suspension,
steering, and brakes. Students wanting to continue in this program may pursue the Certificate – Automotive Technology Master
Certification or the Associate in Applied Science – Automotive Technology.



 Course                        Title                    Cr          Course                          Title                    Cr
AUT-16100      Engine Fundamentals & Overhaul           4         AUT-17703        Automotive Braking Systems                4
AUT-16302      Automotive Fundamentals                  4         AUT-20402        Intro to Auto Service Management          2
AUT-26500      Steering, Suspension & Alignment         4         AUT-23101        Auto Service Area – Chassis               4




AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS SPECIALIST
Special Certificate (SAUT1)                                                                        Minimum Credits: 25




Introduction
Kirtland's Automotive Electrical Systems Specialist certificate is designed to provide the student with the necessary skills and
knowledge to gain employment in the automotive electrical field. This program is certified by the National Automotive
Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Successful completion of this program will qualify the student for the Michigan
State and National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) testing and certification in the following: 1) elec-
tricity/electronics, and 2) engine performance. Students wanting to continue in this program may pursue the Certificate –
Automotive Technology Master Certification or the Associate in Applied Science – Automotive Technology.



 Course                         Title                   Cr          Course                          Title                    Cr
AUT-16201      Fuel Systems & Emission Controls         4         AUT-20402        Intro to Auto Service Management          2
AUT-16302      Automotive Fundamentals                  4         AUT-23103        Auto Service Area – Electrical            4
AUT-16401      Basic Electricity                        3         AUT-26601        Engine Performance & Diagnostics          4
AUT-16801      Automotive Electrical Systems            4
AUTOMOTIVE GENERAL
Special Certificate (SAUT2)                                                                            Minimum Credits: 15




Introduction
Kirtland's Automotive General certificate is designed to introduce the student to automotive technology. The student will have
the flexibility to choose a specialty area and, upon completion, be qualified to take certification tests in two areas of repair. Areas
of instruction will include automotive fundamentals and two automotive electives, as well as a section of the service area course.
This program is certified by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Students wanting to continue
in this program may pursue the Certificate – Automotive Technology Master Certification or the Associate in Applied Science –
Automotive Technology.



 Course                        Title                      Cr           Course                             Title                    Cr
AUT-16302       Automotive Fundamentals                   4          AUT-              At least six credits from below
AUT-23104       Automotive Internship                     5

                                     and six or more credit hours from the following list:
AUT-16100       Engine Fundamentals & Overhaul          4       AUT-27000       Heating & Air Conditioning                          3
AUT-16201       Fuel Systems & Emission Control         4       AUT-17703       Automotive Braking Systems                          4
AUT-16401       Basic Electricity                       3       AUT-27900       Manual Transmission/Drivelines/Axles                4
AUT-26500       Steering, Suspension & Alignment        4       AUT-21800       Automatic Transmissions                             4
AUT-16801       Automotive Electrical Systems           4




AUTOMOTIVE POWERTRAIN SPECIALIST
Special Certificate (SAUT3)                                                                            Minimum Credits: 22




Introduction
Kirtland's Automotive Powertrain Specialist certificate is designed to provide the student with the necessary skills to gain entry-
level employment in the automotive industry. This program is certified by the National Automotive Technicians Education
Foundation (NATEF). Successful completion of this program will qualify the student for the Michigan State and National
Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) testing and certification in the following: 1) brakes, and 2) manual drivetrain
and axles. Students wanting to continue in this program may pursue the Certificate – Automotive Technology Master
Certification or the Associate in Applied Science – Automotive Technology.


 Course                       Title                       Cr           Course                           Title                      Cr
AUT-16100       Engine Fundamentals & Overhaul            4          AUT-27900        Manual Transmission/ Drivelines/Axles        4
AUT-16302       Automotive Fundamentals                   4          AUT-20402        Intro to Auto Service Management             2
AUT-17703       Automotive Braking Systems                4          AUT-23102        Auto Service Area - Powertrain               4
                                                                                                                                    B
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            Certificates
            • Entrepreneurship                                                                                                      S
            • General Business
                                                                                                                                    I
                                                                                                                                    N
            Associate in Applied Science
            • Business Management

            Associate                                                                                                               E
            • Business Administration
                                                                                                                                    S
                                 PARTNERSHIP PROGRAMS                                                                               S
            Bachelor of Business Administration
            • Management – Northwood University

            Bachelor of Science
            • Applied Management – Franklin University
            • Business Administration – Franklin University
            • Business Administration – Management – Lake Superior State University
            • Business Administration – Marketing – Lake Superior State University
Foundation
Kirtland Community College recognizes the importance of students possessing basic academic skills in English, reading, and
mathematics in order to successfully complete college-level courses. Therefore, all entry-level students are required to
demonstrate their proficiency in basic academic skills. In the certificate programs there are no English, reading, or mathematic
requirements, however, these courses are the foundation for success in all programs. The student’s advisor will indicate which of
the following courses need to be taken based on ACT scores or COMPASS placement testing results. It is highly recommended
that students take these courses during the first semester in order to prepare for the road ahead, as well as possibly satisfying
prerequisites needed for more advanced courses. Specific courses needed may be tracked below. Students must plan additional
time to complete their program requirements if placement results require them to begin with DEV courses.

              ENG-10000 Writing Lab (if required)                       Mathematics:____________________
              English:________________________                          Reading: _______________________




                      For more information, please contact the Business Department.
                  Judith Grenkowicz                                    989-275-5000, extension 219
ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Certificate of Completion (CENT0)                                                                  Minimum Credits: 33

Introduction
Kirtland's program in Entrepreneurship offers the student a broad exposure to the business world through a selected set of
courses, which may be completed in one year. This program is ideal for the small business owner, manager, or those opting to get
into small business for the first time. It also works well for those who have technical degrees and want to incorporate knowledge
of business with their technical expertise. Students may also elect to pursue the Associate in Applied Science – Business
Management at any point in this program.


 Course                         Title                   Cr           Course                        Title                     Cr
ACC-12100      Accounting Principles I*                 4         BUS-21000        Principles of Management                  3
ACC-12200      Accounting Principles II                 4         BUS-21500        Legal Environment of Business             3
ACC-12500      Computer Accounting/QuickBooks           4         BUS-24500        Personnel Management                      3
BUS-10100      Introduction to Business                 3         MKT-20000        Principles of Marketing                   3
BUS-20101      Internship in Business & Marketing       3         OIS-10500        Business Correspondence                   3




GENERAL BUSINESS
Certificate of Completion (CBUS0)                                                                  Minimum Credits: 31

Introduction
Kirtland's program in General Business is designed to provide an overall background of training that is necessary for entry and
success in the business world. The program is intended to lay a foundation for a great variety of entry-level positions that may
ultimately lead to mid-management positions in business or industry. Students are given the opportunity to enhance decision-
making, problem-solving and creative abilities. Emphasis is placed on management and business communications. Students may
also elect to pursue the Associate in Applied Science – Business Management at any point in this program.


  Course                        Title                  Cr             Course                       Title                     Cr
ACC-12100       Accounting Principles I                4          OIS-10401/2/3      Keyboarding I-A/B/C* OR
BUS-10100       Introduction to Business               3           OIS-11401/2/3      Keyboarding II-A/B/C OR
CIS-10500       Introduction to Computers OR                           --- ---        Business Elective                      3
 CIS-17001        Microsoft Office                      3         OIS-10500          Business Correspondence                 3

                                        and six credit hours from the following list:
ACC-12500      Computer Accounting/QuickBooks          4        MKT-11500          Customer Relations                         3
BUS-201--      Internship in Business & Marketing     3-9       MKT-20000          Principles of Marketing                    3
BUS-20200      Grant Writing                           3        MKT-20100          Principles of Retailing                    3
BUS-21100      E-Commerce Management                   3        MKT-20200          Internet Marketing                         3
BUS-21500      Legal Environment of Business           3        MKT-20400          Advertising                                3
BUS-24500      Personnel Management                    3        OIS-18201/2/3      Word Processing I-Word-A/B/C               3
CIS-17001      Microsoft Office                        3        OIS-21500          Desktop Publishing for the Office          3


    Subject Area               Credits                 Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications                  6-7       • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (1) (if required)
                                          • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)
                                          • ENG-10403 – English Composition II (3)
Math/Natural Science             3-4      • MTH-12000 – Intermediate Algebra (4) OR OIS-11201 – Business Calculations (3)
Notes: * Students who have completed one year of high school typing may take OIS-11401/2/3 Keyboarding II-A/B/C or a
Business elective.
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Associate in Applied Science (DBSM0)                                                              Minimum Credits: 60

Introduction
Kirtland's program in Business Management is designed to provide an overall background of training that is necessary for entry
and success in the business world. The program is intended to lay a foundation for a great variety of entry-level positions that
may ultimately lead to mid-management positions in business or industry. Students are given the opportunity to enhance
decision-making, problem-solving, and creative abilities. Emphasis is placed on management, marketing, and business communi-
cations. Any Business Management major who plans to eventually acquire a bachelor's degree after completion of the associate
degree is encouraged to follow the Associate in Business Administration degree.



  Course                       Title                   Cr           Course                          Title                   Cr
ACC-12100      Accounting Principles I                 4         ECO-20200          Principles of Economics-MICRO           3
ACC-12200      Accounting Principles II                4         MKT-20000          Principles of Marketing                 3
BUS-10100      Introduction to Business                3         OIS-10401/2/3      Keyboarding I-A/B/C OR
BUS-21000      Principles of Management                3          BUS-                Business elective                     3
BUS-21500      Legal Environment of Business           3         OIS-10500          Business Correspondence                 3
BUS-24500      Personnel Management                    3             --- ---        One to four credits from below*        1-4
ECO-20100      Principles of Economics-MACRO           3

                  *One to four credit hours of any ACC, BUS, CIS, MKT, or OIS course above 100 level




                                Credits                                          Courses
    Subject Area                Needed                         (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications                   9-10        • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (1) (if required)
                                             • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)
                                             • ENG-10403, English Comp II (3)
                                             • SPE-10500, Fund. of Speech (3) OR
                                                SPE-11400 Into to Interpersonal/Public Communication (3)
Humanities/Social Science          6         • POL-10100 – American Government (3) OR Any Humanities (3)
                                             •PSY-10100 – Introduction to Psychology (3)
Math/Natural Science               8         • MTH-12000 (4) – Intermediate Algebra
                                             • Any science course with a lab (4)
 ASSOCIATE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
 (DABA1)                                                                                             Minimum Credits: 61

 Introduction
 The Associate in Business Administration degree is designed for students who plan to eventually complete a bachelor's degree in
 a business-related field. Listed below are some of the majors pursued by students following this program:
Accounting              Economics           General Business             Marketing                         Public Administration
Advertising             Finance             Management                   Personnel/Industrial Relations

 Students planning to transfer to a four-year college or university must consult with their advisor and carefully study the require-
 ments of the four-year institution from which they intend to secure a bachelor's degree. Appropriate course substitutions may be
 made upon the recommendation of a student's advisor and with approval of the appropriate dean or associate dean. Substitutions
 are only made in accordance with the specific requirements of the baccalaureate degree-granting institution to which the student
 intends to transfer.
 Students who have previously attended other colleges or universities may apply earned transfer credit in subject areas (i.e.,
 psychology elective, biology elective, etc.) where deemed appropriate. This degree satisfies the requirements of the MACRAO
 Transfer Agreement as defined in the Handbook section of this catalog.

   Course                      Title                      Cr          Course                        Title                       Cr
  ACC-12100     Accounting Principles I                   4         ACC-12200        Accounting Principles II                   4

                                         and 5 - 8 credit hours from the following list:
  ACC-12500     Computer Accounting/QuickBooks           4        BUS-24500         Personnel Management                        3
  BUS-10100     Introduction to Business                 3        MKT-11000         Principles of Selling                       3
  BUS-201--     Internship in Business & Marketing     3-9        MKT-11500         Customer Relations                          3
  BUS-20200     Grant Writing                            3        MKT-20000         Principles of Marketing                     3
  BUS-21000     Principles of Management                 3        MKT-20100         Principles of Retailing                     3
  BUS-21100     E-Commerce Management                    3        MKT-20300         Internet Marketing                          3
  BUS-21500     Legal Environment of Business            3        MKT-20400         Advertising                                 3
  BUS-24000     Financial Management                     3        MKT-21000         Market Research                             3



     Subject Area         Credits                         Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
   Communications          12-13     • CIS-10500 – Introduction to Computers (3)*
                                     • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (1) (if required)
                                     • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)*
                                     • ENG-10403 - English Composition II (3)*
                                     • SPE-10500 – Fund. of Speech (3)* OR SPE-11400 – Interpersonal Communication (3)*
   Humanities               8-9      • Select 2-3 credits from Art, Music, or Theater.*
                                     • Select 3 credits from Journalism, Languages, or Literature. *
                                     • Any HIS OR PHL Elective (3)*
   Social Science            12      • POL-10100 – Intro. to American Government (3)*
                                     • Any ANT, Anthropology OR SOC, Sociology, OR PSY, Psychology Elective (3)*
                                     • ECO-20100 – Principles of Economics (Macroeconomics) (3)
                                     • ECO-20200 – Principles of Economics (Microeconomics) (3)
   Math &                    16      • MTH-13000 College Algebra (4)* or higher
   Natural Science                   • MTH-20600 – Statistics (4)
                                     • Two science courses with labs (8)*
MANAGEMENT                                                                                PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
Bachelor of Business Administration

Northwood University                                                                              Kirtland Community College
Rachel Rodriquez, 989-671-9405                                                       Judith Grenkowicz, 275-5000, extension 219
E-Mail: rachel@northwood.edu                                                                    E-Mail: grenkowj@kirtland.edu

The Business Administration degree with an emphasis on Management is a collaborative program offered by an agreement
between Kirtland Community College and Northwood University. The program is designed to prepare graduates to pursue
careers in management, business, industry, government, and non-profit organizations. In addition to classroom instruction, the
student will also have an option to receive on-the-job practical education through college-provided internships.
Kirtland students may earn any associate degree at Kirtland, as long as the associate degree includes English Composition,
history or sociology, science, and speech. There is an additional third year of courses that can be taken at Kirtland. If students
get a business degree and have already taken some of these third-year courses, they will then work with a Northwood or Kirtland
advisor and take other Kirtland courses for their third year. A minimum of 90 semester hours must be completed at Kirtland
prior to transferring to Northwood to take full advantage of this agreement.
The collaborative program has many benefits for students at Kirtland including the following:
•    Most of the general education, business basics, and prerequisite courses can be taken at Kirtland.
•    Advisors at both schools are well trained to assist students in planning their program.
•    Northwood is only a one and one-half-hour ride from Kirtland.

Students should contact those listed for specific program information.




APPLIED MANAGEMENT                                                                        PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
Bachelor of Science

Franklin University                                                                                Kirtland Community College
Bob Morris                                                                                                    Judith Grenkowicz
1-888-341-6237 or 614-651-4471                                                                      989-275-5000, extension 219
morrisb@franklin.edu                                                                                      grenkowj@kirtland.edu

The Applied Management Degree is a collaborative program offered by an agreement between Kirtland Community College and
Franklin University. The program is designed to prepare graduates to pursue careers in management, business, industry,
government, and non-profit organizations. In addition to classroom instruction, the student will also have an option to receive
on-the-job practical education through college-provided internships.

To enter the Kirtland Community College/Franklin University program, students must meet one of the following admissions
criteria:
•    Have earned an Associate in Business Administration or an Associate in Applied Science - Business Management
•    Have earned any other Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, or Associate in Applied Science degree
•    Have completed 60 semester/90 quarter credit hours and earned a 2.5 GPA

The final year of courses are taken online through Franklin University. Students need to work with a Franklin advisor to
determine exactly what courses will be taken online.

The collaborative program has many benefits for students at Kirtland including the following:
•    Students never have to leave home or northern Michigan because Franklin courses can be taken online. Many of the required
     Kirtland courses are also offered online. This is a great program for those that may find it difficult to travel.
•    Advisors at both schools are well trained to assist students in planning their program.

Students should contact those listed for specific program information.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
Bachelor of Science

Franklin University                                                                                Kirtland Community College
Bob Morris                                                                                                    Judith Grenkowicz
1-888-341-6237 or 614-651-4471                                                                      989-275-5000, extension 219
morrisb@franklin.edu                                                                                      grenkowj@kirtland.edu

The Business Administration degree is a collaborative program offered by an agreement between Kirtland Community College
and Franklin University. The program is designed to prepare graduates to pursue careers in management, business, industry,
government, and non-profit organizations. In addition to classroom instruction, the student will also have an option to receive
on-the-job practical education through college-provided internships.

To enter the Kirtland Community College/Franklin University program, students must meet one of the following admissions
criteria:
•    Have earned an Associate in Business Administration or an Associate in Applied Science - Business Management
•    Have earned any other Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, or Associate in Applied Science degree
•    Have completed 60 semester/90 quarter credit hours and earned a 2.5 GPA

The final year of courses are taken online through Franklin University. Students need to work with a Franklin advisor to
determine exactly what courses will be taken online.

The collaborative program has many benefits for students at Kirtland including the following:
•    Students never have to leave home or northern Michigan because Franklin courses can be taken online. Many of the required
     Kirtland courses are also offered online. This is a great program for those that may find it difficult to travel.
•    Advisors at both schools are well trained to assist students in planning their program.

Students should contact those listed for specific program information.



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION – MANAGEMENT
PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
Bachelor of Science

Lake Superior State University                                                                    Kirtland Community College
John Erkkila, 888-800-5778, extension 2108                                           Judith Grenkowicz, 275-5000, extension 219
E-Mail: jerkkila@gw.lssu.edu                                                                    E-Mail: grenkowj@kirtland.edu

The Business Administration Degree with an emphasis on Management is a collaborative program offered by an agreement
between Kirtland Community College and Lake Superior State University. The program is designed to prepare graduates to
pursue careers in management, business, industry, government, and non-profit organizations.               In addition to classroom
instruction, the student will also have an option to receive on-the-job practical education through college-provided internships.
The collaborative program has many benefits for students at Kirtland including the following:
•    Most of the general education, business basics, and prerequisite courses can be taken at Kirtland.
•    Advisors at both schools are well trained to assist students in planning their program.
•    Lake Superior State University is only a two and one-half-hour ride from Kirtland

Students should contact those listed for specific program information.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION – MARKETING
PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
Bachelor of Science

Lake Superior State University                                                                    Kirtland Community College
John Erkkila, 888-800-5778, extension 2108                                           Judith Grenkowicz, 275-5000, extension 219
E-Mail: jerkkila@gw.lssu.edu                                                                    E-Mail: grenkowj@kirtland.edu

The Business Administration degree with an emphasis on Marketing is a collaborative program offered by an agreement between
Kirtland Community College and Lake Superior State University. The program is designed to prepare graduates to pursue careers
in management, business, industry, government, and non-profit organizations. In addition to classroom instruction, the student
will also have an option to receive on-the-job practical education through college-provided internships.
The collaborative program has many benefits for students at Kirtland including the following:
•    Most of the general education, business basics, and prerequisite courses can be taken at Kirtland.
•    Advisors at both schools are well trained to assist students in planning their program.
•    Lake Superior State University is only a two and one-half-hour ride from Kirtland

Students should contact those listed for specific program information.
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              • Computer Technician
              • Webmaster
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              • Associate in Computer Information Systems
              • Associate in Computer Science
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For more information, please contact the Computer Information Systems Department.   T
Lisa Balbach (balbachl@kirtland.edu)                 989-275-5000, extension 414    E
Gene Frazier (frazierg@kirtland.edu)                 989-275-5000, extension 293
                                                                                    M
                                                                                    S
COMPUTER TECHNICIAN
Certificate of Completion (CTEC0)                                                                      Minimum Credits: 33

Introduction
Kirtland Community College’s Computer Technician program is designed to provide a comprehensive background of training
necessary for success in technically oriented, computer-related jobs. Students will acquire skills that will allow them to analyze
hardware and software related problems, assess solutions, implement the best solution, and evaluate the results. The program is
intended to lay a foundation for a large variety of entry-level positions in the computer repair field. Emphasis is placed on both
theoretical and hands-on applications. Students may also elect to pursue the Associate in Applied Science: Technology
Management degree at any point in this program.

Required Courses
     Course                    Title                      Cr           Course                       Title                    Cr
   CIS-10500     Introduction to Computers                3         CIS-21000 or      Internet & Web Page
   CIS-19600     Hardware Certification                   3          CIS-26100        Development or
   CIS-19700     OS Certification                         3         &                   Internet and
   CIS-22400     UNIX                                     2          CIS-26200          Web Pages and                         3
                                                                    &                    Advanced Web Pages
                                                                     CIS-26300
    CIS-26000       Intro to Computer Networking          3         ENG-10000         Writing Lab (if needed)               0-1
    CIS-27001       Programming I                         3         ENG-10303         English Composition I                  3
    CIS-280- -      Internship in Computer Info Sys      3-9        Electives         See List Below                        1-6

Elective Courses
The courses outlined below are the recommended CIS electives. Students need to take between one and six elective credits to meet
certificate requirements.
    CIS-11700            Visual Basic I                             3         CIS-26400         JavaScript                         2
    CIS-17001            Microsoft Office                           3         CIS-27101         Programming II                     4
    CIS-22500            Spreadsheets                               3         MTH-12000         Intermediate Algebra               4
    CIS-23501            Database Design                            3         OIS-10100         Basic Keyboarding                  1
WEBMASTER
Certificate of Completion (CWEB0)                                                                  Minimum Credits: 45

Introduction
Kirtland Community College’s Webmaster certificate is designed to provide a background of training necessary for web based
programming and development. Students will acquire skills that will allow them to create both static and dynamic (interactive)
web pages. Students may also elect to pursue the Associate in Applied Science: Technology Management degree at any point in
this program.

Required Courses
The courses outlined below are required in this certificate program:

          Course# and Name                                                            Credits
          ART10500 – Introduction to Design                                                 3
          ENG10403– English Composition II                                                  3
          or
          ENG10600 – Technical Writing
          CIS10500 – Introduction to Computers                                              3
          CIS11700 – Visual Basic I                                                         3
          CIS21000- Internet and Web Development                                            3
          OR
          CIS26100 – Internet AND CIS26200 – Web Pages AND CIS26300 –
          Advanced Web Pages
          CIS21500 – Web Animation & Multimedia                                             3
          CIS22400 – UNIX                                                                   2
          CIS26000 – Intro to Networking                                                    3
          CIS26400 – JavaScript                                                             3
          CIS27001– Programming I                                                           3
          CIS27101 – Programming II                                                         4
          CIS27200 – Web Programming                                                        3
          Electives                                                                         9
                                                          Total Credits                    45


Elective Courses
The courses outlined below are recommended CIS electives (students need to take nine elective credits to meet certificate
requirements):

 ART-19000         Digital Communications I*               3           CIS17001      Microsoft Office                        3
 ART-27545         Computer Generated Images I*            3           CIS-23501     Database Design                         3
 ART-27546         Computer Generated Images II            3           CIS-280--     Internship                             3-9
 CIS-19600         Hardware Certification                  3           MTH-12000     Intermediate Algebra                    4
 CIS-19700         OS Certification                        3           OIS-10100     Basic Keyboarding                       1

* Recommended elective courses
ASSOCIATE IN COMPUTERS
Computer Science (DACP0)                                                                         Minimum Credits: 60
Introduction
Students interested in pursuing a career in the computer field should plan to eventually complete a bachelor’s degree at a four-
year school of their choice. Computer majors are found in two separate areas: Computer Information Systems and Computer
Science.
Computer Science degrees are mathematically and engineering oriented. Positions of employment would include computer
programmers, systems programmers, software engineers, systems engineers, database administrators, network administrators,
systems administrators, or systems analysts. Degrees in this area include the following: Software Engineering, Computer
Science, Computer Engineering or Computer Networking.

Students planning to transfer to a four-year college or university must consult with a Computer Information Systems
(CIS) advisor and carefully study the requirements of the four-year institution from which they intend to secure a
bachelor’s degree. Appropriate course substitutions may be made upon the recommendation of a student’s advisor and with the
approval of the appropriate dean. Substitutions are only made in accordance with the specific requirements of the baccalaureate
degree granting institution to which the student intends to transfer.
Students who have previously attended other colleges or universities may apply earned transfer credit in subject areas (i.e.,
psychology, elective, biology elective etc.) where deemed appropriate. This degree also satisfies the requirements of the
MACRAO Transfer Agreement as defined in the handbook section of the college catalog.

Year 1:

     Fall Semester                                                 Winter Semester
     ENG-10303 English Composition I w/computers          3        ENG-10403 English Composition II w/Computers              3
     ENG-10000 Writing Lab (if required)                 0-1       BIO-10100 or BIO-20100, or BIO-20200 or BIO-              4
                                                                   21000, or BIO-213 00 (See CIS advisor for
                                                                   recommended course)
     CIS-10500 Introduction to Computers                  3        POL-10100 American Government                             3
     Chemistry w/lab (See CIS advisor for                4-5       MTH-13000 or higher or elective course if math           2-4
     recommended course)                                           sequence is complete (excluding MTH-205 & MTH-206)
     MTH-12000 Intermediate Algebra or higher             4        PSY-10100 or SOC-10100                                    3
     (excluding MTH-205 & MTH-206)

Year 2:

     Fall Semester                                                 Winter Semester
     CIS-27001 Programming I                              3        CIS-27101 Programming II                                  4
     SPE10500 Fundamentals of Speech or SPE-              3        HIS-105, 106, 201, 202, 203, or 204                       3
     11400 - Interpersonal Communications
     Humanities Elective – Language or                    3        Humanities Elective – ART, MUS, or THE                   2-3
     Literature (see CIS advisor for course list)
     GEO-100, POL-200, or POL-201                        3-4       Elective course (listed below)                           2-3
     MTH-14000 or higher or elective course if math      3-4       MTH-22000 or higher or elective course if math           3-4
     sequence is complete (excluding MTH-205 & MTH-                sequence is complete (excluding MTH-205 & MTH-206)
     206)


Electives:

      CIS-11700 Visual Basic I                                3
      CIS-17001 Microsoft Office                              3
      CIS-22400 UNIX                                          2
      CIS-23501 Database Design                               3
      CIS-26000 Intro to Computer Networking                  3
      MTH-22102 Calculus II                                   4
ASSOCIATE IN COMPUTERS
Information Systems (DACP1)                                                                        Minimum Credits: 60
Introduction
Students interested in pursuing a career in the computer field should plan to eventually complete a bachelor’s degree at a four-
year school of their choice. Computer majors are found in two separate areas: Computer Information Systems and Computer
Science.
Computer Information Systems degrees are business oriented. Positions of employment would include computer programmers,
application programmers, systems analysts, network administrators, database administrators, systems administrators, web
developers, or microcomputer specialists. Degrees in these areas include the following: Management Information Systems
(MIS), Computer Information Systems (CIS) or Information Systems (IS).
Students planning to transfer to a four-year college or university must consult with a Computer Information Systems
(CIS) advisor and carefully study the requirements of the four-year institution from which they intend to secure a
bachelor’s degree. Appropriate course substitutions may be made upon the recommendation of a student’s advisor and with the
approval of the appropriate dean. Substitutions are only made in accordance with the specific requirements of the baccalaureate
degree granting institution to which the student intends to transfer.
Students who have previously attended other colleges or universities may apply earned transfer credit in subject areas (i.e.,
psychology, elective, biology elective etc.) where deemed appropriate. This degree also satisfies the requirements of the
MACRAO Transfer Agreement as defined in the handbook section of the college catalog.


Year 1:

   Fall Semester                                                  Winter Semester
   ENG-10303 English Composition I w/computers           3        ENG-10403 English Composition II w/computers                3
   ENG-10000 Writing Lab (if required)                  0-1       BIO-10100 or BIO-20100, or BIO-20200 or BIO-                4
                                                                  21000, or BIO-21300
   CIS-10500 Introduction to Computers                   3        POL-10100 Intro to American Government                      3
   Chemistry w/lab                                      4-5       MTH-13000 College Algebra or elective course if math       2-4
                                                                  sequence is complete (excluding MTH-205 & MTH-206)
   MTH-12000 Intermediate Algebra or higher or           4        PSY-10100 or SOC-10100                                         3
   elective course if math sequence is complete
   (excluding MTH-205 & MTH-206)


Year 2:

   Fall Semester                                                  Winter Semester
   CIS-27001 Programming I                               3        CIS-27101 Programming II                                   4
   SPE-10500 Fundamentals of Speech or                   3        HIS-105, 106, 201, 202, 203, or 204                        3
   SPE-11400 Interpersonal Communications
   Humanities Elective – Language or Literature          3        Humanities Elective – ART, MUS, or THE                    2-3
   (see CIS advisor for course list)
   GEO-100, POL-200, or POL-201                         3-4       Elective course (listed below)                            2-3
   Elective course (listed below)                       3-4       Elective course (listed below)                            3-4

                             Electives:
                                       ACC-12100 Accounting Principles I                    4
                                       ACC-12200 Accounting Principles II                   4
                                       BUS-10100 Introduction to Business                   3
                                       CIS-11700 Visual Basic I                             3
                                       CIS-17001 Microsoft Office                           3
                                       CIS-22400 UNIX                                       2
                                       CIS-22500 Spreadsheets                               3
                                       CIS-23501 Database design                            3
                                       CIS-26000 Computer Networking                        3
                                       ECO-20100 Economics – Macroeconomics                 3
                                       ECO-20200 Economics – Microeconomics                 3
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS                                                                   PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
Bachelor of Science
Ferris State University                                                                           Kirtland Community College
(231) 591-2434                                                                              Lisa Balbach, balbachl@kirtland.edu
CISD@ferris.edu                                                                                    989-275-5000, extension 414
The Computer Information Systems (CIS) curriculum provides students with a broad understanding of core business functions,
competency in computer programming, knowledge of information technology infrastructure, and a sound foundation in systems
analysis and design. The CIS program has close relationships with industry through an advisory board and offers internships as a
practical        hands-on        experience.              Additional      information      is      also      available        at
http://services.kirtland.edu/cis/Transfer/Ferris_CIS_transfer.htm. Students should contact those listed for specific program
information.
 Saginaw Valley State University                                                                Kirtland Community College
 Randall Hock. hock@svsu.edu                                                              Lisa Balbach, balbachl@kirtland.edu
 989-964-4343                                                                                    989-275-5000, extension 414
Computer Information Systems is a rapidly expanding filed that encompasses a wide spectrum of specialties and affects various
aspects of life. As a CIS graduate, students are employed in many phases of the analysis, design, manufacturing, testing,
research, development, and administration of computer systems. A Computer Information Systems graduate might become a
programmer, applications programmer, system administrator, web developer, analyst, systems analyst, network administrator, or
database administrator. Co-op opportunities are available with local industries.
Students should contact those listed for specific program information. Students wanting additional information on the Computer
Information Systems major at Saginaw Valley State University should visit http://www.svsu.edu/cs/cis.htm. Additional
information is also available at http://services.kirtland.edu/cis/Articulation/SVSU_CIS_Articulation.htm


COMPUTER SCIENCE                                                                                PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
Bachelor of Science
Central Michigan University                                                                       Kirtland Community College
Marcie Otteman, ottem1mm@cmich.edu or Marcie.M.Otteman@cmich.edu                            Lisa Balbach, balbachl@kirtland.edu
989-774-3076                                                                                       989-275-5000, extension 414
The study of computer science can lead to such careers as applications programmer, systems programmer/analyst, computer
communications specialist, database manager, and consultant. The field serves those students desiring general instruction in
computer science, those interested in teaching the subject, and those who want to undertake advanced study of computer science
at the graduate level. Information technology graduates will find a variety of career opportunities, including network administra-
tion, database administration, Web master, application system designer, multimedia specialist, and customer service technologist.
Students should contact those listed for specific program information. Additional information is also available at
http://services.kirtland.edu/cis//Articulation/CMUarticulation.htm
 Franklin University                                                                               Kirtland Community College
 Bob Morris, morrisb@franklin.edu                                                            Lisa Balbach, balbachl@kirtland.edu
 1-888-341-6237 or 614-651-4471                                                                       989-275-5000, extension 414
The Computer Science curriculum provides all graduates with a foundation in programming, algorithm development, computer
architecture, operating systems, and networks through a set of core courses. The curriculum also allows specialization through the
choice of two different options: software engineering, which is more technical in nature, and an MIS option, which is business-
oriented. Courses ranging from introductory programming courses to advanced courses in Artificial Intelligence, Computer
Architecture, Computer Graphics, Human Computer Interaction, Web Application Development, Systems Programming, Data
Communication, and Compiler Construction are available. For additional information on the Computer Science BS Degree at
Franklin University visit http://cs.franklin.edu/
To enter the Kirtland Community College/Franklin University program, students must meet one of the following admissions
criteria:
•     Have earned an Associate in Computers – Information Systems
•     Have earned any other Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, or Associate in Applied Science degree
•     Have completed 60 semester/90 quarter credit hours and earned a 2.5 GPA
Additional information is also available at http://services.kirtland.edu/cis/Articulation/Franklin_CS_Articulation.htm. Students
should contact those listed for specific program information.
                                                    (Continued on next page)
Saginaw Valley State University                                                                   Kirtland Community College
Randall Hock, hock@svsu.edu                                                                 Lisa Balbach, balbachl@kirtland.edu
989-964-4343                                                                                       989-275-5000, extension 414
Computer Science is a rapidly expanding field that encompasses a wide spectrum of specialties and affects various aspects of life.
Computer scientists may be employed in many phases of the analysis, design, manufacturing, testing, research, development, and
administration of computer systems. Students may be employed as software engineers, applications programmers, system
administrators, web developers, algorithm development engineers, network administrators, or database administrators. Co-op
opportunities are available with local industries. Students should contact those listed for specific program information.
Additional information is also available at http://services.kirtland.edu/cis/Articulation/SVSU_CS_Articulation.htm. Students
wanting additional information on the Computer Information Systems major at Saginaw Valley State University should visit
http://www.svsu.edu/cs/cs.htm




DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS                                                                          PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
Bachelor of Science
Franklin University                                                                               Kirtland Community College
Bob Morris, morrisb@franklin.edu                                                            Lisa Balbach, balbachl@kirtland.edu
1-888-341-6237 or 614-651-4471                                                                     989-275-5000, extension 414
Successful businesses are increasingly using the Internet and related electronic commerce technologies. These business initiatives
require graduates who understand current and future trends in digital communication and electronic commerce and are prepared
to manage the analysis, design, implementation, marketing, and operation of digital information systems. This program includes a
Web Development track and an E-Commerce track. Depending on the track selected, students will acquire skills or knowledge in
web development, marketing, graphics design, electronic commerce system skills, and the technology of databases, user interface
design, networking, and management information systems.
To enter the Kirtland Community College/Franklin University program, students must meet one of the following admissions
criteria:
•     Have earned an Associate in Computers – Information Systems
•     Have earned any other Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, or Associate in Applied Science degree
•     Have completed 60 semester/90 quarter credit hours and earned a 2.5 GPA
Additional information is also available at http://services.kirtland.edu/cis/Articulation/Franklin_DigitalComm_Articulation.htm.
Students should contact those listed for specific program information. Students wanting additional information on the Digital
Communications BS Degree at Franklin University should visit http://www.franklin.edu/programs/dcom/..



MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SCIENCE (MIS)                                                                       PARTNERSHIP
PROGRAM
Bachelor of Science
Franklin University                                                                               Kirtland Community College
Bob Morris, morrisb@franklin.edu                                                            Lisa Balbach, balbachl@kirtland.edu
1-888-341-6237 or 614-651-4471                                                                     989-275-5000, extension 414
The MIS program focuses on the intersection of management and technology. A distinguishing feature of this program is its
integrated approach to technical, organizational, and systems elements within the curricula that will enable future managers and
technical specialists to interact effectively in organizations. Franklin is building a bridge between management and technology in
order to meet the growing demand of companies seeking to sustain a competitive advantage technologically. This program
includes a large number of business and computer courses.
To enter the Kirtland Community College/Franklin University program, students must meet one of the following admissions
criteria:
•     Have earned an Associate in Computers – Information Systems
•     Have earned any other Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, or Associate in Applied Science degree
•     Have completed 60 semester/90 quarter credit hours and earned a 2.5 GPA
Additional information is also available at http://services.kirtland.edu/cis/Articulation/Franklin_MIS_Articulation.htm. Students
should contact those listed for specific program information.
The following programs of study are available only at the M-TEC                                                      C
Campus in Gaylord. For more information please contact the M-
TEC by telephone at (989) 705-3605, or by email at                                                                   O
mtec.kirtland.edu                                                                                                    N
                          Certificates                                                                               S
                          • Carpentry
                          • Electrical Technology                                                                    T
                          • Heating/Ventilation/Air Conditioning/Refrigeration
                                                                                                                     R
                          Associate in Applied Science
                          • Carpentry                                                                                U
                          • Electrical Technology                                                                    C
                          • Heating/Ventilation/Air Conditioning/Refrigeration
                                                                                                                     T
Foundation
Kirtland Community College recognizes the importance of students possessing basic academic skills in English,
reading, and mathematics in order to successfully complete college-level courses. Therefore, all entry-level
                                                                                                                     I
students are required to demonstrate their proficiency in basic academic skills. In the certificate programs there
are no English, reading, or mathematic requirements, however, these courses are the foundation for success in all    O
programs. The student’s advisor will indicate which of the following courses need to be taken based on ACT
scores or COMPASS placement testing results. It is highly recommended that students take these courses during
the first semester in order to prepare for the road ahead, as well as possibly satisfying prerequisites needed for
                                                                                                                     N
more advanced courses. Specific courses needed may be tracked below. Students must plan additional time to
complete their program requirements if placement results require them to begin with DEV courses.

               ENG-10000 Writing Lab (if required)                       Mathematics:____________________            T
              English:________________________                           Reading: _______________________
                                                                                                                     E
Prerequisites:                                                                                                       C
WorkKeysR is used to assess the core competency levels of reading, mathematics, locating information, and
writing. Students are required to take WorkKeysR assessments as they proceed to completion of requirements for
a certificate and/or degree.
                                                                                                                     H
                                                                                                                     N
                                                                                                                     O
                                                                                                                     L
                                                                                                                     O
                                                                                                                     G
                                  For more information, please contact M-TEC.                                        I
                                                      989-705-3605                                                   E
                                                     mtec.kirtland.edu
                                                                                                                     S
CARPENTRY
Certificate of Completion (CCPT0)                                                            Minimum Credits: 31

After completing requirements for the certificate students may continue on with the Associate in Applied Science:
Carpentry.


Course       Title                                              Course      Title
Core Courses                                                    Carpentry Level III
COR-10001 Basic Safety                                          CPT-20023 Exterior Finish
COR-10002 Introduction to Construction Math                     CPT-20024 Roofing Applications
COR-10003 Introduction to Hand Tools                            CPT-20025 Thermal & Moisture Protection
COR-10004 Introduction to Power Tools                           CPT-20026 Stairs
COR-10005 Introduction to Blueprints                            CPT-20027 Framing with Metal Studs
COR-10006 Basic Rigging                                         CPT-20028 Drywall One: Installation
Carpentry Level I                                               CPT-20029 Drywall Two: Finishing
CPT-10007    Orientation to the Trade                           CPT-20030 Interior Finish One: Doors
CPT-10008    Building Materials, Fasteners, & Adhesives         CPT-20031 Interior Finish Two: Suspended Ceilings
CPT-10009    Hand & Power Tools                                 CPT-20032 Interior Finish Three: Window/Door/Ceiling
CPT-10010    Floor Systems                                      CPT-20033 Interior Finish Four: Cabinet Installation
CPT-10011    Wall & Ceiling Framing                             Carpentry Level IV
CPT-10012    Roof Framing                                       CPT-20034 Site Layout II: Angular Measurement
CPT-10013    Windows & Exterior Doors                           CPT-20035 Advanced Roof Systems
Carpentry Level II                                              CPT-20036 Advanced Floor Systems
CPT-10014    Reading Plans & Elevations                         CPT-20037 Advanced Wall Systems
CPT-10015    Site Layout I: Distance Measurements               CPT-20038 Advanced Stair Systems
CPT-10016    Concrete & Reinforcing Materials                   CPT-20039 Introduction to Light Equipment
CPT-10017    Foundation & Flatwork                              CPT-20040 Welding
CPT-10018    Concrete Forms                                     CPT-20041 Metal Buildings
CPT-10019    Reinforcing Concrete                               CPT-20042 Project Management & Supervision
CPT-10020    Handling & Placing Concrete                        CAP-10000 Core Capstone
CPT-10023    Manufactured Forms                                 Electives   ELT – HVC – IND – MPT - WLD (1.1 cr)




CARPENTRY
Associate in Applied Science (DCPT0)                                                         Minimum Credits: 64

Students who have completed the requirements for the certificate may continue on with the Associate in Applied
Science: Carpentry by completing the additional requirements listed below.

Course        Title                                  Cr         Course            Title                              Cr
                                                     3
EDT-11000     Detailing with AutoCAD                            EDT-14000         Architectural Drawing/CAD          4


     Subject Area            Credits                    Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications                9-10      • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (0-1) (if required)
                                        • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)
                                        •ENG-10403 – English Composition II (3) OR ENG-10600 – Tech Report Writing (3)
                                        •SPE-10500 or SPE-11400 (3)
Humanities/Social Science       9       • POL-10100 – American Government (3)
                                        •Social Science elective (3)
                                        •Humanities elective (3)
Math/Natural Science            8       • MTH-12000 – Intermediate Algebra (4) or higher excluding MTH-20500 and MTH-
                                                  20600
                                        • Any science course with a lab (4)
ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY
Certificate of Completion (CELC0)                                                                      Minimum Credits: 31
After completing requirements for the certificate, students may continue on with the Associate in Applied Science: Electrical
Technology.
Course         Title                                                 Course         Title
Core Courses                                                         ELT-10066      Contactors & Relays
COR-10001      Basic Safety                                          ELT-10067      Electrical Lighting
COR-10002      Introduction to Construction Math                     Electrical Technology Level III
COR-10003      Introduction to Hand Tools                            ELT-20068      Load Calculations – Branch Circuits
COR-10004      Introduction to Power Tools                           ELT-20069      Conductor Selection & Calculations
COR-10005      Introduction to Blueprints                            ELT-20070      Overcurrent Protection
COR-10006      Basic Rigging                                         ELT-20071      Raceway, Box & Fitting Fill Requirements
Electrical Technology Level I                                        ELT-20072      Wiring Devices
ELT-10044      Electrical Safety                                     ELT-20073      Distribution Equipment
ELT-10045      Hand Bending                                          ELT-20074      Distribution System Transformers
ELT-10046      Fasteners & Anchors                                   ELT-20075      Basic Lighting
ELT-10047      Electrical Theory One                                 ELT-20076      Motor Calculations
ELT-10048      Electrical Theory Two                                 ELT-20077      Motor Maintenance, Part I
ELT-10049      Electrical Test Equipment                             ELT-20078      Motor Controls
ELT-10050      Introduction to the NEC                               ELT-20079      Electricity in HVAC Systems
ELT-10051      Raceways, Boxes, & Fittings                           ELT-20080      Hazardous Locations
ELT-10052      Conductors                                            Electrical Technology Level IV
ELT-10053      Introduction to Electrical Blueprints                 ELT-20081      Load Calculations – Feeder & Services
ELT-10054      Electrical Wiring: Commercial/Industrial              ELT-20082      Practical Applications of Lighting
ELT-10055      Electrical Wiring: Residential                        ELT-20083      Standby & Emergency Systems
Electrical Technology Level II                                       ELT-20084      Basic Electronic Theory
ELT-10056      Alternating Current                                   ELT-20085      Fire Alarm Systems
ELT-10057      Motors: Theory & Application                          ELT-20086      Specialty Transformers
ELT-10058      Grounding                                             ELT-20087      Advanced Controls
ELT-10059      Conduit Bending                                       ELT-20088      HVAC Controls
ELT-10060      Boxes & Fittings                                      ELT-20089      Welding Machines
ELT-10061      Conductor Installation                                ELT-20090      Heat Tracing & Freeze Protection
ELT-10062      Cable Tray                                            ELT-20091      Motor Maintenance, Part 2
ELT-10063      Conductor Terminations & Splices                      ELT-20092      High Voltage Terminations/Splices
ELT-10064      Installation of Electrical Services                   CAP-10000      Core Capstone
ELT-10065      Circuit Breakers & Fuses                              Electives      CPT – HVC – IND – MPT – WLD (3.2 cr)


ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY
Associate in Applied Science (DELC0)                                                                   Minimum Credits: 64
Students who have completed the requirements for the certificate may continue on with the Associate in Applied
Science: Electrical Technology by completing the requirements listed below.
In addition to requirements for the certificate, students must complete the following requirements and any electives
necessary.
Course          Title                                      Cr        Course               Title                                 Cr
EDT-11000       Detailing with AutoCAD                     3
                                                                     EDT-14000            Architectural Drawing/CAD             4

      Subject Area               Credits                        Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications                    9-10       • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (0-1) (if required)
                                             • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)
                                             • ENG-10403 – English Composition II (3) OR ENG-10600 – Tech Report Writing (3)
                                             • SPE-10500 or SPE-11400 (3)
Humanities/Social Science           9        • POL-10100 – American Government (3)
                                             • Social Science elective (3)
                                             • Humanities elective (3)
Math/Natural Science                8        • MTH-12000 – Intermediate Algebra (4) or higher excluding MTH-20500 and MTH-
                                                       20600
                                             • Any science course with a lab (4)
HEATING/VENTILATION/AC/REFRIGERATION
Certificate of Completion (CHVC0)                                                              Minimum Credits: 31
After completing requirements for the certificate, students may continue on with the Associate in Applied Science:
Heating / Ventilation / AC / Refrigeration.
Course       Title                                             Course        Title
Core Courses                                                   HVC-10121     Maintenance Skills/Service Tech
COR-10001    Basic Safety                                      HVC-10122     Electric Heating
COR-10002    Introduction to Construction Math                 HVC-10123     Control Circuit Troubleshooting
COR-10003    Introduction to Hand Tools                        HVAC Level III
COR-10004    Introduction to Power Tools                       HVC-20140     Planned Maintenance
COR-10005    Introduction to Blueprints                        HVC-20141     Troubleshooting Gas Heating
COR-10006    Basic Rigging                                     HVC-20142     Troubleshooting Electric Heating
HVAC Level I                                                   HVC-20143     Troubleshooting Oil Heating
HVC-10093    Introduction to HVAC                              HVC-20144     Troubleshooting Cooling
HVC-10094    Trade Mathematics                                 HVC-20145     Troubleshooting Heat Pumps
HVC-10095    Tools of the Trade                                HVC-20146     Troubleshooting Accessories
HVC-10096    Copper & Plastic Piping Practices                 HVC-20147     Troubleshooting Electronic Controls
HVC-10097    Soldering & Brazing                               HVC-20148     Hydronic Heating & Cooling Systems
HVC-10098    Ferrous Metal Piping Practices                    HVC-20149     Airside Systems
HVC-10099    Basic Electricity                                 HVC-20150     Air Properties/Air System Balancing
HVC-10100    Introduction to Cooling                           HVAC Level IV
HVC-10101    Introduction to Heating                           HVC-20128     Advanced Blueprint Reading
HVAC Level II                                                  HVC-20129     Indoor Air Quality
HVC-10103    Chimneys, Vents, & Flues                          HVC-20130     Energy Conservation Equipment
HVC-10105    Alternating Current                               HVC-20131     Energy Management Systems
HVC-10106    Basic Electronics                                 HVC-20132     Water Treatment
HVC-10109    Accessories & Optional Equipment                  HVC-20133     System Start-Up & Shut-Down
HVC-10110    Metering Devices                                  HVC-20134     Heating & Cooling System Design
HVC-10111    Compressors                                       HVC-20135     Commercial & Industrial Refrigeration
HVC-10112    Heat Pumps                                        CAP-10000     Core Capstone
HVC-10113    Leak Detection, Evacuation, Recovery              Electives     CPT – ELT – IND – MPT – WLD (4.9)
HVC-10120    Air Distribution Systems




HEATING/VENTILATION/AC/REFRIGERATION
Associate in Applied Science (DHCV0)                                                            Minimum Credits: 64
Students who have completed requirements for the certificate may continue on with the Associate in Applied
Science: Heating / Ventilation / AC / Refrigeration by completing the requirements listed below.
In addition to requirements for the certificate, students must complete the following requirements and any electives
necessary.
Course         Title                                    Cr       Course             Title                              Cr
EDT-11000 Detailing with AutoCAD                        3        EDT-14000          Architectural Drawing/CAD          4



     Subject Area              Credits                      Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications                  9-10     • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (0-1) (if required)
                                         • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)
                                         • ENG-10403 – English Composition II (3) OR ENG-10600 – Tech Report Writing (3)
                                         • SPE-10500 or SPE-11400 (3)
Humanities/Social Science         9      • POL-10100 – American Government (3)
                                         • Social Science elective (3)
                                         • Humanities elective (3)
Math/Natural Science              8      • MTH-12000 – Intermediate Algebra (4) or higher excluding MTH-20500 and MTH-
                                                   20600
                                         • Any science course with a lab (4)
                                                                                                                          C
                                                                                                                          O
                        Special Certificates
                        • Limited Specialist Manicure Instructor                                                          S
                        • Natural Hair Cultivation
                        • Natural Hair Cultivation Instructor                                                             M
                        • Limited Specialist Skin Care Instructor                                                         E
                                                                                                                          T
                        Certificates                                                                                      O
                        • Cosmetology
                        • Cosmetology Instructor                                                                          L
                        • Nail Technician
                        • Skin Care Technician
                                                                                                                          O
                                                                                                                          G
                        Associate in Applied Science
                                                                                                                          Y
                        • Cosmetology


             We welcome high school students into cosmetology programs.
Foundation
Kirtland Community College recognizes the importance of students possessing basic academic skills in English, reading, and
mathematics in order to successfully complete college-level courses. Therefore, all entry-level students are required to
demonstrate their proficiency in basic academic skills. In the certificate programs there are no English, reading, or mathematic
requirements, however, these courses are the foundation for success in all programs. The student’s advisor will indicate which of
the following courses need to be taken based on ACT scores or COMPASS placement testing results. It is highly recommended
that students take these courses during the first semester in order to prepare for the road ahead, as well as possibly satisfying
prerequisites needed for more advanced courses. Specific courses needed may be tracked below. Students must plan additional
time to complete their program requirements if placement results require them to begin with DEV courses.

