Mission and Goals by wuyunyi

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									ACCREDITATION SELF-STUDY REPORT

MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAM

  THOMAS JEFFERSON UNIVERSITY

          September 2008
                                                       Table of Contents


Criterion 1.0 – The Public Health Program .................................................................................... 3
  Criterion 1.1      Mission............................................................................................................ 4
  Criterion 1.2       Evaluation and Planning ................................................................................ 9
  Criterion 1.3      Institutional Environment ............................................................................. 41
  Criterion 1.4      Organization and Administration.................................................................. 50
  Criterion 1.5      Governance ................................................................................................... 60
  Criterion 1.6      Resources ...................................................................................................... 69
Criterion 2.0 – Instructional Programs.......................................................................................... 79
  Criterion 2.1      Master of Public Health Degree.................................................................... 79
  Criterion 2.2      Program Length ............................................................................................ 83
  Criterion 2.3      Public Health Core Knowledge .................................................................... 85
  Criterion 2.4      Practical Skills ............................................................................................ 106
  Criterion 2.5      Culminating Experience.............................................................................. 114
  Criterion 2.6      Required Competencies .............................................................................. 117
  Criterion 2.7      Assessment Procedures............................................................................... 135
  Criterion 2.8      Academic Degrees ...................................................................................... 145
  Criterion 2.9      Doctoral Degrees ........................................................................................ 146
  Criterion 2.10 Joint Degrees............................................................................................... 147
  Criterion 2.11      Distance Education or Executive Degree Programs .................................. 154
Criterion 3.0 – Creation, Application and Advancement of Knowledge.................................... 155
  Criterion 3.1      Research...................................................................................................... 155
  Criterion 3.2      Service......................................................................................................... 182
  Criterion 3.3      Workforce Development............................................................................. 197
Criterion 4.0 – Faculty, Staff and Students................................................................................. 206
  Criterion 4.1      Faculty Qualifications................................................................................. 206
  Criterion 4.2      Faculty Policies........................................................................................... 218
  Criterion 4.3      Faculty and Staff Diversity ......................................................................... 222
  Criterion 4.4      Student Recruitment and Admissions......................................................... 226
  Criterion 4.5      Student Diversity ........................................................................................ 233
  Criterion 4.6      Advising and Career Counseling ................................................................ 237




                                                                    2
Criterion 1.0 – The Public Health Program


                                          Introduction

Thomas Jefferson University (TJU) is a private, nonsectarian, not-for-profit academic institution
located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Founded in 1824 as the Jefferson Medical College (JMC),
the institution was granted a full charter by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 1838 and it
gained University status on July 1, 1969.

Thomas Jefferson University is comprised of the Jefferson Medical College (JMC), the Jefferson
College of Graduate Studies (JCGS) and the Jefferson College of Health Professions (JCHP).
JMC has awarded more than 26,000 medical degrees since its inception. Currently a faculty of
3,000 provides instruction to over 900 medical students annually. The College of Graduate
Studies was established in 1969 and currently offers programs leading to Masters of Science,
Doctor of Philosophy and the Master of Public Health (MPH) degrees for approximately 600
students, as well as oversight for over 240 post-doctorial trainees. The Jefferson College of
Health Professions was established in 1969 with educational programs that date back to 1891
with the School of Nursing in Jefferson Hospital.

The self-study documentation that follows addresses each CEPH criterion and those aspects of
Jefferson's Master's of Public Health pertaining thereto. All tables, budgets and assessments are
accurate as of September 8, 2008. Program information is included in the Jefferson website
(www.jefferson.edu/mph).




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Criterion 1.1 Mission

The program shall have a clearly formulated and publicly stated mission with supporting
goals and objectives. The program shall foster the development of professional public
health values, concepts and ethical practice.

1.1a   A clear and concise mission statement for the program as a whole.

Mission: The mission of the graduate Master of Public Health (MPH) program is to enhance the
health of our communities through the development of future public health leaders via
multidisciplinary education, research, community practice and service.

Vision: Our vision is that the Thomas Jefferson University’s MPH program is recognized as a
center of excellence for integrative population health training throughout the greater Philadelphia
region and beyond.

MPH students are prepared for professional practice in a variety of venues including public
health departments, hospitals/clinics, community agencies/organizations, health insurance
industry, pharmaceutical industry, schools, worksites and governmental agencies.
To meet its mission, the MPH program provides graduate training and research opportunities in
the primary domains of public health: biostatistics, epidemiology, health policy and
management, social and behavioral sciences, and environmental health sciences and provides a
range of other required and elective courses to add breath and depth to the students’ exposure to
public health issues and skills. It also encourages faculty and student community service and
provides graduates, faculty and practitioners with continuing education opportunities for further
academic development, important in a constantly developing field.
The MPH program provides a generalist curriculum of core courses and electives in public health
that is designed for both full-time and part-time students. Students must earn at least 42 credit
hours in course work, a community-based clerkship experience, and a master's-level capstone
research project. Full-time students may complete the MPH in one intensive year plus their
capstone project. This is especially desirable for students taking the recently established dual
degree programs, including the JD/MPH and the MD/MPH degrees. A dual nursing/public health
MSN/MPH degree is in the planning stages for the 2009-2010 academic year. Part-time students
may complete the MPH at their own pace taking typically two to four years to complete their
degree.

The primary goal of TJU’s MPH program is to give students a sound theoretical and practical
foundation in the field of public health. Students will be prepared to work with communities to
identify increasingly complex health problems, work on an interdisciplinary basis, and
collaborate through partnerships and coalitions to formulate and implement solutions, monitor
progress, and evaluate process and outcomes. The program reflects the changing public health
environment and the rapid expansion of competencies that are needed its practitioners. The
principal aim is to prepare graduates who will assume or continue professional and leadership
roles as public health practitioners in research, policy development and implementation, and
program development, implementation, and evaluation.




                                                4
1.1b One or more goal statements for each major function by which the program intends
to attain its mission, including instruction, research and service.

Instruction

Goal:

To provide all MPH students with quality graduate level education in core and elective courses
and in community-based learning opportunities via clerkship and capstone projects that facilitate
student mastery of public health competencies.

Research

Goal:

To provide opportunities and train all MPH students in the development and translation of public
health research through coursework and the capstone research project.

Service

Goal:

To provide structured service-learning opportunities for students through clerkship, capstone and
other continuing education initiatives as formal and informal components of the MPH program
and to encourage faculty to participate in public health community service.

1.1c A set of measurable objectives relating to each major function through which the
program intends to achieve its goals of instruction, research and service.

Instruction Objectives:

   •    100% of students who complete a minimum of 42 credits in the MPH program will
        graduate with a B average or better
   •    80% of students who complete the MPH program will report proficiency in at least 70%
        of the core public health competencies
   •    90% of students and alumni completing the MPH will report satisfaction with the overall
        education/instruction received in TJU’s MPH program
   •    100% of MPH core course syllabi will have learning objectives addressing core public
        health competencies
   •    90% of students and alumni will rate the overall quality of their education in the 5 core
        areas as good or better
   •    75% of full-time MPH students will complete their degree requirements in 18 months or
        less
   •    80% of part-time MPH students will complete their degree requirements in 36 months or
        less




                                                5
   •   80% of MPH graduates will be employed in a public health position or using public
       health skills in current employment within 12 months of graduation
   •   80% of graduating students will have participated in at least one public health continuing
       education program offered at TJU or in the greater Philadelphia region

Research Objectives:

   •   90% of students will successfully complete a capstone research project approved by
       her/his capstone committee resulting in a paper of publishable quality, an oral
       presentation to faculty, community preceptors, and student colleagues, and a submitted
       abstract to a national, regional, state, or local public health- related conference
   •   80% of graduating students will successfully complete research methods courses with a
       grade of B or better
   •   90% of graduating students will report competency in understanding of basic public
       health research methods
   •   80% of MPH faculty participate in public health research or evaluation initiatives
   •   25% of students who complete the MPH will prepare and submit an article for
       publication.

Service Objectives:

   •   60% of students will complete a community-based clerkship experience of 72-144 hours
       as approved by their community preceptor and faculty clerkship advisor with a grade of
       pass
   •   90% of students will report satisfaction with her/his clerkship project
   •   50% of graduating students will have participated in at least one community service
       activity in addition to their clerkship or capstone experience
   •   90% of MPH faculty will provide consultative or direct service to international, national,
       state, and/or local community or professional health organizations
   •   The MPH program will provide or promote at least 10 TJU sponsored continuing
       education/workforce development programs for the Philadelphia region public health
       community annually, based on input from alumni, the Community Advisory Board
       (CAB) and other partners.

1.1d A description of the manner in which Mission, Goals, and Objectives are developed,
monitored and periodically revised and the manner in which they are made available to the
public.

TJU’s mission, goals, and objectives were developed by the Core Faculty of its MPH program in
consultation with the MPH program committees, other faculty, students, and community
partners. They are monitored through a process of continuous evaluation through regular
meetings and informal communication with Core Faculty, MPH program committees, students,
College of Graduate Studies and MPH program administration, and MPH Community Advisory
Board members. In addition, ongoing measurements of program objectives occur through
assessment of courses, student competencies via faculty advisors, and through formal student,




                                                6
alumni, and faculty assessments. Examples of our initial measurement tools and results are
provided in Appendix A.

The MPH Program Director, Coordinator, and Program Committee are charged with monitoring
program goals and objectives. Input is obtained through the MPH Curriculum Committee,
Accreditation and Program Evaluation Committee, Student Affairs Committee, Community
Advisory Board, faculty advisors, other faculty, students, and alumni. In addition to ongoing
review and program improvements of policies and procedures such as marketing, applicant
review, admissions, and faculty advising, a formal review process will be conducted annually
that will assess the program’s mission, vision, and program goals and objectives. In addition to
outcomes currently assessed, such as overall GPA, completion rate and time to graduation, the
program will assess job changes, advancements, and promotions. The Curriculum Committee
reviews course evaluations and makes recommendations for course and scheduling
improvements, and reviews the Clerkship and Capstone initiatives to expand and improve
community health experiences for our students, as well as student and faculty assessments of
student core competencies upon completion, and 6-12 months after graduation. These reviews
are being conducted via in-person, electronic, and mailing interviews and surveys. Results of
these assessments are shared with all MPH program committees and the CAB leading to focused
discussions on changes to our MPH mission, vision, goals and objectives, and improvements in
our instruction, research, and service.

TJU’s MPH program’s mission, goals, and objectives are posted on our website as well as on our
internal Jefferson intranet, PULSE, which is available to all students, faculty, and administration.
They are also communicated in our MPH program newsletter and other printed materials.

1.1e A statement of values that guide the program, with a description of how the values
are determined and operationalized.

TJU’s MPH Program has developed a set of program values that help guide the overall program
through its administration, instruction, service and research. They were developed by the Core
Faculty and administration with input from the Accreditation and Program Evaluation
Committee, Curriculum, and Student Affairs Committees, and adopted by the MPH Program
Committee. Although not directly measurable, they provide an overarching framework of key
values to help us achieve our program mission and goals. The MPH Program Core Values are
integrated into the program beginning with the applicant interview process, the initial interview
with a student’s faculty advisor, within the MPH courses, the clerkship and the capstone projects,
subsequent communication with MPH faculty and exemplified by MPH faculty and in MPH
committees and administration through graduation. They are publicized via the MPH website,
the PULSE intranet site and at orientation with all new students. Those values include:

   •   Education serves as a principal change agent for the current and future public health
       workforce
   •   Social justice and the ethical treatment of all people will be underpinning values
       incorporated into our program
   •   Working in multidisciplinary teams, population health approaches can and should be
       incorporated within the health care system



                                                 7
   •   Our program has an important role to play in the betterment of the health of the
       communities through active community involvement
   •   Our communication will be open and honest with our students, faculty, and community
       partners
   •   Our program will strive for diversity in its students, faculty, educational methods, and
       community initiatives to enhance our collective experience in addressing the increasing
       complexity of public health issues and problems we face
   •   Mentoring is an important process for student learning so we will strive for developing
       and expanding mentoring opportunities for our students with faculty, alumni, Clerkship
       and Capstone preceptors, members of our Community Advisory Board
   •   Public health education is one of lifelong learning; hence we will provide a variety of
       continuing education opportunities for our students, alumni, faculty, and the communities
       we serve
   •   Recognizing the importance of a global health context for public health professionals, we
       strive to provide an increasing number and variety of student opportunities for an
       international public health experience

1.1f   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met. As our program has moved from a MSPH to an MPH program, now
offering a full-time as well as a part-time curriculum, we have given careful attention to the
development of our mission, vision, program goals and objectives and have initiated operational
measures to assess our progress toward the accomplishment of our goals and objectives.
Although we are at the early stages of assessment of our program goals and objectives, with a
relatively small number of past graduates of our previous MSPH program, we believe we have
begun the process of assessing our overall program success and can, as a result, conduct
continuous program improvement strategies and operations for the betterment of our students
and the program as a whole. We have also enhanced our administrative structure with stronger
leadership and inclusion of students and a wider variety of faculty so that it will be more
responsive to student and faculty needs and better meet the changing needs of public health
professional training. Assessment processes, tools, and results will be reported to CEPH via
annual reports.




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Criterion 1.2 Evaluation and Planning

The program shall have an explicit process for evaluating and monitoring its overall efforts
against its mission, goals and objectives; for assessing the program’s effectiveness in
serving its various constituencies; and for planning to achieve its mission in the future.

1.2a Description of the evaluation procedures and planning processes used by the
program, including an explanation of how constituent groups are involved in these
processes.

During the past two years Thomas Jefferson University, under the leadership of University
President Dr. Robert Barchi, undertook and completed a strategic planning process. The newly
developed strategic plan emphasizes population health and interdisciplinary education. The
MPH program serves as a cornerstone of this strategic plan function and is being fully integrated
into the newly developed interdisciplinary focus through development of joint degrees and
participation in multidisciplinary mentoring programs. The MPH Program Director and other
core MPH faculty (listed below) participate in University –wide planning/implementation efforts
aimed at achieving the new strategic plan. To this end faculty from the Medical School, the
School of Nursing and the College of Health Professions also participate on the MPH
Curriculum Committee.

Five constituent groups are involved in the planning process. These are the Program Committee,
the Curriculum Committee, the Student Affairs Committee, the Accreditation and Program
Evaluation Committee and the Community Advisory Board. They are described in the following
five paragraphs. Seven routes or means of evaluation are described below. These include the
student survey and focus group, the faculty survey, the alumni survey, the graduate exit
interview, the capstone and clerkship evaluations, and course evaluations.

The Program Committee, chaired by the Director of the MPH Program, meets monthly and is
responsible for overseeing program planning and evaluation processes of the MPH program,
including all MPH committees (Curriculum Committee, Accreditation and Program Evaluation
Committee, Student Affairs Committee). The roles and responsibilities of this committee
include strategic planning, decision making/approval of new policies and procedures, and
addressing fundamental issues related to course/degree offerings, faculty issues/development,
professional development and student achievement/concerns. This committee consists of the Co-
Chairs of the MPH Community Advisory Board, the MPH Director, Curriculum Committee
Chair, Accreditation and Program Evaluation Committee Chair, a Biostatistics faculty member,
Co-chairs of the Student Affairs committee; a member Curriculum Committee, Associate Dean
for Masters Degree Programs of the College of Graduate Studies, Admissions Director of the
College of Graduate Studies, the MPH Program Coordinator, a Teaching Assistant, and an MPH
student representative. Core Faculty members serve on most committees to ensure integration
throughout the MPH program. MPH Core Faculty currently includes Drs. Simmons, Brawer,
Diamond, Maio, Plumb, Sarfaty, and Yuen. Besides teaching in the MPH program, they have a
varied percentage of their time budgeted to the MPH program to interview applicants, serve as
faculty advisors for students, and serve on one or more of the various MPH committees. It is
expected that additional core faculty members will be added as the MPH program grows in the
future. Current members of the Program and other Committees are found in Criterion 2


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Each of the committee memberships and roles and responsibilities related to planning and
evaluation are discussed below.

The Curriculum Committee is responsible for curriculum development and ensuring that MPH
core competencies and related learning objectives are reflected in course syllabi of all MPH core
courses. The Committee meets monthly to discuss issues related to new course development,
curricular issues related to joint degree programs, course sequencing, course evaluation, student
concerns regarding curriculum, registration processes, admissions requirements, advising
procedures, Clerkship and Capstone requirements and curricular concerns of specific students
with input from the Student Affairs Committee. In addition, the Committee provides input to the
MPH Program Director and Program Coordinator on the planning and coordination of
professional development opportunities offered to the Jefferson and the Philadelphia community.
Curriculum Committee members include Core Faculty, the MPH Program Coordinator, teaching
faculty representing core courses and electives, and representatives from the Library, Medical
College, School of Nursing, the College of Health Professions, and an MPH student
representative.

The Student Affairs Committee provides a formal mechanism for students to voice concerns
with MPH program administrators and to provide students with an opportunity for student input
into the program. This new Committee was formed in response to CEPH requirements and the
lack of a formal mechanism for students to file grievances within the College of Graduate
Studies and the MPH Program. The Committee is facilitated by two MPH Core Faculty and the
MPH Program Coordinator. It addresses any issue related to any aspect of the MPH program
that impacts students such as University policies, curriculum, Clerkship/Capstone experiences,
academic counseling, communications, career support, research and service opportunities, and
student-life issues, among others. Individual student issues that do not impact on other students
are addressed via a student’s faculty advisor and direct communication with the MPH Program
Director and MPH Program Coordinator. At least 50% of the Committee members are MPH
students. Issues discussed at this meeting are shared, as appropriate, with other committees so
that plans can be initiated to address the identified concerns.

The Accreditation and Program Evaluation Committee is responsible for continuous quality
improvement of the MPH program and oversees the CEPH Accreditation Self-study process
including evaluating and monitoring the program’s overall efforts against its mission, goals and
objectives. The Committee uses the CEPH self-study process as the foundation for on-going
evaluation and is responsible for planning/conducting assessments and analyzing information
gleaned during this process. Specifically the Committee conducts on-going assessment of
student achievement, the program’s effectiveness in serving its students, faculty, the university
and the community at large, as well as its own professional leadership at the state and national
level. In addition, data about faculty research, professional presentations, and publications is
collected annually. The MPH Core Faculty and the Program Coordinator are primarily
responsible for evaluating the program’s overall efforts. In addition, a teaching assistant and an
MPH student participate in this process. The Accreditation and Program Evaluation Committee
was formed about a year ago after the new MPH Program Director was hired, and has been
meeting on a regular basis to develop/revise CQI assessments as part of the self-study process.
The committee works closely with the Curriculum and Student Affairs Committees to ensure



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program continuity and integration. The Accreditation and Program Evaluation Committee
utilizes multiple measures and both quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods to monitor
and assess program effectiveness including the following: Copies of all survey and assessment
tools are available in Appendix A

The Community Advisory Board (CAB) meets semi-annually and provides overall planning
guidance about a variety of issues such as future trends in public health, Clerkship/Capstone
opportunities, continuing education and professional development opportunities/needs, student
recruitment and program development. The CAB is chaired by David B. Nash MD, MBA and
Richard C. Wender MD (Chairs of the Department of Health Policy (DHP) and the Department
of Family and Community Medicine (DFCM), respectively). Members of the CAB include
leaders of community-based health-related organizations, Clerkship/Capstone preceptors, the
City Health Department, the pharmaceutical industry, hospitals, Widener University
representatives, Jefferson faculty, the Regional Health Administrator of DHHS Region III,
among others. The spring meeting, held right before graduation, also serves as an opportunity
for the CAB to meet with MPH students and includes the annual MPH student, faculty and
community service awards event. (See Appendix B for the complete list of the MPH Program
CAB members)

Self Study Tools and Methods – Evaluation Procedures

   •   Student Survey – This survey is sent in April annually to all current MPH students. The
       survey is designed to elicit student input concerning overall satisfaction with the
       program, satisfaction with and competence of the faculty, opportunities for
       research/service, satisfaction with program policies/procedures, faculty advising, the
       Clerkship/Capstone experiences, extent that personal knowledge/skills developed and
       current employment. A copy of the survey and summary results are in Appendix A.

   •   Student Focus Group – A focus group of students was conducted in late August, 2008 as
       a complement to the student survey to obtain more detailed and open-ended input from
       current MPH students. Twelve students participated in the group. A trained facilitator
       not directly connected to the MPH program was utilized. The purpose of the focus group
       was to gain insight into the MPH Program’s effectiveness, strengths/weaknesses and
       addressed issues such as the curriculum, quality of instruction, faculty advising,
       opportunities for research/service, and career and job counseling. A copy of the focus
       group questions and summary results are in Appendix A.

   •   Faculty Survey – This survey is sent annually to all teaching and Core Faculty and is
       designed to ascertain faculty service and research, committee involvement within the
       University, suggestions for curriculum improvement, demographic information, and
       perceptions of public health trends, public health workforce development activities, and
       faculty development. A copy of the Faculty Survey is in Appendix A.

   •   Alumni Survey - This survey is sent in January annually to all alumni. The survey is
       designed to document alumni perceptions concerning overall satisfaction with the
       program, satisfaction with and competence of the faculty, contributions to the public



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    health field since graduating (professional memberships, research, service, and
    presentations), satisfaction with program policies/procedures, faculty advising, the
    Clerkship/Capstone experiences, and the extent that their personal knowledge/skills were
    developed. Current employment venues, interest in mentoring other students and
    continuing education needs are also assessed. A copy of the Alumni Survey and results
    are in Appendix A.

•   Exit Interview – This survey and subsequent interview is conducted by faculty advisors
    with graduating students after completion of their Capstone presentation and prior to
    receiving a diploma. The purpose of the survey is to assess the extent to which the
    student achieved his/her desired goals during their coursework and overall experience as
    an MPH student at TJU. Student perceptions of the Capstone Seminar and Project, and
    their observations about the strengths and weaknesses of the MPH Program overall are
    discussed. Students complete an exit interview survey that includes a self-assessment of
    public health competencies. The survey is sent to the student’s faculty advisor. A
    subsequent one-on-one meeting between the student and advisor is held where they
    collectively review the survey and discuss student self-confidence in her/his
    competencies, strategies to enhance competencies via future work experiences and
    continuing education, and overall assessment of the MPH program and recommendations
    for improvement. A copy of the survey and results are found in Appendix A.

•   Clerkship Surveys – Upon completion of the Clerkship experiences, preceptors are sent a
    survey to gather information about the value of the Clerkship to their organization and the
    extent that the student was adequately skilled and prepared for the experience. In
    addition, students prepare a site profile, and evaluate the preceptor/site for
    appropriateness, preceptor expertise, mentorship and overall satisfaction with the
    experience. A copy of the Clerkship Survey is found in the Clerkship Handbook in
    Appendix C.

•   Course Evaluations – All courses are evaluated by the students the week prior to the end
    of the term. A student volunteer distributes the survey to all students at the end of class,
    collects completed surveys and returns them to the College of Graduate Studies.
    Aggregated information on each MPH course is shared with MPH faculty to encourage
    course revisions as needed. The MPH Program Director and the Chair of the MPH
    Curriculum Committee hold regular meetings with individual faculty members and in
    small groups of faculty, such as those teaching biostatics and epidemiology, or research
    methods to discuss individual courses and how they complement and reinforce
    information and skills, and processes for course improvements. Formal course changes
    are also discussed in the MPH Curriculum Committee. A copy of a course evaluation is
    provided in Appendix A. The actual course evaluations are provided in the Resource
    File.




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1.2b Description of how the results of evaluation and planning are regularly used to
enhance the quality of programs and activities.

The Program Director and/or a Committee Chair share data collected from the various
constituents and methods described above with the appropriate individual or committee. This
includes Program Committee meetings, other committee meetings, faculty meetings, the College
of Graduate Studies Curriculum Committee and Graduate Council (on broad policies affecting
the MPH program) and the Community Advisory Board as appropriate. The Program Director
and Core Faculty leadership is charged with monitoring all aspects of the program and informing
appropriate committees of issues that need to be discussed and resolved. Decisions, in general,
are made by consensus. If necessary, decisions/ recommendations of committees may be put on
the agenda of the Program Committee for discussion/resolution. In some instances,
recommendations for changes in policies and procedures are shared with the Dean of the College
of Graduate Studies and the College’s Grad Council for review and approval. The results of the
recently completed surveys and focus group have been shared with the Program Director,
Program Coordinator, Curriculum Committee Chair and Accreditation and Program Evaluation
Committee Chairs. Plans are being developed to share the information with appropriate
committees and to develop a performance improvement plan in such areas as curriculum
(including clerkship and capstone), course sequencing, faculty development, student
communication, career counseling services, among others.

1.2c Identification of outcome measures that the program uses to monitor its effectiveness
in meeting its mission, goals and objectives. Target levels should be defined and data
regarding the program’s performance must be provided for each of the last three years.

The outcome measures used to monitor our effectiveness in meeting the program’s mission,
goals and objectives are included in the Table 1.2c that follows:




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Table 1.2c – Mission & goals – Measurable Instruction Objectives

Objectives                 Target                      Actual                  Actions if target not
                                                                               met
Instruction
Students who complete a 100% of students               2005-2008               Assessment of
minimum of 42 credits   upon graduation                Average GPA for         courses with student
in the MPH program will                                graduates & students    grades less than a B
graduate with a B                                      expected to graduate    average, faculty
average or better (by                                  in 2008 = 3.69. GPA     advisor meetings with
student records)                                       range= 3.0-4.0          students whose GPA
                                                                               have fallen below a B
                                                                               average.
Students who complete      80% of students             Exit interviews for     Assessment of
the MPH program will       upon graduation             2007-2008               courses, clerkship and
report confidence of                                                           capstone experiences,
proficiency in at least                                47% of all students     continuing education,
70% of the core public                                 reported being          and faculty
health competencies (by                                confident/very          consultation with
self completion of public                              confident in at least   students. Course
health competencies as                                 70% of all 48 core      improvements
part of an exit interview)                             competencies.           targeting specific
                                                                               competencies that
                                                       87% of all students     students reported
                                                       reported being          lower self-efficacy.
                                                       confident/very          Assessment of
                                                       confident in at least   instrument scale used
                                                       60% of all 48 core      as part of exit
                                                       competencies.           interview.

Students and alumni        90% of students in          2005-2006 – not         Assessment of
completing the MPH         student and alumni          measured                courses, faculty, and
will report satisfaction   surveys                     2006-2007 – not         student academic
with the overall                                       measured                support.
education/instruction
received in TJU’s MPH                                  Students (2005-2008)
program                                                - 91%
                                                       Alumni (2005-2008) -
                                                       95%

MPH core course syllabi    100% of course              2005-2006 – not         Review of course
will have learning         syllabi by review of        measured                syllabi and learning
objectives addressing      course syllabi              2006-2007 – not         methodologies
core public health                                     measured
competencies
                                                       2007-2008 - 100%


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Objectives                    Target                     Actual                Actions if target not
                                                                               met
Students and alumni will      90% of current             Students (2007-2008) Instructors will
rate the overall quality of   students and alumni        –                     present summary of
their education in the 5      by student /alumni         Biostatistics – 87%   their course
core areas as good or         survey                     Epidemiology – 97% evaluations to the
better.                                                  Environmental Health Curriculum
                                                         – 79%                 Committee for
                                                         Health Policy – 77%   discussion. Program
                                                         Behavioral and Social Director and
                                                         - 86%                 Curriculum
                                                                               Committee chair will
                                                         Alumni (2005-2008) review original
                                                         -                     version of course
                                                         Biostatistics – 89%   evaluations. Ideas for
                                                         Epidemiology –        course improvement
                                                         100%                  will be considered
                                                         Environmental Health and a plan developed.
                                                         – 74%                 Course Director will
                                                         Health Policy – 95%   meet annually with
                                                         Behavioral and Social faculty as part of
                                                         - 83%                 annual faculty
                                                                               evaluations.
Full-time MPH students        75% of full-time           No full time students Enhanced faculty
will complete their           students by student        have graduated to     advisor work with
degree requirements in        records                    date. Full time       students, review of
18 months or less                                        program initiated in  course scheduling and
                                                         Fall 2007             offerings
Part-time MPH students        80% of part-time           2005-2006 – 80%       Enhanced faculty
will complete their           students by student        2006-2007 – 57%       advisor work with
degree requirements in        records                    2007-2008 – 93%       students, review of
36 months or less                                                              course scheduling and
                                                         Overall – 81%         offerings
MPH graduates will be         80% of MPH                 2006-2007 100%        Enhanced focus on
employed in a public          graduates via the          2007-2008 79%         student career
health position or using      alumni survey                                    counseling and
public health skills in                                                        support, increased
current employment                                                             focus on student job
within 12 months of                                                            placement
graduation




                                                    15
Objectives                  Target                 Actual                 Actions if target not
                                                                          met
Graduating students will    80% of students        Not measured at this   Increased continuing
have participated in at     upon Exit Interview    time                   education
least one public health                                                   opportunities,
continuing education                                                      enhanced publicity of
program offered at TJU                                                    events and advisors
or in the greater                                                         will actively
Philadelphia region (exit                                                 encourage
interview)                                                                participation.




