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19 Senses-Kovalik - AEA 267

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					   Enriched Environment
   “Our window on the world is far more powerful than conventional thinking indicates. Human beings have at least 19
   senses, not five. And, not surprisingly, there is a direct correlation between the number of senses activated, and the
   amount and locations of brain activity. Quite simply, the greater the range of sensory input, the greater the
   physiological activity and growth in the brain. The result is more learning and a greater likelihood that such learning
   will be retained in long-term memory.”

   “While the names of some of these senses may seem foreign, your use of them is not. Consider this story for example,
   a childhood memory of co-author Karen Olsen that is as vivid today as it was almost half a century ago.”

   An Example of Vivid Memory Based on High Sensory Input
   “Age eight, with her older brother, engaged in the thoroughly hopeless but intriguing task of attempting to
   dam up the creek south of the family home; sunshine on their backs, reflections dancing on the water; bare
   feet scrunching in the pebbly gravel and gooey mud; the tepid, slow-moving water with darting minnows
   disturbed by rearranging of rocks and the shovels full of smelly mud; the sweat from their efforts dripping
   down their faces; their laughter rippling across the creek; her brother’s nearness; his patience with a little
   sister who “never stayed home like the other girls did”… the lessons of that day, the wonder of the creek, the
   beauty of family relationships.”

   Such moments of acute sensory awareness stay with us, as if etched into our memories.*

                                                    The 19 Senses
        SENSES                 KIND OF INPUT                            EXAMPLES OF SENSORY INPUT FROM STORY
   Sight              Visible light                       Reflections dancing on the water; darting minnows, dams breaking, etc.
   Hearing            Vibrations in the air               Laughter, gravel scrunching; mud sucking; rocks clashing, splashing
   Touch              Tactile contact                     Bare feet scrunching in the pebbly gravel; tepid, slow-moving water
   Taste              Chemical molecular                  Sweat dripping down their faces; an occasional splash of creek water
   Smell              Olfactory molecular                 Smelly mud
   Balance            Kinesthetic geotropic               Keeping balance wading in the deep gravel; moving rocks/mud
   Vestibular         Repetitious movement                Rearranging rocks and shoveling smelly mud
   Temperature        Molecular motion                    Warm summer day
   Pain               Nociception                         Thankfully, none!
   Eidectic imagery   Neuroelectrical image retention     The vivid picture of the scene and its details
   Magnetic           Ferromagnetic orientation           The location of the creek- south of the family home
   Infrared           Long electromagnetic waves          The warmth and power of the sun’s rays
   Ultraviolet        Short electromagnetic waves         The warmth and power of the sun’s rays
   Ionic              Airborne ionic image                The refreshing feeling from being around water
   Vomeronasal        Pheromonic sensing                  Primal sense of smell- body odors, sweat, rotting vegetation
   Proximal           Physical closeness                  The nearness of the brother
   Electrical         Surface charge                      The humidity of the creek eliminated any perceivable static electricity
   Barometric         Atmospheric pressure                The steady, unchanging atmospheric pressure of a calm summer day
   Geogravimetric     Sensing mass differences            Density (weight to mass) of material- pebbly gravel versus gooey mud.



*Permission Granted: Exceeding Expectations: A User’s Guide to Implementing Brain Research in the Classroom, by Susan J. Kovalik
& Karen D. Olsen (pgs. 1.9-1.14) From the research of: Bob Samples, Open Mind, Whole Mind; R. Rivlin & Karen Gravelle, Deciphering
Your Senses                                                              For additional information: www.thecenter4learning.com
    Unforgettable      Unforgettable           Unforgettable           Unforgettable         Unforgettable    Unforgettable    Unforgettable
      Learning           Learning                Learning                Learning              Learning         Learning         Learning
                                                                                                                                 Barometric