              ENG-10000 Writing Lab (if required)                       Mathematics:____________________
              English:________________________                          Reading: _______________________




                   For more information, please contact the Cosmetology Department.
                  Shannon Weaver                                       989-275-5000, extension 274
LIMITED SPECIALIST - MANICURE INSTRUCTOR
Special Certificate (SMIN0)                                                                        Minimum Credits: 15
Introduction: Kirtland’s Special Certificate: Limited Specialist - Manicure Instructor program is designed to provide instruction
and practice to become a Manicure Instructor. This program leads to a special certificate, preparing students to pass the
Michigan State Board Exam for Limited Specialist – Manicure Instructors. Students earn a minimum of 15 credit hours to
qualify for graduation.
  Course                      Title                     Cr           Course                         Title                    Cr
COS-20200 Manicure Instructor I                         2.5        COS-20500        Manicure Instructor IV                   2.5
COS-20300 Manicure Instructor II                        2.5        COS-20600        Manicure Instructor V                    2.5
COS-20400 Manicure Instructor III                       2.5        COS-20700        Manicure Instructor VI                   2.5



NATURAL HAIR CULTIVATION
Special Certificate (SNHC0)                                                                        Minimum Credits: 15
Introduction: Kirtland’s Special Certificate: Natural Hair Cultivation program is designed to provide specialized instruction and
practical application for employment. This program leads to a special certificate, preparing students to successfully pass the
Michigan State Board Exam in Natural Hair Cultivation, which is required by law to practice Natural Hair Cultivation in
Michigan. Students earn a minimum of 15 credit hours to qualify for graduation. Job placement in this program is excellent.
Students also have the opportunity to continue their education by enrolling in the Associates Degree program.
  Course                       Title                     Cr           Course                         Title                    Cr
COS-15010 Natural Hair Cultivation I                     2.5       COS-15040         Natural Hair Cultivation IV              2.5
COS-15020 Natural Hair Cultivation II                    2.5       COS-15050         Natural Hair Cultivation V               2.5
COS-15030 Natural Hair Cultivation III                   2.5       COS-15060         Natural Hair Cultivation VI              2.5



LIMITED SPECIALIST - NATURAL HAIR CULTIVATION
INSTRUCTOR
Special Certificate (SNHC1)                                                                        Minimum Credits: 15
Introduction: Kirtland’s Special Certificate: Limited Specialist - Natural Hair Cultivation Instructor program is designed to
provide instruction and practice to become a Natural Hair Cultivation Instructor. This program leads to a special certificate,
preparing students to pass the Michigan State Board Exam for Limited Specialist - Natural Hair Cultivation Instructor. Students
earn a minimum of 15 credit hours to qualify for graduation.
  Course                        Title                   Cr          Course                        Title                    Cr
COS-25010 Natural Hair Cultivation Instructor I         2.5      COS-25040        Natural Hair Cultivation Instructor IV   2.5
COS-25020 Natural Hair Cultivation Instructor II        2.5      COS-25050        Natural Hair Cultivation Instructor V    2.5
COS-25030 Natural Hair Cultivation Instructor III 2.5            COS-25060        Natural Hair Cultivation Instructor VI   2.5



LIMITED SPECIALIST – SKIN CARE INSTRUCTOR
Special Certificate (SSCI0)                                                                        Minimum Credits: 15

Introduction: Kirtland’s Special Certificate: Limited Specialist – Skin Care Instructor program is designed to provide instruction
and practice to become a Limited Specialist – Skin Care Instructor. This program leads to a special certificate, preparing students
to pass the Michigan State Board Exam for Limited Specialist – Skin Care Instructor. Students earn a minimum of 15 credit hours
to qualify for graduation.
   Course                      Title                    Cr            Course                         Title                     Cr
COS-24100 Skin Care Instructor I                        2.5        COS-24400        Skin Care Instructor IV                    2.5
COS-24200 Skin Care Instructor II                       2.5        COS-24500        Skin Care Instructor V                     2.5
COS-24300 Skin Care Instructor III                      2.5        COS-24600        Skin Care Instructor VI                    2.5
COSMETOLOGY
Certificate of Completion (CCOS1)                                                              Minimum Credits: 40

Introduction
Kirtland's certificate program in cosmetology is designed to provide specialized instruction and practical application for
employment in beauty salons. This program prepares students to successfully pass the Michigan State Board Exam, which is
required by law to practice cosmetology in Michigan. Job placement in this program is excellent. The courses are taught in
modern facilities utilizing cutting-edge equipment. Students wanting to continue in this program may pursue an Associate in
Applied Science – Salon Management degree after they obtain a license.
                       We welcome high school students into cosmetology programs.
Focus
  Course                      Title                   Cr          Course                       Title                     Cr
COS-12100     Cosmetology I                           2.5       COS-12900       Cosmetology IX                           2.5
COS-12200     Cosmetology II                          2.5       COS-13000       Cosmetology X                            2.5
COS-12300     Cosmetology III                         2.5       COS-13100       Cosmetology XI                           2.5
COS-12400     Cosmetology IV                          2.5       COS-13200       Cosmetology XII                          2.5
COS-12500     Cosmetology V                           2.5       COS-13300       Cosmetology XIII                         2.5
COS-12600     Cosmetology VI                          2.5       COS-13400       Cosmetology XIV                          2.5
COS-12700     Cosmetology VII                         2.5       COS-13500       Cosmetology XV                           2.5
COS-12800     Cosmetology VIII                        2.5       COS-13600       Cosmetology XVI                          2.5




COSMETOLOGY INSTRUCTOR
Certificate of Completion (CCIN1)                                                              Minimum Credits: 55

Introduction
Kirtland's Cosmetology Instructor program is designed to provide instruction and practice to become a cosmetology instructor.
The student must be a licensed cosmetology prior to entering the program. This program prepares students to pass the State of
Michigan State Exam for Cosmetology Instructors. The student must have a high school diploma or GED certificate in order to
take this exam. Students wanting to continue in this program may pursue an Associate in Applied Science – Salon Management
degree after they obtain a license.

                       We welcome high school students into cosmetology programs.
Focus
  Course                    Title                     Cr           Course                       Title                  Cr
COS-22100     Cosmetology Instructor I                2.5       COS-22500         Cosmetology Instructor V             2.5
COS-22200     Cosmetology Instructor II               2.5       COS-22600         Cosmetology Instructor VI            2.5
COS-22300     Cosmetology Instructor III              2.5       Kirtland Certificate – Cosmetology OR
COS-22400     Cosmetology Instructor IV               2.5       Current State of Michigan Cosmetology License           40
  NAIL TECHNICIAN
  Certificate of Completion (CNTC0)                                                                  Minimum Credits: 30
  Introduction: The Nail Technician program is designed to prepare the student to pass the Michigan State Board Exam, and for
  employable skills as a nail technician. Students wanting to continue in this program may pursue an Associate in Applied Science:
  Salon Management degree after they obtain a license. State of Michigan licensure exam may be taken after 400 contact hours.
                                We welcome high school students into cosmetology programs.
  Course                         Title                  Cr           Course                        Title                           Cr
ACC-12500 or     Computer Accounting/QuickBooks OR       4       COS-11600       Manicuring V                                      2.5
ACC-10600        Fundamental of Accounting
COS-11200        Manicuring I                           2.5      COS-11700       Manicuring VI                                     2.5
COS-11300        Manicuring II                          2.5      COS-17500       Salon Management                                   1
COS-11400        Manicuring III                         2.5      ENG-10000       Writing lab (if required)                         0-1
COS-11500        Manicuring IV                          2.5      ENG-10303       English Composition I                              3
                                                                                 Elective credits                                   7




  SKIN CARE TECHNICIAN
  Certificate of Completion (CSCT0)                                                                  Minimum Credits: 30
  Introduction: Kirtland’s certificate program in Skin Care (Esthetician) is designed to provide specialized instruction and
  practical application for employment. This program prepares students to successfully pass the Michigan State Board of
  Esthetician Exam, which is required to practice skin care in Michigan. State of Michigan licensure exam may be taken after 400
  contact hours of skin care (esthetician) courses. Job placement in this program is excellent. Students wanting to continue in this
  program may pursue an Associate in Applied Science: Salon Management degree after they obtain a license.
                                   We welcome high school students into cosmetology programs.

   Course                       Title                     Cr          Course                           Title                    Cr
  ACC-12500       Computer Accounting/QuickBooks          4         COS-14500         Skin Care V                               2.5
     or                          OR
  ACC-10600      Fundamentals of Accounting                4
  COS-14100      Skin Care I                              2.5       COS-14600         Skin Care VI                             2.5
  COS-14200      Skin Care II                             2.5       COS-17500         Salon Management                          1
  COS-14300      Skin Care III                            2.5       ENG-10000         Writing lab (if required)                0-1
  COS-14400      Skin Care IV                             2.5       ENG-10303         English Composition I                     3
                                                                                      Elective credits                          7
COSMETOLOGY
Associate in Applied Science (DSMN4)                                                            Minimum Credits: 60

Introduction
Kirtland's associate degree program in Cosmetology is designed to provide specialized instruction in practical application,
communication skills, and general knowledge for employment as a licensed cosmetologist. This program prepares students to
successfully pass the Michigan State Board of Cosmetology Exam. Job placement in this program is excellent. Students must
submit a copy of a current cosmetology license prior to completing this program. Students also have the opportunity to continue
their education by enrolling in the Cosmetology Instructor program after obtaining a license.

                        We welcome high school students into cosmetology programs.
 Course                        Title                   Cr           Course                        Title                  Cr
ACC-xxxxx      Any Accounting course                   0-4       Any 1 of 4 Kirtland Certificate – Cosmetology OR       30-55
BUS-10100      Introduction to Business                 3        Current Michigan Cosmetology License                    40
COS-17500      Salon Management                        0-1                        Elective credits as needed             0-4


                              Credits                                          Courses
    Subject Area              Needed                          (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications                 6-10       • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (0-1) (if required)
                                          • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (0-3)
                                          • ENG-10403 – English Composition II (3) OR
                                             OIS-10500 – Business Correspondence (3)
                                          • Any Speech course (3)
Humanities/Social Science        9        • Any Humanities elective (3)
                                          • Any social science course (3)
                                          • POL-10100 – Intro to American Government (3)
Math/Natural Science             8        • MTH-12000 – Intermediate Algebra (4) or higher
                                          • Any science with lab course (4)
                                                                                                                     C
            Certificates
                                                                                                                     R
            • Correctional Officer                                                                                   I
            Associate in Applied Science                                                                             M
            • Corrections Administration
            • Corrections Administration – Jail Administration                                                       I
            • Criminal Justice Administration
            • Criminal Justice Pre-Service                                                                           N
            Associate                                                                                                A
            • Criminal Justice – Generalist
                                                                                                                     L
                                    PARTNERSHIP PROGRAMS
            •     Police Academy – Alpena Community College
            •     Mid Michigan Community College                                                                     J
            •     North Central Michigan College
                                                                                                                     U
                                                                                                                     S
Foundation
Kirtland Community College recognizes the importance of students possessing basic academic skills in English,
reading, and mathematics in order to successfully complete college-level courses. Therefore, all entry-level
                                                                                                                     T
                                                                                                                     I
students are required to demonstrate their proficiency in basic academic skills. In the certificate programs there
are no English, reading, or mathematic requirements, however, these courses are the foundation for success in
all programs. The student’s advisor will indicate which of the following courses need to be taken based on
ACT scores or COMPASS placement testing results. It is highly recommended that students take these courses
during the first semester in order to prepare for the road ahead, as well as possibly satisfying prerequisites
                                                                                                                     C
needed for more advanced courses. Specific courses needed may be tracked below. Students must plan
additional time to complete their program requirements if placement results require them to begin with DEV           E
courses.

                ENG-10000 Writing Lab (if required)             Mathematics:____________________
                English:________________________                Reading: _______________________




                  For more information, please contact the Criminal Justice Department.
                  Shawn Kaniewski                                         989-275-5000, extension 283
                  Jerry Boerema                                           989-275-5000, extension 323
CORRECTIONAL OFFICER
Certificate of Completion (CCRR1)                                                                   Minimum Credits: 32

Introduction
The Correctional Officer certificate prepares graduates for jobs in a prison system as a corrections officer. This one- year certi-
ficate of completion incorporates the 15 semester hours of corrections, criminal justice, psychology, sociology, and human rela-
tions credits required by the Michigan Department of Corrections. All candidates must maintain a 2.0 cumulative GPA or better,
with a C or better in all criminal justice courses. A mandatory dress code is in effect for all students enrolled in the corrections
curriculum. Students have the opportunity to plan for transfer to a four-year college or university, and credits may be used toward
a corrections administration degree.

Prerequisites
Applicants admitted to this program must meet the following special entrance requirements: 1) have no felony convictions;
2) have a high school diploma or GED; 3) interview by appointment with a criminal justice advisor before entering the program;
4) provide personal background information and sign a release form to facilitate possible background investigation (information
and/or investigation may determine eligibility to enter the program); 5) sign and abide by the Criminal Justice Code of Conduct,
which includes mandatory dress code; 6) submit proof of a physical examination, if required.


  Course                        Title                    Cr          Course                         Title                       Cr
CJS-10000      Introduction to Criminal Justice          3         CJS-17000      Correctional Institutions & Facilities        3
CJS-10900      Introduction to Corrections               3         CJS-17103      Correctional Officer’s Report Writing         1
CJS-11000      Careers in Criminal Justice               1         CJS-17200      Client Relations in Corrections               3
CJS-11100      Legal Issues in Corrections               3         CJS-24000      Criminology                                   3
CJS-11200      Client Growth & Development               3         CJS-           CJS elective with advisor approval            3



                               Credits                                          Courses
    Subject Area               Needed                         (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications                   3         • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (1) (if required)
                                           • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)
Life Skills                        3       • CIS-10500 – Introduction to Computers (3)
CORRECTIONS ADMINISTRATION
Associate in Applied Science (DCRA0)                                                               Minimum Credits: 67

Introduction
The Corrections Administration program is concerned with all segments of the criminal justice system. The major emphasis is
placed on corrections history, development, sentencing, incarceration, community-based programs, diversion, probation, parole,
prisoner's rights, offender violence, supervision, and corrections of the future. Graduates are prepared for jobs within a prison
system. All candidates must maintain a 2.0 cumulative GPA or better, with a grade of C or better in all criminal justice courses.
A mandatory dress code is in effect for all students enrolled in the corrections curriculum. Students have the opportunity to plan
for transfer to a four-year college or university.

Prerequisites
Applicants admitted to this program must meet the following special entrance requirements: 1) have no felony convictions;
2) have a high school diploma or GED; 3) interview by appointment with a criminal justice advisor before entering the program;
4) provide personal background information and sign a release form to facilitate possible background investigation (information
and/or investigation may determine eligibility to enter the program); 5) sign and abide by the Criminal Justice Code of Conduct,
which includes mandatory dress code; 6) submit proof of a physical examination, if required.



  Course                        Title                   Cr           Course                          Title                    Cr
CJS-10000      Introduction to Criminal Justice         3         CJS-17200         Client Relations in Corrections           3
CJS-10900      Introduction to Corrections              3         CJS-20800         Criminal Justice Internship*              3
CJS-11000      Careers in Criminal Justice              1         CJS-21100         Narcotics Investigation                   3
CJS-11100      Legal Issues in Corrections              3         CJS-24000         Criminology                               3
CJS-11200      Client Growth & Development              3         CJS-27000         Community Based Corrections               3
CJS-17000      Correctional Institutions & Facilities   3         CJS-              One elective from below                   3
CJS-17103      Correctional Officer’s Report Writing    1

                                         and three credit hours from the following list:
CJS-10200      Physical Training I                       3        CJS-24500       Social Deviant Behavior                      3
CJS-10800      Firearms                                  3        CJS-28001       Institutional Jail/Prison Administration     3

Note: *Students may take up to nine credits in Criminal Justice Internship.


                               Credits                                           Courses
    Subject Area               Needed                           (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications                  9-10       • ENG-10403 – English Composition II (3) OR ENG-106 Technical Writing
                                           • SPE-10500 – Speech (3) OR SPE-11400 – Interpersonal Communication (3)
                                           • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (1) (if required)
                                           • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)
Humanities/Social Science         12       • POL-10100 – American Government (3)
                                           • PSY-10100 – Introduction to Psychology (3)
                                           • SOC-10100 - Introduction to Sociology (3)
                                           • Humanities elective (3)
Life Skills                          3     • CIS-10500 – Introduction to Computers (3) OR
                                             OIS-10401/2/3 – Keyboarding I A, B, & C (3)
Math/Natural Science                 8     • MTH-12000 – Intermediate Algebra (4) or higher
                                           • Science Elective (3) AND Lab (1)
CORRECTIONS ADMINISTRATION – JAILADMINISTRATION
Associate in Applied Science (DCRA1)                                                                Minimum Credits: 67

Introduction
The Corrections Administration - Jail Administration program is concerned with all segments of the criminal justice system. The
major emphasis is placed on a 160-hour Local Corrections Academy, dealing with booking, intake and release, suicide
awareness, report writing, prison behavior, correctional law, custody and security, PPCT defensive tactics, interpersonal
communication, fire and safety, cultural diversity, sexual harassment, ethics, and stress management. Graduates are prepared for
jobs within the local jail systems. All candidates must maintain a 2.0 cumulative GPA or better, with a grade of C or better in all
criminal justice courses. A mandatory dress code is in effect for all students enrolled in the corrections curriculum. Students have
the opportunity to plan for transfer to a four-year college or university.
Prerequisites
Applicants admitted to this program must meet the following special entrance requirements: 1) have no felony convictions;
2) have a high school diploma or GED; 3) interview by appointment with a criminal justice advisor before entering the program;
4) provide personal background information and sign a release form to facilitate possible background investigation (information
and/or investigation may determine eligibility to enter the program); 5) sign and abide by the Criminal Justice Code of Conduct,
which includes mandatory dress code; 6) submit proof of a physical examination, if required.



  Course                        Title                    Cr          Course                          Title                      Cr
CJS-10000      Introduction to Criminal Justice          3         CJS-21100        Narcotics Investigation                     3
CJS-10900      Introduction to Corrections               3         CJS-24000        Criminology                                 3
CJS-11000      Careers in Criminal Justice               1         CJS-26007        Corrections Academy                         10
CJS-17200      Client Relations in Corrections           3         CJS-27000        Community Based Corrections                 3
CJS-20800      Criminal Justice Internship*              3         CJS-             One elective from below

                                         and three credit hours from the following list:
CJS-10200      Physical Training I                       3        CJS-24500      Social Deviant Behavior                        3
CJS-10800      Firearms                                  3        CJS-28001      Institutional Jail/Prison Administration       3

Note: *Students may take up to nine credits in Criminal Justice Internship.



                               Credits                                           Courses
    Subject Area               Needed                           (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications                  9-10       • ENG-10403 – English Composition II (3) OR ENG-106 Technical Writing
                                           • SPE-10500 – Speech (3) OR SPE-11400 – Interpersonal Communication (3)
                                           • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (1) (if required)
                                           • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)
Humanities/Social Science         12       • POL-10100 – American Government (3)
                                           • PSY-10100 – Introduction to Psychology (3)
                                           • SOC-10100 - Introduction to Sociology (3)
                                           • Humanities elective (3)
Life Skills                          3     • CIS-10500 – Introduction to Computers (3) OR
                                             OIS-10401/2/3 – Keyboarding I A, B, & C (3)
Math/Natural Science                 8     • MTH-12000 – Intermediate Algebra (4) or higher
                                           • Science Elective (3) AND Lab (1)
CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION
Associate in Applied Science (DCJA0)                                                                Minimum Credits: 63

Introduction
Criminal Justice Administration is a program concerned with all branches of law enforcement - federal, state, local, and private
agencies - in crime prevention, law enforcement, detection and apprehension of criminals, deterrence of delinquency, corrections,
probation, and parole. Graduates are prepared for jobs in any law enforcement agency for positions other than a certified police
officer, i.e., corrections, dispatch, juvenile officer. All candidates must maintain a 2.0 cumulative GPA or better, with a grade of
C or better in all CJS courses. A mandatory dress code is in effect for all students enrolled in the criminal justice administration
curriculum. Students have the opportunity to plan for transfer to a four-year college or university, and credits may be used toward
a Corrections Administration degree. Students should contact a criminal justice advisor for further questions.

Prerequisites
Applicants admitted to this program must meet the following special entrance requirements: 1) have no felony convictions;
2) have a high school diploma or GED; 3) interview by appointment with a criminal justice advisor before entering the program;
4) must provide personal background information and sign a release form to facilitate possible background investigation
(information and/or investigation may determine eligibility to enter the program); 5) sign and abide by the Criminal Justice Code
of Conduct, which includes mandatory dress code; 6) submit proof of a physical examination, if required.



  Course                        Title                    Cr           Course                           Title                    Cr
CJS-10000      Introduction to Criminal Justice          3         CJS-20800         Criminal Justice Internship*                3
CJS-11000      Careers in Criminal Justice               1         CJS-24000         Criminology                                 3
CJS-17000      Correctional Institutions & Facilities    3         CJS-              18 hours of electives from below           18

                                         and 18 credit hours from the following list:
CJS-10200      Physical Training I                      3       CJS-17200       Client Relations in Corrections                  3
CJS-10800      Firearms                                 3       CJS-21100       Narcotics Investigation                          3
CJS-10900      Introduction to Corrections              3       CJS-24500       Social Deviant Behavior                          3
CJS-11100      Legal Issues in Corrections              3       CJS-27000       Community Based Corrections                      3
CJS-11200      Client Growth & Development              3       CJS-28001       Institutional Jail/Prison Administration         3
CJS-17103      Correctional Officer’s Report Writing    1

Note: *Students may take up to nine credits in Criminal Justice Internship.



                               Credits                                           Courses
    Subject Area               Needed                           (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications                  9-10       • ENG-10403 – English Composition II (3) OR ENG-106 Technical Writing
                                           • SPE-10500 – Speech (3) OR SPE-11400 – Interpersonal Communication (3)
                                           • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (0-1) (if required)
                                           • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)
Humanities/Social Science         12       • POL-10100 – American Government (3)
                                           • PSY-10100 – Introduction to Psychology (3)
                                           • SOC-10100 - Introduction to Sociology (3)
                                           • Humanities OR Social Science elective (3)
Life Skills                        3       • CIS-10500 – Introduction to Computers (3) OR
                                               OIS-10401/2/3 – Keyboarding I A, B, & C (3)
Math/Natural Science               8       • MTH-12000 – Intermediate Algebra (4) or higher
                                           • Science Elective (3) AND Lab (1)
CRIMINAL JUSTICE PRE-SERVICE
Associate in Applied Science (DCJP0)                                                               Minimum Credits: 69

Introduction
Criminal Justice Pre-Service is a program leading to certification by the Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards
(MCOLES). Upon completion of Police Academy and successfully passing a mastery exam administered by MCOLES, students
will be eligible for employment as law enforcement officers in most police agencies in Michigan and some other states.
Candidates in this program must maintain a GPA of 2.0 or better, with a C or better in all criminal justice courses. A mandatory
dress code is in effect for all students enrolled in the criminal justice curriculum. Students have the opportunity to plan for
transfer to a four-year college or university, and credits may also be used toward the criminal justice administration degree.

Prerequisites
Applicants admitted to the Pre-Service program must be qualified according to the rules and regulations of MCOLES and follow
their policies and procedures. This program has special entrance requirements: 1) possess a valid Michigan motor vehicle
operator's or chauffeur's license; 2) have no felony convictions; 3) have a high school diploma or GED; 4) interview by appoint-
ment with a criminal justice advisor before entering the program; 5) provide personal background information and sign a release
form to facilitate possible background investigation (information and/or investigation may determine eligibility to enter the
program); 6) sign and abide by the Criminal Justice Code of Conduct, which includes mandatory dress code; 7) have a physical
examination before enrolling in Physical Training class; 8) successfully complete the MCOLES literacy and physical agility
exams before entering Police Academy. A complete physical examination and hearing and vision tests are also required prior to
entering the Police Academy.


  Course                        Title                    Cr           Course                        Title                      Cr
CJS-10000      Introduction to Criminal Justice          3         CJS-24000        Criminology                                3
CJS-10200      Physical Training I                       3         CJS-24500        Social Deviant Behavior                    3
CJS-11000      Careers in Criminal Justice               1         CJS-26600        Police Academy                             21
CJS-20800      Criminal Justice Internship               3


  Subject Area             Credits                         Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications              9-10          • ENG-10403 - English Composition II (3) OR ENG-10602 – Tech Report Writing (3)
                                          • SPE-10500 – Speech OR SPE-11400 – Interpersonal Communication(3)
                                          • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (1) (if required)
                                          • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)
Humanities/Social             12          • POL-10100 – American Government (3)
Science                                   • PSY-10100 – Introduction to Psychology (3)
                                          • SOC-10100 - Introduction to Sociology (3)
                                          • PSY-20200 – Abnormal Psychology (3)
Life Skills                    3          • CIS-10500 – Introduction to Computers (3) OR
                                            OIS-10401/2/3 – Keyboarding I A, B, & C (3)
Math/Natural                   8          • MTH-12000 – Intermediate Algebra (4) or higher
Science                                   • Science Elective (3) AND Lab (1)

POLICE ACADEMY
The Academy is a 17-week, 40-hour per week, MCOLES (Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards) certified
program that covers the following: Investigation - Introduction to investigation, substantive criminal law, criminal procedure,
investigation, court functions and civil law, crime scene process, special investigation, and investigation of domestic violence;
Patrol Procedures - Patrol operations, interpersonal relations and conflict mediation, patrol techniques, report writing, and
juveniles; Detention and Prosecution - Receiving and booking process, case prosecution, and civil process; Police Skills - First
aid, firearms, police physical skills, and emergency vehicle operation; Traffic - Motor vehicle law, vehicle stops, traffic control
and enforcement, operating under the influence of liquor, and motor vehicle traffic crash investigation; Special Operations -
Emergency preparedness/disaster control, civil disorders, and tactical operations.

Note: *Students should refer to the pages after the Generalist degree for more information about articulation agreements that are
in place with other colleges.
ASSOCIATE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE - GENERALIST
(DCJG0)                                                                                             Minimum Credits: 60

Introduction
The Associate in Criminal Justice - Generalist degree is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or
university, and to help students transferring in from other colleges to meet requirements for entry into the Kirtland Regional
Police Academy.
Students planning to transfer to a four-year college or university must consult with their advisor and carefully study the require-
ments of the four-year institution from which they intend to secure a bachelor's degree. Appropriate course substitutions may be
made upon the recommendation of a student's advisor and with approval of the appropriate dean or associate dean. Substitutions
are only made in accordance with the specific requirements of the baccalaureate degree-granting institution to which the student
intends to transfer.
Students who have previously attended other colleges or universities may apply earned transfer credit in subject areas (i.e.
psychology elective, biology elective, etc.) where deemed appropriate. This degree satisfies the requirements of the MACRAO
Transfer Agreement as defined in the handbook section of this catalog.
Prerequisites
Applicants admitted to the Criminal Justice - Generalist program must meet the following special entrance requirements:
1) possess a valid Michigan motor vehicle operator’s or chauffeur’s license; 2) have no felony convictions; 3) have a high school
diploma or GED; 4) interview by appointment with a criminal justice advisor before entering the program; 5) provide personal
background information and sign release form to facilitate possible background investigation (information and/or investigation
may determine eligibility to enter the program); 6) sign and abide by Criminal Justice Code of Conduct, which includes a
mandatory dress code; 7) pass a physical examination before enrolling in physical training class.


   Course                         Title                  Cr           Course                        Title                    Cr
CJS-10000         Introduction to Criminal Justice       3         CJS-              Criminal Justice electives with
CJS-24000         Criminology OR                                                      advisor approval                       0-4
 SOC-24000        Criminology OR
                  Substitution approved by advisor        3


 Subject Area        Credits                            Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications        12-13      • CIS-10500 – Introduction to Computers (3)*
                                 • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (1) (if required)
                                 • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)*
                                 • ENG-10403 - English Composition II (3)*
                                 • SPE-10500 – Fund. of Speech (3)* OR SPE-11400 – Interpersonal Communication (3)*
Humanities            11-12      • Select 2-3 credits from Art, Music, or Theater.*
                                 • Select 3 credits from Journalism, Languages, or Literature. *
                                 • HIS-10500 – World Societies to 1500 (3)* OR
                                   HIS-10600 – World Societies Since 1500 (3)* OR
                                   HIS-20100 – US History to 1865 (3)* OR
                                   HIS-20200 – US History Since 1865 (3)* OR
                                   HIS-20300 – Michigan History (3)*
                                 • PHL-20100 – Intro to Philosophy (3)* OR PHL-21000 – Intro to Ethics (3)*
Social Science        15-16      • POL-10100 – American Government (3)*
                                 • GEO-10000 – World Geography (4)* OR
                                   POL-20000 – International Relations (3)* OR
                                   POL-20100 – Comparative Government* (3)
                                 • SOC-10100 – Introduction to Sociology (3)*
                                 • PSY-10100 – Introduction to Psychology (3)*
                                 • PSY-20200 – Abnormal Psychology (3)
Math/Natural          12-14      • MTH-13000 – College Algebra (4)* or higher (excluding MTH-20500 and MTH-20600)
Science                          • Select two science courses with a lab from BIO, CHE, GEL, or PHY (8-10)*
* Courses that meet General Education Core Competencies

Note: Students must maintain a GPA of 2.0 or better, and a grade of “C” or better in all criminal justice courses.
POLICE ACADEMY
3 + 1 Transfer Agreement – Alpena Community College
3 + 1 Transfer Agreement – Mid Michigan Community College
3 + 1 Transfer Agreement – North Central Michigan College


                                                   PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM


Alpena Community College                                                           Kirtland Community College
Contact: Michael Roy                                                 Contact: Jerry Boerema or Shawn Kaniewski
989-358-7208                                                                         989-275-5000, extension 323
roym@ns.alpena.cc.mi.us                                                                   boeremaj@kirtland.edu

Mid Michigan Community College
Contact: Barney Ledford
989-773-6622, ext. 230
bledford.@midmich.edu

North Central Michigan College
Contact: James Carter
Phone # 231-439-6379
jcart@ncmc.cc.mi.us

Articulation agreements allow criminal justice students at Alpena Community College, Mid Michigan Community College, and
North Central Michigan College to complete their general education and prerequisites at any of the three schools and then
transfer to Kirtland for the police academy program. Upon completion, the student’s academy credits are transferred back to
their home institution, which then issues the appropriate associate degree.

Benefits for the students include the following:

•    Students in the Harrison/Mt. Pleasant, Alpena, and Petoskey areas may complete their general education and prerequisite
     courses in their home area.
•    Alpena Community College, Mid Michigan Community College, and North Central Michigan College students who are
     accepted into the police academy will pay Kirtland’s in-district tuition rates.

Students should contact those listed for specific program information.
                                                                                                                          E
                                                                                                                          D
                          Associate in Applied Science
                                                                                                                          U
                          •    Paraprofessional                                                                           C
                                                                                                                          A
                          Associate in Teaching
                                                                                                                          T
                                                                                                                          I
                                                                                                                          O
                                                                                                                          N
Foundation
Kirtland Community College recognizes the importance of students possessing basic academic skills in English, reading, and
mathematics in order to successfully complete college-level courses. Therefore, all entry-level students are required to
demonstrate their proficiency in basic academic skills. In the certificate programs there are no English, reading, or mathematic
requirements, however, these courses are the foundation for success in all programs. The student’s advisor will indicate which of
the following courses need to be taken based on ACT scores or COMPASS placement testing results. It is highly recommended
that students take these courses during the first semester in order to prepare for the road ahead, as well as possibly satisfying
prerequisites needed for more advanced courses. Specific courses needed may be tracked below. Students must plan additional
time to complete their program requirements if placement results require them to begin with DEV courses.

              ENG-10000 Writing Lab (if required)                       Mathematics:____________________
              English:________________________                          Reading: _______________________




                        For more information, please contact the Education advisors.

   Don Dyer                              Paraprofessional AAS                   989-275-5000, extension 231
   Denise Kemp                           Associate in Teaching              989-275-5000, extension 391 & 290
   Marcell Romancky
PARAPROFESSIONAL
Associate in Applied Science (DPRO0)                                                                 Minimum Credits: 60

Introduction
Most paraprofessionals who work in schools who receive Title I funds are now required to complete an associate's degree or two
years of study at an institution of higher learning, and/or pass a formal assessment to demonstrate knowledge and ability to assist
in reading, writing, and mathematics instruction. There are many different associate degrees at Kirtland from which a student
may select, but this program is tailored to those who want to focus primarily on courses that will provide direct benefit on the job.

    Subject Area                Credits                       Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications                   9-10      • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (0-1) (if required)
                                           • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)
                                           • ENG-10403, English Comp II (3)
                                           • Any speech course (3)
Education                          6       • EDU-10000 – Introduction to Teaching (3)
                                           • EDU-24000 – Technology in Education (3)
Humanities/Social Science          9       • - - - - - - - - Humanities Elective (3)
                                           • PSY-10100 – Introduction to Psychology (3)
                                           • POL-10100 – Intro to American Government (3)
Life Skills                        3       • CIS-10500 – Introduction to Computers (3)
Math/Natural Science             14-15     • MTH-12000 – Intermediate Algebra or higher (4)
                                           • MTH-11700 – Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I (3)
                                           • MTH-21700 – Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II (3)
                                           • One science course with a lab (4-5)

    Students must also complete the elective courses below. Please see an advisor for assistance selecting your program
                                                         electives.
             A maximum of three credits in Physical Education courses can be used to meet degree requirements.

             Course                                                     Title                                              Cr
            Electives               Electives – Select any 100-level or higher courses*                                   16-17
 ASSOCIATE IN TEACHING
 (DATG0)                                                                                         Minimum Credits: 60

 Introduction
 The following program will prepare students who plan to be an elementary or secondary teacher. The program is designed for
 students who will be transferring to nearby universities to earn a bachelors degree in teaching. Students should identify which
 university they plan to transfer to and meet with an advisor from that university during their freshman year at Kirtland
 Community College. With curriculum information from the university, the student’s Kirtland advisor can customize the
 students’ freshman and sophomore schedule to best select the appropriate transfer courses. There may be substitutions to the
 curriculum below depending on the major, minor, university, and level of teaching targeted. You must meet with Marcell
 Romancky and Denise Kemp, they are designated advisors at Kirtland Community College that can help students who are
 planning to become school teachers.


      Subject Area             Credits                   Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
  Communications                9-10      • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (1) (if required)
                                          • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)
                                          • ENG-10403 – English Composition II (3)
                                          • SPE-10500 – Fundamentals of Speech (3) OR
                                              SPE-11400 – Intro to Interpersonal & Public Communication (3)
  Education                       6       • EDU-10000 – Introduction to Teaching (3)
                                          • EDU-24000 – Technology in Education (3)
  Humanities/Social Science       26      • ENG-23000 – American Literature before 1865 (3) OR
                                             ENG-23100 – American Literature after 1865 (3)
                                          • FRE-11000 – French I (4) OR
                                             SPN-11000 – Spanish I (4)
                                          • GEO-10000 – World Geography (4)
                                          • HIS-20100 – United States History to 1865 (3) OR
                                             HIS-20200 – United States History since 1865 (3)
                                          • MUS-10100 – Music History (3)
                                          • PHL-21000 – Introduction to Ethics (3)
                                          • POL-10100 – Introduction to American Government (3)
                                          • PSY-10100 – Introduction to Psychology (3)
  Life Skills                     3       • CIS-10500 – Introduction to Computers (3)
  Math/Natural Science            13      • MTH-12000 – Intermediate Algebra (4)
                                          • AST-10201 – Astronomy I (3) AND AST-10202 – Astronomy I lab (2)
                                          • BIO-10100 – General Biology (4)


              Select one option from below to complete the degree specialization you are seeking:

           Elementary Education Option                                          Secondary Education Option
  Course                         Title                    Cr          Course                        Title                     Cr
MTH-11700       Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I     3         MTH-13000        College Algebra or higher                4
MTH-21700       Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II    3
                                                                                                                              H
                                                                                                                              E
               Special Certificates
               • Basic Emergency Medical Technician
                                                                                                                              A
               Certificates                                                                                                   L
               • Massage Therapy
               • Paramedic
                                                                                                                              T
               • Practical Nursing – Level I (Full and Part Time programs)                                                    H
               Associate in Applied Science
               • Emergency Medical Services (Paramedic)                                                                       C
               • Massage Therapy
               • Nursing – Level II (Full and Part Time programs)                                                             A
                                                                                                                              R
                                  PARTNERSHIP PROGRAMS
               Associate in Applied Science                                                                                   E
               • RN from LPN/LVN – Monroe County CC & Kalamazoo Valley CC
               • Radiography – Mid Michigan Community College                                                                 E
               • Cardiovascular Sonography – Michigan School of Cardiovascular
                  Sonography
                                                                                                                              R
Foundation
                                                                                                                              S
Kirtland Community College recognizes the importance of students possessing basic academic skills in English,
reading, and mathematics in order to successfully complete college-level courses. Therefore, all entry-level
students are required to demonstrate their proficiency in basic academic skills. In the certificate programs there
are no English, reading, or
mathematic requirements, however, these courses are the foundation for success in all programs. The student’s advisor will
indicate which of the following courses need to be taken based on ACT scores or COMPASS placement testing results. It is
highly recommended that students take these courses during the first semester in order to prepare for the road ahead, as well as
possibly satisfying prerequisites needed for more advanced courses. Specific courses needed may be tracked below. Students
must plan additional time to complete their program requirements if placement results require them to begin with DEV courses.

              ENG-10000 Writing Lab (if required)                       Mathematics:____________________
              English:________________________                          Reading: _______________________




                  For more information, please contact the Health Careers Department.
               Anne Essmaker                                              989.275.5000, extension 372
               Karen Brown                                                989.275.5000, extension 298
               Bobbie Otwell (for Sonography)                             989.705.3605
BASIC EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN (EMT)
Special Certificate (SEMT0)                                                                        Minimum Credits: 10

Introduction
The Basic EMT Certification program covers all basic techniques in emergency medical care within the responsibilities of the
Basic Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) as a first responder and basic life supporter. Upon successful completion of this
program, the student will be eligible to take the national certification examination, which is required to obtain a state license.
Students wanting to continue in this program may pursue the Certificate - Paramedic or the Associate in Applied Science –
Emergency Medical Services (Paramedic) degrees.

The following course is the only required course in this program.

                                   Course                        Title                      Cr
                                  ALH-21701       Basic Emergency Medical Technician        10

Notes:
•   Conviction for some criminal offenses may render a candidate ineligible for taking the national certification examination.
•   There are abilities (with or without accommodation) that a student in this program must have. A list of these abilities can be
    obtained from the health careers advisor. Based on history and physical examination findings, and these required abilities, a
    recommendation from a health care provider is required prior to beginning the program.
•   Students are required to complete all required courses with a grade of “C” or better.




PARAMEDIC
Certificate of Completion (CPAR0)                                                                  Minimum Credits: 52

Introduction
The Paramedic program is designed to provide basic knowledge and skills training necessary for entry-level positions as
paramedics in advanced life support and transport. Following successful completion of this program, students are eligible to take
the national certification examination for paramedics, which is required to obtain a state license. Students wanting to continue in
this program may pursue the Associate in Applied Science – Emergency Medical Services (Paramedic) degree.

Prerequisites
Students must have completed the Basic EMT program and be eligible for licensure, or have current valid State of Michigan
Basic EMT license.

Some of the courses listed may have prerequisites (listed in the course description section of the catalog). Therefore, students
should consult advisors for assistance in planning course schedules.

 Course                         Title                    Cr           Course                         Title                    Cr
ALH-21500      Paramedic I                               13         ALH-24500       Paramedic IV                               7
ALH-22500      Paramedic II                              13         ENG-10000       Writing Lab (if required)                 0-1
ALH-23500      Paramedic III                             16         ENG-10303       English Composition I w/Computer           3

Notes:
•   Conviction for some criminal offenses may render a candidate ineligible for taking the national certification examination.
•   There are abilities (with or without accommodation) that a student in this program must have. A list of these abilities can be
    obtained from the health careers advisor.
•   Students are required to complete all required courses with a “C” or better.



FOR ADVISING IN THE ABOVE PROGRAMS PLEASE CALL ANNE ESSMAKER (989) 275-5000, EXT 372
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES
Associate in Applied Science (DEMS0)                                                               Minimum Credits: 60

Introduction
The Associate in Applied Science degree in Emergency Medical Services (E.M.S.) is designed to prepare students for entry-level
positions as paramedics while providing a solid basis for continued professional growth and career mobility. This program will
provide students with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to function as an advanced emergency care provider, as well as
give them additional education that will prepare them for advancement in EMS or in another related health field, such as nursing.
Following successful completion of this program, students are eligible to take the national certification examination for
paramedic.

Prerequisites
Students must have completed the Basic EMT program and be eligible for licensure, or have current valid State of Michigan
Basic EMT license.



  Course                       Title                    Cr           Course                          Title                    Cr
ALH-10101      Medical Terminology                      2         ENG-10403           English Composition II                  3
ALH-11201      Medical Ethics & Law                     1         POL-10100           Intro to American Government            3
BIO-10700      Essentials of Anatomy &                  4         MTH-12000           Intermediate Algebra or higher          4
               Physiology
               Current Paramedic License               31         PSY-10100           Introduction to Psychology               3
ENG-10000      Writing Lab (if required)               0-1        SPE-----            Any speech course                        3
ENG-10303      English Composition I                                                  Any humanities                           3
                                                        3
               w/Computers



Notes:
•   Conviction for some criminal offenses may render a candidate ineligible for taking the national certification examination.
•   There are abilities (with or without accommodation) that a student in this program must have. A list of these abilities can be
    obtained from the health careers advisor
•   Students are required to complete all required courses with a grade of “C” or better.




FOR ADVISING IN THE ABOVE PROGRAM PLEASE CALL ANNE ESSMAKER (989) 275-5000, EXT 372
MASSAGE THERAPY
Certificate of Completion (CMAS0)                                                                Minimum Credits: 39.5

Introduction
The Kirtland Community College Massage Therapy program is dedicated to advancing the science and art of massage therapy.
Students completing the program will be prepared to practice massage therapy and to register for the National Certification
Examination for Professional Massage and Bodywork. A minimum of 41.5 credit hours and 664 contact hours are required.
Students wanting to continue in this program may pursue the Associate in Applied Science – Massage Therapy degree.

Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete the prerequisite courses in Semester I – Fall, before being admitted to the
program.

Courses that are marked with an asterisk (*) below may be taken in any of the four semesters, as long as the student takes the
prerequisite general education courses first (i.e., BIO-10700 before ALH-10801).
  Course                      Title                      Cr           Course                        Title                        Cr
     Semester I – Fall (Prerequisites to program)                                    Semester III – Summer
ALH-10101     Medical Terminology                        2         MAS-12200        Clinic I                                     2
BIO-10701     Essentials of Anatomy/Physiology           3         MAS-13004        Topics I                                     1
BIO-10702     Essentials of Anato/Physiology Lab         1         MAS-12401        Structural Based Bodywork II                 3
MAS-10000     Introduction to Massage Therapy            1         MAS-13005        Topics II                                    1
                  Semester II – Winter                                                  Semester IV – Fall
MAS-10200       Introduction to Clinic Operations         1        ALH-11201        Medical Ethics & Law*                         1
MAS-10300       Swedish Massage I                         2        MAS-12500        Structural Based Bodywork III                 1
MAS-10400       Swedish Massage II                        2        MAS-12600        Energy Based Bodywork I                       2
MAS-11000       Massage Skills Lab                        1        MAS-12700        Energy Based Bodywork II                      2
MAS-12801       Integrated Structural Dynamics            2        MAS-13100        Clinic II                                     2
MAS-12300       Structural Based Bodywork I               1        MAS-13200        Internship                                   1.5
ALH-10801       Pathology*                                3        ALH-20201        Standard First Aid* or current First          1
                                                                                    Aid & CPR Cards
                                                                   ENG-10000        Writing Lab (if required) *                  0-1
                                                                   ENG-10303        English Composition I *                       3

Notes:
•   There are abilities (with or without accommodation) that a student in this program must have. A list of these abilities can be
    obtained from the health careers advisor. Based on history and physical examination findings, and these required abilities, a
    recommendation from a health care provider is required prior to beginning the program.
•   Students are required to complete all required courses with a grade of C or better.
•   A student must be at least 18 years old by Semester II.
•   An authorization for release of information with regard to criminal history is required.




FOR ADVISING IN THE ABOVE PROGRAM PLEASE CALL ANNE ESSMAKER (989) 275-5000, EXT 372
MASSAGE THERAPY
Associate in Applied Science (DMAS0)                                                           Minimum Credits:              63.5

Introduction
Kirtland's Massage Therapy program is dedicated to advancing the science and art of massage therapy. Students completing the
program will be prepared to practice massage therapy and to register for the National Certification Examination for Professional
Massage and Bodywork. A minimum of 61.5 credit hours and 1,048 contact hours are required.

Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete the prerequisite courses in Semester I – Fall, before being admitted to the
program.


     Course                      Title                   Cr            Course                           Title                    Cr
    Semester I – Fall (Prerequisites to the program)                                  Semester III – Summer
ALH-10101        Medical Terminology                      2         MAS-12200         Clinic I                                   2
BIO-10701        Essentials of Anatomy/Physiology         3         MAS-13004         Topics I                                   1
BIO-10702        Essentials of Anat/Physiology Lab        1         MAS-12401         Structural Based Bodywork II               3
MAS-10000        Introduction to Massage Therapy          1         MAS-13005         Topics II                                  1
                  Semester II – Winter                                                    Semester IV - Fall
MAS-10200        Introduction to Clinic Operations        1         MAS-12500         Structural Based Bodywork III              1
MAS-10300        Swedish Massage I                        2         MAS-12600         Energy Based Bodywork I                    2
MAS-10400        Swedish Massage II                       2         MAS-12700         Energy Based Bodywork II                   2
MAS-11000        Massage Skills Lab                       1         MAS-13100         Clinic II                                  2
MAS-12801        Integrated Structural Dynamics           2         MAS-13200         Internship                                1.5
MAS-12300        Structural Based Bodywork I              1

The following courses are also required for this degree and may be taken in any of the four semesters, as long as the student takes
the prerequisite general education courses first (i.e., ENG-10303 before ENG-10403).
                           Course                                 Title                           Cr
                       ALH-10801                Pathology                                         3
                       ALH-11201                Medical Ethics & Law                              1
                       ALH-20201                Standard First Aid or current First Aid           1
                                                and CPR cards
                       BUS-10100                Introduction to Business                           3
                       CIS-10500                Introduction to Computers                          3
                       ENG-10303                English Composition I                              3
                       ENG-10000                Writing lab (if needed)                           0-1
                       ENG-10403                English Composition II                             3
                       MTH-12000                Intermediate Algebra or competency                 4
                       POL-10101                Intro to American Government                       3
                       PSY-10100                Introduction to Psychology                         3
                                                Any Humanities Elective                            3
                                                Any Speech Course                                  3

Notes:
•     There are abilities (with or without accommodation) that a student in this program must have. A list of these abilities can be
      obtained from the health careers advisor. Based on history and physical examination findings, and these required abilities, a
      recommendation from a health care provider is required prior to beginning the program.
•     Students are required to complete all required courses with a grade of “C” or better.
•     A student must be at least 18 years old by Semester II.