                                              16
Table 1.2c – Mission & goals – Measurable Research Objectives
Objectives                 Target               Actual                    Actions if target not
                                                                          met
Research
Students will              90% of students by   2005-2006 - 100%          Review of capstone
successfully complete      student files        (abstract not required)   policies and
a capstone research                             2006-2007 – 100% %        procedures,
project approved by                             (abstract not required)   assessment and
her/his capstone                                                          improvement of
committee resulting in                          2007-2008 – 100%          capstone seminar,
a paper of publishable                          (abstract required)       increased opportunities
quality, an oral                                                          for student writing and
presentation to faculty,                                                  presentations.
community preceptors,
and student
colleagues, and a
submitted abstract to a
national, regional,
state, or local public
health- related
conference
Graduating students        80% of students by   2005-2008 - Graduated     Review and
will successfully          student record       students                  improvement of
complete research                                                         quality and quantity of
methods courses with                            Average GPA for           research methods
a grade of B or better                          research = 3.64 (A-)      courses and
(such as 660, 580,                              45 of 47 students had     experiences
506, 670, 606, 615)                             GPA >3.0 (96%)
Graduating students        90% of students by   Alumni Survey – 85%       Review and
will report                exit interview and                             improvement of
competency in              alumni survey        Not included in exit      quality and quantity of
understanding of basic                          interview                 research methods
public health research                                                    courses and
methods                                                                   experiences
MPH faculty                80% of faculty via   2005-2006 – 12 /18        Faculty improvement
participate in public      faculty survey       2006-2007 – 12/18         strategies to improve
health research or                              2007-2008 - 12/18         research and
evaluation initiatives                          2005-2008 – 16/18         evaluation skills and
                                                89%                       opportunities via
                                                                          grants and community
                                                                          health initiatives
Students who               25% (Exit interview 4 alumni/students          Increased emphasis on
complete the MPH           and alumni survey) indicated publishing        research
will prepare and                               out of 52 surveys          methodologies and
submit an article for                          returned                   publishing,
publication.                                                              enhancement of skills
                                                                          within courses and
                                                                          continuing education
                                                17                        opportunities
Table 1.2c – Mission & goals – Measurable Service Objectives
Objectives              Target              Actual                        Actions if target not
                                                                          met
Service
Students will complete     60% of students by    2005-2006 – 5 out of 9   Assessment and
a community-based          review of clerkship   = 56%                    improvement
clerkship experience of    program and           2006-2007 – 3 out of 7   strategies for the
72-144 hours as            student grades        = 43%                    clerkship experience
approved by their                                2007-2008 - 14 out of
community preceptor                              17 = 82%
and faculty clerkship
advisor and will                                 2005-2008 – 22 out of
receive a grade of Pass                          33 = 67% (community
(student records)                                based organization or
                                                 health department or
                                                 federal gov. agency)
Students will report       90% of students       2005-2008 – 100% of      More in depth
satisfaction with          student survey        current students who     surveys, interviews
her/his clerkship                                competed the survey      and/or focus groups
project (exit interview,                                                  with students.
student/alumni survey)                           2005-2008 – 90% of       Discussions with
                                                 alumni who completed     community
                                                 the survey.              preceptors,
                                                                          particularly those sites
                                                                          that graduating
                                                                          students indicate
                                                                          dissatisfaction with, to
                                                                          determine and address
                                                                          issues of concern.




                                                 18
Objectives                 Target               Actual                    Actions if target not
                                                                          met
Graduating students        50% of students as   Exit interviews for       Strengthen public
will have participated     documented in exit   2007-: 6 of 14 (43%)      health student
in at least one            interview            of graduating students    association (SAPHE)
community service                               indicated involvement     and their involvement
activity in addition to                         in service.               in community service;
their clerkship or                              Based on exit interview   strengthen linkages
capstone experience                             comments, this should     with Community
(exit interview)                                improve as the number     Advisory Board for
                                                of full time students     service projects.
                                                increases.                Increase awareness
                                                                          and promotion of
                                                15 of 32 current          service opportunities
                                                students surveyed in      available in the
                                                2008 belong to SAPHE      Philadelphia region.
                                                and 8 students reported
                                                involvement in APHA,
                                                the Global Health
                                                Council, Move4Health,
                                                PPHA, Planned
                                                Parenthood and
                                                SOPHE.
MPH faculty will           90% of faculty as    2005-2008 - 89% (16       Recruitment and
provide consultative or    documented in        of 18 faculty)            promotion policies
direct service to          faculty survey                                 will be reviewed to
international, national,                                                  promote engagement
state, and/or local                                                       in service to the
community or                                                              community.
professional health
organizations
The MPH program will       At least 10          2005-2006 – 12            Discuss with
provide or promote         programs annually    programs                  interdisciplinary
TJU sponsored              (program log,        2006-2007 – 13            education committee
continuing                 alumni surveys,      programs                  to encourage greater
education/workforce        CAB minutes)         2007-2008 - 17            public health focus.
development programs                            programs
for the Philadelphia
region public health
community annually,
based on input from
alumni, the CAB and
other partners




                                                19
1.2d An analytical self-study document that provides a qualitative and quantitative
assessment of how the program achieves its mission, goals and objectives and meets all
accreditation criteria, including a candid assessment of strengths and weaknesses in terms
of the program’s performance against the accreditation criteria.

This document provides the analytical self-study of the Jefferson University MPH Program. We
have made significant gains over the past two years in response to the last Accreditation’s
recommendations (see Section 1.2e). Through the various evaluation strategies undertaken
during the past two years, additional programmatic strengths and weaknesses were identified.
Examples of our findings and how they are, or will be, addressed are provided below.

Summary of Program Strengths

TJU’s MPH program has made a significant number of improvements since the last accreditation
in January, 2006. The program developed a strong mission, vision, and core values as well as
program goals and measurable objectives in instruction, research and service. The institutional
support and infrastructure have greatly improved with the hiring of a full-time program director,
a full-time program coordinator (previously part-time), and the expansion of dedicated core
MPH faculty. The MPH program director reports directly to the Dean of the College of
Graduate Studies and sits on the College’s Graduate Council and its Curriculum Committee. He
also represents the MPH program on TJU interdisciplinary committees such as inter-professional
education and community benefit. Communication has been enhanced with the other two
colleges in TJU, the Jefferson Medical College, and the College of Health Professions. The MPH
program budget has increased significantly with the MPH program director and program
coordinator directly submitting a specific MPH program budget directly to the Dean of the
College of Graduate Studies.

Originally a program offering the MSPH degree on a part-time basis geared toward the working
professional, TJU’s public health program has shifted to a 42 credit MPH program beginning in
the fall of 2007. It now includes “a one-year plus” full-time option that has expanded its appeal
to new and current public health professionals who choose to study full-time. The full-time
option has allowed TJU to offer joint degree programs with a JD/MPH and MJ/MPH option that
began in fall, 2007 in collaboration with the Widener University, School of Law, Health Care
Institute. This fall, we initiated a joint MD/MPH option. These two options are described in
Criterion 2.10.

The MPH program has expanded its infrastructure with the expansion of its MPH Program
Committee, its Curriculum Committee, and the development an Accreditation and Program
Evaluation Committee and a Student Affairs Committee. Measurement processes have been
initiated to obtain input from students, alumni, and faculty. Course competencies have begun to
be assessed using both the Council of Linkages and the ASPH MPH competencies. A new
curriculum review process has begun with the active involvement of the faculty and the MPH
Curriculum Committee. New courses have been developed that include capstone seminar, GIS
mapping, cultural competency, and health communication, and plans are underway for
development of courses in global health and public health policy and advocacy. New program
policies have been developed on graduation, credit transfer, and the MPH clerkship. More clear



                                               20
and detailed procedures and guidelines for both the clerkship and capstone projects have been
developed along with the new capstone seminar to assist students with the final, integrative
capstone project. Public health professional development seminars have been expanded and
made available to students, alumni, faculty, community advisory board members, and the larger
community. The MPH Community Advisory Board (CAB) has been expanded to include a
wider range and diverse representatives of local community agencies and steps have been
initiated to develop a mentoring initiative pairing students with CAB members and their
agencies.

The MPH program is more integrated with other public health graduate training institutions
through expanded representation on the Public Health Committee of the College of Physicians.
In addition, the MPH program has expanded its connections with the public health community in
the greater Philadelphia region through its adjunct faculty and research and service initiatives
involving local community organizations. In addition, the MPH faculty are extensively involved
in public health service activities and over the past three years have significantly increased their
research productivity.

Summary of Program Weaknesses

Through our Accreditation and Program Evaluation Committee assessment over the past year, a
number of MPH program weaknesses and areas of improvement have been uncovered. Although
improvements have been made in curricula assessment and development processes, a more
rigorous assessment process is needed to better align course objectives and teaching methods
with public health competencies. The MPH course evaluation process needs to be assessed and
revised to provide more detailed information for course improvement and faculty assessment.
Course scheduling needs to be reviewed carefully as the MPH program moves into a new School
of Health Policy and Population Health beginning in fall of 2009. Online education is an option
that is currently being reviewed to provide more access to public health education for our
students. A thorough assessment of faculty teaching MPH courses is needed over the next year
to improve the quality of faculty instruction and research and to better integrate faculty research
and student research interests. Improved communication with faculty is a priority to better
integrate public health courses across various disciplines. While we have a more formal student
advising process than in previous years, this remains an area of student and faculty concern.

Expanding diversity of TJU faculty and students is a top priority for the MPH program. Special
efforts are needed to market TJU and its MPH program to recruit a more diverse faculty and
student population. As reported by our students, the TJU MPH program needs to expand its
career development and counseling services. Although an increasing number of public health
career resources are provided to our students, a comprehensive career development program with
an emphasis on public health practice and research opportunities needs to be developed that
actively involves our community partners and integrated into the existing University Career
Development Center.




                                                21
The following chart summarizes the program strengths and weaknesses as identified through the
alumni survey, the student survey and focus group, and the student exit interview. Weaknesses
of the program are described based on responses from at least 20% of our students.

Summary of Program Strengths and Weaknesses as Communicated by Students
Criteria Strengths and Weaknesses          Action Steps and Commentary
1.0-1.6  Weakness
         Student input into the program    This past year students have been appointed to
         (25% expressed dissatisfaction in all the major committees and a Student Affairs
         current student survey)           Committee has been initiated.

                                                   Annual surveys, focus groups and exit
                                                   interviews with students have been initiated in
                                                   the past academic year.
2.0-2.11   Strengths
           Overall satisfaction with program
           (94% of Alumni). 72% of
           graduating students were very
           satisfied or extremely satisfied
           with the MPH program (Exit
           interview)
           Overall alumni satisfaction with        Continued emphasis on Public Health core
           the quality of the education in 4 of    competencies in curriculum.
           the 5 core areas:
           Biostatistics (89%)
           Epidemiology (100%)
           Health Policy (95%)
           Social and Behavioral Health
           (83%)
           Expertise of the faculty for all 5      Quality improvement course review process
           core areas (alumni survey)              has begun including a focus on teaching
                                                   methods.
           Clerkship and Capstone                  Instituted new Clerkship Guidelines which
           experiences -                           includes more detailed preceptor information
           Overall satisfaction with the           such as agreements with site preceptors.
           Clerkship experience
           Alumni – 88%
           Current Students – 100%
           Overall satisfaction with the
           clerkship preceptor was 100% for
           both the alumni and current
           students




                                                  22
Criteria   Strengths and Weaknesses                Action Steps and Commentary
           Survey data shows that both             The program has instituted a Capstone Seminar
           alumni and current students have        to prepare students for their Capstone research
           very positive experiences with          project. We are considering an additional
           capstone/thesis project and their       seminar mid year to better accommodate
           capstone advisor (90% or above)         students status in the program. Clerkship and
           Focus groups and Exit Interviews        Capstone manuals have been updated, and
           indicate the following suggestions      periodic clerkship seminars initiated for
           for improving the clerkship and         academic year 2008-2009.
           capstone experiences:
           Provide additional assistance in
           finding placements
           More guidance in finding capstone
           projects
           Improve orientation to the
           clerkship and capstone processes
           to ensure better understanding of
           the requirements
           Consider adding an additional
           capstone Seminar course.
           Students in Exit Interviews
           indicated confidence in 80-100%
           of core competencies for
           epidemiology and social and
           behavioral health.
           Weaknesses
           Students in Exit Interviews did not     While students expressed good or better overall
           indicate confidence in at least 80%     quality for Health Policy and Biostatistics, they
           of core competencies for                were less confident in their ability to perform
           Biostatistics, Environmental            the core competencies of these core areas.
           Health and Health Policy                Core course syllabi are being reviewed to
           The overall quality of the              ensure that public health competencies are
           education in the Environmental          covered. A new Public Health Policy and
           Health course was not rated highly      Advocacy course is under development.
           (27% of alumni students rated the
           overall quality as fair/poor; 21%       The Environmental Health Course has been
           of current students rated the course    reviewed and a change in instructor will take
           as fair)                                effect this academic year. In addition, the
                                                   course syllabi and course evaluations will be
                                                   closely monitored.




                                                  23
Criteria   Strengths and Weaknesses               Action Steps and Commentary
           Dissatisfaction with course            Course offerings have been increased and
           offerings (42% of participants in      include Planning and Evaluating Health
           student survey)                        Programs, Qualitative Research Methods, GIS
                                                  mapping, Cultural Humility and Competence
           Student comments from student          (hybrid on-line course), and Health
           survey and focus groups, and Exit      Communications. New courses under
           Interviews:                            development include Global Health and the
           Increase the number of classes         History of Public Health. Additional on-line
           offered later in the day               instruction will be investigated.
           Expand course content and reduce
           redundancy between courses             The vast majority of classes are now started at
           Improve quality of syllabi in terms    4:00 to address needs of working students.
           of objectives, course expectations
           and course design                      Expansion of epidemiology, biostatistics and
           Improve coordination of team           environmental health courses are being
           teaching                               planned.
           More experiential learning
           opportunities in all courses.          All courses are being reviewed by the
           More practice with statistical         curriculum committee (course evaluations,
           software packages                      syllabi and teaching methods).
           Provide on-line classes
           Provide additional electives in
           global health, medical ethics,
           public health law, public health
           advocacy and advanced
           epidemiology and statistics
           Orientation to MPH Program             In 2007-2008 an annual orientation program
           (26% of student respondents            was instituted, however it was only mandatory
           indicated dissatisfaction)             for new students. New students who have
                                                  attended our orientation have responded
                                                  positively.
3.0-3.3
           Public Health Research-                The difference between the current students and
           In the current student survey 31%      exit interviews with graduating students may be
           of students were dissatisfied with     reflective of the increase in full time students.
           opportunities to do research.          Full time students may have more time
           However, Exit Interviews               available for participating in research projects.
           indicated that research experience     Students participate in faculty research
           has been enhanced and is a             particularly during clerkship and capstone.
           strength of the program.               Strategies to link faculty research to public
                                                  health students is being explored through
                                                  faculty connections and interdisciplinary
                                                  committees.




                                                 24
Criteria   Strengths and Weaknesses                Action Steps and Commentary
           Public Health Service –                 Increased promotion of public health service
           27% of alumni indicated that the        opportunities has occurred.
           program did not help them to
           become involved in community            SAPHE has been reorganized, faculty are now
           service. However, current student       more involved and service opportunities are on
           surveys indicate that 85% of            PULSE and emailed to students. Faculty
           students are satisfied with these       encourage students to get more involved with
           opportunities.                          existing service programs on campus.

           Part-time students who work full        Emphasis on Public Health Week activities has
           time expressed difficulty               increased over the past three years and is now
           incorporating school, work and          integrated with other University graduate
           community service (Exit                 programs.
           Interviews). Only 43%
           participated in service while a
           student.

           Student exit interviews suggested
           that awareness of service
           opportunities need to be promoted
           through e-mail, blackboard and
           that optional class activities
           include service for elective credit,
           and better organizing the Student
           Advocates for Public Health
           Education (SAPHE) organization.
           Also increase student involvement
           throughout the University in
           Public Health Week.
           Students have not                       Research. presentation and publication skills
           published/presented their capstone      have been integrated into the capstone seminar
           projects to the degree expected.        and course curriculum. Students are required to
                                                   submit an abstract to a local, regional or
                                                   national meeting for professional presentations.




                                                  25
Criteria   Strengths and Weaknesses                 Action Steps and Commentary
4.0-4.6
           Advising–                                Student advising differences between current
           Exit Interviews indicated that           and graduating students may reflect recent
           100% of graduating students              changes to the MPH requirements and the new
           indicated that their advisor was         curriculum requirements. In addition new
           available whenever they needed           advisors were added this past year. Current
           guidance and 89% indicated they          students may be MPH or MSPH and may be
           were satisfied with interactions         full or part time. Advisors prepare students
           with their faculty advisor.              based on their particular circumstances and this
           However, 22% of students                 may initiate confusion as students discuss their
           indicated dissatisfaction with           particular requirements with each other.
           interactions with their faculty
           advisor.                                 Faculty advising procedures have been
                                                    formalized in the past year.
           In exit interviews students felt that
           there was not enough guidance            Students at exit interviews suggested increased
           available for students besides their     mentoring as a means to assist students in
           advisor to address questions/            better navigating the system. Enhanced
           problems related to the program.         mentoring by faculty and other students is
                                                    being considered.
           Career development –                     Focus group suggested the need to develop a
           Career Support from program              career development/job counseling center that
           (35% of alumni indicated                 maintains employment listings and prepares for
           dissatisfaction)                         the job search including resume construction
           In the current student survey 33%        and mock interviews.
           of students expressed
           dissatisfaction with career              Job opportunities had been e-mailed to all
           advising; 26% expressed                  students. Web-based job and career resources
           dissatisfaction with                     are now posted on the intranet.
           communication about job
           opportunities; and 39% expressed         During this academic year public health career
           dissatisfaction with public health       resources will be incorporated into the
           work opportunities for students.         University Career Development Center.




                                                   26
1.2e An analysis of the program’s responses to recommendations in the last accreditation
report (if any).

#1 Mission and Goals

Recommendations:

   •   Objectives lack consistency (action steps vs. objectives) and timeframes for achievement.
   •   Need clearly structured process defined to review program’s mission, goals and
       objectives.
   •   Need to present the complete mission in materials sent to students.

Discussion:

Since the last self study process the program mission, goals and objectives have been reviewed
and revised by the MPH Program and Accreditation and Program Evaluation Committees to
ensure relevance, measurability and timeframes as appropriate. A process has been developed to
review the mission, goals and objectives to ensure continuing relevance and progress towards
achievement. This process includes annual meetings between the Program Director and faculty
to review course evaluations, current research and service activities that support the program
goals and objectives. The Curriculum Committee meets monthly to review all course syllabi and
make recommendations for course revisions. Faculty are invited to present a summary of current
courses, course evaluations, and discuss course improvements with the Curriculum Committee.
Syllabi are revised based on course evaluations, faculty recommendations and new research
findings. The Program Committee utilizes faculty/student and alumni surveys, exit interviews
with graduating students and focus groups with current students to monitor progress towards
achievement of program goals and objectives. In addition, a bi-annual retreat is being planned
that will focus on programmatic strengths, weaknesses and opportunities for enhancement. The
retreat will include Core Faculty, representation from the Community Advisory Board, Thomas
Jefferson University Administration and MPH alumni. The purpose of this retreat is to provide a
regular mechanism for strategic planning and an opportunity to address overarching
programmatic concerns and opportunities.

The mission of the MPH program is publicized in the MPH program brochure, Pulse (University
website), the MPH program Newsletter and in the student welcome packet of information. In
addition, the mission is reinforced at orientation for all new students.

#2 Organizational Setting

Recommendation:

   •   Suggest centralizing responsibility – yielding stronger positioning of MPH program
       within the University




                                              27
Discussion:

Based on CEPH recommendations the organizational structure of the MPH Program has been
modified to provide more authority within the MPH program, strengthening our position within
the University and our ability to make timely decisions concerning Program direction and needed
modifications. The revised Organizational Chart has been provided under Criterion 1.3b, (pages
42-45). The major changes are as follows:

(1) Creation of a fulltime Program Director position. Previously Drs. Nash and Wender, shared
responsibility as co-directors of the program, overseeing overall management of the program in
addition to their responsibilities within the Department of Health Policy and the Department of
Family and Community Medicine. The previous Steering Committee felt that a single individual
who could devote efforts full time to the program was necessary in order to grow the MPH
program while maintaining high quality and effectiveness. As a result, a full time Program
Director position was established and Drs. Nash and Wender became co-chairs of the
Community Advisory Board and members on the newly formed Program Committee that
replaced the prior Steering Committee. This new Committee has broader member representation
and is chaired by the Program Director. In July, 2007 Dr. Rob Simmons was hired as Director of
the MPH program, centralizing oversight for the program to a single person with overall
authority to make day-to-day programmatic decisions. Dr. Simmons reports directly to the Dean
of the College of Graduate Studies and indirectly to Drs. Nash and Wender as co-chairs of the
MPH Community Advisory Board. Dr. Simmons provides leadership to the Program and
represents the program on a variety of University Committees, enhancing the visibility of the
program and its role in the overall strategic plan of the University, thus strengthening our
position within the University. Dr. Simmons serves on the College of Graduate Studies, Grad
Council and the College’s Curriculum Committee. He also serves on the Jefferson Inter-
Professional Education Steering Committee, the Jefferson Health Mentors Steering Committee,
the Jefferson Hospital Community Benefit Steering Committee, and the Department of Health
Policy Division Directors Committee. Representing Thomas Jefferson University and the MPH
Program, Dr. Simmons serves on the College of Physicians’ Public Health Committee and
regularly meets with other directors of public health programs from other universities in the
greater Philadelphia region. In addition, Core Faculty serve on the University IRB (Dr. Brawer),
the University Student Affairs Committee (Dr. Plumb), the Jefferson Medical College
Curriculum Committee (Dr. Sarfaty).

(2) Expansion of the Program Coordinator position to full-time. Since the previous self-study,
the part-time Program Coordinator resigned, providing the opportunity to expand the role and
number of hours budgeted for this position. This has allowed us to begin the process of
centralizing databases within the Department in order to improve our access to data in the format
required by CEPH and to improve our ability to serve our students. This is key given the
growing number of students in the MPH program. The MPH Program has hired Ms. Lisa
Chosed, who is skilled in creating/managing databases, as well as writing newsletters and
maintaining websites. Her previous position in the College of Graduate Studies provided her
with knowledge about University processes particularly within the College of Graduate studies
and the MPH program, and extensive experience working with and supporting graduate
students; and



                                               28
(3) MPH committee restructuring which is discussed in the governance recommendations section
that follows.

# 3 Governance

Recommendations:

   •   Steering committee unwieldy. Consider establishing multiple committees with clearly
       defined memberships, responsibilities, and relationships.
   •   Current curriculum committee lacks a clear sense of mission to guide its efforts, thus
       hampering its ability to function effectively.
   •   No processes are in place to receive student course evaluations therefore the curriculum
       committee cannot play a role in evaluation-based planning
   •   No formal process for reviewing course syllabi
   •   Increase representation of community based organizations on the Advisory committee

Discussion:

In response to CEPH recommendations of the previous self-study, the MPH organizational
structure has been modified along with roles and responsibilities of committees and membership
on each committee. As mentioned above the Steering Committee was dissolved and replaced by
a Program Committee that meets monthly and provides overall program oversight. In addition to
the Program Committee and the existing Curriculum Committee, an Accreditation and Program
Evaluation Committee was formed to oversee the continuous quality improvement process of the
MPH program and the CEPH Accreditation Self-study process including evaluating and
monitoring the program’s overall efforts against its mission, goals and objectives. A Student
Affairs Committee has also been established to provide a formal mechanism for students to
file/voice concerns with MPH program administrators and to provide students with an
opportunity for student input into the program. Committee roles and responsibilities were
discussed in Section 1.2a and Committee membership is provided in Section 1.4b. The
restructuring has allowed for decisions to be made at the committee level and reported to the
Program Committee when higher level of decision making or input is required such as revising
existing or instituting new policies. This restructuring has allowed Core Faculty to address
program needs more quickly and efficiently. It has also allowed faculty and staff to efficiently
focus discussion on the issue at hand (for example curriculum) rather than attempting to resolve
all MPH programmatic issues in a single meeting. At the same time, Core Faculty often serve on
multiple committees improving communication across committees. Core Faculty serve as Chairs
of the various committees with membership (discussed previously) representative of the
committee focus. For example, the Curriculum Committee includes faculty from other Schools
within the University to encourage curriculum development and sharing resources across the
University; while the membership of the Student Affairs Committee is fifty percent students, to
encourage student voice and involvement.

The Curriculum Committee has worked diligently over the past two years to develop processes
for syllabi review to ensure that a public health focus and public health core competencies are



                                               29
reflected. The Curriculum Committee reviews new and revised course syllabi prior to sending
them to the Graduate Council for approval, and reviews all existing syllabi annually. Faculty are
required to demonstrate how course content links to the public health competencies in their
syllabi by completing a matrix that includes the national public health competencies divided into
eight skill domains (left hand column) and how each competency is demonstrated/achieved in
the course (methods are listed in the first row of the matrix and include testing, observation, class
discussion, papers, presentations, etc). See Criterion 2 for a sample matrix. This was also done
to raise student awareness about skills/knowledge that will be achieved throughout the course
and their relationship to the specific competencies. In addition, the Committee developed
processes for review of students’ course evaluations. The Program Director and the Chair of the
Curriculum Committee are responsible for reviewing course evaluations with each faculty
member and bringing concerns to the Curriculum Committee. The faculty member, the Program
Director and/or the Curriculum Committee Chair make suggestions for course improvement.
Student and alumni surveys/exit interviews are also taken into consideration. (See Criterion 2 for
more in depth discussion).

Over the past year, the MPH Community Advisory Board (CAB) has been expanded greatly.
Most of the new members are from community-based health organizations representing a diverse
population or health topic area. In addition, some key Jefferson representatives have been added
to the CAB to expand the MPH program’s reach within the organization. CAB members are
now invited to all continuing education activities sponsored by the MPH program and receive
information on public health community initiatives. They have participated in a joint MPH
faculty/CAB meeting in Fall 2007 and with the SAPHE student organization for our end of year
CAB meeting/student awards celebration held in May 2008. CAB members are asked to serve as
career mentors with MPH students. CAB members and their organizations are also encouraged
to serve as preceptors for student clerkship and capstone projects. See Appendix B.

#4 Resources

Recommendations:

   •   Lack budgetary autonomy
   •   Potential sustainability concerns
   •   No formal written agreements pledging cooperation with community organizations
       (Clerkship/Capstone).

Discussion:

While formal legal agreements indicating cooperation between site preceptors and the MPH
program are not required, Clerkship forms that specify goals and objectives of the Clerkship, and
requirements of the student and preceptor have been developed. These forms require field
supervisors/preceptors to indicate their agreement to mentor and guide students by signing and
dating the Clerkship form. This is also true for Capstone/Thesis contracts. Requiring formal
legal contracts would prevent completion of student Clerkship, Thesis and Capstone experiences
within the term framework because of the time necessary for the legal department to review and




                                                 30
sign contracts. An agreement letter for Clerkship preceptors has been developed and is found in
the Clerkship Handbook in Appendix C.

During the previous self-study the reviewers raised concerns about budgetary autonomy of the
MPH program and sustainability. Since that time, as previously discussed, a new Program
Director position was established. The Program Director has focused on enhancing student
recruitment efforts including revision of the MPH Program brochure, expanding the MPH
website, and enhancement of our recruitment materials and strategies through regional academic
recruitment events. The Program Director and Core Faculty have attended the annual APHA and
PPHA conferences as well as national and state SOPHE conferences. In addition the Director
has recruited students through career days at area institutions of higher learning including
Widener and the University of Pennsylvania. These program marketing opportunities have
helped to increase student enrollments. Other strategies initiated to increase student enrollment
include JD/MPH and MJ/MPH joint degree programs with Widener University’s Law School,
the development of an MD/MPH joint degree program beginning September 2008, and are
developing an MSN/MPH joint degree program with the School of Nursing. The Department of
Family and Community Medicine recently received a HRSA grant to expand the residency
program to include an MPH degree for interested individuals, and there has been discussion with
Jefferson’s other Residency programs to structure the MPH degree within the Residency
programs.

Increased enrollment has influenced the 2008-2009 MPH budget. The Program Director, in
consultation with Core Faculty, and MPH Program Committee developed the 2008-2009 MPH
Program Budget which included increased percentages of FTE of Core Faculty, new courses, and
resources for faculty assistants, providing courses in multiple terms, resources for student awards
and stipends for professional presentation expenses, program marketing materials, and Core
Faculty professional development. Additional resources have been provided for the 2008-2009
academic year that includes resources for student and faculty travel and presentation expenses
for local, state, and national public health conferences and events. The MPH Program has
demonstrated autonomy over its budget within the College of Graduate Studies for the 2008-
2009 academic year as all proposed expenses were approved. The MPH Program Director and
Program Coordinator will be working closely with the Dean and Associate Dean for Instruction
of the new School of Health Policy and Population Health during this transition year on the
budget for the 2009-2010 academic years and beyond.

Although the total number of students in the MPH program has remained constant over the past
three years, the average number of active students enrolled in classes each term has increased
appreciatively over the past year from an average of 24 students per term in the previous three
years beginning in the 2004-2005 academic year to an average of 35 students per term in the
2007-2008 academic year. This is due to an increased effort to communicate with part-time
students who have been inactive over the past year and encouraging them to proceed toward the
completion of the program or in some cases, become “inactive” and dropped from the program.
The number of students is expected to increase in 2008-2009 as the number of new students
registered for the fall term in 2008 is significantly higher that similar fall terms in previous years.
Reflecting both increased credits from our part-time students, and the increasing number of full-
time students (now approximately 40% of our MPH student body), the total number of MPH



                                                  31
credits increased by 69% in the 2007-2008 academic year as reflected in the tuition increase
from $379,718 in 2006-2007 to $611,535 in 2007-2008. (Template A on page 71)

#5 Core knowledge, practice and culminating experience

Recommendations:

   •   Clerkship lacks formality and mechanisms to guarantee that all students receive true
       public health practice experience (goals do not match well the spirit/intent of the
       experience).
   •   Needs to immerse students in public health practice, not just research
   •   Need to expand Clerkship opportunities – centralize the list and regularly update.
   •   Need wider array of opportunities beyond personal contacts of faculty. Need to expand
       non-TJU affiliated relationships

Discussion:

A major focus during the year after the previous self-study was to develop more formal
procedures for the Clerkship and Capstone experiences. These procedures are discussed in
Criterion 2.4.

