MATHEMATICS by ucGE7N5

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									                                   Social Studies
                                 Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:       Fifth
Course Title:      United States
Strand:            I. History
Topic:             Time and Chronology
Grade Level Standard:       5-1 Explore time and chronology.


Grade Level Benchmark:      1. Measure chronological time by decades and centuries.
   (I.1.LE.1)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                          Resources

1. Illustrate a timeline with 100 year increments to identify   Paper
   centuries and 10 year increments to identify decades.        Rulers

2. On a timeline of 100 years (1 century), students will        Paper
   locate the decade in which they were born and compare        Rulers
   the length of their life (approximately a decade) to the
   length of the whole century.




New Vocabulary: Chronological, decade, century




                                                                                      1
                                   Social Studies
                                 Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:       Fifth
Course Title:      United States
Strand:            I. History
Topic:             Time and Chronology
Grade Level Standard:       5-1 Explore time and chronology.


Grade Level Benchmark:      2. Place major events in the history of the United States in
   chronological order. (I.1.LE.2)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                           Resources

1. Create a timeline with a certain time period (i.e., Time of   Paper
   Exploration, Colonial Period, etc.)                           Ruler

2. In groups, assign a significant historical event to           Paper
   illustrate. Then, put these up around the classroom to        Rulers
   create a timeline.                                            Crayons
                                                                 Markers
3. Create a timeline of the student‘s life. Suggest events to    Colored Pencils
   include on the timeline and model how to properly space.
                                                                 Paper
                                                                 Rulers
                                                                 Crayons




New Vocabulary: Chronological




                                                                                           2
                                   Social Studies
                                 Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:       Fifth
Course Title:      United States
Strand:            I. History
Topic:             Time and Chronology
Grade Level Standard:       5-1 Explore time and chronology.


Grade Level Benchmark:      3. Place major events in the early history of the United
   States in chronological order. (I.1.LE.3)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                          Resources

1. Create a flip book with captions and illustrations that      Construction paper
   follows the chronological sequence of events during a        Pencils
   time period from history (i.e., events leading up to the     Markers
   Revolutionary War).                                          Crayons

2. Create a timeline of major events in early U.S. history.     Paper
   Present it to the class.                                     Rulers




New Vocabulary: Chronological




                                                                                       3
                                    Social Studies
                                  Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:        Fifth
Course Title:       United States
Strand:             I. History
Topic:              Comprehending the Past
Grade Level Standard:        5-2 Comprehend the past.


Grade Level Benchmark:       1. Summarize the sequence of key events in stories
   describing life from the past in parts of the United States. (I.2.LE.1)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                             Resources

1. Create a poster illustrating customs practiced by the           Poster
   Native Americans. Present it orally to the class.               Crayons

2. Write a narrative highlighting the activities of a day in the   Paper
   life of a pilgrim.                                              Pencils

3. With a partner, pretend to interview an individual from the Paper
   past (famous or not). Come up with interview questions      Pencils
   and ―mock‖ answers that are historically accurate. Then Dress-up clothes
   act it out with one person as interviewer and one as
   interviewee. Bonus: Dress up as a person from that time
   period.




Graphic Organizer: Summarize




                                                                                  4
                                  Social Studies
                                Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:       Fifth
Course Title:      United States
Strand:            I. History
Topic:             Comprehending the Past
Grade Level Standard:       5-2 Comprehend the past.


Grade Level Benchmark: 2. Use narratives and graphic data to compare the past
   parts of the United States with present day life in those places. (I.2.LE.2)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                          Resources

1. Create a Venn Diagram comparing various segments of          Paper
   life (i.e. transportation, jobs, economy, communication)     Pencils
   from the past with life today.

2. Students will write a paragraph comparing how Native         Internet
   Americans lived in the 1600‘s versus how they live today     History book
   (or where colonists came from in the 1600‘s and 1700‘s       Paper
   and where immigrants come from today, or where               Pencils
   explorers of 1400‘s and 1500‘s explore versus where
   they explore today).




New Vocabulary: Narrative, compare




                                                                                  5
                                  Social Studies
                                Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:      Fifth
Course Title:     United States
Strand:           I. History
Topic:            Comprehending the Past
Grade Level Standard:      5-2 Comprehend the past.


Grade Level Benchmark:     3. Recount the lives and characters of a variety of
   Individuals from the past representing parts of the United States. (I.2.LE.3)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                          Resources

1. Write a biographical report about a famous person from       Biographical information
   U.S. history (i.e., Abraham Lincoln, Cesar Chavez,           from Internet,
   Pontiac, Martin Luther King Jr., Sojourner Truth).           encyclopedia, library
                                                                books
2. Make a chart showing what are good traits and bad traits.
   Then choose a good and bad trait that contrast (like
   bravery vs. cowardice) and find examples of historical
   people who have exhibited that trait (i.e., Martin Luther
   King, Jr. vs. Malcolm X)




New Vocabulary: Biography, character, trait




                                                                                       6
                                  Social Studies
                                Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:      Fifth
Course Title:     United States
Strand:           I. History
Topic:            Comprehending the Past
Grade Level Standard:      5-2 Comprehend the past.


Grade Level Benchmark: 4. Identify and explain how individuals in history
   demonstrated good character and personal virtue. (I.2.LE.4)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                        Resources

1. Create a poster showing several historical people (you     Trade books
   could choose a particular time period to correspond with   Internet
   curriculum), a character trait they exhibited, and a
   specific example that demonstrates that trait.

2. Write a report about a historical figure, focusing on      Encyclopedia
   specific examples that exemplify good character and        Trade books
   virtue.




New Vocabulary: Character, virtue




                                                                             7
                                   Social Studies
                                 Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:       Fifth
Course Title:      United States
Strand:            I. History
Topic:             Analyzing and Interpreting the Past
Grade Level Standard:       5-3 Analyze and interpret the past.


Grade Level Benchmark:      1. Use primary sources to reconstruct past events in their
   local community. (I.3.LE.1)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                            Resources

1. Visit a historical museum (i.e., Detroit Historical Museum     Bus or other
   or other local museum).                                        transportation

2. Read a copy of the Declaration of Independence and             Internet or provide
   summarize the reasons given that led up to the                 copies
   Revolutionary War.

3. Show examples of primary sources (i.e., birth certificate,     Primary source
   driver‘s license, report card).                                examples – birth
                                                                  certificate, death
                                                                  certificate, driver‘s
                                                                  license, report card

                                                                  www.memory.loc.gov/
                                                                  learn/lessons/primary.
                                                                  html#object




New Vocabulary: Primary source




                                                                                           8
                                  Social Studies
                                Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:      Fifth
Course Title:     United States
Strand:           I. History
Topic:            Analyzing and Interpreting the Past
Grade Level Standard:      5-3 Analyze and interpret the past.


Grade Level Benchmark: 2. Interpret conflicting accounts of events in the United
   States history and analyze the viewpoints of the authors. (I.3.LE.2)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                           Resources

1. Read two varying accounts of a past event (i.e., Native       Encounter
   American response to explorers of Western Hemisphere,         (Native American
   Loyalists/Patriots views on Boston Massacre and Stamp         accounts of when
   Act, Northern and Southern views on the Institution of        Columbus landed)
   Slavery with respect to the 3/5 Compromise, or response
                                                                 History book showing
   of Native Americans to westward expansion) and create         European account
   a chart reflecting the different perspectives.
                                                                 ―A Massacre in Boston‖
2. Using the examples from above, have 2 groups do a skit:       in From Colonies to
   one group acts out one perspective and the other group        Country
   acts out the opposing perspective.
                                                                 Construction paper
                                                                 (optional) for props




New Vocabulary: Perspectives, viewpoints




                                                                                          9
                                     Social Studies
                                   Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:       Fifth
Course Title:      United States
Strand:            I. History
Topic:             Analyzing and Interpreting the Past
Grade Level Standard:       5-3 Analyze and interpret the past.


Grade Level Benchmark:      3. Compose simple narratives of events from the history of
   the United States. (I.3.LE.3)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                            Resources

1. Pretend students are reporters who have to write a news        Text or Internet for
   story about a specific historical event (i.e., Revolutionary   narrative background
   or Civil War events, famous speeches, etc.). Then put          Paper
   the stories together to create a faux newspaper from that      Pencils
   time.