FOR ADVISING IN THE ABOVE PROGRAM PLEASE CALL ANNE ESSMAKER (989) 275-5000, EXT 372
PRACTICAL NURSING – LEVEL I
Certificate of Completion (CLPN0)                                                                   Minimum Credits: 40
Introduction: The Level I Nursing program at Kirtland is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions as practical
nurses. Following successful completion of this program, graduates are eligible to take the licensure exam to practice as a
Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN). The program is also designed to provide career mobility and a foundation for continued learning
by serving as the first year of the associate degree nursing program. Students can attend school and complete the nursing program
on a part- or full-time basis. The program must be completed within two years after beginning the nursing courses. Programs are
offered at the Central campus in Roscommon and the M-TECSM campus in Gaylord.
Each class of nursing students is considered a cohort (group) and courses/schedules are assigned. Students must consult with the
health careers advisor before making any schedule changes or changing from full-time to part-time.
Admission Requirements - Practical Nursing - Level I: Applicants must be granted regular admission to Kirtland, and meet
the following requirements to be considered for admission to the Practical Nursing program:
• Demonstrate proficiency in basic academic skills in writing, reading, and mathematics. If placement testing indicates that
   developmental writing and/or reading courses must be taken by the student, then such courses must be completed successfully
   with an “SC” or better unless otherwise noted.
• Computer skills are essential to program success (internet, email, word processing).
• Successfully complete all required prerequisite courses with grade of “C” or better, except where noted.
• Students requesting admission to the program must submit a Request for Admission to Nursing form, available in Health
   Careers and Student Services, and turn it into the Health Careers office between January 1 and March 1 of the calendar year in
   which the student is requesting admission to the nursing program. Acceptance letters will be mailed by the first week of June.
• If applicants exceed the number of available seats in the program, priority will be given to students with required prerequisites
   and general education courses completed, then by date of program application.
 Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete the following courses before being admitted to the nursing program.
  Course                        Title                Cr             Course                      Title                Cr
ALH-10101       Medical Terminology                   2
ALH-20201       Standard First Aid (taken just prior 0-1          ALH-12401 Lifetime Wellness & Nutrition             2
                to program OR substitute                          DEV-07300 Basic Algebra or competency              0-4
                professional CPR taken within 3                   ENG-10000 Writing Lab (if required)                0-1
                months prior to start of clinical)                ENG-10303 English Composition I/Computers           3
BIO-10701/2 Essentials of Anatomy &                  3/1          BIO-11500      Anatomy & Physiology I AND           8
                Physiology AND Lab (with grade              OR     BIO-11600 Anatomy & Physiology II (with
                of “B” or better)                                                grade of “B” or better)
  Course                       Title                     Cr          Course                         Title                Cr
                    Semester I – Fall                              NUR-12800       Maternal-Child Nursing Care           2
NUR-10300      Nursing Essentials                         2        NUR-20900       Pharmacology II                       2
NUR-10900      Pharmacology I                             2                          Semester III – Summer
NUR-10502      Foundations of Nursing                     3        NUR-13302       Current Issues in Nursing             1
NUR-10700      Mental Health Concepts                     1        NUR-13402       Nursing Clinical III                  2
NUR-10803      Nursing Practice Lab                       3                          PART-TIME OPTION
NUR-10804      Nursing Clinical I                         2        Students also have the option of completing this program
                  Semester II - Winter                             on a part-time basis in five semesters. Information about
NUR-12304      Nursing Clinical II                        5        the semester sequence for part-time students is available
NUR-12503      Adult Medical-Surgical Nursing             4        from the health careers advisor.
Notes
•   Conviction for some criminal offenses may render a candidate ineligible for writing the examination (NCLEX-PN) for state
    licensure.
•   Felony convictions and misdemeanor convictions involving abuse or neglect of vulnerable populations will prohibit
    admission to clinical agencies which is a requirement of the nursing program.
•   There are abilities (with or without accommodation) that a student in this program must have. A list of these abilities can be
    obtained from the health careers advisor. Based on history and physical examination findings, and these required abilities, a
    recommendation from a health care provider is required prior to beginning the program.
•   Professional provider CPR certification must be obtained no earlier than three months prior to the start of the first clinical
    semester.
•   The above information is applicable for students entering the nursing program in the 2005/2006 school year. Students
    entering the program in future years will be subject to the requirements outlined in the applicable catalog.
•   A minimum grade of “C+” is required on all nursing program courses.
ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN NURSING – LEVEL II
Associate in Applied Science (DADN1)                                                                        Minimum Credits: 69
Introduction: The Associate in Applied Science in Nursing program is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions as
registered nurses and to provide continued learning and career mobility in nursing for licensed practical nurses. The Associate in Applied
Science in Nursing Program is the Level I (practical nursing) plus the Level II program.
Graduates of Level I must have earned a 3.0 or higher G.P.A. in prerequisite and Level I course work to be considered for admission into
the Level II program. Students can attend school and complete the Level II program on a full- or part-time basis; however, once the
program has begun, it must be completed within two years. Following successful completion of Level II, graduates are eligible to take
the licensure exam to practice as a Registered Nurse (RN). Each class of nursing students is considered a cohort (group) and
courses/schedules are assigned. Students must consult with the health careers advisor before making any schedule changes or changing
from full-time to part-time. Graduates of Level II program are qualified to enter the many B.S.N. completion programs available.
Admission Requirements Associate Degree Nursing - Level II: Applicants must be granted regular admission to Kirtland and meet the
following requirements to be considered for admission to the Associate Degree Nursing program:
•    Submit official transcripts demonstrating successful completion of an approved practical nursing program within the last three
     years. The applicant who graduated more than three years ago must demonstrate 12 months of clinical experience in an acute or
     skilled care setting within the last three years or successfully complete the Foundations of Nursing (NUR-10502) and/or satis-
     factorily complete Nursing Skills Lab (NUR-106--) and/or Nursing Seminar (NUR-255--) within the last academic year.
•    Computer skills are essential to program success (internet, email, word processing).
•    Students requesting admission to the program must submit a Request for Admission to Nursing form, available in Health Careers
     and Student Services, and turn it into the Health Careers office between January 1 and March 1 of the calendar year in which the
     student is requesting admission to the nursing program. Acceptance letters will be mailed by the first week of June.
•    Successfully complete all prerequisite courses with a grade of C or better except where noted.
    Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete the following courses before being admitted to the level II nursing
                                                         program.
     Course                            Title                         Cr         Course                           Title                    Cr
                                                                     20       BIO-11600         Anatomy & Physiology II (B or better)      4
    Successful completion (GPA 3.0 or higher) of Level I or
                                                                     *        BIO-21500         Pathophysiology                            4
    other Practical Nursing program with Experience
                                                                              ENG-10403         English Composition II                     3
ALH-12401           Lifetime Wellness/Nutrition OR                   1-2      MTH-10100         Finite Math OR competency **              0-4
 NUR-25508          Nursing Wellness Seminar (if approved                     POL-10100         Introduction to Government                 3
                    Nutrition course completed or KCC
                    Level I Graduate prior to 2001)                           PSY-10100       Introduction to Psychology                   3
BIO-11500           Anatomy & Physiology I (B or better)             4        ALH-20201 or Professional provider CPR taken within          1
                                                                              3 months of program
       *Students with current LPN licenses may be granted 20 credits toward this program upon presentation of their license.
      **Beginning Fall 2008, MTH-12000 Intermediate Algebra OR competency, three credit of humanities, and three credits of speech are
      required.
    Course                         Title                       Cr             Course                            Title                    Cr
                        Semester I – Fall                                  NUR-22300         Adult Nursing Clinical                       5
NUR-22001        Nursing Assessment                             3          NUR-25201         Professional Practice                        2
NUR-23200        Family Centered Pediatrics                     2
NUR-24201        Community Mental Health Nursing                2
NUR-24302        Community Mental Health Clinical              1.5
NUR-24600        Nursing Care of Women & Families               2                              PART-TIME OPTION
NUR-24900        Pediatric/Women’s Health Clinical 2           1.5         Students also have the option of completing this program on a
                     Semester II – Winter                                  part-time basis in six semesters. Information about the
NUR-21400        Nursing Pharmacology                           2          semester sequence for part-time students is available from the
NUR-22201        Critical Thinking in Adult Care                5          health careers advisor. Program work must be completed
                                                                           within two years.
Notes:
•     Conviction for some criminal offenses may render a candidate ineligible for writing the examination (NCLEX-RN) for state
      licensure.
•     Felony convictions and misdemeanor convictions involving abuse or neglect of vulnerable populations will prohibit admission to
      clinical agencies which is a requirement of the nursing program.
•     There are abilities (with or without accommodation) that a student in this program must have. A list of these abilities can be
      obtained from the health careers advisor. Based on history and physical examination findings, and these required abilities, a
      recommendation from a health care provider is required prior to beginning the program.
•     Professional provider CPR certification must be obtained no earlier than three months prior to the start of the first clinical semester.
•     A minimum grade of “C+” is required on all nursing program courses.
RN FROM LPN/LVN
Associate in Applied Science (DADN2)                                                                   Minimum Credits: 75
                                              PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
                             Michigan Community College Virtual Learning Collaborative
   This program was developed by colleges participating in the Michigan Community College Virtual Learning Collaborative
                      (MCCVLC). Some of the courses are available only through online instruction.
                                       Program Website: http://vcampus.mccvlc.org/

Kirtland Community College
Karen Brown                                                                                                     brownk@kirtland.edu

Introduction: This program will prepare an experienced LPN for RN licensure. Graduates of this program are qualified to enter
the many B.S.N. completion programs available.
Admission Requirements
•  Students must apply for regular admission to the college. Students must also apply for program admission online by May 1.
   An official college transcript must be submitted by that time that shows successful completion (grade C or better) of all
   required courses in order to be considered. Candidates must also have a license to practice as an LPN/LVN in good standing
   and one year of full-time acute care or skilled care experience (or equivalent) to be considered for admission. A detailed
   resume of LPN experience including supervisor’s name and phone number must be submitted online with the program
   application.
•  The program will only accept students to begin each fall semester. Candidates who have completed prerequisites will be
   ranked in order of date of program application. If seats remain unfilled, candidates may be provisionally admitted if
   working on prerequisites that can be completed prior to the beginning of the program.
•  Students will be notified of their admission status by e-mail by June 1. Students must maintain an active personal e-mail
   account to ensure timely communication between students, faculty, and staff.
     Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete the following courses before being admitted to the program.
Course                        Title                       Cr            Course                         Title                    Cr
               Successful completion of LPN/              20*           ENG-10403         English Composition II/Computer       3
               LVN program with experience
               Successfully complete an online                0         MTH-10100         Finite Math OR demonstrated           0-4
               college course                                                             Competency**
BIO-11500      Anatomy & Physiology I                         4         NURS 180W         Pharmacology (Kalamazoo Valley)
BIO-11600      Anatomy & Physiology II                        4          NUR 21400        OR Pharmacology (Kirtland)            2-3
ENG-10303      English Composition I/Computers                3         POL-10100         Intro to American Government           3
                                                                        PSY-10100         Introduction to Psychology             3
                                                                           --- ---        Humanities elective                    3
    **Beginning Fall 2008, MTH-12000 Intermediate Algebra OR competency and three credits of speech are required.
   Course                      Title                     Cr             Course                        Title                    Cr
                 Semester I                                                                   Semester II
NUR-22001        Nursing Assessment                       3          NUR-290.L1        Nursing Leadership (Monroe)              3
NUR-26001        Nursing Care of Adults                   8          NUR-27000         Nursing Care/Special Populations         8

                                                                                              Semester III
                                                                     NUR-28000         Clinical Application of Nursing Care     8
Notes:
•   Conviction for some criminal offenses may render a candidate ineligible for writing the examination (NCLEX-RN) for state
    licensure.
•   Felony convictions and misdemeanor convictions involving abuse or neglect of vulnerable populations will prohibit
    admission to clinical agencies which is a requirement of the nursing program.
•   There are abilities (with or without accommodation) that a student in this program must have. A list of these abilities can be
    obtained from the health careers advisor. Based on history and physical examination findings, and these required abilities, a
    recommendation from a health care provider is required prior to beginning the program.
•   Professional provider CPR certification must be obtained no earlier than three months prior to the start of the first clinical
    semester.
RADIOGRAPHY                                                                                           PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
Associate in Applied Science – Mid Michigan Community College
Mid Michigan Community College                                                                          Kirtland Community College
John Skinner, Program Director                                                                                        Anne Essmaker
989-386-6646                                                                                             989-275-5000, extension 372
jskinner@midmich.cc.mi.us                                                                                      essmakea@kirtland.edu
The Radiography program is a collaborative program offered by an agreement between Kirtland Community College and Mid Michigan
Community College. The program is designed to prepare graduates to function as members of the health team in hospitals, clinics,
government and military installations, industry, and public health. In addition to classroom instruction and experience in the laboratory,
the student will receive on-the-job practical education in radiology departments of local hospitals participating in the program.
The prerequisite and general education courses are taken at Kirtland Community College and can be completed in one year. The second
year will be taken at Mid Michigan Community College. The third year will be a clinical internship at area hospitals. Program graduates
are eligible to take the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists certification examination. Mid Michigan Community College
confers the associate degree.
The collaborative program has many benefits for students at Kirtland including the following:
•    Most general education and prerequisite courses can be taken at Kirtland. HUM-200 must be taken at Mid Michigan Community
     College.
•    Mid Michigan has a limited number of reserved seats for qualified Kirtland students ready to be admitted into the program.
•    Kirtland students who are accepted into the program and transfer to Mid Michigan for their radiography courses will pay in-district
     tuition at Mid Michigan.
•    Kirtland students who are in the program and ready for their clinical internship in a hospital will be assigned to an in-district
     hospital.
Students should contact those listed for specific program information.
Cardiovascular Sonography
Associate in Applied Science (DSON0))                                                                 Minimum Credits: 78.5
Michigan School of Cardiovascular Sonography (MSOCS)                 Kirtland Community College (M-TEC campus in Gaylord)
Chris Martin, School Manager                                                                   Bobbie Otwell, Student Advisor
989.705.3687                                                                                                    989.705.3605
                                                                                                        otwellb@kirtland.edu


Introduction
The Cardiovascular Sonography program is a collaborative program of study offered by the Michigan School of Cardiovascular
Sonography (MSOCS) and Kirtland Community College at M-TEC in Gaylord. The curriculum provides the individual with the
knowledge and skills necessary to visualize and evaluate the human heart and vascular structures. A Cardiovascular Sonographer uses
high frequency sound waves to produce images of the heart and vascular structures.

Admission Requirements
Students must complete prerequisite courses with a minimum GPA of 2.5 overall and have earned a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Anatomy
and Physiology. Application to the program is through MSOCS after most prerequisites are complete.

Prerequisite Courses
  Course                      Title                        Cr            Course                         Title                    Cr
ALH-10101        Medical Terminology                       2           ENG-10000         Writing Lab (if required)               0-1
                                                                       ENG-10303         English Composition I/Computers          3
BIO-10700        Essentials of Anatomy &                    4          ALH-20201         Standard 1st Aid                         1
                 Physiology
MTH-12000        Intermediate Algebra                       4          SON-10000         Introduction to Sonography               4
CIS-10500        Intro to Computers                         3


Other KCC General Education Courses required that can be taken before, during, or after MSOCS courses:


                            Course                            Title                         Cr
                       PSY-10100                Intro to Psychology                         3
                       POL-10100                Intro to American Government                3
                       ENG-10400                English Composition II                      3
                       SPE-XXXX                 Any Speech Elective                         3
                                                Any Humanities Elective                     3



          MSOCS Program begins every semester after all KCC prerequisite courses have been completed:

                       Semester One          MSOCS Courses                              10 credits
                       Semester Two          MSOCS Courses                              10 credits
                       Semester Three        MSOCS Courses                              10 credits
                       Semester Four         MSOCS Off-Campus Externship               15.5 credits
The following information is designed for students to take the general education courses
that are needed to transfer to a university for bachelor’s degree completion. Further details
regarding employment information and curriculum are available in the Transfer
programs, under Associate in Science.


                                               Pre-Engineering
Nature of the Work
Engineers employ the theory and principles of science and mathematics to the economical solution of practical technical
problems. They design machinery, products, systems, and processes for efficient and economical performance. Also, many
engineers design, plan, and supervise the construction of buildings, highways, and transit systems. Most engineers specialize in
one of more than 25 major specialties recognized by professional societies

Engineers in each specialization have knowledge and training that can be applied to many fields. They often use computers to
simulate how a machine, structure, or system operates. Many engineers work in laboratories, industrial plants, or construction
sites where they inspect, supervise, or solve onsite problems. Others work in an office almost all the time.




                                                 Pre-Optometry
Nature of the Work
Over half the people in the United States wear glasses or contact lenses. Optometrists provide most of the primary vision care
people need. They examine people's eyes to diagnose vision problems and eye disease and provide treatment. Most optometrists
are in general practice.




                                                 Pre-Pharmacy
Nature of the Work
Pharmacists dispense drugs prescribed by physicians and other health practitioners and provide information to patients about
medications and their use. They advise physicians and other health practitioners on the selection, dosages, and side effects of
medications. Pharmacists must understand the use, composition, and effects of drugs. Compounding - the actual mixing of
ingredients to form powders, tablets, capsules, ointments, and solutions - is only a small part of a pharmacist’s practice, because
most medicines are produced by pharmaceutical companies in a standard form and dosage.




                                      Pre-Veterinary Medicine
Nature of the Work
Veterinarians care for pets, livestock, sporting and laboratory animals, and protect humans against diseases carried by animals.
Veterinarians diagnose medical problems, dress wounds, set broken bones, perform surgery, prescribe and administer medicines,
and vaccinate animals against diseases. They also advise owners on care and breeding.
KIRTLAND HONORS PROGRAM                                                                                                H
Introduction
The Kirtland Honors Program is designed to meet the needs of students of high academic standing who are seeking
                                                                                                                       O
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additional challenges and rewards in both general education and occupational programs. Honors students may earn
honors credits in Kirtland “honors option” courses and in individually designed honors and service learning
projects. Students who complete 12 honors credits may be awarded an honors degree, with transcript recognition
for all completed honors courses, and, upon completing the honors degree program, an honors degree.
                                                                                                                       O
                                                                                                                       R
A minimum of 12 credits in honors courses is required to earn an Honors associate degree. An additional
three credits in honors courses is required for each subsequent honors degree.


                                                                                                                       S
Honors degrees may be earned in all of the following degree areas:

Honors Associate in Arts                                            Honors Associate in Fine Arts
Honors Associate in Applied Science                                 Honors Associate in Science
Honors Associate in Business Administration

Students interested in earning an honors degree in these or an area not mentioned above should contact the Honors
Secretary at 989-275-5000, ext 359.

Honors Degree Requirements
Students admitted to the Kirtland Honors Program who complete the following requirements will be awarded an
honors degree:

• The student must complete at least one 3-credit course designated as an Honors Colloquium (HON-25000).

• In addition to one Honors colloquium, the student must complete at least nine additional honors credit hours.
  These hours may be earned in the following ways:

  •    in classes designated as honors sections (indicated by a 9 as the fourth and/or fifth character in the course
       number)
  •    Service Learning
  •    in Honors Projects (HON 225; up to three credits) undertaken in conjunction with non-honors course

• The student must have a cumulative Kirtland grade point average of at least 3.5.

• The required 12 honors credit hours must be earned at Kirtland.

• The student must complete all other requirements established for his or her degree at Kirtland.

Every effort will be made to ensure that honors students can complete the requirements for an honors degree within
two academic years. However, students must be made aware that scheduling difficulties may prevent their
completion of the requirements within two years.

The honors degree will be noted on the student's degree certificate; honors courses will be noted on the student's
transcript. At the graduation ceremony, academic regalia will include some feature distinguishing an honors degree
recipient.




                 For more information, please contact the Honors Program Department.
                Honors Secretary                                           989-275-5000, extension 359
                Kathy Marsh                                                989-275-5000, extension 245
Please check the program location for the following programs. Some
                                                                                                                    I
are available on the Central Campus, and others are available on
the M-TEC Campus only.
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                         Certificates                                                                               D
                         • Industrial Maintenance (M-TEC Campus)
                         • Industrial Processes Technician (Central and M-TEC)
                                                                                                                    U
                         • Outdoor Power Engines (M-TEC Campus)                                                     S
                         Associate in Applied Science
                                                                                                                    T
                         • Engineering & Design Technologies (Central Campus)                                       R
                         • Industrial Maintenance (M-TEC Campus)
                         • Outdoor Power Engines (M-TEC Campus)
                                                                                                                    I
                                                                                                                    A
Foundation
Kirtland Community College recognizes the importance of students possessing basic academic skills in                L
English, reading, and mathematics in order to successfully complete college-level courses. Therefore, all
entry-level students are required to demonstrate their proficiency in basic academic skills. In the certificate
programs there are no English, reading, or mathematic requirements, however, these courses are the
foundation for success in all programs. The student’s advisor will indicate which of the following courses
need to be taken based on ACT scores or COMPASS placement testing results. It is highly recommended that            T
                                                                                                                    E
students take these courses during the first semester in order to prepare for the road ahead, as well as possibly
satisfying prerequisites needed for more advanced courses. Specific courses needed may be tracked below.
Students must plan additional time to complete their program requirements if placement results require them
to begin with DEV courses.
                                                                                                                    C
                                                                                                                    H
              ENG-10000 Writing Lab (if required)               Mathematics:____________________
              English:________________________                  Reading: _______________________

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                                                                                                                    G
        For more information, please contact the Industrial Technologies Department.
                                                                                                                    I
      Jason Prout (Central Campus)                          989-275-5000, ext. 318/ proutj@kirtland.edu             E
      Kerry Harwood (M-TEC Campus)                                 989-705-3695/ harwoodk@kirtland.edu              S
           Industrial Technology Course Groupings and Locations
           (Please note that all courses are taught on both campuses unless otherwise noted.)


Metal Machining Level I (MPT10272-10288, 4.18 credit hours)

Metal Machining Level 2 (MPT10289-10299, 10302-10306, 10364, 10408-9, 8.72 credit hours)

Metal Machining Level 3 (MPT20366-68, 1.29 credits hours) – M-TEC campus only

Metrology (MPT10308-10316, 1.83 credit hours) - M-TEC campus only

Metallurgy (MPT20319-20330, 2.22 credit hours)

Machinist Handbook (MPT20331-20340, 2.9 credit hours) M-TEC campus only

Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (MPT10307, .33 credit hours) – M-TEC campus only

Statistical Process Control (MPT 20374-85, 3.96 credit hours) – M-TEC campus only

MPT10317, MPT10318, MPT10364, MPT10408, MPT10409, MPT20366-20370 – M-TEC campus only

Advanced Metal Machining (MPT 20386-20398) – M-TEC campus only

Welding Level I (WLD10341-10354, 4.02 credit hours)

Welding Level 2 (WLD10355-10363, 4.18 credit hours)

Welding Level 3 (WLD20400-20406, 3.89 credit hours)

Welding Level 4 (WLD20419, 4 credit hours)

Welding Level 5 (WLD20420-20430, 4.13 credit hours)

Welding Level 6 (WLD20431-20437, 3.13 credit hours)

Welding Technical Electives – WLD20407, WLD20438-20444

EDT 11000 & EDT 13000 – offered on both campuses

EDT14XXX – Architectural Drafting I, II, III offered on a variable basis only.

All other EDT courses are offered on central campus only.
INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE / M-TEC Campus
Certificate of Completion (CIND0)                                                                Minimum Credits: 30.30
After completing certificate requirements, students may continue in Associate in Applied Science: Industrial
Maintenance.
Prerequisites: WorkKeysR is used to assess the core competency levels of reading, mathematics, locating information, and writing.
Students are required to take WorkKeysR assessments as they proceed to completion of requirements for a certificate and/or degree.
  Course                              Title                           Course                              Title
               Industrial Maintenance                                             Industrial Maintenance Level III
COR-10001      Basic Safety                                         IND-20228     Overcurrent Protection
COR-10002      Introduction to Construction Math                    IND-20230     Motor Controls
COR-10003      Introduction to Hand Tools                           IND-20231     Motor Maintenance, Part One
COR-10004      Introduction to Power Tools                          IND-20233     Installing Couplings
COR-10005      Introduction to Blueprints                           IND-20234     Installing Mechanical Seals
COR-10006      Basic Rigging                                        IND-20235     Installing Belt & Chain Drives
               Industrial Maintenance Level I                       IND-20236     Installing Bearings
IND-10202      Electrical Safety                                    IND-20237     Gaskets & Packing
IND-10203      Hand Bending                                         IND-20238     Installing Seals
IND-10204      Fasteners & Anchors                                  IND-20239     Pumps
IND-10205      Electrical Theory One                                IND-20240     Basic Hydraulic Systems
IND-10207      Electrical Test Equipment                            IND-20241     Basic Pneumatic Systems
IND-10208      Introduction to NEC                                                Industrial Maintenance IV
IND-10209      Conductors                                           IND-20245     Advanced Controls
IND-10210      Introduction to Electrical Blueprints                IND-20246     Commercial & Industrial Refrigeration
IND-10211      Oxyfuel Cutting                                      IND-20249     Conventional Alignment
               Industrial Maintenance Level II                      IND-20252     Steam Traps
IND-10212      Wiring: Commercial & Industrial                      IND-20253     Steam Systems
IND-10213      Alternating Current                                  IND-20254     Programmable Logic Controllers
IND-10214      Motors: Theory & Application                                       Industrial Maintenance Level V
IND-10215      Grounding                                            IND-20258     Preventive & Predictive Maintenance
IND-10216      Boxes & Fittings                                     IND-20259     Performing Reverse Alignment
IND-10218      Conductor Terminations & Splices                     IND-20261     Troubleshooting/Repairing Pneumatic Equipment
IND-10220      Circuit Breakers & Fuses                             IND-20262     Troubleshooting/Repairing Pumps
IND-10221      Contactors & Relays                                  IND-20263     Troubleshooting/Repairing Hydraulic Equipment
IND-10222      Lubrication                                          IND-20264     Troubleshooting/Repairing Gearboxes
IND-10223      Introduction to Bearings                             IND-20265     Programmable Logic Controllers
IND-10224      Copper & Plastic Piping Practices                    IND-20267     Flow, Pressure, Level, & Temperature
IND-10225      Ferrous Metal Piping Practices                       IND-20269     Precision Measuring Tools
IND-10226      Piping Systems                                       CAP-10000     Core Capstone
IND-10227      SMAW Equipment & Setup



INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE / M-TEC Campus
Associate in Applied Science (DIND0)                                                              Minimum Credits: 62.3
After completing the certificate, students may continue in Associate in Applied Science: Industrial Maintenance, as listed
below.
  Course                      Title                     Cr            Course                          Title                       Cr
EDT-11000      Detailing with AutoCAD                   3          EDT-14000 OR      Architectural Drawing/CAD OR                 4
                                                                     EDT-13000       Fundamentals of MasterCAM                    3

     Subject Area                 Credits                         Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications                     9-10        • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (0-1) (if required)
                                               • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)
                                               • ENG-10403 – English Composition II (3) OR ENG-10600 – Tech Report Writing (3)
                                               • SPE-10500 or SPE-11400 (3)
Humanities/Social Science            9         • POL-10100 – American Government (3)
                                               • Social Science elective (3)
                                               • Humanities elective (3)
Math/Natural Science                 8         • MTH-12000 – Intermediate Algebra (4) or higher excluding MTH-20500 and MTH-
                                                         20600
                                               • Any science course with a lab (4)
INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES TECHNICIAN / Central & M-TEC Campus
Certificate of Completion (CIND1)                                                                  Minimum Credits: 30
After completing the Certificate: Industrial Processes Technician requirements, students may continue in Associate
in Applied Science: Engineering and Design Technologies.
Prerequisites: WorkKeysR is used to assess the core competency levels of reading, mathematics, locating information, and
writing. Students are required to take WorkKeysR assessments as they proceed to completion of requirements for a certificate
and/or degree.
  Course                     Title                  Cr             Course                         Title                Cr
 EDT-10000     Engineering Graphics (if needed)    0-3         AUT-16401 or      Basic Electricity OR
 EDT-11000     Detailing with AutoCAD               3           ELT electives       ELT-10047, 10048, 10049, 10058,    3
 EDT-15000     Quality Assurance Methods            3            as listed              10066, 20084 and 20089
                                                and the following courses:
         Manufacturing Processes Technology (4.18 credits)                               Welding (4.02)
MPT-10272, 10273, 10274, 10275, 10276, 10277, 10278, 10279,           WLD-10341, 10342, 10343, 10344, 10345, 10346, 10347,
10280, 10281, 10282, 10283, 10284, 10285, 10286, 10287 and 10288      10348, 10349, 10350, 10351, 10352, 10353, and 10354

                            and electives from the following lists for a total of 30 program credits:
Engineering Design Technology       Manufacturing Processes Technology           Math                       Welding
  EDT-100XX EDT electives              MPT-XXX MPT electives                MTH-12000 or higher      WLD-XXX Welding electives
                                            * excluding MTH-20500 and MTH-20600

 FIND A REWARDING CAREER IN ENGINEERING DESIGN TECHNOLOGY:
 A WORLD OF INTERESTING CONCEPTS, ILLUSTRATIONS AND RESULTS
Engineering designers help turn visions into reality – they take ideas and translate them into models and plans that can be created
from materials. The Engineering Design Technology program at Kirtland integrates mathematics, engineering and computers into
technical courses that teach students the most up-to-date techniques in the field.
The Engineering Design Technology program at Kirtland provides technical training in the fields of industrial, manufacturing,
and mechanical engineering technology. EDT is designed to prepare students directly for industry as well as higher education. An
Engineering Design Technology Associate in Applied Science degree is offered as well as a CAD Operator Certificate.
AutoCAD, SolidWorks and Mastercam are the featured software tools.
If you’re curious about how objects are designed and constructed; like math, technical drawing and computers; and enjoy being
on the cutting edge of an exciting field, this program may be for you. The objective of the EDT program is to build and enhance
students’ skills so they can become successful CAD operators and technical designers in Michigan’s competitive job market or
move on to become the engineers of their generation.

ENGINEERING and DESIGN TECHNOLOGIES / Central
Campus
Associate in Applied Science (DEDT1)                                                               Minimum Credits: 60
After completing the Certificate: Industrial Processes Technician students may continue in Associate in Applied Science:
Engineering and Design Technologies, as listed below.
    Subject Area              Credit                        Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications                 9-10    • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (if required) (0-1)
                                       • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)
                                       • ENG-10403 – English Composition II (3)
                                       • SPE-10500 – Fund of Speech (3) or SPE-11400 Intro to I/P Comm (3)
Humanities/Social Science       9      • POL-10100 – Intro to Government (3)
                                       • Humanities Elective (3)
                                       • Social Science Elective (3)
Math/Natural Science            8      • MTH-14000 – Trigonometry (3) or higher excluding MTH-20500 & 20600
                                       • PHY-20101/02, General Physics I w/lab (4/1)
                            and electives from the following lists for a total of 60 program credits:
           Engineering Design Technology       Manufacturing Processes Technology              Welding
             EDT-XXX EDT electives                MPT-XXX MPT electives                 WLD-XXX Welding electives
                                                                                                                          O
                                                                                                                          F
                          Certificates
                          • Medical Billing and Coding                                                                    F
                          • Medical Clerk
                          • Medical Transcription                                                                         I
                          • Office Assistant                                                                              C
                          • Word Processing Specialist
                                                                                                                          E
                          Associate in Applied Science
                          • Administrative Assistant
                          • Advanced Word Processing Specialist
                          • Legal Secretary
                                                                                                                          I
                          • Medical Secretary                                                                             N
                          • Medical Transcription
                                                                                                                          F
Foundation
Kirtland Community College recognizes the importance of students possessing basic academic skills in English,
reading, and mathematics in order to successfully complete college-level courses. Therefore, all entry-level
                                                                                                                          O
students are required to demonstrate their proficiency in basic academic skills. In the certificate programs there are
no English, reading, or mathematic requirements, however, these courses are the foundation for success in all             R
                                                                                                                          M
programs. The student’s advisor will indicate which of the following courses need to be taken based on ACT
scores or COMPASS placement testing results. It is highly recommended that students take these courses during
the first semester in order to prepare for the road ahead, as well as possibly satisfying prerequisites needed for more
advanced courses. Specific courses needed may be tracked below. Students must plan additional time to complete
their program requirements if placement results require them to begin with DEV courses.
                                                                                                                          A
                ENG-10000 Writing Lab (if required)                              Mathematics:____________________
                                                                                                                          T
                                                                                                                          I
              English:________________________                                 Reading: _______________________


                                                                                                                          O
                                                                                                                          N

                                                                                                                          S
                                                                                                                          Y
                                                                                                                          S
                                                                                                                          T
                                                                                                                          E
         For more information, please contact the Office Information Systems Department.                                  M
         OIS Faculty
         FLEX Lab
                                                                                   989-275-5000, extension 237
                                                                                   989-275-5000, extension 213
                                                                                                                          S
  MEDICAL BILLING AND CODING
  Certificate of Completion (CMBC0)                                                               Minimum Credits: 35

  Introduction
  The Medical Billing and Coding program provides the career education necessary to be proficient in completing insurance
  claims. The student learns billing and collection techniques. The student works to become proficient in assigned ICD-9-CM and
  CPT codes.

  Course                      Title                   Cr                Course                           Title                    Cr
                     Semester I                                                            Semester II
ALH-10101     Medical Terminology                      2          ALH-10801             Pathology                                   3
ALH-11201     Medical Ethics & Law                     1          OIS-10600             Intro to Health Information Systems         3
BIO-10701     Essentials of Anatomy &                  3          OIS-10401/02/03 or    Keyboarding I – A/B/C OR                    3
 BIO-10702    Physiology w/lab                         1           OIS-18201/02/03        Word Processing I – A/B/C
ENG-10000     Writing Lab (if required)               0-1         OIS-11300             Medical Coding I                            3
ENG-10303     English Composition I w/Computers        3          OIS-11500             Medical Insurance Billing                   3
CIS-10500     Introduction to Computers                3
                                                       Semester III
OIS-21300     Medical Coding II                        3    &     OIS-24109             Internship – Medical Billing/Coding         4




  LEGAL SECRETARY
  Associate in Applied Science (DLES1)                                                            Minimum Credits: 67

  Introduction
  Kirtland's Legal Secretary program is specifically designed to educate students in the skills necessary to secure employment by
  attorneys, judges, corporate legal departments, or government offices where knowledge of legal terminology and procedures is
  required. All candidates for an Associate in Applied Science: Legal Secretary degree must complete the courses below. Students
  may substitute advanced courses for beginning courses with prior advisor approval.

     Course                           Title                 Cr           Course                        Title                      Cr
                     Semester I (Fall)                                OIS-21500 or     Desktop Publishing for the Office or       3
                                                                        CIS-17001        Microsoft Office
ALH-10101           Medical Terminology                      2        MTH-12000        Intermediate Algebra or higher               4
CIS-10500           Introduction to Computers                3        xxx-xxxxx        Humanities Elective                          3
ENG-10303           English Composition I w/Computers        3        OIS-17000        Legal Terminology/Transcription              3
ENG-10000           Writing lab (if required)               0-1                        Semester IV (Winter)
OIS-18201/02/03     Word Processing I – A/B/C                3        OIS-10500        Business Correspondence                      3
OIS-20501/02/03     Records Management-A/B/C                 3
                  Semester II (Winter)                                OIS-22500        Legal Office Procedures                     3
SPE-10500 or        Fundamentals of Speech OR                3        xxx-xxxxx        Science course with lab                    4-5
SPE-11400           Intro to Interpersonal/Public Comm.
OIS-11201 or        Business Calculations OR                 3        POL-10100        Intro to American Government                 3
ACC-12500 or        Accounting with QuickBooks OR            4        xxx-xxxxx        Any Social Science                           3
ACC-10600           Fundamentals of Accounting               4
OIS-11401/02/03     Keyboarding II - A/B/C                   3                         Semester V (Summer)
OIS-19001/02/03     Machine Transcription - A/B/C            3        OIS-24102        Internship – Legal Secretary                 3
OIS-22200           Word Processing II-Word                  3
                    Semester III (Fall)                               OIS-21400        Keyboarding III                              3
BUS-21500           Legal Environment of Business            3
    MEDICAL CLERK
    Certificate of Completion (CMOA1)                                                                  Minimum Credits: 36

    Introduction
    The Medical Clerk program is designed to train students for employment as a medical office clerk. The program emphasizes
    development of proficiency in administrative medical office skills including preparation of correspondence, transcription of
    medical dictation, billing, insurance, receptionist duties, ethics and law, and medical office procedures. Students may transfer
    into the Associate in Applied Science: Medical Secretary program at any time during or after completion of the certificate
    program.

    Course                           Title                    Cr              Course                           Title                       Cr
                     Semester I (Fall)                                                       Semester II (Winter)
ALH-10101            Medical Terminology                       2         ALH-11201            Medical Ethics & Law                             1
CIS-10500            Introduction to Computers                 3         OIS-10500            Business Correspondence                          3
ENG-10000            Writing Lab (if required)                0-1        OIS-10701/02/03      Medical Office Transcription-A/B/C               3
ENG-10303            English Composition I w/Computers         3         OIS-20501/02/03      Records Management-A/B/C                         3
OIS-11401/02/03      Keyboarding II-A/B/C                      3         OIS-11500            Medical Billing and Coding                       3
OIS-18201/02/03      Word Processing I – A/B/C                 3         OIS-21100            Medical Office Procedures                        3
                                                      Semester III (Summer)
OIS-11201            Business Calculations OR                            OIS-24108            Internship – Medical Clerk                       3
 ACC-12500           Computer Accounting/QuickBooks          3-4




    MEDICAL SECRETARY
    Associate in Applied Science (DMES1)                                                                Minimum Credits: 67

    Introduction
    Medical Secretary is one of the specialized secretarial programs Kirtland offers. Graduates of this program are trained in a variety
    of skills that will enable them to work for physicians in either a private medical office or in various hospital settings such as
    medical records, the business office, or the emergency room. This program places emphasis on the development of proficiency in
    word processing and related computerized tasks, medical office procedures, insurance billing and coding, transcription of medical
    dictation for medical specialties, and administrative secretarial duties.

      Course                           Title                       Cr          Course                         Title                    Cr
                       Semester I (Fall)                                                       Semester III (Fall)
 ALH-10101            Medical Terminology                           2      xxx-xxxxx          Humanities Elective                          3
 ENG-10000            Writing Lab (if required)                    0-1     POL-10100          Intro to American Government                 3
 ENG-10303            English Composition I w/Computers             3      SPE-10500 or       Fundamentals of Speech OR                    3
                                                                           SPE-11400          Intro to Interpersonal/Public Comm.
 OIS-10600            Intro to Health Information Systems           3      OIS-22200          Word Processing II-Word                      3
 OIS-10701/02/03      Medical Office Transcription-A/B/C            3      MTH-12000          Intermediate Algebra or higher               4
 OIS-18201/02/03      Word Processing I – A/B/C                     3                        Semester IV (Winter)
                     Semester II (Winter)                                  ALH-11201          Medical Ethics & Law                      1
 BIO-10701            Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology            3      OIS-11201 or       Business Calculations OR                 3-4
  BIO-10702           w/lab                                         1      ACC-12500 or       Accounting with QuickBooks OR
                                                                           ACC-10600          Fundamentals of Accounting
 CIS-10500            Introduction to Computers                     3      OIS-11500          Medical Billing & Coding                     3
 OIS-10801/02/03      Medical Transcription I – A/B/C               3      OIS-21100          Medical Office Procedures                    3
 OIS-11401/02/03      Keyboarding II-A/B/C                          3      OIS-22100          Office Pharmacology                          2
 OIS-20501/02/03      Records Management-A/B/C                      3      xxx-xxxxx          Any Social Science                           3
                                                                                             Semester V (Summer)
                                                                           OIS-10500          Business Correspondence                      3
                                                                           OIS-24103          Internship – Medical Secretary               3
   MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION
   Certificate of Completion (CMET0)                                                                  Minimum Credits: 31

   Introduction
   This program provides the career training necessary to transcribe physicians’ dictated reports for medical records used in medical
   offices, hospitals, insurance companies, courts, governmental agencies and other medical-related business. The student will
   acquire a background in general office skills as well as intensive training in transcribing actual medical dictation. Students may
   continue in this program by pursuing the Associate in Applied Science: Medical Transcription degree.

         Course                          Title                      Cr        Course                     Title                    Cr
                             Semester I                                                         Semester II
   ENG-10303            English Composition I w/Computers           3       BIO-10701       Essentials of Anatomy &                3
                                                                              BIO-          Physiology w/lab                       1
   ENG-10000            Writing Lab (if required)                   0-1     10702
   OIS-18201/02/03      Word Processing I – A/B/C                    3      ALH-10801       Pathology                              3
   ALH-10101            Medical Terminology                          2      OIS-            Medical Transcription I – A/B/C        3
                                                                            10801/02/0
                                                                            3
    OIS-10701/02/03     Medical Office Transcription-A/B/C           3      OIS-22100       Office Pharmacology                    2
    ALH-11201           Medical Ethics & Law                         1
                                                           Semester III
    OIS-20601/02/03     Medical Transcription II – A/B/C             3      OIS-24106       Internship – Medical                   4
                                                                                            Transcription




   MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION
   Associate in Applied Science (DMET0)                                                               Minimum Credits: 65

   Introduction
   This program provides the career training necessary to transcribe physicians’ dictated reports for medical records used in medical
   offices, hospitals, insurance companies, courts, governmental agencies, and other medical-related businesses. The student will
   acquire a background in general office skills as well as intensive training in transcribing actual medical dictation.

    Course                           Title                    Cr              Course                         Title                      Cr
                      Semester I (Fall)                                                      Semester III (Fall)
ENG-10303           English Composition I w/Computers          3          SPE-10500 or        Fundamentals of Speech OR                 3
                                                                          SPE-11400          Intro to Interpersonal/Public Comm.
ENG-10000           Writing Lab (if required)                 0-1         OIS-20601/02/03     Medical Transcription II – A/B/C          3
OIS-18201/02/03     Word Processing I – A/B/C                  3          OIS-10500           Business Correspondence                   3
ALH-10101           Medical Terminology                        2          MTH-12000           Intermediate Algebra or higher            4
OIS-10600           Intro to Health Information Systems        3          POL-10100           Intro to American Government              3
OIS-10701/02/03     Medical Office Transcription-A/B/C         3
                  Semester II (Winter)                                                      Semester IV (Winter)
OIS-11401/02/03     Keyboarding II-A/B/C                       3          OIS-22100           Office Pharmacology                       2
BIO-10701           Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology         3          ALH-10801           Pathology                                 3
 BIO-10702          w/lab                                      1          ALH-11201           Medical Ethics & Law                      1
CIS-10500           Introduction to Computers                  3          OIS-20701/02/03     Medical Transcription III – A/B/C         3
OIS-10801/02/03     Medical Transcription I – A/B/C            3          xxx-xxxxx           Humanities Elective                       3
OIS-20501/02/03     Records Management-A/B/C                   3          xxx-xxxxx           Any Social Science                        3
                                                                                            Semester V (Summer)
                                                                          OIS-24106           Internship – Medical Transcription        4
  OFFICE ASSISTANT
  Certificate of Completion (COAS0)                                                                  Minimum Credits: 30

  Introduction: Kirtland's Office Assistant program is designed to prepare the students with marketable skills needed for
  employment in office work situations where clerical and/or secretarial skills are required. With Advisor permission students may
  substitute more advanced courses for beginning courses listed below, depending on previous education in determining which
  courses satisfy the student’s needs. All courses in this program may apply to the Associate in Applied Science: Administrative
  Assistant degree, Legal Secretary degree, Medical Secretary degree, and Advanced Word Processing degree.

      Course                            Title                      Cr            Course                        Title                    Cr
                       Semester I (Fall)                                                    Semester II (Winter)
ENG-10000              Writing Lab (if required)                   0-1       CIS-10500           Introduction to Computers              3
ENG-10303              English Composition I w/ Computers           3        OIS-10500           Business Correspondence                3
OIS-10401/02/03 or     Keyboarding I – A/B/C OR                     3        OIS-11401/02/03     Keyboarding II – A/B/C OR              3
  OIS-11401/02/03       Keyboarding II – A/B/C                               or OIS-21400          Keyboarding III
OIS-11201 or           Business Calculations OR                    3-4       OIS-xxxxx           OIS elective/advisor approval          3
 ACC-12500             Computer Accounting/QuickBooks
OIS-xxxxx              OIS Elective w/advisor approval             3         xxx-xxxxx           General elective/advisor               3
xxx-xxxxx              General Elective w/advisor approval         3                             approval




  ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
  Associate in Applied Science (DADA0)                                                                Minimum Credits: 65

  Introduction
  The office careers program at Kirtland includes intensive training in basic and advanced secretarial and clerical courses stressing
  the use of current office procedures and practices assisted by modern equipment and facilities. A variety of courses are offered to
  meet the needs of beginning and advanced students. This program is designed to enable graduates to obtain positions of
  responsibility in a variety of office situations. Students may substitute advanced courses for beginning courses with prior advisor
  approval.

    Course                          Title                    Cr             Course                        Title                     Cr
                     Semester I (Fall)                                                      Semester III (Fall)
BUS-10100            Introduction to Business                 3          xxx-xxxxx        Science course with lab                   4-5
CIS-10500            Introduction to Computers                3          OIS-10500        Business Correspondence                    3
ENG-10303            English Composition I w/Computers        3          OIS-21400        Keyboarding III                            3
ENG-10000            Writing Lab (if required)               0-1         OIS-21500        Desktop Publishing for the Office          3
OIS-20501/02/03      Records Management-A/B/C                 3          SPE-10500 or     Fundamentals of Speech OR                  3
OIS-18201/02/03      Word Processing I – A/B/C                3          SPE-11400        Intro to Interpersonal/Public Comm.
                  Semester II (Winter)                                                    Semester IV (Winter)
xxx-xxxxx            Humanities Elective                      3          CIS-17001        Microsoft Office                              3
MTH-12000            Intermediate Algebra or higher           4          OIS-11201 or     Business Calculations OR
OIS-11401/02/03      Keyboarding II - A/B/C                   3          ACC-12500 or     Computer Account/QuickBooks OR            3-4
                                                                         ACC-10600        Fundamentals of Accounting
OIS-19001/02/03      Machine Transcription - A/B/C            3          OIS-21000        Office Procedures                             3
OIS-22200            Word Processing II-Word                  3          POL-10100        Intro to American Government                  3
                                                                         xxx-xxxxx        Any Social Science                            3
                                                                                          Semester V (Summer)
                                                                         OIS-24101        Internship – Administrative Assistant         3
   WORD PROCESSING SPECIALIST
   Certificate of Completion (CWPS0)                                                              Minimum Credits: 30

   Introduction
   Kirtland's Word Processing Specialist program is designed to prepare students for employment in the automated office. Jobs are
   available in many businesses, industries, governmental agencies, and professional offices. Students may transfer into the
   Advanced Word Processing program at any time during or after the certificate program and receive an Associate in Applied
   Science degree.

    Course                          Title                    Cr           Course                        Title                       Cr
                     Semester I (Fall)                                                  Semester II (Winter)
CIS-10500           Introduction to Computers                3         CIS-17001        Microsoft Office                            3
ENG-10303           English Composition I w/Computers        3         OIS-10500        Business Correspondence                     3
ENG-10000           Writing Lab (if required)               0-1        OIS-21400        Keyboarding III                             3
OIS-11401/02/03     Keyboarding II - A/B/C                   3         OIS-21500        Desktop Publishing for the Office           3
OIS-18201/02/03     Word Processing I – A/B/C                3         OIS-22200        Word Processing II-Word                     3
OIS-20501/02/03     Records Management-A/B/C                 3




   ADVANCED WORD PROCESSING SPECIALIST
   Associate in Applied Science (DWPS0)                                                            Minimum Credits: 62

   Introduction
   This program is designed to prepare students for the changing office. Students enrolled in this program may obtain employment
   as advanced word processing specialists, as word processing supervisors, and as secretaries in various business, industrial,
   governmental, and professional firms.