CEPH recommended that Clerkships be expanded to include more opportunities for experiences
related to Public Health Practice. In the previous self study 65% of all clerkships were done in
public health practice settings, such as community based organizations and local federal health
departments. In the current self-study period 71% of Clerkships to date involve Public Health
Practice. The program has continued to expand its public health practice opportunities and
encourage students to seek clerkships that reflect this practice. In this current year 82% of our
students are engaged in clerkships focusing on public health practice. These data demonstrate
progress towards expanding the depth and breadth of Clerkship opportunities. See Table below
for trends.

 Clerkship Type       2003-2005     %    2005-2006     %       2006-      %      2007-2008      %
                                                               2007

Public Health            11/17      65       6/9       67       4/8       50       14/17        82
Practice
Research/Health          6/17       35       3/9       33       4/8       50        3/17        18
Policy Analysis

In the previous self study only 20% of all Thesis projects were related to Public Health Practice.
In the current self study period 48% of all Thesis/Capstone projects involved Public Health
Practice. See Table below for trends.




                                                32
 Thesis/Capstone     2003-2005     %    2005-2006    %       2006-     %      2007-2008      %
      Type                                                   2007

Public Health            1/5       20       4/7      57      7/17      41         5/9        55
Practice
Research/Health          4/5       80       3/7      43      10/17     59         4/9        45
Policy Analysis


Lists of previous Clerkship and Capstone experiences have been compiled and are available on
Pulse for students’ information. The lists of past and potential community based sites for
Clerkships and Capstones sites are regularly updated through a variety of mechanisms, including
letters/surveys to CAB and faculty, faculty connections/ partnerships and suggestions from
students.

#6 Programmatic Learning Objectives

Recommendations:

   •   Students not aware of programmatic learning objectives. Need to increase awareness so
       they can judge their progress of study against the standards.
   •   Need to revise learning objectives. Need a process that formalizes on-going evaluation
       and updating of programmatic and course-level learning objectives.
   •   Syllabi have vague or non-observable learning objectives. Some syllabi lack learning
       objective all together.

Discussion:

As previously discussed, a major focus of the first year after our previous self-study was to
address the CEPH recommendations related to revising course syllabi to reflect assessable
learning objectives and on-going processes for reviewing/updating programmatic and learning
objectives. To this end, the Curriculum Committee devised a matrix that faculty complete that
demonstrates the relationship of course content to Public Health core competencies and the
methods used to demonstrate how these competencies are assessed throughout the course. The
instructors have been asked to consider carefully the objectives for each core subject area that
were developed by the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH) in their Core
Competency Development Project (posted on the ASPH website). These objectives were
developed with the intent of providing guidance to public health educational programs on how to
instill in students the broad understanding of the areas of knowledge basic to public health. In
addition the Curriculum committee reviewed all core course syllabi to ensure that learning
objectives were clear and linked to the core competencies. As described earlier, new course
syllabi are reviewed by the Curriculum Committee prior to review by the Graduate School. In
addition all core course syllabi are reviewed annually by the Chair of the Curriculum Committee
and the Program Director for appropriateness. Additionally, the Program Coordinator reviews
student comments pertinent to the course and through discussions with the course instructor
suggests appropriate revisions. See Criterion 2.1 to 2.3 for more detailed discussion.


                                              33
To enhance student awareness of programmatic learning objectives, they are provided at
orientation and posted on the TJU Pulse Intranet website and the MPH website. In addition, the
MPH newsletter lists programmatic objectives. The process for the development of course
syllabi is being reviewed and faculty are now required to provide observable/measurable course
objectives in course syllabi.

#7 Assessment of Student Achievement

Recommendations:

   •   No way to document, other than satisfactory completion of course work that ensures
       graduates attained the identified programmatic learning objectives. Need procedures to
       track these to broader educational themes.
   •   Program lacks measures to appropriately assess student outcomes. Data tracking
       procedures not in place. (Degree completion rates, post graduation data, career changes,
       employment, exit interviews, graduate surveys, employer surveys)

Discussion:

During academic year 2008, under the leadership of the Program Director, processes to assess
student achievement were developed and implemented including surveys of current students and
alumni, faculty surveys, and exit interviews with graduating students. Beginning in 2008,
graduating students are being asked in exit interviews to rate their attainment of core
competencies as defined by ASPH. In addition, Clerkship/Capstone preceptors continue to be
surveyed as to student preparation and ability to perform the required skills/activities. The
Program Coordinator is in the process of developing databases to centralize data collection
related to number of enrolled students, inactive students, degree completion, employment of
graduates, etc., so that we are less dependent on the data maintained by information services and
the Graduate School. The self-study process has highlighted the need for data to be collected
and maintained in a format that responds to the CEPH self-study and accreditation process.

#8 Research

Recommendations:

   •   Need systematic process developed to raise awareness of research opportunities within
       TJU
   •   Create linkages to other TJU faculty/researchers to broaden scope of research available
   •   Increase involvement of MPH students in faculty research

Discussion:

The Program Director and Core Faculty meet regularly with University faculty to identify
potential Clerkship/Thesis/Capstone research projects opportunities related to public health
practice. Increasing research opportunities for MPH students is a priority outcome for these



                                               34
linkage efforts within the TJU community. Other strategies for raising awareness about research
opportunities include enlisting Jefferson faculty/researchers as well as local public health
practitioners as speakers and include Population Health Forums, webinars and Public Health 501
(Introduction to Public Health). Students in these classes/programs have the opportunity to
connect with these individuals and learn more about their public health research/evaluation
interests. Contacts that have resulted in Clerkship/Thesis/Capstone projects include community-
based organizations such as HepTrec, Maternity Care Coalition and Project HOME, (see
Criterion3.3 for the grid). In addition, faculty from the School of Nursing, Jefferson Medical
College and the College of Health Professions are members of the Curriculum Committee,
providing a link to research opportunities in these schools/departments. A faculty survey has
been initiated to document the research involvement of MPH faculty (core courses and electives)
and will be used to promote opportunities for students. Lastly, the Community Advisory Board is
asked to provide information about research opportunities that could involve students for
Thesis/Capstone projects.

From 2005-2008, MPH and other Jefferson faculty contacts were responsible for 30 (91%) of
Capstone projects. Compared to the previous self study, more Thesis/Capstone projects have
been generated due to faculty (MPH and TJU) research and gains have been realized in
connecting MPH students to TJU faculty research outside the MPH program. (See Table below)

   Year          MPH             %            TJU              %          Student            %
                Faculty                      Faculty                      Initiated

2003-2005         2/5            40            1/5             20            2/5            40
2005-2006        8/15            53           6/15             40            1/15            7
2006-2007         6/8            75            2/8             25             0             0
2007-2008        5/10            50           3/10             30            2/10           20
2005-2008        19/33           58           11/33            33            3/33            9

Because Clerkship experiences are often related to the student’s desired Thesis/Capstone, these
relationships are key to expanding research within the TJU academic community. Capstone
project research/evaluation included topics such as oral health, cancer prevention, palliative care,
medication safety protocols in daycare programs, obesity, diabetes among homeless men, and
health literacy. The breadth of these topics reflects the varied interests of the faculty and
departments throughout our academic Jefferson Medical Center.

#9 Service

Recommendations:

   •   More formal policies and outcome measures would benefit program. Tie service to
       hiring, promotion, tenure practices/ guidelines.
   •   Need way to evaluate what is “success”. Currently there is no formal process to evaluate
       progress beyond number of service activities.




                                                35
Discussion:

Service goals for MPH Program faculty and students have been developed and are being
evaluated as of 2008. Faculty, Student and Alumni surveys as well as exit interviews with
graduating students are being utilized to document public health related service to the
community as well as opportunities for expansion based on student and faculty interests. In
addition the Community Advisory Board is asked to provide information about service
opportunities. Faculty seeking promotions within the University are asked to document service
to the University as well as the community. Applicants for new faculty positions and current
faculty are also asked to document their service activities at the national, state and local level.
While service to the University is required for all faculty, service to the community is only
encouraged. However, community service is gaining a higher profile within the Academic
Medical Center (University and Hospital) and a cross institutional committee has been formed to
define and document service in a more systematic manner. MPH faculty are serving on the
Steering Committee for this initiative. We anticipate that the emphasis on service will be
strengthened through this focus.

The SAPHE student organization has been enhanced with their priority being community service
activities in association with other student organizations on campus and in the Philadelphia
region.

#10 Faculty Qualifications

Recommendation:

   •   Need to broaden qualifications monitored to include number of tenured faculty, number
       of faculty with MPH/public health degrees, or number of faculty with significant public
       health experience.

Discussion:

Whether faculty are eligible for tenure is determined by the College in which they hold a primary
appointment. For example, in JCGS only researchers are offered a tenure track, so this is not an
appropriate qualification for MPH faculty in this College. In Jefferson Medical College, the
clinical and educational scholarship track, and the academic investigator track offer tenure. The
clinician educator track and the non-tenured research track do not offer tenure. Faculty
qualifications, including degrees and disciplines are now being collected through a bi-annual
faculty survey. In addition, the scope of their public health practice is being identified. This
information is being maintained in an EXCEL database by the Program Coordinator. It is noted
that only the past three years of MPH faculty community service/research is listed on the survey,
but several faculty have provided over 10 years of public health community service.

In the previous self-study, of the 20 faculty listed as MSPH Program faculty, 3 had an MPH, and
13 of the 20 teaching faculty had extensive public health experience. Among the three Core
faculty, two had an MPH degree, and all had extensive Public Health experience.




                                                36
Currently among core public health faculty, 4 of 7 have an MPH degree and all have either a
DrPH, PhD or MD. Compared to the previous self-study, the depth of the knowledge, experience
and expertise of the Core Faculty have been significantly enhanced, providing opportunities for
growth and improvement in all aspects of the MPH Program. Of the 35 teaching faculty between
2005-2008, 7 faculty have MPH degrees and an additional 23 have significant public health
experience. Compared to the previous self-study, the percentage of faculty with either an MPH
or significant public health experience increased from 80% to 86%.

#11 Faculty Development

Recommendations:

   •   Lack of well defined established policies for recruitment and appointment of qualified
       faculty at the program level. Difficult to expand course offerings if faculty not available
       to teach courses.
   •   Faculty program evaluations not shared with Department Chairs

Discussion:

While policies related to faculty recruitment have not been established at this time, efforts to
expand programming by coordinating efforts with other Schools/Colleges/Departments within
the University have been established through the efforts of the MPH Program Director. Drs.
Sarfaty and Simmons, both of whom have taught public health policy courses, will be developing
a core Public Health Policy and Advocacy course. Dr. Elaine Yuen (Health Policy) will be
teaching a one credit course on GIS Mapping in Fall 2008. In addition a Cultural Humility and
Competence course is under development by Drs. Simmons and Yuen in collaboration with the
College of Health Professions to be offered system-wide. An Introduction to Global Health
course is also in the early stages of development and will be taught by Dr. Hector Lopez of the
Jefferson Medical College and MPH faculty member Dr. James Plumb. Dr. Helen Black from
the Center for Aging Research and Health in the College of Health Professions was recruited to
teach qualitative research methods in Summer 2008, as an alternative for the logistical
regressions quantitative methods course. In collaboration with the University of Delaware, a
Health Communications course is planned to be offered in winter 2009 in Wilmington, Delaware
with easy access from Philadelphia via the SEPTA train system.

Course evaluations completed by students are provided to faculty and to the Program Director.
The Program Director meets with faculty to discuss the evaluations and shares the evaluation
summary with faculty member’s Department Chair as appropriate (not all faculty are part of a
University Department).

#12 Faculty Diversity

Recommendation:

   •   All Caucasian. Faculty does not reflect diversity of community or its students. No MPH
       program specific plans exist to address under represented minority faculty members.



                                                37
Discussion:

As discussed above, the Program Director has been meeting with faculty throughout the
University to determine their interests in teaching in the MPH program and the public health
related course content they wish to teach. As a result of this strategy, three minority faculty have
been identified. Dr. Elaine Yuen (of Asian descent) has joined the MPH core faculty and will be
teaching GIS Mapping and Cultural Humility and Competence in Fall 2008. Dr. Suet Lim (of
Asian descent) will be teaching Epidemiology in the Spring I term of 2009. Dr. Hector Lopez
(of Hispanic descent) will be teaching a new course entitled, Introduction to Global Health in the
next academic year. Thomas Jefferson University’s MPH program is committed to developing a
public health faculty that reflects the Philadelphia community and to this end will continue to
recruit diverse faculty members.

#13 Advising and Career Counseling

Recommendations:

   •   Increase number of mentors among faculty
   •   Need formal career/placement services and/or processes
   •   Need more formal career counseling services
   •   Need database to track graduates experience with the program and their subsequent
       professional activities.
   •   Need evaluation of counseling services by student

Discussion:

The number of core faculty advisors has been expanded from 4 to 7. An Advising Template was
developed and instituted for all advisors. The Program has provided additional career
information including internship and fellowship opportunities. The Program has provided public
health career web-based resources on the MPH website, including full and part-time jobs and
internships on the TJUH PULSE intranet site, and serves as a link with community health
organizations for Jefferson students seeking part-time public health employment opportunities.
Current student surveys, exit interviews and alumni surveys assess student satisfaction/concerns
with advising and career counseling. A database was created to track graduates experiences with
the program and subsequent professional activities. The Program has provided budgetary
resources for 2008-2009 to assist students with expenses for accepted presentations for local,
state, and national professional meetings, to enhance skills in meeting other public health
professionals and colleagues. Program faculty have written letters of support for fellowships and
scholarships for TJU MPH students. Coaching, writing resources, and interview techniques, have
been instituted by JCGS to enhance career counseling services. As the Clerkship and
Thesis/Capstone projects have expanded to other Jefferson faculty and community-based sites,
additional opportunities for potential career placement have occurred. The MPH CAB members
have been asked to serve as career mentors for MPH students and the MPH Program Office is
developing a list of interested CAB members and their backgrounds to provide to students to
encourage such mentorship opportunities.



                                                38
1.2 f. A description of the manner in which the self-study document was developed,
including effective opportunities for input by important program constituents, including
institutional officers, administrative staff, teaching faculty, students, alumni and
representatives of the public health community.

The CEPH self-study was continued after receiving the CEPH report after the previous
accreditation process in 2006. During the 2006-2007 academic year administrators and Core
Faculty began work on addressing report recommendations related to curriculum and
organizational structure. Restructuring included instituting a MPH Program Director position
and expansion of the program to 42 credits. During this time the Core Faculty worked to revise
the Clerkship and Capstone experiences, integrate ASPH core competencies into course syllabi,
revise the course offerings to reflect the degree change from an MSPH to MPH degree, and
expanded the program to include a JD/MPH and MJ/MPH offering. By early summer, 2007, the
Program Director was recruited and hired and the self-study process was formalized. The MPH
Program Coordinator became a full-time position. A CEPH Accreditation Coordinator (Dr.
Brawer) was appointed from the Core Faculty in late summer 2007 and an Accreditation and
Program Evaluation Committee was formed and has met weekly since September. This
committee (membership was described in Criterion 1.2a and includes the Program Director, the
Program Coordinator, Core Faculty members, a student representative, and an MPH teaching
assistant) was charged with reviewing the previous self-study document and developing
procedures and policies to address site reviewers’ comments and recommendations. Each
member of the committee was assigned specific sections to review, specific self-study
documents from other accredited MPH programs to examine for best practices, and specific
sections to write. In addition the accreditation team requested technical assistance from the
CEPH evaluators. Processes for obtaining input from students, alumni, preceptors, the
community advisory board, administration, and faculty (see Criterion 1.2a) were developed and
implemented. In addition, the Accreditation and Program Evaluation Committee reviewed and
revised advising procedures, organized data collection systems and, in conjunction with the
Curriculum Committee, continued to review all syllabi for ties to MPH core competencies and
learning objectives. The Clerkship/Capstone process and structure, and service /research
opportunities were also assessed. The Accreditation and Program Evaluation Committee
Coordinator reported at monthly Program Committee meetings about progress so that
administration within the College of Graduate Studies would have an opportunity for input into
the process. The process was challenged somewhat in the Fall of 2007 when the existing half-
time Program Coordinator resigned; however, within a couple of months a full-time Program
Coordinator, was hired who was familiar with the program, having worked for the College of
Graduate Studies.

1.2 g   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

The criterion is met with commentary. The MPH program has greatly improved since the last
self-study with improved administration, faculty, governance, more clearly defined mission,
goals, and objectives, policies and procedures, increased number and quality of students (full-
time and part-time), and a greatly enhanced public health focus within the university and in the
community. Given that many of the policies and procedures are new, there has been insufficient



                                               39
time to fully assess the program improvements. The areas of student and faculty diversity,
student and alumni assessments, faculty development, a more integrated curriculum, improved
student records, career counseling and support, and expanded research and service opportunities
are priority areas for future improvement.




                                              40
Criterion 1.3 Institutional Environment

The program shall be an integral part of an accredited institution of higher education.

1.3a   Description of the Institution

The MPH program is a degree-granting program of Thomas Jefferson University (TJU).
Founded in 1824 as the Jefferson Medical College (JMC), the institution gained University status
in 1969 and is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States
Association of Colleges and Schools. In June 1993, the Commission re-affirmed the
University’s accreditation, without condition, for the full 10-year term. The most recent
accreditation visit was in April 2004. At that time, the accreditation was reaffirmed for the full
period of 10-year term through 2014. The Middle States Commission on Higher Education is the
accrediting body recognized by the United States Department of Higher Education for all higher
education institutions in our region.

The Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) granted full eight-year accreditation to
Jefferson Medical College in 2007. Accreditation by LCME confers eligibility for participation
in federal student loan programs. Most state boards of licensure require that U.S. medical schools
be accredited by the LCME, as a condition for licensure of their graduates. The Department of
Education recognizes the LCME for the accreditation of undergraduate medical education
programs in institutions that are themselves accredited by regional accrediting associations.

Change of Infrastructure and Location of the MPH Program in Fall of 2009:

In the recently developed strategic plan of Thomas Jefferson University “health policy and
population health” was identified as one of its five key strategic priorities. Over the past year,
plans have been generated to address this priority. A proposal was developed to establish a new
school entitled the Jefferson School of Health Policy and Population Health (“JSHPPH”) as a
stand-alone entity within the University. That proposal which includes moving the MPH
program out of the Jefferson College of Graduate Studies into the JSHPPH was approved by the
University’s Board of Trustees on July 28, 2008, hence was not included in the first draft of our
MPH self-study. There will be a transition period and the new the Jefferson School of Health
Policy and Population Health will become operational in July 1, 2009.

The Department of Health Policy (DHP) will be organizationally relocated out of the Jefferson
Medical College to form the initial structure for JSHPPH. DHP, chaired by David B. Nash, MD,
MBA, is nationally recognized for its expertise in key areas such as healthcare quality
improvement and chronic care management, and has played a major leadership role, along with
the Department of Family and Community Medicine in the Jefferson Medical College in the
formation and enhancement of the MPH program over the past five years. The governance of
the JSHPPH in relation to Thomas Jefferson University will be similar to that of the JCGS with
the Dean reporting to the University President. Bylaws, policies, and procedures for the new
JSHPPH will be developed during the 2008-2009 academic year and the MPH program, its
committees and its Program Director and Program Coordinator will be actively involved in the
development process.



                                                41
Additional key collaborators for JSHPPH include the Department of Family and Community
Medicine and the Biostatistics Division of the Department of Pharmacology and Experimental
Therapeutics of Jefferson Medical College; the Kimmel Cancer Center, especially its Division of
Population Science in the Department of Medical Oncology; the Center for Applied Research on
Aging and Health (CARAH) of Jefferson College of Health Professions; Jefferson’s Schools of
Nursing and Pharmacy; and key leadership areas of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
(TJUH) and Jefferson University Physicians (JUP).

The mission of JSHPPH is to prepare leaders with global vision to develop, implement and
evaluate health policies and systems that improve the health of populations and thereby enhance
the quality of life. The School will fulfill this mission through provision of exemplary graduate
academic programming, continuing education courses and conferences, and sustained research
and consulting in areas of health policy, population health, and healthcare quality and safety.

JSHPPH will assume operational responsibility for the Master’s in Public Health (MPH) degree
and public health certificate programs presently offered through Jefferson College of Graduate
Studies. The MPH program will be the “anchor” for the School as it develops additional
graduate degree programs. In addition to the MPH, JSHPPH will offer new certificate and
master’s degree programs in health policy, healthcare quality and safety, and chronic care
management. Doctoral degree programs in population health and health policy will be
considered. These programs will stress interdisciplinary and inter-professional training in concert
with the current campus-wide initiatives.

The development of the new JSHPPH and the MPH program being the initial degree program in
the new school will be a positive step for the MPH program as the program will have a closer tie
to the other educational degree programs and population health research initiatives in the new
School. Currently, the MPH program has minimal synergy with the PhD and MS academic
programs in the JCGS and the bench research in laboratories that are integral of the education
and research initiatives of the JCGS. The budget for the MPH program and the public health
certificate program will be a separate budget within the JSHPPH. Currently, the MPH program
has a separate budget in the JCGS, with the public health certificate program being managed by
the JCGS.

As the JSHPPH is expected to initiate collaborative relationships with a range of undergraduate
academic programs across the greater Philadelphia region, such collaborative relationships will
enhance the marketability of the MPH program and can expect to increase enrollment of the
program over time. In addition, the other degrees offered by the JSHPPH can serve as catalysts
to further market the MPH to mid-career professionals.

The organization of the MPH program will remain the same as it currently exists within the
Jefferson College of Graduate Studies with Dr. Rob Simmons, DrPH, MPH, CHES as the
Program Director. The organization chart for the new JSHPPH has not been finalized to date but
it is expected that Dr. Simmons will directly report to Dean David Nash of the new School of
Health Policy and Population Health and to an Associate Dean for educational programs.




                                                42
Financial analysis, based on conservative estimates of student enrollment, indicates that the
School will be profitable by its third year of operation. The growth of enrollment and
achievement of profitability by the Master’s of Public Health Program demonstrate the financial
viability of the additional academic programs planned under JSHPPH. A plan for covering the
initial deficit due to start-up expenses will be developed in consultation with the Office of the
President and the Office of Institutional Advancement of Thomas Jefferson University.

1.3b   Organizational Charts

The charts that follow depict the existing relationship of the MPH Program within Jefferson
College of Graduate Studies and the Thomas Jefferson University system, as well as the
organization of the College, and its academic programs. The Jefferson College of Graduate
Studies of Thomas Jefferson University is responsible for the overall planning, operation, and
administration of educational programs of Thomas Jefferson University that lead to the Master of
Science (MS) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees in the basic biomedical sciences. In
addition to the MS and PhD degrees, the Jefferson College of Graduate Studies also confers the
MPH degree. Formerly an MSPH degree, the program was changed in the 2007-2008 academic
year to offer the 42 credit, MPH degree.




                                               43
                                                         TJU Organizational Chart



                                                                 Board of Trustees, Chair
                                                                   Brian G. Harrison


                                                                        President
                                                                Robert L. Barchi, MD, PhD
                                                                                                          Interim Senior Vice President for
                                                                                                                    Development
                                                                                                                 Frederick Ruccius
                  Interim Senior Vice President
                      For Academic Affairs
                                                                                                          Senior Vice President for Strategic
                     Michael J. Vergare, MD
                                                                                                                      Initiatives
                                                                                                                 Judith L. Bachman



 Vice President and              Vice President for Finance,                      Senior Vice President      Chief Information       Vice President for
 University Counsel                         CFO                                       for Corporate               Officer                Research
Cristina G. Cavalieri,               Richard J. Schmid                                 Operations            Bruce Metz, PhD         Steven McKenzie,
                                                                                   Victoria V. Sirianni                                  MD, PhD




                         Dean Jefferson College of             Dean Jefferson College of         Interim Dean JMC &              Director, Kimmel
                         Health Professions                    Graduate Studies and VP               President JUP                 Cancer Center
                         James B. Erdmann, PhD                   International Affairs            Michael J. Vergare,            Richard G. Pestell,
                                                                 James H. Keen, PhD                       MD                         MD, PhD




                                                                            44
                                          JCGS Organizational Chart




                                                       James H. Keen, PhD
                                           Dean, Jefferson College of Graduate Studies




          Robert Bartosz                                                                                     Lisa Lorenz
Executive Associate and Director of                                                                  Assistant to the Dean, JCGS
             Finance



                                                                             Dennis Gross, PhD, MSc, Associate Dean & Director of Masters
                                                                                       Degree and Graduate Certificate Programs




                          Lisa Kozlowski, PhD                                            Marc Stearns
                             Assistant Dean                                         Director of Admissions
                  Post Doctoral Affairs and Recruitment




 Graduate Council Committees                              Graduate Council                        Graduate Faculty




                                                                  45
                                        MPH Program Organizational Chart

                                            College of Graduate Studies (CGS)
                                                        James H. Keen, PhD, Dean




                                                           MPH Program


    Community Advisory Board                                     Director
            (CAB)                                      Rob Simmons, DrPH, MPH,
                                                               CHES
                                                                                                   Coordinator
   David B. Nash, MD, MBA, (Co-Chair)                                                               Lisa Chosed
       Department of Health Policy
    Richard C. Wender, MD, (Co-Chair)
     Family and Community Medicine

                                                      MPH Program Committee
                                                  •    MPH Program Director (Chair)
                                                  •    MPH Program Coordinator
                                                  •    CAB Co-Chairs
                                                  •    CGS Associate Dean
                                                  •    Committee Chairs
                                                  •    Faculty
                                                  •    Student Representative




   SAPHE Student                Student Affairs Committee                Accreditation and             Curriculum
    Organization               Vittorio Maio, PharmD, MS, MSPH          Program Evaluation             Committee
James D. Plumb, MD, MPH                    (Co-Chair)                       Committee                Mona Sarfaty, MD,
    (Faculty Advisor)              James D. Plumb, MD, MPH              Rickie Brawer, PhD, MPH,      FAAFP (Chair)
                                           (Co-Chair)                         CHES (Chair)




                                                                 46
1.3c   University Practices

Jefferson College of Graduate Studies Dean, James Keen PhD, reports directly to President
Barchi, President of Thomas Jefferson University and meets regularly with other Deans and top
administrators of the University.

Each masters and doctoral degree within the College of Graduate Studies has a Program Director
with autonomy to manage the administration and operation of her/his program under the general
supervision of the Dean of the College of Graduate Studies. Rob Simmons, DrPH, MPH, CHES,
was hired in July, 2007 to direct TJU’s MPH program. Each graduate program can establish its
own governance structure with appropriate committees and administrative oversight. Major
recommendations as to program policies, curriculum, and faculty are submitted to the College of
Graduate Studies, Committees where appropriate, and its Graduate Council for review and
approval.

Budgeting and resource allocation: Resources allocated to the Graduate School are set during
the annual budget process of the institution. This process is institution-wide and involves all
three colleges, Jefferson Medical College, Jefferson College of Health Professions, and Jefferson
College of Graduate Studies. Resources allocated to individual programs, including the MPH
program, are negotiated by the MPH Program Director, the JCGS Dean, and the JCGS Executive
Associate for Finance. Working with the Dean and the Executive Associate for Finance, Dr.
Simmons submitted a proposed budget for the 2008-2009 academic year based on projected
revenues and expenses for program expansion. That budget was incorporated with the budgets
for other doctoral and masters programs into the overall JCGS budget submitted to the
University for the 2008-2009 academic year. After submission of proposed budgets by each
graduate program, the College allocates indirect costs and other university expenses such as use
of classrooms, instructional audiovisual equipment, use of campus libraries and their equipment
and materials, and other University costs attributed to the College on a pro-rated basis, and
submits its budget to the University administration for review and approval.

Personnel recruitment: JCGS staff are recruited and hired according to policies of the
institution. When a JCGS staff member will be working primarily with a specific program, the
program directors take the lead in the decision-making process.

Faculty coordinating JCGS courses, including those for the Master of Public Health, are either
Members or Associate Graduate College Members or Adjunct Faculty. Adjunct Faculty are
generally appointed for a one-year renewable term, and may serve as Course Directors or
Instructors and as Research Advisors and Mentors for MPH degree candidates. These
appointments are considered by the Faculty Affairs Committee of the Graduate Council and
recommendations are presented to the Graduate Council. The MPH Program Director makes
formal recommendations for TJU faculty and adjunct faculty for the MPH Program. Faculty
may be recruited for a specific course based on programmatic need and not be otherwise
affiliated with Thomas Jefferson University. TJU faculty teaching in the MPH Program, have
their appointments in JCGS or one of the other two TJU colleges (College of Health Professions,



                                               47
and College of Medicine). Full-time faculty advancement is determined by the College of the
faculty’s primary appointment. MPH teaching, course evaluations research initiatives,
educational administration and committee service, educational scholarship, student mentoring,
and provision of service to one’s profession are included as part of the faculty’s portfolio for
consideration of promotion.

TJU and adjunct faculty teaching in the MPH Program are recruited by the MPH Program
Director and Program Coordinator, current faculty teaching in the MPH program, and
administration and faculty from other Departments who share information about faculty in other
programs who would be interested in teaching in the MPH Program as well as potential new
faculty and professionals who might be available to serve as adjunct faculty for the program.
Examples of departments and programs who have submitted names of potential MPH faculty
within TJU include the Department of Health Policy, the Department of Family and Community
Medicine, the College of Health Professions and the School of Nursing and programs in physical
therapy and occupational therapy, TJU’s programs serving seniors in the community, and the
TJU Kimmel Cancer Center. Recommendations for MPH faculty from both internal TJU and
external sources are by the MPH Program Director in communication with the MPH Curriculum
Coordinator, MPH Core Faculty, and the MPH Curriculum Committee.

Selection and advancement: Faculty in JCGS with primary appointments in Jefferson Medical
College or Jefferson College of Health Professions are subject to the selection and advancement
procedures of their specific departments and colleges. The JCGS is involved only in an advisory
capacity with respect to faculty advancement and shares information with the faculty’s primary
department and college upon request.