                                                                                                                               Geogravimetric

                                                                                                                                    Ionic

                                                                                                                                 Ultraviolet
        The two kinds of                                                                                                          Infrared
      input least used in
                                                                                                                                 Magnetic
       classrooms, being
    there and immersion,                                                                                        Electrical        Electrical
       provide the most
                                                                                                                Proximal          Proximal
         sensory input.
     Conversely, the two                                                                                       Vestibular        Vestibular
        most commonly                                                                                           Balance           Balance
      used, secondhand
         and symbolic,                                                                  Vomeronasal           Vomeronasal       Vomeronasal
       provide the least
                                                                                            Pain                  Pain              Pain
         sensory input.
                                                                                        Temperature           Temperature       Temperature

                                                                                           Smell                 Smell             Smell

                                                                                           Taste                  Taste             Taste

                                                               Touch                       Touch                 Touch             Touch

                             Eidetic imagery            Eidetic imagery                Eidetic imagery       Eidetic imagery   Eidetic imagery

         Hearing                Hearing                    Hearing                        Hearing               Hearing           Hearing

           Sight                  Sight                        Sight                        Sight                 Sight             Sight
        SYMBOLIC            SECONDHAND                   HANDS-ON                       HANDS-ON             IMMERSION         BEING THERE
                                                     REPRESENTATIONAL                  REAL THINGS

Being there input occurs when real things are studied in their real-world context, such as a pond, lake, or wetlands area, a mall, factory,
or a neighbor’s backyard- literally “being there.” All 19 senses are activated, producing maximal electrical and chemical activity in the
brain. Input is rich, varied, and plentiful.
Immersion input replicates the real-world context of the being there experience in the classroom as fully as possible. For example, if a
pond is the being there site, a classroom pond (a child’s swimming pool with a black plastic drape) is created with as many real pond
critters and plants as possible. The classroom itself is then made to look like a pond with the water line slightly above the teacher’s head
when standing. Blue film covers the windows to stimulate the water line of the pond. Replicas of animals and plants in the water’s edge
and underwater cover the walls. The tape deck plays water sounds and pond animal sounds. At least 100 books and other printed
materials about ponds, and other multi-media resources fill the room. Models and pictures of pond animals and plants are available for
close analysis and exploration. The environment provides input for 13 of 19 senses.
Hands-on of the real thing provides input through examination of real world things but without the context of being there or immersion.
In the case of the pond, there would be frogs and polliwogs, cattails, and so forth for students to handle and examine closely, engaging
9 of the 19 senses.
Hands-on of representational items provides input from models of real things, such as plastic frogs & polliwogs. Without the context of
being there or immersion or the experience of the real items, hands-on of representational items elicits response from only 4 of the 19
senses. Such limited sensory input provides limited brain activation & thus limits pattern-seeking capabilities for many learners.
Program-building opportunities are very limited because real world applications are difficult to create with only representational items.
Secondhand input can be found in books computers, videotapes and other multi-media presentations which can activate only sight,
hearing and eidetic imagery. Such limited input makes pattern-seeking difficult and provides no opportunities for program-building.
Symbolic is the most difficult input to process. Fewer than 20 percent of students can learn well through this type of input which
includes such things as mathematical sentences and parts of speech. High linguistic and spatial intelligence is needed to make use of
symbolic input, plus prior being there experiences related to the new learnings.

*Permission Granted: Exceeding Expectations: A User’s Guide to Implementing Brain Research in the Classroom, by Susan J. Kovalik
& Karen D. Olsen (pgs. 1.9-1.14) From the research of: Bob Samples, Open Mind, Whole Mind; R. Rivlin & Karen Gravelle, Deciphering
Your Senses                                                              For additional information: www.thecenter4learning.com
*Permission Granted: Exceeding Expectations: A User’s Guide to Implementing Brain Research in the Classroom, by Susan J. Kovalik
& Karen D. Olsen (pgs. 1.9-1.14) From the research of: Bob Samples, Open Mind, Whole Mind; R. Rivlin & Karen Gravelle, Deciphering
Your Senses                                                              For additional information: www.thecenter4learning.com

				
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