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S3 Information Report State and Federal Government Resources

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					Information Report Cycle 1: Lesson 1

Information Report Text o What is an Information report? o When and where do we see Information Reports? o Why do we need Information Reports? o What language would you find in an Information Report? o What else might be in an Information Report?

Information Report Text o What is an Information report? o When and where do we see Information Reports? o Why do we need Information Reports? o What language would you find in an Information Report? o What else might be in an Information Report?

Lesson 2:

Government Fact File

 Australia is governed under a system where there are three levels of government: federal, State and local.  The six States of Australia were originally British colonies. Each colony existed independently of the other. Each colony had its own government and constitution. In 1901, however each colony agreed to join and become a nation. This was called Federation. Federation in Australia meant that there was one Federal government and six State governments. The rules of how each State system works is set out in the State constitutions. These were written during colonial times and were passed by the British Parliament in London. These constitutions gave the colonies the power to govern. After Federation and the writing of the new Australian Constitution, the State constitutions had less power and were subject to the new Australian Constitution.  The Constitution states that the official head of the Australian Parliament is the Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (commonly referred to as the Crown). The current British monarch is Queen Elizabeth II. The British monarch does not live in Australia, so the Governor-General is the Federal representative of the Crown in

Australia, with each State having a Governor to represent the Crown. The Governor-General performs a range of tasks on behalf of the Crown. Although the Governor-General is a powerful position, in practice, the role is mostly ceremonial  There are three main branches, or elements, of government: Legislative, Executive and Judiciary. The Legislature debates upon proposed laws and consists of two Houses - Federal: the upper house or Senate, and the lower house or House of Representatives - State: All State parliaments, except Queensland, are divided into two Houses, known as bicameral parliament (from the Latin 'bi' - meaning 'two' and 'camera' meaning 'chamber'),the upper house or Legislative Council, and the lower house or Legislative Assembly. Queensland's one House of Parliament is called the Legislative Assembly The Executive administers or applies the laws. - The Executive is made up of the Prime Minister Cabinet or Ministers (Federal), Premier, Cabinet or

Ministers (State). Each Minister is responsible for one or more government departments or agencies. Ministers are appointed from amongst the majority party in Parliament and remain members of Parliament. The Judiciary adjudicates on the laws. - The Judiciary is made up of independent judges appointed to a hierarchical system of courts. For example, there is the Commonwealth High Court which is the highest court for the whole of Australia, and in NSW the highest court is the NSW Supreme Court.


Each State parliament is based in the State's capital city, so, for example, the Western Australian Parliament is located in Perth and the Victorian Parliament in based in Melbourne. The adult population of Australia vote for their government representatives in an election. After an election the political party with the most elected members in the lower house forms the government. The government then elects a leader who is known as the Prime Minister (Federal) or Premier (State). The Prime Minister or Premier then chooses other members of the Parliament from the same political party, to take charge of



government departments. These departments look after the areas of public life for which the Federal or State Government is responsible. The Ministers decide which proposed laws will be given to Parliament and decide on the general policies of the Government.
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The political party which has the secondlargest number of members in the Lower House, becomes the Opposition. The leader of this party is known as the Leader of the Opposition. The role of the Opposition is to make sure that the government is accountable for the decisions they make and to ensure that they are running the State appropriately. The role of the Prime Minister or Premier is to be the leader of the government. State Parliaments make laws in their areas of responsibility. The Constitution of Australia sets out the responsibilities of the Federal Government and any area not given to the Federal Government becomes the responsibility of the State governments. Federal Government responsibilities include: foreign affairs, social security, industrial relations, trade, immigration, currency and defence. State Government Responsibilities include: Agriculture,Education,Electricity and gas

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supplies,Health,Housing,Law and order, Main roads, Public transport, Water and also Local government (State governments give some of their power to local councils, to deal with issues such as waste disposal and roads. The State government is in charge of all local governments and their workers). Areas of Australia that are the responsibility of the federal government, but are nor States, are known as Territories. These include the Northern Territory (NT), the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) and Norfolk Island. These territories have their own parliaments, which make laws for their populations. These parliaments are a little different from State parliaments. Territories receive special financial assistance from the federal government.