The MPH Program Director and MPH Program Coordinator are the only two staff of the MPH
Program with the Program Director also serving as a Core Faculty member of the MPH program.
The funding for these positions is currently shared between the JCGS and the Department of
Health Policy in the Jefferson Medical College with the Program Director’s faculty appointment
in that Department. Overall selection, supervision and performance evaluations for the two
MPH staff are conducted by the Department of Health Policy in consultation with the Dean of
the College of Graduate Studies. Other core MPH faculty are evaluated within their own
department in collaboration with the MPH Program staff, taking into consideration their
contribution to the MPH Program via their instruction, research, and community service.
Establishment of academic standards and policies: The Jefferson College of Graduate Studies is
governed by a set of By-Laws and the actions of its Graduate Council. The Graduate Council has
the authority to set academic policies and to recommend changes in the By-Laws. Ad hoc
committees for study of By-Law changes are appointed by the Dean. Changes to the By-Laws
must be approved by a one-third vote of Graduate Faculty. Academic standards are set both
within the Graduate School and by the specific programs. Dr. Simmons, as Director of the MPH
Program, is a member of Graduate Council. He also is a member of the JCGS Curriculum
Committee with oversight of curriculum for all doctoral and masters programs in the College.




                                                48
1.3d/e Collaborative Programs

Not applicable. There are no collaborative programs to date with the College of Graduate
Studies. As part of the MPH Program, there is a joint degree program with Widener University,
School of Law and their Health Law Institute to provide a joint JD/MPH and an MJ/MPH degree
program. In Fall 2008, the joint MD/MPH Program will be initiated in collaboration with the
Jefferson Medical College. Descriptions of the joint degree programs are described in Criterion
2.1.

1.3f Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met. The MPH program has been completely integrated into the University,
including its budgeting processes, personnel recruitment, and academic standards and policies.




                                               49
Criterion 1.4 Organization and Administration

The program shall provide an organizational setting conducive to teaching and learning,
research and service. The organizational setting shall facilitate interdisciplinary
communication, cooperation and collaboration. The organizational structure shall
effectively support the work of the program’s components.

1.4a   Organizational Charts

An organizational chart of the MPH program, showing the administrative organization of the
program is found on page 46.


1.4b   Roles and Responsibilities of Major Units of the MPH Organization Chart

The MPH program is under the leadership of Rob Simmons, DrPH, MPH, CHES, Clinical
Associate Professor at the Jefferson Medical College, Department of Health Policy, who came to
Jefferson in July, 2007. Dr. Simmons is responsible for the overall operations of the MPH
program. His specific roles and responsibilities are to:

   •   Maintain ultimate responsibility for the MPH educational program including the
       facilitation of new public health courses of instruction including teaching as needed
   •   Serve as the primary liaison for the program with University Administration, other
       Colleges, Schools and Departments within Thomas Jefferson University, and with the
       public health community in the region
   •   Insure that the MPH program is financially viable
   •   Manage program governance, as well as the accreditation process
   •   Supervise, mentor, and evaluate program faculty
   •   Supervise and mentor students; manage the student advising program
   •   Market and expand enrollment in the MPH program
   •   Participate in public health research projects performed by the Department of Health
       Policy and other Schools, and Departments as appropriate; attend Department meetings
   •   Involve staff in the identification of system issues and development of corrective actions.
   •   Problem identification, problem resolution, and compliance with all licensing/regulatory
       bodies, as applicable.
   •   Demonstrate commitment to our core values of excellence and innovation, integrity and
       respect, teamwork and communication

Dr. Simmons, as MPH Program Director, directly reports to Dean James Keen of the JCGS and
indirectly to Dr. Dennis Gross, Associate Dean & Director of Masters Degree and Graduate
Certificate Programs and meets with them on a bi-weekly basis. Dr. Simmons indirectly reports
to Drs. David Nash, and Richard Wender, Co-Chairs of the MPH Community Advisory Board
(CAB). The JCGS provides 65% of funding for Dr. Simmons with the remainder being covered
by the Department of Health Policy in the Jefferson Medical College.



                                               50
Ms. Lisa Chosed was hired in November, 2007 as the Program Coordinator for the MPH
program and reports directly to Dr Simmons. Her specific roles and responsibilities are to:

   •   Assist Program Director in the management of day-to-day operations of the MPH
       program
   •   Serve as a link across Thomas Jefferson colleges and departments for coordinated system
       public health activities
   •   Assist in the tracking of annual reports, budgets, and other administrative documents for
       the MPH program
   •   Maintain student records on a data base including post-graduation information on MPH
       graduates
   •   Perform course registration and other support services for MPH students including post-
       graduation communication and support
   •   Assist the Program Director and Associate Dean to seek fellowships, sponsorships, etc.
       for MPH program students
   •   Assist the Program Director and Associate Dean in the development and implementation
       of marketing and recruitment initiatives to broaden and enhance the program’s
       relationships with industry, government, and healthcare organizations
   •   Develop and distribute MPH informational materials used in program marketing and
       recruitment
   •   Participate in recruiting applicants/students for the program
   •   Prepare program materials for presentation to Graduate Council, Board of Trustees, and
       support preparation of materials to the national public health accrediting body (CEPH)
   •   Facilitate coordination and support of Thomas Jefferson sponsored public health
       educational events across the greater Philadelphia region in cooperation with the College
       of Graduate Studies, the Department of Health Policy, and other Schools and
       Departments within Thomas Jefferson University

Ms. Chosed had prior experience working in the administration of Jefferson’s College of
Graduate Studies for the previous two years. She will be completing her Master of Arts degree
in May of 2009 with an emphasis in digital design. Ms. Chosed has a strong interest in health
communications and has taken leadership in designing the MPH web-based and printed
materials. This position was formerly a part-time position and made full-time with the hiring of
Ms. Chosed. The JCGS provides 62% of funding for Ms. Chosed with the remainder being
covered by the Department of Health Policy.

MPH Core Faculty currently include Drs. Simmons, Brawer, Diamond, Maio, Plumb, Sarfaty,
and Yuen. Besides teaching in the MPH program, they have a varied percentage of their time
budgeted to the MPH program to interview applicants, serve as faculty advisors for students, and
serve on one or more of the various MPH committees. It is expected that additional core faculty
members will be added as the MPH program grows in the future.

The MPH Community Advisory Board (CAB) is co-chaired by David B. Nash MD, MBA, and
Richard C. Wender MD. Dr. Nash, Chair of the Department of Health Policy and Dr. Wender,



                                               51
Chair of the Department of Family and Community Medicine served as co-directors of the MPH
program prior to the hiring of Dr. Simmons in July, 2007. Dr. Simmons and Ms. Chosed provide
the main support for and communication with the CAB. The MPH CAB has greatly expanded
over the past year with a wide variety of representatives from community public health
organizations, professional organizations, academic institutions, health care institutions, private
business in the health field. The CAB meets semi-annually to review the MPH program and
provide input and recommendations on program improvement. Many of the CAB members and
their organizations serve as preceptors for MPH students in their Clerkship and/or Capstone
projects. The semi-annual meetings of the CAB are tied to a meeting with the MPH faculty
(Fall) and an end of the academic year meeting with the students which includes annual student
awards. A listing of members of the MPH CAB is provided in Appendix B. Also included in
Appendix B is an agenda from the Nov. 27, 2007 faculty meeting held in conjunction with the
CAB and the agenda from the May 28, 2008 CAB meeting held in combination with the end of
the year MPH student awards ceremony. By linking the CAB meetings with the faculty and
with the students, CAB members can become more engaged with the MPH program,
increasingly the likelihood for collaboration with faculty, our students, the program and Thomas
Jefferson University. For example, CAB members are encouraged to serve as mentors for
students with similar career interests, Clerkship/Thesis/Capstone experiences and provide links
to potential job opportunities. In addition, CAB members provide updates on public health
trends/needs related to practice. CAB members receive regular communication from the MPH
program including the MPH Program Newsletter (PH Link), public health professional
development events held by TJU’s MPH program and other public health academic institutions
in the region, student presentations, and other relevant public health information. Copies of the
MPH newsletter and flyers from MPH symposia and other public health events are referenced in
Criterion 3.3 under workforce development.

The MPH Program Committee, chaired by the Director of the MPH Program, meets monthly
and is responsible for overseeing the MPH program, including all other MPH committees
(Curriculum Committee, Accreditation and Program Evaluation Committee, Student Affairs
Committee). The roles and responsibilities of this Committee include strategic planning,
decision making/approval of new policies and procedures, and addressing fundamental issues
related to course/degree offerings, faculty issues/development, and student
achievement/concerns. The committee is chaired by Dr. Simmons and consists of the Co-Chairs
of the MPH Community Advisory Board, all committee chairs and co-chairs, the JCGS
Associate Dean and Director of Masters Degrees and Graduate Certificate Programs, the JCGS
Director of Admissions, the MPH Program Coordinator, many of the MPH Core Faculty, and a
student representative. A list of the MPH Program Committee members are as follows:




                                                52
Program Committee
                    Name                                             Position
Rob Simmons, DrPH,MPH                              Chair - Program Director
David Nash, MD                                     Co-Chair CAB
Richard Wender, MD                                 Co-Chair CAB
Lisa Chosed                                        MPH Coordinator
James Plumb, MD, MPH                               Core Faculty
Rickie Brawer, PhD, MPH                            Core Faculty
James Diamond, PhD                                 Core Faculty
Mona Sarfaty, MD                                   Core Faculty
Vittorio Maio, PharmD, MPH                         Core Faculty
Dennis Gross, PhD, MS                              Representative from CGS
Caroline Golab PhD                                 Department of Health Policy/ JSHPPH
Marc Stearns                                       Representative from CGS Admissions
Elizabeth Brooks, DVM                              Representative from JMC Admissions
Patrick McManus, MD                                Representative from Department of Family
                                                   and Community Medicine
Edward Grove                                       Alumni Representative
Patrick Gomella                                    Student Representative

The MPH Curriculum Committee is responsible for curriculum development and ensuring that
MPH core competencies and related learning objectives are reflected in course syllabi of all
MPH core courses. The Curriculum Committee meets monthly to discuss issues related to new
course development, curricular issues related to joint degree programs, course sequencing,
course evaluation, student concerns regarding curriculum, registration processes, admissions
policies, advising procedures, Clerkship and Thesis/Capstone requirements and curricular
concerns of specific students with input from the Student Affairs Committee. Major curriculum
decisions made by the Committee are reported up to the MPH Program Committee who in turn,
where appropriate, submit recommendations to the JCGS via the MPH Program Director and
Program Coordinator. For example, a recommended new course offering would be reviewed and
approved by the MPH Curriculum Committee, would then be reviewed by the MPH Program
Committee and upon approval, would go to the JCGS Curriculum Committee for review and
submission to the JCGS Graduate Council for approval. Although this process includes several
layers of oversight, in most cases, policies and courses proposed by the MPH Curriculum
Committee are often expedited and may be approved within a month or less. In addition, the
committee provides input to the MPH Program Director and Program Coordinator on the
planning and coordination of professional development opportunities offered to the Jefferson and
the Philadelphia community. Curriculum Committee members include Core Faculty, the MPH
Program Coordinator, teaching faculty representing core courses and electives, and
representatives from the TJU Library, School of Nursing, the College of Health Professions
(CHP), and an MPH student representative. Below is the list of the MPH Curriculum Committee
members:




                                              53
Curriculum Committee
Name                                                  Position
Mona Sarfaty, MD                                      Chair
Rob Simmons, DrPH,MPH                                 Program Director
Lisa Chosed                                           MPH Coordinator
James Plumb, MD, MPH                                  Core Faculty
Rickie Brawer, PhD, MPH                               Core Faculty
Vittorio Maio, PharmD, MSPH                           Core Faculty
Elaine Yuen, PhD                                      Core Faculty
Dan Kipnis                                            Representative from Scott Library
Molly Rose, PhD, RN                                   Representative from School of Nursing
Reena Antony                                          Representative from Jeff Mentors
Kathy Swenson Miller, PhD                             Representative from CHP (OT)
Al Crawford, PhD                                      MPH faculty
Amy Micheli                                           Student Representative
Abbie Santana                                         Student Representative

The MPH Accreditation and Program Evaluation Committee is responsible for continuous
quality improvement of the MPH program and oversees the CEPH Accreditation Self-Study
process including CEPH annual reports and any interim reports as required. The Committee
addresses all formal assessment processes with students, alumni, and faculty, and evaluates and
monitors the program’s overall efforts against its mission, goals and objectives. It uses the
CEPH self-study process as the foundation for on-going evaluation and is responsible for
planning/conducting assessments and analyzing information acquired during this process.
Specifically the Committee conducts on-going assessment of student achievement, the program’s
effectiveness in serving its students, faculty, the university and the community at large, as well as
professional leadership at the state and national level. The Committee is made up of many of the
MPH Core Faculty, a faculty assistant, the MPH Program Director, the MPH Program
Coordinator and a student representative. The Accreditation and Program Evaluation Committee
has been meeting on a regular basis to develop/revise quality improvement assessments as part of
our self-study process. The committee works closely with both the Curriculum and Student
Affairs Committees to ensure program continuity and integration. The Accreditation and
Program Evaluation Committee utilizes multiple measures and both quantitative and qualitative
evaluation methods to monitor and assess program effectiveness. Copies of all survey and
assessment tools used by the Committee are included in Appendix A.
A list of the MPH Accreditation and Program Evaluation Committee members follows:




                                                 54
Accreditation and Program Evaluation Committee
Name                                         Position
Rickie Brawer, PhD, MPH                      Chair
Mona Sarfaty, MD                             Core Faculty
Rob Simmons, DrPH,MPH                        Program Director
Lisa Chosed                                  MPH Coordinator
James Plumb, MD, MPH                         Core Faculty
James Diamond, PhD                           Core Faculty
Erin Whitesell, MPH                          Course Assistant
Michelle Marinucci                           Student

In addition to the formal MPH committees, the MPH Program Director and MPH Program
Coordinator meet regularly with the other Core Faculty of the MPH Program. MPH program
operations that involve the MPH Core Faculty, such as student advising and monitoring, career
advising, ongoing communication with students, MPH professional development community
events, among other items are discussed at the MPH Core Faculty meetings. A listing of the
seven MPH Core Faculty are included in Criterion 4.

The role of the Student Affairs Committee is to provide a formal mechanism for students to
make program recommendations and to voice concerns with MPH program administrators,
providing students with a formal process for input to the program. This new committee was
formed due to the lack of a formal mechanism for students to provide input into the MPH
program. The committee is facilitated by two MPH Core Faculty and the MPH Program
Coordinator. The committee addresses issues that impact students such as program policies and
curriculum, Clerkship/Capstone experiences, academic counseling, communications, career
support, research and service opportunities, and student life issues, among others. Individual
student issues that do not impact on other students are addressed via a student’s faculty advisor
and direct communication with the MPH Program Director and MPH Program Coordinator. At
least 50% of the committee members are MPH students. Issues discussed at this meeting are
shared, as appropriate, with other committees so that plans can be initiated to address the
identified concerns. A list of the MPH Student Affairs Committee members follows:

Student Affairs Committee
Name                                                        Position
James Plumb, MD, MPH                                        Co-Chair
Vittorio Maio, PharmD, MPH                                  Co-Chair
Lisa Chosed                                                 MPH Coordinator
Erin Whitesell, MPH                                         Course Assistant
Katie Thomas                                                Student/SAPHE representative
Joshua Schoppe                                              Student
Maura Murphy                                                Student/ SAPHE representative
Salini Mohanty                                              Student




                                               55
The Student Association for Public Health Education (SAPHE) is a student-run service
organization of the MPH program and is one of the over 100 student associations and clubs
within the TJU system. SAPHE has a small budget from the university and holds regular
meetings to plan student service activities related to public health and social services in the
greater Philadelphia area. SAPHE selects its own officers and helps recruit MPH students to
serve on the various MPH committees. It also coordinates the annual student awards selection
and ceremony at the end of the academic year. Examples of SAPHE projects include a clothing
drive for a homeless shelter, and distribution of grocery store recycling bags.

1.4c   Interdisciplinary Coordination, Cooperation, and Collaboration

Administratively, support for the collaboration among these disciplines comes from the JCGS
Dean who is responsible for the academic, operational, and financial success of the Graduate
College and its programs. He reports to the President of the University and is the Chief
Academic and Administrative Officer for the JCGS. Further support for these efforts is provided
by Associate and Assistant Deans of each of the graduate degree programs, including the MPH.
The MPH Program consists of faculty and students from a variety of professional disciplines
from across the university. Such cross discipline brings a richness of experience, perspective and
application of public health core concepts and processes. The membership of the MPH Program
Committee and Curriculum Committees and its Community Advisory Board, described above,
are examples of interdisciplinary coordination and collaboration. The MPH faculty represents
the diverse core disciplines within public health and the students have several electives that
further enhance their exposure to multiple disciplines.

The MPH Core Faculty also serves on a variety of University committees. Participation in these
committees raises awareness throughout the University community about the MPH activities, but
also increases MPH faculty awareness of opportunities for cooperation/ collaboration with
faculty from other Departments and Colleges within the University. Such examples include the
TJU Inter-Professional Education Committee with the MPH Program Director serving on its
steering committee. The Program Director also serves on the Thomas Jefferson Hospital’s
Community Benefit Committee as do Drs. Plumb and Brawer representing the Department of
Family and Community Medicine and the Jefferson Hospital. A list of Core Faculty Committee
membership is provided below.




                                               56
Faculty member                         Jefferson Committee
Rob Simmons, DrPH, MPH, CHES           Interdisciplinary Professional Education Committee
                                       University Community Benefit Committee
                                       Graduate School Council
                                       JCGS Curriculum Committee
                                       Jeff Mentors Steering Committee
Mona Sarfaty, MD                       JMC Curriculum Committee
James Plumb, MD, MPH                   JMC Student Affairs Committee
                                       Professorial Faculty Advisory Committee
                                       Community Benefit Committee
                                       Chair of the Community Medicine Section
                                       DFCM Executive Committee
                                       DFCM Research Steering Committee
                                       ICM I & II Steering Committee
                                       JMC Learning Society Executive Committee
                                       Jeff Mentors Steering Committee
James Diamond, PhD                     JMC Admissions Committee
                                       Professional Code of Conduct Committee
                                       DFCM Research Steering Committee
Rickie Brawer, PhD, MPH, CHES          Institutional Review Board
                                       Community Benefit Committee
                                       Jeff Mentors Steering Committee
                                       DFCM Research Steering Committee

Within TJU, there is an increasing emphasis on interdisciplinary initiatives both within and
outside of the University. The MPH Program is involved in a number of interdisciplinary
projects and committees. Program examples include: 1) participation in the system Jeff Health
Mentors service learning program where medical, nursing, allied health, pharmacy, and now
public health students works in teams with chronically ill persons who serve as “mentors” to the
students over a two year period; and 2) collaborative development of a course entitled, “Cultural
Humility and Competence for Health Care and Public Health Professionals” that will be offered
to allied health and public health students beginning in the fall. An example of external
collaboration is the involvement of Jefferson’s MPH program in the Philadelphia College of
Physicians’ Section on Public Health and Preventive Medicine which coordinates professional
public health programs across public health academic programs in Philadelphia in cooperation
with the Philadelphia Department of Public Health. An example of collaboration is the
development of a History of Public Health course that will be offered at the Philadelphia College
of Physicians (Mutter Museum) through all five academic institutions that provide graduate
public health training.

The multidisciplinary nature of public health is further illustrated in the student Thesis (MSPH)
and Capstone (MPH) projects. The student Thesis and Capstone Committees generally reflect
multiple disciplines, exposing the students to a variety of concepts as they complete their
community-based projects. The faculty’s links throughout the University and to the public


                                                57
health community throughout the region enriches opportunities for collaborative and coordinated
instruction, service and research.

1.4d   Fair and Ethical Dealings

TJU and the JCGS have written policies that address the importance of fairness and ethical
practices. The University has established the TJU Code of Conduct that provides the basic
guidance for members of the TJU community to achieve the highest ethical and professional
standards and compliance with all applicable laws and regulations. (Policy Number 107.02) As a
dynamic document, the Code of Conduct policy is revised to demonstrate TJU’s commitment to
the expected ethical conduct of its community. These expectations include but are not limited to
the avoidance of conflicts of interests, employing the highest standards of patient care, and
maintaining the appropriate levels of confidentiality as well as the highest standards of academic
integrity in regard to research. (See Appendix D for copies of appropriate TJU and JCGS
policies).

Those faculty who have their primary appointments through the Jefferson Medical College are
regulated by the College’s Professional Code of Conduct Committee (PCCC) that was formed in
July 2007 with members elected by their peers. One of the MPH Core Faculty, Dr. James
Diamond, serves on this Committee. The PCCC meets monthly to deal with issues relating to
unprofessional and unethical behavior by JMC faculty. The PCCC is not a disciplinary body and
can not make a determination of guilt. It is charged with exploring the problem with the faculty
member(s) involved. The following options are available to it: (1) no further action; (2)
remedial action through assistance to the faculty person and based upon his/her concurrence: (3)
deferred action for future contingencies; (4) referral to the Dean of JMC; (5) referral to the
Faculty Affairs Committee; and (6) other action as appropriate.

The MPH Program is committed to ethics both in the incorporation of public health ethical issues
within its instruction, research and service as well as its policies related to the MPH program.
Examples of such policies include: 1) the allowance of conversion of the MSPH degree program
to a MPH degree for those students who entered the TJU’s public health program prior to fall,
2007 when the MSPH was offered; 2) the MPH program credit transfer policy that allows
students to transfer up to nine required or elective credits from an accredited public health school
or program. Copies of such policies and guidelines are included in Appendix E.

In addition, to ensure ethical behavior in research, all MPH students are required to pass
Jefferson’s IRB exam as part of their Capstone Seminar in preparation for their Capstone project.
Dr. Brawer serves on the IRB to raise awareness about ethical issues specific to community-
based research.




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1.4e   Student Grievance and Complaints

Students play an important and active role in the MPH program. An MPH Student Affairs
Committee has been established to address general student issues within the program. MPH
students are also represented on each of the MPH committees, providing an opportunity for
students to share their perspectives on various program components. A recent example has been
the previous MPH Program policy on granting transfer credits that was restricted to elective
credits only. Two students submitted formal requests to allow transfer of core courses from
accredited public health institutions due to scheduling and other reasons. After review of the
requests, the MPH Curriculum and Program Committees approved the requests and changed its
policy to allow transfer credits up to a maximum of nine for a combination of required and/or
elective MPH courses. The student justifications regarding the fidelity of such courses by
accredited MPH Schools and Programs served as a basis for these policy changes. Over the past
three years, there have been no grievances filed by MPH students.

1.4f   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met

This criterion is met. TJU, the JCGS, and the MPH program provide an organizational setting
conducive to public health teaching and learning, research, and community service.




                                              59
Criterion 1.5 Governance

The program administration and faculty shall have clearly defined rights and
responsibilities concerning program governance and academic policies. Students shall,
where appropriate, have participatory roles in conduct of program evaluation procedures,
policy-setting and decision-making.

1.5a   Description of the program’s governance

The College of Graduate Studies (JCGS) is one of the Colleges of Thomas Jefferson University
and is concerned with graduate education leading to Master of Public Health, Master of Science,
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees, and with the research and services that relates to these
programs. It is responsible for the planning, operation, and administration of the educational
programs of Thomas Jefferson University that lead to the Master’s degree and to doctoral
degrees other than the Doctor of Medicine degree and the allied health degrees that are the
responsibility of the College of Health Professions. The MPH program is one of the Masters
programs within the JCGS. This section describes the governance and administrative structure of
the JCGS and of the MPH program specifically.

The ultimate governance authority of the JCGS and all its programs rests with the Board of
Trustees of Thomas Jefferson University, which is responsible for approving the Bylaws of the
College and for approving the selection of its Dean. The President of Thomas Jefferson
University is the Chief Executive Officer of the University and serves as liaison between the
Dean of the JCGS and the Board of Trustees of the University. The Dean reports directly to the
University President, Robert Barchi MD, PhD.

The Dean of the JCGS serves as its Chief Executive Officer. The Dean is responsible for
preparing the annual budget of the College and for preparing an annual report for the President of
TJU. The Dean assesses resource requirements, including space and equipment, and periodically
prepares a report about these resource needs for the President. Additional responsibilities
include appointment of Assistant and Associate Deans. He sits on the Scientific and Academic
Affairs Committee of the Board of Trustees and gives a report at each meeting of this group
regarding the decisions of the Graduate Faculty and the Graduate Council.

The Graduate Council, chaired by the Dean of the JCGS, is delegated by the Graduate Faculty to
act on its behalf in any matter in which the Graduate Faculty has academic authority and
responsibility. Council's functions include:

   1. Establishing policies, along with the Dean, for governing the admission of students to the
      JCGS.
   2. Setting academic standards for maintenance of enrollment and consideration of cases of
      student failure to maintain prescribed levels of scholarship. In such cases, the Graduate
      Council is the ultimate authority as to whether a student should continue in graduate
      study.
   3. Recommending to the Board of Trustees candidates for graduate degrees.


                                               60
   4. Receiving and approving proposals for new graduate courses and determining whether
      such courses are appropriate for graduate study at the JCGS.
   5. Receiving and considering nominations for membership in the Graduate Faculty.
   6. Approving new graduate programs and recommending to the Board of Trustees the
      granting of graduate degrees not yet conferred by the University.
   7. Arranging for periodic review of the individual graduate programs.

The Graduate Council meets at least eight times per year and distributes meeting minutes to the
entire graduate faculty. In addition to the Graduate Council, the JCGS also has several standing
committees: Faculty Appointments; Student Affairs; Curriculum; Awards and Fellowships; and
Policies and Procedures. These committees play an advisory role to the Dean and the Graduate
Council. The MPH Program Director is a voting member of the Graduate Council and also a
member of the JCGS Curriculum Committee. He also represents the JCGS on Jefferson’s
Community Benefit Steering Committee.

The MPH Program Director, in cooperation with the MPH Program Committee and the
committees that report to it, has overall responsibility for the MPH Program policy development.
The MPH Program Director in cooperation with the MPH Program Committee and the
Accreditation and Program Evaluation Committee developed and approved the program’s
revised mission, core values, program goals and objectives. They were subsequently reviewed
and approved by the Dean of the College of Graduate Studies. The MPH Program Committee
and the Accreditation and Program Evaluation Committee are responsible for periodic reviews of
the program's mission, goals and objectives. MPH Program policies often are developed by its
committees, particularly Accreditation and Program Evaluation, and Curriculum, and then
submitted to the MPH Program Committee for review, which upon approval, are transmitted to
the JCGS for review and approval.

The implementation of MPH policies and procedures are conducted by MPH Program Director
and Program Coordinator in cooperation with the MPH Core Faculty and the various committees
of the MPH Program.

The JCGS overall budget and all program budgets of the JCGS are established during the annual
budget process of the institution. This process is institution-wide and involves all three colleges
of TJU. Resources allocated to the individual programs within the JCGS, such as the MPH
program, are negotiated by the program's directors, the JCGS Dean, and the JCGS Executive
Associate for Finance. The JCGS Dean is responsible for assessing resource needs for all
Graduate degree programs, including the MPH. Following consideration of the budgetary
requirements of each of the component programs, the Dean compiles the budget that is presented
to the Board of Trustees. Budgetary support is provided for time devoted to teaching and for
administrative support and leadership of programs. Budgetary allocations are also available for
marketing of programs, orientation of students, professional and workforce development
programs, and meetings of external committees including the MPH Community Advisory Board.
The Program Director of the MPH program, with guidance from the MPH Program Committee,
submits his assessment of program needs to the Dean and is notified of specific budgetary



                                                61
allocation for instructional needs specific to the MPH program. Allocation for direct teaching
expenses via TJU faculty, adjunct faculty, and faculty assistants are budgeted according to a
formula that is applied to all teachers of graduate school courses.

The recruitment of graduate students is a joint effort of the JCGS and the faculty of the
individual degree programs. Printed material describing the programs (Graduate College
Catalogs, brochures, posters and flyers), as well as participation in graduate recruitment fairs are
the primary responsibility of the Graduate Admissions Office. The director of admissions and
recruitment coordinates overall recruitment activities for the JCGS. Faculty members from
various departments strengthen recruitment efforts by attending area fairs and hosting continuing
education programs. The JCGS Admissions Office recruits at 15-20 organized college fairs each
year including programs like Idealist.org graduate fairs and arranges small group class
presentation at colleges and universities through faculty contacts or career service offices.
Minority recruitment efforts include visits to HBCU-Xavier, Morehouse, and Spellman
Universities, Fattah Conference on Higher Education, McNair Scholars Graduate School as well
as meetings at local universities in the greater Philadelphia region such as Cheney and Lincoln
Universities.

Criteria for admission to the JCGS masters programs are available at:
http://www.jefferson.edu/jcgs/admissions/tests/apply_ms.cfm. Online applications are available
at: http://www.jefferson.edu/jcgs/admissions/apponline.cfm.

Student recruitment into the MPH program is coordinated by the MPH Program Director and
Program Coordinator in association with the JCGS Director of Admissions (who sits on the MPH
Program Committee), the core MPH faculty, and the various committees of the program.
Awarding of degrees is coordinated by the Jefferson College of Graduate Studies in accordance
with the policies of TJU. All programs within the JCGS are asked to submit a list of students
who are planning to graduate in the late spring, typically late May or the first week of June.
Students may complete their MPH requirements in any of the College’s four terms but may only
officially graduate in the spring. Students may obtain from the TJU Registrar’s Office a letter of
completion of the MPH and its requirements at the end of any term that those requirements have
been completed with the approval of the MPH Program Office. Such letters of completion are
often useful for career opportunities in public health such as jobs, grants, internships, and
continuing graduate education.

Current students contribute greatly to recruitment initiatives either through their organizational
affiliations, e.g., Graduate Student Association (GSA), Jefferson African-American Student
Society (JAASS), and the Student Association of Public Health Education (SAPHE) - or serve as
hosts for student visits, assist at Open House programs, and serve as tour guides for visitors to
the University.

Prospective students are able to access information regarding the MPH Program via the
University and MPH-specific website (www.jefferson.edu/mph). Students are able to download
MPH information materials and TJU application forms or apply on-line.