2. Same as above, except students can act out a                   Paper
   performance pretending to do a ―live report‖ of that story.    Pencils
   (Would have to discuss that in reality, they did not have
   video cameras or TV at that time, though.)

3. Create a mini-diary from the perspective of a historical       Paper
   person. Write it as if the student lived at that time – a      Pencils
   child in Colonial times, a slave (again discussing that        Colored pencils
   most slaves could not read or write).




New Vocabulary: Narrative




                                                                                         10
                                   Social Studies
                                 Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:      Fifth
Course Title:     United States
Strand:           I. History
Topic:            Judging Decisions from the Past
Grade Level Standard:      5-4 Judge decisions from the past.


Grade Level Benchmark:     1. Identify problems from the past that divided the United
   States and analyze the interests and values of those involved. (I.4.LE.1)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                          Resources

1. Discuss the problems that have divided the country (i.e.,
   slavery, agricultural economy vs. industrial economy,
   Revolutionary War – Loyalists vs. Patriots).

2. Create a chart to show the reasons that the problem          Paper
   divided the U.S.                                             Pencils

   Example:          North           South

                                Or

                    Loyalists     Patriots




New Vocabulary: Values




                                                                                        11
                                  Social Studies
                                Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:      Fifth
Course Title:     United States
Strand:           I. History
Topic:            Judging Decisions from the Past
Grade Level Standard:      5-4 Judge decisions from the past.


Grade Level Benchmark:     2. Select decisions made to solve past problems and
   evaluate those decisions in terms of ethical considerations, the interests of those
   affected by the decisions, and the short- and long-term consequences in those
   decisions. (I.4.LE.2)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                          Resources

1. Students will write a paragraph saying whether they          Copy of Emancipation
   agree with Abraham Lincoln‘s decision to sign the            Proclamation
   Emancipation Proclamation or not and give supporting         Paper
   reasons.                                                     Pencils

2. Concerning Abraham Lincoln‘s decision to go to war in        Civil War background
   order to keep the Union together, discuss how                knowledge
   consequences could have changed if we had not had the
   Civil War.




New Vocabulary: Ethical, consequences




                                                                                         12
                                 Social Studies
                               Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:      Fifth
Course Title:     United States
Strand:           II. Geography
Topic:            People, Places, and Cultures
Grade Level Standard:     5-5 Examine people, places, and cultures.


Grade Level Benchmark:    1. Locate and describe cultures and compare the
   similarities and differences among the roles of women, men, and families.
   (II.1.LE.1)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                        Resources

1. Students will interview a parent and/or a grandparent and Family member
   make a Venn Diagram or write a paper illustrating the     Paper
   similarities and differences of the roles of women and    Pencils
   children as they evolved over time.

2. Assign small groups each a different cultural group for    Internet access
   which to research (Native Americans, Hispanic-             Encyclopedia
   Americans, Asian-Americans, etc.). Make and present a      Trade books
   poster to the class regarding the role of women, men,      Construction paper
   and children. Then the student must choose 2 of those      Markers
   cultures and write a paragraph comparing and               Paper
   contrasting the roles of men, women, and children.




New Vocabulary: Culture




                                                                                   13
                                   Social Studies
                                 Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:       Fifth
Course Title:      United States
Strand:            II. Geography
Topic:             People, Places and Cultures
Grade Level Standard:       5-5 Examine people, places, and cultures.


Grade Level Benchmark:      2. Locate and describe diverse kinds of communities and
   explain the reasons for their characteristics and locations. (II.1.LE.2)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                           Resources

1. Discuss the differences between an industrial community       Maps
   and a farming community and what causes those                 Paper
   differences (including location, jobs, and physical and       Pencils
   human features). Locate on a map.

2. Explain the differences between the people living in the      Paper
   Upper Peninsula vs. the Lower Peninsula. Make a chart         Pencils
   or Venn Diagram to compare and contrast.




New Vocabulary: Diverse




                                                                                      14
                                  Social Studies
                                Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:      Fifth
Course Title:     United States
Strand:           II. Geography
Topic:            People, Places and Cultures
Grade Level Standard:      5-5 Examine people, places, and cultures.


Grade Level Benchmark:     3. Locate and describe the major places, cultures, and
   communities of the nation and compare their characteristics. (II.1.LE.3)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                        Resources

1. Make a list of common characteristics between Native       Textbook
   American groups in the United States (Eastern              Paper
   Woodlands, Plains, Southwest, and Pacific Northwest).      Pencils

2. In groups, students will research each of the 3 colonial   Textbook
   regions: New England Colonies, Middle Colonies, and        Web resources
   Southern Colonies. (Topics include: population,            Encyclopedias
   economic activity, physical characteristics, human         Atlases
   characteristics, *attitudes toward slavery and *women‘s    PowerPoint
   rights). Teacher could provide an organizer for students
   to take notes. Then, students do an oral presentation
   (PowerPoint) and compare the regions.




New Vocabulary:




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                                  Social Studies
                                Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:      Fifth
Course Title:     United States
Strand:           II. Geography
Topic:            Human/Environment Interaction
Grade Level Standard:      5-6 Analyze human/environment interaction.


Grade Level Benchmark:     1. Explain basic ecosystem concepts and processes.
   (II.2.LE.1)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                         Resources

1. Create a poster with half of the paper for producers and    Magazines
   half for consumers. Students can cut out pictures from      Newspapers
   magazines or newspapers and glue them on the                Construction paper
   appropriate side of the poster. The poster should also      Markers
   include labels and a brief definition of producer and       Glue
   consumer.                                                   Pencils

2. Read a book or visit a website to introduce students to     Book, City Park by
   simple ecosystem concepts and processes. Then take a        Wendy Davis
   trip to a local park and have students record their         The Franklin Institute
   observations of its ecosystem in a journal. Include         www.fi.edu/tfi/units/life/
   examples of living and non-living things and a food chain   habitat/habitat.html
   (with illustrations). On returning from the park, have
   students share their observations and illustrations.        Notebooks (Journals)




New Vocabulary: Ecosystem, producer, consumer, populations, food chain,
interdependence



                                                                                            16
                                    Social Studies
                                  Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:          Fifth
Course Title:         United States
Strand:               II. Geography
Topic:                Human/Environment Interaction
Grade Level Standard:         5-6 Analyze human/environment interaction.


Grade Level Benchmark:        2. Describe the location, use, and importance of different
   kinds of resources and explain how they are created and the consequences of their
   use. (II.2.LE.2)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                           Resources

1. Ask students to list some basic needs of people (e.g.         Green gold: Michigan's
   food, clothing, shelter). Discuss how natural resources       forest history [video]
   such as fertile soil and plants are used to meet these        1997 Michigan Forest
   needs. Using a resource map of the United States              Association
   discuss important state resources, their location, and        Resources to Riches by
   uses. Ask students how they think these resources were        Jean Shafer 1997
   created. Finally, discuss the idea that all resources are
   scarce, or limited, and therefore it is important to
   conserve them. List ways states‘ resources can be
   conserved.

2. Students select a natural resource and create a poster
   describing where it is found, how it is created, a use of
   the resource, and one way to conserve the resource.




New Vocabulary: Natural resources, recyclable, renewable, non-renewable resources,
limited, scarce, conserve



                                                                                           17
                                  Social Studies
                                Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:      Fifth
Course Title:     United States
Strand:           II. Geography
Topic:            Human/Environment Interaction
Grade Level Standard:      5-6 Analyze human/environment interaction.


Grade Level Benchmark:     3. Describe the major physical patterns, ecosystems,
   resources, and land uses of the state, region, and country and explain the processes
   that created them. (II.2.LE.3)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                        Resources

1. Show a map depicting glaciers covering Michigan during     Great State-Great Parks-
   the Ice Age. Describe a glacier to students or do an       Great History 1999 4th
   experiment showing glacial action. Discuss how the         grade Lap Kit [WA 16-
   receding of the glaciers impacted physical patterns,       17 & WA 21-23]
   ecosystems, resources, and land use in Michigan. For       The Shaping of Michigan
   example:                                                   by Jean Shafer and
    Fertile land was distributed in the Lower Peninsula      Lynne Deur 1999
    Rugged mountains in the Upper Peninsula were
      rounded and smoothed
    Many rivers and lakes were created
    Deposits of resources such as gravel were left behind

2. Each student will select a region (community, county,
   state, etc.) and make a poster describing in words and
   illustrations one major physical pattern, one resource,
   one land use, and one ecosystem evident in the region
   and explain a process that created at least one of them.