     Course                          Title                   Cr           Course                       Title                   Cr
                      Semester I (Fall)                                                  Semester III (Fall)
SPE-10500 or         Fundamentals of Speech OR               3         POL-10100       Intro to American Government             3
SPE-11400            Intro to Interpersonal/Public Comm.
CIS-10500            Introduction to Computers               3         CIS-17001       Microsoft Office                         3
ENG-10303            English Composition I w/Computers       3         xxx-xxxxx       Humanities Elective                      3
ENG-10000            Writing Lab (if required)              0-1        OIS-21500       Desktop Publishing for the Office        3
OIS-11201 or         Business Calculations OR                          xxx-xxxxx       Science course with lab                 4-5
ACC-12500 or         Computer Account/QuickBooks OR         3-4
ACC-10600            Fundamentals of Accounting
OIS-18201/02/03      Word Processing I – A/B/C               3
                   Semester II (Winter)                                                Semester IV (Winter)
MTH-12000            Intermediate Algebra or higher          4         xxx-xxxxx       Any Social Science                       3
OIS-11401/02/03      Keyboarding II - A/B/C                  3         OIS-10500       Business Correspondence                  3
OIS-19001/02/03      Machine Transcription - A/B/C           3         OIS-21000       Office Procedures                        3
OIS-20501/02/03      Records Management-A/B/C                3         OIS-21400       Keyboarding III                          3
OIS-22200            Word Processing II-Word                 3         OIS-24107       Internship – Advanced Word               3
                                                                                                                     T
                                                                                                                     E
                                                                                                                     C
                          Associate in Applied Science                                                               H
                          • Technology Management
                                                                                                                     N
                                                                                                                     O
                                                                                                                     L
Foundation
Kirtland Community College recognizes the importance of students possessing basic academic skills in English,
reading, and mathematics in order to successfully complete college-level courses. Therefore, all entry-level
                                                                                                                     O
students are required to demonstrate their proficiency in basic academic skills. In the certificate programs there
are no English, reading, or mathematic requirements, however, these courses are the foundation for success in        G
all programs. The student’s advisor will indicate which of the following courses need to be taken based on
ACT scores or COMPASS placement testing results. It is highly recommended that students take these courses
during the first semester in order to prepare for the road ahead, as well as possibly satisfying prerequisites
                                                                                                                     Y
needed for more advanced courses. Specific courses needed may be tracked below. Students must plan
additional time to complete their program requirements if placement results require them to begin with DEV

                                                                                                                     M
courses.

              ENG-10000 Writing Lab (if required)               Mathematics:____________________
              English:________________________                  Reading: _______________________
                                                                                                                     A
                                                                                                                     N
                                                                                                                     A
                                                                                                                     G
                                                                                                                     E
                                                                                                                     M
                                                                                                                     E
                                                                                                                     N
                                                                                                                     T

              For more information, please contact the Technology Management advisor.
              Don Dyer                                                       989-275-5000, extension 231
TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE (DETC0)                                                                 Minimum Credits: 62
Introduction
The Technology Management degree is designed for students who want to apply their prior and current technical training and/or
education toward the completion of an associate degree. This degree is an appealing choice for students who are former military,
current military, or non-completers of one or more technical education programs.

                                            General Education Requirements
   COURSE                         TITLE                                                                                    Cr

   CIS-10500                      Introduction to Computers                                                                 3
   ENG-10000                      Writing Lab (if required)                                                                0-1
   ENG-10303                      English Composition I with Computers                                                      3
   ENG-10403 or                   English Composition II with Computers or
     ENG-10601 or                    Technical Writing or
      ENG-10602                            Technical Writing with Computers                                                 3

   Humanities Elective            (Chosen from ART, Language, HIS, HUM, Journalism, LIT, MUS, PHL, THE)                     3

   MTH-10100 or                   Finite Math or
    MTH-12000 (or higher)            Intermediate Algebra (or higher)                                                       4

   Science Elective w/lab         (Chosen from BIO, CHE, GEL, PHY)                                                         4-5

   Social Science Elective        (Chosen from ANT, ECO, GEO, POL, PSY, SOC)                                               3-4

   SPE-10500 or                   Fundamentals of Speech or
     SPE-11400                                                                                                              3
                                   Intro to Interpersonal & Public Communication
                                                                                                General Education:        26-29

                                                 Leadership/Management
      Military credit for Supervision, Management or Leadership and/or Kirtland credit from the following course options:
                                                    (Select two courses:)
   BUS-10100                      Introduction to Business                                                                  3
   BUS-21000                      Principles of Management                                                                  3
   BUS-24500                      Personnel Management                                                                      3
                                                                                         Leadership/Management:             6



                                                Technical Elective Courses
      College courses or military equivalent credit from the following list of career/technical programs must be taken to fulfill
      this requirement. Substitute courses may be taken with the approval of an advisor and academic dean.

   Technical Electives: Accounting, Allied Health, Automotive Technology, Business, Carpentry, Computer
   Aided Drafting, Computer Information Systems, Criminal Justice, Electrical Technology,
   Heating/Ventilation/AC/Refrigeration, Industrial Maintenance, Machine Tool Technology, Manufacturing
   Processes Technology, Marketing, Nursing, Office Information Systems, Outdoor Power Equipment, and
   Welding.                                                                         Technical Electives:                   15


                                                 General Elective Courses
   Any 10000-level or higher course can be used. Up to three credits in Physical Education courses can be applied
   toward degree requirements.                                                                General Electives:            15

                                                                                                 Total Credit Hours:      62-64
                                                                                                                          T
                                                                                                                          R
          Associate
          • Arts                                                                                                          A
          • Business Administration
          • Computers – Computer Science                                                                                  N
          • Computers – Information Systems                                                                               S
          • Criminal Justice – Generalist
          • Fine Arts – Creative Writing                                                                                  F
          • Fine Arts – Studio Art
          • Fine Arts – Theatre Arts                                                                                      E
          • Science – Life Science
          • Science – Physical Science
                                                                                                                          R
                                PARTNERSHIP PROGRAMS
          Associate in Applied Science
          • Radiography
          Bachelor of Science
          Computers
                         For an updated list of partnership schools, go to:
                                      http://services.kirtland.edu/cis/Transfer.htm
          •    Computer Information Systems – Ferris or Saginaw Valley
          •    Computer Science – Central Michigan University, Ferris, or Saginaw Valley
          •    Digital Communications – Franklin
          •    Management Information Science – Franklin
Foundation
Kirtland Community College recognizes the importance of students possessing basic academic skills in English, reading, and
mathematics in order to successfully complete college-level courses. Therefore, all entry-level students are required to
demonstrate their proficiency in basic academic skills. In the certificate programs there are no English, reading, or mathematic
requirements, however, these courses are the foundation for success in all programs. The student’s advisor will indicate which of
the following courses need to be taken based on ACT scores or COMPASS placement testing results. It is highly recommended
that students take these courses during the first semester in order to prepare for the road ahead, as well as possibly satisfying
prerequisites needed for more advanced courses. Specific courses needed may be tracked below. Students must plan additional
time to complete their program requirements if placement results require them to begin with DEV courses.
                ENG-10000 Writing Lab (if required)                       Mathematics:____________________
               English:________________________                           Reading: _______________________
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS
(DLIB0)                                                                                            Minimum Credits: 60
Introduction
The Associate in Arts degree program is designed for students who plan to eventually complete a bachelor's degree in the field of
education, liberal arts, humanities, or social sciences. Listed below are some of the majors pursued by students following this
program:
        Art                        Education *(Elementary, Secondary, & Special) Journalism             Social Science
        Anthropology               English                                       Music                  Social Work
        Archaeology                Geography                                     Political Science      Sociology
        Communications             History                                       Pre-Law                Speech
        Criminal Justice           Humanities                                    Psychology             Theatre
Students planning to transfer to a four-year college or university must consult with their advisor and carefully study the
requirements of the four-year institution from which they intend to secure a bachelor's degree. Appropriate course substitutions
may be made upon the recommendation of a student's advisor, and with approval of the appropriate dean or associate dean. Sub-
stitutions are only made in accordance with the specific requirements of the baccalaureate degree-granting institution to which
the student intends to transfer.
Students who have previously attended other colleges or universities may apply earned transfer credit in subject areas (i.e.,
psychology elective, biology elective, etc.) where deemed appropriate. This degree satisfies the requirements of the MACRAO
Transfer Agreement as defined in the handbook section of the college catalog.

                                        *INTERESTED IN BECOMING A TEACHER?
Students interested in pursuing a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Education degree can usually follow an Associate in
Arts or Associate in Science transfer degree offered at Kirtland. When planning pre-education course work for an Elementary,
Secondary, or Special Education degree, students should meet with a Kirtland counselor or faculty advisor. Though some
similarities exist in course requirements among the universities or colleges that prepare teachers, there are also differences that
can complicate the advising process and the selection of appropriate courses for transfer to the student’s university or college of
choice. Therefore, it is very important that each student meet with a counselor or faculty advisor.


 Course                                                          Title                                                        Cr
  --- ---    Electives – Select any100-level or higher courses. Three credits in Physical Education courses can be used.     8-13


 Subject Area          Credits                           Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications          12-13      • CIS-10500 – Introduction to Computers (3)*
                                   • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (1) (if required)
                                   • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)*
                                   • ENG-10403 - English Composition II (3)*
                                   • SPE-10500 – Fund of Speech (3)* OR SPE-11400 – Interpersonal Communication (3)*
Humanities              11-12      • Select 2-3 credits from Art, Music, or Theater.*
(Maximum of two                    • Select 3 credits from Journalism, Languages, or Literature. *
courses per subject
area)                              • History elective (3)*
                                   • Philosophy elective (3)*
Social Science          12-13      • POL-10100 – American Government (3)*
                                   • GEO-10000 – World Geography (4)* OR POL-20000 – International Relations (3)* OR
                                     POL-20100 – Comparative Government* (3)
                                   • ANT-10100 – Cultural Anthropology (3)* OR SOC-10100 – Intro to Sociology (3)* OR
                                     PSY-10100 – Introduction to Psychology (3)*
                                   • Select an additional course from ANT, ECO, GEO, POL, PSY, or SOC (3)
Math/Natural            12-14      • MTH-13000 – College Algebra (4)* or higher
Science                            • Select two science courses with a lab from BIO, CHE, GEL, or PHY (8-10)*

* Courses that meet General Education Core Competencies
 ASSOCIATE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
 (DABA1)                                                                                            Minimum Credits: 61

 Introduction
 The Associate in Business Administration degree is designed for students who plan to eventually complete a bachelor's degree in
 a business-related field. Listed below are some of the majors pursued by students following this program:
Accounting              Economics           General Business             Marketing                         Public Administration
Advertising             Finance             Management                   Personnel/Industrial Relations

 Students planning to transfer to a four-year college or university must consult with their advisor and carefully study the require-
 ments of the four-year institution from which they intend to secure a bachelor's degree. Appropriate course substitutions may be
 made upon the recommendation of a student's advisor and with approval of the appropriate dean or associate dean. Substitutions
 are only made in accordance with the specific requirements of the baccalaureate degree-granting institution to which the student
 intends to transfer.
 Students who have previously attended other colleges or universities may apply earned transfer credit in subject areas (i.e.,
 psychology elective, biology elective, etc.) where deemed appropriate. This degree satisfies the requirements of the MACRAO
 Transfer Agreement as defined in the Handbook section of this catalog.

   Course                      Title                      Cr          Course                        Title                       Cr
  ACC-12100     Accounting Principles I                   4         ACC-12200        Accounting Principles II                   4

                                         and 5 - 8 credit hours from the following list:
  ACC-12500     Computer Accounting/QuickBooks           4        BUS-24500         Personnel Management                        3
  BUS-10100     Introduction to Business                 3        MKT-11000         Principles of Selling                       3
  BUS-201--     Internship in Business & Marketing     3-9        MKT-11500         Customer Relations                          3
  BUS-20200     Grant Writing                            3        MKT-20000         Principles of Marketing                     3
  BUS-21000     Principles of Management                 3        MKT-20100         Principles of Retailing                     3
  BUS-21100     E-Commerce Management                    3        MKT-20300         Internet Marketing                          3
  BUS-21500     Legal Environment of Business            3        MKT-20400         Advertising                                 3
  BUS-24000     Financial Management                     3        MKT-21000         Market Research                             3



     Subject Area         Credits                         Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
   Communications          12-13     • CIS-10500 – Introduction to Computers (3)*
                                     • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (1) (if required)
                                     • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)*
                                     • ENG-10403 - English Composition II (3)*
                                     • SPE-10500 – Fund. of Speech (3)* OR SPE-11400 – Interpersonal Communication (3)*
   Humanities               8-9      • Select 2-3 credits from Art, Music, or Theater.*
                                     • Select 3 credits from Journalism, Languages, or Literature. *
                                     • Any HIS OR PHL Elective (3)*
   Social Science            12      • POL-10100 – Intro. to American Government (3)*
                                     • Any ANT, Anthropology OR SOC, Sociology, OR PSY, Psychology Elective (3)*
                                     • ECO-20100 – Principles of Economics (Macroeconomics) (3)
                                     • ECO-20200 – Principles of Economics (Microeconomics) (3)
   Math &                    16      • MTH-13000 College Algebra (4)* or higher
   Natural Science                   • MTH-20600 – Statistics (4)
                                     • Two science courses with labs (8)*
ASSOCIATE IN COMPUTERS
Computer Science (DACP0)                                                                            Minimum Credits: 60
Introduction
Students interested in pursuing a career in the computer field should plan to eventually complete a bachelor’s degree at a four-
year school of their choice. Computer majors are found in two separate areas: Computer Information Systems and Computer
Science.
Computer Science degrees are mathematically and engineering oriented. Positions of employment would include computer
programmers, systems programmers, software engineers, systems engineers, database administrators, network administrators,
systems administrators, or systems analysts. Degrees in this area include the following: Software Engineering, Computer
Science, Computer Engineering or Computer Networking.

Students planning to transfer to a four-year college or university must consult with a Computer Information Systems
(CIS) advisor and carefully study the requirements of the four-year institution from which they intend to secure a
bachelor’s degree. Appropriate course substitutions may be made upon the recommendation of a student’s advisor and with the
approval of the appropriate dean. Substitutions are only made in accordance with the specific requirements of the baccalaureate
degree granting institution to which the student intends to transfer.
Students who have previously attended other colleges or universities may apply earned transfer credit in subject areas (i.e.,
psychology, elective, biology elective etc.) where deemed appropriate. This degree also satisfies the requirements of the
MACRAO Transfer Agreement as defined in the handbook section of the college catalog.

Year 1:

   Fall Semester                                                   Winter Semester
   ENG-10303 English Composition I w/computers           3         ENG-10403 English Composition II w/Computers             3
   ENG-10000 Writing Lab (if required)                  0-1        BIO-10100 or BIO-20100, or BIO-20200 or BIO-             4
                                                                   21000, or BIO-213 00 (See CIS advisor for
                                                                   recommended course)
   CIS-10500 Introduction to Computers                   3         POL-10100 American Government                            3
   Chemistry w/lab (See CIS advisor for                 4-5        MTH-13000 or higher or elective course if math          2-4
   recommended course)                                             sequence is complete (excluding MTH-205 & MTH-
                                                                   206)
   MTH-12000 Intermediate Algebra or higher              4         PSY-10100 or SOC-10100                                   3
   (excluding MTH-205 & MTH-206)

Year 2:

   Fall Semester                                                   Winter Semester
   CIS-27001 Programming I                               3         CIS-27101 Programming II                                  4
   SPE10500 Fundamentals of Speech or SPE-               3         HIS-105, 106, 201, 202, 203, or 204                       3
   11400 - Interpersonal Communications
   Humanities Elective – Language or                     3         Humanities Elective – ART, MUS, or THE                    2-
   Literature (see CIS advisor for course list)                                                                              3
   GEO-100, POL-200, or POL-201                         3-4        Elective course (listed below)                            2-
                                                                                                                             3
   MTH-14000 or higher or elective course if math       3-4        MTH-22000 or higher or elective course if math            3-
   sequence is complete (excluding MTH-205 & MTH-                  sequence is complete (excluding MTH-205 & MTH-206)        4
   206)


Electives:

      CIS-11700 Visual Basic I                                3
      CIS-17001 Microsoft Office                              3
      CIS-22400 UNIX                                          2
      CIS-23501 Database Design                               3
      CIS-26000 Intro to Computer Networking                  3
      MTH-22102 Calculus II                                   4
ASSOCIATE IN COMPUTERS
Information Systems (DACP1)                                                                       Minimum Credits: 60
Introduction
Students interested in pursuing a career in the computer field should plan to eventually complete a bachelor’s degree at a four-
year school of their choice. Computer majors are found in two separate areas: Computer Information Systems and Computer
Science.
Computer Information Systems degrees are business oriented. Positions of employment would include computer programmers,
application programmers, systems analysts, network administrators, database administrators, systems administrators, web
developers, or microcomputer specialists. Degrees in these areas include the following: Management Information Systems
(MIS), Computer Information Systems (CIS) or Information Systems (IS).
Students planning to transfer to a four-year college or university must consult with a Computer Information Systems
(CIS) advisor and carefully study the requirements of the four-year institution from which they intend to secure a
bachelor’s degree. Appropriate course substitutions may be made upon the recommendation of a student’s advisor and with the
approval of the appropriate dean. Substitutions are only made in accordance with the specific requirements of the baccalaureate
degree granting institution to which the student intends to transfer.
Students who have previously attended other colleges or universities may apply earned transfer credit in subject areas (i.e.,
psychology, elective, biology elective etc.) where deemed appropriate. This degree also satisfies the requirements of the
MACRAO Transfer Agreement as defined in the handbook section of the college catalog.

Year 1:
  Fall Semester                                                  Winter Semester
  ENG-10303 English Composition I w/computers           3        ENG-10403 English Composition II w/computers               3
  ENG-10000 Writing Lab (if required)                  0-1       BIO-10100 or BIO-20100, or BIO-20200 or BIO-               4
                                                                 21000, or BIO-21300
  CIS-10500 Introduction to Computers                  3         POL-10100 Intro to American Government                     3
  Chemistry w/lab                                     4-5        MTH-13000 College Algebra or elective course if           2-4
                                                                 math sequence is complete (excluding MTH-205 & MTH-
                                                                 206)
  MTH-12000 Intermediate Algebra or higher or          4         PSY-10100 or SOC-10100                                     3
  elective course if math sequence is complete
  (excluding MTH-205 & MTH-206)

Year 2:
  Fall Semester                                                  Winter Semester
  CIS-27001 Programming I                              3         CIS-27101 Programming II                                   4
  SPE-10500 Fundamentals of Speech or                   3        HIS-105, 106, 201, 202, 203, or 204                        3
  SPE-11400 Interpersonal Communications
  Humanities Elective – Language or Literature         3         Humanities Elective – ART, MUS, or THE                    2-3
  (see CIS advisor for course list)
  GEO-100, POL-200, or POL-201                        3-4        Elective course (listed below)                            2-3
  Elective course (listed below)                      3-4        Elective course (listed below)                            3-4

                             Electives:
                                       ACC-12100 Accounting Principles I                    4
                                       ACC-12200 Accounting Principles II                   4
                                       BUS-10100 Introduction to Business                   3
                                       CIS-11700 Visual Basic I                             3
                                       CIS-17001 Microsoft Office                           3
                                       CIS-22400 UNIX                                       2
                                       CIS-22500 Spreadsheets                               3
                                       CIS-23501 Database design                            3
                                       CIS-26000 Computer Networking                        3
                                       ECO-20100 Economics – Macroeconomics                 3
                                       ECO-20200 Economics – Microeconomics                 3
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS                                                                     PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
Bachelor of Science
Ferris State University                                                                           Kirtland Community College
(231) 591-2434                                                                              Lisa Balbach, balbachl@kirtland.edu
CISD@ferris.edu                                                                                    989-275-5000, extension 414
The Computer Information Systems (CIS) curriculum provides students with a broad understanding of core business functions,
competency in computer programming, knowledge of information technology infrastructure, and a sound foundation in systems
analysis and design. The CIS program has close relationships with industry through an advisory board and offers internships as a
practical        hands-on        experience.              Additional      information      is      also       available       at
http://services.kirtland.edu/cis/Transfer/Ferris_CIS_transfer.htm. Students should contact those listed for specific program
information.
Saginaw Valley State University                                                                  Kirtland Community College
Randall Hock. hock@svsu.edu                                                                Lisa Balbach, balbachl@kirtland.edu
989-964-4343                                                                                      989-275-5000, extension 414
Computer Information Systems is a rapidly expanding filed that encompasses a wide spectrum of specialties and affects various
aspects of life. As a CIS graduate, students are employed in many phases of the analysis, design, manufacturing, testing,
research, development, and administration of computer systems. A Computer Information Systems graduate might become a
programmer, applications programmer, system administrator, web developer, analyst, systems analyst, network administrator, or
database administrator. Co-op opportunities are available with local industries.
Students should contact those listed for specific program information. Students wanting additional information on the Computer
Information Systems major at Saginaw Valley State University should visit http://www.svsu.edu/cs/cis.htm. Additional
information is also available at http://services.kirtland.edu/cis/Articulation/SVSU_CIS_Articulation.htm


COMPUTER SCIENCE                                                                                 PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
Bachelor of Science
Central Michigan University                                                                       Kirtland Community College
Marcie Otteman, ottem1mm@cmich.edu or Marcie.M.Otteman@cmich.edu                            Lisa Balbach, balbachl@kirtland.edu
989-774-3076                                                                                       989-275-5000, extension 414
The study of computer science can lead to such careers as applications programmer, systems programmer/analyst, computer
communications specialist, database manager, and consultant. The field serves those students desiring general instruction in
computer science, those interested in teaching the subject, and those who want to undertake advanced study of computer science
at the graduate level. Information technology graduates will find a variety of career opportunities, including network administra-
tion, database administration, Web master, application system designer, multimedia specialist, and customer service technologist.
Students should contact those listed for specific program information. Additional information is also available at
http://services.kirtland.edu/cis//Articulation/CMUarticulation.htm

Franklin University                                                                               Kirtland Community College
Bob Morris, morrisb@franklin.edu                                                            Lisa Balbach, balbachl@kirtland.edu
1-888-341-6237 or 614-651-4471                                                                     989-275-5000, extension 414
The Computer Science curriculum provides all graduates with a foundation in programming, algorithm development, computer
architecture, operating systems, and networks through a set of core courses. The curriculum also allows specialization through the
choice of two different options: software engineering, which is more technical in nature, and an MIS option, which is business-
oriented. Courses ranging from introductory programming courses to advanced courses in Artificial Intelligence, Computer
Architecture, Computer Graphics, Human Computer Interaction, Web Application Development, Systems Programming, Data
Communication, and Compiler Construction are available. For additional information on the Computer Science BS Degree at
Franklin University visit http://cs.franklin.edu/
To enter the Kirtland Community College/Franklin University program, students must meet one of the following admissions
criteria:
•     Have earned an Associate in Computers – Information Systems
•     Have earned any other Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, or Associate in Applied Science degree
•     Have completed 60 semester/90 quarter credit hours and earned a 2.5 GPA
Additional information is also available at http://services.kirtland.edu/cis/Articulation/Franklin_CS_Articulation.htm. Students
should contact those listed for specific program information.
                                                    (Continued on next page)
Saginaw Valley State University                                                                   Kirtland Community College
Randall Hock, hock@svsu.edu                                                                 Lisa Balbach, balbachl@kirtland.edu
989-964-4343                                                                                       989-275-5000, extension 414
Computer Science is a rapidly expanding field that encompasses a wide spectrum of specialties and affects various aspects of life.
Computer scientists may be employed in many phases of the analysis, design, manufacturing, testing, research, development, and
administration of computer systems. Students may be employed as software engineers, applications programmers, system
administrators, web developers, algorithm development engineers, network administrators, or database administrators. Co-op
opportunities are available with local industries. Students should contact those listed for specific program information.
Additional information is also available at http://services.kirtland.edu/cis/Articulation/SVSU_CS_Articulation.htm. Students
wanting additional information on the Computer Information Systems major at Saginaw Valley State University should visit
http://www.svsu.edu/cs/cs.htm



DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS                                                                                     PARTNERSHIP
PROGRAM
Bachelor of Science
Franklin University                                                                               Kirtland Community College
Bob Morris, morrisb@franklin.edu                                                            Lisa Balbach, balbachl@kirtland.edu
1-888-341-6237 or 614-651-4471                                                                     989-275-5000, extension 414
Successful businesses are increasingly using the Internet and related electronic commerce technologies. These business initiatives
require graduates who understand current and future trends in digital communication and electronic commerce and are prepared
to manage the analysis, design, implementation, marketing, and operation of digital information systems. This program includes a
Web Development track and an E-Commerce track. Depending on the track selected, students will acquire skills or knowledge in
web development, marketing, graphics design, electronic commerce system skills, and the technology of databases, user interface
design, networking, and management information systems.
To enter the Kirtland Community College/Franklin University program, students must meet one of the following admissions
criteria:
•     Have earned an Associate in Computers – Information Systems
•     Have earned any other Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, or Associate in Applied Science degree
•     Have completed 60 semester/90 quarter credit hours and earned a 2.5 GPA
Additional information is also available at http://services.kirtland.edu/cis/Articulation/Franklin_DigitalComm_Articulation.htm.
Students should contact those listed for specific program information. Students wanting additional information on the Digital
Communications BS Degree at Franklin University should visit http://www.franklin.edu/programs/dcom/..



MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SCIENCE (MIS)                                                                       PARTNERSHIP
PROGRAM
Bachelor of Science
Franklin University                                                                               Kirtland Community College
Bob Morris, morrisb@franklin.edu                                                            Lisa Balbach, balbachl@kirtland.edu
1-888-341-6237 or 614-651-4471                                                                     989-275-5000, extension 414
The MIS program focuses on the intersection of management and technology. A distinguishing feature of this program is its
integrated approach to technical, organizational, and systems elements within the curricula that will enable future managers and
technical specialists to interact effectively in organizations. Franklin is building a bridge between management and technology in
order to meet the growing demand of companies seeking to sustain a competitive advantage technologically. This program
includes a large number of business and computer courses.
To enter the Kirtland Community College/Franklin University program, students must meet one of the following admissions
criteria:
•     Have earned an Associate in Computers – Information Systems
•     Have earned any other Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, or Associate in Applied Science degree
•     Have completed 60 semester/90 quarter credit hours and earned a 2.5 GPA
Additional information is also available at http://services.kirtland.edu/cis/Articulation/Franklin_MIS_Articulation.htm. Students
should contact those listed for specific program information.
ASSOCIATE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE - GENERALIST
(DCJG0)                                                                                              Minimum Credits: 60

Introduction
The Associate in Criminal Justice - Generalist degree is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or
university, and to help students transferring in from other colleges to meet requirements for entry into the Kirtland Regional
Police Academy.
Students planning to transfer to a four-year college or university must consult with their advisor and carefully study the require-
ments of the four-year institution from which they intend to secure a bachelor's degree. Appropriate course substitutions may be
made upon the recommendation of a student's advisor and with approval of the appropriate dean or associate dean. Substitutions
are only made in accordance with the specific requirements of the baccalaureate degree-granting institution to which the student
intends to transfer.
Students who have previously attended other colleges or universities may apply earned transfer credit in subject areas (i.e.
psychology elective, biology elective, etc.) where deemed appropriate. This degree satisfies the requirements of the MACRAO
Transfer Agreement as defined in the handbook section of this catalog.
Prerequisites
Applicants admitted to the Criminal Justice - Generalist program must meet the following special entrance requirements:
1) possess a valid Michigan motor vehicle operator’s or chauffeur’s license; 2) have no felony convictions; 3) have a high school
diploma or GED; 4) interview by appointment with a criminal justice advisor before entering the program; 5) provide personal
background information and sign release form to facilitate possible background investigation (information and/or investigation
may determine eligibility to enter the program); 6) sign and abide by Criminal Justice Code of Conduct, which includes a
mandatory dress code; 7) pass a physical examination before enrolling in physical training class.
   Course                         Title                  Cr           Course                        Title                    Cr
CJS-10000         Introduction to Criminal Justice       3         CJS-              Criminal Justice electives with
CJS-24000         Criminology OR                                                      advisor approval                       0-4
 SOC-24000        Criminology OR
                  Substitution approved by advisor        3


 Subject Area        Credits                            Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications        12-13      • CIS-10500 – Introduction to Computers (3)*
                                 • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (1) (if required)
                                 • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)*
                                 • ENG-10403 - English Composition II (3)*
                                 • SPE-10500 – Fund. of Speech (3)* OR SPE-11400 – Interpersonal Communication (3)*
Humanities            11-12      • Select 2-3 credits from Art, Music, or Theater.*
                                 • Select 3 credits from Journalism, Languages, or Literature. *
                                 • HIS-10500 – World Societies to 1500 (3)* OR
                                   HIS-10600 – World Societies Since 1500 (3)* OR
                                   HIS-20100 – US History to 1865 (3)* OR
                                   HIS-20200 – US History Since 1865 (3)* OR
                                   HIS-20300 – Michigan History (3)*
                                 • PHL-20100 – Intro to Philosophy (3)* OR PHL-21000 – Intro to Ethics (3)*
Social Science        15-16      • POL-10100 – American Government (3)*
                                 • GEO-10000 – World Geography (4)* OR
                                   POL-20000 – International Relations (3)* OR
                                   POL-20100 – Comparative Government* (3)
                                 • SOC-10100 – Introduction to Sociology (3)*
                                 • PSY-10100 – Introduction to Psychology (3)*
                                 • PSY-20200 – Abnormal Psychology (3)
Math/Natural          12-14      • MTH-13000 – College Algebra (4)* or higher (excluding MTH-20500 and MTH-20600)
Science                          • Select two science courses with a lab from BIO, CHE, GEL, or PHY (8-10)*
* Courses that meet General Education Core Competencies
Note: Students must maintain a GPA of 2.0 or better, and a grade of “C” or better in all criminal justice courses.
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS
Creative Writing (DAFA0), Studio Art (DAFA1), or Theatre Arts (DAFA2)
                                                                                                       Minimum Credits: 64
Introduction
The Associate in Fine Arts degree is designed for students with an interest in studio arts (such as sculpture or painting), creative
writing, or theatre arts. This degree program works to give students both practical experience in the art form of their choice and
the critical and academic background necessary for further study of the fine arts while helping develop a personal sense of
aesthetic and artistic criteria. Because the artist's association with the world is stressed, a strong academic schedule is affiliated
with the creative discipline.
Students planning to transfer to a four-year college or university must consult with their advisor and carefully study the
requirements of the four-year institution from which they intend to secure a bachelor's degree. Appropriate course substitutions
may be made upon the recommendation of a student's advisor and with approval of the appropriate dean or associate dean. Sub-
stitutions are only made in accordance with the specific requirements of the baccalaureate degree-granting institution to which
the student intends to transfer.
Students who have previously attended other colleges or universities may apply earned transfer credit in subject areas (i.e.,
psychology elective, biology elective, etc.) where deemed appropriate. This degree satisfies the requirements of the MACRAO
Transfer Agreement as defined in the handbook section of the college catalog.
                                        select ONE of the following options:
                                                     CREATIVE WRITING
  Course                       Title                   Cr                Creative Writing elective options
ENG-29100        Poetry Workshop I OR                  3      ENG-21500 – Creative Writing (3)
ENG-29200          Fiction Workshop I                         ENG-29100 or 29300 – Poetry Workshop I (3) or P.W. II (3)
ENG- -----       Creative Writing elective options     13     ENG-29200 or 29400 – Fiction Workshop I (3) or F.W. II (3)

                                                           STUDIO ART
ART-28000        Portfolio                                3      ART- -----       Any ART Electives (recommendation:             15
CIS-21900        MacIntosh O.S. X                         1                       see Studio Art advisor for guidance)

                                                        THEATRE ARTS
THE-12000        Introduction to Theatre                 3     THE- -----         Any THE Electives (recommendation:             13
THE-27000        Audition/Resume Workshop                3                             see Theatre advisor for guidance)


 Subject Area         Credits                            Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications         12-13       • CIS-10500 – Introduction to Computers (3)*
                                   • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (1) (if required)
                                   • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)*
                                   • ENG-10403 - English Composition II (3)*
                                   • SPE-10500 – Fund of Speech (3)* OR SPE-11400 – Interpersonal Communication (3)*
Humanities               12        • Select 3 credits from Art, Music, or Theater.*
                                   • Select 3 credits from Journalism, Languages, or Literature. *
                                   • HIS Elective OR
                                       ART-10000 – Art History I (3) OR
                                       ART-10103 – Art History II (3)
                                   • Select a Fine Arts option:
                                     Creative Writing Option: ENG 21500 – Creative Writing (3)
                                     Studio Art Option: Select an art course (3)
                                     Theatre Arts Option: THE-12000 – Introduction to Theatre (3)
Social Science          9-10       • POL-10100 – American Government (3)*
                                   • GEO-10000 – World Geography (4)* OR POL-20000 – International Relations (3)* OR
                                     POL-20100 – Comparative Government* (3)
                                   • PSY-10100 – Introduction to Psychology (3)* OR SOC-10100 – Intro to Sociology (3)*
Math/Natural            12-14      • MTH-13000 – College Algebra (4)* or higher
Science                            • Select two science courses with a lab from BIO, CHE, GEL, or PHY (8-10)*

* Courses that meet General Education Core Competencies
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE
Life Science (DASC1) or Physical Science (DASC2)                                                     Minimum Credits: 60

Introduction
Students who plan to eventually complete a bachelor's degree in the field of mathematics, natural science, physical science, edu-
cation, or engineering are encouraged to follow the Associate in Science degree program. Listed below are some of the majors
pursued by students following this program:
      Biology                       Education – Elementary *       Geology                        Physics
      Chemistry                     Education - Industrial         Mathematics                    Pre-Professional Health
      Computer Science              Education – Secondary*         Natural Science                Pre-Engineering
      Conservation                  Forestry                       Physical Science               Zoology

Students planning to transfer to a four-year college or university must consult with their advisor and carefully study the
requirements of the four-year institution from which they intend to secure a bachelor's degree. Appropriate course substitutions
may be made upon the recommendation of a student's advisor and with approval of the appropriate dean or associate dean. Sub-
stitutions are only made in accordance with the specific requirements of the baccalaureate degree-granting institution to which
the student intends to transfer.
Students who have previously attended other colleges or universities may apply earned transfer credit in subject areas (i.e.,
psychology elective, biology elective, etc.) where deemed appropriate. This degree satisfies the requirements of the MACRAO
Transfer Agreement as defined in the handbook section of the college catalog.


                                         INTERESTED IN BECOMING A TEACHER?
Students interested in pursuing a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Education degree can usually follow an Associate in
Arts or Associate in Science transfer degree offered at Kirtland. When planning pre-education course work for an Elementary,
Secondary, or Special Education degree, students should meet with a Kirtland counselor or faculty advisor. Though some
similarities exist in course requirements among the universities or colleges that prepare teachers, there are also differences that
can complicate the advising process and the selection of appropriate courses for transfer to the student’s university or college of
choice. Therefore, it is very important that each student meet with a counselor or faculty advisor.


  Subject Area           Credits                          Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
Communications            12-13      • CIS-10500 – Introduction to Computers (3)*
                                     • ENG-10000 – Writing Lab (1) (if required)
                                     • ENG-10303 – English Composition I (3)*
                                     • ENG-10403 - English Composition II (3)*
                                     • SPE-10500 – Fund of Speech (3)* OR SPE-11400 – Interpersonal Communication (3)*
Humanities                11-12      • Select 2-3 credits from Art, Music, or Theater.*
                                     • Select 3 credits from Journalism, Languages, or Literature. *
                                     • HIS-10500 – World Societies to 1500 (3)* OR
                                       HIS-10600 – World Societies Since 1500 (3)* OR
                                       HIS-20100 – US History to 1865 (3)* OR
                                       HIS-20200 – US History Since 1865 (3)* OR
                                       HIS-20300 – Michigan History (3)*
                                     • PHL-20100 – Intro to Philosophy (3)* OR PHL-21000 – Intro to Ethics (3)*
Social Science            9-10       • POL-10100 – American Government (3)*
                                     • GEO-10000 – World Geography (4)* OR
                                       POL-20000 – International Relations (3)* OR
                                       POL-20100 – Comparative Government* (3)
                                     • ANT-10100 – Cultural Anthropology (3)* OR SOC-10100 – Intro to Sociology (3)* OR
                                       PSY-10100 – Introduction to Psychology (3)*
                                                    (continued)



                                    Select ONE of the following options:

Math/Natural           21-26     Life Science Option
Science                            MTH-20600 – Application in Statistics (4)
                                 • Select one of the following mathematics courses:
                                   MTH-13000 – College Algebra (4) OR
                                   MTH-14000 – Trigonometry (4) OR
                                   MTH 22002 – Calculus I (4) OR
                                   MTH 22102 – Calculus II (4) OR
                                   MTH-22202 – Calculus III (4) OR
                                   MTH-23000 – Differential Equations (4)
                                 • BIO-10100 – General Biology (4)
                                 • BIO-20100 – General Zoology (4) OR
                                   BIO-20200 – General Botany (4) OR
                                   BIO-21000 – Microbiology (4) OR
                                   BIO-21300 – Nature Study (4)
                                 • Select either a Chemistry or Physics sequence:
                                   CHE-10101/02 – General Chemistry I (4) & Lab (1) AND
                                   CHE-10201/02 – General Chemistry II (4) & Lab (1) OR
                                   PHY-20101/02 – Physics I with Trigonometry (4) & Lab (1) AND
                                   PHY-20201/02 – Physics II with Trigonometry (4) & Lab (1) OR
                                   PHY-22101/02 – Physics I with Calculus (4) & Lab (1) AND
                                   PHY-22201/02 – Physics II with Calculus (4) and Lab (1)
Math/Natural                     Physical Science Option
Science                          • Select two of the following mathematics courses:
                                   MTH 22002 – Calculus I (4) OR
                                   MTH 22102 – Calculus II (4) OR
                                   MTH-22202 – Calculus III (4) OR
                                   MTH-23000 – Differential Equations (4)
                                   (MTH-20500 or MTH-20600 cannot be counted for credit.)
                                 • Select either a Chemistry or Physics sequence:
                                   CHE-10101/02 – General Chemistry I (4) & Lab (1) AND
                                   CHE-10201/02 – General Chemistry II (4) & Lab (1) OR
                                   PHY-20101/02 – Physics I with Trigonometry (4) & Lab (1) AND
                                   PHY-20201/02 – Physics II with Trigonometry (4) & Lab (1) OR
                                   PHY-22101/02 – Physics I with Calculus (4) & Lab (1) AND
                                   PHY-22201/02 – Physics II with Calculus (4) and Lab (1)
                                 • Select any two of the following courses:
                                  BIO-10100 – General Biology (4)
                                  BIO-20100 – General Zoology (4)
                                  BIO-21000 – Microbiology (4)
                                  BIO-21300 – Nature Study (4)
                                  CHE-10101/02 – General Chemistry I (4) & Lab (1)
                                  CHE-10201/02 – General Chemistry II (4) & Lab (1)
                                  GEL-10500 – Physical Geology (4)
                                  MTH 22102 – Calculus II (4)
                                  MTH-22202 – Calculus III (4)
                                   PHY-20101/02 – Physics I with Trigonometry (4) & Lab (1)
                                   PHY-20201/02 – Physics II with Trigonometry (4) & Lab (1)
                                   PHY-22101/02 – Physics I with Calculus (4) & Lab (1)
                                   PHY-22201/02 – Physics II with Calculus (4) and Lab (1)

* Courses that meet General Education Core Competencies
 This curriculum is designed to provide the general education courses needed to transfer
 to a university for bachelor’s degree completion. The five areas of study do not
 comprise a degree.
                                                   Pre-Engineering
 Nature of the Work: Engineers employ the theory and principles of science and mathematics to the economical solution of
 practical technical problems. They design machinery, products, systems, and processes for efficient and economical performance.
 Also, many engineers design, plan, and supervise the construction of buildings, highways, and transit systems. Most engineers
 specialize in one of more than 25 major specialties recognized by professional societies.
 Engineers in each specialization have knowledge and training that can be applied to many fields. They often use computers to
 simulate how a machine, structure, or system operates. Many engineers work in laboratories, industrial plants, or construction
 sites where they inspect, supervise, or solve onsite problems. Others work in an office almost all the time.
 Employment: In 2002 engineers held 1.5 million jobs. Just under one half of the jobs were located in manufacturing industries.
 Employment opportunities are expected to be average through the year 2012. In 2003 the median annual income was $81,120.
 The Courses: The Kirtland Community College engineering curriculum is designed to provide the general education courses that
 are needed to transfer to a university for bachelor's degree completion. The courses do not comprise a degree.
    Course                           Title                    Cr           Course                      Title               Cr
Semester I (Fall)                                                      Semester III (Fall)
CHE-10101/02      General Chemistry I w/lab                  5         EDT-12000           3D Parametric Solids w/Solidworks        3
EDT-10000         Engineering Graphics                       3         XXX-XXXXX           Humanities Elective                      3
ENG-10303         English Composition I w/Computers          3         MTH-22202           Calculus III                             4
MTH-22002         Calculus I                                 4         PHY-22101/02        College Physics I w/lab                  5
SPE-10500         Fundamentals of Speech                     3
Semester II (Winter)                                                   Semester IV (Winter)
ENG-10403         English Composition II w/Computers         3         CIS-27001        Programming I                               3
XXX-XXXXX         Humanities Elective                        3         XXX-XXXXX        Humanities Elective                         3
MTH-22102         Calculus II                                4         PHY-22201/02     College Physics II w/lab                    5
POL-10100         Intro to American Government               3         XXX-XXXXX        Social Science Elective                     3
XXX-XXXXX         Social Science Elective                    3

                                             Pre-Natural Resources
 Nature of the Work: Forests and range lands serve a variety of needs from supplying wood products, livestock forage, minerals,
 and water, to serving as sites for recreational activities and providing habitats for wildlife. Foresters and conservationists manage,
 develop, use, and help protect these and other natural resources.
 Employment: Conservation scientists and foresters held about 33,000 jobs in 2002. Nearly one-third of all workers were
 employed by the Federal Government. Another 24% worked for state governments, and 7% worked in local governments. The
 remainder worked in private industry, mainly in the forestry industry. Other significant employers included logging and lumber
 companies and sawmills.
 Job Outlook: Employment of conservation scientists and foresters is expected to grow more slowly than the average for all
 occupations through 2012. Growth should be strongest in private sector consulting firms and in scientific research and
 development services. Median annual earnings of conservation scientists in 2002 were $50,340. Salaries ranged between $39,300
 and $61,440.
 The Courses: There are courses at Kirtland Community College designed to provide the general education that is needed to
 transfer a university for bachelor's degree completion for most programs in forestry, conservation, agriculture, and park and
 wildlife management. The courses do not comprise a degree.
    Course                          Title                    Cr            Course                          Title                     Cr
                        Semester I (Fall)                                                     Semester III (Fall)
BIO-10100          General Biology                            4        BIO-21000           Microbiology                                 4
CHE-10101/02       General Chemistry I w/lab                  5        XXX-XXXXX           Humanities Elective                          3
ENG-10303          English Composition I w/Computers          3        XXX-XXXXX           Social Science Elective                      3
MTH-22002 or       Calculus I                                 4        PHY-20101/02        General Physics I w/lab                      5
 MTH-18001           Precalculus
                     Semester II (Winter)                                                    Semester IV (Winter)
BIO-20100          General Zoology                            4        BIO-21000           Microbiology                                 4
CHE-10201/02       General Chemistry II w/lab                 5        XXX-XXXXX           General Electives                            5
ENG-10403          English Composition II w/Computers         3        XXX-XXXXX           Humanities Elective                          3
XXX-XXXXX          Humanities Elective                        3        XXX-XXXXX           Social Science Elective                      3
POL-10100          Intro to American Government               3
                                                  Pre-Optometry
 Nature of the Work: Over half the people in the United States wear glasses or contact lenses. Optometrists provide most of the
 primary vision care people need. They examine people's eyes to diagnose vision problems and eye disease and provide treatment.
 Most optometrists are in general practice.
 Employment: The number of jobs is greater than the number of practicing optometrists at this time because some held two or
 more jobs, such as in a private practice and in another clinic or vision care center. Median annual earnings of salaried
 optometrists were $86,090 in 2002. The yearly salary ranged between $62,030 and $115,550.
 Job Outlook: Employment of optometrists is expected to grow about as fast as the average for all occupations through 2012, in
 response to the vision care needs of a growing and aging population.
 The Courses: The courses at Kirtland Community College are designed to provide the general education that is needed to
 transfer to a university. The courses do not comprise a degree. A license to practice optometry is required in all states. To obtain a
 license, one must have a Doctor of Optometry degree from an accredited college of optometry and pass both a written and a
 clinical state board examination. Licenses are renewed every year or two and in most states, continuing education credits are
 needed for renewal.
    Course                          Title                   Cr             Course                         Title                      Cr
                       Semester I (Fall)                                                     Semester III (Fall)
BIO-10100         General Biology                             4        BIO-11500          Anatomy & Physiology I                    4
CHE-10101/02      General Chemistry I w/lab                   5        XXX-XXXXX          Humanities Elective                       3
ENG-10303         English Composition I w/Computers           3        XXX-XXXXX          Social Science Elective                   3
XXX-XXXXX         Humanities Elective                         3        PHY-20101/02       General Physics I w/lab                   5
MTH-22002         Calculus I                                  4
                    Semester II (Winter)                                                    Semester IV (Winter)
BIO-20100         General Zoology                             4        BIO-11600          Anatomy & Physiology II                   4
CHE-10201/02      General Chemistry II w/lab                  5        XXX-XXXXX          Humanities Elective                       3
ENG-10403         English Composition II w/Computers          3        XXX-XXXXX          Social Science Elective                   3
POL-10100         Intro to American Government                3        PHY-20201/02       General Physics II w/lab                  5

                                                   Pre-Pharmacy
 Nature of the Work: Pharmacists dispense drugs prescribed by physicians and other health practitioners and provide
 information to patients about medications and their use. They advise physicians and other health practitioners on the selection,
 dosages, and side effects of medications. Pharmacists must understand the use, composition, and effects of drugs. Compounding -
 the actual mixing of ingredients to form powders, tablets, capsules, ointments, and solutions - is only a small part of a
 pharmacist’s practice, because most medicines are produced by pharmaceutical companies in a standard form and dosage.
 Employment: Pharmacists held about 230,000 jobs in 2002. About 62 percent work in community pharmacies that are either
 independently owned or part of a drugstore chain, grocery store, department store, or mass merchandiser. Most community
 pharmacists are salaried employees, but some are self-employed owners.
 Job Outlook: Very good employment opportunities are expected for pharmacists over the 2002-12 period because the number of
 degrees granted in pharmacy is expected to be less than the number of job openings created by employment growth and the need
 to replace pharmacists. Median annual wage & salary earnings of pharmacists in 2002 were $77,050. Salaries range from $66,210
 and $87,250 a year.
 The Courses: The courses at Kirtland Community College are designed to provide the general education needed to transfer to a
 university. The course below do not comprise a degree but a group of transfer courses appropriate for pre-pharmacy. A license to
 practice pharmacy is requires in all states. To obtain a license, one must graduate from an accredited college of pharmacy, pass a
 state examination, and serve an internship under a licensed pharmacist.
 .