                                                62
Applicants to the MPH Program are reviewed by the JCGS Admissions Office to verify
completeness of the application. Completed applications are reviewed by the Associate Dean for
Masters Degree and Certificate Programs and forwarded to the MPH Program Office. The MPH
Program Coordinator then arranges interview dates and times with two of the seven MPH Core
Faculty. Each conducts an in-person or telephone interview (those greater than two hours
driving time from Philadelphia are given the option of a telephone interview) and completes a
standard interview form of acceptance or non-acceptance that is forwarded to the MPH Program
Office. In the case of agreement between the two faculty interviewers, the Program Coordinator
submits the results of the interview to the JCGS Admissions Office who generates an appropriate
response to the applicant. In the case of a disagreement between the two interviewers, the
applicant file is reviewed by the MPH Program Director who may choose to have the two faculty
members communicate directly with each other about the applicant to gain consensus or have a
third faculty member interview the applicant. Applicants who are not initially accepted in the
MPH program may be encouraged to pursue the 15 credit public health certificate. If the student
does well in the certificate program, s/he may re-apply to the MPH Program and if accepted,
credits earned in the certificate program are applied to the MPH Program. Besides an
acceptance letter sent to the applicant by the College, the MPH Program sends a separate letter to
each accepted applicant asking the applicant to communicate back to the MPH Program his/her
acceptance within three weeks. Positive responses result in establishing a student file, the
assignment of a faculty advisor, and the mailing of a welcome packet to the future student.

Through advertisements in various sources, interested parties are able to access information on
TJU’s MPH program. A Jefferson College of Graduate Studies informational booklet is
distributed to academic institutions and to all prospective applicants. General information
regarding the MPH is contained in the MPH Program brochure in Appendix F. Also included in
Appendix F are the MD/MPH brochure and the JD/MPH, MJ/MPH brochure.

As part of our on-going initiatives, Jefferson College of Graduate Studies faculty members and
administration visit a number of undergraduate colleges and universities. In addition, some
faculty members attend area graduate recruitment fairs and meet with prospective applicants at
various seminars and conferences throughout the year. JCGS admissions staff in conjunction
with departmental faculty host quarterly information sessions about graduate programs including
the MPH. In addition, the MPH Program Director, Program Coordinator, Core Faculty, and the
Co-Chairs of the MPH Program Committee meet with prospective students throughout the year
in formal and informal settings. Over the past year, a number of informational sessions on the
MPH program have occurred at Widener University School of Law for the joint degree JD/MPH
and MJ/MPH programs and at Jefferson Medical College events reaching prospective and 1st,
2nd, and 3rd year Jefferson medical students to discuss the new joint MD/MPH degree program
beginning in Fall 2008.

Graduate recruitment fairs provide excellent opportunities for interaction with undergraduate
students. JCGS administrators, faculty and students attend the "grad fairs." While on the various
undergraduate campuses, representatives often meet with faculty and academic advisors.




                                               63
The faculty who participate in the MPH program are subject to the same policies as all other
University faculty. Course instructors must have a faculty appointment in the JCGS, although
individuals without a faculty appointment may be invited to teach selected classes. Members of
the JCGS faculty have their primary appointment in another College of the University, such as
Jefferson Medical College (JMC) or the College of Health Professions (JCHP). There are three
levels of appointment for faculty to the JCGS: Member, Associate Member, and Adjunct
Member. Adjunct Members are generally appointed for a one-year renewable term, and may
serve as course directors or instructors and as research advisors and mentors for MPH degree
candidates. The JCGS does not customarily grant a title such as Professor at any rank or with
any prefix and does not grant tenure. The College in which the faculty member has his or her
primary appointment grants all specific ranks and tenure. Jefferson Medical College has four
faculty tracks defined as Clinical and Educational Scholarship, Clinician Educator, Research, and
Academic Investigator. Only faculty in the Academic Investigator and Clinical Educational
Scholarship tracks are tenure-eligible. Faculty with key roles in clinical and/or education
programs represent the Clinical and Educational Scholarship track. Researchers can choose to be
in either the non-tenure Research track or in the tenure-eligible Academic Investigator track.
Clinical Educators are those clinical faculty involved in the University’s educational programs.

To obtain a faculty appointment in one of the Colleges that grants appointments, one must be
recommended by a specific department. This process is outlined in the bylaws of the specific
College in which the department is located. Each department in the JMC is required to have a
standing Appointments and Promotions Committee that is responsible for reviewing each faculty
candidate and each candidate for promotion to a new rank. This Committee issues a
recommendation for or against this action to the Chair of the Department who is ultimately
responsible for forwarding a recommendation to the Promotions Committee of the JMC, a
standing Committee comprised of faculty members at the Professorial rank. This committee has
two responsibilities. First, it authors the guidelines for promotion to various ranks, and second,
makes the ultimate recommendation for action on new appointments or promotions to JMC's
Executive Council. If this body approves this recommendation, it is forwarded to the Board of
Trustees of the University for final approval. The JMC has established an Office of Faculty
Development. In addition to offering many programs on a large variety of topics that are
available to all faculty members, this office works with Department Chairs to ensure that annual
performance reviews are conducted in a timely manner and that mentorship is provided to all
faculty, particularly those at the more junior ranks.

The University also has a Professorial Advisory Committee that acts as the "voice" of the
faculty. The Committee has members from both clinical and basic science departments and
brings matters of concern to the administration and the Board of Trustees.

Per JMC Bylaws, the Committee on Faculty Affairs "shall make recommendations on all matters
concerning faculty welfare, faculty awards, sabbatical leave, and all grievances except where
dismissal with cause or compliance violations are at issue."




                                               64
Department Chairs are responsible for ensuring that faculty members have adequate guidance
and opportunity to pursue promotion and that faculty salaries and total compensation are as
attractive as possible relative to American Association of Medical Colleges salary levels and to
local benchmarks.

Information on JMC faculty affairs, appointments, promotion, bylaws, faculty development,
evaluation, funding, committees hiring and employment, and the TJU and JMC Faculty
Handbook are available online at www.jefferson.edu/jmc/faculty.

Recruitment of faculty occurs within the context of the University environment and extends
beyond it to the outside contacts of the MPH faculty and Community Advisory Board. It also
includes all the typical means of recruitment utilized by academic medical centers. Within the
context of the academic medical center which is comprised of a health science university
attached to a health system, there are many researchers and physicians within the larger system
who hold MPH degrees who are potentially qualified to teach core subjects or electives for the
MPH program. Thus recruitment often occurs internally within the university and the health
system. Because Philadelphia is home to four academic medical centers and is a city with a
diverse array of public health programs and agencies, recruitment within the immediate area
based on faculty and departmental contacts is often productive. The contacts of Community
Advisory Board members and of the Senior Scholars group established by the Department of
Health Policy can also be fruitful. Recruitment extends to a national audience as well via the
Jefferson website, medical and public health journals, and professional association listings.
Recruitment responsibility may be vested in the Program Director, the Chair of the MPH
Curriculum Committee, or shared with the Research Director of the Department of Health Policy
(DHP). This latter individual is often recruiting for new research positions. This provides an
opportunity to hire faculty who split their time between research and teaching.

TJU and Adjunct Faculty teaching in the MPH program are recruited by the MPH Program
Director and Program Coordinator, current faculty teaching in the MPH program, and
administration and faculty from other departments who share information about faculty in other
programs who would be interested in teaching in the MPH program as well as potential new
faculty and professionals who might be available to serve as Adjunct Faculty for the program.
Examples of departments and programs who have submitted names of potential MPH faculty
within TJU include the Departments of Health Policy and Family and Community Medicine in
the JMC, the College of Health Professions, and its School of Nursing, and programs in physical
therapy and occupational therapy, TJU’s programs serving seniors in the community, and the
TJU Kimmel Cancer Center. Recommendations of potential instructors for the MPH program,
be they existing TJU faculty or potential adjunct faculty from community organizations, are sent
to the MPH program office. The MPH Program Director may directly contact the potential
instructor in-person or over the phone to learn more their professional background, teaching
experience, and interest in teaching in the MPH program. Potential faculty or adjunct faculty are
reviewed with the MPH Curriculum Committee Chair and the entire committee in the context of
instruction for existing MPH courses or proposed new courses. If an instructor and course is
recommended for the MPH program, it is submitted to the JCGS Curriculum Committee and/or



                                               65
Faculty Affairs Committee for review. Recommended faculty and courses (either new courses or
changes to existing courses) approved by the JCGS committee(s) are forwarded to the Dean of
the JCGS and placed on the agenda for the JCGS Graduate Council for consideration and a
decision of the new faculty/course.

TJU faculty teaching in the MPH program, have their primary appointments in one or both of the
other two TJU colleges, typically, the Jefferson Medical College. Full-time faculty advancement
is determined by the college of the faculty’s primary appointment. MPH course evaluations are
included as part of the faculty’s portfolio for consideration of promotion along with research
initiatives, educational administration and committee service, educational scholarship, student
mentoring, and provision of service to one’s profession and the TJU community, and in the
Greater Philadelphia area.

Faculty in the JCGS with primary appointments in Jefferson Medical College or Jefferson
College of Health Professions are subject to the selection and advancement procedures of their
specific departments and colleges. The JCGS is involved only in an advisory capacity with
respect to faculty advancement and shares information with the faculty’s primary Department
and College upon request.

In order to be considered making satisfactory academic progress, the student is required to
maintain a cumulative grade point average of no less than B (3.0). A student whose grade point
average falls below B is placed on academic probation and required to connect with her/his
faculty advisor for support and assistance. The MPH faculty advisor (MPH Core Faculty) plays
an important role in working with the student to address issues that have lead to the student lack
of satisfactory academic progress. Often the advisor will recommend remedial assistance to
assist the student to improve his/her performance. Organizational issues related to the provision
of remedial assistance are discussed at MPH Core Faculty meetings and recommendations for
enhanced student support may be considered by the MPH Program Director.

Students on academic probation who have not been able to obtain a cumulative grade point
average of 3.0 or higher after two consecutive probationary terms must petition the MPH
Program and the JCGS Graduate Council for permission to continue as a student in the Graduate
College, or be discharged from the College. The student must submit the petition in writing to
the MPH Program Office and the Dean of the JCGS for consideration by the JCGS Graduate
Council. Upon a recommendation by the MPH Program, the Graduate Council will make a
decision either to allow the student to continue study in the Graduate College or to dismiss the
student. In the former case, Council and the MPH Program will define a set of recommended
conditions under which the student may be allowed to continue study. The decision of the
Council will be placed in the student’s file in the MPH Program Office and will be provided to
the student in writing and is final.

In accordance with the Bylaws of the JCGS, graduate faculty members are responsible for the
academic and research programs of the College. Participation in research is not, however, an
absolute requirement for membership on the JCGS Faculty. Some faculty members serve



                                                66
exclusively as teachers or program leaders. A copy of the JCGS bylaws will be available in the
on-site Resource File. Since faculty hold their primary appointment in the JMC or JCHP, their
research portfolio and experience is evaluated by those colleges for contract renewal and tenure
as appropriate.

As described in Criterion 1.1 and 1.2, the MPH Program has established goals and objectives in
the areas of instruction, research, and service. These goals and objectives focus on program
expectations for students, faculty, and overall MPH program administration. MPH faculty,
regardless of their faculty appointment, are expected to demonstrate competence in all three core
areas of the program.

1.5b Copy of constitution, bylaws or other policy document that determines the rights
and obligations of administration, faculty, and students in governance

The Bylaws of the University define responsibilities throughout the University. Specifically, the
Bylaws define the responsibilities of the governing board, the duties of the President (as chief
executive officer) and the senior officers. The mission of each of the University divisions and
responsibilities of the Board’s standing committees are also detailed in the Bylaws (Current
University Bylaws were adopted by the Board of Trustees on June 2, 2003). In addition, each
College has its own Bylaws that conform to the University’s mission. The Jefferson College of
Graduate Studies policies are found at: www.jefferson.edu/jcgs/policies. A copy of the Bylaws
is included in Appendix D.

1.5c A list of standing and important ad hoc committees, with a statement of charge,
composition, and current membership for each.

The MPH Program Office, staffed by the MPH Program Director and MPH Program Coordinator
in cooperation with the MPH Program Committee, the MPH Curriculum Committee, the MPH
Accreditation and Program Evaluation Committee, and the MPH Student Affairs Committee
make up the program's key administrative bodies. A listing of MPH committees and its
membership were referenced in Criterion 1.4.

1.5d Identification of program faculty who hold membership on university committees,
through which faculty contributes to the activities of the university.

MPH faculty participates in a wide range of committees in the JCGS, JMC and the Thomas
Jefferson University Hospital. In addition, MPH faculty participates in a large number of
regional and national organizations and committees that have relevance to public health practice
and education. A listing of MPH program faculty who hold membership on university
committees are found in Criterion 1.4 b.




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1.5e Description of student roles in governance, including any formal student
organizations, and student roles in evaluation of program functioning.

MPH students play an active role in governance of the MPH Program. A student representative,
selected through the student SAPHE organization is a member of all MPH committees with the
newly formed Student Affairs Committee having at least 50% of its membership being students.
Students also provide input to the MPH program through course evaluations, student-faculty
advisor meetings, and their exit interview.

In addition, an active student service organization, the Student Association for Public Health
Education (SAPHE) provides an opportunity for MPH students to meet and address MPH issues
as well as planning health-related community service activities. Dr. Jim Plumb serves as the
faculty advisor for SAPHE. The SAPHE organization is one of over 30 student organizations on
the TJU campus and interfaces with other student organizations on campus. An example of a
recent project of the SAPHE organization is the planning of the year-end student, faculty, and
community service award ceremony as part of the MPH Community Advisory Board meeting.

1.5f   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met

This criterion of governance of the MPH Program within the Jefferson College of Graduate
Studies and Thomas Jefferson University is met.




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Criterion 1.6 Resources

The program shall have resources adequate to fulfill its stated mission and goals, and its
instructional, research and service objectives.

1.6a   Description of the budgetary and allocation process

Resources allocated to the Graduate School are set during the annual budget process of the
institution. This process is institution-wide and involves all three colleges, Jefferson Medical
College, Jefferson College of Health Professions, and Jefferson College of Graduate Studies.
Resources allocated to individual programs, such as the MPH program, are negotiated by the
MPH Program Director, the JCGS Dean, and the JCGS Director of Finance. Working with the
Dean and the Executive Associate for Finance, Dr. Simmons submitted a proposed budget for the
2008-2009 academic year based on projected revenues and expenses for program expansion.
That budget was incorporated with the budgets for other doctoral and masters programs into the
overall JCGS budget submitted to the University for the 2008-2009 academic year. After
submission of proposed budgets by each graduate program, the College allocates indirect costs
and other university expenses such as use of classrooms, instructional audiovisual equipment,
use of campus libraries and their equipment and materials, and other University costs attributed
to the College on a pro-rated basis, and submits its budget to the University administration for
review and approval. The College then allocates these corporate expenses to each program
based on their use of these services. Budgets for individual programs of the College are adjusted
after approval by TJU. They are subsequently re-adjusted as needed when the actual figures for
the previous fiscal year are finalized.

Costs for personnel and operations are charged directly to each graduate program. However,
some costs such as classroom use, library services, information technology services, registrar,
financial aid office, etc. are allocated to each college within the University. There are no indirect
cost recoveries in the College of Graduate Studies. Tuition & fees are tracked by each specific
graduate program within the college and assigned to the program by each specific student.
Fundraising activities are conducted on a college-wide basis, primarily with the assistance of the
Jefferson Foundation. Costs for these efforts are allocated to each graduate program as a
component of College/University overhead.

Jefferson MPH faculty are currently paid through their regular faculty appointment through the
Jefferson Medical College. MPH core faculty have a varied percentage of time allocated to the
MPH program. The College of Graduate Studies pays the corresponding salary to the
Department of the core faculty member within the Jefferson Medical College for services
provided to the MPH program including student advising, time on committees, and courses
taught. Adjunct MPH faculty are approved by the Jefferson College of Graduate Studies upon
recommendation by the MPH program and are paid directly through the College. Faculty
appointments are for a 12 month period. MPH Faculty are not responsible for raising a
percentage of their salaries for the MPH program although they may have such responsibility for
raising research dollars for their individual departments in the JMC.



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1.6b   MPH Program Budget Statement

Below is Template A depicting the MPH budget over a five year period. The 2004-2005 fiscal
year was the initial year that the program had a designated budget. The projected budget for
2008-2009 is based on a 20% increase in student tuition fees (not adjusting for a tuition credit fee
increase over the previous year). It includes increased resources for faculty, staff, a broad
operational support category that encompasses many program expenses such as marketing,
travel, professional development costs, awards, accreditation fees, etc., student support, and core
faculty professional development. Tuition received from MPH students are allocated directly to
the MPH program.

All tuition and fees are applied directly to the MPH program, and are available to cover faculty
and staff salaries and benefits, program operations, Administrative/University overhead.

Faculty appointments are for twelve months. With the exception of the Program Director, MPH
faculty receive various proportions of their salaries directly from the MPH program based on
their responsibilities, and from their various primary University/Hospital Departments based on
Public Health service and research activities (Refer to Tables).




                                                70
Template A (1.6.b.) Sources of Funds and Expenditures by Major Category
Sources of Funds                 FY 2004-2005   FY 2005-2006        FY 2006-2007   FY 2007-2008   FY 2008-2009
                                                                                                  Projected
Tuition & Fees                   $307,895       $377,208            $379,718       $611,535       $720,200
State Appropriation
University Funds
Grants/Contracts
Indirect Cost Recovery
Endowment
Gifts
Other (explain)
Other (explain)
Other (explain)

Expenditures
Faculty Salaries & Benefits      $135,312       $163,075            $157,235       $146,744       $234,147
(includes faculty coordinators
& course instruction)
Staff Salaries & Benefits        $24,130        $20,502             $27,035        $90,861        $123,460
Operations                       $14,459        $30,744             $40,395        $32,477        $47,477
Travel
Student Support                                                                                   $2,000
University Tax
Other – Core faculty                                                                              3,500
professional development
Other- Graduate                  $31,350        $36,742             $50,629        $77,868        $61,861
College/University Allocations
(Student Services –
Registrar/Financial
Aid/Library/IT)
Other- (College                  $142,337       $177,410            $190,572       $242,334       $246,362
Administration/University
Overhead)
Total                            $347,588       $428,473            $465,866       $590,284       $718,808




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1.6c   Collaborative Program

Not applicable. The JD/MPH and MJ/MPH joint degrees are coordinated with Widener
University’s School of Law but budgets are completely separate with the exception of a small
amount of shared marketing resources from both Widener and TJU that are used to produce the
JD/MPH and MJ/MPH program brochure.

1.6d   MPH Core Faculty over the past three years

The MPH Core Faculty has expanded over the past three years and, for the current fiscal year
includes seven faculty. These faculty, listed below, have responsibilities for applicant
interviewing, student advising, and serving on MPH committees in addition to teaching courses.
Dr. Plumb coordinates the MPH Clerkship projects. Template F in Criterion 4.1 provides more
detail on the current MPH Core Faculty.

For FY 2005-2006, there were three Core Faculty in TJU’s MSPH program. These included:

   •   Dr. James Diamond, PhD
   •   Dr. Jennifer Lofland, PhD., MPH
   •   Dr. James Plumb, MD, MPH

For FY 2006-2007, there were five Core Faculty in TJU’s MSPH program. These included:

   •   Dr. Rickie Brawer, Ph.D., MPH
   •   Dr. James Diamond, PhD
   •   Dr. Jennifer Lofland, PhD., MPH
   •   Dr. James Plumb, MD, MPH
   •   Dr. Mona Sarfaty, MD

For FY 2007-2008 to present:

   •   Dr. Rickie Brawer, Ph.D, MPH
   •   Dr. James Diamond, Ph.D.
   •   Dr. Vittorio Maio, PharmD., MSPH
   •   Dr. James Plumb, MD, MPH
   •   Dr. Mona Sarfaty, MD
   •   Dr. Rob Simmons, DrPH, MPH CHES
   •   Dr. Elaine Yuen, Ph.D., MBA


1.6e   Table of Faculty, Students and Student/Faculty Ratios

The MPH program currently has seven Core Faculty and 23 other faculty. The number of Core
Faculty and other faculty have increased over the past three years as have the total FTE for both



                                                72
core and other faculty. Regarding students, the total headcount has slightly declined over the
past three years as students have graduated. The full-time equivalence of students has increased
significantly from 11.8 in 2006-2006 to 19.2 in 2007-2008 indicating the increase in students
taking moving through the program more quickly. The student/faculty ratio has decreased
significantly over the past three from 5.67 to 3.76 this current year.

Template B (1.6.e) Faculty, Students, and Student/Faculty Ratios by Department or
Specialty Area
Table (1.6.e) Faculty, Students, and Student/Faculty Ratios by Department or Specialty Area
          HC       FTEF HC          FTEF Total      Total HC         FTE       SFR SFR
          Core     Core Other       Other Faculty FTEF Students Students by            by
          Faculty          Faculty          HC                                 Core Total
                                                                               FTEF FTEF
General

2005-      3         .78     18        1.30    22        2.08     75       11.8      15.13 5.67
2006

2006-      5         2.30    21        1.45    26        3.75     73       13.0      5.65     3.47
2007

2007-      7         3.55    23        1.55    30        5.10     70       19.2      5.40     3.76
2008


Table must include footnote explaining the school’s method for calculating faculty FTE. CEPH
does not specify the manner in which this should be done

Refer to Criterion 1.6.e for further explanation of template categories

HC = Head Count
Core = full time faculty who support the teaching programs
FTE = full time equivalent
FTEF = full time equivalent faculty
Other = adjunct, part time and secondary faculty
Total = Core + Other
SFR = student/faculty ratio

Full time student is equivalent to 36 credits per year (9 credits x 4 semesters)
Core Faculty time includes teaching, research, community relationship building, advising,
and committees. Other faculty includes 5% time for each course taught.




                                                73
1.6f   Availability of Other Personnel

Other personnel (administrative and staff) available to support the MPH program includes:

   •   The Dean of the College of Graduate Studies, whose office oversees the MPH program,
   •   The Associate Dean & Director of Masters Degree and Graduate Certificate Programs
   •   The two co-chairs of the MPH Community Advisory Board (CAB) Three program
       coordinators, responsible for accreditation (0.22 FTE), curriculum (0.30 FTE - to be
       increased to 0.40 FTE in FY 2006), and clerkship and thesis coordination (0.16 FTE),
       each with faculty appointments at Jefferson Medical College and JCGS,
   •   The MPH Program Coordinator (1.00 FTE)

1.6g   Amount of space available to the program

Thomas Jefferson University's campus covers four city blocks and includes 12 major buildings.
The University occupies approximately 3 million ft2 of space. A Campus Map is provided in
Appendix F.

The MPH program is housed administratively in Jefferson Alumni Hall - located between 10th
and 11th street on Locust Street - where there is dedicated space for the Program Coordinator, a
separate enclosed office for private meetings, and a desk and computer for students. There is
also a shared faculty office of approximately 125 ft2 in the same location. As the program's
faculty have their primary appointments in the Medical College, each has a departmental office
in their home departments such as Family and Community Medicine and Health Policy. These
offices are all approximately the size of the Alumni Hall office.
Total TJU instructional space is approximately 73,000 ft2, spread over six buildings, most within
the heart of the campus. The MPH program's courses are taught within this space, including
Jefferson Alumni Hall, the College Building and the Bluemle Life Science Building.
In addition to providing classroom space for formal instruction, the University has made every
effort to provide sufficient educational study space on campus. This has resulted in an extension
of library hours and ongoing assessment of the University's room reservation requirement for
students. The Office of the Registrar reserves certain classrooms and auditorium space for study
space in all degree programs. Available space includes McClellan Hall, Herbut, Brent and Solis-
Cohen Auditoriums, as well as space in Jefferson Alumni Hall, College Hall, the Hamilton
Building, and the Curtis Building.

1.6h   Laboratory space

The MPH program does not utilize University laboratory space.

1.6i   Computer facilities

The Academic Information Services and Research (AISR) has the overall responsibility for the
Library, academic computing and the overall learning structure of the University. AISR has 278



                                               74
publicly-accessible computers in the different teaching buildings. The computer classrooms are
provided free of charge for use by members of the TJU community. Most classrooms are
equipped with laser printers, MS Office Application Software, Internet access, instructors’
workstations with a projection screen, and TJU computer–based learning packages.
AISR provides audiovisual materials and access to the Library’s non-print collections including
modules and manuscripts in the Learning Resources Classroom of the Scott Library. This facility
supports academic computing in the Scott and Edison Building and in Jefferson Alumni Hall.
Computers in the Scott Building lab may be reserved for students from two hour blocks of time
when the Learning Resources Classroom is occupied with a class. The Services provided by
Learning Resources include: Internet Access, software applications for computer based learning,
informatics, clinical decision-making, graduate medical education, statistics, graphic/text
scanning, word processing, and Web searching, Macintosh and Window computers, fee-based
laser printing, and free dot matrix printing. Journal access is provided to students and faculty
from computers at locations across the campus and through a proxy server on or off campus via
the Web.

Since the computer facilities and resources are for use by students, faculty, administration and
staff, without limitation to any specific department or degree program, we cannot assign a
dedicated portion of these resources to the MPH program.

1.6j   Library/Information services

The University’s primary medical library is the Scott Memorial Library, located on Walnut
Street, (central to the classroom buildings), and maintained by AISR. Scott Memorial Library
collection consists of over 200,000 volumes of books, journals and audiovisual materials that
cover the broad scope of biomedical sciences. In addition, the Library maintains a small collec-
tion of leisure reading materials (popular magazines and novels). Selection of items for the
collection is based upon the Collection Development Policy. The scope of the collection is
adequate to support the research agenda and curricular needs of the University.
Scott Memorial Library maintains a Reserve Books section. The Library keeps one copy of the
required texts for each course on reserve. Additional services include Interlibrary Loan and
photocopying. There is also a desk with dedicated staff to assist with Internet searches and
library research. Students have access to numerous workstations that can be used for literature
and web-based searches. Accessed articles may be printed directly to a library printer or e-
mailed off-site.

A University Library Committee advises the Librarian on the development of policies pertaining
to the selection and acquisition of new materials, the circulation of library materials to internal
and external populations, and the retention of existing material to ensure adequate and equitable
library support of the University's education, patient care, and research programs (Policy
Number 109.03, effective date July 1, 1987). The Committee also reviews library procedures,
personnel and space needs. A copy of the Collection Development Policy for Library Resources
will be available in the on-site Resource File.




                                                75
Dan Kipnis from the University Library Services sits on the MPH Curriculum Committee. As
mentioned earlier, the University Library provides a wide range of computer-based services for
students and faculty. To meet the needs of MPH students, special skill-based workshops have
been established in the late afternoons to provide basic computer skills sessions that are required
for all MPH students who entered the program in Fall 2007 or later.

1.6k Community resources for instruction, research, and service and any formal
agreements

In addition to the clerkship sites and resources cited in Criterion 2.4, members of the Community
Advisory Board (CAB) serve as community resources for our students (see Appendix B for a list
of the current MPH CAB. Students seeking community resources for instruction, research and
service are encouraged to collaborate with one of the program’s CAB members.
Also, MPH faculty have a wide range of professional relationships with additional agencies,
organizations and community resources in the greater Philadelphia Region and the State of
Pennsylvania. These include:

   •   U.S. Department of Health and Human Services – Region III
   •   Philadelphia College of Physicians – Public Health Section
   •   Prevention Point Philadelphia
   •   Health Promotion Council
   •   Mayors Commission on Literacy
   •   Congresso
   •   Delaware Valley Regional Diabetes Coalition
   •   Allies Against Asthma
   •   Southeast Asian Mutual Assistance Coalition
   •   Philadelphia Corporation on Aging
   •   Latino Health Consortium
   •   Greater Philadelphia Diabetes Coalition
   •   American Heart Association
   •   American Cancer Society
   •   Pennsylvania Cancer Control Consortium
   •   Pennsylvania Associates for Nutrition and Activity (PANA)
   •   Project HOME
   •   Greater Philadelphia Federation of Settlements

These organizations work with our students and with the Clerkship Coordinator on an as needed
basis as resources for community clerkship and capstone sites. The MPH program does not have
formal written agreements with these organizations unless they are serving as preceptors for
clerkship or capstone projects.




                                                76
1.6l   In-kind academic contributions

The MPH program is increasingly integrated with TJU and its three Colleges, particularly the
Medical College and College of Health Professions. Besides serving on MPH committees,
faculty from various departments and programs within these Colleges serve as guest presenters
in a number of the MPH courses. They also serve on MPH Capstone Committees for our
students.

1.6m Outcome measures to judge adequacy of resources. Inclusion of institutional
expenditures per full-time equivalent student, research dollars per full-time equivalent
faculty, and extramural funding as a percent of total budget.

As described in Template A, the total expenditures for the MPH program for 2005-2006 was
$428,473. In that year, the MPH program had 11.8 full-time-equivalent students as cited in
Template B. Therefore, our institutional expenditures per FTE student in 2005-2006 was
$36,311.

For 2006-2007, the total expenditures for the MPH program were $465,866. In that year, the
program had 13.0 full-time-equivalent students so the institutional expenditures pre FTE in
2006-2007 was $35,836.

For 2007-2008 the total expenditures for the MPH program were $590,284. The MPH program
has 19.2 full-time-equivalent students so the institutional expenditures per FTE student in the
current fiscal year are $30,744.

Research dollars per full-time-equivalent faculty is calculated from the MPH faculty survey as
reported in Criterion 3.1. It was calculated by totaling the research dollars listed for each of the
past three years divided by the full-time-equivalent faculty for each of those three years. In
calculating the data, we recognize that faculty may have under-reported research dollars received
in any particular year and will be updating the annual reporting of those dollars for the revised
self-study. Clearly, the research dollars received by our MPH faculty has increased significantly
over this timeframe.