Lesson 3:

Information Report Example

Sydney and Melbourne

Sydney and Melbourne are cities found in Australia.

capital

Sydney is located on the coast of New South Wales, whereas Melbourne is located near the Yarra River in Victoria. Each of these capital cities has many significant sites. One of Sydney’s is the Telstra Stadium. A similarity in Melbourne is the Cricket Ground. Each of these grounds is used for AFL, as well as for other sporting events. A significant contrast between them can be found in their shape. While Telstra Stadium is oval, the Melbourne Cricket Ground is round in shape. Both are tourist attractions for their city. Another tourist attraction in Sydney is Star City Casino. It is similar to the Crown Casino in Melbourne. One similarity between them is that they both have several entertainment rooms. Both casinos have gambling

machines. A difference that can be found between the two is that Star City has fewer restaurants in comparison with Crown Casino. Melbourne and Sydney have many special events, such as the Lygon Street Festival in Melbourne and the Norton Street Festival in Sydney. One similarity between these two festivals is that they both celebrate the Italian culture. One difference between them is that the Lygon Street one goes for four days whereas the Norton Street Festival only goes for one. Another event celebrated by both states is the Agricultural Show. While both have shows and games, a significant contrast is that the show in Sydney Easter Show is celebrated during the season of Easter, whereas in Melbourne, it occurs at different times throughout the year. Sydney and Melbourne are home to many significant sites and events.

Lesson 4 : Language of Comparison and Contrast Sentence Cards

Sydney and Melbourne are both capital cities found in Australia. Sydney is located on the coast whereas Melbourne is located near a river. A similarity between the two cities is that they both have a large sporting field. A difference between them can be found in the shape of the sporting fields. Each city has a casino. Each has many special events, however Melbourne’s lasts a longer time. Both have Agricultural shows.

Lesson 4 Cycle 1: Dice Game (Cards for Die)

Each Each level of government has…however,

…has responsibility for…while…

A similarity …although

A Significant contrast occurs …

…whereas…

Information Report Cycle 1: Lesson 5: Research Matrix
http://www.peo.gov.au/students/cl/multi.html http://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/resources/s ystem

Federal Government

State Government

Structure

Structure

Responsibilities Responsibilities

People

People

Lesson 6 : Language Matrix

Language of Generalisation

Descriptive Language

Technical Language

Lesson 6: Talking Spinner

Language of Descript ion Technica l Language

Languag e of Compari son/ Contras Language t of Generali sation

Information Report: Lesson 7:Joint Construction (Scaffold)

Opening Statement
- Language of Generalisati on

Categories  Facts
- Language of Description - Language of Comparison / Contrast - Technical Language

Lesson 7:

Government Fact Cards

Australia is governed under a system where there are three levels of government: federal, State and local. The six States of Australia were originally British colonies. Each colony existed independently of the other. Each colony had its own government and constitution. In 1901, however each colony agreed to join and become a nation. This was called Federation. . The Constitution states that the official head of the Australian Parliament is the Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (commonly referred to as the Crown). The current British monarch is Queen Elizabeth II. The British monarch does not live in Australia, so the Governor-General is the Federal representative of the Crown in Australia, with each State having a Governor to represent the Crown. The Governor-General performs a range of tasks on behalf of the Crown. Although the Governor-General is a powerful position, in practice, the role is mostly ceremonial

There are three main branches, or elements, of government: Legislative, Executive and Judiciary.

Each State parliament is based in the State's capital city, so, for example, the Western Australian Parliament is located in Perth and the Victorian Parliament in based in Melbourne.