    Course                          Title                     Cr           Course                        Title                   Cr
                      Semester I (Fall)                                                      Semester III (Fall)
BIO-10100         General Biology                             4        BIO-11500          Anatomy & Physiology I                    4
CHE-10101/02      General Chemistry I w/lab                   5        XXX-XXXXX          Humanities Elective                       3
ENG-10303         English Composition I w/Computers           3        MTH-22002          Calculus I                                4
XXX-XXXXX         Humanities Elective                         3        XXX-XXXXX          Social Science Elective                   3
                    Semester II (Winter)                                                    Semester IV (Winter)
BIO-20100         General Zoology                             4        BIO-11600          Anatomy & Physiology II                   4
CHE-10201/02      General Chemistry II w/lab                  5        BIO-21000          Microbiology                              4
ENG-10403         English Composition II w/Computers          3        XXX-XXXXX          Humanities Elective                       3
MTH-20600         Application in Statistics                   4        XXX-XXXXX          Social Science Elective                   3
SPE-10500         Fundamentals of Speech                      3
                                      Pre-Veterinary Medicine
 Nature of the Work: Veterinarians care for pets, livestock, sporting and laboratory animals, and protect humans against diseases
 carried by animals. Veterinarians diagnose medical problems, dress wounds, set broken bones, perform surgery, prescribe and
 administer medicines, and vaccinate animals against diseases. They also advise owners on care and breeding.
 Job Outlook: Veterinarians held about 58,000 jobs in 2002. About 28 percent were self-employed in solo or group practices.
 Most others were salaried employees of another veterinary practice. The Federal Government employed about 1,100 civilian
 veterinarians. Most veterinarians caring for zoo animals are private practitioners who contract with zoos to provide services,
 usually on a part time basis. Very good opportunities are expected because the number of graduates from veterinary school is not
 expected to increase significantly over the 2002-12 period. Median annual earnings of veterinarians were $63,090 in 2002. The
 yearly salaries range between $49,050 and $85,770.
 The Courses: The KCC courses provide the general education courses designed to transfer to the university level for
 continuation of studies. The courses do not comprise a degree. All states in the U.S. require that veterinarians be licensed. To
 obtain a license, applicants must have a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from an accredited college of veterinary medicine
 and pass a state board examination.
   Course                         Title                    Cr           Course                        Title                    Cr
                      Semester I (Fall)                                                  Semester III (Fall)
BIO-10100         General Biology                          4        BIO-11500 or       Anatomy & Physiology I OR                4
CHE-10101/02      General Chemistry I w/lab                5         BIO-21000          Microbiology
ENG-10303         English Composition I w/Computers        3        XXX-XXXXX          General Elective                        5
XXX-XXXXX         Humanities Elective                      3        PHY-20101/02       General Physics I w/lab                 5
MTH-22002         Calculus I                               4        XXX-XXXXX          Social Science Elective                 3
                   Semester II (Winter)                                                 Semester IV (Winter)
BIO-20100         General Zoology                          4        BIO-11600 or       Anatomy & Physiology II OR               4
CHE-10201/02      General Chemistry II w/lab               5         BIO-20200          General Botany
ENG-10403         English Composition II w/Computers       3        XXX-XXXXX          Humanities Elective                     3
XXX-XXXXX         Humanities Elective                      3        XXX-XXXXX          Social Science Elective                 3
POL-10100         Intro to American Government             3        PHY-20201/02       General Physics II w/lab                5


                                               Pre-Chiropractic
 Nature of the Work: Under Construction.
 Job Outlook: Under Construction.
 The Courses: The KCC courses provide the general education courses designed to transfer to the university level for
 continuation of studies. The courses do not comprise a degree. This statement is Under Construction.

            Subject Area               Credits                  Courses (Credit hours are listed after each course.)
  Biology                                8          • BIO-11500 – Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
                                                    • BIO-11600 – Anatomy and Physiology II (4)
  Inorganic Chemistry                     10        • CHE-10101/02 – General Chemistry I with Lab (4/1)
                                                    • CHE-10201/02 – General Chemistry II with Lab (4/1)
  Physics                                 10        • PHY-20101/02 – General Physics I with Lab (4/1)
                                                    • PHY-20201/02 – General Physics II with Lab (4/1)
  Communication/Writing/Speech             6        • Literature courses are not recommended (6 or more)
  Humanities and Social Sciences          18        • Select courses from: Anthropology, Classics, Communications, Criminal
                                                    Justice, Economics, Education, English, Fine Arts, Foreign Languages,
                                                    Government, History, Psychology, Philosophy, Political Science, Religion,
                                                    and Sociology

 Organic Chemistry: An academic year of Organic Chemistry is not available at this institution. Please contact Palmer College of
 Chiropractic Admissions Department for assistance in selecting the appropriate course(s).

 THIS PROGRAM IS SUBJECT TO REVISION DUE TO ADDITIONS AND/OR
 DELETIONS IN THE COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY BULLETIN.
                            COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
This portion of the 2007-2008 College Catalog lists all courses offered by Kirtland Community College. Courses are separated
into their respective subject areas. The following example displays how to properly interpret a course description:

EXAMPLE:
CHE-10003          Chemical Science                                  (F,W)                                   4 (3-2)
                   Course description would be inserted here.
                   Prerequisite: DEV-07300 or
                   Corequisite: DEV-07300
                   (Credit Type)

Chemical Science presents the elementary principles of inorganic, physical, and organic chemistry. It is intended to introduce
college chemistry, or to satisfy course requirements in technical fields such as nursing. Prerequisite or corequisite: DEV-07300.

1.    Course Number: Composed of three letters and a number. The letters identify a course by subject area. In this case, CHE
      is for Chemistry.

2.    Course Title: Identifies a course by name.

3.    Course Availability: The letter code designates the semester in which the course is usually offered: S = Summer; W =
      Winter; F = Fall; and V = Variable (occasionally or on demand if sufficient enrollment develops).

4.    Credit Hours: The number of credits a course is assigned toward graduation.

5.    Lecture-Laboratory Hours: During a 15-week semester, the first number refers to the hours the student will spend per
      week in a classroom lecture. The second number refers to the instructional hours that a student will spend in a laboratory
      per week. Some clinical nursing classes list a third number that specifies the number of hours spent in a clinical setting
      each week. The addition of these figures will produce the total number of contact hours the student will spend per week in
      the class over a 15-week semester.

6.    Course Description: An explanation of the knowledge and skills gained by successful completion of the course.

7.    Prerequisite: Requirement(s) that must be met or course(s) that must be taken before enrolling in a specific course.