For fiscal year 2005-2006, total research dollars of $664,045 were reported by our MPH faculty.
Divided by the 2.08 FTE faculty for that year from Template B, the research dollars per full-
time-equivalent faculty for that year was $319,252. For fiscal year 2006-2007, a total of
$1,712,272 was reported by MPH faculty. Divided by the 3.75 FTE faculty for that year, the
research dollars per full-time-equivalent faculty for that year was $456,606. For fiscal year,
2007-2008, a total of $4,543,924 was reported by MPH faculty. Divided by the 5.1 FTE faculty
for this year, the research dollars per full-time-equivalent faculty is $890,965.

There is no reported extramural direct funding for the MPH program.




                                                77
1.6n   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met

This criterion of resources of the MPH program is met with commentary. The MPH program
has shown considerable growth over the past several years as depicted by the numbers of
students, the development of a full-time MPH program, and the overall MPH program budget
which includes two full-time administrative staff, seven Core Faculty and 23 other faculty. The
program has become more fully integrated into the university system and its Colleges and
various Departments. The financial health of the program is stable and expected to grow in the
future.




                                               78
Criterion 2.0 – Instructional Programs

Criterion 2.1 Master of Public Health Degree

2.1a An Instructional matrix presenting all of the program’s degree programs and areas
of specialization, including undergraduate, masters and doctoral degrees, as appropriate.

The TJU Master of Public Health (MPH) program offers a course of study to provide the student
with a sound academic background in order to practice competently as a generalist in public
health. The curriculum is designed to provide students with a broad mastery of the subject
matter, including core and elective courses, practicum and culminating experience, inculcating in
the student the methods necessary to organize, analyze, interpret and communicate knowledge in
an applied manner.

The TJU MPH program offers an MPH degree to all students who have entered the program
since the Fall of 2007. Prior to September 2007, the TJU program offered a Master of Science in
Public Health (MSPH) degree for fewer credits. Thus at this time, there are candidates for the
MPH and MSPH studying side-by-side in the same classrooms. Both are obtaining generalist
degrees. There were/are no areas of specialization associated with either degree. Students who
entered the MSPH program but wish to be awarded the MPH degree must satisfy additional
requirements. A summary of the core and elective courses required for each degree are listed
below. Note that the MSPH requires two additional credits in Biostatistics and Environmental
Health while the MPH degree has more requirements in Behavioral and Social Science and in
Management and Policy. The MSPH requires two biostatistics courses: basic biostatistics and
applied regressions. With the MPH, the applied regressions course is optional; however,
students must take either applied regressions or the qualitative research course. Which course is
taken depends on student interest, Capstone Project type and/or additional skill building desired.
The MSPH requires two environmental health courses: the basic environmental health course
and an environmental and occupational toxicology course. The MPH requires only an
Introductory Environmental Health course at this time.

Course                       MSPH credits            MPH credits
Biostatistics                5                       3-5
Epidemiology                 3                       3
Environmental Health         5                       3
Management and Policy        3                       6
Behavioral/ Social Science   5                       8-10
Electives                    4-10                    5-8
Clerkship                    3-6                     3-6*
Capstone Seminar                                     3
Thesis/Capstone project      6                       3
Total                        40                      42
Beginning in Fall 2008, new MPH students will only receive 3 credits




                                               79
The MSPH requires one Management and Policy course, and a health services research course.
The MPH requires a second course in this field which may be selected by the student from
several alternatives. Three additional required credits have been added in the Behavior and
Social Science category with the required course in planning and evaluation. In this category,
the student also has the option of taking a course in qualitative research. The Research Thesis
which was the culminating requirement of the MSPH was replaced by the combination of a
Capstone Seminar and Project for the MPH. All of these changes in credit allocations led to a 2
credit loss of possible Elective credits. A side by side comparison of the requirements for the
two degree may be seen in the table above.

The Instructional Matrix presenting all of the Program’s degree programs is presented below.
There are no areas of specialization.

Template C (2.1.a.) Instructional Matrix
Table (2.1.a.) Instructional Matrix – Degree/Specialization

                                          Instructional                    Professional
Bachelor Degrees

Masters
  •   MSPH                        X (Prior to Fall 2007)
  •   MPH                                                         X (Beginning Fall 2007)

Doctoral

Joint
   •    JD/MPH                                                    X (Fall 2007)
   •    MJ/MPH                                                    X (Fall 2007)
   •    MD/MPH                                                    X (Beginning Fall 2008)


2.1b Bulletin or other official publication, which describes all curricula offered by the
program.

See the current course offerings on the CGS Pulse website
www.jefferson.edu/jcgs/msprogram/index.cfm and in the table below.




                                               80
MPH Course Offerings

Required Courses                                        Credits   Term Offered
GC 660 Statistical Methods of Data Analysis*            3         F SI SII        Su
GC 670 Applied Regression Models**                      2                 SII
MI 580 Fundamentals of Epidemiology*                    3             SI SII
PH 507 Introduction to Environmental Health*            3                 SII
PH 506 Health Services Research*                        3             SI
PH 501 Introduction to Public Health*                   2         F
PH 502 Behavioral & Social Theories in Public Health*   3         F
PH 606 Qualitative Research Methods**                   2                         Su
PH 615 Planning and Evaluation Health Programs*         3                   SII
Management & Policy* (Choose one of the following:)     3
   GC 600 Management Skills                                       F    SI   SII
   GC 515 Quality Measures and Outcomes                           F
   GC 620 Fundamentals of Financial Management                         SI
   GC 650 Economic Analysis of Hlth Care Intrvntions                              Su
   PH 508 Health Policy: An International Perspective                  SI
PH 610 Capstone Seminar*                                3                         Su
PH 810/20/30 Clerkship (Complete 1 term before Cap)     3         F    SI   SII   Su
PH 710 Capstone Project* (Culminating Experience)       3         F    SI   SII   Su
Credit Total                                            34

Highly Suggested Electives
GC 600 Management Skills                                3           F SI SII
GC 605 Performance Improvement                          3           F
GC 515 Quality Measures and Outcomes                    3           F
GC 620 Fundamentals of Financial Management             3               SI
GC 650 Economic Analysis of Hlth Care Interventions 3                             Su
GC 654 Pharmacoepidemiology                             2           F
PH 505 Environmental & Occupational Toxicology          1                    SII
PH 508 Health Policy: An International Perspective      3               SI
PH 509 Health Communication                             3               SI
PH 607 GIS Mapping                                      1           F
GC 720 Scientific Writing                               2                         Su
OT 797 Cultural Humility & Competence                   3           F
Total Elective Credits                                  8
*Required Courses
** Students must take either Applied Regression Models or Qualitative Research Methods.




                                             81
2.1c   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

The TJU MPH program meets the criterion for awarding of the MPH degree.




                                             82
Criterion 2.2 Program Length


An MPH degree program or equivalent professional Masters degree must be at least 42
semester credit units in length.

2.2a   Definition of a credit with regard to classroom/contact hours

A credit is defined as twelve hours of classroom instruction. It is expected that students will
spend twice as many hours outside the classroom in reading, writing, and preparation of
assignments for the class. The MPH program offers the 42-credit MPH degree to all students
who entered the program beginning in the fall of 2007. Prior to September 2007, the program
offered a Master of Science in Public Health (MSPH) degree that required 40 course credits.
Students who entered the program prior to fall 2007, can choose to complete the 40 credit MSPH
program or switch to the 42 credit MPH program. Both the MSPH and the MPH are generalist
degrees. There are no areas of specialization associated with either degree. In the last three
years, all graduating students received the MSPH degree with 40 credits

2.2b Information about the minimum degree requirements for all professional degree
curricula shown in the instructional matrix.

For students who entered prior to Fall 2007 and have switched to the MPH program, they must
take either Planning and Evaluation or another Policy and Management course and complete the
Capstone process. When the last students who entered the MSPH program complete their
training, the MSPH degree will no longer be awarded. A detailed listing of the course offerings,
both required and elective, and the terms in which they are offered are provided in Criterion
2.1b.

In the previous year, MPH Curriculum Committee heard from faculty that many students did not
possess some of the needed computer skills to be successful in MPH courses. The Jefferson
library has been offering short 1 ½ hour computer software sessions for all students in the middle
of the day, which had not been convenient for many of the MPH students. The Curriculum
Committee contacted the Jefferson Library who agreed to offer the courses for MPH students in
in late afternoons. Hence, beginning in fall, 2007, the MPH program required all students to take
these free workshops. The computer-based skills workshops include MS Word, Excel,
PowerPoint, Searching with Mesh Headings, and Bibliography with Refworks. The MPH
students are also required to prepare for, and pass, the Jefferson online Protection of Human
Subjects Program examination (approximately 5 hours). This is needed prior to submission of
one’s Capstone project that is reviewed by the University’s Office of Human Research. Students
must present documentation that they have completed these workshops which is maintained in
their student files.

Students in the TJU MPH program may complete their program on a full-time or part-time basis.
Full-time students would typically finish the program in 15-18 months or “one year plus” the
time it takes to complete their Capstone Project. Part-time students are expected to complete the


                                               83
program in 2-4 years. Since the program instituted the “one year plus” program in fall 2007, the
first students will not complete the MPH degree on this timeline until the end of calendar year
2008.

2.2c Information about the number of MPH degrees awarded for less than 42 semester
credit units, or equivalent, over each of the last three years. A summary of the reasons
should be included.

To date, all TJU graduating public health students have graduated with the 40 credit MSPH
degree since the MPH program only began to be offered in the fall of 2007. The first cohort of
MPH students will be graduating in the 2008-2009 academic year.

2.2d   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met

The TJU meets criterion 2.2 regarding the length of the MPH program.




                                               84
Criterion 2.3 Public Health Core Knowledge

2.3a Identification of the means by which the program assures that all professional
degree students have a broad understanding of the areas of knowledge basic to public
health.

Introduction. There are several ways that the program assures that all degree students have a
broad understanding of the areas of knowledge basic to public health. These are listed with
bullets below. All students who enroll in the MPH program, and those who enrolled in the
MSPH program, have been required to take courses in the five core areas of public health, which
are biostatistics, epidemiology, behavioral and social science, management and policy, and
environmental health. With the advent of the MPH degree, a course requirement in Planning and
Evaluation (3 credits) was added and is included in the Behavioral and Social Science category.
(The policy on conversion of the MSPH degree to the MPH degree may be found in Appendix
E). Students must also complete the Clerkship which is the field experience or practicum that
provides the opportunity to witness the application of core knowledge to real world problems.
The culminating MSPH Research Thesis or MPH Capstone process also provides an opportunity
for the student to utilize their proficiency in problem solving within the key areas of their
education. These requirements are discussed in more detail below. The specific courses and
credits in each of the core areas are listed and described above in Criterion 2.1.

The objectives for the required courses in these core areas are reviewed by the Curriculum
Committee of the MPH program. The instructors have been asked to include objectives for their
core subject area that were developed by the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH) in
their Core Competency Development Project (posted on the ASPH website). The ASPH
objectives were developed with the intent of providing guidance to public health educational
programs on how to instill in students the broad understanding of the areas of knowledge basic to
public health. The course syllabi with the objectives just discussed will be included in the
Resource File. The competencies referable to these core areas of knowledge have been
summarized in a matrix that may be found at the end of criterion 2.3.

Assurance that students attain the competencies in each core area that leads to a broad
understanding is gained in several ways:

   •   Completion of Courses. Students must complete all the required courses specified by the
       MPH program. The required courses address the core subject areas of public health and
       include an experiential Clerkship. Students must pass those courses with a grade of B or
       better, or a “Pass” in the case of the experiential Clerkship. In addition, they must
       complete 8 elective credits.

   •   Capstone Project. CEPH requires a culminating final project for all public health
       students. This culminating project should be an integrative experience that provides the
       student an opportunity to demonstrate the many skills he or she has acquired during the
       course of the MPH education. The Capstone Project undertaking encourages the student
       to apply as many core and cross cutting competencies as possible within the context of a


                                                85
       single project. The completion of the Capstone Project gives the student an opportunity
       to expand, integrate, and demonstrate their competencies through the process of applying
       them.

The culminating Capstone Project is intended to be a project that approximates public health
practice. The primary educational objective of the Capstone Project is to have the student
integrate, utilize, and reinforce the competencies they have gained during their public health
education. While core competencies are discipline specific and are an essential foundation of
public health education, the cross cutting competencies are those that are shared by public health
professionals in all disciplines. The Capstone Project is an opportunity for the student to employ
both core competencies and the cross-cutting competencies. According to the Council on
Linkages between Academia and Public Health, the cross cutting competencies may be
organized into eight domains. These are listed below:

   •   Analytic/Assessment Skills
   •   Communication Skills
   •   Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
   •   Cultural Competency Skills
   •   Financial Planning and Management Skills
   •   Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
   •   Policy Development/Program Planning Skills
   •   Public Health Sciences Skills


The range of choices for this final project are expected to be flexible and broad enough to give
students an opportunity to engage in a project that approximates actual public health practice.
Students may select from a variety of project types including program planning, research,
program evaluation, policy analysis, and other choices. A useful way to conceptualize the
culminating (Capstone) project is that it should make a contribution to: 1) the field of public
health; 2) a public health institution; or 3) the recipients of a public health service.

The Capstone Project follows a required course, the Capstone Seminar, which is a course that
assists students to complete the initial stages of their Capstone Project. They must first select a
project type and subject. The Capstone Seminar results in completion of the proposal for the
project that incorporates the following elements: (a) a literature search and creation of a
reference list, (b) background research that provides a description of the significance and
determinants of the public health issue or problem, (c) a description of the project and its aims
(d) description of the public health methodologies that the student intends to employ in the
conduct of the Capstone Project and how they will be employed, and (e) a timeline for project
completion, (f) completion of an application to the Institutional Review Board (IRB).

It is considered essential that students have mastery of basic computer software and research
skills, such as MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Refworks, in order to complete and present
their Capstone Project. Thus MPH students are required to complete a skills workshop at the



                                                 86
beginning of their training. Additional workshops have been woven into the Health Services
Research and the Capstone Seminar courses to provide opportunities for students to gain
experience in any of these software and research skills that may still need reinforcement.

The Jefferson College of Graduate Studies (JCGS) has approved a guideline document that
itemizes the specific requirements for this final MPH project. The Capstone Project Guidelines,
August 2008 version, which is posted on the Pulse site through the link to the Master of Public
Health program, is attached in Appendix G.

Students are advised to select their electives depending on their intended career direction. The
student’s Faculty Advisor explores this subject matter with the student. Students are also asked
to submit short “goals” papers that focus on their personal career goals at the beginning and the
end of their Introduction to Public Health course, (PH501), which is typically taken at the
beginning of their pubic health education.

   •   Student Evaluation of Competencies. In addition to successful completion of courses
       (maintenance of a 3.0 GPA), Clerkship and Capstone projects, faculty advisor meetings,
       students must complete an exit interview as part of a final meeting with their faculty
       advisor that requires them to self-assess their level of confidence in the accomplishment
       of core public health competencies and address plans for continuing professional
       development to achieve competence in areas of lower confidence. The student evaluation
       of the competencies at the time of their Exit Interview is another way the program may
       assess the competencies gained in the MPH education.

   •   Matrix of Courses and Core Competencies. Below is a matrix that displays the TJU MPH
       courses and the competencies that comprise the core domains of public health education
       as identified by the Association of Schools of Public Health. MPH courses that teach
       those competencies as assessed by the faculty are indicated on the table.

The Table below describes the contributions of the required courses as they relate to the core
public competencies.




                                                87
Core Competencies: Biostatistics
                   Biostat   Appld   Epi   Htlh    Qual    Plan   Cap     Cap     Intro   BehavSoc   Env Htlh   Pol      Policy   Policy   Policy   Policy
                   GC        Reg     MI    Serv    Resrc   &      Sem     Proj    PH501   Sci        PH507      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt
                   660       GC      580   Resrc   PH      Eval   PH610   PH710           PH 502                PH 508   GC515    GC600    GC620    GC650
                             670           PH      606     PH
                                           506             615
Describe the         X         X                                   X               X                                       X
roles
biostatistics
serves in the
discipline of
public health.
Distinguish          X         X             X                                                                             X
among the
different
measurement
scales and the
implications
for selection of
statistical
methods to be
used based on
these
distinctions.
Apply                X         X      X      X              X      X                                              X        X                 X        X
descriptive
techniques
commonly
used to
summarize
public health
data.




                                                                            88
                   Biostat   Appld   Epi   Htlh    Qual    Plan   Cap     Cap     Intro   BehavSoc   Env Htlh   Pol      Policy   Policy   Policy   Policy
                   GC        Reg     MI    Serv    Resrc   &      Sem     Proj    PH501   Sci        PH507      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt
                   660       GC      580   Resrc   PH      Eval   PH610   PH710           PH 502                PH 508   GC515    GC600    GC620    GC650
                             670           PH      606     PH
                                           506             615
Describe basic       X         X                                                                                           X
concepts of
probability,
random
variation and
commonly
used statistical
probability
distributions.
Apply                X         X                            X                                                     X        X                 X        X
common
statistical
methods for
inference.
Describe             X         X                                                                                                             X        X
preferred
methodological
alternatives to
commonly
used statistical
methods when
assumptions
are not met.




                                                                            89
                   Biostat   Appld   Epi   Htlh    Qual    Plan   Cap     Cap     Intro   BehavSoc   Env Htlh   Pol      Policy   Policy   Policy   Policy
                   GC        Reg     MI    Serv    Resrc   &      Sem     Proj    PH501   Sci        PH507      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt
                   660       GC      580   Resrc   PH      Eval   PH610   PH710           PH 502                PH 508   GC515    GC600    GC620    GC650
                             670           PH      606     PH
                                           506             615
Apply                X         X                     X                                                                                       X        X
descriptive and
inferential
methodologies
according to
the type of
study design
for answering a
particular
research
question.
Interpret            X         X      X      X                                                                    X        X
results of
statistical
analyses found
in public health
studies.
Develop              X         X                                   X
written and
oral
presentations
based on
statistical
analyses for
both public
health
professionals
and educated
lay audiences.




                                                                            90
                  Biostat   Appld   Epi   Htlh    Qual    Plan   Cap     Cap     Intro   BehavSoc   Env Htlh   Pol      Policy   Policy   Policy   Policy
                  GC        Reg     MI    Serv    Resrc   &      Sem     Proj    PH501   Sci        PH507      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt
                  660       GC      580   Resrc   PH      Eval   PH610   PH710           PH 502                PH 508   GC515    GC600    GC620    GC650
                            670           PH      606     PH
                                          506             615
Apply basic         X         X      X                                            X                              X        X
informatics
techniques
with vital
statistics and
public health
records in the
description of
public health
characteristics
and in public
health research
and evaluation.




                                                                           91
Core Competencies: Epidemiology
                  Biostat   Appld   Epi   Htlh     Qual    Plan   Cap   Cap     Intro   Behav Soc   Env Htlh   Pol      Policy   Policy   Policy   Policy
                  GC        Reg     MI    Serv     Resrc   &      Sem   Proj    PH501   Sci         PH507      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt
                  660       GC      580   Resrc    PH      Eval   PH    PH710           PH 502                 PH 508   GC515    GC600    GC620    GC650
                            670           PH 506   606     PH     610
                                                           615
Explain the                          X                             X              X        X           X
importance of
epidemiology
for informing
scientific,
ethical,
economic and
political
discussion of
health issues.
Describe a                           X                      X      X              X                    X         X
public health
problem in
terms of
magnitude,
person, time
and place.
Apply the                            X                                            X                    X         X
basic
terminology
and definitions
of
epidemiology.
Identify key                         X                      X                     X                    X                                             X
sources of data
for
epidemiologic
purposes.




                                                                           92
                 Biostat   Appld   Epi   Htlh     Qual    Plan   Cap   Cap     Intro   Behav Soc   Env Htlh   Pol      Policy   Policy   Policy   Policy
                 GC        Reg     MI    Serv     Resrc   &      Sem   Proj    PH501   Sci         PH507      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt
                 660       GC      580   Resrc    PH      Eval   PH    PH710           PH 502                 PH 508   GC515    GC600    GC620    GC650
                           670           PH 506   606     PH     610
                                                          615
Calculate                           X
basic
epidemiology
measures.
Evaluate the                        X                                                                 X                                             X
strengths and
limitations of
epidemiologic
reports.
Draw                                X                      X                                          X         X
appropriate
inferences
from
epidemiologic
data.
Communicate                         X                      X                              X           X
epidemiologic
information to
lay and
professional
audiences.




                                                                          93
                  Biostat   Appld   Epi   Htlh     Qual    Plan   Cap   Cap     Intro   Behav Soc   Env Htlh   Pol      Policy   Policy   Policy   Policy
                  GC        Reg     MI    Serv     Resrc   &      Sem   Proj    PH501   Sci         PH507      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt
                  660       GC      580   Resrc    PH      Eval   PH    PH710           PH 502                 PH 508   GC515    GC600    GC620    GC650
                            670           PH 506   606     PH     610
                                                           615
Comprehend                           X                       X     X                                   X
basic ethical
and legal
principles
pertaining to
the collection,
maintenance,
use and
dissemination
of
epidemiologic
data.
Identify the                         X                                            X
principles and
limitations of
public health
screening
programs.




                                                                           94
Core Competencies: Environmental Health
                 Biostat   Appld   Epi   Htlh     Qual    Plan   Cap   Cap     Intro   BehavSoc   Env Htlh   Pol      Policy   Policy   Policy   Policy
                 GC        Reg     MI    Serv     Resrc   &      Sem   Proj    PH501   Sci        PH507      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt
                 660       GC      580   Resrc    PH      Eval   PH    PH710           PH 502                PH 508   GC515    GC600    GC620    GC650
                           670           PH 506   606     PH     610
                                                          615
Specify                                                                          X        X          X
approaches for
assessing,
preventing and
controlling
environmental
hazards that
pose risks to
human health
and safety.
Describe the                                                                     X                   X
direct and
indirect
human,
ecological and
safety effects
of major
environmental
and
occupational
agents.
Specify
current
environmental
risk
assessment
methods.




                                                                          95
                 Biostat   Appld   Epi   Htlh     Qual    Plan   Cap   Cap     Intro   BehavSoc   Env Htlh   Pol      Policy   Policy   Policy   Policy
                 GC        Reg     MI    Serv     Resrc   &      Sem   Proj    PH501   Sci        PH507      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt
                 660       GC      580   Resrc    PH      Eval   PH    PH710           PH 502                PH 508   GC515    GC600    GC620    GC650
                           670           PH 506   606     PH     610
                                                          615
Describe                                                                                  X          X
genetic,
physiologic
and
psychosocial
factors that
affect
susceptibility
to adverse
health
outcomes
following
exposure to
environmental
hazards.
Discuss                                                                          X                   X
various risk
management
and risk
communicatio
n approaches
in relation to
issues of
environmental
justice and
equity.




                                                                          96
                   Biostat   Appld   Epi   Htlh     Qual    Plan   Cap   Cap     Intro   BehavSoc   Env Htlh   Pol      Policy   Policy   Policy   Policy
                   GC        Reg     MI    Serv     Resrc   &      Sem   Proj    PH501   Sci        PH507      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt
                   660       GC      580   Resrc    PH      Eval   PH    PH710           PH 502                PH 508   GC515    GC600    GC620    GC650
                             670           PH 506   606     PH     610
                                                            615
Explain the
general
mechanisms of
toxicity in
eliciting a
toxic response
to various
environmental
exposures.
Develop a
testable model
of
environmental
insult.
Describe                                                                           X                   X
federal and
state
regulatory
programs,
guidelines and
authorities that
control
environmental
health issues.




                                                                            97
Social and Behavioral Science
                   Biostat   Appld   Epi   Htlh     Qual    Plan   Cap   Cap     Intro   BehavSoc   Env Htlh   Pol      Policy   Policy   Policy   Policy
                   GC        Reg     MI    Serv     Resrc   &      Sem   Proj    PH501   Sci        PH507      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt
                   660       GC      580   Resrc    PH      Eval   PH    PH710           PH 502                PH 508   GC515    GC600    GC620    GC650
                             670           PH 506   606     PH     610
                                                            615
Describe the                                         X        X     X              X        X          X                  X
role of social
& community
factors in the
onset and
solution of
public health
problems.
Identify the                                                 X      X              X        X          X
causes of
social and
behavioral
factors that
affect health of
individuals
and
populations.
Identify basic                                       X       X      X              X        X                                                        X
theories,
concepts and
models from a
range of social
and behavioral
disciplines that
are used in
public health
research and
practice.




                                                                            98
                 Biostat   Appld   Epi   Htlh     Qual    Plan   Cap   Cap     Intro   BehavSoc   Env Htlh   Pol      Policy   Policy   Policy   Policy
                 GC        Reg     MI    Serv     Resrc   &      Sem   Proj    PH501   Sci        PH507      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt
                 660       GC      580   Resrc    PH      Eval   PH    PH710           PH 502                PH 508   GC515    GC600    GC620    GC650
                           670           PH 506   606     PH     610
                                                          615
Apply ethical                                      X        X     X                       X          X
principles to
public health
program
planning,
implementatio
n and
evaluation.
Specify                                                    X      X                       X          X                  X
multiple
targets &
levels of
intervention
for
social/behavio
ral science
programs
and/or
policies.
Identify                                                   X      X                       X          X
individual,
organizational
and
community
concerns,
assets,
resources and
deficits for
social and
behavioral
science
interventions.



                                                                          99
                  Biostat   Appld   Epi   Htlh     Qual    Plan   Cap   Cap     Intro   BehavSoc   Env Htlh   Pol      Policy   Policy   Policy   Policy
                  GC        Reg     MI    Serv     Resrc   &      Sem   Proj    PH501   Sci        PH507      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt
                  660       GC      580   Resrc    PH      Eval   PH    PH710           PH 502                PH 508   GC515    GC600    GC620    GC650
                            670           PH 506   606     PH     610
                                                           615
Apply                                               X        X     X                       X          X                  X                          X
evidence-
based
approaches in
the
development
and evaluation
of social and
behavioral
science
interventions.
Describe the                                X       X              X                       X          X                  X
merits of
social/behavio
ral science
interventions/p
olicies.
Describe steps                                              X      X                       X          X                  X
and
procedures for
the planning,
implementatio
n and
evaluation of
public health
programs,
policies and
interventions.




                                                                          100
                 Biostat   Appld   Epi   Htlh     Qual    Plan   Cap   Cap     Intro   BehavSoc   Env Htlh   Pol      Policy   Policy   Policy   Policy
                 GC        Reg     MI    Serv     Resrc   &      Sem   Proj    PH501   Sci        PH507      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt
                 660       GC      580   Resrc    PH      Eval   PH    PH710           PH 502                PH 508   GC515    GC600    GC620    GC650
                           670           PH 506   606     PH     610
                                                          615
Identify                                                    X                             X          X                  X
critical
stakeholders
for the
planning,
implementatio
n and
evaluation of
public health
programs,
policies and
interventions.




                                                                         101
Health Policy and Management
                  Biostat   Appld   Epi   Htlh     Qual    Plan   Cap    Cap     Intro   BehavSoc   Env Htlh   Pol      Policy   Policy   Policy   Policy
                  GC        Reg     MI    Serv     Resrc   &      Sem    Proj    PH501   Sci        PH507      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt
                  660       GC      580   Resrc    PH      Eval   PH61   PH710           PH 502                PH 508   GC515    GC600    GC620    GC650
                            670           PH 506   606     PH     0
                                                           615
Identify the                                X                                      X                   X         X        X                 X        X
main
components
and issues of
the
organization,
financing and
delivery of
health services
and public
health systems
in the US.
Discuss the                                                                        X                   X         X        X
policy process
for improving
the health
status of
populations.
Describe the                                X       X                              X                   X         X        X
legal and
ethical bases
for public
health and
health
services.




                                                                           102
                 Biostat   Appld   Epi   Htlh     Qual    Plan   Cap    Cap     Intro   BehavSoc   Env Htlh   Pol      Policy   Policy   Policy   Policy
                 GC        Reg     MI    Serv     Resrc   &      Sem    Proj    PH501   Sci        PH507      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt
                 660       GC      580   Resrc    PH      Eval   PH61   PH710           PH 502                PH 508   GC515    GC600    GC620    GC650
                           670           PH 506   606     PH     0
                                                          615
Apply quality                                                                     X                   X                  X                 X
and
performance
improvement
concepts to
address
organizational
performance
issues
Demonstrate                                X               X                               X                                      X        X
leadership
skills for
building
partnerships
Apply                                                      X                                                             X
principles of
strategic
planning and
marketing to
public health.
Communicate                                                                                           X                  X                          X
health policy
and
management
issues using
appropriate
channels and
technologies




                                                                          103
                 Biostat   Appld   Epi   Htlh     Qual    Plan   Cap    Cap     Intro   BehavSoc   Env Htlh   Pol      Policy   Policy   Policy   Policy
                 GC        Reg     MI    Serv     Resrc   &      Sem    Proj    PH501   Sci        PH507      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt      Mgt
                 660       GC      580   Resrc    PH      Eval   PH61   PH710           PH 502                PH 508   GC515    GC600    GC620    GC650
                           670           PH 506   606     PH     0
                                                          615
Apply the                                                   X     X                        X                             X                 X
principles of
program
planning,
development,
budgeting,
management
and evaluation
in
organizational
and
community
initiatives.
Explain                                                                           X                   X
methods of
ensuring
community
health safety
and
preparedness.
Apply                                                      X                               X                             X                 X
"systems
thinking" for
resolving
organizational
problems




                                                                          104
2.3b   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criteria on Public Health Core Knowledge has been met with commentary.

There are several mechanisms as described above to assure that core public health competencies
are taught by the courses of the MPH curriculum. The courses that address the core subject
domains of public health knowledge are required for all students. Instructors endeavor to include
the objectives for these subjects in their courses, as they have been identified by the Association
of Schools of Public Health. The matrix above demonstrates which core courses address the core
competencies. While there is redundancy for many objectives; there are also some gaps. Some
core competencies are not addressed.