The Legislature debates upon proposed laws and consists of two Houses Federal: the upper house or Senate, and the lower house or House of Representatives State: All State parliaments, except Queensland, are divided into two Houses, known as bicameral parliament (from the Latin 'bi' - meaning 'two' and 'camera' meaning 'chamber'),the upper house or Legislative Council, and the lower house or Legislative Assembly. Queensland's one House of Parliament is called the Legislative Assembly

The Executive administers or applies the laws. The Executive is made up of the Prime Minister Cabinet or Ministers (Federal), Premier, Cabinet or Ministers (State). Each Minister is responsible for one or more government departments or agencies. Ministers are appointed from amongst the majority party in Parliament and remain members of Parliament.

The Judiciary adjudicates on the laws. The Judiciary is made up of independent judges appointed to a hierarchical system of courts. For example, there is the Commonwealth High Court which is the highest court for the whole of Australia, and in NSW the highest court is the NSW Supreme Court.

The adult population of Australia vote for their government representatives in an election. After an election the

political party with the most elected members in the lower house forms the government. The government then elects a leader who is known as the Prime Minister (Federal) or Premier (State). The Prime Minister or Premier then chooses other members of the Parliament from the same political party, to take charge of government departments. These departments look after the areas of public life for which the Federal or State Government is responsible. The Ministers decide which proposed laws will be given to Parliament and decide on the general policies of the Government. The political party which has the second-largest number of members in the Lower House, becomes the Opposition. The leader of this party is known as the Leader of the Opposition. The role of the Opposition is to make sure that the government is accountable for the decisions they make and to ensure that they are running the State appropriately. The role of the Prime Minister or of the government. Premier is to be the leader

Federal Government responsibilities include: foreign affairs, social security, industrial relations, trade, immigration, currency and defence. State Government Responsibilities include: Agriculture,Education,Electricity and gas supplies,Health,Housing,Law and order, Main roads, Public transport, Water and also Local government (State governments give some of their power to local councils, to deal with issues such as waste disposal and roads. The State government is in charge of all local governments and their workers).

Lesson 11: Scavenger Hunt: Political Party Web Pages A Web Site is an Information Report: Its purpose is to classify and describe factual information on a specific topic. A political party website’s purpose is to classify and describe factual information about itself for Party members and anyone who wants to know more about them. Task: 1. Research the websites of 3 major political parties. 2. In pairs, complete the Scavenger Hunt Matrix (The Greens to be modelled by Teacher on Smartboard Matrix).

Sit at computers next to each other, with one computer open on the Liberal Party, the other open to the Labor Party. - Each Student has a copy of the matrix and is to fill it in by hand. ( a copy of the visuals to be cut and pasted onto a word document and printed, then stuck onto matrix so be careful of size) - Student are to discuss (using Language of Comparison and Contrast) what they find on the site that answer the questions. 3. Share as a class and add to Smartboard Matrix -

Lesson 11 (cont) Scavenger Hunt: Political Party Websites

Purpose of Site

Labor Greens http://www.nsw.greens.org.au/ http://www.nswalp.com/home http: To provide information about the Greens political party

Under what heading is the Opening General Statement/General Classification What are the Sub section headings?

About Us

Home ,News, Events, Policies, In Parliament, Join Donate, Get Involved, Shop, About, Contact , News, Policies, In Parliament, Get Involved, Contact (Others may apply)

Which 5 do you think are the most important in providing descriptive information about various aspects of the subject? Language of Generalisation: give examples (if any)

Greens, the membership, these policies,

Language of Description:

Local Greens, Australian

give examples (if any)

Technical Language

Greens, working hard, decentralised decisionmaking, quality public education Media Releases, The Constitution of the GreensNSW, affiliated, Our commitment, responds, challenges, opportunity, shape direction

Language of Opinion: give examples (if any)

In your opinion, which Website is the most effective and why? Select 2 visuals that have been used and state if you think they are they effective

Lesson 14: Web Page Scaffold


				
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