New Vocabulary: Receding, physical patterns




                                                                                     18
                                 Social Studies
                               Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:      Fifth
Course Title:     United States
Strand:           II. Geography
Topic:            Human/Environment Interaction
Grade Level Standard:     5-6 Analyze human/environment interaction.


Grade Level Benchmark:    4. Explain how various people and cultures have adapted
   to and modified the environment. (II.2.LE.4)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                       Resources

1. A River Ran Wild: Adaptations and Modifications           Geography for Life 1994
   (activity attached)                                       p 69 National
                                                             Geographic Research
2. Community Adaptations and Modifications Chart (activity   Exploration
   attached)
                                                             A River Ran Wild by
                                                             Lynn Cherry (1992)
                                                             Help Your Child Learn
                                                             Geography
                                                             http://www.ed.gov/pubs/
                                                             parents/Geography/relati
                                                             on.html




New Vocabulary: Adapt, modify




                                                                                    19
                 A RIVER RAN WILD:
           ADAPTATIONS AND MODIFICATIONS

Read A River Ran Wild by Lynn Cherry to students. This book describes the
history of life along the Nashua River. It begins with early Native American
settlement and progresses through European settlement and the subsequent
industrial development leading to serious environmental problems. As you read
the book discuss ways people in the story adapted to the environment and ways
they modified the environment. Record ideas on a class T-chart. Examples from
the book include:

Ways people adapted to fit the environment:
    Native Americans learned to make their houses out of cattails because
      the riverbanks provided these materials.
    Native Americans planted corn and squash because they were crops that
      would grow in forest clearings.
    People stopped swimming in the river because it had become polluted.

Ways people modified the environment to fit them.
    The English cleared the land because they wanted to build houses and a
      settlement.
    Dams were built on the river because millponds were needed for mills.
    Pulp was dumped from paper mills into the river because it was easy for
      disposal.
    People worked together to clean the river because it had become
      polluted.




                                                                           20
                  COMMUNITY ADAPTATIONS
                  AND MODIFICATIONS CHART

Ask students to think of ways people in their community have adapted to fit their
environment and why they did so. Students are then asked to think of ways in
which people in their community have modified, or changed, the environment to
fit them and why they made the changes. Have students explain the changes on
a T -chart in complete sentences which follow this pattern.

      They _______________________because _______________________.

Example of T -chart:

    Ways People Have Adapted                 Ways People Have Changed
    to the Environment and Why          the Environment to Fit Them and Why




                                                                               21
                                    Social Studies
                                  Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:       Fifth
Course Title:      United States
Strand:            II. Geography
Topic:             Location, Movement, and Connections
Grade Level Standard:       5-7 Describe location, movement, and connections.


Grade Level Benchmark:      1. Describe major kinds of economic activity and explain the
   factors influencing their location. (II.3.LE.1)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                         Resources

1. Agricultural Production and Distribution (activity attached) Michigan Relief Map
                                                                (1995) Hillsdale, MI:
2. Essay: Attract University Agricultural Students (activity    Hillsdale Educational
   attached)                                                    Publishers
                                                               Michigan Student
                                                               Desktop Map (1998)
                                                               Hillsdale, MI: Hillsdale
                                                               Educational Publishers.
                                                               Somers, L. (Ed.) 1977
                                                               Atlas of Michigan




New Vocabulary: Agriculture, manufacturing, goods, services, needs, wants,
production, distribution



                                                                                        22
   AGRICULTURE PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION
Duplicate the chart below listing the highest producing counties for Michigan agricultural
products. On an outline map of Michigan with the counties labeled, have each student color the
counties listed for one of the agricultural products, using a different a different color for each
product map.

Post the maps in the front of the room, and ask students to make observations. Brainstorm
factors affecting agricultural production and sale of products. Display other Michigan maps
showing highways, physical features, and population distribution, and ask students to make
inferences. Guide their critical thinking, as needed, with questions such as: Why are large fruit
and vegetable markets located in the western Lower Peninsula? Why are cereal companies
located in Battle Creek? Where would you locate a plant that processes grapes into grape juice
and jelly? If you worked for a trucking company based in Grand Rapids, what farm products
might you haul, and where would you haul them? How might the location of farming affect other
businesses?

                    ESSAY: ATTRACT UNIVERSITY
                     AGRICULTURAL STUDENTS
Have students focus on one Michigan region, and write a paragraph aimed at attracting
Michigan State University agricultural students to the area for farming. They may refer to maps
in the classroom and should include benefits of the location and information about crops,
geographic features, and transportation to markets.

      Corn        Dry Beans           Wheat            Cattle            Hogs             Hay
St. Joseph      Huron            Huron            Huron            Cass             Sanilac
Cass            Tuscola          Sanilac          Sanilac          Allegan          Lapeer
Tuscola         Bay              Lenawee          Allegan          Ottawa           Kent
Huron           Gratiot          Eaton            Ottawa           Van Buren        Washtenaw
Saginaw         Sanilac          Saginaw          Ionia            Jackson          Huron
Branch          Saginaw          Shiawassee       Kent             Branch           Clinton
Hillsdale       Montcalm         Washtenaw        Isabella         Hillsdale        Isabella
Lenawee         Midland          St. Clair        Lapeer           St. Joseph       Jackson
Sanilac         Arenac           Tuscola          Lenawee          Huron            Ionia
Gratiot         Isabella         Clinton          Gratiot          Calhoun          Montcalm

  Sugar Beets         Oats          Potatoes         Soybeans           Fruits       Vegetables
Bay Huron       Sanilac          Montcalm         Saginaw          Leelanau         Oceana
Saginaw         Huron            Bay              Lenawee          Grand Traverse   Van Buren
Gratiot         Tuscola          Presque Isle     Monroe           Oceana           Cass
Tuscola         Shiawassee       Allegan          Gratiot          Kent             Berrien
Lenawee         Washtenaw        Antrim           Tuscola          Van Buren        Allegan
Sanilac         Isabella         Tuscola          Shiawassee       Berrien          Mason
Arenac          Ionia            Mecosta          Sanilac          Allegan          Gratiot
Gladwin         St. Clair        Arenac           Clinton          Ottawa           Muskegon
Midland         Saginaw          Delta            St. Joseph       Mason            Newaygo
Isabella        Arenac           Monroe           Hillsdale        Manistee         Macomb
St. Clair       Kent             Dickinson
Monroe


                                                                                                23
                                  Social Studies
                                Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:       Fifth
Course Title:      United States
Strand:            II. Geography
Topic:             Location, Movement, and Connections
Grade Level Standard:      5-7 Describe location, movement, and connections.


Grade Level Benchmark:     2. Describe the causes, consequences, routes, and
   movement of major migration to the United States. (II.3.LE.2)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                       Resources

1. Migration: First Wave (activity attached)                 Attached

2. Fictional Person Portrait and Essay (activity attached)




New Vocabulary: Migration




                                                                               24
                       MIGRATION: FIRST WAVE
A major pattern of migration began shortly after European contact with South and North
America. Between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries, the 'first wave of migration
took place. Begin your discussion of this phenomenon by highlighting the Bering land
bridge theory of 'Indian' presence in North and South America. While technically the
Native Americans also migrated, they were here so long before other groups they are
not considered part of this ―first wave.‖

Spend some time activating student background knowledge by brainstorming reasons
people might move from their homes to another place. Record their thoughts and
conclude by defining migration as a movement of a large group of people from their
homes to a new home.