The environmental health domain has been identified as one where there are gaps. This is the
result of a change in the curriculum. Before 2007, two environmental health courses were
required, Introduction to Environmental Health and Environmental and Occupational
Toxicology. With the advent of the new MPH program in the Fall 2007, only one revised
environmental health course was required. The second course, Environmental and Occupational
Toxicology became an elective. A few competencies included in the elective Toxicology course
did not get included in the new required course. This omission was inadvertent. This will be
remedied next year by expanding the course objectives in the required Introduction to
Environmental Health course so they include the missing objectives.




                                               105
Criterion 2.4 Practical Skills


2.4a Description of the program’s policies and procedures regarding practice
placements, including selection of sites, methods for approving preceptors, approaches for
faculty supervision of students, means of evaluating practice placement sites, preceptor
qualifications and criteria for waiving the experience.

The TJU MPH Clerkship is a structured 72-144 hour field training experience. The variance in
hours is that students have been allowed to take their Clerkship for a variable number of credits
(3-6) based on the number of hours completed for the Clerkship. It should be noted that
beginning in fall, 2008, the Clerkship is now solely a 3 credit project with students completing a
minimum of 120 hours for the Clerkship. This will allow for more program consistency and
allow students who may have chosen to take the Clerkship for more than 3 hours, to take an
additional public health elective course.

Students are generally eligible for the Clerkship when they have completed PH 501 Introduction
to Public Health and MI 580 Fundamentals of Epidemiology. Completing additional coursework
may be appropriate depending on career and/or Clerkship goals and objectives.

The purpose of the Clerkship is to provide a worksite/field experience as an integral part of the
education and training of all future public health practitioners. The Clerkship is designed to
promote professional development and should allow students to:

   •   Experience first hand the nature of work in the student’s area of interest;
   •   Apply knowledge gained in the classroom to the problems of public health practice in the
       field;
   •   Learn additional skills needed for work in the public health field;
   •   Understand the community context of public health, including the political and social
       environments within which public health activities are conducted;
   •   Participate in a project useful to the organization which also allows the student to refine
       professional skills;
   •   Enhance the student’s opportunity for future job placement;
   •   Explore opportunities for a Capstone project based on the interests of the student, and the
       needs of the organization;
   •   Develop a project idea, collect data or acquire training for the student’s Capstone Project

The experience may take place in a public or private academic, clinical, or research institution, a
public or private agency (government, government contractor, voluntary agency), in a
community setting, or private industry. Projects that are strictly clerical in nature and/or that
provide no “hands-on” training are not acceptable.

Clerkship Processes: Selection, Approval, Enrollment, Completion
Selection and Approval: The student is required to:
   1. Complete required coursework (PH 501 and MI 580); other courses if appropriate


                                                106
    2. Meet with their Faculty Advisor to review their academic plan, progress and ideas for the
         Clerkship;
    3. Meet with the Clerkship Coordinator to determine potential Clerkship activities and field
         sites;
    4. Contact the appropriate site preceptor(s) and schedule an initial meeting to discuss
         learning objectives, activities/project, work hours, and starting date
    5. Complete Clerkship Objective Form, Part I;
    6. Obtain signed approval of the Clerkship Coordinator, advisor and the site preceptor
Enrollment and Completion: The student is required to:
    1. Contact Site Preceptor to get assistance with refining learning objectives, defining
         Clerkship activities or project, scheduling work hours, and starting date
    2. Meet with Clerkship Coordinator to determine Clerkship credits and obtain signatures on
         the Clerkship Objectives Form;
    3. Register for Clerkship credits;
    4. File approved form with the MPH Program Office;.
    5. Accomplish the activities/projects/goals of the Clerkship as agreed upon by the student,
         Site Preceptor and Clerkship Coordinator;
    6. Attend Clerkship and conduct activities according to the agreed upon schedule and
         activities
    7. Complete the Clerkship Site Profile
    8. Complete an 8-10 page final paper that describes the student’s experience in meeting the
         Clerkship goals.
    9. Complete Clerkship evaluation form
.
Students meet with the Clerkship Coordinator to discuss their interests. In preparation for this
appointment, they are encouraged to peruse the list of sites identified by the MPH program and
the list of completed clerkships (list of clerkships is in Criterion 2.4b). Students may also
choose another community health organization, not on the MPH Program’s site list for a
Clerkship. When the student and Preceptor agree on the site for student placement, an agreement
is presented to the Preceptor for signature to establish the plan for the student’s Clerkship
(Appendix C). The student must present the plan which includes the hours and time frame for
the student commitment back to the Clerkship Director. The student will submit a Site Profile as
part of the experience.

Sites are selected for possible field placement in several ways. Opportunities are often based on
personal contacts that faculty have with key individuals who serve in local community agencies.
Recruitment also occurs by sending letters to MPH Community Advisory Board members,
faculty of Thomas Jefferson University, and collaborating partners of Jefferson faculty. In the
Introduction to Public Health Course students are introduced to individuals and agencies
involved in public health practice.

Of the total Clerkship sites completed, in 2005-2006 – five out of nine (56%) were with
community based organizations, health departments or a federal government agency, in 2006-
2007 three of seven (43%) and in 2007-2008 fourteen of seventeen (82%). Overall for 2005-
2008, 22 out of 33 clerkships (67%) were with community based organizations, health

                                               107
departments or a federal government agency. The Program has met its objective of 60% and will
continue to maintain relationships with current partners as well as develop new opportunities.
Methods for evaluating clerkship sites include student and preceptor evaluation at the conclusion
of the experience and evaluation through student/alumni surveys and Exit Interviews with
graduating students. In a survey conducted in 2007-2008 with current students, 100% of
students indicated they were satisfied or very satisfied with both the Clerkship experience and
the Clerkship preceptor. In an alumni survey conducted in 2007-2008, 94% of alumni indicated
they were satisfied/very satisfied with their Clerkship experience and all indicated they were
satisfied or very satisfied with the site preceptor. The Program met its objective of 90%
satisfaction with the clerkship experience.

Preceptors are chosen based on professional credentials and/or significant public health practice
experience through recommendations from faculty, the CAB, and student contacts. Letters of
introduction and thank you are sent to each Site preceptor, as is a copy of the Clerkship
Handbook. Evaluations are completed by both the student and the field preceptor. The student
completes an evaluation of the Clerkship which is submitted at the same time as the final paper.
The field preceptor also completes an evaluation of the student. The letters and forms may be
found in the Clerkship Handbook in Appendix C.


2.4b Identification of agencies and preceptors used for practice experiences for students,
by specialty area, for the last two academic years.

See Clerkship Opportunities for academic years 2005 through 2007 below (2005-2006, 2006-
2007, 2007-2008).




                                               108
Agencies and Preceptors in Clerkship Experiences Academic Years 2006-2007 and 2007-
                                          2008
    Last              Activity           Academic          Site            Field
                                           Year                        Supervisor
                                         Completed
Airoldi      Developed network for      2006-2007   Bethlehem        Bonnie Coyle,
             future employment;                     Department of    MD
             initiated plans for                    Public Health
             Hepatitis \Clinic in
             Lehigh Valley
Fink         Use of Fresh Frozen        2006-2007   Thomas           Jay Herman,
             Plasma in hospital                     Jefferson        MD; Gino
             settings, literature                   University       Merli, MD
             review, key informant                  Hospital
             interviews, protocol
             development
Gagne        Organizational review;     2006-2007   Health Policy –  Daniel Louis,
             staff meetings; review of              Thomas           MS
             data bases; literature                 Jefferson
             review                                 University
Getahun      International public       2006-2007   Durban South     James Plumb,
             health programs                        Africa – Child   MD, MPH
             targeting women and                    Family
             children – site visits;                International
             interviews
Griga        Assessing thyroid          2006-2007   Department       Patrick ‘O
             nodules post Chernobyl                 Ultrasound –     Kane, MD
             exposure Standards of                  Thomas
             assessment,                            Jefferson
             consequences of                        University
             radiation exposure                     Hospital
Grove        Epidemiology Unit –        2006-2007   Philadelphia     Victor Spain,
             organizational                         Department of    DVM, MPH
             assessment; data base                  Public Health
             exploration; vaccine
             surveillance programs
Hanley       Medication errors in       2006-2007   Health Policy –  Jennifer
             daycare centers; review                Thomas           Lofland Pharm
             study protocol, literature             Jefferson        D, PhD, MPH
             review, data collection                University
             instruments




                                        109
   Last             Activity             Academic          Site            Field
                                           Year                          Supervisor
                                         Completed
Marshall    Breast Health Education     2006-2007    Breast Center –   Roseanne
            – development of                         Thomas            Iaconno, RN
            educational materials                    Jefferson
            and                                      University
            implementation/evaluati                  Hospital
            on of program
Micheli     Organizational review;      2006-2007    NIH – Clinical    Larissa Korde
            literature review;                       Genetics Branch   MD, MPH
            epidemiology study;                      (NCI)
            development of a survey
            to assess feasibility of
            physical activity
            intervention
Raman       Organizational              2006-2007    Tobacco           Frank Leone
            assessment; literature                   Research Center   MD, MS
            review; proposal                         - Thomas
            development; structured                  Jefferson
            interview                                University
                                                     Hospital
Samuel      Tropical Medicine –         2006-2007    Child Family      Dilip Murarka,
            Infectious Disease                       International –   MD
            Program – clinic visits,                 Mumbai India
            key informant
            interviews, literature
            reviews
Seideman    Disease Reporting –         2006-2007    Philadelphia      Carolyn
(D’Amico)   HID/Aids; rapid testing                  Department of     Johnson MD
            analysis                                 Public Health
Sembhi      Semi-structured             2006-2007    Children’s        Christine Cho,
            interviews on nature of                  Hospital of       MD
            professionalism in health                Philadelphia
            professions;
            organizational
            assessment, literature
            review; data analysis
Singh       Diabetes care in            2006-2007    Ridge Shelter     Jim Plumb MD,
            homeless populations;                                      MPH, Rickie
            focus groups, key                                          Brawer PhD
            informant interviews,                                      MPH
            literature review



                                          110
   Last             Activity            Academic           Site              Field
                                          Year                             Supervisor
                                        Completed
Thomas      Lit review of current      2006-2007    Various Child        Jennifer
            state of safety among                   Care Facilities in   Lofland
            children cared for in                   Phila                PharmD, PhD,
            child care facilities                                        MPH
Ahn         Hepatitis Prevention –     2007-2008    HepTrec              Amy Jessop
            organizational                          (Hepatitis,          PhD, MPH
            assessment; screening                   Treatment,
            and immunization                        Education and
            clinics                                 Care)
Brisbon     Philadelphia Urban Food    2007-2008    Philadelphia         Rickie Brawer
            and Fitness Alliance;                   Department of        PhD MPH
            organizational                          Public Health
            assessment
Chiquone    Cervical Cancer            2007-2008    Family Planning      Christopher
            Prevention –                            Council              Chambers MD
            organizational
            assessment; exploration
            research data bases;
            participation staff
            meetings
DiCarlo     Childhood Obesity          2007-2008    Office Advance       Rickie Brawer,
            prevention                              Population           PhD, MPH
                                                    Health
Fusaro      Run Philly Style           2007-2008    National Nursing     Heather
                                                    Centers              McDaniel MPH
                                                    Consortium
Halko       Maternal Child Health –    2007-2008    Maternity Care       Margery
(Bray)      organizational                          Coalition            Margolis PhD
            assessment; site visits;
            literature review;
            developed research
            agenda
Schlener    Organizational             2007-2008    Nicetown Tioga       Rickie Brawer
(Santana)   assessment;                             Improvement          PhD, MPH
            implementation of Value                 Team
            Template process; use of
            quantitative analysis




                                         111
    Last             Activity           Academic         Site            Field
                                          Year                         Supervisor
                                        Completed
Shenker       COMPLIANCE Study –       2007-2008    Project HOME     James Plumb
              reviewing logistics                                    MD, MPH
              involved in developing
              community based
              intervention, patient and
              key informant interviews
Spain         Assessing Social Service 2007-2008    Inglis House, MS Karen Mariner-
              Needs that Impact QOL                 Society          MS Society
              in Community Living
              MS Patients
Talati        Smoking patterns in       2007-2008   Center for       Frank Leone
              Pharmacy professionals                Tobacco          MD, MS
              – organizational review               Research
Wallin         Community Assessment 2007-2008       Project HOME     Jim Plumb MD,
                                                                     MPH, Rickie
                                                                     Brawer, PhD
                                                                     MPH, Jennine
                                                                     Miller
Wirjosemito   Assessment Wellness      2007-2008    Mercy Wellness   Grace Lefevre
              Centers                               Center




                                          112
2.4c Data on the number of students receiving a waiver of the practice experience for
each of the last three years.

Through August 2008, the MPH program did not grant waivers of the Clerkship practical
experience. However, beginning in Fall 2008 students may petition for a waiver of the Clerkship
Practical experience. There was discussion of the pros and cons of granting such a waiver for
MPH students who have had extensive public health community experience. Ultimately it was
decided that such waivers should be available. Students who receive such a waiver must make
up the three credits with other courses.

2.4d Data on the number of preventive medicine, occupational medicine, aerospace
medicine, and public health and general preventive medicine residents completing the
academic program for each of the last three years, along with information on their
practicum rotations.

Not applicable. The TJU MPH program has not had medicine residents in its program to date.
With the beginning of the MD/MPH joint degree program beginning in fall, 2008, it is expected
that there will be future residents in family and community medicine and general medicine (TJU
does not have a Preventive Medicine program) and data on the number of such residents and
their practicum rotations will be kept.

2.4e   Assessment of extent to which this criterion is met

This criterion on Practical Skills has been met. Results of the program surveys of students and
alumni show that satisfaction with the Clerkship was high. The program has added measurable
objectives, a number of new Clerkship sites, and tools and procedures for students and
preceptors. Clerkship assessments by students, alumni and preceptors have been enhanced. The
TJU program has significantly advanced since the last self study in the extent to which it meets
the criteria on practical skills.




                                               113
Criterion 2.5 Culminating Experience


2.5a   Identification of the culminating experience required for each degree program.

MSPH students are required to complete a thesis project prior to graduation. The process for
completing the thesis project is similar to the MPH Capstone project with the exception of the
Capstone Seminar. These processes are discussed below.

The Capstone Project (described in the Capstone Concept Document located in Appendix G) is
the culminating project for the MPH degree. The Capstone Project applies as many
competencies as possible within the context of a single project. The completion of the Capstone
Project gives the student an opportunity to expand, integrate, identify and demonstrate their
competencies through the process of applying them. The Capstone is a guided project in public
health under faculty and preceptor supervision that approximates public health research and
practice. It follows the Capstone Seminar and implements the proposal which the student
completes in the Capstone Seminar. Written and oral presentation of the project is required.
Prior to the Capstone Seminar, students are also now required to take Planning and Evaluation.
The major project for this course is the development and presentation of a grant proposal on a
public health topic working in small teams as part of a simulated community coalition
experience. Planning and Evaluation includes a number of core courses amongst its
prerequisites, in particular biostatistics, epidemiology, behavioral and social sciences. One year
plus students will also have taken Health Services Research before they take Planning and
Evaluation. Thus by the time the students begin the Capstone Seminar which brings them up to
the actual completion of their Capstone Project, they will have completed the core content of the
MPH.

The MPH curriculum equips students with the knowledge and skills to demonstrate their ability
to integrate the core curriculum and the related competencies of public health training. In
addition to the five basic knowledge areas of biostatistics, epidemiology, behavioral and social
science, management and policy, and environmental science, these competencies, based on the
Council of Linkages, include skills in analysis or assessment, public health sciences, policy
development or program planning, communication, cultural competence, community dimensions
of practice, financial planning and management, and leadership and systems thinking. The
Clerkship experience may establish the groundwork for the future Capstone project. The
Clerkship placement is selected with the student’s interests in mind and students are encouraged
to identify projects that might be developed out of their Clerkship experience.

The Capstone project provides students with a choice of project type. The Capstone project
should be a high quality example of one of the following types of projects: a community
assessment; an exercise in program planning and evaluation, a secondary data analysis; original
research; policy assessment/development; strategic planning; or a grant proposal. An applied
research project is an option for MPH students while it is still required of MSPH students.
Though the content of the final Capstone projects will differ by type of project, all projects must
include similar headings, including the aims of the project, background research including a
literature review, problem definition and key determinants of the problem, a description of the


                                                114
methodologies to be used for analysis or development, presentation of results, and conclusions or
recommendations. The project should result in a formal presentation, completion of the
Capstone paper in a manner that could be publishable, and dissemination of the results through
future presentations and/or publications.

A useful way to conceptualize the culminating (Capstone) project is that it should make a
contribution to: 1) the field of public health; 2) a public health institution; or 3) the recipients of
a public health service.

The steps toward initiating the project that must be taken by the student are listed below.

    •   Topic and Project Type. The first steps each student must take in the process are to select
        a topic and project type for their project. Choosing a topic and project type can be
        challenging, especially for students who have not previously worked in health programs
        and services. These steps are of key importance to the student because he or she will
        spend a significant amount of time working on the topic and project type. Students are
        advised to begin thinking about their Capstone Project from the outset of their MPH
        coursework. They will be encouraged to do this during the required “Introduction to
        Public Health, PH 501,” course which includes a goals exercise.

    •   The student is encouraged to consult their faculty advisor, course faculty, and other
        public health professionals. Student interest and direction should be a topic of discussion
        with their MPH Faculty Advisor from the outset of their MPH education. Depending on
        the topic and project type, specific coursework may be advisable. The student’s Advisor
        should be able to assist the student in determining the requisite course content. If the
        Advisor believes it is worthwhile to consult another faculty member, they will guide the
        student through this process.

    •   The Clerkship. The Clerkship experience may assist students in selecting a Capstone
        topic and project type as it places students in a setting where they can gain direct
        experience of a public health service, or research operation. The experiential Clerkship
        should be completed before the student begins the Capstone Seminar. For students who
        have already selected a topic area and project type for their Capstone Project, the
        Clerkship need not be directly relevant but gaining depth is useful in building toward a
        public health-related career. In this case, the Clerkship requirement is an opportunity for
        the student to experience a new area of public health.

    •   Course Prerequisites. Depending on the project type selected, it is important for the
        student to choose courses that prepare them to complete their Capstone Project. The
        relevant courses should be completed before they begin the Capstone Seminar.
        Qualitative Research Methods, PH 606, is an essential course for a student who chooses
        to do qualitative research for their Capstone Project. A course that offers health policy
        analysis is encouraged for students who wish to do a policy analysis as their Capstone
        Project. Faculty will be available to help students think through the appropriate course
        sequence that will prepare them for the Capstone Seminar and Project.




                                                  115
Progress toward the completion of the Capstone Project proceeds through the following steps:

   •   Identification and definition of topic (problem, issue, question)
           o Choice of a project type (i.e., health services research, program
               planning/evaluation, qualitative research, secondary data analysis, writing a grant
               proposal, etc.). This may occur early or later in the students course sequence.
           o Coursework may be determined, in part, by the project type anticipated;
   •   Course prerequisites
           o Students should have completed most of the required coursework before they take
               the Capstone Seminar. This includes biostatistics, epidemiology, behavioral and
               social sciences, health services research, planning and evaluation
   •   The Capstone Seminar will guide the student through essential steps in the generation of
       the Capstone Project proposal and will be guided by several public health faculty
       members. The student will identify their Primary Capstone Advisor and Preceptor during
       this course.
           o The Capstone Project will be completed in a subsequent quarter(s) after the
               Capstone Seminar with input and guidance from the Capstone Advisor and
               Preceptor.
   •   Completion of steps as listed in the Capstone Guidelines document.
   •   Formal submission of Abstract of the Project.
   •   Presentation of Project in Oral and Written Form
   •   Presentation to the Philadelphia College of Physicians Public Health Preventive Medicine
       Annual Poster Session in May or submission of an abstract for consideration to another
       regional or national meeting
   •   Presentation and dissemination of the results in a paper of publishable quality.

2.5b   Assessment of the extent to which this criteria is met.

This criterion on the Culminating Experience has been met. The Capstone Project is a
culminating experience that requires student to synthesize and integrate knowledge acquired in
coursework and other learning experiences and to apply theory and principles in a situation that
approximates some aspect of professional practice. It is utilized by the program to determine
whether the student has mastered the body of knowledge and can demonstrate proficiency in the
required competencies. Frequently, but not in all cases, the experiential Clerkship is the basis for
the Capstone project later undertaken by the student.




                                                116
Criterion 2.6 Required Competencies


2.6a Identification of core public health competencies that all MPH students are expected
to achieve through their courses of study.

The MPH Curriculum Committee focused on two sets of domains that encompass the
competencies of a generalist public health education. The first set of domains in the core areas
of public health (biostatistics, epidemiology, behavioral science, environmental health,
management & policy) has been identified by the Association of Schools of Public Health in
their Core Competency Development Project. The second set of domains, the eight cross-cutting
capacities of public health professionals, has been identified by the Council on Linkages between
Academia and Public Health Practice. The eight domains are:

   •   Analytic/Assessment Skills
   •   Policy Development/Program Planning Skills
   •   Communication Skills
   •   Cultural Competency Skills
   •   Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
   •   Basic Public Health Sciences Skills
   •   Financial Planning and Management Skills
   •   Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills

The program developed a matrix to help in gauging the degree to which the required and elective
courses of the program integrate the competencies of the core and cross cutting domains into the
coursework. The matrix for the cross-cutting domains identifies the pathways in which students
learn and demonstrate their mastery of the competencies in their courses. The learning
pathways are:

   •   Reading Assignments
   •   Attending Lectures
   •   Completing Problem Sets or Making a Presentation or Writing a Paper
   •   Completing a Group Project or Presentation
   •   Examination

Each Instructor of a required course or recommended elective course was asked to complete the
matrix of the competencies for all 8 domains and indicate the pathway(s) through which student
learning occurred for each competency. Where there was more than one instructor who taught
the same course, all instructors were asked to confer with each other to develop a consensus
response to the matrix survey. A matrix summarizing the competencies and pathways is
presented below. All core courses and recommended electives are included in 2.6b.

Beginning in Spring 2008, student self-assessment of competencies, using the ASPH criteria, is
being conducted during an Exit Interview prior to graduation. Each graduating student is asked
to complete the Exit Interview survey prior to meeting with his/her advisor. During the Exit
Interview the student and their advisor discuss the survey and their perceptions of all aspects of



                                                117
the program. Advisors document the discussion and share findings with the appropriate MPH
Committee chairs as part of on-going program evaluation.

2.6b   A matrix that identifies the learning experiences by which the core competencies are
met.

A matrix of all core subject domains and competencies and the courses that provide them may be
found above in 2.3a. The matrix of competencies in the cross-cutting domains and the manner in
which they are taught as follows below:




                                             118
                          Matrix of Competencies in Cross-Cutting Domains

Instructions: Below is a matrix for MPH faculty of national public health competencies divided
into eight skill domains. The Council of Education for Public Health (CEPH) requires accredited
programs to assess their MPH courses, practice, and research addressing core public health
competencies. In order to assess the skills taught in our current MPH courses, we have
developed a matrix for each faculty member to complete which demonstrates the skills covered
and the extent of that coverage for each of their courses. For each public health course that you
teach, please complete the matrix below. If you collaborate with a colleague on a course, please
connect with your colleague so we have a single joint assessment for each course.

Please evaluate the course and place a check mark (√) in the appropriate boxes below that
describe the activities the students complete to help them learn the skills for each competency
within every domain. You can place a check on one or more boxes for each skill listed. Every
course is not expected to address all the domains.

                                Domain – Analytic/Assessment Skills
List of student skills       (1)          (2)            (3)              (4)           (5)    (6)
                           Reading     Attended      Completed        Completed        Exam    N/A
                           Assigned    Lecture      Problem Set/    Group Project
                                                    Presentation/   or Presentation
                                                       Paper
Defines a problem         PH501       PH501        PH501            PH502             PH501
                          PH502       PH502        PH502            PH506             PH502
                          PH506       PH506        PH506            PH615             PH507
                          PH507       PH507        PH507            MI580             PH606
                          PH615       PH615        PH615            GC515E            GC515E
                          GC660       GC660        MI580            PH508E            GC620E
                          GC670       GC670        PH606            GC650E
                          PH606       PH606        GC515E
                          GC515E      GC515E       GC620E
                          GC620E      GC620E       PH505E
                          GC605E      GC605E       PH508E
                          PH505E      PH508E       GC650E
                          PH508E      GC650E
                          GC650E
Determines appropriate    PH501       PH501        PH501            PH502             PH501
uses and limitations of   PH502       PH502        PH502            PH506             PH502
both quantitative and     PH506       PH506        PH506            PH615             PH507
qualitative data*         PH507       PH507        PH507            MI580             GC660
                          PH615       PH615        PH615            GC515E            GC670
                          GC660       GC660        GC660            GC650E            PH606
                          GC670       GC670        GC670                              GC515E
                          MI580       MI580        MI580                              GC650E
                          PH606       PH606        PH606
                          GC515E      GC515E       GC515E
                          GC620E      GC620E       GC605E
                          GC605E      GC605E       PH508E
                                      PH505E
                                      PH508E
                                      GC650E



                                                  119
List of student skills        (1)          (2)            (3)              (4)           (5)     (6)
                            Reading     Attended      Completed        Completed        Exam     N/A
                            Assigned    Lecture      Problem Set/    Group Project
                                                     Presentation/   or Presentation
                                                        Paper
Selects and defines        PH501       PH501        PH501            PH502             PH501    PH508E
variables relevant to      PH502       PH502        PH502            PH506             PH502
defined public health      PH506       PH506        PH506            PH615             GC660
problems                   PH615       PH615        PH615            GC515E            GC670
                           GC660       GC660        GC660            GC650E            GC515E
                           GC670       GC670        GC670
                           MI580       MI580        GC515E
                           GC515E      GC515E       PH505E
                           PH505E      PH505E
Identifies relevant and    PH501       PH501        PH501            PH502             PH501
appropriate data and       PH502       PH502        PH502            PH506             PH502
information sources        PH506       PH506        PH506            PH615             MI580
                           PH615       PH615        PH615            MI580             PH606
                           MI580       MI580        MI580            GC515E            GC515E
                           PH606       PH606        PH606            GC650E            GC650E
                           GC515E      GC515E       GC515E
                           GC620E      GC620E       PH505E
                           GC605E      GC605E       PH508E
                           GC650E      PH505E       GC650E
                                       GC650E
Evaluates the integrity    PH501       PH501        PH501            PH502             PH501
and comparability of       PH502       PH502        PH502            PH506             PH502
data and identifies gaps   PH506       PH506        PH506            PH615             PH507
in data sources            PH507       PH507        PH507            MI580             PH606
                           PH615       PH615        PH615            GC515E            GC515E
                           MI580       MI580        MI580            GC650E
                           PH606       PH606        PH606
                           GC515E      GC515E       GC515E
                           GC605E      GC620E       PH505E
                           GC650E      GC605E       PH508E
                                       PH505E
                                       GC650E
Applies ethical            PH506       PH506        PH506            PH506             PH501    PH508E
principles to the          PH615       PH615        PH615            PH615             PH606
collection,                MI580       MI580        PH606            GC515E            GC515E
maintenance, use, and      PH606       PH606                         GC650E
dissemination of data      GC515E      GC515E
and information            GC605E      GC620E
                                       GC605E
                                       PH505E
Partners with              PH501       PH501        PH501            PH502             PH502    PH506
communities to attach      PH502       PH502        PH502            PH615             PH606    PH507
meaning to collected       PH615       PH615        PH615                                       MI580
quantitative and           PH606       PH606        PH606                                       PH505E
qualitative data*                                                                               PH508E
                                                                                                GC650E
Makes relevant             PH501       PH501        PH501            PH502             PH501
inferences from            PH502       PH502        PH502            PH506             PH502
quantitative and           PH506       PH506        PH506            PH615             PH507
qualitative data*          PH507       PH507        PH507            MI580             GC660
                           PH615       PH615        PH615            GC515E            GC670


                                                   120
List of student skills         (1)          (2)            (3)              (4)           (5)     (6)
                             Reading     Attended      Completed        Completed        Exam     N/A
                             Assigned    Lecture      Problem Set/    Group Project
                                                      Presentation/   or Presentation
                                                         Paper
                            GC660       GC660        GC660                              MI580
                            GC670       GC670        GC670                              PH606
                            MI580       MI580        MI580                              GC515E
                            PH606       PH606        PH606                              GC620E
                            GC515E      GC515E       GC620E                             PH508E
                            GC620E      GC620E       PH505E                             GC650E
                            GC605E      GC605E       PH508E
                            PH508E      PH505E       GC650E
                            GC650E      PH508E
Obtains and interprets      PH501       PH501        PH501            PH502             PH502    PH508E
information regarding       PH502       PH502        PH502            PH506             PH507    GC650E
risks and benefits to the   PH506       PH506        PH506            PH615             PH606
community                   PH507       PH507        PH507            GC515E            GC515E
                            PH615       PH615        PH615
                            PH606       MI580        PH606
                            GC515E      PH606        PH505E
                            PH505E      GC515E
                                        PH505E
Applies data collection     PH501       PH501        PH501            PH506             PH507    MI580
processes, information      PH506       PH506        PH506            PH615             PH606    PH508E
technology                  PH507       PH507        PH507            GC515E                     GC650E
applications, and           PH615       PH615        PH615
computer systems            PH606       GC660        GC660
storage/retrieval           GC605E      GC670        GC670
strategies                              PH606        PH606
                                        GC605E       GC620E
                                        PH505E       GC605E
                                                     PH505E
Recognizes how the          PH501       PH501        PH501            PH502             PH502
data illuminates ethical,   PH502       PH502        PH502            PH506             PH507
political, scientific,      PH506       PH506        PH506            PH615             PH606
economic, and overall       PH507       PH507        PH507            GC515E
public health issues        PH615       PH615        PH615            GC650E
                            PH606       MI580        PH606
                            PH505E      PH606        PH505E
                            PH508E      GC605E
                                        PH505E
                                        PH508E
                                        GC650E