8.    Corequisite: Course that must be taken at the same time as the desired course.

9.    Distribution: Some programs require courses of a specific distribution type. The category in which a course may be used
      is listed in italics.
                                          ACCOUNTING (ACC)
ACC 10600 Fund of Accounting                                             (F)                                                4
This course is a study of the fundamental principles of accounting. Emphasis is placed on the accounting cycle from
journal entries to the preparation of financial statements for both the service and merchandising firm, including payroll
and accounting for cash.
ACC 12100 Accounting Principles I                                        (F)                                           4 (4-0)
This course provides an introduction to fundamental accounting principles. The principles are applied to the recording of
transactions as assets, liabilities, owner's equity, income and expenses. The recorded transactions are then used in the
preparation of financial statements - balance sheet, income statement and statement of owner's equity for sole
proprietorships and partnerships. Prerequisite: DEV-07300 or compentency.
ACC 12200 Accounting Principles II                                     (W)                                            4 (4-0)
This course builds on the fundamental accounting principles taught in Accounting 12100. The class covers the recording
of corporate stock and dividend transactions and the proper presentation of the stockholder's equity section of the balance
sheet. The course introduces management accounting concepts through analysis of financial statements, preparation of the
statement of cash flows, the introduction to cost accounting concepts and an understanding of the need for and
development of budgets. Prerequisite: ACC-12100.
ACC 12500 Computer Accounting w/QuickBooks                               (W)                                       4 (4-0)
This course is organized into three sections. The first section introduces students to the computer, Windows, and
QuickBooks accounting for a service business. The second section focuses on merchandising businesses. The third
section concentrates on payroll and creating a company using QuickBooks. Accounting concepts and their relationship to
QuickBooks Pro 2000 are presented in each chapter. In addition to accounting concepts, students use a fictitious company
and receive hands-on training in the use of QuickBooks Pro within each chapter.
                                       ALLIED HEALTH (ALH)
ALH 10101 Medical Terminology                                          (F,W,S)                                       2 (2-0)
This course is a survey study in the word-building system for medical terms. It covers word roots, combining forms,
prefixes, suffixes, and medical word-building and decoding. Emphasis is placed on the correct spelling of terms, as well
as definition and usage according to medical specialties. This course can be utilized by students who are planning a health
career.
ALH 10400 Nursing Assistant                                            (F,W,S)                                       5 (3-5)
This course will prepare students to provide competent, evidence-based assistive nursing care in a variety of healthcare
settings, with primary focus on the elderly. Emphasis will be placed on effective communication and interpersonal skills;
infection control measures; safety and emergency procedures; and the promotion of residents’ independence and rights.
Successful completion of this course will prepare students to be eligible for the state competency evaluation exam and
placement on state Nurse Aide Registry. Prerequisite: Physical Examination, TB Test, Uniform, and clean criminal
background.
ALH 10801 Pathology                                                    (W)                                          3 (3-0)
This survey course focuses on basic diseases, components of diagnosis, etiology, common manifestations, and treatment.
This course is utilized by students who are planning a health career. Prerequisite: ALH-10101 or permission of instructor,
BIO-10701, and BIO- 10702.
ALH 11201 Medical Ethics & Law                                          (F,W)                                          1 (1-0)
This course provides an introduction to the health care professional’s role, ethical dilemmas faced in the field, and legal
responsibilities in individuals’ roles and in society.
ALH 12401 Lifetime Wellness & Nutrition                              (F,W,S)                                        2 (2-0)
This course focuses on recommended screening to maintain health, appropriate nutrition, concepts of fitness, and stress
management. It will help the student understand how an individual can plan a healthier lifestyle.
ALH 20201 Standard First Aid                                         (F,W,S)                                   1 (0.5-0.5)
This course provides information and practice for appropriate response in the event of an emergency. Students will gain
knowledge and practice in professional CPR (one-man, two- man, infant, child, AED, and choking victim) and basic first
aid.
ALH 21500 Paramedic I                                                 (V)                                           13 (11-2)
This course provides the foundation for the paramedic program and begins to prepare students to function in emergency
medical care within the scope and responsibilities of the paramedic. Hands-on practical skills training is included.
Prerequisite or corequisite: Licensed EMT or completion of EMT program and eligible for licensure.
ALH 21701 Basic Emergency Medical Technician                            (V)                                        10 (7-3)
This course prepares students to function in emergency medical services within the scope and responsibilities of a Basic
EMT. Hands-on skills lab practice and structured clinical experiences at hospital emergency rooms and on ambulances is
provided. Prerequisites: Valid driver’s license, no felony convictions, completed health form, and immunizations prior to
clinical.
ALH 22500 Paramedic II                                              (V)                                             13 (9-8)
This course is the second part of the paramedic program. Hands-on practical skills training is included. Prerequisite:
ALH-21500.
ALH 23500 Paramedic III                                                 (V)                                        16 (11-11)
This course is the third part of the paramedic program. It provides structured clinical experience in pre-hospital and
hospital settings. Prerequisite: ALH-22500.
ALH 24500 Paramedic IV                                                (V)                                           7 (0-7)
This course is the fourth part of the paramedic program. Further theory, hands-on training, and structured clinical
experiences are included. Prerequisite: ALH-23500.
                                                    ART (ART)
ART 10000 Art History I                                              (F)                                          3 (3-0)
This course surveys the major developments, movements, and philosophies of the visual arts from the Prehistoric to the
Renaissance period by means of lecture, slides, and videos. (Humanities Credit)
ART 10103 Art History II                                               (W)                                       3 (3-0)
This course provides a survey of the major developments, movements, and philosophies of the visual arts from the
Renaissance period to the present, by means of lecture, slides, and videos. (Humanities Credit)
ART 10500 Intro to Design                                               (F,W)                                          3 (0-4)
In this course, students will gain an understanding of the relationships between shape, form, pattern, texture, and color.
By using computers, the student will create compositions dealing with biomorphic and rectilinear shapes. This course is
intended to give the student a basic knowledge of the principles of composition and the elements of design and the role
they play in the creative process. (Humanities Credit)
ART 10600 Fund of Drawing I                                             (F,W)                                          3 (0-4)
This course will stress the process of drawing as an imitation of nature through eye-hand coordination. Drawings are
generated exclusively from still lifes as subject matter. Emphasis is on linear construction with a concern for accurate
proportion and simple positive-negative/figure-ground relationships. Value structure is introduced after an initial but solid
understanding of sighting and measuring, composition, and spatial relationships has been developed. Media is limited to
achromatic/monochromatic dry drawing materials. (Humanities Credit)
ART 10700 Painting I                                                     (F,W)                                        3 (0-4)
This course will stress the process of painting as an imitation of nature through eye-hand coordination. Paintings are
generated from photographs and still lifes (observed objects) as subject matter. Emphasis is on the exploration of
techniques with a concern for accurate proportion, simple positive-negative/figure-ground relationships, and color
dynamics. Technical realism is introduced after an initial but solid understanding of color theory, compositions, and
spatial relations has been developed. Media is limited to full-spectral wet oil materials. (Humanities Credit)
ART 10800 Ceramics I                                                     (F,W,S)                                        3 (0-4)
This course provides an introduction to clay and its characteristics as a creative medium in utilitarian and non-utilitarian
forms through hand-built and wheel-thrown objects. (Humanities Credit)
ART 11000 Watercolors                                                    (S)                                          3 (0-4)
This course will stress the process of painting as an imitation of nature through eye-hand coordination. Paintings are
generated from photographs and still lifes (observed objects) as subject matter. Emphasis is on the exploration of
techniques with a concern for accurate proportion, simple positive-negative/figure-ground relationships, and color
dynamics. Technical realism is introduced after an initial but solid understanding of color theory, compositions, and
spatial relations has been developed. Media is limited to full-spectral wet watercolor materials. (Humanities Credit)
ART 11400 Sculpture I                                                   (F,W)                                         3 (0-4)
Students will explore the processes and materials of sculpture (clay, stone, wood, plaster, metals, and other media) with
an emphasis on the concepts of three-dimensional form and space. (Humanities Credit)
ART 11500 Photography I                                                  (F,W)                                         3 (2-2)
This course offers an introduction to the basic technical skills of photography as a creative medium for personal
expression. Students must provide a 35mm camera. (Humanities Credit)
ART 19000 Digital Communications I                                    (F,W)                                        3 (1-3)
This course is designed to offer a thorough grounding in the language and process of graphic design, from comps to
finished mechanicals, with an emphasis on fine typography and an understanding of Photoshop imaging techniques.
(Humanities Credit)
ART 20600 Drawing II                                                    (F,W)                                        3 (0-4)
This course stresses the process of drawing as an imitation of nature through eye-hand coordination. Drawings are
generated from still life and photographs as subject matter. In Drawing I, emphasis is on linear construction with a
concern for accurate proportion and simple positive-negative/figure-ground relationships. Emphasis in Drawing II is on
value structure and the development of the realistic rendering techniques. Students should show a concentration in
experimental media, techniques, spatial relationships, and conceptual processes of drawing. Prerequisite: ART-10600.
(Humanities Credit)
ART 20700 Painting II                                                     (F,W)                                      3 (0-4)
Painting II will continue to stress the process of painting as an imitation of nature through eye-hand coordination.
Paintings are generated from photographs and still lifes as subject matter. Students embark on a wider exploration of
techniques with a concern for accurate proportion, simple positive-negative/figure-ground relationships, and color
dynamics. Technical realism is one approach used to develop a continuing understanding of color theory, composition,
and spatial relationships. Emphasis is on the student’s personal development and refinement of personal expression.
Media is limited to full-spectral wet oil materials. Prerequisite: ART-10700. (Humanities Credit)
ART 20800 Ceramics II                                               (F,W,S)                                       3 (0-4)
This course offers advanced study of forms in clay with emphasis on wheel-thrown objects, glaze calculations, and kiln
procedures. Prerequisite: ART-10800. (Humanities Credit)
ART 21400 Sculpture II                                                (F,W)                                         3 (0-4)
Students will be exposed to a broad variety of materials and techniques. Greater emphasis will be placed on scale and
style. Prerequisite: ART-11400. (Humanities Credit)
ART 21500 Photography II                                             (F,W)                                           3 (2-2)
This course provides creative work for the advanced student in developing a photography portfolio. This course will
expand upon the techniques and skills learned in Photography I. Students will explore a variety of films and specialized
processing techniques, as well as creative darkroom printing procedures. Students must provide a 35mm camera.
Prerequisite: ART-11500. (Humanities Credit)
ART 21800 Ceramics (Studio Problems)                                   (F,W,S)                                       3 (0-4)
Students will be expected to begin developing a style, concentrating their studies on specific forming techniques. A
greater emphasis will be put on formulation of glazes and operating of kilns. Prerequisite: ART-20800. (Humanities
Credit)
ART 22400 Advanced Sculpture I                                           (F,W)                                          3 (0-4)
This course will allow students to intensify their studies of techniques briefly touched on in Sculpture I and II. Each
student will be encouraged to explore how personal issues influence the development of his/her own style. Prerequisite:
ART-21400. (Humanities Credit)
ART 22500 Intro to Color Photography                                  (F,W)                                          3 (0-4)
By using color transparency film, computers, and/or color negative film, students will explore the use of color as a
compositional element in photography. Prerequisite: ART-11500. (Humanities Credit)
ART 22800 Ceramics (Studio Operations)                                   (F,W,S)                                          3 (0-4)
This course will be devoted to polishing the students’ skills in all areas. Great attention will be given to kiln operation,
glazing techniques, mould making, and kiln and studio equipment fabrication. Prerequisite: ART-21800. (Humanities
Credit)
ART 23400 Advanced Sculpture II                                          (F,W)                                       3 (0-4)
During this course, students will pursue their own particular interests. Students will be encouraged to experiment with
different media and ideas. Prerequisite: ART-22400. (Humanities Credit)
ART 23500 Digital Communications II                                  (F,W)                                            3 (1-3)
Digital Communications II teaches advanced page layout using the industry standard software QuarkXPress. Specifically,
XPress Tag (which allows the student to use a favorite word processor to completely format a QuarkXPress document),
books and synchronization (which allows the student to split large Quark files into several smaller files), and indexing
with an indexing Xtension. Prerequisite: ART-19000. (Humanities Credit)
ART 25000 Illustration I                                                 (F,W)                                            3 (1-3)
This is an introductory course in the basic black, white, and color media illustration techniques with exploration in
figurative drawing, media techniques, color and composition, spatial relationships, and conceptual progress of page
layout. Illustration I will utilize the knowledge gained in Fundamentals of Drawing I to produce artwork that tells a story
or expresses an idea. Artwork is generated by the media available to the student that best fits the idea, such as graphite,
charcoal, ink, digital, photography, paint, colored pencil, etc. The ultimate goal in illustration is to create work that can
be used for publication, whether magazine, book, brochure, etc. Prerequisite: ART-10600. (Humanities Credit)
ART 26000 Illustration II                                            (F,W)                                               3 (1-3)
Emphasis will be placed on the exploration of color media and processes within specific illustration assignments.
Problem-solving is encouraged through creative investigation. Prerequisite: ART-25000. (Humanities Credit)
ART 27504 Advanced Drawing                                          (F,W)                                      3 (1-3)
This course continues the elements of Drawing II and emphasizes independent problem-solving, refinement of technical
skills and the development of conceptualization processes. (Humanities Credit)
ART 27531 Rendering                                                     (F,W)                                                  3
Course description not currently available. Please contact instructor for more information.
ART 27532 Photo Studio Problems                                         (F,W)                                                  3
Course description not currently available. Please contact instructor for more information.
ART 27533 Watercolors II                                               (S)                                           3 (1-3)
An advanced course in the basic painting sequence, Watercolors II will continue to stress the process of painting as an
imitation of nature through eye-hand coordination. Students embark on a wider exploration of techniques with a concern
for accurate proportions, simple positive-negative/figure-ground relationships, and color dynamics. Technical realism is
one approach to create with a continuing understanding of color theory, composition, and spatial relationships. Emphasis
is on the student’s personal development and refinement of personal expression. Media is limited to full-spectral
watercolor materials. Prerequisite: ART-11000 (Humanities Credit)
ART 27545 Computer Generated Images I                                   (F,W)                                     3 (1-3)
In this course, students will learn the fundamental concepts and features of Adobe Photoshop. These concepts include
photo editing and retouching, color correction, layer basics, and special effects. (Humanities Credit)
ART 27546 Computer Generated Images II                              (F,W)                                       3 (1-3)
Building on the techniques learned in ART-27545, this course teaches advanced techniques used by professional graphic
artists and photographers. Prerequisite: ART-27545. (Humanities Credit)
ART 27550 Digital Darkroom                                           (F,W)                                           3 (1-3)
Through the use of conventional cameras/processes and their digital counterparts, students will learn to scan, edit,
manipulate, and print photographic images. (Humanities Credit)
ART 27553 Adv Black & White Photography                                (F,W)                                       3 (1-3)
Students will draw on skills acquired in Photography I and II to develop and polish a personal style. Assignments will be
developed to aid the student in pursuing their own unique goals. Prerequisite: ART-21500. (Humanities Credit)
ART 27565 Comic Book Illustration                                       (F,W)                                            3 (1-3)
This course provides a basic introduction to comic book illustration, with exploration in figure drawing, media,
techniques, spatial relationships, and the conceptual progress of page layout. (Humanities Credit)
ART 27566 Computer Generated Images III                              (F,W)                                   3 (1-3)
Building on the fundamentals learned in ART-27545 and ART-27546, this course explores the advanced type techniques
and effects, layout, and design. Prerequisite: ART-27546. (Humanities Credit)
ART 27571 Computer Animation I                                         (F,W)                                         3 (1-3)
Computer Animation I is an introductory study of the three-dimensional computer images and animation. The class will
use 3D Studio to create three-dimensional imagery, apply texture maps, and lighting effects. Several animation
techniques will also be studied. Students will meet in small groups to discuss lessons and activities. (Humanities Credit)
ART 27573 Computer Animation II                                        (F,W)                                                  3
This course further develops the student's skill in 3D Studio Max. It will emphasize 'realistic' rendering by means of
developing the student's conceptual and technical understanding of effective texture and lighting.
ART 27575 DS-Computer Animation III                                     (F,W)                                            3
This course focuses on advanced techniques for animators. Both classical animation and new digital skills and techniques
will be covered with an emphasis on the situations that are best suited for the student's ultimate goal in their work.
ART 27578 Computer Generated Images IV                               (F,W)                                         3 (1-3)
This course continues the exploration of advanced type techniques and effects, layout, & design. Prerequisite: ART-
27566 (Humanities Credit)
ART 27581 Children's Book Illustration                                  (F,W)                                         3 (1-3)
This course provides a basic introduction to aesthetic principles, including color and composition, through a variety of
materials, with emphasis on media and techniques for children’s storybooks. (Humanities Credit)
ART 27587 Painting IV                                                   (F,W)                                        3 (1-3)
Emphasis will be placed on the student’s ability to develop ideas, themes, and motifs of personal significance and the
formal, technical skills to successfully execute his/her work. The course will also examine important theoretical and
aesthetic issues related to art and will review major figures in contemporary painting. Prerequisite: ART-21600.
(Humanities Credit)
ART 27590 Watercolors III                                              (S)                                          3 (1-3)
An advanced course in the painting sequence, Watercolors III will emphasize individual development and refinement of
personal expression in various approaches to painting. Students embark on a wider exploration of techniques with
concern for accurate proportions, positive-negative/figure-ground relationships, and color dynamics while finding the
artist within. Realism is only one approach to creating with a continuing understanding of color theory, composition, and
spatial relationships. Prerequisite: ART-27533. (Humanities Credit)
ART 27598 Portfolio II                                                (F,W)                                                   3
This course continues the elements of Portfolio to develop a unified body of work.
ART 27611 Rendering II                                              (F,W)                                                3 (1-3)
This course continues the elements of Rendering in superrealism. (Humanities Credit)
ART 28000 Portfolio                                                      (F,W)                                           3 (3-1)
This is an advanced course in portfolio preparation. It will stress the process of preparing an intensive portfolio for the
artist’s market. Résumés and artist’s statements are written to develop an initial but solid understanding of the artist’s
work.
                                          ASTRONOMY (AST)
AST 10201       Astronomy I Lecture                                 (V)                                             3 (0-3)
Introductory course studying Astronomy and related sciences. Covering topics of solar/stellar structure and evolution, and
cosmology. Prerequisite: DEV-07300. Corequisites: MTH-12000 and AST-10102. (Science credit)
AST 10202        Astronomy I Laboratory                             (V)                                           1 (0-2)
Introducing the techniques for mapping and measuring of the physical universe, and become familiar with the night and
day skies. Develop understanding of the mechanisms of the universe. Corequisite: AST-10101. (Science credit)
                                           AUTOMOTIVE (AUT)
AUT 16100 Engine Fundamentals & Overhaul                                (W)                                        4 (3-3)
This course provides an introduction to design, operation, troubleshooting, and service procedures of modern gasoline
engines. The student will participate in disassembly, measurement, inspection, and reassembly of engine components. Use
of technical data and service procedures will be stressed. Prerequisite: AUT-16302 or instructor’s permission.
AUT 16201 Fuel Systems & Emission Control                              (W)                                            4 (3-3)
This lecture/lab course is designed to provide instruction in fundamentals, construction, operation, troubleshooting, and
servicing of the components of the fuel and emission control systems. Students will participate in disassembly and
reassembly of components and fuel systems and in emission control testing. Prerequisite: AUT-16401 or instructor’s
permission.
AUT 16302 Automotive Fundamentals                                        (F)                                            4 (2-3)
This is a lecture/lab course designed to familiarize the student with the automotive unit, design, production, operating,
testing, servicing, and job opportunities. Technician certification will be covered on the state and national levels. General
ethics at school, on and off the job, along with sexual harassment education, will also be addressed.
AUT 16401 Basic Electricity                                             (F)                                              3 (2-2)
This electrical course is designed as a prerequisite for automotive electrical classes. Areas of instruction will cover basic
electricity, magnetism, fundamentals of batteries, starting motors, charging systems, ignition systems, electrical
accessories, and basic wiring. Prerequisite: DEV-06300.
AUT 16801 Automotive Electrical Systems                                   (W)                                          4 (3-3)
In this course, students will develop technical knowledge and skills necessary to service and diagnose modern electrical
systems. Emphasis will be placed on electrical testing techniques and use of electrical testing equipment. Instruction and
lab work will cover chassis wiring, electrical accessories, batteries, starters, charging systems, and ignition system
service. Prerequisite: AUT-16401 or instructor’s permission.
AUT 17703 Automotive Braking Systems                                   (F)                                           4 (3-3)
This course is designed to provide instruction and skill development in automotive brake system theory and service.
Students will develop skills and technical knowledge in the evolution of operation, theory, diagnosis, and repair of
conventional and modern computer-controlled anti-lock braking systems. Corequisite: AUT-16302 or instructor’s
permission.
AUT 20402 Intro to Auto Service Management                              (W)                                           2 (2-0)
This course is a study of facility licensing and management, with coverage of customer relations, promotional techniques,
ethics, sexual harassment issues, job-seeking skills, and the laws of the State of Michigan as they apply to the automotive
repair industry. The subjects of warranty processing, expense control, productivity, and time labor standards are defined
and studied. Employee compensation and incentives, along with job opportunities and classifications, are also discussed
and identified. Prerequisite: AUT-16302 or instructor permission.
AUT 20403 Advanced Auto Service Management                            (W)                                                     1
This course is a study of management techniques which are less tangible than previously covered in AUT-20402. It
includes administrative leadership functions, stress management, the employee acquisition and dismissal process, and
motivational techniques. Prerequisite: ENG10303. Prerequisite or corequisite: AUT20402.
AUT 20404 Auto Service Management                                    (W)                                          3 (3-0)
This course includes AUT-20402, Introduction to Automotive Service Management, and additionally studies
management techniques, which are less tangible. It includes administrative leadership functions, stress management, the
employee acquisition and dismissal process, and motivational techniques. Prerequisites: AUT-16302, and ENG-10303.
AUT 21800 Automatic Transmissions                                        (F)                                        4 (2-4)
In this lecture/lab course, students are prepared to service, diagnose, and overhaul commonly used automatic
transmissions and transaxles. Emphasis will be placed on principles of operation, model variations, servicing techniques,
and troubleshooting procedures. Prerequisite: AUT-16302 or instructor’s permission.
AUT 23101 Auto Service Area-Chassis                                     (W)                                           4 (0-6)
This is a specialty service lab for students pursuing the Chassis Specialist certificate. Prerequisites: AUT-16201, AUT-
16302, and AUT-17702. Corequisite: AUT-16500.
AUT 23102 Auto Service Area-Powertrain                                  (W)                                           4 (0-6)
This is a specialty service lab for students pursuing the Powertrain Specialist certificate. Prerequisites: AUT-17702 and
17901. Corequisite: AUT-16100.
AUT 23103 Auto Service Area-Electrical                                   (W)                                            4 (0-6)
This is a specialty service lab for students pursuing the Electrical Specialist certificate. Prerequisites: AUT-16201, AUT-
16302, AUT-16401, AUT-16801, and AUT-26601.
AUT 23104 Automotive Internship                                         (W)                                          5 (0-5)
This internship offers supervised automotive repair experience at a selected automotive repair facility. Students
accomplish the course objectives while employed in the automotive industry. This course is required for completion of
the associate in applied science, and the master certificate program. Prerequisites: successful completion of automotive
program curriculum. The student will complete 180 hours in this course. Corequisite: AUT-17901 or instructor
permission.
AUT 26500 Steering Suspension & Alignment                             (W)                                         4 (3-3)
This is a lecture/lab course covering nomenclature and operating principles of steering and suspension systems. Emphasis
is on skill development in servicing power steering systems, replacement of suspension components, and four-wheel
alignment. Prerequisite: AUT-16302 and AUT-17702 or instructor's permission.
AUT 26601 Engine Performance & Diagnostics                              (F)                                             4 (3-3)
Through the study of theory and use of testing and diagnosis procedures for computerized engine controls, the student
will develop the skills required of a diagnostic tune-up technician. Prerequisites: successful completion of first and second
semester of automotive curriculum or instructor’s permission and AUT-16201, AUT-16302, AUT-16401, and AUT-
16801.
AUT 27000 Heating & Air Conditioning                                     (F)                                                   3
In this basic refrigeration and air conditioning course, students will gain skills in refrigeration tools and materials, basic
refrigeration systems, compressors, refrigerant controls, electric circuit controls, refrigerants testing, and repair of air
conditioning units. Prerequisite: AUT-16302 or instructor's permission.
AUT 27900 Manual Trans Drivelines/Rear Axles                              (W)                                               4
This is a lecture/lab course in the function, construction, operation, servicing, and troubleshooting of conventional power
transmission components used in passenger cars and light trucks; clutch, manual transmission/transaxel, propeller shafts,
universal joints, and rear axles. The student is given experience in disassembly and reassembly of component parts.
Prerequisite: AUT-16302 or instructor permission.
                                               AVIATION (AIR)
AIR 25000        Private Pilot Ground School                              (W)                                           3 (3-0)
This is a beginning course for students engaged in primary flight instruction or interested in such instruction. Topics
include introduction to airplanes, airplane systems, theory of flight, airports, communications, air traffic control, weight
and balance, meteorology, Federal Aviation Regulations, Airmen's Information Manual, flight computer, basic
navigation, performance factor, radio navigation, and medical factors of flight. Upon successful completion, the student
will be qualified to take the Federal Aviation Administration written examination for private pilots.
                                                BIOLOGY (BIO)
BIO 10100         General Biology                                         (F,W)                                           4 (3-2)
This is a lecture and laboratory course in the basic principles of life science; genetics, origin, and evolution of life,
structure, function, and classification of organisms and interactions in the ecosystem are stressed. (Science Credit)
BIO 10700        Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology                  (F,W,S)                                            4
This course provides an abbreviated study of the gross and microscopic structures and functions of the systems, organs,
and tissues of the human body. Terminology and common pathologies of each system will be introduced. This course
includes two hours of laboratory.
BIO 11500        Anatomy & Physiology I                                 (F,W)                                         4 (3-2)
The first of a two-semester sequence, the first semester covers the nature of life science, organization of the human body,
cell chemistry and metabolism, the integumentary system, histology, the skeletal and muscular systems, and the nervous
system. Prerequisite: high school chemistry with a minimum grade of "B"; or permission of instructor. Nursing students
must have taken course within 10 years of entering the nursing program. (Science Credit, except for Associate in Science)
BIO 11600        Anatomy & Physiology II                              (F,W,S)                                       4 (3-2)
This is a continuation of BIO-11500 with emphasis on the sensory system, endocrine system, cardiovascular system,
respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system with an introduction to genetics. The
course will conclude with a study of pregnancy and human growth and development. Prerequisite: BIO-11500 and High
School Chemistry with a minimum grade of "B"; or permission of instructor. (Science Credit, except Associate in Science)
BIO 20100         General Zoology                                        (W)                                          4 (3-2)
This course provides a lecture/laboratory survey of the major animal groups including internal and external structure;
reproductive processes; behavior patterns; life history; and special features peculiar to each group. Some field work in
identification of local animals is included. Prerequisite: BIO-10100 or permission of instructor. (Science Credit)
BIO 20200        General Botany                                          (V)                                            4 (3-2)
This is a survey course in plant morphology. The structure, classification, and natural history of major plant groups is
stressed, as well as extensive field work in the collection and identification of local plant species. (Science Credit)
BIO 21000       Microbiology                                              (W)                                        4 (3-2)
This course provides a lecture/laboratory study of the major groups of microbes. The structure of the unicellular organism
will be compared to the structure of multicellular organisms. Applications to medicine and ecology will be discussed. The
course is designed for the liberal arts student as well as the health sciences student. Prerequisites: CHE-10003, CHE-
10004, and BIO-10100, or permission of instructor. (Science Credit)
BIO 21300        Nature Study                                             (F,W,S)                                         4 (3-2)
A lecture/laboratory and field course in the behavior, ecology, and classification of plants and animals, including
recognition of local flora and fauna, the course is designed to give natural history background material to the liberal arts
non-science major, to the non-specialists interested in outdoor life, to those interested in nature interpretation, and to
elementary school teachers. (Science Credit)
BIO 21500        Pathophysiology                                      (F,S)                                          4 (4-0)
Content of this course will examine the mechanism underlying disease processes and the subsequent adaptation and
alterations in body function. Selective health problems will be emphasized throughout the course. Clinical application
will be made in concurrent and subsequent nursing courses. Prerequisites: ALH-10101 and BIO-11600. (Science Credit,
except for Associate in Science)
                               BUSINESS & MARKETING (BUS)
BUS 10100       Intro to Business                                       (F,W,S)                                      3 (3-0)
This course provides an orientation to characteristics and functions of business, business environment, opportunities,
ownership, management, organization, marketing, physical plant, personnel, finance, ethics, law, and controls for
decision making.
BUS 201--        Internship in Business & Marketing                   (V)                                             3-9
This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to earn credit while obtaining meaningful discipline-
related work experience outside the classroom setting. Students are expected to spend a minimum of 128 hours (3 credits)
in an appropriate work setting. The course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. Prerequisite: 2.5 GPA,
sophomore standing, employer and instructor approval, and submission to, and approval by, business department.
BUS 20200        Grant Writing                                         (W)                                            3 (3-0)
This course is designed to give students experience in the research, writing, and planning skills involved in preparing
grants. Emphasis is placed on writing grants for nonprofits.
BUS 21000        Prin of Management                                   (W)                                          3 (3-0)
This course examines management as a basic process of organizing, directing, actualizing, and controlling the operation
of a business enterprise. Prerequisite: BUS-10100 or permission of instructor.
BUS 21100         E-Commerce Management                                (W)                                          3 (3-0)
This course examines and integrates the three elements that are crucial to the success of any e-commerce operation, those
being, internet technology, business models and marketing. It addresses how companies are using the Internet to add
value using the six-C framework of commerce, content, communication, connectivity, community, and computing. E-
commerce management rests on three pillars - Internet and related technologies, business models, and marketing. Future
managers learn how the Internet and the Web are organized, how sites can be located and how sites relate to one another.
Managers then learn how these technologies affect business variables such as sales, costs, revenues and marketing.
Prerequisite: BUS-10100, or permission of instructor.
BUS 21500       Legal Environment of Business                           (F)                                            3 (3-0)
This course provides an introduction to the legal environment as it relates to business and society, to provide the student
with a basic understanding of law as it pertains to business operations and their relationships with society.
BUS 24000        Financial Management                                  (W)                                          3 (3-0)
This course is designed to provide a basic foundation in the major areas of finance, providing the necessary background
for courses in business finance, financial management, monetary theory, banking problems, public finance, agricultural
finance, security markets, and related courses. Prerequisite: ACC-12200 or permission of instructor.
BUS 24500        Personnel Management                                   (F)                                           3 (3-0)
The object of this course is to acquaint students with the problems of personnel management. Personnel problems that
deal directly with departmental organization, employment procedures, methods of testing, occupational descriptions, job
evaluations, merit rating, wage plans, wage and salary control, aids to employees, safety, health and recreation, and
employer-employee relations are covered.
                 CAREER & PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT (CAR)
CAR 10201 College Survival and Success I                                (F,W,S)                                      1 (1-0)
This course introduces skills necessary for early survival and success in college. It focuses on personal development,
learning style analysis, time management, goal setting, and a thorough overview and orientation of Kirtland Community
College programs, services, and resources.
CAR 10202 College Survival and Success II                              (F,W,S)                                      1 (1-0)
This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to cultivate the academic skills necessary to become
confident and capable learners. Students complete the college student inventory and discuss strategies. Topics include
effective listening and reading strategies, concentration and memory, note taking, and test taking strategies.
CAR 10203 College Survival and Success III                              (F,W,S)                                     1 (1-0)
This course focuses on higher order skills such as creative and critical thinking, decision making, and communication. It
also examines wealth and stress management and assists students in identifying career goals.
CAR 10204 College Success and Survival                                 (F,W,S)                                          3 (3-0)
This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to cultivate the skills, values, and attitudes necessary to
become capable and confident learners. It introduces students to college resources, programs, and services and assists
students in identifying career goals.
CAR 10300 Career Development Skills                                      (F,W)                                            1 (1-0)
Career development skills are those abilities that allow students to be successful in all aspects of their careers. This course
teaches career exploration, job search, employment correspondence, and interview and employability skills. Life skills
such as time management, communications, and working cooperatively are emphasized. Students will engage in written,
oral, and interpersonal activities to learn and demonstrate workplace skills.
CAR 12600 Service Learning Lab                                       (V)                                           1 (99-99)
A service-learning project designed by an instructor to supplement course learning, this may be offered either as a
required or optional lab.
CAR 200--        Service Learning Project                             (V)                                                1-5
An individual service-learning project will be designed under the supervision of the coordinator of service learning and
appropriate faculty members. The student will design a community placement as the basis for academic learning.
Prerequisite: permission of the service learning advisory committee.
                                            CHEMISTRY (CHE)
CHE 10003 Chemical Science                                             (F,W)                                         3 (3-0)
Chemical Science presents the elementary principles of inorganic, physical, and organic chemistry. It is intended to
introduce college chemistry, or to satisfy course requirements in technical fields such as nursing. Prerequisite: DEV-
07300 or high school algebra. Corequisite: CHE-10004. (Science Credit)
CHE 10004 Chemical Science Lab                                    (F,W)                                               1 (0-2)
This is a laboratory course to accompany CHE-10003. Corequisite: CHE-10003. (Science Credit)
CHE 10101 Gen Chemistry I                                              (F)                                             4 (4-0)
General Chemistry I provides a thorough discussion of the topics of atomic structure, stoichiometry, solutions and pH,
gas laws, electronic configuration and bonding theories, the periodic tables, and liquids and solids. Prerequisites: high
school chemistry or CHE-10003 and CHE-10004 and one year of high school algebra. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG-
10303 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: CHE- 10102. (Science Credit)
CHE 10102 Gen Chemistry Lab I                                     (F)                                                 1 (0-3)
This is a laboratory course to accompany CHE-10101. Corequisite: CHE-10101. (Science Credit)
CHE 10201 General Chemistry II                                       (W)                                         4 (4-0)
This is a continuation of General Chemistry I, concerned broadly with thermodynamics and kinetics. Topics discussed
include kinetics data analysis and reaction mechanisms, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, chemical
thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, and some descriptive chemistry of the elements. Prerequisite: CHE-10101.
Corequisite: CHE-10202. (Science Credit)
CHE 10202 General Chemistry II Lab                                (W)                                                 1 (0-3)
This is a laboratory course to accompany CHE-10201. Corequisite: CHE-10201. (Science Credit)
CHE 20101 Organic Chemistry I                                          (V)                                        4 (4-0)
Modern bonding theory in organic molecules, theory of reactions, stereochemical principles, chemistry of alkanes,
cycloalkanes, alkenes, dienes, alkynes, aromatics, and alcohols, with special emphasis on reaction mechanisms.
Prerequisite: CHE10200 General Chemistry II.
CHE 20102 Organic Chemistry Lab I                                   (V)                                               1 (0-3)
Fundamental laboratory techniques and preparations. Prerequisite: CHE 10200 General Chemistry II.
CHE 20201 Organic Chemistry II                                      (V)                                           4 (4-0)
Study of ethers and epoxides, carbonyl-containing compounds, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives,
carbanion chemistry, aliphatic and aromatic nitrogen-containing compounds, with special emphasis on bioorganic
compounds, amino acids and polypeptides, carbohydrates and lipids. Prerequisite: CHE20101 Organic Chemistry I.
CHE 20202 Organic Chemistry Lab II                                  (V)                                               1 (0-3)
Fundamental laboratory techniques and preparations. Prerequisite: CHE20101 Organic Chemistry I.
                    COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (CIS)
CIS 01000         Basic Computing                                       (F,W)                                         2 (2-0)
This course is designed to help students learn about the fundamental aspects of using a computer. It is designed for
beginners who have never used a computer or are afraid to use one. This course is slower paced and does not have the
rigor of a transferable computer course. Students will learn about hardware components, Windows, word processing
software, the Internet, and e-mail. This course does not transfer to other colleges or universities. No prerequisite.
CIS 10500        Intro to Computers                                    (F,W,S)                                       3 (3-0)
Students will become familiar with hardware and software terminology/concepts, Windows operating system, word
processing, spreadsheet, database management, presentation software, data communications, the Internet, and
ethical/moral issues related to computing. Application software used is the
current version of Microsoft Office Professional and the current version of the Internet Explorer. Keyboarding skills are
required and necessary for successful completion of this course. Prerequisite: Keyboarding skills.
CIS 11700        Visual Basic I                                        (W)                                      3 (1.5-1.5)
This course serves as an introduction to Visual Basic. The course introduces concepts concerning the design, creation,
test, and execution of Visual Basic Applications. Prerequisite: CIS-10500 with a "B" or better, or demonstrated
competency.
CIS 11800       Visual Basic II                                       (V)                                    3 (1.5-1.5)
This Visual Basic Programming II course reviews algorithmic design concepts and implements them using the Visual
Basic programming language. This course addresses Visual Basic programming constructs, arrays, files, and functions;
then moves to advanced concepts, controls, and objects. Prerequisite: CIS-11700.
CIS 17001       Microsoft Office                                        (F,W)                                        3 (3-0)
This course covers how to utilize and integrate all the applications contained within Microsoft Office. Exercises will
involve business applications using the word processing, spreadsheet, database management, and presentation software
components of Microsoft Office. Application software used Microsoft Office Professional which includes: Word, Excel,
Access, and PowerPoint. Prerequisite: CIS-10500 or demonstrated competency.
CIS 17102        PowerPoint                                            (V)                                          1 (1-0)
Students will create and modify slide show presentations using Microsoft PowerPoint. Emphasis will be placed on
customizing slide shows by: a) changing colors, fonts, and styles; b) adding clip art or WordArt objects; c) embedding
spreadsheets; and d) adding animation and transition effects. Students will learn how to present the show on a computer
monitor and on the World Wide Web. Application software used is the current commercial version of Microsoft
PowerPoint. Prerequisite: CIS-10500, or CIS-22302, or demonstrated competency.
CIS 17200       Publisher                                                (S)                                            2 (2-0)
The student will learn desktop publishing concepts by working through hands-on projects that produce newsletters,
brochures, web sites, business cards, letterheads, business forms, and specialty documents. Students will also learn how to
customize publications and how to integrate other office objects (i.e., spreadsheets, charts, etc.) into a publication.
Application software used is the current version of Microsoft Publisher. No prerequisite.
CIS 17300        Microsoft Access                                       (V)                                           1 (1-0)
Students will learn how to create database tables, queries, reports and forms. Students will also learn how to develop
relationships among the tables and how to publish database information to the internet. Application software used is
Microsoft Access. Prerequisite: CIS-10500 or CIS-22302; or demonstrated competency.
CIS 19600        Hardware Certification                                 (F)                                          3 (3-0)
This course will attempt to prepare students for the industry standard hardware certification exam. Topics will include
major hardware components such as motherboards, processors, memory, storage, and peripheral devices. Operating
System software from DOS up to the current Windows version will be covered. Techniques for troubleshooting problems
and hands-on applications will be presented. Prerequisite: CIS-10500.
CIS 19700        OS Certification                                     (F)                                        3 (1-2)
This course will help prepare students for the industry standard hardware certification exam with an emphasis on
Operating System (OS) core components. Topics include Windows Operating System software and a review of major
hardware components that address: motherboards, processors, memory, storage, and peripheral devices. Prerequisite: CIS-
10500, or demonstrated competency.
CIS 21000        Internet & Web Page Development                        (F,S)                                         3 (1-2)
Students will be given an overview of the Internet, WWW and Windows file management techniques. Students will learn
how to design and create W3C compliant web pages using HTML, XHTML, and cascading style sheets (CSS). Areas
covered include: css formatting, hyperlinks, images, image maps, tables, newsletter formats, forms, framed pages,
multimedia files, and java applets. Students will also learn how to create their own graphical images for their pages using
web-based sites and Photoshop. Completed pages will be uploaded to the student’s Internet web site and debugged.
Prerequisite: CIS-10500.
CIS 21500        Web Animation & Multimedia                           (F)                                        3 (3-0)
Students will create animated graphic content for websites using the current commercial version of Macromedia Flash.
Prerequisite: CIS-10500 or demonstrated compentency.
CIS 21900       MacIntosh OS X                                       (W)                                            1 (1-0)
The student will learn functions and commands in the MacIntosh operating system. Specific topics to be covered in this
course include working with windows and menus, customizing the desktop, managing files and folders, and running
application programs that come with the operating system. This course will offer a brief exposure to internet and multi-
media applications, and how they operate in the Mac OS environment.
CIS 22302       Windows XP                                         (V)                                           1 (1-0)
The student will learn functions and commands in the Windows operating system. Specific topics to be covered in this
course include working with windows and menus, customizing the windows environment, managing files and folders,
running application programs that come with Windows, multitasking, exploring multimedia features, and investigating
data communication features.
CIS 22400         UNIX                                               (W)                                           2 (2-0)
Students will learn about the UNIX operating system environment. They will learn about the different UNIX shells and
how to issue basic system commands. Students will explore the UNIX file system (partitions, directories, navigation,
etc.). Other topics covered include the following: 1) using common editors; 2) basic and advanced file management
commands; 3) creating simple and complex shell scripts; 4) using pine for e-mail; 5) using UNIX utilities; and 6)
programming in a UNIX environment. System administration will also be covered. Prerequisite: CIS-10500 or
demonstrated competency.
CIS 22500        Spreadsheets                                          (W)                                            3 (3-0)
Students will learn how to build, save, format, print, and modify spreadsheets. Students will also learn how to develop
formulas/functions, charts, link worksheets, link workbooks, utilize auditing features, use database features, and develop
macros. Application software used is Microsoft Excel 2003. Prerequisite: CIS-10500 or demonstrated competency.
CIS 22702        Microsoft Excel                                      (V)                                             1 (1-0)
This course explores the use of Microsoft Excel in business-related applications. Students will learn how to build, save,
print and modify spreadsheets as well as how to create formulas/functions and charts. Application software used is Excel
2003. (This software is packaged with Microsoft Office Standard, Microsoft Office Professional, and it can be purchased
as a standalone product). Prerequisite: CIS-10500, or CIS-22302, or demonstrated competency.
CIS 23501        Database Design                                        (F)                                          3 (2-2)
Students will learn the theoretical knowledge necessary to design and implement effective information databases. Areas
such as file layout, data structures, implementation methods, security, and web interfacing will be addressed. Students
will work with a currently popular commercially available database management system. Prerequisite: CIS-10500 or
demonstrated competency.
CIS 24000        Technology in Education                              (F)                                          3 (3-0)
Students will learn to operate a wide variety of technology-based equipment; select and assess instructional media
materials, courseware, and software; and integrate technology and media into K-12 education. No Prerequisite.
CIS 26000       Intro to Computer Networking                        (F)                                          3 (3-0)
This course serves as an overview of digital data communications. The course addresses the following: data
communications, digital and analog signals, communications media, multiplexers, data transmission, Protocols, Network
concepts, WANs, MANs, LANs, communications services, the Internet, eBusiness, network security, and network
management. Prerequisite: Keyboarding skills.
CIS 26100        Internet                                               (V)                                          1 (1-0)
This course will investigate the resources of the Internet. Areas of exploration will be the World Wide Web, e-mail,
Usenet newsgroups, FTP’s and Telnet. This course will offer the students the ability to become comfortable finding and
retrieving information from this network of networks. Prerequisite: CIS-10500 or demonstrated competency.
CIS 26200        Web Pages                                             (V)                                           1 (1-0)
Students will design and create web pages using HTML. Once a page has been created, students will edit pages to include
text formatting, hyperlinks, images, and tables. Pages will be uploaded to the Internet and debugged. Prerequisite: CIS-
10500 or demonstrated competency.
CIS 26300        Advanced Web Pages                                  (V)                                            1 (1-0)
Students will create a wide variety of web pages including forms, newsletters, and framed pages. They will also learn how
to create and add multimedia files to web pages and how to add code for Java applets. Corequisite: CIS-26200 or
demonstrated competency.
CIS 26400        JavaScript                                             (W)                                                3
JavaScript is a programming language that resides inside HTML documents. It is used to create interactive web pages that
incorporate banners, pop-up windows, calculations, interactive forms, dynamic images, etc., into web pages. JavaScript
topics such as conditionals, functions, objects, properties, methods, event handlers, forms, and frames will be covered in
this course. We will also cover ASP commands including database connectivity to give students exposure to serverside
scripting. Prerequisite: CIS21000 or CIS26300 or demonstrated competency.
CIS 27001        Programming I                                          (F)                                           3 (3-0)
This course investigates general methods of problem-solving, principles of structured programming, and algorithmic
design. This includes data types and variable declarations, I/O (input and output), arithmetic operators, assignment and
expressional operators, static and automatic variables, external declaration, functions and modular programming, array
processing, pointers, record data structures, and file I/O. Programming language used is C. Prerequisite: CIS-10500 or
demonstrated competency. Corequisite: MTH-12000 or demonstrated competency.
CIS 27101        Programming II                                            (W)                                          4 (4-0)
General methods of problem-solving, principles of algorithmic design, and object-oriented design are discussed. This
includes data types, functions, arrays, pointers, objects, classes, class inheritance, polymorphism, exceptions, input,
output, and file-handling techniques. Other topics introduced include linked lists, stacks, queues, recursion, and dynamic
allocation. Programming language used is C++. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in CIS-27001 or demonstrated
competency.
CIS 27201       Web Programming                                      (V)                                          3 (3-0)
Students will produce interactive, dynamic web-based applications using popular, marketable, web programming
languages and tools. Server-side scripting and the .NETenvironment will be explored. Prerequisite: CIS-21000 (or CIS-
26200 AND CIS-26300) or demonstrated competency.
CIS 275--        Directed Study-Computer Information System            ( V)                                                1-6
This is a course designed to meet special occupational needs for individual students. Prerequisite: advisor
recommendation.
CIS 280--        Internship in Computer Information Systems           (V)                                             3-9
This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to earn credit while obtaining meaningful discipline-
related work experience outside the classroom setting. Students are expected to spend a minimum of 128 hours (3 credits)
in an appropriate work setting. The course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. Prerequisite: 2.5 G.P.A.,
sophomore standing, employer and instructor approval, and submission to, and approval by, the CIS department.
                                        COSMETOLOGY (COS)
COS 11200       Manicuring I                                           (F,W,S)                                 2.5 (0.51-4)
This course covers orientation and theory. Instruction and application include water manicure, hot oil manicure, and
pedicure, along with sanitation of equipment and implements. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of
"C-" to advance to the next section.
COS 11300        Manicuring II                                        (F,W,S)                                   2.5 (0.51-4)
This course covers theory and laboratory work on the public. Instruction and application include sculptured acrylic nails,
overlays, and fill-ins. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section.
Prerequisite: COS-11200.
COS 11400       Manicuring III                                        (F,W,S)                                   2.5 (0.51-4)
This course covers theory and laboratory work on the public. Instruction and application include nail tips (blended) and
nail wraps. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite:
COS-11300.
COS 11500       Manicuring IV                                         (F,W,S)                                2.5 (0.51-4)
This course covers theory and laboratory work on the public. Instruction and application include spa manicures, gel nails,
and hand and feet paraffin. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section.
Prerequisite: COS-11400.
COS 11600       Manicuring V                                         (F,W,S)                                     2.5 (0.51-4)
This course covers theory and laboratory work on the public. Instruction and application include nail art, air brushing,
and Michigan state laws. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section.
Prerequisite: COS-11500.
COS 11700        Manicuring VI                                          (F,W,S)                                    2.5 (0.51-4)
This course covers theory review, preparation for the final test, and practice of all curriculum in clinic or on a manikin
hand. Students complete a final exam and a simulated state board exam. Students must pass this course with a minimum
grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-11600.
COS 12100         Cosmetology I                                         (F,W,S)                                   2.5 (0.5-3.5)
This course covers orientation, career information, state laws and regulations, professional image, first aid, chemistry,
electricity, job-seeking, and professional ethics. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance
to the next section.
COS 12200         Cosmetology II                                        (F,W,S)                                 2.5 (0.5-3.5)
This course covers health, public sanitation methods, chemical agents, types, classifications of bacterial growth, biology,
infections, infection control, products, tools, equipment use and safety, bacteriology, and decontamination. Students must
pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-12100.
COS 12300        Cosmetology III                                      (F,W,S)                                 2.5 (0.5-3.5)
This course covers principles and techniques of treatment and disorders of the hair and scalp and related chemistry,
shampoos, rinses, and scalp treatments. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the
next section. Prerequisite: COS-12200.
COS 12400       Cosmetology IV                                        (F,W,S)                                2.5 (0.5-3.5)
This course covers the principles and techniques of wet styling, blow dry and waving, finger waving, and hairdressing.
Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-12300.
COS 12500        Cosmetology V                                        (F,W,S)                                   2.5 (0.5-3.5)
This course covers the principles and techniques of sectioning, removing length or bulk with a razor, scissors, clippers, or
shears in haircutting. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section.
Prerequisite: COS-12400.
COS 12600        Cosmetology VI                                          (F,W,S)                                  2.5 (0.5-3.5)
This course covers the principles and techniques of temporary, semi-permanent, deposit-only, and permanent colors,
bleaching, tinting, toning, frosting, special effects, and problems in haircoloring. Students must pass this course with a
minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-12500.
COS 12700       Cosmetology VII                                       (F,W,S)                                 2.5 (0.5-3.5)
This course covers the principles and techniques of sectioning, wrapping, processing of chemicals, and rearranging the
hair. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-
12600.
COS 12800        Cosmetology VIII                                      (F,W,S)                                    2.5 (0.5-3.5)
This course covers the principles and techniques of sectioning, curling, and relaxing hair as a texture service. Students
must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-12700.
COS 12900       Cosmetology IX                                        (F,W,S)                                  2.5 (0.5-3.5)
This course covers the principles and techniques of advanced nails with nail art. Students must pass this course with a
minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-12800.
COS 13000       Cosmetology X                                        (F,W,S)                                 2.5 (0.5-3.5)
This course covers the principles and techniques of massage, manicuring, and pedicuring. Students must pass this course
with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-12900.
COS 13100        Cosmetology XI                                       (F,W,S)                                 2.5 (0.5-3.5)
This course covers the principles and techniques of skin chemical procedures, massage, and facial treatments. Students
must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-13000.
COS 13200       Cosmetology XII                                       (F,W,S)                                  2.5 (0.5-3.5)
This course covers the principles and techniques of cosmetic application, artificial eyelashes, removal of unwanted hair,
and lash and brow tinting. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section.
Prerequisite: COS-13100.
COS 13300       Cosmetology XIII                                       (F,W,S)                                2.5 (0.5-3.5)
This course covers the principles and techniques of light therapy. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of
"C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-13200.
COS 13400        Cosmetology XIV                                     (F,W,S)                               2.5 (0.5-3.5)
This course covers the fundamentals of business management, opening a salon, and business plans. Students must pass
this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-13300.
COS 13500        Cosmetology XV                                        (F,W,S)                                  2.5 (0.5-3.5)
This course covers the principles and techniques of written agreements, licensing requirements and regulations, laws,
salon operations, policies, practices, compensation packages, payroll deductions, telephone use, advertising, sales,
communication, public/human relations, insurance, and salon safety. Students must pass this course with a minimum
grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-13400.
COS 13600       Cosmetology XVI                                         (F,W,S)                                    2.5 (0-2.5)
This course covers theory review, preparation for the final test and practice of all curriculum, and a simulated state board
exam. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-
13500.
COS 14100         Skin Care I                                           (F,W,S)                                    2.5 (0.51-4)
In this course, the student will learn how to have a professional image, the history of skin and its cells, and anatomy and
physiology. Students will also learn bacteria classifications and safety procedures for a salon. Students must pass this
course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section.
COS 14200         Skin Care II                                            (F,W,S)                                  2.5 (0.51-4)
In this course, the student will learn skin disorders, nutrition and health of the skin, chemistry and product ingredients,
skin analysis and client consultation, and the proper draping of the client. Students must pass this course with a minimum
grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-14100.
COS 14300         Skin Care III                                        (F,W,S)                                 2.5 (0.51-4)
In this course, the student will learn proper cleansing, massage and mask therapy, and how to do facials with and without
the aid of machines. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section.
Prerequisite: COS-14200.
COS 14400         Skin Care IV                                         (F,W,S)                                  2.5 (0.51-4)
In this course, the student will learn about removing unwanted hair, aging factors and cosmetic surgery effects, male skin
care, aromatherapy, advanced topics, and working with a physician. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade
of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-14300.
COS 14500         Skin Care V                                           (F,W,S)                                2.5 (0.51-4)
In this course, the student will learn color therapy and professional makeup application techniques. Students must pass
this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-14400.
COS 14600        Skin Care VI                                          (F,W,S)                                  2.5 (0.51-4)
The student will learn the business part of managing a salon and the selling of products and services. Students must pass
this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-14500.
COS 15010       Natural Hair Cultivation I                                (F,W,S)                                      2.5 (1-4)
The student will learn the ancient originas of hair braiding, traditional African braid styles, what certain braid styles
communicate, and the African-American hair experience, with some braiding techniques. Students must pass this course
with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section.
COS 15020        Natural Hair Cultivation II                            (F,W,S)                                      2.5 (1-4)
The student will learn the definition and types of bacteria, how bacteria grows and reproduces, the relationship of bacteria
and the spread of disease, prevention and infection control, standard sanitation practices, and how to use antiseptics,
disinfectants, and detergent, techniques of braiding. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of “C-“ to
advance to the next section.
COS 15030        Natural Hair Cultivation III                            (F,W,S)                                       2.5 (1-4)
The student will learn how to build client trust, how to maintain a professional attitude, what particular services natural
hair care specialist/braid designers offer clients, and how to nurture the client’s total well-being, with some braiding
techniques. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 15040        Natural Hair Cultivation IV                            (F,W,S)                                        2.5 (1-4)
The student will learn how to conduct a professional consultation, what questions to ask a client, how to set up a client
profile card, what to look for during a hair examination, how to identify facial structures and styles that fit them, and how
to advise a client appropriately, as well as some braiding techniques. Students must pass this course with a minimum
grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 15050        Natural Hair Cultivation V                            (F,W,S)                                    2.5 (1-4)
The student will learn nurturing shampoo techniques for textured hair, how to shampoo braids, how to remove braids
before shampooing for touch-ups, the different types of shampoo, and types of herbal rinses and conditioners, as well as
different braiding techniques. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 15060       Natural Hair Cultivation VI                             (F,W,S)                                      2.5 (1-4)
The student will learn to identify hair crafters’ tools and how to handle them to create braiding styles, how to brush and
comb out textured hair safely, how to section hair to prepare for various braiding designs, Shampoo and massaging
techniques, and how to apply various hair oils and conditioning preparations, as well as all the different braid techniques.
Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 17500         Salon Management                                       (F,W,S)                                       1 (1-0)
In this course, the student will study all aspects of salon business operations including physical plan, furnishings and
supplies, systems, personnel, and the overall function in the business community. Students must pass this course with a
minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section.
COS 20200       Manicure Instructor I                                  (F,W,S)                                     2.5 (1-4)
This course offers orientation and review of all subjects in the cosmetology curriculum. Students must pass this course
with a minimum grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 20300        Manicure Instructor II                             (F,W,S)                                      2.5 (1-4)
This course provides demonstration and theory in lesson plans. Students are required to do ten lesson plans. Students
must pass this course with a minimum grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 20400       Manicure Instructor III                              (F,W,S)                                       2.5 (1-4)
This course provides demonstration and theory in course outlines. Students are required to do five course outlines.
Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 20500        Manicure Instructor IV                               (F,W,S)                                    2.5 (1-4)
This course provides demonstration and theory in syllabi and exam questions. The student is required to do a cosmetology
syllabus and a 500-question, multiple-choice exam for graduate testing. Students must pass this course with a minimum
grade of C- to advance to the next section.
COS 20600       Manicure Instructor V                               (F,W,S)                                        2.5 (1-4)
This course provides demonstration and theory in teaching in a dynamic clinic, teaching to diverse learning styles.
Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 20700       Manicure Instructor VI                                  (F,W,S)                                      2.5 (1-4)
This course covers theory review, preparation for the final test and practice of all curriculum, and a simulated state board
exam. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 21100        Cosmetology Seminar                                 (V)                                      1 (99-99)
This seminar provides brush-up for licensed cosmetologists. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-
" to advance to the next section.
COS 21300        Cosmetology Seminar                                 (V)                                      4 (99-99)
This seminar provides brush-up for licensed cosmetologists. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-
" to advance to the next section.
COS 21500        Dry Room Body Wraps                                 (F,W,S)                                     1 (1-0)
This course will provide instruction on three body wraps, which do not require removal of products. The Siddha Body
Detoxification, Herbology Body Treatment, and the Aromatherapy Body wrap will be demonstrated, along with a scalp
massage. Aromatherapy oils and gem stone therapy treatments will be explored. Prerequisite: Licensure as Cosmetologist
or Esthetician, or current cosmetology student.
COS 22100       Cosmetology Instructor I                               (F,W,S)                                    2.5 (0.51-4)
This course offers orientation and review of all subjects in the cosmetology curriculum. Prerequisite: license in
cosmetology from the State of Michigan. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the
next section.
COS 22200        Cosmetology Instructor II                           (F,W,S)                                   2.5 (0.51-4)
This course provides demonstration and theory in lesson plans. Students are required to do ten lesson plans. Students
must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-22100.
COS 22300       Cosmetology Instructor III                           (F,W,S)                                   2.5 (0.51-4)
This course provides demonstration and theory in course outlines. Students are required to do five course outlines.
Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-22200.
COS 22400        Cosmetology Instructor IV                            (F,W,S)                                  2.5 (0.51-4)
This course provides demonstration and theory in syllabi and exam questions. The student is required to do a cosmetology
syllabus and a 500-question, multiple-choice exam for graduate testing. Students must pass this course with a minimum
grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-22300.
COS 22500       Cosmetology Instructor V                            (F,W,S)                                    2.5 (0.51-4)
This course provides demonstration and theory in teaching in a dynamic clinic, teaching to diverse learning styles.
Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-22400.
COS 22600       Cosmetology Instructor VI                               (F,W,S)                                   2.5 (0.51-4)
This course covers theory review, preparation for the final test and practice of all curriculum, and a simulated state board
exam. Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of "C-" to advance to the next section. Prerequisite: COS-
22500.
COS 24100       Skin Care Instructor I                                 (F,W,S)                                     2.5 (1-4)
This course offers orientation and review of all subjects in the cosmetology curriculum. Students must pass this course
with a minimum grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 24200        Skin Care Instructor II                            (F,W,S)                                      2.5 (1-4)
This course provides demonstration and theory in lesson plans. Students are required to do ten lesson plans. Students
must pass this course with a minimum grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 24300       Skin Care Instructor III                             (F,W,S)                                       2.5 (1-4)
This course provides demonstration and theory in course outlines. Students are required to do five course outlines.
Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 24400       Skin Care Instructor IV                               (F,W,S)                                    2.5 (1-4)
This course provides demonstration and theory in syllabi and exam questions. The student is required to do a cosmetology
syllabus and a 500-question, multiple-choice exam for graduate testing. Students must pass this course with a minimum
grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 24500       Skin Care Instructor V                              (F,W,S)                                        2.5 (1-4)
This course provides demonstration and theory in teaching in a dynamic clinic, teaching to diverse learning styles.
Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 24600       Skin Care Instructor VI                                 (F,W,S)                                      2.5 (1-4)
This course covers theory review, preparation for the final test and practice of all curriculum, and a simulated state board
exam.
COS 25010       Natural Hair Cultivation Instructor I                  (F,W,S)                                     2.5 (1-4)
This course offers orientation and review of all subjects in the cosmetology curriculum. Students must pass this course
with a minimum grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 25020        Natural Hair Cultivation Instructor II             (F,W,S)                                      2.5 (1-4)
This course provides demonstration and theory in lesson plans. Students are required to do ten lesson plans. Students
must pass this course with a minimum grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 25030       Natural Hair Cultivation Instructor III              (F,W,S)                                       2.5 (1-4)
This course provides demonstration and theory in course outlines. Students are required to do five course outlines.
Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 25040       Natural Hair Cultivation Instructor IV                (F,W,S)                                    2.5 (1-4)
This course provides demonstration and theory in syllabi and exam questions. The student is required to do a cosmetology
syllabus and a 500-question, multiple-choice exam for graduate testing. Students must pass this course with a minimum
grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 25050       Natural Hair Cultivation Instructor V               (F,W,S)                                        2.5 (1-4)
This course provides demonstration and theory in teaching in a dynamic clinic, teaching to diverse learning styles.
Students must pass this course with a minimum grade of “C-“ to advance to the next section.
COS 25060       Natural Hair Cultivation Instructor VI                  (F,W,S)                                      2.5 (1-4)
This course covers theory review, preparation for the final test and practice of all curriculum, and a simulated state board
exam.
                                      CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CJS)
CJS 10000        Intro to Criminal Justice                                (F)                                           3 (3-0)
This course covers the history and developing philosophy of law enforcement, including the police, courts, and
corrections; present organization and jurisdiction of local, state, and federal agencies; and an introduction to the problems
facing the criminal justice system today. Prerequisite: permission of criminal justice advisor.
CJS 10200        Physical Training I                                      (F,W,S)                                        3 (4-0)
This course is designed for the criminal justice student to participate in the state's Physical Agility Test. The student will
work at developing upper-body strength, stamina, and legwork as needed to pass the different stages of the examination.
Prerequisite: permission from a criminal justice advisor.
CJS 10201        Physical Training II                                    (F,W,S)                                       3 (4-0)
This course is a continuation of CJS-10200. It is designed to continue the preparation of the criminal justice student
planning to participate in the state's Physical Agility Test. The student will continue working on developing upper-body
strength, stamina, and legwork as needed to pass the different stages of the examination. Prerequisite: CJS-10200.
CJS 10202        Physical Training III                                   (F,W,S)                                       3 (4-0)
This course is a continuation of CJS-10201. It is designed to continue the preparation of the criminal justice student
planning to participate in the state's Physical Agility Test. The student will continue working on developing upper-body
strength, stamina, and legwork as needed to pass the different stages of the examination. Prerequisite: CJS-10201.
CJS 10800        Firearms                                               (F,W)                                           3 (1-2)
This is an eight-week course that covers orientation to firearms; policies, procedures, and liability of firearms; and use
and hands-on firearms range techniques using targets approved by the Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement
Standards (MCOLES). Prerequisite: employment as a peace officer or status as a criminal justice student.
CJS 10900        Intro to Corrections                                 (F)                                            3 (3-0)
This course introduces the agencies and processes within the correctional system, beginning with ancient history through
the modern era. Correctional legislation and the courts are examined, along with the integral parts they play in
sentencing, parole, probation, community corrections, and the correctional officer's professional work ethics. Prerequisite:
permission of criminal justice advisor.
CJS 11000        Careers in Criminal Justice                           (F)                                            1 (1-0)
The course is designed to acquaint the student with a variety of criminal justice occupations. Prerequisite: enrollment as a
criminal justice student.
CJS 11100        Legal Issues in Corrections                            (F)                                              3 (3-0)
This course is a study of up-to-date constitutional law and its impact on correctional institutions, the correctional officer,
and the inmate. The student will gain a basic understanding of how state and federal court decisions pertaining to inmate
rights have affected the writing of policy and procedure within the correctional system. Prerequisite: permission of
criminal justice advisor.
CJS 11200        Client Growth & Development                            (F,W,S)                                      3 (3-0)
This course is designed to assist the student in identifying behaviors and motivations of the inmate. Emphasis will be
placed on the needs of the inmate and intervention strategies. Prerequisite: permission of criminal justice advisor.
CJS 12300       Firearms-Concealed Weapon Program                      (F,W,S)                                       2 (1-1)
This program is developed for the individual who is currently required by local gun boards to have training prior to the
issuance of a concealed weapons permit. This course covers the dangers of owning and carrying a handgun, the laws of
carrying, and use of the handgun (both civilly and criminally). The individual must demonstrate total understanding of the
handgun owned and demonstrate proficient marksmanship qualities. Prerequisite: permission of criminal justice advisor.
CJS 12400        Firearms - Instructor Program                           (F,W)                                        3 (1-2)
This course is designed to instruct the student on how to become an effective firearms instructor. Topics such as the use
of deadly force and the liabilities are covered, along with the five shooting fundamentals, multiple target shooting,
training aids, building a proper shooting program, developing a departmental policy, positive teaching methods, use of
tear gases and the dangers, as well as several other topics. Prerequisite: permission of criminal justice advisor.
CJS 17000        Correctional Institution/Facilities                     (W)                                            3 (3-0)
Included in this course will be an overview of the different levels of security and their historical development within the
correctional system. Facility design, organizational structure, custody, security, and inmate due process rights will be
reviewed, as well as future projections for correctional facilities and personnel. Prerequisite: permission of criminal
justice advisor.
CJS 17103        Corr Officer Report Writing w/Comp                    (W)                                            1 (1-0)
The course is designed to develop and improve the student’s report-writing skills that are needed in correctional
institutions. The student will demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in written form. This is an eight-week
course that meets two hours per week. Students prepare their writing using microcomputers. Prerequisite: ENG-10303 or
permission of the head of criminal justice.
CJS 17200        Client Relations in Corrections                        (W)                                          3 (3-0)
This course is designed to give the student an understanding of culture and discrimination. Ethics, morals, and
professionalism will be examined closely. Affirmative action, social attitudes, and how they affect the correctional
systems will also be carefully scrutinized. Prerequisite: permission of criminal justice advisor.
CJS 20100         Basic Investigative Techniques                         (F,W)                                     3 (2-1)
This course covers the basic skills necessary for modern criminal investigation, including the discovery, development,
and lifting of latent fingerprints; the making of crime scene sketches; the use of plaster and silicone rubber for
reproducing evidence at crime scenes; the use of modern investigative aids; and a grounding in the modern techniques of
criminal interrogation. Prerequisite: permission of the head of criminal justice.
CJS 208--         Criminal Justice Internship                            (V)                                               3-9
After successful completion of basic criminal justice courses, students may elect criminal justice internship. Students are
placed in an approved training station, earn credits for satisfactory work performance, and may earn remuneration.
Participation requires approval from the director of criminal justice. Students' occupational interests are considered with
their background and related classes to determine employment arrangements. Flexibility of individual programs in any of
the law enforcement occupations is accomplished through a practical training program developed in agreement with the
training station supervisors and college coordinator. The director shall arrange objectives and assignments that are in
accord with purposes of vocational education and maintain constant evaluation through coordination visits to training
stations and weekly meetings with the students. Prerequisite: first year of program completed or permission of the head of
criminal justice.
CJS 21100        Narcotics Investigation                               (F)                                           3 (3-0)
This course will familiarize students with investigations involving dangerous drugs and will include history, sources,
recognition, laws, and courtroom presentations. Prerequisite: permission of criminal justice advisor.
CJS 22400         Advanced Firearms Training                          (W)                                            3 (1-2)
The course presents the concepts and techniques related to safely using a semiautomatic pistol. The policies, procedures,
and liabilities concerning the use and care of the weapon will be demonstrated by each student. The student will also
demonstrate his or her proficiency with weapons using a course and targets approved by MCOLES. This is an eight-week
course of which 16 hours are lecture and 32 hours are range time. Prerequisite: CJS-10800 or permission of the head of
criminal justice.
CJS 24000       Criminology                                           (W,S)                                            3 (3-0)
This course provides an analysis of crime, criminal behavior, and punishment through a variety of historical and
contemporary theoretical perspectives. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG-10303 or permission of instructor.
CJS 24500       Social Deviant Behavior                                (W)                                            3 (3-0)
This course studies social deviant behavior, including social and ethnic bias, sociopaths, cult behavior, and ethical
behaviors within the criminal justice process. Prerequisite: PSY-10100 or SOC-10100 and permission of criminal justice
advisor.
CJS 250--        In-Service Courses                                    (V)                                              1-8
In-service training courses are designed to update full-time law enforcement officers on new and current trends in police
services. The general purpose of the update is to improve the knowledge and intellectual functioning of the police officer.
Departments have the need for in-service training as a means of dealing with the threat of vicarious liability.
CJS 26007        Prof Dev for Corrections Officers                     (F)                                      10 (0-160)
This course is a 160-hour Local Corrections Academy approved by the Michigan Correctional Officer’s Training
Council. The course will cover booking, intake and release, suicide awareness, report writing, prison behavior,
correctional law, custody and security, PPCT defensive tactics, interpersonal communication, fire and safety, cultural
diversity, sexual harassment, ethics, and stress management. Prerequisites: employment or sponsorship by a sheriff’s
department and approval of the head of criminal justice.
CJS 26600        Police Academy                                         (F,W)                                         21 (1-42)
This is a 17-week, Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards (MCOLES)-approved, regional police
academy. It will cover investigation, patrol procedures, detention and prosecution, police skills, traffic, and special
operations. Prerequisite: degree in hand, enrollment in Kirtland's pre-service program, or sponsorship by a police
organization, upon approval of the director of the academy.
CJS 27000       Community Based Corrections                            (F)                                          3 (3-0)
This course surveys the history, development, techniques, and fundamentals of non-institutional correctional programs
and services. Emphasis will be placed on the necessity of correctional programs to interact with other human services
agencies within the community. Prerequisite: permission of criminal justice advisor.
CJS 275--         Directed Study-Criminal Justice Administratio (V)                                                      1-6
This course is designed to meet special occupational needs for individual students. Prerequisite: permission of the head of
criminal justice.
CJS 28001        Institutional Jail & Prison Admin                       (W)                                         3 (3-0)
This course provides a study of the total confinement process from arrest through administration of justice, probation,
prison, and correctional institutions. Particular emphasis will be placed on coping with problems of custodial personnel in
city and county jails. Prerequisite: permission of criminal justice advisor.
                                     DEVELOPMENTAL (DEV)
DEV 06300 Basic Mathematics                                         (F,W,S)                                    4 (4-0)
Mathematical concepts involving whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, proportions, measurement, geometry, and
elementary algebraic operations will be taught.
DEV 07300 Basic Algebra                                                  (F,W,S)                                       4 (4-0)
The fundamental operation of algebra using integers and rational numbers, exponents, linear equations, word problems,
special products, factoring, and graphing of straight lines will be taught. A graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite:
DEV-06300 or required COMPASS test scores.
DEV 07400 Basic Algebra Lab                                         (F,W,S)                                         1
This course provides instructional support for Basic Algebra (DEV07300). Students will receive homework support and
supplemental instruction. DEV07300 Basic Algebra is a corequisite of this course.
DEV 08000 Essential Language Skills                                  (F,W,S)                                           3
This course is designed to meet the needs of those students who have demonstrated very low reading and writing skills.
Self-paced instruction and tutorial assistance provided.
DEV 08601 Basic Reading Skills                                         (F,W)                                        3 (3-0)
This course offers instruction in basic reading techniques to improve comprehension, vocabulary, and critical thinking
skills.
DEV 088--       Writing Mechanics                                     (V)                                                 1-3
This course provides individualized and/or small group instruction in basic writing skills. Prerequisite: permission of the
instructor.
DEV 09000 Fund of English                                            (F,W,S)                                      3 (3-0)
This course provides instruction for freshmen who have demonstrated limited ability in communication skills. Content
includes emphasis on grammar, word usage, mechanics, and basic expository writing. NOTE: Successful completion of
this course is a prerequisite for ENG-10303 for students who have not demonstrated proficiency on the English placement
test.
DEV 09301 Study Skills                                                  (V)                                        1 (1.5-0)
This course will assess students’ study habits. Students will learn note-taking, test-taking, memory improvement, time
management, and how to reduce anxiety. Students will explore college life and methods to cope with it through group
counseling activities.
DEV 09601 College Reading Skills                                       (F,W,S)                                      3 (3-0)
This course focuses on identifying each student’s strengths and problems as a learner and using that information to
improve reading and study skills. It also emphasizes goal setting, time management, critical reading/thinking, vocabulary
building, and reading faster while understanding more.
                                          ECONOMICS (ECO)
ECO 20100 Prin of Economics-MACRO                                     (F)                                        3 (3-0)
This is a one-semester basic economics course emphasizing national income determination, monetary and fiscal policy,
and international trade. (This course may be taken before or after ECO-20200.) Prerequisite: DEV-09601. Prerequisite or
corequisite: ENG-10303. Recommended Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (Social Science Credit)
ECO 20200 Prin of Economics-MICRO                                    (W)                                            3 (3-0)
This is a one-semester course that concentrates on supply and demand analysis, theory of the firm, and the pricing of
factors of production. (This course may be taken before or after ECO-20100.) Prerequisite: DEV-09601. Prerequisite or
corequisite: ENG-10303. Recommended Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (Social Science Credit)
                                           EDUCATION (EDU)
EDU 10000 Intro to Teaching                                           (F,W)                                         3 (2-1)
This course explores teaching as a career. Along with understanding the requirements of obtaining a degree and a job in
teaching, students will develop a knowledge of current issues and problems in education. Observation techniques will be
presented that the student will apply to guided classroom observation and participation for each student in accordance
with the student's schedule. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG-10303.
EDU 11500 Intro to Child Growth & Development                          (V)                                          3 (3-0)
This course focuses on child growth and development from birth to age 12 with emphasis on establishing a safe, healthy
learning environment for children. Ways to support positive social development, teaching strategies for positive guidance,
and establishing/maintaining a safe, healthy, appropriate learning environment will be provided.
EDU 12000 Preschool Lesson Design & Class Mgt                          (V)                                          3 (3-0)
This course will provide materials, knowledge, and hands-on experience in ways to nurture cognitive, motor, language,
and creative process skills in children. Emphasis will be placed on advancing physical and intellectual development in
young children. NOTE: A minimum of 25 hours of fieldwork required outside of class. Prerequisite or corequisite: EDU-
11500.
EDU 13000 CDA Credential Practicum                                     (W)                                           3 (3-0)
This course is designed to provide students with a vehicle for attainment of the Child Development Associate Credential.
Students will by the end of the course have demonstrated through practical application and written work, competencies in
thirteen functional areas of Child Development. In addition they will have completed the observations, training, and
professional documentation necessary for attainment of the Child Development Associate Credential. Prerequisite:
advisor or instructor approval - NOTE: The following prerequisites are required by the CDA Council to apply for CDA
Certification: Must be 18 years of age or older, must have High School Diploma or GED, must be currently employed in
a child care setting and have spent a minimum of 480 hours caring for children in the last five years.
EDU 21500 Administering Preschool Programs                             (V)                                         3 (3-0)
This course addresses program management, parent partnerships, and professionalism. Emphasis will be placed on
positive and productive relations with families, ensuring a well-run and purposeful program responsive to needs and
understanding professional commitment. Prerequisite: EDU-11500. Corerequisite: EDU-13000.
EDU 24000 Technology in Education                                     (F)                                          3 (3-0)
Students will learn to operate a wide variety of technology-based equipment; select and assess instructional media
materials, courseware, and software; and integrate technology and media into K-12 education.
                  ENGINEERING DESIGN TECHNOLOGY (EDT)
EDT 10000        Engineering Graphics                                     (F,W)                                         3 (3-0)
Engineering Graphics will introduce students to the manufacturing design language of our industrial world. Topics will
include lettering, sketching, orthographic projection, auxiliaries, sections, and dimensioning layout. This class is intended
for students who have no prior experience with drafting fundamentals.
EDT 11000        Detailing w/AutoCAD                                    (F,W)                                     3 (2-2)
Detailing with AutoCAD is intended to instruct students in the fundamentals of two-dimensional, computer-aided
drafting. Topic areas will include orthographic, auxiliary, and section view drawings with an emphasis on dimensioning
techniques common to industry. Assignments will be completed on a computer using AutoCAD software. Prerequisite:
EDT-10000, or permission of instructor.
EDT 12000       3D Parametric Solids w/Solidworks                       (F,W)                                        3 (2-2)
3D Parametric Solids is the creation of virtual parts within a three-dimensional computer-drafting program. Instructional
emphasis will be placed on parametric model creation, associative assemblies, and drawing layout. Other topics will
include Mechanisms and Gear Calculations. Assignments will be created using the Solidworks Software Program.
EDT 13000       Fundamentals of MasterCAM                            (V)                                    3 (1.5-1.5)
Fundamentals of MasterCAM is designed to give students a working knowledge of the MasterCAM software. Topics will
include 2D and 3D line drawing, solids, and tool path geometry. Assignments will be completed on the MasterCAM
computer-drafting program. Prerequisite: EDT-10000, or permission of instructor.
EDT 14000        Architectural Drafting/CAD                             (V)                                         4 (2-2)
In Architectural Drafting, students will prepare complete sets of residential and/or light commercial working drawings.
Students will complete assignments with a computer-aided drafting system. Prerequisite: EDT-11000, or permission of
instructor.
EDT 15000        Quality Assurance Methods                               (F)                                             3 (3-0)
Quality Assurance Methods is a study of the main quality methods used in problem solving for many commercial and
industrial applications. Students will be introduced to the variety of uses of Statistical Process Control (S.P.C.), and Total
Quality Management. Students will develop an understanding of the principles of S.P.C. and the ability to use S.P.C.
through study materials, demonstrations, preparation of control charts, team assignments, and problem-solving exercises.
EDT 20500        Descriptive Geometry                                    (F)                                         3 (3-1)
Descriptive Geometry is the study of graphic methods for solving mathematically based problems. Emphasis will be
placed on: fundamental views of true length and point view of a line; edge view and true size/shape of a plane; and
measurement of slope (dip) and bearing (strike). Additional topics will include: skewed lines; pierce points and plane
intersections; perpendicular relationships; dihedral angles; revolution; intersection and developments; and topographic
and civil drawings. Students will complete some assignments on a computer aided drafting system. Prerequisite: EDT-
11000 or EDT-14000.
EDT 21000        Geometric Dimensioning/Tolerancing                    (F)                                       3 (3-0)
Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T) is a study of the concepts adopted by the American National
Standards Institute (ANSI) and published by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) for engineering
and related documentation practices. The standard is titled ASMEY14.5M-1994 Dimensioning and Tolerancing. This
class can be considered as a source of formal training in the above standard. Prerequisite: EDT-11000 or EDT-12000, or
permission of instructor.
EDT 21500        Tool Design Fundamentals                              (W)                                           3 (3-0)
Tool Design Fundamentals is the study of the equipment and processes that make our industrial system of mass
production and interchangeability possible. Students will solve typical design problems in several areas of design. The
principles learned here can be applied to larger and more complicated transfer, assembly, testing, and special machine
tools in industry.
EDT 22000        Engineering Design Problems                           (W)                                         3 (3-1)
Engineering Design Problems will focus on the process of reverse engineering. Students will break down existing
components, model all parts, re-assemble them, and create working drawings. Time will also be spent determining how
designs can be improved. This class is designed to give students a large amount of experience creating models and related
drawings. Teamwork and leadership skills will also be emphasized through a class wide project. This class is intended to
be taken in the final year of the students program. Prerequisites: EDT-11000 and EDT-12000, or permission of instructor.
EDT 24000        Architectural Drafting/CAD II                            (V)                                         4 (2-2)
This course will require each student to develop CAD drawings for residential construction of a multi-story dwelling. The
student will explain the calculations for beams, trusses, floors, walls, and ceilings. The dwelling will have complex roof
pitches. A presentation of the final project will be made to the other students in the course. Prerequisite: EDT-14000.
EDT 25000        Statistical Proc Control Problems                       (W)                                         2 (2-1)
Statistical Process Control Problems is an advanced study of uses of Statistical Process Control (S.P.C.) and Total Quality
Management. Students will use the principles of S.P.C. through study materials, demonstrations, preparation of control
charts, team assignments, and problem-solving exercises. Advanced studies will include attribute charts and process
capability studies. Other current trends in industry will also be discussed. Prerequisite: EDT-15000 or permission of
instructor.
EDT 275--        Directed Study-Engineering Design Technologi (V)                                                     1-6 (-)
This course is designed to meet special occupational needs for individual students. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
                               ENGLISH & LITERATURE (ENG)
ENG 10000 Writing Lab                                                 (F,W,S)                                        1 (1-1)
This course provides personalized, competency-paced instruction in writing skills. Because this is part of the English
composition requirement, most students will take this course while enrolled in ENG-10303. (Communication)
ENG 10303 English Composition I w/Computers                              (F,W,S)                                        3 (3-0)
This course is a study, through extensive practice, of various modes of expression, organization, and development in
expository essays, designed to develop the student's ability to think critically and write effectively. Students prepare their
writing using microcomputers. Prerequisite: DEV-09000 or a satisfactory writing sample, and DEV-09601 or a
satisfactory reading placement. (Communication)
ENG 10403 English Composition II w/Computers                           (F,W,S)                                       3 (3-0)
A continuation of English Composition I, this course emphasizes writing analytical, critical, and argumentative essays
and developing effective thinking skills. The course provides practice in library methods, research techniques, and the
documented research essay. Students prepare their writing using microcomputers. Prerequisite: Satisfactory (C- or above)
completion of ENG-10303. (Communication)
ENG 10602 Technical Writing w/Computers                                (W)                                            3 (3-0)
Students will learn techniques for collecting and presenting technical data through preparation of informal and formal
reports and technical papers and through the study of forms and procedures to establish a general pattern for all technical
reports. Students prepare their writing using microcomputers. Prerequisite: Satisfactory (C- or above) completion of
ENG-10303.
ENG 12000 Journalism I                                                  (F,W)                                        3 (3-0)
This introduction to journalism includes techniques of news gathering and news writing as well as issues such as
accuracy, fairness, laws, and ethics. Current newspaper, radio, television, and Internet news sources are also examined.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory (C- or above) completion of ENG-10303 or permission of instructor. (Humanities Credit -
Journalism)
ENG 12100 Journalism II                                               (F,W)                                         3 (3-0)
This course provides an in-depth look at journalistic news gathering and news writing. Special areas studied include
police and courtroom news, sports reporting, environmental news, and opinion columns. Prerequisite: Satisfactory (C- or
above) completion of ENG-10303 or permission of instructor. (Humanities Credit - Journalism)
ENG 125--        Journalism Practicum                                 (F,W)                                            1-4
Students work with the advisor as staff members of the college news magazine in one area of reporting, editing,
photography, desktop publishing, advertising sales, or a combination of these areas. The course may be repeated up to a
maximum of four credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG-12000 and ENG-12100 or permission of instructor. (Humanities
Credit - Journalism)
ENG 21400 Intro to Literature                                            (W)                                           3 (3-0)
This course considers the expression in literature of such universal themes in human experience as the loss of innocence,
the search for identity, the desire for happiness, and the confrontation with death through the study of selected essays,
fiction, poetry, and drama. Prerequisite: Satisfactory (C- or above) completion of ENG-10303 or permission of instructor.
(Humanities Credit - Literature)
ENG 21500 Creative Writing                                            (F,W)                                            3 (3-0)
This course provides study and practice of imaginative writing in poetry, fiction, and personal essay. Half the class time
will be used in workshop format, sharing work for group comment and critique. The other half of class time will be used
to discuss contemporary creative works and essays by writers. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG-10303 or permission of
instructor. (Humanities Credit - Creative Writing)
ENG 22500 Contemporary Literature                                      (S)                                           3 (3-0)
Students will study works of selected authors of the 20th century. Prerequisite: Satisfactory (C- or above) completion of
ENG-10303 or permission of instructor. (Humanities Credit - Literature)
ENG 22800 Mythology                                                     (F)                                           3 (3-0)
A cross-cultural and historical survey of the world's myths, the class will also consider such questions as the meaning of
myth, the purposes and functions of myth, theories of how myths originate, and ways that myths have been analyzed and
interpreted. Prerequisite: Satisfactory (C- or above) completion of ENG-10303. (Humanities Credit - Literature)
ENG 23000 American Literature Before 1865                            (F)                                         3 (3-0)
This course surveys the growth and development of America's literature from its beginnings to the Civil War.
Representative authors may include Bradstreet, Franklin, Irving, Cooper, Poe, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Melville, Whitman,
and others. Prerequisite: Satisfactory (C- or above) completion of ENG-10303 or permission of instructor. (Humanities
Credit - Literature)
ENG 23100 American Literature After 1865                             (W)                                           3 (3-0)
This course is a survey of the growth and development of America's literature from the Civil War to the present day.
Representative authors may include Twain, James, Frost, Eliot, O'Neill, Hemingway, Faulkner, Welty, Bellow, and
others. Prerequisite: Satisfactory (C- or above) completion of ENG-10303 or permission of instructor. (Humanities
Credit - Literature)
ENG 23200 English Literature                                           (F)                                          3 (3-0)
This course will cover the major periods in English literature: Old English, Middle English, Sixteenth Century,
Seventeenth Century, Restoration and Eighteenth Century, the Romantic Period, the Victorian Age, and the Modern Age.
This course is designed for non-English majors, relying on class discussion with instructor lectures. Prerequisite:
Satisfactory (C- or above) completion of ENG-10303 or permission of instructor. (Humanities Credit - Literature)
ENG 251--        Topics in Literature                                     (W)                                            3 (3-0)
This course is a study of a significant literary topic and may cover genres, literary figures, subjects, or themes. The class
may be repeated for credit if the topics are different. Prerequisite: Satisfactory (C- or above) completion of ENG-10303 or
permission of instructor. (Humanities Credit - Literature)
ENG 29100 Poetry Workshop I                                             (V)                                          3 (3-0)
This course is a workshop-oriented class for advanced poetry writing. Students will be expected to write poems in a
variety of forms, discuss each other’s work intelligently, and read contemporary poetry. Students are also expected to
develop a manuscript of finished poems and work on Controlled Burn. Prerequisite: ENG-21500. (Humanities Credit -
Creative Writing)
ENG 29200 Fiction Workshop I                                           (W)                                            3 (3-0)
This course is a workshop-oriented class for advanced fiction writing. Students will be expected to write three to five
stories in various voices or work on a novel, discuss each other’s work intelligently, and read contemporary fiction.
Students are also expected to develop a manuscript of fiction and work on Controlled Burn. Prerequisite: ENG-21500.
(Humanities Credit - Creative Writing)
ENG 29300 Poetry Workshop II                                           (W)                                         3 (3-0)
This course furthers students’ pursuits in the study of poetry through workshop and in individual conferences with the
instructor. Prerequisite: ENG-29100. (Humanities Credit - Creative Writing)
ENG 29400 Fiction Workshop II                                            (W)                                        3 (3-0)
This course is designed to allow students to develop their craft in fiction writing through workshop and individual
conferences. Prerequisite: ENG-29200. (Humanities Credit - Creative Writing)
                     ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL)
ESL 01000        Eng as a 2nd Lang/Beginning                            (F,W)                                        3 (3-0)
This self-instructional course addresses the needs of an international student who is minimally conversant in English. The
course concentrates mainly on oral communication. The class involves independent listening to audiotapes and language
practice with a native-speaking tutor/trainer for three hours per week. A minimal amount of grammar and textbook
reading may also be introduced. Prerequisite: approval of instructor, based on a personal interview and/or writing sample.
ESL 05000        Eng as a 2nd Lang/Intermediate                        (F,W)                                      3 (3-0)
This course addresses the needs of an international student who can converse and read in English. The class combines