Complete some map analysis and census review as a class using historical and
geographic atlases. Lessons 9-13 in the Nystrom historical atlas, "Exploring Our
Country,‖ will facilitate students' understanding of who moved, when they moved, where
they settled, what they experienced when they got here, and some information related
to why they came. Include these groups of people in your discussion:
British Spanish Africans Pilgrim Puritans French Swedish/German


        FICTIONAL PERSON PORTRAIT AND ESSAY
Evaluating census information at the Historical Census Data Browser site as a class
might also be helpful to build conceptual understanding. Students can make
observational statements as they observe the population statistics, which are divided by
ethnic group/country of origin and population of various colonial settlements. Students
will also need some understanding of what life was like in Europe and Africa at the time.
Joy Hakim‘s series A History of U.S. Books 1-3 are very helpful. Web sites are also
very useful. The students‘ first task is to draw a portrait of a person who might have
participated in this first wave of migration, and research should include items listed
below. (A more expansive explanation of the potential and details of this type of project
can be found in the book Social Studies at the Center pp. 100-108.) Give students an
organizer or note taking guide.

Use the information that you gathered during your research to write a fictional account
of this person and his or her life. Your story should be at least 1 page long. Include at
least one example of each of the following in a well-written description:
    1. Dates of migration                  7. Why he/she chose to leave
    2. Where he/she settled                8. Life in the New World
    3. Life in homeland                    9. Work
    4. Economics                           10. Home
    5. Religion                            11. Friends
    6. Daily activities                    12. Dally Activities


                                                                                        25
RESOURCES
Garrison, Tina, (Ed.). (1998). Exploring Our Country. Chicago, IL: Nystrom

Hakim, Joy. (1999). A History of U.S.: Making Thirteen Colonies. Oxford, NY: Oxford
      University Press

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research at the Institute for Social
       Research at the University of Michigan. (1992). United States Historical Census
       Data Browser [Online]. <http://fisher.lib.virginia.edu/census// background>.
       (August, 2000)

Lindquist, Tarry and Selwyn, Douglas. (2000). Social Studies at the Center:
      Integrating Kids, Content, and Literacy. Portsmouth, NH: Heinman, Northeastern
      University in Boston, World History Center, Department of History. (1996)

Migration Prototype Project Migrations: The Americas, 1600-1800.
       <http://www.whc.new.edu/prototype/migration.html>. (August, 2000)

National History Day Project – Immigration in the Americas and the 13 Colonies –
      Ernesto. (19). <http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Way/9301/
      HistoryDay.html>. (August, 2000)

ThinkQuest. (1997). Virtual Renaissance. <http://library.thinkquest.org/3588/
      renaissance/GeneralFiles/Introduction.html>. (August, 2000)

USA: Outline of American History (1990) From Revolution to Revolution.
     <http://odur.let.rug.nl/~usa/usa.htm>. (Home) <http://odur.let.rug.nl/~usa/
     H/1995/ch2_pl.htm>. (Colonial Period)




                                                                                       26
                                  Social Studies
                                Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:       Fifth
Course Title:      United States
Strand:            II. Geography
Topic:             Location, Movement, and Connections
Grade Level Standard:      5-7 Describe location, movement, and connections.


Grade Level Benchmark:     3. Explain how transportation and communication link
   people and communities. (II.3.LE.3)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                          Resources

1. Ask students to brainstorm a list of ways people are         Geography for Life by
   linked to other people. Common student examples will         Sarah Bednarz 1994 pp.
   most likely include roads, the postal service, telephones,   85-86,127
   etc. Introduce the terms 'transportation' and                Transportation: A
   'communication' and discuss how communities and
                                                                Complete Thematic Unit
   people are linked by transportation and communication        by Martha Cheney and
   networks. Guide students in adding new examples to           Diane Bockwoldt 1996
   their brainstormed list. For example, even though a
   community may not be a port, many of the goods found         Transportation:
   in the community may have traveled at one time by ship.      Automobiles to
   Using the expanded list discuss how people, goods, and       Zeppelins by Jane
   information travel between communities using                 English 1995
   transportation and communication networks.                   Construction paper
2. Each student will create a poster explaining in words and    Markers
   illustrations three modes of transportation and three        Crayons
   modes of communication that link their local community
   with other communities.




New Vocabulary: Transportation, communication, networks




                                                                                     27
                                  Social Studies
                                Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:      Fifth
Course Title:     United States
Strand:           II. Geography
Topic:            Location, Movement, and Connections
Grade Level Standard:      5-7 Describe location, movement, and connections.


Grade Level Benchmark:     4. Describe some of the major movements of goods,
   people, jobs, and information within the United States and explain the reasons for
   the movements. (II.3.LE.4)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                      Resources

1. Discuss reasons people move (e.g., to find a better      Geography for Life by Sarah
   life, jobs, etc.). Using information from websites,      Bednarz 1994
   books, etc. discuss how people have moved into and       A Diverse People by Jean
   within Michigan. Organize the information into a chart   Shafer and Lynne Deur
   showing who the people were, where they moved,           1996
   and why they moved. For example, the early French
   (who) moved into the Upper Peninsula (where) to          Internet (Michigan Historical
   take part in the fur trade (why). Ask students what      Center)
   might move besides people. Guide students to the         http://www.michigan.gov/hal/
   conclusion that goods (things) and information (ideas)   0,1607,7-160-17445_19273-
   also move. Discuss some Michigan examples of             --,00.html
   these movements with students. For example, ideas
   moved between Native American and European
   settlements; food crops move between rural and
   urban areas.

2. Students individually identify one group of people,
   one good, and one idea that have moved within
   Michigan. They complete a chart describing where
   the movement occurred and explain one reason for
   the movement.
New Vocabulary: Human features, natural features, landmarks




                                                                                        28
                                   Social Studies
                                 Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:       Fifth
Course Title:      United States
Strand:            II. Geography
Topic:             Regions, Patterns, and Processes
Grade Level Standard:       5-8 Compare regions, patterns, and processes.


Grade Level Benchmark:      1. Draw sketch maps of the community, region, and nation.
   (II.4.LE.1)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                           Resources

1. Obtain a large map of your community and small copies         Geography for Life.
   for students. Guide students in locating major natural        National Geographic
   features such as rivers. Next, locate human features          Society 1994 pp. 61-64
   such as major roads, a library, a mall, schools, a post       Mapmaking with
   office, etc. Discuss the relative location of each of these
                                                                 Children by David Sobel
   features. Discuss the idea that this map has more detail      1998 pp. 1-10, 17-19
   than a sketch map would require. Ask students which
   features would be most important to include on a sketch
   map of the community.

2. Draw a sketch map of the United States showing major
   interstate highways, major regional human features (e.g.
   Statue of Liberty), and major regional natural features.




New Vocabulary: Human features, natural features, landmarks




                                                                                      29
                                  Social Studies
                                Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:       Fifth
Course Title:      United States
Strand:            II. Geography
Topic:             Regions, Patterns, and Processes
Grade Level Standard:      5-8 Compare regions, patterns, and processes.


Grade Level Benchmark:     2. Describe places, cultures, and communities in the United
   States and compare them with those in other regions and countries. (II.4.LE.2)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                           Resources

1. Compare Native American regions: northwest, desert,           A History of U.S.: The First
   plains, and woodlands (activity attached)                     Americans-Prehistory-1600
                                                                 by Joy Hakim 1999
2. Select two of the culture groups or tribes that have been     Atlas of Our Country by
   studied. Write an essay comparing the way they met their      Charles Novosad (Ed.)
   needs and used the environment. The essay should be           1996
   at least three paragraphs long and include the following:     Native Americans: People
   1. A statement of the two culture groups or tribes that       of the Desert [Videotape]
       are being compared                                        1993 Raleigh, NC:
   2. The regions in which they lived                            Rainbow Educational
   3. Description of the region in which each group lived (at    Media Inc.
       least three physical characteristics).                    Native Americans: People
   4. At least five comparisons selected from these areas:       of the Forest [Videotape]
       food, clothing, shelter, religion, government, fears or   1993
       problems.
                                                                 Native Americans: People
   5. An explanation of the effect the environment had on        of the Northwest Coast
       the areas of comparison.                                  [Videotape] 1993
   6. Identify at least one resource that each group had
       that the other might have wished for.                     Native Americans: People
                                                                 of the Plains [Videotape]
                                                                 1993



New Vocabulary: Culture, physical characteristics, human characteristics




                                                                                           30
          COMPARE NATIVE AMERICAN REGIONS

The diversity among Native American cultural groups and the regions in which
they lived provide excellent opportunities to compare regional characteristics.
Most students have a broad background in Native American culture that allows
this activity to concentrate on using geography skills.

