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Subordinating Conjunctions Subordinating Conjunctions connect two complete ideas by making

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Subordinating Conjunctions Subordinating Conjunctions connect two complete ideas by making Powered By Docstoc
					   Subordinating
   Conjunctions
connect two complete ideas by
   making one of the ideas
 subordinate or less important
        than the other
                 Clauses
   All clauses have a subject and a verb
    • Subordinate clauses cannot stand
      alone
    • Ex: before Nate left on his trip
    Subject
                               Verb

    • Independent clauses can stand alone
      as a complete sentence.
    • Ex: Nate left on his trip.
                 Clauses
   All clauses have a subject and a verb
    • Subordinate clauses cannot stand
      alone
    • Ex: before Nate left on his trip
                    Subordinating
                     Conjunction
    • Independent clauses can stand alone
      as a complete sentence.
    • Ex: Nate left on his trip.
    List of Subordinating Conjunctions

   After               Even though
   Although            If
   As                  In order that
   As if               Lest
   As long as          Now that
   As soon as          Since
   As though           So that
   Because             Than
   Before              Though
   Even if             Till
                Examples
   After considering the consequences
    of murder, the burglar fled the bank
    without harming the teller.
   The tree will fall over unless we
    replace the top soil.
   Whenever Jessica flips her hair, all
    the boys in the class lose their focus.
      Punctuating with subordinate
             conjunctions
   When the subordinating clause
    begins the sentence, the
    subordinating clause is separated
    from the independent clause with a
    comma.
   No comma is used when the
    subordinating clause follow the
    independent clause.
              Assignment
   Write one sentence beginning with a
    subordinating conjunction.
   Write another sentence with the
    subordinating conjunction in the
    middle of the sentence separating
    the two clauses.
         Conjunctive Adverbs
   Creates a relationship between ideas
    in the sentence.

   Not a „true‟ conjunction.
Here are some commonly used
     Conjunctive Adverbs
   Accordingly     * Instead
   Also            * Likewise
   Afterwards      * Nonetheless
   Besides         * Moreover
   Consequently    * Otherwise
    Finally        * Similarly
   Furthermore     * Still
   Hence          * Therefore
   However        * Thus
   Indeed
How to use conjunctive adverbs
   Is only used when wanting to join
    two independent clauses (2
    sentences) that have some kind of
    relationship.
   They are normally placed between
    the two sentences. A semicolon (;)
    comes before the word and a comma
    (,) goes after the word.
               Examples
   Joel wanted to go to the movies;
    however, his mom had other plans.

   Ricky turned in his homework in the
    wrong hour; consequently, Mrs.
    Alexander hasn‟t graded it yet.
              Assignment
   Write 3 sentences using the
    Conjunctive Adverbs found on page
    666.
          Let’s try them together
   Tell whether the following are Subordinating
    Conjunctions or Conjunctive Adverbs.
   1. After dinner the other evening, I went to the store
    because we ran out of milk.
   2. Several students have a hard time with conjunctions;
    however, I am determined to explain it as many times as
    necessary.
   3. My husband broke his finger fixing our car;
    consequently, he could not play his saxophone for several
    months.
   4. Because I spent seven hours grading, I went to bed
    early.
   5. Some students neither come prepared nor organized for
    class; hence, they have to write “P to the Ninth”.

				
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posted:11/17/2011
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