two-page readings, discussion, vocabulary and grammar practice, as well as sentence and paragraph writing. Prerequisite:
approval of instructor, based on a personal interview and/or writing sample.
ESL 06000        Eng as a 2nd Lang/High Intermediate                  (F,W)                                        3 (3-0)
This course addresses the needs of an international student who can converse, read, and write short paragraphs in
English. The class focuses mainly on the writing of 200-400 word essays. This course prepares the student to take ENG-
10303. Prerequisite: ESL-05000 or permission of instructor, based on a personal interview and a writing sample
(placement test).
                                           GEOGRAPHY (GEO)
GEO 10000 World Geography                                                (F)                                           4 (4-0)
This course provides description and analysis of basic geographic concepts as they relate to the major world regions, and
the distribution patterns of various social, economic, and cultural activities of man. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG-
10303. (Social Science Credit)
                                             GEOLOGY (GEL)
GEL 10500 Physical Geology                                              (F)                                         4 (3-2)
This lecture and laboratory course examines earth materials and the internal and external processes acting on them.
Among the topics to be discussed are rocks and minerals, vulcanism, accretion, and the agents of erosion. Laboratory
studies include rock and mineral identification and interpretation of topographic maps, geologic maps, and aerial
photographs. (Science Credit)
                                                HISTORY (HIS)
HIS 10500        History of World Societies to 1500                      (F)                                           3 (3-0)
This course provides a historical survey of the origins and development of human communities from their prehistoric
origins to the 16th century. Emphasis is given to similarities, differences, and interrelationships among selected societies,
cultures, and civilizations. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG-10303. (History Credit)
HIS 10600        Hist of World Societies Since 1500                    (W)                                          3 (3-0)
This course is a historical survey of the human community from approximately 1500 to the present. Emphasis is given to
the nature, cause, and consequences of the current phase of global integration. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG-10303.
(History Credit)
HIS 20100        United States History to 1865                          (F)                                         3 (3-0)
This course is a survey of the history of the United States from its European background through the Civil War, with
special emphasis on the colonial period and the Revolution, the rise of the federal system of government, the growth of
democracy, territorial expansion, sectionalism and the Civil War. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Prerequisite or
corequisite: ENG-10303. (History Credit)
HIS 20200        United States History Since 1865                      (W)                                          3 (3-0)
A continuation of HIS-20100, this is a survey of United States history from 1865 to the present, starting with the
aftermath of the Civil War, emphasizing industrial growth, social changes, and reforms, 20th-century political trends,
international commitments, and leadership. Recommended prerequisite: HIS-20100. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG-
10303. (History Credit)
HIS 20300         Michigan History                                        (F)                                         3 (3-0)
This course provides a survey of the history of Michigan from the coming of the white man. The history of the state is
placed in its regional and national setting. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG-10303 or permission of instructor. (History
Credit)
HIS 20400        The American Civil War                                (W)                                           3 (3-0)
This course examines the origins and outcomes of the sectional conflict that split the United States in two from 1861 to
1865. Emphasis is given to social, political, and military events from the 1840s to the end of Reconstruction. Prerequisite
or corequisite: ENG-10303. (History Credit)
                                               HONORS (HON)
HON 225--        Honors Project                                          (V)                                            1-3
A significant project over and above the typical course requirements which may be undertaken in connection with any
regular Kirtland course, the Honors project may involve the student in primary or secondary research, writing, internship,
service-learning opportunities, or other possible activities. All proposed honors projects must be approved by the Honors
Program committee. Projects may earn from one to three credits. Students may achieve more than three credits in honors
projects, but no more than three credits may be applied toward the honors degree. Prerequisites: admission to the Honors
Program; permission of the instructor and the Honors Program committee.
HON 250--        Honors Colloquium                                       (W)                                           3 (3-0)
This is an interdisciplinary course that examines a significant topic or theme. Through such activities as reading,
discussion, research, writing, and speaking, students will explore this topic from a variety of academic perspectives.
Prerequisites: admission to the Honors Program and sophomore standing, or permission of instructor and the Honors
Program committee.
                                          HUMANITIES (HUM)
HUM 20500 The Individual and Society                                   (F,W)                                          3 (3-0)
This course examines the perspectives of many social sciences and cultures in order to appreciate the mosaic of American
and other societies from a variety of points of view. As several key current social issues and controversies are studied,
students will work to illuminate an understanding of their own place in their communities, the larger society, and the
modern world. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG-10303. (Humanities Credit)
                       MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY (MPT)
MPT 10272 Machine Tool Safety                                                                                       0.17
Safety is the most important concern in the machine shop. This course will give you an overview of safe work practices,
safe clothing, personal safety, fire prevention in the shop, hand tool safety, and machinery safety.
MPT 10273 Identifying Surface Finishes                                                                                   0.08
This course gives consideration to surface smoothness wherever two machined surfaces come into contact with each
other. This packet will help the learner identify factors which contribute to the quality of surface finish and give the
learner practice in identifying surface finishes.
MPT 10274 Shop Math - Speeds and Feeds                                                                                 0.21
This course will teach the learner how to accurately calculate cutting speeds, RPM, and feeds for the purpose of cutting
metal.
MPT 10275 Sharpening Drill Bits                                                                                             0.25
In this course the learner will learn how to sharpen a drill bit by hand.
MPT 10276 Drilling on a Press                                                                                               0.17
In this course the learner will be taught how to drill holes in a work piece on the drill press.
MPT 10277 Power Tap on the Drill Press                                                                                      0.25
In this course the learner will be taught the proper steps and how to power tap on the drill press.
MPT 10278 Drill Press Project                                                                                               0.58
In this course the learner will use several drilling operations to complete a drill vise to print specifications.
MPT 10279 Band Saw Blade Welding                                                                                            0.25
In this course the learner will develop the skill of welding a band saw blade.
MPT 10280 Vertical Band Saw Project                                                                                     0.25
In this course the learner will be taught how to select, mount, cut and weld band saw blades. The student will also learn
how to saw pieces to meet specifications.
MPT 10281 Maintaining the Lathe                                                                                             0.17
In this course the student will be introduced to the lathe, its basic parts and accessories. The student will also learn lathe
safety procedures and maintenance.
MPT 10282 Grinding Lathe Tools                                                                                              0.25
In this course the student will learn how to sharpen lathe tools.
MPT 10283 Facing on the Lathe                                                                                               0.21
In this course the student will learn how to face the ends of a work piece to a specified length.
MPT 10284 Aligning Lathe Centers                                                                                            0.17
In this course the student will learn how to align the centers of the lathe using the trial cut method.
MPT 10285 Cutting External Threads                                                                                           0.5
In this course the student will learn about threads and thread forms and how to chase an external thread.
MPT 10286 Dial In Vise/Tram in Head                                                                                         0.21
In this course the student will learn the processes of a milling machine.
MPT 10287 Fly Cutter & End Mill/Square Block                                                                                0.21
In this course the student will learn how to square a block of material on all 6 sides.
MPT 10288 Digital Read/Drill, Tap, & Ream                                                                                   0.25
This course will teach the learner how to use the digital readout to locate part coordinates to the print specifications.
MPT 10289 Parallel Turning on the Lathe                                                                                    0.21
This course will instruct the learner in turning work on the lathe to "rough" and "finish" quality.
MPT 10290 Groove and Part on the Lathe                                                                                     0.13
This course will teach the student to cut grooves and cut off stock on the lathe.
MPT 10291 Cutting Internal Threads                                                                                         0.42
This course will instruct the student in how to cut internal screw threads.
MPT 10292 Knurling on the Lathe                                                                                            0.13
In this course the student will learn how to knurl on the lathe.
MPT 10293 Sharpen End Mills (End)                                                                                            1
This student will gain an understanding of the principles of sharpening the ends (of faces) of end milling cutters. This
skill will be developed through reading and hands-on practice on a Cutter and Tool Grinding Machine using the
associated tools and fixtures.
MPT 10295 Tilt Head and Turn Vise/Cut "V"                                                                                   0.5
This course will instruct the learner how to turn the swivel vise to cut a 30 degree "V" with a .250 radius and then tilt the
head to cut a 90 degree "V" in a block of C.R.S. (Cold Rolled Steel), also referred to as "Mild Steel" or "Machine Steel."
MPT 10296 Turntable/Cut Radii                                                                                              0.33
This course will show the student how to "set-up" the turntable and cut radii.
MPT 10297 Sine Plate/Cut Angles                                                                                          0.33
This course will show the student how to use the sine plate accessory to cut angles on a piece of steel using the vertical
milling machine.
MPT 10298 Boring Head/Bore 4 Holes                                                                                      0.33
This course will show how to use the boring head to bore holes into a piece of steel using the lay-out drilling machine
(also called a "Jig Borer").
MPT 10299 Indexing Head/Key Ways                                                                                     0.17
This course will show the student how to use the indexing head to cut keyways and keyseats with a vertical milling
machine. The indexing head locks in increments of 15 degrees with the locating pin, but can be set and locked at any
degree with the lever lock.
MPT 10302 Square and Block (6 Sides)                                                                                    0.25
This course will teach the student safety precautions pertaining to grinders; how to select a grinding wheel, how to care
for a grinding wheel; how to dress a grinding wheel; how to grind a magnetic chuck; how to grind a block square to print
tolerances.
MPT 10303 Grind Angles and Radii                                                                                          0.5
This course will teach the student how to grind angles on a part by using a sine bar/sine plate; how to grind angles on a
part by forming the grinding wheel; how to grind internal and external radii on a part by forming the grinding wheel with
a radius dresser.
MPT 10304 Parallel Grind to Print                                                                                           1
This course will teach the student the proper way to parallel grind (on cylindrical grinders) by completing projects to print
specifications.
MPT 10305 External/Internal Tapers                                                                                          0.5
This course will teach the student the proper way to grind external and internal tapers on a cylindrical grinder by
completing two projects to print specifications within tolerance.
MPT 10306 CNC Fundamentals                                                                                    0.83
This module will provide the learner with knowledge of Computer Numerical Control (CNC) terminology and concepts.
MPT 10307 Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerance                                                                             0.33
This module will help the student to build the ability to read and interpret GD&T symbols which provide increased
information about the function and relationship of part features.
MPT 10308 Micrometer                                                                                              0.13
This course will teach the student how to read micrometers, care for micrometers, name the parts which make up
micrometers, know the different types of micrometers, and know the "feel" involved when using contact measuring tools.
MPT 10309 Calipers: Digital, Vernier, Dial                                                                               0.17
This course will teach the student how to read calipers, how to care for calipers, the names for parts which make up
callipers, and the "feel" involved when using contact measuring tools.
MPT 10310 Telescoping Gage                                                                                               0.13
This course will teach the learner the proper way to accurately measure holes using a telescoping gage.
MPT 10311 Depth Micrometer                                                                                               0.13
This course will teach the student to measure the depths of holes and steps with a depth micrometer within +/- .001.
MPT 10312 Dial Indicators                                                                                                0.13
This course will teach the student to use the dial indicator correctly in a machining environment.
MPT 10313 Gage Blocks                                                                                                    0.13
This course will introduce the learner to and help use gage blocks.
MPT 10314 Machine Shop Trigonometry                                                                                      0.67
This course will instruct the learner in identifying different math procedures and calculations using trigonometry to solve
problems.
MPT 10315 Height Gage                                                                                                    0.17
This course will provide the learner with practice using a height gage.
MPT 10316 Sine Bar                                                                                                      0.17
The sine bar is used to establish or check angles when an accuracy of 5 minutes or less is required. This course will teach
the learner to use the sine bar for precision measurement of angles.
MPT 10317 CMM Fundamentals                                                                                         0.25
The student will gain an understanding of coordinate measuring machine applications and measuring techniques used in
manufacturing and quality environments. The student will solve problems pertaining to coordinate systems, geometric
elements, alignments, probe styles, coordinate measuring machine construction, and trends in metrology.
MPT 10318 CMM Part Inspection                                                                                      0.67
The student will gain an understanding of coordinate measuring machine applications and measuring techniques by
performing inspections on various parts using the coordinate measuring machine, and will document dimensions of
various part features. Student will practice and demonstrate measuring techniques on a manual CMM to identify
numerous part geometries. Student will work with coordinate systems, geometric elements, alignments, touch probes,
and CMM software.
MPT 10364 Cut Radius and External Tapers                                                                                  0.5
The student will learn to machine an external taper using the taper attachment.
MPT 10408 Math for Dividing Head                                                                                         0.17
This course will show the learner how to calculate simple and direct indexing.
MPT 10409 Dividing Head/Cut Gear                                                                                        0.42
This course will teach the student how to use the Dividing Head to cut a gear after preparing the work piece on the lathe
and broach a keyway to fit an arbor.
MPT 20319 Prop of Metals/Physical Metallurgy                                                                              0.13
This course will instruct the learner in examining and identifying the different properties of metals and their applications
for different jobs.
MPT 20320 Constitution of Alloys                                                                                          0.17
This course will instruct the learner in examining and studying the purpose of alloys in a given material.
MPT 20321 Carbon and Alloy Steels                                                                                         0.13
This course will teach the student the range of possible types of steels, their properties, and their uses.
MPT 20322 Heat and Surface Treat for Steel                                                                               0.13
This course will instruct the learner in examining and studying the heat treat process and what it does to metals properties.
MPT 20323 Cast Irons                                                                                                      0.13
This course will instruct the learner in examining and identifying what makes cast iron desirable for machining and
construction purposes.
MPT 20324 Light Metals and Alloys                                                                                         0.13
This course will provide the learner with knowledge of light metals and alloys and their applications.
MPT 20325 Lead, Tin, and Zinc                                                                                             0.13
This course will provide the learner with knowledge of lead, tin, and zinc, their properties, and their applications.
MPT 20326 Introduction to Metallurgy                                                                                      0.46
This course will assist the welding student in developing a solid background in metallurgy.
MPT 20327 Examining and Identifying Metals                                                                                0.13
This course will provide information that the learner may use to examine and identify the metal being welded.
MPT 20328 Fund of Welding & Brazing/Casting                                                                               0.13
This course will provide information that the student may use to examine and identify cast iron.
MPT 20329 Fund of Welding Stainless Steel                                                                                 0.13
This course will provide information that the student may use to examine and identify stainless steel.
MPT 20330 Testing Metals                                                                                                  0.42
This course will instruct the student in examining and identifying different inspection methods and metal processes.
MPT 20331 Machinery Handbook                                                                                              0.17
This module will familiarize the learner with the Machinery's Handbook.
MPT 20332 Machine Tool Blueprint Reading                                                                                  0.83
This module will introduce the learner to blueprints and drawing techniques which will be built upon with further
modules in the program.
MPT 20333 Basic Shop Math                                                                                             0.67
This module will instruct the student in whole numbers, fractions, decimals, inch/millimeter conversions, and percentages.
MPT 20334 Machine Tool Math                                                                                            0.75
This course covers equations and formulas, exponents and roots, lines and angles, triangles, quadrilaterals, hexagons,
circles, right triangles, special applications of trigonometry functions, and oblique triangles.
MPT 20335 Machinist Scale                                                                                                0.08
In this course the learner will develop skill in the use of the machinist’s scale (rule) used for rough measurements and
laying out work pieces for machining.
MPT 20336 Dividers                                                                                                         0.08
The dividers are a measuring device even though they have no scales to read. One of the important uses of the dividers is
transferring measurements from a drawing to the work piece. Because of the methods used to reproduce drawings, you
cannot use a machinist’s scale or the dividers directly on the drawing. In this course, the learner will learn to transfer
measurements from the scale to the work piece.
MPT 20337 Spring Calipers                                                                                                 0.08
In this course, the learner will learn how to use the two common types of calipers, inside and outside calipers.
MPT 20338 Combination Square                                                                                              0.08
This course will instruct the learner in drawing angles and lines on a piece of metal and how to layout the center of a
piece of round stock. The learner will use a set of tools called the combination square set to scribe angles and straight
lines.
MPT 20339 Legged Calipers (Hermaphrodite)                                                                                 0.08
This course will teach the learner how to use the hermaphrodite caliper to scribe parallel lines and find the center of round
stock.
MPT 20340 Surface Gage                                                                                                   0.08
This course will instruct the learner in scribing lines on a vertical surface with a surface gauge.
MPT 20366 EDM Fundamentals                                                                                               0.29
This course examines and identifies the EDM process, applications, theory and various tooling components.
MPT 20367 EDM Project                                                                                                   0.5
The student will design and build an electrode. After machining the electrode, the student will complete a project (using
the electrode) in the EDM machine.
MPT 20368 Universal Indexing Head                                                                                   0.5
The milling machine has many accessories. This module will show you how to use the Universal Indexing Head. This
Head can be turned 180 degrees around in increments of 15 degrees and from horizontal to perpendicular in increments of
one degree.
MPT 20369 CNC Turning                                                                                                     1.67
Upon completion of this module, you will be able to demonstrate competency in the following skills: safety with CNC
lathes, CNC Lathe machine components, functions and operations, coordinate systems, axis addresses & positioning,
tooling identification, work holding, tool offsets, tool life data, operator controls, loading and editing part programs,
establishing program zero, establishing the safe index point, reference point return, machine zero, machine set-up,
machine start up, machine home, programming methods, modal and non-modal codes, on-line and off-line programming,
reading and writing EIA/ISO part programs, reading and writing conversational part programs, cutter diameter
compensation, canned cycles, circular interpolations, writing various programs and producing quality parts.
MPT 20370 CNC Milling                                                                                                     1.67
Upon completion of this module, you will be able to demonstrate competency in the following skills: safety with CNC
Mills, CNC Mill machine components, functions and operations, coordinate systems, axis addresses & positioning,
tooling identification, work holding, tool offsets, tool life data, operator controls, loading and editing part programs,
establishing program zero, establishing the safe index point, reference point return, machine zero, machine set-up,
machine start up, machine home, programming methods, modal and non-modal codes, on-line and off-line programming,
reading and writing EIA/ISO part programs, reading and writing conversational part programs, cutter diameter
compensation, canned cycles, circular interpolations, writing various programs and producing quality parts.
MPT 20371 Precision Vise                                                                                               2.08
This course will prepare you to demonstrate all of the machining skills needed to produce a precision vise that meets print
specifications.
MPT 20372 1-2-3 Blocks                                                                                                      1
This module will instruct the learner in all of the machining skills needed to produce 1-2-3 blocks.
MPT 20373 Tool Makers V-Blocks                                                                                           1.67
This module will instruct the learner in all of the machining skills needed to produce Toolmakers V-Blocks.
MPT 20374 Transformation of American Ind. #1                                                                             0.33
In this course the student will gain an understanding of the principles of Statistical Process Control (SPC).
MPT 20375 Deming on Quality & Productivity #2                                                                            0.33
In this course the student will gain an understanding of Deming’s principles on quality and productivity.
MPT 20376 Model for Quality/Product Impvmt #3                                                                          0.33
In this course the student will gain an understanding of the principles of a model for quality/productivity improvement.
MPT 20377 Project Selection #4                                                                                           0.33
In this course the student will gain an understanding of some of the principles used in project selection.
MPT 20378 Data Gathering & Problem Solving #5                                                                            0.33
In this course the student will gain an understanding of the principles of data gathering and problem solving.
MPT 20379 Data Analysis and Interpretation #6                                                                            0.33
In this course the student will gain an understanding of data analysis and interpretation.
MPT 20380 Process Control X-Bar & R-Charts #7                                                                            0.33
In this course the student will gain an understanding of process control x-bar and r charts.
MPT 20381 Process Capability #8                                                                                          0.33
In this course the student will gain an understanding of the project implementation: process capability.
MPT 20382 Median and Individual Charts #9                                                                                0.33
In this course the student will gain an understanding of the proper use of median and individual charts.
MPT 20383 Attribute Charts #10                                                                                           0.33
In this course the student will gain an understanding of the proper use of attribute charts.
MPT 20384 Project Evaluation #11                                                                                         0.33
In this course the student will gain an understanding of the principles of the project evaluation format.
MPT 20385 Continuing Improvement Strategy #12                                                                            0.33
In this course the student will gain an understanding of some continuing improvement strategies.
MPT 20386 Reaming on the Drill Press                                                                                     0.13
This course will teach the learner to ream holes using a drill press and reamer.
MPT 20387 Counterbore/Sink, Spot-Face                                                                                    0.21
In this course, the learner will receive instruction in counterboring and spot facing.
MPT 20388 Hand Tap on the Drill Press                                                                                    0.21
In this course the learner will receive instruction on hand tapping on the drill press.
MPT 20389 Boring Internal Tapers                                                                                         0.67
In this course the learner will be instructed on how to bore and cut a tapered hole on the lathe.
MPT 20390 Lathe Project                                                                                                   1.25
In this course, the learner will have an opportunity to apply the skills in lathe operation gained in previous lathe modules.
MPT 20391 Horizontal Milling/Saw Slot                                                                                  0.17
This course will show the learner how to set-up the horizontal attachment on a vertical milling machine and saw a slot in
a piece of steel using the horizontal milling method.
MPT 20392 5C Collet Holders/Cut Square & Hex                                                                             0.33
This course will instruct the learner in machining a set of T-bolts to print specifications.
MPT 20393 Make Dove Tails                                                                                                0.67
This course will help you learn to machine external and internal dovetails.
MPT 20394 Mill Project                                                                                                1.25
This course will provide the learner with an opportunity to perform a variety of milling machine operations on a work
piece.
MPT 20395 Complete Two Projects to Print                                                                                  1.58
In this course the learner will develop the skills necessary to grind complex parts to print specifications using various
machines, tooling and fixturing.
MPT 20397 Sine Bar Project                                                                                             0.83
Upon completion of this course the learner will be able to demonstrate all of the machining skills needed to produce a
Sine Bar.
MPT 20398 CNC Advanced Programming                                                                                       2.08
This course will instruct the learner in the proper way to successfully program a CNC machine.
MPT 20399 Sharpen End Mills (Sides)                                                                                          1
In this course the student will gain an understanding of the principles of sharpening the sides (or periphery) of end milling
cutters.
                                           MARKETING (MKT)
MKT 11000 Prin of Selling                                           (F)                                          3 (3-0)
This course covers principles and techniques employed by successful salesmen, with emphasis on how to sell rather than
how to manage.
MKT 11500 Customer Relations                                           (F)                                           3 (3-0)
This course examines the role of Customer Relations in the economy with emphasis on customer relations in business and
organizations that have considerable dealings with the public. The class addresses the four C’s of excellent customer
service, dealing with difficult people, handling angry customers, developing service strategies, customer service habits to
develop, do’s and don’ts of customer service, customer service on the web, and culminates with the student’s
development of a customer relations policy and program for their ‘chosen’ organization.
MKT 20000 Principles of Marketing                                     (F)                                       3 (3-0)
This course covers the managerial approach to the marketing process. This includes marketing and business management,
the role of the consumer, marketing structure, merchandising, support functions, and product flow.
MKT 20100 Prin of Retailing                                             (W)                                           3 (3-0)
This course emphasizes the theory of retailing and its application to business problems. The course covers retail structure,
consumer analysis, store operation (organization, management, and control), personnel, merchandising, and sales
promotion. Students are required to complete a retail store plan.
MKT 20200 Internet Marketing                                            (W)                                           3 (3-0)
This course focuses on marketing in electronic environments primarily on the Internet, on one or more of its services
(WWW, email), or offline by enterprises that produce and sell Internet-related products. The focus is on the synergy
created when traditional marketing is performed in electronic environments that greatly reduce or eliminate time and
space constraints, facilitate personalization and customization and allow the interoperability of computers and other
devices. Prerequisite: CIS-10500, or equivalent, or permission of instructor; and MKT-20000, or equivalent, or
permission of instructor.
MKT 20400 Advertising                                                   (W)                                             3 (3-0)
This course addresses the social value of advertising and its role in marketing. Analysis of behavioral scientists' findings
in regard to customer appeals and motivations, window display techniques, and principles of advertising copy and layout
are conducted.
                                   MASSAGE THERAPY (MAS)
MAS 10000 Intro to Massage Therapy                                     (F,W)                                       1 (1-0)
This introductory course provides the student with a basic overview of massage therapy. Through lecture, discussion,
demonstration, and hands-on practice, the student will learn the benefits of massage, basic massage strokes,
contraindications, and an overview of different bodywork systems. Time will also be devoted to the history and trends of
massage therapy.
MAS 10200 Intro to Clinic Operations                                   (W)                                          1 (1-0)
This course will prepare the student to practice in the KCC Clinic. Upon completion of the course, students will
understand the physical, financial, health, and business requirements of clinic operation. Prerequisite: MAS-10300.
Corerequisites: MAS-10400 .
MAS 10300 Swedish Massage I                                           (W)                                        2 (1.5-1.5)
Swedish massage is considered to be the foundation of most modern massage techniques. This course focuses on
applying the anatomy and physiology knowledge gained in BIO-10701 and BIO-10702, as well as building skills in
manipulations and the necessary support skills. These include body mechanics; positioning and draping; communication;
hygiene, safety, and sanitation; sequence and flow; range of motion; and preparation for the Kirtland clinic experience.
Prerequisite: BIO-10701 and BIO-10702. Corequisites: MAS-10400.
MAS 10400 Swedish Massage II                                          (W)                                      2 (1.5-1.5)
Swedish Massage II is a continuation of Swedish Massage I. This course is designed to build skills in manipulation and
necessary support skills as described in Swedish I. This course focuses on applying the anatomy and physiology
knowledge gained in ALH-12401, BIO-10701, BIO-10702, and MAS-10300 in building skills in manipulations and the
necessary support skills, including body mechanics; positioning and draping; communication; hygiene, safety, and
sanitation; sequence and flow; range of motion; and preparation for the KCC clinic experience. Prerequisite: MAS-10300.
MAS 11000 Massage Skills Lab                                           (W)                                          1 (0-1)
This is a massage laboratory course designed to enable the student to practice massage skills and meet the requirements
for graduation. The modular approach allows for individualized self-paced instruction. Corequisite: MAS-10300.
MAS 12200 Clinic I                                                    (S)                                          2 (0-2)
This laboratory experience enables the student to practice Swedish and structural-based techniques in a supervised
setting. Prerequisite: MAS-10200 and MAS-12300. Corequisites: MAS-12401, MAS-13004, and MAS-13005.
MAS 12300 Structural Based Bodywork I                                 (W)                                           1 (1-0)
This course will introduce the massage therapist to one of the most popular and versatile techniques—on-site, or chair,
massage. Topics will include benefits of this type of massage, common conditions, special equipment and its use,
techniques, managing the on-site environment, and business development. This course is recommended to professional
massage therapists and individuals who have completed at least 100 hours of training. Corequisite: MAS-10200.
MAS 12401 Structural Based Bodywork II                                 (S)                                           3 (3-0)
This course will introduce students to the specialty of sports/performance massage. Topics will include the benefits of
sports massage, basic applications, specific techniques, and common conditions and injuries. Participation includes
providing massage at the AuSable Canoe marathon. This course is recommended to professional massage therapists and
individuals who have completed at least 100 hours of training. Prerequisite: MAS-12300.
MAS 12500 Structural Based Bodywork III                              (F)                                          1 (1-0)
Participants will learn patterns of body movement that promote grace and ease of movement, as well as the reduction of
body stress. Prerequisite: MAS-12401.
MAS 12600 Energy Based Bodywork I                                     (F)                                          2 (1-1)
This course introduces the student to energy-based bodywork techniques and their applications. Students will have an
opportunity to explore systems such as reflexology, shiatsu, acupressure, therapeutic touch, and healing touch.
Prerequisite: MAS-10200.
MAS 12700 Energy Based Bodywork II                                      (F)                                           2 (1-1)
This course further develops the student’s skill in using and integrating energy-based systems. The course includes an
introduction to cranio-sacral techniques, as well as lecture, demonstration, and hands-on practice. The student will be
assigned a client for a case study. Corequisite: MAS-12600.
MAS 12801 Integrated Structural Dynamics                               (W)                                         2 (1-1)
This course is designed to assist the student in gaining greater knowledge of the human musculoskeletal systems via
muscle identification, palpation, and assessment of movement. The material will be integrated into the coursework
throughout the program. Prerequisites: ALH-10101, BIO-10701, and BIO-10702. Corequisite: MAS-10000.
MAS 13004 Topics I                                                     (S)                                           1 (1-0)
This course examines the issues of special populations served by the massage therapist (the elderly, the pregnant, infants,
children, the disabled, survivors of abuse). Topics include appropriate techniques, common conditions, contraindications,
marketing and professional development, identifying the special needs of the various populations, and practical
experience under supervision. Prerequisite: MAS-10400.
MAS 13005 Topics II                                                     (S)                                           1 (1-0)
This course will familiarize the student with modalities that can be integrated into the massage treatment. Students will
explore the use of aromatherapy, hot and cold treatments, hydrotherapy, and specific techniques for specific conditions.
Prerequisite: MAS-10400.
MAS 13100 Clinic II                                                  (F)                                            2 (0-2)
This advanced laboratory experience provides an opportunity for the student to practice Swedish, structural, and energy-
based massage techniques in a supervised environment. Prerequisite: MAS-12200.
MAS 13200 Internship                                                    (F)                                    1.5 (0-1.5)
This course enables the student to gain a working knowledge by practicing with an approved professional in the
community. Practice sites may include hospitals, resorts, private clinics, and salons. Corequisite: MAS-13100.
MAS 27500 DS-Massage Therapy I                                          (S)                                            2 (2-0)
This course enables the student to focus on his or her individual area of interest. Specialized areas of study and methods
of study must be approved by the instructor. Prerequisite: MAS-10400 or permission of instructor.
                                         MATHEMATICS (MTH)
MTH 11700 Mathematics / Elementary Teachers I                        (F)                                         3 (3-0)
A Mathematical course designed for prospective elementary teachers and for non-mathematics majors in the liberal arts
curriculum. The course covers the modern concepts of mathematics taught in grades K-8. It places emphasis on set
theory, problem-solving, numeration systems, operations on natural numbers and rational numbers, elementary number
theory, and exercises using manipulatives. Prerequisite: ENG-10303. Corequisite: MTH12000. (Math Credit)
MTH 12000 Intermediate Algebra                                          (F,W)                                         4 (4-0)
This course includes the study of the properties of real numbers, basic concepts of algebraic operations, solving and
graphing linear and nonlinear functions, systems of equations, complex numbers, quadratic functions, factoring, rational
expressions, and basic interpretations of tables and graphs of data. A graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite:
requisite COMPASS test scores or MTH-10100. (Math Credit)
MTH 13000 College Algebra                                               (F,W)                                        4 (4-0)
This is a one semester course designed to prepare students for the study of calculus. The topics to be covered include
review of the fundamentals of algebra, relations, functions, solutions, of first- and second degree equations and
inequalities, systems of equations, determinants, binomial theorem, mathematical induction, polynomial functions and
theory of equations, analytic geometry and conic sections, geometric and arithmetical sequences and series, and
miscellaneous topics. Calculators will be used for selected topics. Prerequisite: MTH-12000 or requisite COMPASS test
scores. (Math Credit)
MTH 14000 Trigonometry                                                 (W)                                           3 (3-0)
This course includes the study of functions and their graphs, trigonometric functions, analytic trigonometry, applications
of trigonometric functions, parametric and polar functions, vectors, and analytic geometry. Prerequisite: MTH-12000.
(Math Credit)
MTH 20600 Application in Statistics                                       (F,W)                                           4 (4-0)
This is an introductory course in statistics for any field in which the collection, analysis, interpretation, and presentation
of numerical data are important. Topics include organization of data, types of distributions (binomial, normal, student t,
chi-square), sampling, testing of hypotheses, confidence intervals, correlation, and regression. Additionally, the students
will choose a project that will allow them to gain experience and demonstrate understanding of some of the statistical
techniques or methods. A calculator is required. Computer software will be utilized. Prerequisite: MTH-12000 or higher.
(Math Credit)
MTH 21700 Mathematics/Elementary Teachers II                            (W)                                      3 (3-0)
The second mathematical course designed for prospective elementary teachers and for non-math majors in the liberal arts
curriculum. The course covers Decimals, percent, ratio/proportions, geometry (concepts and measurement), probability,
statistics, introduction to Algebra, and exercises using manipulatives. Prerequisites: ENG-10303 and MTH-12000.
MTH 22002 Calculus I                                                     (F)                                           4 (4-0)
This is the first of a three-semester sequential course in analytic geometry and calculus. Topics include functions, limits,
continuity, derivatives, integrals, and their applications. A graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite: MTH-13000 and
MTH-14000; or requisite COMPASS test scores. (Math Credit)
MTH 22102 Calculus II                                                    (W)                                        4 (4-0)
This course is a continuation of MTH-22002. Topics include applications of integration, techniques of integration,
L’Hopital’s Rule, improper integrals, infinite series, conic section, plane curves, parametric equations, and polar
coordinates. A graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite: MTH- 22002. (Math Credit)
                                                 MUSIC (MUS)
MUS 10100 Music History & Appreciation                                (F)                                            3 (3-0)
This course is a guide to listening, with emphasis on understanding and experiencing the fundamentals of music to
increase the enjoyment and knowledge of music and to cultivate the art of intelligent and perceptive listening. Prerequisite
or corequisite: ENG-10303. (Humanities Credit)
MUS 10400 Piano I                                                       (W)                                        3 (1.5-1.5)
This course is designed for group instruction on electronic piano. It will develop proficiency in piano playing in students
who have had no experience at the keyboard. Other musical experience such as MUS-10100 is helpful but not essential.
(Humanities Credit)
MUS 10802 Contemp Acoustic Guitar Styles I                              (F)                                           2 (1-1)
This class will teach beginners in an ensemble setting the basics of guitar styles used by today’s musicians. Students will
learn strumming and picking techniques along with simple major, minor and 7th chords that will allow them to
accompany themselves and/or others. (Humanities Credit)
MUS 10901 Contemp Acoustic Guitar Styles II                         (F)                                        2 (1-1)
This class is a continuation of MUS-10802 and will teach more advanced chords, strumming and picking techniques,
along with more complex chord progressions. Both rhythm and lead techniques are taught in an ensemble setting.
Prerequisite: MUS-10802 or permission of instructor. (Humanities Credit)
MUS 11500 Beginning Voice                                               (F)                                         3 (3-0)
This course provides classroom instruction in singing and vocal technique, including posture breathing, tone, song
preparation, and performance. Some individual instruction, choral training, and general musicianship are also provided.
The course is required of all students seeking a concentration in acting. (Humanities Credit)
MUS 12300 Jazz History & Appreciation                                  (W)                                                 3
This course is an in-depth study of America's only original art form through a historical and social perspective beginning
with Blues and including Dixieland, swing, BeBop, and modern jazz. (Humanities credit)
MUS 27503 DS-Intermediate Voice                                        (F)                                         3 (3-0)
This course is a continuation of MUS-11500. It provides classroom instruction in singing and vocal technique, including
articulation, resonance, vocal health, vocal problem-solving, and performance. Some individual instruction, choral
training, and general musicianship are also provided. Prerequisite: MUS-11500 or permission of instructor. (Humanities
Credit)
                                               NURSING (NUR)
NUR 10502 Foundations of Nursing                                        (F,W)                                          3 (3-0)
This is the basic course in the nursing curriculum, which provides the foundation upon which other courses will build and
expand. It is designed to introduce the beginning nursing student to the philosophy and objectives of practical nursing.
Content includes the scientific principles and skills concerned with basic nursing practice, with emphasis on areas of
nursing skills in respect to safety, comfort, coping, and adaptation. The student is introduced to the nursing process, basic
communication skills, general assessment, death and dying, and spiritual and transcultural issues. Prerequisite: admission
into the nursing program.
NUR 10700 Mental Health Concepts                                        (F,W)                                          1 (1-0)
This course is designed to assist the student nurse to develop knowledge and skills in providing basic psychiatric nursing
care. The student will achieve psychosocial adaptation competencies in assisting the client with an acute or chronic
mental illness, substance abuse issue, or crisis/violence need. Students will apply scientific process to problem solve
client’s needs. Prerequisite: admission into the nursing program.
NUR 10803 Nursing Practice Lab                                         (F)                                              3 (0-4)
This course consists of guided learning lab practice. The focus is acquisition of basic nursing skills. Prerequisite:
admission into the nursing program.
NUR 10804 Nursing Clinical I                                            (F)                                             2 (0-6)
This course consists of guided learning clinical experience in selected health care facilities/settings. Emphasis is placed on
the principles and activities concerned with basic nursing techniques that are common to the client within the health care
facility. Prerequisite: admission into the nursing program.
NUR 12304 Nursing Clinical II                                           (W)                                           5 (0-15)
This is a clinical course designed to introduce the student to basic concepts of using the nursing process to deliver care to
adults with well-defined nursing diagnoses. Safe administration of medications will be integrated. Medical, surgical, and
physiology principles serve as the foundation for the course. Application will occur in selected acute care and
community sites. Prerequisite: admission into the nursing program.
NUR 12503 Adult Medical-Surgical Nursing                               (F,W)                                          4 (4-0)
This course introduces students to concepts focusing on how the adult responds to alterations in health. Emphasis is
placed on using the nursing process as the student explores disease entities and the physiological responses of the body to
these problems. This course presumes a basic understanding of normal anatomy and physiology, nutrition, and nursing
foundations. Prerequisite: admission into the nursing program.
NUR 12800 Maternal-Child Nursing Care                                  (W,F)                                           2 (2-0)
This course is designed to introduce the student to the concepts of obstetrical/pediatric nursing care. The course will
include the health concerns confronting the following populations: women, pregnant client, the infant, child, and
adolescent and their families, caretakers, and the community. The course presumes a basic understanding of normal
anatomy and physiology. Basic concepts and principles of growth and development from conception through infancy,
childhood and adolescence will be integrated throughout. Nutritional needs of these client groups and variations of diet
therapy will be included. Prerequisite: admission into the nursing program. Corequisite: NUR-12304.
NUR 13302 Current Issues in Nursing                                   (S)                                            1 (1-0)
This is a course designed to emphasize the responsibilities and concerns associated with a graduate practical nurse. The
course will focus on employment opportunities, continuing education, professional issues, and role. Prerequisite:
admission into the nursing program.
NUR 13402 Nursing Clinical III                                          (S)                                            2 (0-6)
This course consists of guided learning clinical experience in selected health care facilities. Continued emphasis is placed
on meeting the biopsychosocial developmental needs of the client. Role transition to graduate status is fostered.
Prerequisite: admission into the nursing program.
NUR 20900 Pharmacology II                                                (F,W)                                       2 (2-0)
A course designed to introduce the nurse to advanced concepts of drug therapy, principles and methods of drug
administration and related nursing activities and responsibilities. The course is based on the pharmaco/physiological
concept. Continual association to clinical experience and physiology cellular principles will be emphasized through the
course. This course is designed to continue the concepts of Pharmacology I. Prerequisite: Pharmacology I.
NUR 21400 Nursing Pharmacology                                           (W)                                         2 (2-0)
This course is designed to introduce the nurse to advanced concepts of drug therapy, principles and methods of drug
administration, and related nursing activities and responsibilities. The course is based on the pharmaco/physiological
concept. Continual association to clinical experience and physiology cellular principles will be emphasized throughout
the course. Prerequisite: admission into the Level II nursing program, or permission of department.
NUR 22001 Nursing Assessment                                            (F)                                          3 (3-0)
This course is designed to explore the nursing process in depth as a foundation for professional nursing practice. Methods
for eliciting a sound health history and techniques for physical assessment will be introduced as a means of providing
essential information for care planning. This course is designed to build on previous knowledge of the body’s anatomy
and physiology. Prerequisite: admission into the Level II nursing program, or permission of department.
NUR 22201 Critical Thinking in Adult Care                                  (F,W)                                           5 (5-0)
This is a critical thinking course designed to aid the students in the use of the nursing process as it relates to adult clients
with acute, chronic, and multiple health care problems. Emphasis is on a holistic approach that focuses on the adaptation
of clients and significant others to alterations in the wellness-illness continuum and nursing’s role in this process.
Prerequisite: admission into the Level II nursing program, or permission of department.
NUR 22300 Adult Nursing Clinical                                         (F,W)                                           5 (0-15)
This course provides the student with clinical experiences that emphasize care for adult clients with acute and chronic
health care problems. Nursing interventions focus on meeting the needs of clients with multiple health problems from a
holistic perspective-wellness to illness. Application of theory to practice is critical to the learning process of students in
this course. Prerequisite: admission into the Level II nursing program, or permission of department.
NUR 23200 Family Centered Pediatrics                                      (F,W)                                        2 (2-0)
This is a lecture course regarding applying the nursing process to pediatric clients and their families. The student will
learn to facilitate the child and family in building, mobilizing, and using their resources in health promotion and
maintenance, and managing illness. Prerequisite: admission into the Level II nursing program, or permission of
department.
NUR 23300 Pediatric Nursing Clinical                                    (F,W)                                       1 (0-3)
This clinical course will provide the student with the opportunity to apply the concepts from Family Centered Pediatrics.
The experiences will occur in selected hospital and community settings. Prerequisite: admission into the Level II nursing
program, or permission of department.
NUR 24201 Community Mental Health Nursing                             (F,W)                                           2 (2-0)
This is a course designed to develop knowledge to provide psychiatric nursing care to select clients in the hospital or
community who demonstrate patterns of maladaptive behavior. The student will explore methods of prevention,
maintenance, and treatment of individuals with a mental illness. Prerequisite: admission into the Level II nursing
program, or permission of department.
NUR 24302 Community Mental Health Clinical                            (F,W)                                      1.5 (0-4.5)
Hospital and community clinical experiences are utilized to provide students opportunities to apply the nursing process to
clients with maladaptive behavior. The focus is on one-to-one interpersonal relationships through which the nursing
process is applied and analyzed. Prerequisite: admission into the Level II nursing program, or permission of department.
NUR 24600 Nursing Care of Women & Families                              (F,W)                                       2 (2-0)
This course is designed to assist the student in applying the nursing process in giving care to women, newborns, and their
families, primarily during the period of childbearing. This course focuses on home care, complications of childbearing,
and reproductive health. Emphasis is placed on the nurse’s role in disease prevention, health promotion and maintenance,
and teaching. Prerequisite: admission into the Level II nursing program, or permission of department.
NUR 24700 OB/GYN Nursing Clinical                                       (F,W)                                       1 (0-3)
This course is designed to permit the student an opportunity to apply the nursing process while giving care to women,
newborns, and families, primarily during the childbearing period. Application of concepts will occur in selected hospital,
clinic, and community sites. Prerequisite: admission into the Level II nursing program, or permission of department.
NUR 24900 Pediatric/Women's Health Clinical 2                             (F,W)                                       1.5 (0-4.5)
The focus of this clinical course is to aid the student in applying the nursing process to the needs of obstetrical, female,
newborn, and pediatric families. Nursing intervention in assisting the client and family to promote maximum holistic
health through continuous adaptation, growth, and development in their responses to illness and stress is demonstrated.
Emphasis is placed on the nurse's role of nurturing and facilitating the obstetrical, female, newborn, child, and families in
building, mobilizing and using their resources in health promotion, health maintenance and managing illness. This course
presumes the student has previously attained a basic level of clinical experience in obstetrical, female, newborn, and
pediatric nursing and is designed to build upon that experience base. Application of obstetrical, female, newborn and
family-centered pediatrics nursing care will occur in selected hospital or community based settings. Prerequisite:
admission into the Level II nursing program. Corequisite: NUR23200 and NUR24600.
NUR 25201 Professional Practice                                           (V)                                          2 (2-0)
This course is designed to assist the transition of the student nurse to graduate nurse. Professional nursing behaviors and
attitudes are explored. Health care systems, nursing personnel and roles, staffing, and other professional issues are
examined and evaluated. Prerequisite: admission into the Level II nursing program, or permission of department.
NUR 26001 Nursing Care of Adults                                         (F)                                            8 (8-0)
This course is designed to facilitate the student in using the nursing process to give care to adults who are acutely or
chronically ill or who have multiple health problems. Nursing interventions to assist the client and family in their holistic
adaptive responses to illness and stress are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the nurse’s role in health care management
(disease prevention, health promotion and maintenance, and teaching). Information is designed to build upon the theory
learned in all completed coursework and will enable the student to apply previously learned knowledge and skills.
Prerequisite: admission into program.
NUR 27200 Nursing Care of Special Pops - OB                              (V)                                             2 (2-0)
This is a course designed to facilitate the student in using the nursing process to give care to special populations (mental
illness, childbearing family, and childrearing family). Nursing interventions to assist the client and family in their holistic
adaptive responses to growth and development, illness, and stress are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the nurse’s role in
health care management (disease prevention, health promotion and maintenance, and teaching). Knowledge is
demonstrated by the safe and effective clinical care to clients in various settings. Prerequisite: admission into program and
PSY-10100.
NUR 27400 Nursing Care of Special Pops - Peds                            (V)                                                    2
This is a course designed to facilitate the student in using the nursing process to give care to special populations (mental
illness, childbearing family, and childrearing family). Nursing interventions to assist the client and family in their holistic
adaptive responses to growth and development, illness, and stress are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the nurse’s role in
health care management (disease prevention, health promotion and maintenance, and teaching). Knowledge is
demonstrated by the safe and effective clinical care to clients in various settings. Prerequisite: admission into program and
PSY-10100.
NUR 27600 Nursing - Special Pops/Mental Hlth                             (V)                                                    4
This is a course designed to facilitate the student in using the nursing process to give care to special populations (mental
illness, childbearing family, and childrearing family). Nursing interventions to assist the client and family in their holistic
adaptive responses to growth and development, illness, and stress are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the nurse’s role in
health care management (disease prevention, health promotion and maintenance, and teaching). Knowledge is
demonstrated by the safe and effective clinical care to clients in various settings. Prerequisite: admission into program and
PSY-10100.
NUR 28000 Clinical Application / Nursing Care                             (V)                                            8 (8-0)
This is a clinical course that focuses on the practice of nursing in selected settings (in-patient, out-patient, and community
settings) and with varying client populations. Students apply nursing process to assist clients and families to achieve
maximum holistic health through continuous adaptation and growth and development. Students will manage care for
increasing numbers of clients within selected settings. Communication skills with clients, peers, and the health care team
are emphasized, as are professional nursing behaviors. Knowledge is demonstrated by the safe and effective clinical care
to clients in the mental health, childbearing, childrearing, and medical-surgical settings over 15 weeks of clinical
experience. Prerequisites: NUR-22001, NUR-26001, NUR-27000, and Nursing Leadership (NURS 290.L1)
                        OFFICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS (OIS)
OIS 10100        Basic Keyboarding                                  (F,W,S)                                                  1
This course is for those who have not had any previous keyboarding instruction.
OIS 10401        Keyboarding I-A                                     (F,W,S)                                                 1
Students will be using a microcomputer and appropriate software to develop touch-type operation of the keyboard and
drill work to develop their keyboarding skills.
OIS 10402        Keyboarding I-B                                     (F,W,S)                                                 1
Students will be using a microcomputer and appropriate software to develop touch-type operation and basic skills in
keyboarding, including the numeric keypad and the ability to prepare memorandums and business letters. Review and
drill work are also incorporated into the course.
OIS 10403        Keyboarding I-C                                       (F,W,S)                                           1
Students will be using a microcomputer and appropriate software to develop basic skills in keyboarding, including touch-
type operation of the keyboard, and the ability to prepare simple business letters, reports, manuscripts, and outlines.
Review and drill work are available for those students who have previously developed some keyboarding skill.
OIS 10500        Business Correspondence                               (F,W,S)                                          3
Detailed examination of methods of communication in business. Instruction and practice in writing and constructing
rough drafts, finished letters and forms used in business. Includes grammatical and mechanical foundation for preparing
business correspondence with emphasis on successful human relations. Employability skill, including letters of
appreciation, application forms, and interview techniques are presented. The course also includes a documented research
paper. Prerequisite: ENG-10303.
OIS 10600          Intro to Health Information Systems                  (F,W,S)                                          3
This course is designed to introduce the student to health information systems from a broad view of the health care
industry to the basic elements of health information technology, through the physician’s office, acute care setting, and
other health care environments. A complete integration of computer-based terminology and concepts will be addressed as
it relates to health information technology. The course includes the practical application of various health information
functions.
OIS 10701         Medical Office Transcription-A                          (F,W,S)                                             1
This introductory course is designed to expose the student to the beginning stages of medical transcription. The student
will learn the different tools of transcription, how to operate the different types of dictation and transcription equipment,
how to use the reference materials in terms of punctuation and transcribing numbers. Basic transcription will be
introduced. Corequisites: ALH-10101; OIS-11401 or OIS-18201 or equivalent; or permission of advisor.
OIS 10702        Medical Office Transcription-B                         (F,W,S)                                           1
This course is designed to expose the student to formatting transcription letters and to developing proofreading skills.
Guidelines will be introduced for style, grammar, and specific medical transcription mechanics such as editing, spelling,
and formatting of medical reports. Intermediate transcription skills will be developed upon completion of this course.
Prerequisites: OIS-10701.
OIS 10703        Medical Office Transcription-C                        (F,W,S)                                            1
This course exposes the student to identifying the various mechanical formats used to prepare the diverse medical reports
used in transcribing. Upon completion of this course, the student will be typing reports, memos, minutes, and agendas.
Advanced transcription skills will be developed upon completion of this course. Prerequisites: OIS-10702 or equivalent.
OIS 10800        Medical Transcription I                              (F,W,S)                                              3
Transcription of authentic physician-dictated reports organized by body systems or medical specialties. Emphasis on
development of accuracy, speed, and medical knowledge for transcription of letters, chart notes, history and physical
examination reports, consultations, emergency room reports, operative reports, discharge summaries, laboratory reports,
diagnostic studies, radiology and pathology reports. Using reference materials and other resources efficiently. Editing and
proofreading techniques. Grammar and punctuation review. Prerequisites: ENG-10303, and OIS-10703 or equivalent.
OIS 11201        Business Calculations                                 (F,W,S)                                            3
The student will learn how to add, subtract, multiply, and divide to complete various business application problems using
an electronic calculator and the microcomputer ten-key pad.
OIS 11300       Medical Coding I                                      (F,W)                                             3
This course includes the study and practical application of coding medical diagnoses and procedures from medical record
documentation using CPT-4 coding systems. The student will review medical records to identify the key components of
documentation that are used in the coding and documentation process. Prerequisite: ALH-10101.
OIS 11401        Keyboarding II-A                                     (F,W,S)                                           1
This course is designed to increase speed and accuracy in the preparation of keyed projects. The student will be
introduced to memorandums and e-mail, personal and business letters, and tables. Prerequisite: OIS-10403 or equivalent,
or permission of advisor.
OIS 11402        Keyboarding II-B                                       (F,W,S)                                             1
This course is designed to increase speed and accuracy in the preparation of business reports and letters. The student will
be introduced to various letter styles, forms, manuscripts, and tabulation problems. Prerequisite: OIS-11401 or equivalent.
OIS 11403        Keyboarding II-C                                       (F,W,S)                                             1
This course is designed to increase speed and accuracy in the preparation of business reports and letters. The student will
be introduced to various letter styles, forms, manuscripts, and tabulation problems. Prerequisite: OIS-11402 or equivalent.
OIS 11500         Medical Billing & Coding                            (F,W)                                                 3
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform the duties of an Insurance Billing
Specialist. This includes reviewing and completing health insurance forms properly and accurately abstracting with the
appropriate diagnoses and procedure codes. Students will prepare and organize patient charts, bills, ledgers, and
encounter forms. Prerequisite: ALH-10101 or permission of advisor.
OIS 17000         Legal Terminology & Transcription                    (F,W)                                              3
This course is designed to give the student a background in basic legal terminology including spelling, pronunciation, and
meaning. The student will develop transcription skills by transcribing from taped dictation documents dealing with the
courts, legal systems, and litigation procedures. Prerequisites: ENG-10303 and OIS-10403. Corequisites: OIS11401 or
higher.
OIS 18201        Word Processing I-Word-A                           (F,W,S)                                             1
This course is designed to provide students with a knowledge of word processing concepts, equipment, and the ability to
perform word processing operations using a word processing system. The student will perform basic word processing
functions including inputting, formatting, editing, and printing.
OIS 18202        Word Processing I-Word-B                                (F,W,S)                                             1
This course is designed to provide students with a knowledge of word processing concepts, equipment, and the ability to
perform word processing operations using a word processing system. The student will perform basic word processing
functions including inputting, formatting, editing, saving, retrieving, creating, printing, maintaining files, using writing
tools, using tabs, and manipulating text. Prerequisite: OIS-18201.
OIS 18203        Word Processing I-Word-C                               (F,W,S)                                         1
This course is designed to provide students with a knowledge of word processing concepts, equipment, and the ability to
perform word processing operations using a word processing system. The student will perform basic word processing
functions including inputting, formatting, editing, printing, maintaining files, using writing tools, using tabs, and
manipulating text. Prerequisite: OIS-18202.
OIS 19001        Machine Transcription-A                                (F,W,S)                                              1
This is an introductory course, which teaches the basic skills needed to operate a transcribing machine. Emphasis is
placed on listening skills, proofreading, and applying the principles of correct grammar to the transcription of letters and
memorandums. Prerequisites: ENG-10303; OIS-11401 or OIS-18201 or equivalent. Corequisites: OIS11401 or
OIS18201.
OIS 19002        Machine Transcription-B                                (F,W,S)                                        1
This intermediate course introduces dictation of documents requiring document-formatting decisions. Emphasis continues
to be placed on listening skills, use of proper punctuation, and accurate proofreading techniques. Prerequisites: OIS-
19001 or equivalent.
OIS 19003       Machine Transcription-C                                 (F,W,S)                                           1
This course requires the student to apply the basic skills acquired in OIS-19001 and OIS-19002 to dictation of increasing
difficulty. Grammar, spelling, formatting, and editing decisions will be more challenging. Prerequisites: OIS-19002 or
equivalent.
OIS 20501        Records Management-A                                   (F,W,S)                                              1
This course is an introduction to the basic principles, procedures, and methods of records storage, control, retrieval, and
management. Practical applications of manual filing are utilized to assist students in mastering the rules and principles of
alphabetic filing.
OIS 20502       Records Management-B                                   (F,W,S)                                           1
This course expands on the introductory course by reviewing the basics of alphabetic filing through additional practical
applications. Emphasis is placed on procedures for efficient records retention, retrieval, and transfer procedures.
Prerequisite: OIS-20501.
OIS 20503        Records Management-C                                (F,W,S)                                           1
This course provides the student with advanced training in records management, which includes principles and practical
applications of subject, numeric, and geographic filing. For enhancement of records management techniques, an interview
with a records manager in an off-campus business will be conducted by the student. Prerequisite: OIS-20502.
OIS 20600        Medical Transcription II                                (F,W,S)                                              3
This course will expand the transcription skills of the student by the use of dictation in the specialty areas of medicine and
will include dictation by heavily accented English-speaking people. The students will further develop their skill in
efficient usage of reference materials.
OIS 20700       Medical Transcription III                             (F,W,S)                                           3
This machine transcription course will required the student to develop an employable production speed while transcribing
a variety of medical documents dealing with the specialty areas of medicine and advanced terminology. Dictation by
persons with foreign accents will be incorporated into this class.
OIS 21000        Office Procedures                                    (F,W,S)                                              3
This course provides the application and combination of previously learned skills. It introduces the application of
standard office procedures and practices. Emphasis is on the production of quality materials suitable for actual use, with
further emphasis on the development of acceptable personal attitudes and personality. The course also includes a review
of employability skills. Prerequisites: ENG-10303; and OIS-11403 and OIS-18203 and OIS-19003, or equivalent.
OIS 21100         Medical Office Procedures                             (F,W,S)                                             3
This course is a concentrated application of various tasks that a medical clerk/secretary performs, including administrative
responsibilities, preparing and organizing patient charts, medical ethics and law, Internet projects, telephone procedures,
appointments, and records management. The use of the computer is emphasized in each of these applications.
Prerequisites: ALH-10101 and ENG-10303; or equivalent.
OIS 21300       Medical Coding II                                     (F,W,S)                                                3
This course includes the advanced study and practical application of coding medical diagnoses and procedures from
medical record documentation using ICD-9-CM and CPT-4. The student will achieve a thorough understanding of the
impact of coding on all aspects of the reimbursement process. Prerequisite: OIS-11300.
OIS 21400       Keyboarding III                                        (F,W,S)                                               3
This course provides application and study in the preparation of common and specialized letters, business forms, legal
papers, and correct office methods and procedures. Also, typing of specialized forms in accounting, government, and
professional and technical fields is taught. Prerequisite: OIS-11403 and OIS-18203, or equivalent.
OIS 21500        Desktop Publishing for the Office                          (F,W,S)                                               3
This is a course designed to study the technology of desktop publishing. A word processing program will be used to
create documents such as reports, brochures, advertisements, newsletters, flyers, and correspondence. Advanced features
will also be taught; therefore, the student will acquire a skill that is valuable in both small and large offices. Prerequisites:
CIS-10500 and OIS-22200 or equivalent; or permission of advisor. Corequisites: OIS11403.
OIS 22100         Office Pharmacology                                      (W)                                                 2
This course is designed for the medical secretary or transcriptionist and will focus on drugs prescribed and/or dispensed
in the office setting, patient instructions, reporting reactions, and storage. Emphasis will be placed on correct spelling and
transcription of prescribed medications. Prerequisites: ALH-10101, BIO-10701, and BIO-10702, or permission of
advisor. Prerequisite or corequisite: ALH-11201.
OIS 22200        Word Processing II-Word                             (F,W,S)                                          3
This course is designed to provide advanced applications of the word processing system and program used in OIS-18203.
The student will demonstrate proficiency in advanced word processing applications including power typing, creation of
documents, and enhancement to promote efficiency. Prerequisite: OIS-18203.
OIS 22500        Legal Office Procedures                                   (F,W)                                        3
This course is designed to provide students with fundamental concepts of American jurisprudence, and practical
application of tasks that will be required in a legal office setting. Prerequisites: BUS-10100, BUS-21500, and OIS-17000
with a grade of "C" or better. Corequisites: OIS11403.
OIS 24101         Internship-Administrative Asst                         (F,W,S)                                                 3
The externship consists of 128 hours of directed office work experience consisting of supervised secretarial duties in a
suitable office facility either on or off campus. Prerequisites: completion of all courses required for program, a GPA of
2.0 or better, and permission of advisor.
OIS 24102         Internship-Legal Secretary                             (F,W,S)                                            3
The externship consists of 128 hours of directed office work experience consisting of supervised legal secretarial duties in
a suitable legal office. Prerequisites: completion of all courses required for program, a GPA of 2.0 or better, and
permission of advisor.
OIS 24103         Internship-Medical Secretary                            (F,W,S)                                             3
The externship consists of 128 hours of directed office work experience consisting of supervised medical secretarial
duties in a suitable medical facility. Prerequisites: completion of all courses required for program, a GPA of 2.0 or better,
and permission of advisor.
OIS 24106        Internship-Medical Transcription                        (F,W,S)                                           4
This externship consists of coordinated, directed, on-site training under the supervision of a qualified medical record
administrator in an office specializing in medical transcription. The externship will involve 144 hours of work experience
transcribing the basic four reports (history and physical, consultation, operative report, and discharge summary), as well
as other specialty area transcription. A transcription project will be developed along with a transcription procedures
manual. Prerequisites: completion of all courses required for program, a GPA of 2.0 or better, and permission of advisor.
OIS 24107       Internship-Adv Word Processing Spec                       (F,W,S)                                                3
The externship consists of 128 hours of directed office work experience consisting of supervised advanced word
processing duties in a suitable facility. Prerequisite: completion of all courses required for program, a GPA of 2.0 or
better, and permission of advisor.
OIS 24108         Internship-Medical Clerk                                (F,W,S)                                            3
The externship consists of 128 hours of directed office work experience consisting of supervised medical office assistant
duties in a suitable medical facility. Prerequisite: completion of all courses required for program, a GPA of 2.0 or better,
and permission of advisor.
OIS 24109        Internship-Medical Billing/Coding                        (F,W,S)                                         4
The externship consists of 144 hours of directed office work experience consisting of supervised billing and coding duties
in a suitable medical facility. Prerequisite: completion of all courses required for program, a GPA of 2.0 or better, and
permission of advisor.
                            OUTDOOR POWER ENGINES (OPE)
OPE 10001         Two & Four Cycle Engines Level 1                     (F,W)                                         3 (1-3)
Students will be able to identify basic engine parts as single components or as assemblies. Students also will explain the
overall function of the engine including components, function, identification, and purpose. The class also includes hand
tool identification, measurement tools functions, and minor removal and installation of certain components on the engine.
OPE 11032        Two & Four Cycle Engines Level 2                      (F,W)                                          3 (1-3)
Students will be able to identify basic engine problems, diagnose or troubleshoot and correct or repair. Students will also
perform preventative maintenance measured on engines and tune-up engines, gearboxes, and transaxles before failure
occurs in these components. Prerequisite: OPE-10001.
OPE 20100         Outdoor Power Engines Capstone                         (F,W,S)                                        3 (1-3)
This is a project based course that applies both the theory and practical hands-on content that was covered in the two
previous courses (OPE Level 1 and Level 2). The students will apply those skills learned in the previous two classes,
while they troubleshoot and service equipment. Students will repair a multitude of minor issues that could include
mechanical, electrical, or fuel-related problems, either internal or exterior to the engine or equipment it is mounted to.
Prerequisite: OPE10001 & OPE11032.
                                          PHILOSOPHY (PHL)
PHL 20100        Intro to Philosophy                                    (F)                                           3 (3-0)
An introduction to not only the study of philosophy, but also its active and systematic practice. While the course explores
such topics as the origin and development of philosophy, the ideas of major philosophers, and significant philosophical
issues and problems, students are encouraged, above all, to practice the methods of philosophy as a life skill. Prerequisite
or corequisite: ENG-10303 or permission of instructor. (Humanities Credit)
PHL 21000       Intro to Ethics-Hist/Appl Approach                      (W)                                         3 (3-0)
An introduction to the study of moral philosophy. Through reading, writing, and discussion, students will explore moral
values and the major ethical theories, practice effective moral reasoning, and apply ethical thinking to issues and
problems in various fields and their own lives. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG-10303 or permission of instructor.
(Humanities Credit)
                                               PHYSICS (PHY)
PHY 10501 Physical Science                                              (W)                                           3 (3-0)
This is a lecture and virtual laboratory classroom course in physical science. The course investigates fundamental matter
and energy concepts in the physical universe through the use of selected materials from the areas of astronomy,
chemistry, and physics. Attention is given to the methods of scientific inquiry and applications in technology. This course
may be elected to meet the science requirement by those not majoring in science. Corequisite: MTH-12000 and PHY-
10502. (Science Credit)
PHY 10502 Physical Science Lab                                     (W)                                               1 (0-2)
This is a laboratory course to accompany PHY-10501. Corequisite: PHY-10501. (Science Credit)
PHY 20101 Physics I with Trigonometry                                 (W)                                            4 (4-0)
This is an algebra-trigonometry-based lecture course in introductory physics. Topics will include general properties of
energy and matter with emphasis on mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, and sound. Prerequisite: MTH-12000 or
permission of instructor. Corequisite: MTH-14000 and PHY-20102. (Science Credit)
PHY 20102 Physics I with Trigonometry Lab                          (W)                                               1 (0-3)
This is a laboratory course to accompany PHY-20101. Corequisite: PHY-20101.
PHY 20201 Physics II with Trigonometry                                  (F)                                           4 (4-0)
This is a continuation of General Physics I. Topics will include principles of electricity and magnetism, optics, and
concepts of modern physics such as relativity and nuclear physics. Prerequisite: PHY-20100 or permission of instructor.
Corequisite: PHY-20202. (Science Credit)
PHY 20202 Physics II with Trigonometry Lab                         (F)                                               1 (0-3)
This is a laboratory course to accompany PHY-20201. Corequisite: PHY-20201. (Science Credit)
PHY 22101 Physics I with Calculus                                        (W)                                         4 (4-0)
This is an introductory lecture course that will provide a calculus-based background of basic principles and theories with
practical applications; topics will include general properties of matter with emphasis on mechanics and waves; heat and
thermodynamics, and sound. Prerequisite: MTH-22002. Corequisite: MTH-22102 and PHY-22102. (Science Credit)
PHY 22102 Physics I with Calculus Lab                                  (W)                                           1 (0-3)
This is a laboratory course to accompany PHY-22101. It will provide the student with a background of basic laboratory
skills and experimental experience in approaching physical principles and theories with practical applications; topics will
include electricity and magnetism, optics and light, modern physics, and nuclear physics. Emphasis will be placed on
proper laboratory procedures and utilization of the Scientific Method. Corequisite: PHY-22101. (Science Credit)
PHY 22201 Physics II with Calculus                                      (F)                                          4 (4-0)
This is a continuation of PHY-22101 that will provide a calculus-based background of basic principles and theories with
practical applications; topics will include electricity and magnetism, optics and light, modern physics, and nuclear
physics. Prerequisite: PHY-22101. Corequisite: PHY-22202. (Science Credit)
PHY 22202 Physics II with Calculus Lab                                    (F)                                         1 (0-3)
This is an laboratory course that should be taken in tandem with the PHY-22201 physics lecture course. It will provide
the student with a background of basic laboratory skills and experimental experience in approaching physical principles
and theories with practical applications; topics will include electricity and magnetism, optics and light, modern physics,
and nuclear physics. Emphasis will be placed on proper laboratory procedures and utilization of the Scientific Method.
Prerequisite: PHY-22101 and PHY-22102. Corequisite: PHY-22201. (Science Credit)
                                    POLITICAL SCIENCE (POL)
POL 10100         Intro to American Government                             (F,W,S)                                   3 (3-0)
A study of the processes and functions of national government, this course includes a study of federalism, political
parties, constitutional principles, and the role of the citizen. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG-10303.
POL 20000         International Relations                                 (F)                                            3 (3-0)
This is a study of the nature of relations among nations with particular reference to the basic principles of international
politics, including foreign policy, cooperation, conflict, and the role of international organizations. Special focus will be
on global issues such as political and economic development, human rights, population growth, food and energy policies,
and conservation. Prerequisite: POL-10100. (Social Science Credit)
POL 20100        Comparative Government                                (F)                                               3 (3-0)
This course surveys the government and political institutions in selected Western European democracies, communist
systems, and third world countries, emphasizing political socialization, participation, political parties, interest groups,
policy making, and governmental structures. The student will come to understand the differences between the American
political system and other democratic and non-democratic systems. In addition, the course considers cultural, economic,
and social differences. Prerequisite: POL-10100. (Social Science Credit)
                                           PSYCHOLOGY (PSY)
PSY 10100         Intro to Psychology                                    (F,W,S)                                        3 (3-0)
This course is a study of human and animal behavior with reference to perception, learning memory, thinking, emotions,
intelligence, aptitude, and personality. The need for scientific investigation of behavior is stressed throughout the course.
In addition, the behavioral neuroscience, psychodynamic, social/behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic viewpoints are
considered for analysis of psychological phenomena. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG-10303. (Social Science Credit)
PSY 20200        Abnormal Psychology                                     (F,W,S)                                     3 (3-0)
Abnormal psychology provides examination of the main psychological disorders manifested by individuals across the life
span. This includes a descriptive and theoretical survey of the major forms of psychopathology in children, adolescents,
and adults, and will also explore current trends and research in the fields of mental health and psychopathology. The
course will provide an historical overview of mental illness followed by exploration into the eating disorders,
schizophrenia, mood disorders, suicide, anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, sexual and gender identity disorders and
the insanity defense. Prerequisite: PSY-10100. (Social Science Credit)
PSY 24000        Lifespan Developmental Psychology                      (W)                                        3 (3-0)
This is a course designed to introduce the basic principles of developmental psychology from conception to death (life-
span). The course, while pursuing a chronological approach (life-stages) and examining basic developmental tasks
appropriate to each stage, will explore the factors that influence growth and development. Prerequisite: PSY-10100 or
permission of instructor. (Social Science Credit)
PSY 26001        Human Sexuality                                      (F)                                         3 (3-0)
This course will examine the effect of human sexuality and sex roles upon human behavior. Additionally, findings in
contemporary sexual research and therapy will be emphasized. Prerequisite: PSY-10100 or SOC-10100. (Social Science
Credit)
                                             SOCIOLOGY (SOC)
SOC 10100        Intro to Sociology                                      (F,W,S)                                         3 (3-0)
This course is an introduction to the nature of society, culture, group relations, social processes, and institutions.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG-10303. (Social Science Credit)
SOC 24000       Criminology                                           (W,S)                                        3 (3-0)
This course provides an analysis of crime, criminal behavior, and punishment through a variety of historical and
contemporary theoretical perspectives. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG-10303 or permission of instructor. (Social
Science Credit)
SOC 24500       Social Deviant Behavior                                 (W)                                           3 (3-0)
This course provides a study of social deviant behavior, including social and ethnic bias, sociopath, cult behavior and
ethical behaviors within the criminal justice process. Prerequisite: PSY-10100 or SOC-10100. (Social Science Credit)
SOC 26001        Human Sexuality                                      (F)                                         3 (3-0)
This course will examine the effect of human sexuality and sex roles upon human behavior. Additionally, findings in
contemporary sexual research and therapy will be emphasized. Prerequisite: PSY-10100 or SOC-10100. (Social Science
Credit)
                                               SPEECH (SPE)
SPE 10500        Fund of Speech                                      (F,W)                                        3 (3-0)
Fundamentals of Speech addresses the basic principles of speech construction and delivery. During the course, the
student will give various kinds of speeches, including impromptus and extemporaneous. (Communication)
SPE 11400        Intro to Interpersonal/Public Comm                  (F,W,S)                                       3 (3-0)
Introduction to Interpersonal and Public Communication is a course aimed at understanding and applying communication
theory. Communication skills will be developed through small group activities, public speaking, and personal assessment
assignments. (Communication)
                                              THEATRE (THE)
THE 12000 Intro to Theatre                                               (F)                                         3 (3-0)
This course is a survey of the evolution of world theatre forms, from the cave drawings of prehistoric man to the most
recent shows on the Broadway stage. Classroom discussions will cover the major producers, playwrights, performers,
directors, and designers of each era covered, as well as the body of literature that has come to represent that era.
Classroom sessions will be augmented by readings from these periods. (Humanities Credit)
THE 121--       Theatre Workshop I                                     (F,W)                                             1-3
The workshop provides practical experience in mounting a theatrical production. The student will gain familiarity with
one or more of the following areas: acting, directing, costuming, scenery construction, properties, lighting and sound, and
stage management. A weekly time commitment will be a requirement during the semester. The student will be required to
work 30 hours or more for one credit hour, 60 hours or more for two credit hours, and 90 hours or more for three credit
hours. (Humanities Credit)
THE 12200 Stagecraft I                                                  (W)                                            3 (3-0)
This course studies and applies the basic techniques of set construction, theatrical lighting, sound technology, stage
rigging, and backstage organization. This "basics" course will introduce the student to the various technical elements that
make a theatre run. The class will cover various theatre disciplines outlined above and provide actual hands-on
experience with theatre lighting and sound equipment, maneuvering theatre catwalks, and building basic theatrical
scenery. This course is required for admission to upper-level design and technology courses. (Humanities Credit)
THE 12300 Acting I                                                       (F)                                          3 (3-0)
This class is an introduction to the art of acting. The student walks the path of the actor from developing an acting
technique to the performance of short scenes. The actor learns to get beyond the limits of self and explore the freedom of
creating a character. Along the way, time will be spent exploring the creative process and developing an ensemble
approach to acting. Acting I can work in conjunction with the semester’s theatrical production. (Humanities Credit)
THE 21000 Theatre Makeup                                               (W)                                        3 (3-0)
The student will become familiar with the art and profession of stage makeup. This course will involve hands-on
experience in the principles of the art and technique of designing and applying theatrical makeup. Makeup textbooks will
be provided as reference material. The course will cover character analysis, facial anatomy, makeup supplies, and
professional makeup application. (Humanities Credit)
THE 221--        Theatre Workshop II                                  (F,W)                                               1-3
This course is a continuation of Theatre Workshop I. Students concentrate their efforts in different areas than they did in
Workshop I. A weekly time commitment will be a requirement during the semester. The student will be required to work
45 hours or more for one credit hour, 90 hours or more for two credit hours, and 135 hours or more for three credit hours.
Prerequisite: THE-12100 or permission of instructor. (Humanities Credit)
THE 27000 Audition/Resume Workshop                                     (W)                                            3 (3-0)
This course prepares the student to audition and/or interview for professional employment in theatre or for admission into
a B.F.A. training program. Students will develop theatrical résumés, portfolios, and/or audition books specific to the field
they wish to pursue. Students will also learn how to modify and update their audition/interview materials as changes in
their circumstances dictate. Prerequisites: sophomore status, successful completion of THE-12000 or permission of
instructor. (Humanities Credit)
                                               WELDING (WLD)
WLD 10341 Welding Shop Safety Rules                                                                                        0.17
This course will introduce the learner to welding lab safety regulations. In this course the student will learn the safety
rules that help to make the job site safer for everyone.
WLD 10342 Identifying Joints/Welds/Positions                                                                              0.13
This course will teach the student to recognize several types of joints, welds, and welding positions.
WLD 10343 Measuring w/Rules & Squares                                                                                     0.13
This course will instruct the learner in the appropriate use of a rule and square.
WLD 10344 Defining Oxyacetylene Welding Terms                                                                             0.17
This course will instruct the student in oxyacetylene welding and safety terms and definitions acceptable to welding
industry standards.
WLD 10345 Setting Up Oxyacetylene Station                                                                                 0.08
This course will teach the student to set up welding equipment in a safe and proper manner.
WLD 10346 Running Beads w & w/o Filler                                                                                    0.29
This course will instruct the student how to run beads with and without a filler rod.
WLD 10347 Welding Basic Joints-Flat Position                                                                                 1
In this course the student will learn to weld basic joints in the flat position.
WLD 10348 Oxyctyln/Plasma/Carbon Arc Cutting                                                                           0.13
This course will teach the student to recognize and identify the safety precautions, equipment, procedures, and techniques
used in oxygen cutting.
WLD 10349 Cutting Ferrous Metals w/Oxyctlne                                                                               0.33
The student will learn the proper way to manually cut metal using oxyacetylene.
WLD 10350 Brazing Basic Joints-Flat Position                                                                              0.33
This course will instruct the learner in the proper way to braze basic joints in the flat position.
WLD 10352 Arc Welding Terms & Definitions                                                                                 0.17
This course will introduce the student to the most common terms important to arc welding.
WLD 10353 Identify/Select Electrode f/SMAW                                                                              0.21
This course will teach the student the features and properties of covered electrodes. It also explains the AWS electrode
numbering system so the student can learn to identify the different covered electrodes, what electrodes are most
commonly used, where and when they are used, and some distinguishing characteristics.
WLD 10354 Striking Arc/Running Stringer Beads                                                                             0.67
This course will teach the student how to strike and maintain an arc to run stringer beads.
WLD 10355 Analyzing Good Welding Character                                                                               0.13
This course will teach the student to recognize good welding characteristics, types of electrode characteristics, and types
of machines and their settings. Knowledge of what constitutes a good weld and what constitutes a poor weld is also
stressed.
WLD 10356 Multipass Fillet Welds-Flat Positn                                                                              0.5
This course will teach the student to weld a basic lap joint using a multipass or weave weld that will meet or exceed the
AWS standards for appearance, strength, and testing.
WLD 10357 Increasing Weld Size Using Weave                                                                             0.5
This course will provide the student with information on weaving an electrode and controlling the bead according to the
position and requirements of the weld.
WLD 10358 V-Groove Butt Jnt w/Backing Plate                                                                                   0.5
This course will instruct the student in welding a square butt joint with a backing plate using the SMAW method.
WLD 10359 V-Groove Butt Jnt w/o Backing Plate                                                                            0.67
This course will teach the student to safely and correctly make a V-groove butt joint in the flat position according to AWS
standards.
WLD 10360 Butt Jnts w/Backing Plate-Vrt Up                                                                                   0.46
This course will teach the student how to make a butt joint in the vertical up position with a backing plate.
WLD 10361 Butt Jnts w/o Backing Plate-Vrt Up                                                                                 0.75
This course will teach the student how to make a butt joint in the vertical up position without a backing plate.
WLD 10362 Welding Blueprint Reading                                                                                0.17
This course will teach the student how to read welding blueprints and recognize how to use the various symbols and
notations to assure that welded assemblies meet design requirements.
WLD 10363 Fabricating a Project                                                                                         0.5
The student will learn how to develop a sketch (including weld symbols) of a project to build. The student will then order
the material and complete the project to AWS standards.
WLD 20400 Explaining Gas Metal Arc Welding                                                                                   0.29
This module will teach the student the general principles of GMAW, some of the advantages and disadvantages of
GMAW, and how the wire electrode is applied or transferred to the parent metal being welded.
WLD 20401 Establishing Arc/Making Bead w/GMAW                                                                                0.17
This course will teach the student how to establish the arc and make weld beads using MIG equipment.
WLD 20402 Welding Basic Joints-All Positions                                                                           1.67
This course will teach the student how to establish the arc and weld basic joints in all positions using MIG equipment.
WLD 20403 Welding Basic Jnts w/GMAW Aluminum                                                                                 0.67
This course will teach the student to establish an arc and make welded joints using the GMAW aluminum process.
WLD 20404 Pulse Arc Welding                                                                                                  0.25
This course will teach the student the basic fundamentals of the pulse arc welding mode.
WLD 20405 Explaining Gas Tungsten Arc Welding                                                                                0.42
This course will teach the student the basics of the TIG process, equipment, welding machines, and electrodes.
WLD 20406 Starting Arc/Running String Beads                                                                                  0.42
This course will teach the student how to start an arc and run stringer beads on aluminum using TIG equipment.
WLD 20407 Directed Study in Welding Technique                                                                             4
This course is designed to meet special occupational needs for the individual student. Prerequisite: recommendation of an
advisor.
WLD 20419 Complete 10 Welder Qualifications                                                                               4
Students complete 10 welder qualification using SMAW, OAW, GMAW, GTAW, and plasma arc. A drawing, layout,
and a completed welding project are required in the course, and students complete a variety of welding repairs during the
course.
WLD 20420 Cutting Ferrous/Non-Ferrous Metals                                                                        0.33
In this course the student will learn how to cut both ferrous and non-ferrous metals by manual and automatic means.
WLD 20421 Cutting Ferrous Metal w/Carbon Arc                                                                                  0.13
In this course the student will learn to identify terms and definitions of the air carbon arc cutting, as well as utilize the
process to acceptable industry standards.
WLD 20422 Silver Brazing Dissimilar Metals                                                                              0.13
In this course the student will learn to solder using silver.
WLD 20423 Lead Soldering Seams                                                                                          0.25
This course will teach the learner to solder joints of ferrous and non-ferrous metals.
WLD 20424 Making a Corner Joint/Flat Position                                                                           0.67
This course will teach the student the proper way to make a smooth corner weld.
WLD 20425 Welding Tee Joints - Vertical Up                                                                              0.58
This course will teach the student how to make a tee joint in the vertical up position.
WLD 20426 Welding Tee Joints - Vertical Down                                                                            0.29
This course will teach the student how to make a tee joint in the vertical down position.
WLD 20427 Butt Joint w/Back Plate-Vrt Down                                                                              0.42
This course will teach the student how to make a butt joint with back plate in the vertical down position.
WLD 20428 Butt Joint w/o Back Plt-Vrt Down                                                                              0.33
This course will teach the student how to make a butt joint without a back plate in the vertical down position.
WLD 20429 Butt Joint w/Back Plate-Horizontal                                                                             0.5
This course will teach the student how to make a butt joint with a back plate in the horizontal position.
WLD 20430 Butt Joint w/o Back Plate-Horizontl                                                                            0.5
This course will teach the student how to make a butt joint without a back plate in the horizontal position.
WLD 20431 Weld Tee Joints Overhead                                                                                       0.5
In this course the student will learn how to weld tee joints in the overhead position.
WLD 20432 Butt Joint w/Back Plate-Overhead                                                                              0.58
In this course the student will learn to weld butt joints with a backing plate in the overhead position.
WLD 20433 Butt Joint w/o Back Plate-Overhead                                                                            0.83
In this course the student will learn how to weld butt joints without a backing plate in the overhead position.
WLD 20434 Identifying Pipe Welding                                                                                      0.21
In this course the student will learn some of the codes governing pipe welding and the tests they must take to qualify. The
student will also discuss pipe joint design, edge preparation, and accessories for pipe welding.
WLD 20435 Cast Iron Repair                                                                                              0.17
In this course the student will learn the basics of cast iron repair.
WLD 20436 Hardsurfacing                                                                                               0.17
In this module, the student will learn how to hard surface material by one or more techniques, including fusion welding.
WLD 20437 Tool & Die Welding                                                                                           0.67
This course will teach the student to identify and follow proper procedures to make necessary repairs on tool and dies in
accordance with industry standards.
WLD 20438 Weld Basic Joints on Aluminum                                                                                 1.25
This course will teach the student how to weld aluminum in the flat position (GTAW).
WLD 20439 Weld Basic Joints - Stainless Steel                                                                           1.25
This course will teach the student the proper way to weld stainless steel in the flat position.
WLD 20440 Weld Basic Jnts/Aluminum-Horizontal                                                                            1.67
This course will teach the student how to run beads in three positions when welding four basic joints: butt, tee, lap, and
corner.
WLD 20441 Weld Pipe 2G Fixed Position                                                                                     0.83
This course will instruct the student in positioning, tacking, and welding pipe in the 2G fixed position.
WLD 20442 Weld Pipe 5G Fixed - Vertical Up                                                                                1.25
This course will instruct the student in positioning, tacking, and welding pipe in the 5G fixed position - vertical up.
WLD 20443 Weld Pipe 5G Fixed - Vertical Down                                                                              1.04
This course will instruct the student in positioning, tacking, and welding pipe in the 5G fixed position - vertical down.
WLD 20444 Weld Pipe 6G Fixed Position                                                                                     1.04
This course will instruct the student in positioning, tacking, and welding pipe in the 6G fixed position.
                                   WORLD LANGUAGES (LAN)
FRE 11000       French I                                                 (F)                                        4 (4-0)
This course concentrates on functional communication. Communication is a primary goal with grammar to support this
goal. This course will also introduce the student to the cultures associated with the language. (Humanities Credit)
FRE 12000       French II                                              (W)                                          4 (4-0)
A continuation of Language I with further development of oral and written skills. The goal is to increase confidence and
comfort with the cultures and language. Prerequisite: FRE-11000 or permission of instructor - NOTE: Students who have
taken French in high school are encouraged to contact the instructor for permission to take this level II course.
(Humanities Credit)
SGN 10200        Fingerspelling                                          (W)                                               2
Students will learn the use of hand shapes to represent letters of the alphabet used in American Sign Language. The
course will focus on reading "words" and not letters. (Humanities Credit)
SGN 11000         American Sign Language I                              (F)                                                 4
This course covers the beginning level of the native language of the deaf. Students will develop receptive and expressive
skills in fingerspelling, vocabulary, and short sentences. Objectives are met through use of drills, videos, and occasional
guests who are deaf. NOTE: There is no prerequisite, but prior knowledge of ASL is helpful. (Humanities Credit)
SGN 12000        American Sign Language II                           (W)                                                   4
This course is a continuation of American Sign Language I. Prerequisite: SGN-10000 or permission of instructor.
(Humanities Credit)
SGN 13000        American Sign Language III                          (V)                                                   4
This course is a continuation of American Sign Language II. Prerequisite: SGN-10100. (Humanities Credit)
SPN 11000       Spanish I                                                (F)                                        4 (4-0)
This course concentrates on functional communication. Communication is a primary goal with grammar to support this
goal. This course will also introduce the student to the cultures associated with the language. (Humanities Credit)
SPN 12000        Spanish II                                            (W)                                          4 (4-0)
A continuation of Language I with further development of oral and written skills. The goal is to increase confidence and
comfort with the cultures and language. Prerequisite: SPN-11000 or permission of instructor - NOTE: Students who have
taken panish in high school are encouraged to contact the instructor for permission to take this level II course.
(Humanities Credit)
                                                PERSONNEL
     KIRTLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION
Thomas Quinn, President
        B.A.     University of Minnesota                     Edmund Koliba, Chief Business and Financial Officer
        M.A.     University of Northern Iowa                        B.S.      Oakland University
        Ed.S     Winona State University                            M.B.A. Saginaw Valley State University
        Ph.D.    University of South Dakota
                                                             Doty Latuszek, Provost: M-TEC
Stacey Barnes, Dean of Student Services                               B.S.     Nazareth College
         B.S.     Ferris State University                             M.A.     Western Michigan University
         M.A.     Central Michigan University                         Ph.D.    Western Michigan University