Begin by examining a map of the major Native American culture areas. There
are many organizations of Native American groups. One organization includes
Natives of the northwest, desert, plains and woodlands. Distribute an outline
map of North America with states, provinces and countries identified. As a class,
color the four broad regions representing the plains, eastern woodlands, desert
(southwest), and northwest native culture groups. Have students work in groups
to research information about the physical characteristics of a region. Standard
characteristics for groups to research would be: bodies of water, climate, flora,
fauna, landforms, and natural resources.

Make a chart with columns for each category. Students could also have a
comparable graphic organizer. Record the information on the board.

After all the groups have shared, have students predict some ways people may
have used the environment. Prompt them with questions such as what they
might have eaten and/or used to make clothes and houses, problems they might
have faced and things they would not have to worry about.

Working in groups, have students use resources to gather information about the
human characteristics evidenced in the lives of various tribes or culture groups
who lived in the region. Provide specific kinds of information they will need to
find such as food, clothing, housing, religion, government and/or relations with
neighbors. Have students share information while others record it on a graphic
organizer. Encourage questioning of each group to help recognize reasons for
the choices native culture groups made.




                                                                                  31
                                  Social Studies
                                Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:      Fifth
Course Title:     United States
Strand:           II. Government
Topic:            Regions, Patterns, and Processes
Grade Level Standard:      5-8 Compare regions, patterns, and processes.


Grade Level Benchmark:     3. Describe the geography of Michigan at major times in its
   history and explain the reasons for its change. (II.4.LE.3)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                           Resources

1. ―Glimpses of Michigan‘s Past‖ (activity attached)             Detroit Historical
                                                                 Museum Glimpses of
                                                                 Michigan‘s Past
                                                                 http://www.detroithistoric
                                                                 al.org/learningcenter/mat
                                                                 erials.asp
                                                                 Michigan: Its Land and
                                                                 People by J. Killoran, S.
                                                                 Zimmer & M. Jarrett
                                                                 1997 pp 73-158
                                                                 Forging the Peninsulas
                                                                 by D. McConnell 1995
                                                                 Michigan‘s Story by D.
                                                                 McConnell 1996




New Vocabulary: Physical characteristics, human characteristics, cultural
characteristics



                                                                                          32
                 GLIMPSES OF MICHIGAN’S PAST
Clarify students' understanding that geography refers to the physical and human, or
cultural, characteristics of a place. Identify physical and human characteristics. Ask how
and why the geography of their neighborhood and community has changed over time.

Have students participate in the Detroit Historical Museum's virtual tour, Glimpses of
Michigan's Past http://www.detroithistorical.org/learningcenter/materials.asp. After
viewing and reading about each of the ten eras, ask students to relate new information
to what they already know and to discuss the physical and human characteristics and
how they interacted. Use questions such as the following:
      What were the physical characteristics (landforms, resources, bodies of water,
         vegetation) of Michigan at that time?
      What were the human or cultural characteristics (economic activities, population
         distribution, social structures, housing, food, religion, recreation) of Michigan at
         that time?
      How did the physical and cultural environment affect people?
      How did people change the physical and cultural environment?

Discuss where they could get additional information about the physical and cultural
geography of Michigan during these times in history.

Each student chooses one of the following eras in Michigan history from Glimpses of
Michigan's Past:
     The First People
     Fur Trading
     Underground Railroad
     Industrial Age
     Early Motor City

He/she uses available resources, as needed for supplementary information, to make a
poster or three- dimensional display contrasting life in Michigan during that era with life
in Michigan today. The visual aid and oral explanation should provide answers to the
following questions:
      What were the physical characteristics (landforms, resources, bodies of water,
         vegetation) of Michigan during that era, how do they compare to the present,
         and if they have changed, why?
      What were the human characteristics (economic activities, population
         distribution, social structures, housing, food, religion, recreation) of Michigan
         defining that era, how do they compare to the present, and if they have
         changed, why?
      How has the physical and cultural environment affected the people then and
         now?
      How have people changed the physical and cultural environment then and
         now?


                                                                                          33
                                  Social Studies
                                Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:      Fifth
Course Title:     United States
Strand:           II. Geography
Topic:            Global Issues and Events
Grade Level Standard:      5-9 Evaluate global issues and events.


Grade Level Benchmark:     1. Locate major world events and explain how they impact
   people and the environment. (II.5.LE.1)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                          Resources

1. Help students locate a major world event on a map or         ―New York Times‖
   globe. Distribute a news article relating to the event.      www.nytimes.com
   Read and discuss the article. Ask students to list ways in   (June, 2000)
   which people and the environment are impacted by the         ―Time for Kids‖
   event. For example, a conflict often displaces people and
                                                                www.timeforkids.com
   destroys parts of the environment. Finally, discuss the      (June, 2000)
   interdependent nature of the world and the idea that
   people far from an event are often impacted by it.           ―Detroit Free Press‖
                                                                www.freep.com (June,
2. Individual students select a current major world event       2000)
   and prepare a short news broadcast in which they locate
   the event on a map and explain two ways the event is
   impacting people and one way the event is impacting the
   environment.




New Vocabulary: Impact, conflicts, environmental disasters, natural disasters,
interdependent



                                                                                       34
                                      Social Studies
                                    Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:         Fifth
Course Title:        United States
Strand:              III. Government
Topic:               Purposes of Government
Grade Level Standard:          5-10 Identify purposes of government.


Grade Level Benchmark:         1. Distinguish among local, state, and national government
   in the United States and describe the roles of government institutions at all three
   levels. (III.1.LE.1)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                                  Resources

1. Phone Directory: Government Pages                                    Office of the
                                                                        Governor/State of
2. List the three levels of government and include the following        Michigan
   information for each one:                                            http://www.michigan.gov
   a. Describe at least one area controlled by each level               /gov
   b. Examine the list of roles handled by government
       institutions. Write the level of government that handles         ―How did the framers
       each role. If a role exists at two levels, write names of both   limit the power of our
       levels. If it exists at all three levels write ‗all three‘.      government?‖ We the
                                                                        people 1999 p. 74-80.
   Declare war (federal)                                                Calabasas, CA: Center
   Put up traffic lights (local)
                                                                        for Civic Education
   Collect taxes (all three)
   Driver‘s license (state)                                             Yahoo! Get Local
   Make sure airlines are safe (federal)                                http://dir.yahoo.com/regi
   Fire department (local)                                              onal/u_s__states/
   Make sure we have clean water (all three)                            michigan/
   Repair highways (state)
   Decide what all students should learn (state and local)
   Print money (federal)




New Vocabulary: Local, enforce, role, government institutions




                                                                                               35
        PHONE DIRECTORY: GOVERNMENT PAGES

Begin a discussion with students by asking them what the government is and does.
Read ―What is a federal government‖ page 99 in We the People and complete the
problem solving activity which begins an explanation of the federal system of
government. After this activity, finish reading the lesson and discuss the answers to
questions 1 and 2. As a homework assignment, have students interview their parents
or other adults to get ideas for answers to these two questions:
    What does our government do for us?
    What does our government make us do?

Collect several telephone directories for each cooperative group. If an adequate supply
is not available, copy the government pages for each group. Have students share some
of the ideas they gathered in their interviews. Help students locate the government
pages in the directories. Give them the task of finding at least one example of a federal,
state and local government institution.

As a class, look under the local heading for examples of government institutions in your
city that students recognize and try to determine the roles they serve. Complete this
activity for each level. Once students are comfortable with the government pages, have
them work in groups to find similar institutions at more than one level. Record the
similarities they found.

Assign pairs of students to use web sites of various levels of government to find the
roles of some of the institutions they did not know.

To conclude the lesson, examine the lists of institutions at each level. Search for
generalizations that can be made about the areas of our lives that these institutions
regulate. Some examples include:
      LOCAL government: rules, laws and institutions that affect our daily lives such
        as schools, utilities, trash collections, traffic light locations and city parks.
      STATE government: rules, laws and institutions that affect people as they move
        outside their city such as highways, driver‘s licenses, social services (welfare)
        and jails.
      FEDERAL government: rules, laws and institutions that affect people in many
        states such as making money, protecting the environment, federal prisons and
        procedures used to grow and exchange agricultural products. They also are in
        charge of this country‘s relationship and trade with other countries.




                                                                                        36
                                   Social Studies
                                 Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:       Fifth
Course Title:      United States
Strand:            III. Government
Topic:             Purposes of Government
Grade Level Standard:        5-10 Identify purposes of government.


Grade Level Benchmark:       2. Give examples of authority and the use of power without
   authority. (III.1.LE.2)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                           Resources

1. Power With and Without Authority Chart (activity              National Standards for
   attached)                                                     Civics and Government
                                                                 1994 pp. 16-17
2. Each student will be asked to create a chart like the one     Calabasas, California:
   in the teaching activity, but this time, the ten examples     Center for Civic
   will be ones selected by the student (from their              Education
   imagination or from current events), and must be              Authority, foundations of
   different from the ones used in the teaching activity. Five   democracy (upper
   of the examples should illustrate the use of power based      elementary) by Kenneth
   on authority, and the other five illustrating the use of      Rodriquez 1997
   power without having the authority. At the bottom of the
   page, the student will provide a statement that correctly
   explains the relationship between power and authority.




New Vocabulary: Power, authority




                                                                                        37
   POWER WITH AND WITHOUT AUTHORITY CHART

After finding out through discussion what students know about the meaning and
relationship of power and authority, present the class with ten examples of
people acting to control or direct something or someone. In the list be certain to
have examples of exercising power with and without authority. Have students in
pairs or small groups create a chart with the example as one column, a second
column entitle acting without authority, and a third column called acting with
authority. Next, have each group take the list of ten actions and classify them into
one of the last two columns. Each group should prepare one or two reasons to
support each classification. Once all groups have completed the chart, the
teacher will collect on the board, or an overhead, the decisions of each group on
a retrieval chart. Each group will be asked to defend its decision and whole class
discussion will follow. Based on this activity, the class as a whole will work
towards constructing definitions of power and authority and will develop a
statement that describes the relationship between the two. The teacher may also
wish to include an example of a person in authority misusing their power.


                Example                      Acting without         Acting with
                                               Authority             Authority




                                                                                  38
                                 Social Studies
                               Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:      Fifth
Course Title:     United States
Strand:           III. Government
Topic:            Purposes of Government
Grade Level Standard:     5-10 Identify purposes of government.


Grade Level Benchmark:    3. Give reasons for limiting the power of government.
   (III.1.LE.3)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                        Resources

1. Playground Rules (activity attached)                       We the People by Duane
                                                              Smith (Ed.) 1999 pp 74-
2. Have each student write a paragraph about how our          80 Calabasas, CA:
   government is organized to limit powers. Give more than    Center for Civic
   one reason for limiting the power of government and give   Education
   more than one way the constitution limits the power of
   our government.




New Vocabulary:




                                                                                   39
                        PLAYGROUND RULES

Have students think about creating school rules for the playground. Divide them
into several groups who might have different opinions about appropriate rules
and have them create a list of rules taking the specific group‘s perspective into
consideration. Groups might include fifth graders, first graders, parents,
lunchroom staff, and so forth. Take a few minutes to discuss the differences in
the lists of rules. Discussion should highlight the fact that people tend to make
rules favoring their own interests.

Have the students read the Problem Solving activity in We the People. Divide
the students into groups to discuss ―How to organize a government.‖ Conclude
the discussion using the questions from We the People.

Read the balance of the lesson in the text that explains how the framers solved
the problem of limiting powers of government. It also gives some of the reasons
they felt it was necessary.

Use the questions at the end of the lesson as a writing assignment and discuss
the answers with the whole group making sure that students can give reasons for
limiting the power of government and how our constitution limits that power.




                                                                                40
                                      Social Studies
                                    Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:         Fifth
Course Title:        United States
Strand:              III. Government
Topic:               Ideals of American Democracy
Grade Level Standard:          5-11 Define ideals of American democracy.


Grade Level Benchmark:         1. Interpret the development and summarize the main
   points in the Declaration of Independence. (III.2.LE.1)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                                  Resources

1. Read with students Lesson 5, pages 34-41 in the book We              From colonies to
   The People. Divide the class into cooperative groups of 3-4          country. ―Declaration of
   students. Assign each group the position of American colonist        Independence by Joy
   or British supporter. Have the small groups meet to review the       Hakim 1993 pp 98-102
   text and other resources to list reasons justifying their position
   regarding the colonists‘ freedom from Great Britain.                 We the people 1999
                                                                        ―How did the founders
   Have the groups share their lists of reasons and record them         use their ideas in the
   in two columns on the board or overhead projector.                   Declaration of
    Lead a discussion helping students to understand that each          Independence‖ pp 34-42
    side had legitimate concerns about the topic. Develop a list of     Calabasas, CA: Center
    other ways the disagreement could have been handled. Make           for Civic Education
    sure students understand that many of the colonists did not
    want to separate from Great Britain and that this difference of
    opinions among American colonists helped the colonial
    government decide to write the Declaration to explain their
    actions. Create a chart demonstrating the different positions of
    Loyalists and Patriots.

2. Divide students into small groups. Give each group a section         Copies of Declaration of
   of the Declaration of Independence to study. Have each group         Independence
   summarize its section in words younger kids could
                                                                        Paper
   understand. Then put the summaries together to create a full
   summary of the Declaration.                                          Pencils
New Vocabulary: Loyalist, Patriot




                                                                                               41
                                   Social Studies
                                 Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:       Fifth
Course Title:      United States
Strand:            III. Government
Topic:             Ideals of American Democracy
Grade Level Standard:       5-11 Define ideals of American democracy.


Grade Level Benchmark:      2. Interpret the meaning of specific rights guaranteed by
   the Constitution including religious liberty, free expression, privacy, property,
   due process of law, and equal protection of the law. (III.2.LE.2)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                            Resources

1. Students Create a Lesson (activity attached)                   ―How did the framers
                                                                  limit the power of our
2. Scenario of our Rights in Action Today (activity attached)     government?‖ We the
                                                                  People 1999 pp 74-80
                                                                  Calabasas, CA: Center
                                                                  for Civic Education




New Vocabulary: Rights, guaranteed, freedom of religion, freedom of expression,
privacy, property, due process of law, equal protection of law



                                                                                        42
                 STUDENTS CREATE A LESSON

The first challenge in teaching to this benchmark is helping the students to
understand the meaning of these rights. The text, We the People does an
excellent job of simplifying these meanings in Unit Four (page 103), ―How does
the constitution protect your basic rights.‖ Read the unit introduction together.
Use a ‗jigsaw approach‘ to teach the five broad categories of constitutional rights
outlined in the text: freedom of expression and religion, the rights to be treated
equally and fairly by the government, and the right to vote. Divide the class into
cooperative groups and assign each group the responsibility to read and discuss
one of the five lessons (lessons #16-20). Have them develop an interesting way
to teach their classmates what they learned. Their sharing should include:
      the meaning of the right
      how it makes our lives better
      what our lives would be like without it
      if and when that right should be limited
      one example of this right in action in our lives today

During each presentation, students should record the information for future
reference in an organized manner. After each lead a discussion to make sure
everyone has recorded and understood the information.

As a homework assignment, have students find three examples from the
newspaper, magazines, or television of Bill of Rights concepts in action. They
should use the criteria above. Share their findings and have them think of
examples of Bill of Rights concepts in our school lives.




                                                                                 43
             SCENARIO OF OUR RIGHTS IN ACTION

Select at least two of the specific rights guaranteed in the Constitution and write
at least one paragraph to explain each one.

Part I:   Your explanation should include:
         the meaning of the right
         its importance
         how it is limited
         how our lives would be different without it
         one example of how we exercise the right

Part II: For at least one of the rights you chose to explain, compose at least one
paragraph to illustrate the right in action in our lives today. Your scenario should
include:
      how it affects our lives
      a description of a situation when the right might have to be limited.