Jerry Boerema, Associate Dean of Instruction                 Kathy Marsh, Dean of Instruction
         A.A.S. West Shore Community College                         B.S.     Lake Superior State College
         B.A.     Central Michigan University                        M.S.     George Washington University
         M.S.A. Central Michigan University
                                                             Timothy Scherer, Director of Institutional Services
Karen Brown, Associate Dean of Instruction                            A.A.S. Community College of the Air Force
         B.S.N. University of Michigan                                B.S.     Park College
         M.S.    University of Michigan
         Ed. D. Central Michigan University                  Dale Shantz, Director of Human Resources
                                                                      B.A.      University of Michigan
JoAnn Comerford, Director of Facilities                               M.A.      Michigan State University
        A.A.S. Kirtland Community College
        B.B.A. Northwood University

                    FULL-TIME FACULTY AND COUNSELORS
    James Backlund, Instructor: Psychology/Sociology         Donald Dyer, Director: Guidance and Counseling
            B.S.      Northern Michigan University                   B.A.      Syracuse University
            M.A.      Western Michigan University                    M.S.      State University College at Oneonta

    Lisa Balbach, Instructor: Computer Information Systems   Joseph Fields, Instructor: English
             B.S.       University of Minnesota                       B.A.       University of Windsor
             M.A.       University of Minnesota                       M.S.       Wayne State University
                                                                      Ph.D.      Michigan State University
    Kevin Baughn, Instructor: Mathematics
            A.A.S. Sinclair Community College                Carol Finke, Instructor: English
            B.S.       Wright State University                        B.A.       University of Michigan
            M.A.       Wright State University                        M.A.       Iowa State University

    Richard Bonk, Instructor: Automotive Technology          Eugene Frazier, Instructor: Computer Information Systems
             A.A.S. Kirtland Community College                        A.A.S. Palomar College
             B.A.      Spring Arbor University                        B.A.       Temple University
                                                                      M.S.       National University
    Scott Cochran, Instructor: Physical Science                       M.S.       University of Southern California
             B.S.       Michigan State University
             B.S.       Eastern Michigan University          Frederic Giacobazzi, Instructor: English
             M.S.       University of Michigan                         B.A.     Wayne State University
                                                                       M.A.     Wayne State University
    Joseph Donna, Instructor: Art
             B.F.A. Michigan State University                Katherine Girard, Instructor: Health Careers
             M.F.A. Michigan State University                         A.D.N. Kirtland Community College
                                                                      M.S.N. Saginaw Valley State University
Judith Grenkowicz, Instructor: Business                    Beth Mogle, Instructor: Nursing
          B.S.     Ferris State University                         B.S.N. Oakland University
          M.B.A. University of Detroit                             M.A.       Central Michigan University
          Ed.D.    Northern Illinois University                    M.S.N. Grand Valley State University

Kerry Harwood, Instructor: Outdoor Power Engines and       Stephen Oppy, Coordinator/Counselor
         Industrial Technologies, M-TEC                             B.A.    Oakland University
         A.A.S. Kirtland Community College                          M.A.    Central Michigan University
         B.S.       Ferris State University
         M.A.       Central Michigan University            Susan Owens, Instructor: Health Careers
                                                                   B.S.N. Hope College
Anne Hauser, Instructor: Science                                   M.S.N. Northern Michigan University
        A.A.S. Cayuga Community College
        B.S.       State Univ. of NY College at Cortland   Nancy Pavelek, Instructor: Health Careers
        M.S.E. State Univ. of NY College at Cortland               A.D.N. Kirtland Community College
                                                                   B.S.N. University of Michigan
Wendy Hillman, Instructor: Nursing                                 M.S.N. Michigan State University
       B.S.N. Mercy College of Detroit
       M.S.N. Wayne State University                       Jason Prout, Instructor: Engineering Design Technology
                                                                    B.S.       Central Michigan University
Charles Hinman, Instructor: Criminal Justice                        M.A.       Central Michigan University
         A.A.S. Mid Michigan Community College
         B.S.     Saginaw Valley State University          Scott Rice, Instructor: Art
                                                                     B.F.A. Ferris State University
Nicholas Holton, Instructor: Mathematics                             M.F.A. Central Michigan University
         B.S.      Western Michigan University
         M.A.      Central Michigan University             Marcell Romancky, Instructor: Mathematics
                                                                    A.A.S. Kirtland Community College
Kate Jakobson, Director of Tutoring and Student Success             B.S.    Central Michigan University
         B.S.      Grand Valley State University                    M.A.    Central Michigan University
         M.S.      Western Michigan University
                                                           Jacquelyn Smith, Instructor: Nursing
Denise Kemp, Instructor: Life Science                               B.S.N. Northern Michigan University
         B.S.     Saginaw Valley State University                   M.S.N. Wayne State University
         M.S.     Central Michigan University
                                                           John Thiel, Instructor: History
Jane Lange, Instructor                                              B.A.       Michigan State University
         B.S.       Ferris State University                         M.A.       Michigan State University
         M.B.A. Baker College
                                                           Jon Thompson, Instructor: English
Lisa Lashley, Instructor: Office Information Systems               B.A.      Alma College
         A.A.S. Kirtland Community College                         M.A.      Central Michigan University
         B.A.       Spring Arbor University                        Ph.D.     Central Michigan University
         M.B.A. Walden University
                                                           Sinan Toprak, Instructor: Political Science
Alan Mabarak, Instructor: Construction Trades, M-TEC                B.A.      University of Bursa
        A.A.S. Macomb Community College                             M.A.      Western Michigan University
        B.S.       Central Michigan University
        M.A.       Spring Arbor University                 Shannon Weaver, Instructor: Cosmetology
                                                                   A.A.S. Kirtland Community College
Douglas Mace, Instructor: Mathematics
        B.A.       Spring Arbor College                    Ginna Wenger, Instructor: English
        M.S.       University of Vermont                           B.A.      Central Michigan University
                                                                   M.A.      Central Michigan University
                                                                   Ph.D.     Andrews University
                                 FULL-TIME CLASSIFIED STAFF
Mark Allen, Director: Auxiliary Services/Purchasing           Jo Ann Gave, Student Services Assistant
         A.A.S. Northwood University
         B.S.      Northwood University                       Thomas Grace, Coordinator: Criminal Justice Training
                                                                      A.A.S. Kirtland Community College
Susanne Allen, Coordinator: Admissions/Recruiting
         A.A.     Kirtland Community College                  Kathy Graham, Registration Support Specialist
         B.S.     Spring Arbor University                              C.C.    Kirtland Community College

Nick Baker, Director: Institutional Research                  Gary Gregg, Custodian
        B.S.       Lake Superior State University
                                                              Gordon Hesse, Custodian
Kathleen Barber, Coordinator: Personnel & Business Services
                                                              Jeffrey Hinkle, Maintenance
Kristin Barnhart, Bookkeeper, Payroll
          B.B.A. Western Michigan University                  Christin Horndt, Director: Financial Aid
                                                                        A.A.S. Kirtland Community College
Luann Beilfuss, Registrar                                               B.B.A. Baker College
        B.S.W. Ferris State University                                  M.A.      Central Michigan University
        M.A.       Spring Arbor University
                                                              Shawn Kaniewski, Coordinator: Criminal Justice Services
Matthew Biermann, WAN Administrator                                   A.A.S. Kirtland Community College
                                                                      B.S.     Saginaw Valley State University
Victoria Borchers, Bookstore Assistant
                                                              Kurt Kiessel, Utility Worker
Mark Burger, Director: eServices
        A.A.S. Ferris State University                        Kathryn Koch, Administrative Assistant to the President
        B.B.A. Wichita State University                                A.A.S. Kirtland Community College
                                                                       A.B.A. Kirtland Community College
Tonya Clayton, Admissions Assistant                                    B.B.A. Northwood University
         A.A.S. Kirtland Community College
                                                              Audrey Larkin, Financial Aid Specialist
Rick Daugherty, Computer Support Technician                           A.A.S. Kirtland Community College
                                                                      B.B.A. Baker College
Angie DeVries, Receptionist/Mail Processor
                                                              Kerry Lashley, Coordinator: eLearning
Kate DeVries, Printing Technician                                      A.A.S. Kirtland Community College
        B.A.       Western Michigan University
                                                              Jackie Liddle, Conference Services Specialist
Elizabeth Ehinger, Coordinator: Special Populations                     C.C.     Kirtland Community College
          A.A.S. Lake Superior State University
                                                              Tony Madaj, LAN Administrator
James Enger, Director: Marketing                                      A.A.S. Kirtland Community College

Marjorie Esch, Webmaster                                      Dennis Mansfield, Director: Public Relations
         B.A.     Goshen College                                      B.A.      Michigan State University

Anne Essmaker, Coordinator: Health Careers                    Mark McCully, Director: Workforce Development
        A.A.S. Macomb Community College                              A.A.S. Kirtland Community College
        B.A.     Spring Arbor College                                B.S.      Ferris State University

Terry Fasbender, Director: Printshop                          Dawn McGillis, Coordinator: Instructional Services
        A.A.S.     Ferris State University
                                                              Gary McPhilimy, Head Custodian
Ken Forst, Public Safety Officer
         A.A.S. Kirtland Community College                    Cathy Meadows, Food Service Assistant/Catering Coordinator
         A.A.S. Macomb Community College                              C.C.     Kirtland Community College
         B.S.      Ferris State University
                                                              Joseph Meadows, Maintenance II
Fred Miracle, Maintenance                                                 Karen Sessions, Faculty Support Specialist
                                                                                   A.A.S. Kirtland Community College
Larry Miracle, Utility Worker                                                      B.S.      Spring Arbor University

Kyle Morrison, eServices Media Specialist                                 Ron Sharpe, Maintenance II
        A.A.S. Kirtland Community College
                                                                          Winifred Sharpe, Coordinator: eTechnology
Mark Nagel, Custodian
                                                                          Daron Shimel, Coordinator: Skilled Trades Lab, M-TEC
Debra Near, Office Support Specialist: Health Careers                              C.C.     Kirtland Community College
        A.A.S. Kirtland Community College                                          A.A.S. Kirtland Community College
        B.S.       Spring Arbor University
                                                                          Debra Shumaker, Director of Library
Suzanne Nelson, Bookkeeper, Accounts Payable                                      B.S.     Central Michigan University
                                                                          Rodger Steinbrink, Custodian
Dennis Noel, Custodian
                                                                          Robert Wallace, Custodian
Roberta Otwell, Office Support Specialist, M-TEC
         A.A.S. Kirtland Community College
                                                                          Gail Westmoreland, Administrative Assistant M-TEC
         B.A.      Spring Arbor University
                                                                                   B.A.     National University
Beth Petrik, Office Assistant: Performing Arts
                                                                          Donald Wray, Director: Kirtland Center for the Performing Arts
                                                                                  B.A.      Western Michigan University
Kimberly Ruddy, Bookkeeper, Accounts Receivable
         A.A.S. Kirtland Community College                                Kathleen Wray, Assistant Registrar
                                                                                         Transfer Credit Specialist
Evelyn Schenk, Physical Plant Assistant                                            B.S      Harding University
         A.A.S. Kirtland Community College
         B.S.     Ferris State University                                 Helen Yopp, eLearning Specialist
                                                                                  A.A.S. Kirtland Community College
Ilene Scherer, Director: Accounting

Mark Schroeder, Groundskeeper

            KIRTLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE FOUNDATION
The Kirtland Community College Foundation was established in 1972 for the purposes of soliciting funds to augment and extend the financial
base of the college. The Foundation is a tax-exempt nonprofit corporation. Funds are used for capital construction, scholarships, library
acquisitions, fellowships, faculty improvement grants, and the equipping and staffing of existing programs with modern tools of technology.

The Foundation officers and members work closely with the college board of trustees and the administration. A member of the college board of
trustees serves as a member of the Foundation and the President of the college serves as secretary of the Foundation.

                                                        Members as of April 2007

C. A. Pepper Karstendiek, President      Bill Gannon, Vice President      Ruggero Dozzi, Treasurer       Thomas, Quinn, Secretary


 Pauline Cournyer                        William Curnalia                 Ruth Ferguson                   Loretta Hassan
 Teresa Money
KIRTLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE ADVISORY COMMITTEES
Advisory committees for individual occupational programs at Kirtland provide information concerning competencies needed by employees,
physical facilities and types of equipment used in the business or industry, technical curriculum content, and recruitment opportunities.
Members also assist with promotion of the programs, evaluation of programs, job placement, and work experience. At times advisory members
are instrumental in acquiring donations of equipment and supplies for occupational programs.
                        Automotive                                                              Marketing/Business
 Jeremy Akin             Chuck Huber          Bob Oakes                    Vickie Barnes       Judith              Connie Schreiber
 Richard Bonk            Matt Jernigan        Derek Pastell                Carl Bourdelais     Grenkowicz          Denis Weiss
 Karen Brown             Chris Kalthoff       David Petrie                 Lois Byrd           Carl Kummer         Barbara Whittington
 Anthony Ciaramitaro     Ed Krause            Frank Schultz                Ken Cramer          Kerry Lashley       Bonnie Wichtner-Zoia
 Jim Decker              Bernie Milnes        Ron Sheffield                Steve Oppy          Steve Leonard       Mike Wurtsmith
 Keith Hough             Gene Moore           James Witt                                       Donna Pflum


        Construction Technology (M-TEC)                                                                Nursing
 Mitch Borowiak        Alan Mabarak         Steve Pyke                     Sheila Atwood        Rose Goick              Deb Powell
 Doty Latuszek         Eric Moore           Kevin Wescott                  Dawn Baker           Martha Haag             Helen Roach
                                                                           Judy Baker           Maureen Hayes           Lisette Schudell
                                                                           Vicki Barnes         Jackie Heron            Gay Showalter
                          Corrections
                                                                           Debbie Bills         Barb Hoakstra           Clair Shull
 Doug Atkinson         William Gutzwiller     Robert Paschke
                                                                           Karen Bloom          John Katona             Margery Singh
 Julie Aube            Randy Hazel            Roger Palmiter
                                                                           Mary Boals           Laura Kaufman           Coleen Smith
 Louis Basso           Arlin Herford          Tom Recker
                                                                           Linda Coffell        Kathy Kent              Mary Steel
 Jerry Boerema         Charles Hinman         Michael Redman
                                                                           Noreen Connelly      Jane Korthase           Lisa Stier
 Douglas Bean          Jerome Newton          Mark Sabin
                                                                           Kathy Dankert        Diane Larson            Dana Sylvester
 Michael Boyd          Richard Kaledas        Patricia Skarbek
                                                                           Gleniss Daversa      Sue Lovelace            Lori Taylor
 Jeffrey Conquest      Robert Lancaster       Dale Suiter
                                                                           Karen Farley         Sue Lucksted            Pat Visscher
 Dave Dagen            Barney Ledford         Lee Teschendorf
                                                                           Diane Fischer        Jill Moore              Dawn Webber
 David Deeter          Deborah Marculis       James Twarog
                                                                           Jim Fischer          Jody Moran              Kathy Zelinsky
 Douglas Dosson        Andrea Martin          Gary Van Riper
                                                                           Lori Fox             Ruth Pilon
 Justin Eastman        Babbette Meggison      Russell Wayne
 Scott Feldhauser      Dennis Murphy          Greg Wood
 Brenda Ford           Matthew Nowicki                                                       Office Information Systems
                                                                           Sharon Blasch         Nancy Kussrow          Judy Ranney
                       Cosmetology                                         Karen Brown           Lorraine               Lori Rau
 Karen Brown           Patrick Hanafin       Tim O’Karski                  Sarah Bruder          Landenburg             Brenda Rinke
 Greg Bush             Shannon Hasty         Mary Rom                      Linda Cunningham      Lisa Lashley           Sarah Schmidt
 Ann Colcanclasure     Teresa Henry          Wendy Sheldon                 Linda Curtis          Leann Leach            Christine Sneden
 Roxie Fernelius       Nancy Magdama         Robin Winton                  Mary Dasho            Alishia Lynd           Leah Sutherby
 Billie Grezeszak      Carmen Miller                                       Monica Durango        Jeannie McCans         Kathy Taylor
                                                                           Rhoda Emerick         Cindy Miller           Peggy Thurnham
  Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Consortium                              Joann Enboden         Diane Moerland         Sherry Trierweiler
                                                                           Laura Gooder          Tonya Ouillette        Jill Uhouse
 Douglas Atchison      Michael Miles        John Vinson
                                                                           Sue Henry             Bobbie Otwell          Dawn Ward
 Rick Benson           Thad Taylor          Robert Wagner
                                                                           Penny Jenereaux       Kathy Painter          Gail Westmoreland
 Jerry Boerema
                                                                                                 Lydia Peters

       Engineering & Design Technologies
 Charles Adams         Don Duggar             Jason Prout                             Outdoor Power Engines (M-TEC)
 Jacob Ames            Dale Eisenbrenner      Chris Squires                Kerry Harwood         Doty Latuszek        John Martin
 Dan Beltz             Donald Gusler          Peter Vejcik                 Jim Lappan, Jr.       Don Lash             Bob Sussman
 Mark Brown            Kerry Harwood          Gerry Wangler
 Dave Clover           Doty Latuszek          Lee Wiltse                                        Special Populations
 Robert Devine         Jack McCauley          Kevin Zettle                 Stacey Barnes            Betty Ehinger        Steve Oppy
                                                                           Luann Beilfuss           Doty Latuszek        Tim Scherer
                                                                           Lacy Cooper              Duane Marchelis      Dale Shantz
          Industrial Technologies (M-TEC)
                                                                           Brenda Dawe              Kathy Marsh          Darlene Stamper
 Jim Gothrup           Kerry Harwood        Dan Schirle
                                                                           Ken Dean                 Chuck Nienhuis       Ginna Wenger
 John Brunk            Doty Latuszek        Duane Wong
                                                                           Don Dyer

				
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