                                                                                  44
                                    Social Studies
                                  Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:       Fifth
Course Title:      United States
Strand:            III. Government
Topic:             Ideals of American Democracy
Grade Level Standard:        5-11 Define ideals of American democracy.


Grade Level Benchmark:       3. Explain responsibilities citizens have to uphold
   constitutional rights. (III.2.LE.3)

Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                           Resources

1. Paper Clip Game (activity attached)                           AskERIC ―You and the
                                                                 U.S. Constitution Lesson
2. Rights Come with Responsibilities (activity attached)         Plan‖
                                                                 http://www.eduref.org/cgi-
3. Have students draw a poster that illustrates the              bin/printlessons.cgi/
   responsibilities associated with each right.                  Virtual/Lessons/Social_St
                                                                 udies/US_Government/G
4. Have groups of 3-5 students develop a skit that               OV0052.html
   demonstrates a citizen‘s responsibility in a particular       ―How did the framers limit
   situation.                                                    the power of our
                                                                 government?‖ by Duane
5. Identifying Responsibilities Associated with Rights           Smith (Ed.) We the
   (activity attached)                                           People 1999 pp. 74-80
                                                                 Calabasas, CA: Center
                                                                 for Civic Education
                                                                 Construction paper
                                                                 Crayons
                                                                 Markers
                                                                 Pencils



New Vocabulary: Constitution, consequences, right, responsibility




                                                                                         45
                              PAPER CLIP GAME

After a study of the constitutional rights guaranteed in the constitution, begin a
discussion by having students suggest rights they believe they have in the school or
classroom. As they list the rights, help them identify the related constitutional rights.
Lead the discussion toward the idea of responsibility by helping them decide how we
make sure these rights are available to everyone. A possible motivating statement
might be: ―Suppose we wrote these rules in large print and posted them. How would
things go? What else would have to be done?‖ Play the Paper Clip Game (attached).
This game helps students develop an understanding of the need for rules and their fair
and consistent application. Paper clips are distributed to students with no explanation
and the direction to begin. Students experience the process of developing rules. Cotton
balls can be used with elementary students.

Lead students to understand that they each have to make sure that everyone has the
same rights. They may also identify the need for enforcement and consequences.
Validate their observations and identify the method for handling those roles in the
classroom.


           RIGHTS COME WITH RESPONSIBILITIES
Read the introduction to Unit 5: ―What are the responsibilities of citizens‖ in We the
People. Begin Lesson 21 by reading pages 138-139. The rest of this lesson involves
students working in cooperative groups to resolve problems related to five basic rights
(expression, religion, equal and fair treatment, and the right to vote). Have each group
discuss a scenario outlined in the book. Each activity asks students to identify the
responsibilities others have to guarantee the right as well as the responsibility the
student would have if involved. The activity concludes by asking students to think about
what might happen if individuals did not fulfill their responsibilities. After each group has
discussed and recorded their response to the questions with their scenario, have each
group share their responses. The other students should reflect on the groups‘
conclusions and discuss their responses. The presenting group could lead the
discussion.

Have students observe situations in various locations such as the lunchroom, the
playground, soccer practice, scouts or church groups and identify the rights and
responsibilities held by individuals. They should also reflect on the same situation and
determine how it would change if no one fulfilled the identified responsibilities.




                                                                                           46
                       THE PAPER CLIP GAME
OVERVIEW:
The paper clip game serves as a good device for discussing the need for and
importance of rules in society. It acts as a springboard for developing a working
definition of law and understanding the importance of law. It serves to overcome
an often negative perception of law.

OBJECTIVES: Students will be able to:
  1. Identify three components of good rules (law): Purpose, Notice,
     Consistency and Fair Application.
  2. Equate the lack of good rules with feelings of confusion, frustration and
     anger.
  3. Recognize the need for good rules to achieve order and a goal.

MATERIALS: paper clips

ACTIVITIES AND PROCEDURES:
  1. Divide the class into rows, making sure that one row has more students
     and that one row has more boys (or girls).
  2. Give each student in the front row five paper clips. Then tell them to begin.
     (Students will exhibit confusion, not knowing what to do. Eventually
     someone will start doing something.)
  3. After a brief period, stop the game. Tell them they may only pass one clip
     at a time. The object is to pass the clips backward and then forward and
     the first row to finish wins. Start them over again.
  4. After a brief period, stop the game. Tell them the clips must be passed
     back over the left should and passed forward over the right. Start them
     over again.
  5. After a brief period, stop the game. Explain that there are too many people
     in one row and they should have twice as many clips to pass and that
     there are more girls in one row, so they should have less clips to pass.
     After making these adjustments, start the game over again.
  6. Allow the game to now proceed to the end and debrief the students on
     their feelings and observations. List the student generated responses on
     the board.

TRYING IT ALL TOGETHER:
Subsequent discussion of student responses should be related to society's need
for rules of conduct, their purpose, their consistency, and their fair application in
order to avoid confusion and frustration and achieve goals. Specific examples or
rules and laws may be used to further illustrate the points made.


                                                                                    47
                  IDENTIFYING RESPONSIBILITIES
                    ASSOCIATED WITH RIGHTS

Tell the class that they are going to identify several responsibilities of citizens.
Divide the class into five groups and assign each group one set of questions from
Rights Without Responsibilities? (attached). Instruct each group to develop
answers to the questions, record their responses and assign one or more
members of the group to report the group‘s responses to the class. Provide time
for small group discussion. Allow time for class discussion of each group‘s
responses. For each right discussed, guide students in developing a class
consensus on the responsibilities associated with each citizen right in Michigan.

This lesson is adapted from the text We the People, published by the Center for
Civic Education with funding by the U.S. Department of Education by act of
Congress. In Michigan, free copies can be obtained by contacting the Center for
Civic Education through Law at (248) 209-2325. Additionally, free classroom
sets (30 copies, plus a teacher‘s guide and resource packet) are available at the
U.S. Congressional District level. Each school year, twenty-five sets of books
are distributed free of charge in each of the 435 congressional districts in the
United States. To contact the District Coordinator for your district, check the
Center for Civic Education through Law‘s website at
<http://www.oakland.k12.mi.us/resources/miciviced/>.
Select the ―Programs‖ link, and then ―We the People.‖




                                                                                 48
           RIGHTS WITHOUT RESPONSIBILITIES?*

Group 1—Freedom of Expression. Your government cannot unfairly limit your
right to speak freely. What responsibilities might go along with this right?

      Suppose you attend a meeting of students in your school. The group is
       supposed to suggest rules for the playground. You have the right to
       speak and give your suggestions. What responsibilities should you have
       in the way you speak and in what you say? List and explain these
       responsibilities.

      What responsibilities should other students at the meeting have toward
       your right to speak? List and explain these responsibilities.

      What responsibilities should you have toward the other students‘ rights to
       speak? List and explain these responsibilities.

      What might happen to the right to free speech if no one fulfilled the
       responsibilities you have discussed?




*From We the People: Level I. Calabasas, CA: Center for Civic Education, 1988. Used by
Permission.



                                                                                         49
           RIGHTS WITHOUT RESPONSIBILITIES?*

Group 2—Freedom of Religion. Your government cannot interfere with your
right to believe as you wish. It cannot unfairly limit your right to practice your
religious beliefs. What responsibilities might go along with these rights?

      Suppose you believe in a particular religion. You attend a church or
       temple in your community. List and explain what responsibilities you
       should have in the way you practice your religious beliefs.

      Suppose there are people in your community who believe in different
       religions or in no religion at all. List and explain what responsibilities they
       should have to protect your right to practice your religious beliefs.

      List and explain what responsibilities you should have to protect other
       people‘s right to practice their religious beliefs or not to have any religious
       beliefs.

      What might happen to the right of freedom of religion if no one fulfilled the
       responsibilities you have discussed?




*From We the People: Level I. Calabasas, CA: Center for Civic Education, 1988. Used by
permission.
                                                                                         50
          RIGHTS WITHOUT RESPONSIBILITIES?*

Group 3—The Right to be Treated Equally. Your government may not favor
some people over others because of such things as their age, sex, race, or
religion. What responsibilities might go along with this right?

     Suppose people in your community are planning a picnic for the public.
      List and explain what responsibilities they might have to be fair to you no
      matter what your age, sex, race, or religion may be.

     Suppose you were helping to plan the picnic. List and explain what
      responsibilities you think you should have to other people no matter what
      their age, sex, race, or religion might be.

     What might happen to the right to be treated equally if no one fulfilled the
      responsibilities you have discussed?




                                                                                51
*From We the People: Level I. Calabasas, CA: Center for Civic Education, 1988. Used by
permission.
           RIGHTS WITHOUT RESPONSIBILITIES?*

Group 4—The Right to be Treated Fairly under the Law. Your government must
be fair to you when it is gathering information and making decisions. In other
words, the laws that the government passes must be enforced and applied fairly.
What responsibilities might go along with this right?

      Suppose someone has accused you of doing something wrong in your
       school or community. What responsibilities should that person have
       toward you? List and explain those responsibilities.

      Suppose you have accused others of doing something wrong in your
       school or community. What responsibilities should you have toward
       them? List and explain those responsibilities.

      What might happen to the right to be treated fairly if no one fulfilled the
       responsibilities you have discussed?




                                                                                         52
*From We the People: Level I. Calabasas, CA: Center for Civic Education, 1988. Used by
permission.
           RIGHTS WITHOUT RESPONSIBILITIES?*

Group 5—The Right to Vote and Run for Public Office. When you are eighteen,
you will have the right to vote. You will also have the right to run for public office
if you want. What responsibilities might go along with this right?

      Suppose you are about to vote in an election. You can vote for or against
       five proposed laws. You must choose between two people running for
       Congress. What responsibilities should you have? List and explain those
       responsibilities.

      Suppose some friends, neighbors, and others in your community do not
       agree with the way you are going to vote. List and explain what
       responsibilities they have toward your right to vote.

      Suppose you do not agree with the way some of your friends, neighbors,
       and others in your community are going to vote. List and explain what
       responsibilities you should have toward their right to vote.

      What might happen to the right to vote if no one fulfilled the
       responsibilities you have discussed?




                                                                                         53
*From We the People: Level I Calabasas, CA: Center for Civic Education, 1988. Used by
permission.
                                    Social Studies
                                  Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:          Fifth
Course Title:         United States
Strand:               III. Government
Topic:                Democracy in Action
Grade Level Standard:         5-12 Describe democracy in action.


Grade Level Benchmark:        1. Describe what state and federal courts are expected to
   do. (III.3.LE.1)




                                                                                          54
Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                          Resources

1. Jobs of the Courts (activity attached)                       Michigan‘s One Court of
                                                                Justice:
2. Venn Diagram                                                 http://courts.michigan.gov
                                                                /supremecourt/index.htm
                                                                ―What is the Judicial
                                                                Branch?‖ We the People
         Federal                   State                        by Duane Smith [Ed.]
         Court                     Court                        1999 pp. 74-80
                      Both
                                                                Calabasas, CA: Center
                                                                for Civic Education.
                                                                The Federal Judiciary
                                                                home page: About the
                                                                U.S. Courts.
                                                                http://www.uscourts.gov/U
                                                                FC99.pdf
                                                                The Judicial Branch of the
                                                                United States
                                                                Government.
                                                                http://www.uscourts.gov/




New Vocabulary:



                         JOBS OF THE COURTS
Select articles from the newspaper that include information about courts. One article for
every two students. The teacher or another adult should select the articles to make sure
they are appropriate for children and that they contain information which might allow
students to draw some conclusions about what courts do.

To activate prior knowledge, ask the students to tell anything they know about courts
and justice. Record this information in a concept map. If a category for what the justice
system/courts do has not evolved, make one now. If one did evolve, separate it and add
ideas to it by asking the specific question, ―What do courts do?‖

Leave the list posted and pass out the newspaper articles to pairs of students. Have
them find as many ideas as possible about the jobs of courts. After each pair has found
about three ideas, review your original list of court jobs as a class. Have students look
for any ideas they would like to remove. Now ask each group to share new ideas about
the jobs of courts they found and add them to the list.

                                                                                        55
                  STATE AND FEDERAL COURT JOBS
Have small groups of students use Internet resources to gather more information about
what courts do and share using the previous process. Have students write one or two
sentences telling the jobs of courts. Share ideas orally and save the writing.

Ask the question: Did anyone find out anything about different kinds of courts? Students
will hopefully identify at least federal and state courts.

Read Lesson 14: ―What is the judicial branch?‖ in We the People together. This will
clarify what the federal branch does as well as to infer the roles of state courts. Have
students make a Venn Diagram that compares and contrasts the jobs of state and
federal courts.

Emphasize that both courts have the power to and decide a case and give a valid
decision. Jurisdiction means the areas in which courts can perform this function and
determines which courts should hear a case. The constitution only specifies one court,
the Supreme Court but gives the power to establish more courts known as federal
courts. The states also have court systems and generally most cases are heard in state
courts except in specific situations. Federal courts hold power to overturn decisions by
‗lower‘ courts. For most situations, cases start at the state court level if they are not the
jurisdiction of the local, city, or county government.




                                    Social Studies
                                  Activity Worksheet


GRADE LEVEL:        Fifth
Course Title:       United States
Strand:             III. Government
Topic:              Democracy in Action
Grade Level Standard:        5-12 Describe democracy in action.


Grade Level Benchmark:       2. Describe issues that arise over constitutional rights.
   (III.3.LE.2)

                                                                                           56
Learning Activity(s)/Facts/Information                     Resources

1. Conflicting Constitutional Rights (activity attached)   We the People 1999
                                                           pp. 110-111, 115, 119,
2. Identifying Conflicting Rights (activity attached)      126-127, and 130
                                                           Calabasas, CA: Center
                                                           for Civic Education
                                                           Paper
                                                           Pencils




New Vocabulary: Constitutional Rights




                                                                                57
         CONFLICTING CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS

A clear understanding of the meaning of specific rights in the Constitution is a
pre-requisite to completing this activity. The clarification for benchmark III.2.LE.2
, or a review of some specific rights and their meanings including expression,
religion, equal treatment, fair treatment, and the right to vote might be helpful.

Complete the problem solving activities in Unit 4, chapters 16-20, of We the
People. The activities, which present scenarios to illustrate constitutional rights in
action, can be found on the following pages:
      pages 110-111……………Right to free expression
      page 115…………………..Right to freedom of religion
      page 119…………………..Right to equal treatment by the government
      page 126-127……………..Right to fair treatment by the government
      page 130…………………..Right to vote

Students can work in groups, as suggested in the text, to discuss the problems.
Debrief each problem by discussing why the right being discussed is important
and brainstorming a list of other situations where issues might arise over these
rights. After completing the activities, students should have generated a list of
several examples of issues related to constitutional rights.

As a homework assignment, have students look in newspapers, magazines, on
television or interview parents to identify additional situations. They should
record these examples and/or bring the article to school. Have them meet in
small groups to discuss their examples and determine if others in the group
agree that their example does represent a conflict with the specific right the
student identified. Share a few with the class.




                                                                                    58
              IDENTIFYING CONFLICTING RIGHTS

Write at least one paragraph to describe disagreements related to constitutional
rights which might occur in at least one of the following situations:
     The school has a rule that students may not wear hats in the building or
      classroom.
     Students who eat in the lunchroom must taste everything on their plates.
     Only students who buy blue t-shirts with the school logo can play soccer
      at lunch recess
     A student tells the teacher that another student took his favorite pencil.
      The teacher makes the accused student miss recess until he admits he
      took the pencil.
     Parents will vote to decide if the fifth grade classes will be allowed to go
      to an amusement park for their graduation field trip. To vote, parents
      must send an e-mail message to the teacher.

Your description should:
1. Restate the rule or decision you are describing.
2. Identify the people who might support the rule or decision
3. Explain the reasons they might support it
4. Identify the people who might question the rule or decision
5. Explain the reasons they might question it
6. Identify at least one constitutional right the group questioning the rule might
   use to justify their position.
7. Tell why this constitutional right might or might not support their position
8. You may state which group you agree with and why




                                                                                     59

								
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