                                                    121
                         Domain – Policy Development/Program Planning Skills
List of student skills         (1)          (2)            (3)              (4)           (5)     (6)
                             Reading     Attended      Completed        Completed        Exam     N/A
                             Assigned    Lecture      Problem Set/    Group Project
                                                      Presentation/   or Presentation
                                                         Paper
Collects, summarizes,       PH501       PH501        PH501            PH502             PH501    PH606
and interprets              PH502       PH502        PH502            PH506             PH502
information relevant to     PH506       PH506        PH506            PH615             PH507
an issue                    PH507       PH507        PH507            GC515E
                            PH615       PH615        PH615            GC650E
                            MI580       GC620E       GC620E
                            GC620E      GC605E       PH505E
                            GC605E      PH508E       PH508E
States policy options       PH501       PH501        PH501            PH502             PH501    PH506
and writes clear and        PH502       PH502        PH502            PH615             PH502    MI580
concise policy              PH507       PH507        PH507            GC515E            PH507    PH606
statements                                           PH615                                       PH505E
                                                     PH508E                                      GC650E
Identifies, interprets,     PH501       PH501        PH501            PH502             PH501    PH506
and implements public       PH502       PH502        PH502            PH615             PH502    MI580
health laws,                PH507       PH507        PH507                              PH507    PH606
regulations, and                        PH615        PH615                                       PH505E
policies related to                                                                              PH508E
specific programs                                                                                GC650E
Articulates the health,     PH501       PH501        PH502            PH502             PH502    PH506
fiscal, administrative,     PH502       PH502        PH507            PH615             PH507    MI580
legal, social, and          PH507       PH507        PH615                                       PH606
political implications of   PH615       PH615                                                    PH505E
each policy option                                                                               PH508E
                                                                                                 GC650E
States the feasibility      PH501       PH507        PH507            PH615             PH507    PH506
and expected outcomes       PH507       PH615        PH615                                       MI580
of each policy option                                                                            PH606
                                                                                                 PH505E
                                                                                                 PH508E
                                                                                                 GC650E
Utilizes current            PH501       PH501        PH506            PH506             PH501    PH507
techniques in decision      PH502       PH502        PH615            PH615             GC650E   MI580
analysis and health         PH506       PH506        GC605E           GC515E                     PH606
planning                    PH615       PH615        GC650E                                      PH505E
                            GC515E      GC515E                                                   PH508E
                            GC620E      GC620E
                            GC605E      GC605E
                            GC650E      GC650E
Decides on the              PH501       PH501        PH501            PH615             PH501    PH506
appropriate course of       PH502       PH502        PH615            GC515E            PH502    MI580
action                      PH615       PH615        GC620E           GC650E                     PH606
                            GC515E      GC515E       GC605E                                      PH505E
                            GC620E      GC620E                                                   PH508E
                            GC605E      GC605E




                                                    122
List of student skills       (1)          (2)            (3)              (4)           (5)     (6)
                           Reading     Attended      Completed        Completed        Exam     N/A
                           Assigned    Lecture      Problem Set/    Group Project
                                                    Presentation/   or Presentation
                                                       Paper
Develops a plan to        PH501       PH501        PH502            PH502             PH501    MI580
implement policy,         PH502       PH502        PH507            PH615             PH502    PH606
including goals,          PH507       PH507        PH615            GC515E            PH507    PH505E
outcome and process       PH615       PH615                                                    PH508E
objectives, and           GC605E      GC605E                                                   GC650E
implementation steps



Translates policy into    PH502       PH502        PH502            PH502             PH502    PH507
organizational plans,     PH615       PH615        PH615            PH615                      MI580
structures, and           GC605E      GC605E       GC605E                                      PH606
programs                                                                                       PH505E
                                                                                               PH508E
                                                                                               GC650E
Prepares and                                                                                   PH507
implements emergency                                                                           PH615
response plans                                                                                 MI580
                                                                                               PH606
                                                                                               PH505E
                                                                                               PH508E
                                                                                               GC650E
Develops mechanisms       PH502       PH502        PH502            PH502             PH501    MI580
to monitor and evaluate   PH506       PH506        PH506            PH506             PH502    PH606
programs for their        PH615       PH615        PH615            PH615             GC515E   PH505E
effectiveness and         GC515E      GC515E       GC515E           GC515E                     PH508E
quality                   GC605E      GC605E                                                   GC650E




                                                  123
                                        Domain – Communication Skills
 List of student skills        (1)             (2)            (3)              (4)           (5)     (6)
                             Reading        Attended      Completed        Completed        Exam     N/A
                             Assigned       Lecture      Problem Set/    Group Project
                                                         Presentation/   or Presentation
                                                            Paper
Communicates                PH502         PH501         PH501            PH502             PH501
effectively both in         PH506         PH502         PH502            PH506             PH502
writing and orally, or in   PH507         PH506         PH506            PH615             PH507
other ways                  PH606         PH507         PH507            GC515E            PH606
                            GC650E        PH615         PH615            GC650E            GC515E
                                          PH606         MI580                              PH508E
                                          GC515E        PH606                              GC650E
                                          GC620E        GC620E
                                          GC605E        GC605E
                                                        PH505E
                                                        PH508E
                                                        GC650E
Solicits input from         PH501         PH501         PH501            PH502             PH501    MI580
individuals and             PH502         PH502         PH502            PH506             PH502
organizations               PH506         PH506         PH506            PH615             PH507
                            PH507         PH507         PH507            GC515E            PH606
                            PH615         PH615         PH615            GC650E
                            PH606         PH606         PH606
                                          GC620E        GC620E
                                          GC605E        GC605E
                                                        PH505E
                                                        PH508E
Advocates for public        PH501         PH501         PH502            PH502             PH501    MI580
health programs and         PH502         PH502         PH507            PH615             PH502    PH505E
resources                   PH507         PH507         PH615                              PH506    PH508E
                            PH615         PH615                                            PH507    GC650E
Leads and participates      PH502         PH502         PH502            PH502             PH502    MI580
in groups to address        PH506         PH506         PH506            PH506             PH507    PH505E
specific issues             PH507         PH507         PH507            PH615                      GC650E
                                          PH615         PH615
                                                        PH508E
Uses the media,             PH502         PH502         PH502            PH502             PH501    MI580
advanced technologies,      PH507         PH507         PH507            PH615             PH506    PH505E
and community               PH615         PH615         PH615                              PH507    PH508E
networks to                                                                                         GC650E
communicate
information
Effectively presents        PH501         PH501         PH501            PH502             PH501
accurate demographic,       PH502         PH502         PH502            PH506             PH502
statistical,                PH506         PH506         PH506            PH615             PH507
programmatic, and           PH507         PH507         PH507            GC650E
scientific information      PH615         PH615         PH615
for professional and lay    PH606         MI580         PH606
audiences                                 PH606         PH505E
                                                        PH508E




                                                       124
Listens to others in an   PH506    PH502     PH506    PH501    PH507   MI580
unbiased manner,          PH507    PH506     PH507    PH502
respects points of view   PH606    PH507     PH615    PH506
of others, and promotes   GC650E   PH615     PH606    PH615
the expression of                  PH606     PH505E   GC650E
diverse opinions and               GC620E
perspectives                       GC605E
                                   GC650E




                                            125
                                  Domain – Cultural Competency Skills
List of student skills      (1)        (2)         (3)             (4)             (5)     (6)
                            Reading    Attended    Completed       Completed       Exam    N/A
                            Assigned   Lecture     Problem Set/    Group Project
                                                   Presentation/   or
                                                   Paper           Presentation
Utilizes appropriate        PH501      PH501       PH501           PH502           PH501   PH506
methods for interacting     PH502      PH502       PH502           PH615           PH502   MI580
sensitively, effectively,   PH615      PH507       PH507                           PH606   PH505E
and professionally with     PH606      PH615       PH615                                   PH508E
persons from diverse        GC605E     PH606       PH606                                   GC650E
cultural,                              GC620E
socioeconomic,                         GC605E
educational, racial,
ethnic and professional
backgrounds, and
persons of all ages and
lifestyle preferences
Identifies the role of      PH501      PH501       PH501           PH502           PH501   MI580
cultural, social, and       PH502      PH502       PH502           PH506           PH502   PH505E
behavioral factors in       PH506      PH506       PH506           PH615           PH507   GC650E
determining the             PH507      PH507       PH507                           PH606
delivery of public          PH615      PH615       PH615
health services             PH606      PH606       PH606
                            GC515E     GC515E
                            GC605E     PH508E
                            PH508E
Develops and adapts         PH501      PH501       PH502           PH502           PH507   PH506
approaches to problems      PH502      PH502       PH507           PH615           PH606   MI580
that take into account      PH507      PH507       PH615                                   PH505E
cultural differences        PH615      PH615       PH606                                   PH508E
                            PH606      PH606                                               GC650E
Understands the             PH501      PH501       PH502           PH502           PH507   PH506
dynamic forces              PH502      PH502       PH507           PH615           PH606   MI580
contributing to cultural    PH507      PH507       PH615                                   PH505E
diversity                   PH615      PH615       PH606                                   PH508E
                            PH606      PH606                                               GC650E




Understands the             PH501      PH501                                               PH506
importance of a diverse     GC515E     GC515E                                              PH615
public health workforce                                                                    MI580
                                                                                           PH505E
                                                                                           PH508E
                                                                                           GC650E




                                                  126
                            Domain – Basic Public Health Science Skills
 List of student skills      (1)          (2)            (3)              (4)           (5)     (6)
                           Reading     Attended      Completed        Completed        Exam     N/A
                           Assigned    Lecture      Problem Set/    Group Project
                                                    Presentation/   or Presentation
                                                       Paper
Identifies the            PH501       PH501        PH501            PH502             PH501    PH506
individual's and          PH502       PH502        PH502            PH615             PH502    MI580
organization's                        PH505E       PH615                                       PH508E
responsibilities within                                                                        GC650E
the context of the
Essential Public Health
Services and core
functions
Defines, assesses, and    PH501       PH501        PH501            PH502             PH501
understands the health    PH502       PH502        PH502            PH506             PH502
status of populations,    PH506       PH506        PH506            PH615             PH507
determinants of health    PH507       PH507        PH507            MI580             MI580
and illness, factors      PH615       PH615        PH615            GC515E            GC515E
contributing to health    MI580       MI580        MI580            GC650E            GC650E
promotion and disease     GC515E      GC515E       PH508E
prevention, and factors   PH508E      PH505E
influencing the use of    GC650E      PH508E
health services                       GC650E
Understands the           PH501       PH501        PH502            PH502             PH501    PH506
historical development,   PH502       PH502        PH507            PH615             PH502
structure, and            PH507       PH507        PH615                              PH507
interaction of public     MI580       PH615
health and health care    PH505E      GC620E
systems                               GC605E
                                      PH505E
                                      PH508E
                                      GC650E
Identifies and applies    PH502       PH502        PH502            PH502             PH502    PH508E
basic research methods    PH506       PH506        PH506            PH506             PH507
used in public health     PH507       PH507        PH507            PH615             GC660
                          PH615       PH615        PH615            MI580             GC670
                          MI580       GC660        GC660            GC515E            MI580
                          PH606       GC670        GC670            GC650E            PH606
                          GC515E      MI580        MI580                              GC650E
                          GC650E      PH606        PH606
                                      GC515E       GC515E
                                      PH505E       PH505E
                                      GC650E       GC650E




                                                  127
 List of student skills       (1)          (2)            (3)              (4)           (5)     (6)
                            Reading     Attended      Completed        Completed        Exam     N/A
                            Assigned    Lecture      Problem Set/    Group Project
                                                     Presentation/   or Presentation
                                                        Paper
Applies the basic public   PH501       PH501        PH502            PH502             PH501    PH508E
health sciences            PH502       PH502        PH506            PH506             PH502
including behavioral       PH506       PH506        PH507            PH615             PH507
and social sciences,       PH507       PH507        PH615            MI580             GC660
biostatistics,             PH615       PH615        GC660            GC515E            GC670
epidemiology,              GC660       GC660        GC670                              MI580
environmental public       GC670       GC670        MI580                              PH606
health, and prevention     MI580       MI580        PH606                              GC515E
of chronic and             PH606       PH606        GC515E
infectious diseases and    GC515E      GC515E       PH505E
injuries                   GC650E      GC650E

Identifies and retrieves   PH501       PH501        PH501            PH502             PH501
current relevant           PH502       PH502        PH502            PH506             PH502
scientific evidence        PH506       PH506        PH506            PH615             PH507
                           PH507       PH507        PH507            MI580             PH606
                           PH615       PH615        PH615            GC515E            GC515E
                           MI580       PH606        MI580            GC650E
                           PH606                    PH606
                           GC515E                   PH505E
                           PH508E                   PH508E
Identifies the             PH506       PH506        PH506            PH506             PH507
limitations of research    PH507       PH507        PH507            PH615             PH606
and the importance of      PH615       PH615        PH615            GC650E            GC650E
observations and           MI580       GC660        MI580
interrelationships         PH606       GC670        PH606
                           GC650E      MI580        PH508E
                                       PH606        GC650E
                                       PH505E
                                       GC650E
Develops a lifelong        PH501       PH501        PH502            PH502             PH501    MI580
commitment to rigorous     PH502       PH502        PH506            PH506             PH502
critical thinking          PH506       PH506        PH615            PH615             PH606
                           PH615       PH615        PH606            GC515E            GC515E
                           PH606       PH606        GC515E
                           GC515E      GC515E       GC620E
                           GC620E      GC620E       PH505E
                                       GC605E
                                       PH505E
                                       GC650E




                                                   128
                          Domain – Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
 List of student skills       (1)          (2)            (3)             (4)          (5)    (6)
                            Reading     Attended      Completed        Completed      Exam    N/A
                            Assigned    Lecture      Problem Set/    Group Project
                                                     Presentation/         or
                                                        Paper         Presentation
Establishes and            PH501       PH501        PH502            PH502           PH501   PH506
maintains linkages with    PH502       PH502        PH615            PH615           PH606   MI580
key stakeholders           PH615       PH615                                                 PH505E
                           PH606       PH606                                                 PH508E
                           GC605E      GC605E                                                GC650E
Utilizes leadership,       PH501       PH501        PH502            PH502           PH502   PH506
team building,             PH502       PH502        PH615            PH615                   PH507
negotiation, and           PH615       PH615        GC605E                                   MI580
conflict resolution        GC605E      GC605E                                                PH505E
skills to build                                                                              PH508E
community                                                                                    GC650E
partnerships
Collaborates with          PH501       PH501        PH502            PH502           PH502   PH506
community partners to      PH502       PH502        PH615            PH615           PH606   PH507
promote the health of      PH615       PH615                                                 MI580
the population             PH606       PH606                                                 PH505E
                                                                                             PH508E
                                                                                             GC650E
Identifies how public      PH501       PH501        PH502            PH502           PH502   PH506
and private                PH502       PH502        PH507            PH615           PH507   PH505E
organizations operate      PH507       PH507        PH615                                    PH508E
within a community         PH615       PH615                                                 GC650E
                           PH606       MI580
                           GC515E      PH606
                                       GC515E
                                       GC605E
Accomplishes effective     PH501       PH501        PH502            PH502           PH502   PH506
community                  PH502       PH502                                                 PH615
engagements                PH606       PH606                                                 MI580
                                                                                             PH505E
                                                                                             PH508E
                                                                                             GC650E
Identifies community       PH501       PH501        PH502            PH502           PH501   PH506
assets and available       PH502       PH502        PH507            PH615           PH502   MI580
resources                  PH507       PH507        PH615                            PH507   PH505E
                           PH615       PH615                                         PH606   PH508E
                           PH606       PH606                                                 GC650E
Develops, implements,      PH501       PH501        PH501            PH502           PH501   PH506
and evaluates a            PH502       PH502        PH502            PH615           PH502   PH507
community public           PH615       PH615        PH615                                    MI580
health assessment                                                                            PH505E
                                                                                             PH508E
                                                                                             GC650E
Describes the role of      PH501       PH501        PH501            PH502           PH501   PH506
government in the          PH502       PH502        PH502            PH615           PH502   MI580
delivery of community      PH507       PH507        PH507                            PH507   PH505E
health services            PH615       PH615        PH615                                    PH508E
                                                                                             GC650E




                                                   129
                          Domain – Financial Planning and Management Skills
 List of student skills       (1)          (2)            (3)              (4)           (5)     (6)
                            Reading     Attended      Completed        Completed        Exam     N/A
                            Assigned    Lecture      Problem Set/    Group Project
                                                     Presentation/   or Presentation
                                                        Paper
Develops and presents      PH506       PH506        PH506            PH506             GC       PH507
a budget                   PH615       PH615        PH615            PH615             620E     MI580
                           GC620E      GC620E       GC620E                                      PH505E
                                                                                                PH508E
                                                                                                GC650E
Manages programs                       GC620E       GC620E                                      PH506
within budget                                                                                   PH507
constraints                                                                                     PH615
                                                                                                MI580
                                                                                                PH505E
                                                                                                PH508E
                                                                                                GC650E
Applies budget             PH615       PH615        PH615            PH615             GC620E   PH506
processes                  GC620E      GC620E       GC620E                                      PH507
                                                                                                MI580
                                                                                                PH505E
                                                                                                PH508E
                                                                                                GC650E
Develops strategies for    PH615       PH615        PH615            PH615                      PH506
determining budget         GC620E      GC620E                                                   PH507
priorities                 GC605E      GC605E                                                   MI580
                                                                                                PH505E
                                                                                                PH508E
                                                                                                GC650E
Monitors program           PH615       PH615        PH615            PH615                      PH506
performance                GC620E      MI580        GC620E                                      PH507
                           GC605E      GC620E                                                   PH505E
                                       GC605E                                                   PH508E
                                                                                                GC650E
Prepares proposals for     PH506       PH506        PH506            PH506                      PH507
funding from external      PH615       PH615        PH615            PH615                      MI580
sources                    PH606       PH606                                                    PH505E
                                                                                                PH508E
                                                                                                GC650E
Applies basic human        GC620E      GC620E                        GC650E                     PH506
relations skills to the    GC605E      GC605E                                                   PH507
management of                                                                                   PH615
organizations,                                                                                  MI580
motivation of                                                                                   PH505E
personnel, and                                                                                  PH508E
resolution of conflicts
Manages information        PH615       PH615        PH615            PH615                      PH506
systems for collection,    GC620E      GC620E       GC620E                                      PH507
retrieval, and use of      GC605E      GC605E                                                   MI580
data for decision-                                                                              PH505E
making                                                                                          PH508E
                                                                                                GC650E




                                                   130
  List of student skills       (1)          (2)            (3)              (4)           (5)     (6)
                             Reading     Attended      Completed        Completed        Exam     N/A
                             Assigned    Lecture      Problem Set/    Group Project
                                                      Presentation/   or Presentation
                                                         Paper
Negotiates and                                                                                   PH506
develops contracts and                                                                           PH507
other documents for the                                                                          PH615
provision of                                                                                     MI580
population-based                                                                                 PH505E
services                                                                                         PH508E
                                                                                                 GC650E
Conducts cost-              GC620E      MI580        GC620E           GC650E            GC620E   PH506
effectiveness, cost-        GC650E      GC620E       GC650E                             GC650E   PH507
benefit, and cost-utility               GC650E                                                   PH615
analyses                                                                                         PH505E
                                                                                                 PH508E




                                                    131
                            Domain – Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
 List of student skills        (1)          (2)            (3)              (4)           (5)     (6)
                             Reading     Attended      Completed        Completed        Exam     N/A
                             Assigned    Lecture      Problem Set/    Group Project
                                                      Presentation/   or Presentation
                                                         Paper
Creates a culture of        PH501       PH501        PH502            PH502             PH502    PH505E
ethical standards within    PH502       PH502        PH507            PH615             PH507    PH508E
organizations and           PH507       PH507        PH615                                       GC650E
communities                 PH615       PH615        GC605E
                            MI580       MI580
                            PH606       PH606
                            GC605E      GC605E
Helps create key values     PH501       PH501        PH502            PH502             PH502    MI580
and shared vision and       PH502       PH502        PH615            PH615                      PH505E
uses these principles to    PH615       PH615                                                    PH508E
guide action                PH606       PH606                                                    GC650E
                            GC605E      GC605E
Identifies internal and     PH502       PH502        PH502            PH502             PH502    MI580
external issues that may    PH507       PH507        PH507            PH615             PH507    PH505E
impact delivery of          PH615       PH615        PH615            GC515E            GC515E   PH508E
essential public health     GC515E      GC515E       GC515E                                      GC650E
services (i.e., strategic   GC605E      GC605E
planning)
Facilitates collaboration   PH502       PH502        PH502            PH502             PH502    MI580
with internal and           PH615       PH615        PH615            PH615                      PH505E
external groups to          GC605E      GC605E       GC605E                                      PH508E
ensure participation of                                                                          GC650E
key stakeholders
Promotes team and           PH501       PH501        PH502            PH502             PH502    MI580
organizational learning     PH502       PH502                         PH615                      PH505E
                            GC515E      GC515E                        GC650E                     PH508E
                            GC605E      GC605E
Contributes to              PH501       PH501        PH502            PH502             PH502    MI580
development,                PH502       PH502        PH615            PH615             GC515E   PH505E
implementation, and         PH615       PH615        GC515E           GC515E                     PH508E
monitoring of               GC515E      GC515E       GC605E                                      GC650E
organizational              GC605E      GC605E
performance standards
Uses the legal and          PH501       PH501        PH502            PH502             PH501    MI580
political system to         PH502       PH502        PH507            PH615             PH502    PH505E
effect change               PH507       PH507        PH615                              PH507    PH508E
                                        PH615                                                    GC650E
Applies theory of           PH501       PH501        PH502            PH502             PH502    MI580
organizational              PH502       PH502        PH615            PH615                      PH505E
structures to               PH615       PH615                                                    PH508E
professional practice       GC605E      GC605E                                                   GC650E




                                                    132
2.6c Identification of a set of competencies for each specialty area identified in the
instructional matrix, including professional and academic degree curricula.

Not applicable.

2.6d A description of the manner in which competencies are developed, used and made
available to students.

The core competencies of the ASPH and the cross-cutting domains and competencies of the
Council on Linkages between Academia and Public Health Practice were selected by the
Curriculum Committee to guide the development and assessment of TJU MPH courses. The
ASPH core competencies are utilized by the faculty who teach the core courses to guide them in
the construction of their course objectives. The extent to which the required courses adhere to
the ASPH competency list is demonstrated on the matrix of core domains in 2.3a. The extent to
which all course adhere to the cross cutting competencies from the Council on Linkages is
demonstrated on the matrix of cross-cutting competencies above. Students are introduced to the
competencies of the core subject areas through the objectives contained in the syllabi of their
courses. Faculty are encouraged to integrate cross-cutting competencies into their course
curriculum and are asked to evaluate the extent to which this is done through an annual
assessment.

2.6e A description of the manner in which the program periodically assesses the
changing needs of public health practice and uses this information to establish the
competencies for its educational programs.

Program faculty members regularly attend national, regional and local meetings, including the
American Public Health Association, the Council of Public Health Programs, the Society for
Pubic Health Education, among other public health professional associations. In addition,
faculty and students regularly attend local public health presentations and faculty interact with
colleagues through participation in Boards, Committees and Associations. The MPH CAB and
Clerkship/Thesis/Capstone preceptors also provide useful information about changing needs of
public health practice. This provides an invaluable opportunity to hear from colleagues who
inform them about the changing reality and needs of public health research and practice.
Discussions with colleagues in the Pennsylvania Public Health Association and other colleagues
around the country are other mechanisms for staying abreast of the changing needs of practice.
Public health journals and newsletters also provide information that is vital to this process. The
many resources of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention are other important sources that keep faculty in touch through
projects, personal contacts, and publications.

2.6f   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met with commentary.

This criteria on Required Competencies has been met with commentary. While the majority of
competencies in every domain, both core and cross-cutting, are included in the curriculum of
more than one required course, and taught through active methods, there is greater redundancy in
some domains than in others. Faculty must integrate the public health core competencies into



                                               133
their course syllabi. The TJU program has met this criteria with comment due to the need to
enhance instruction concerning environmental health and certain aspects of health policy and
management, including emergency preparedness, financial planning, budgeting, and
management strategies.




                                              134
Criterion 2.7 Assessment Procedures

There shall be procedures for assessing and documenting the extent to which each student
has demonstrated competence in the required areas of competence.

2.7a Description of the procedures used for monitoring and evaluating student progress
in achieving the expected competencies.

Multiple procedures exist at TJU for monitoring and evaluating student progress in achieving
expected competencies. These include:

   •   Each student admitted to the MPH program is assigned a faculty advisor. The mentor
       meets with each of his/her students to establish goals of study, to chart course sequencing
       and academic progress, and to assist in establishing goals and objectives for the Clerkship
       that best meets student needs and interests. The Clerkship goals and objectives are
       further reviewed with the Clerkship Coordinator. Each Advisor has access to students'
       transcript and course registration through the TJU Pulse and Banner systems. Advisors
       are expected to review this material and contact students as appropriate. An example of a
       transcript reported on Banner is show below:




                                              135
                               Student Academic Transcript

Transcript Data

STUDENT INFORMATION

Name :
Curriculum Information

Current Program
Masters of Public
Health
College:                College of Graduate
                        Studies
Major:                  Public Health

INSTITUTION CREDIT

Fall, 2006
Subject Course Level Title                               Grade    Credit   Quality   Start R
                                                                  Hours    Points    and
                                                                                     End
                                                                                     Dates
PH       501      GR    Introduction to Public Health    A-       3.000    11.10
                                    Attempt Passed       Earned   GPA      Quality
                                    Hours       Hours    Hours    Hours    Points
Current Term:                       3.000       3.000    3.000    3.000    11.10
Cumulative:                         3.000       3.000    3.000    3.000    11.10
Unofficial Transcript
Subject Course Level Title                               Grade    Credit   Quality   Start
                                                                  Hours    Points    and
                                                                                     End
                                                                                     Date
                                                                                     s
GC       660      GR    Statistical Methods              B        3.000    9.00
PH       502      GR    Behav&Soc Theor/Public Health    A-       2.000    7.40
PH       508      GR    HealPol:International Perspect   A-       3.000    11.10
                                     Attempt Passed      Earned   GPA      Quality
                                     Hours     Hours     Hours    Hours    Points
Current Term:                        8.000     8.000     8.000    8.000    27.50
Cumulative:                          11.000    11.000    11.000   11.000   38.60


                                               136
Unofficial Transcript
Subject Course Level Title                             Grade    Credit    Quality   Start
                                                                Hours     Points    and
                                                                                    End
                                                                                    Date
                                                                                    s
PH    507     GR Environmental Health                  A-       3.000     11.10
Term Totals (Graduate)

                        Attempt    Passed     Earned   GPA      Quality   GPA
                        Hours      Hours      Hours    Hours    Points
Current Term:           3.000      3.000      3.000    3.000    11.10     3.70
Cumulative:             14.000     14.000     14.000   14.000   49.70     3.55

Unofficial Transcript
TRANSCRIPT TOTALS (GRADUATE)

                        Attempt    Passed     Earned   GPA      Quality   GPA
                        Hours      Hours      Hours    Hours    Points
Total Institution:      14.000     14.000     14.000   14.000   49.70     3.55
Total Transfer:         0.000      0.000      0.000    0.000    0.00      0.00
Overall:                14.000     14.000     14.000   14.000   49.70     3.55

Unofficial Transcript
COURSES IN PROGRESS

Spring 2008
Subject Course Level Title                             Credit Hours       Start and End
                                                                          Dates
GC      640     GR      Research Ethics                1.000
MI      580     GR      Principles-Epidemiology        3.000
PH      506     GR      Health Services Research       3.000

Unofficial Transcript




                                               137
   •   Each course has stated objectives that are developed by the faculty. These objectives are
       periodically reviewed by the Chair of the MPH Curriculum Committee with the input
       from the Committee to assure continued relevance to public health theory and practice.
       The documented student achievement in MPH courses is the operational definition of
       their demonstrated competence. This competence is evidenced by the students'
       achievement on papers, examinations and/or presentations required for each course.
       Internal faculty assessment of MPH courses is based on the Council of Linkages public
       health competencies and describe competency within each course based on student
       assignments and examinations, i.e. what students actually do, rather than solely on the
       content covered by the instructor. (See Criterion 2.6 for a copy of the course Matrix)

   •   Following the College of Graduate Studies guidelines, students are required to receive a
       B or better in overall grade point average to maintain status in the program. Faculty
       advisors monitor student progress and are to initiate communication with any student
       whose average falls below a 3.0 (see Advisor Planning Form in Appendix H)

   •   Students and alumni are surveyed annually to track essential information about
       employment, professional/service activities or achievements and opportunities for
       improving the MPH program. In April-May 2008, exit interviews were conducted by
       faculty advisors with those students who completed all MSPH requirements (cohort who
       began prior to Fall 2007 when program offered an MPH degree). This new requirement
       for graduation serves as an assessment of student competencies in the five core areas of
       public health and leads to a discussion of future public health professional growth
       through continuing education and lifelong learning. Students also provide feedback on
       the program including continuing education interests as future alumni of the program.
       Results for our initial exit interview with the spring 2008 cohort of graduates were not
       available as this draft self-study document was being prepared but will be included in the
       revised self-study in September 2008.

In summary, student achievement is assessed through courses (GPA), the Clerkship and
Capstone research projects, faculty input, and ongoing assessment and communication via the
student’s faculty advisor. The faculty advisor meets with the students upon matriculation into
the program and before the student begins her/his classes. A discussion of the student goals and
future career interests (if known) occurs. The advisor communicates with the student to assess
progress in coursework, the student’s clerkship, and any service activities over time. The advisor
discusses with the student progress toward completion of coursework, the clerkship experience,
and preparation for the capstone research project as the student progresses through the program.
Remediation of issues is addressed often in communication with the MPH Program Director
and/or Program Coordinator. Informal assessment of student progress, including self-efficacy of
the core public health competencies occurs along with mentoring, including referral sources
provided as appropriate for each individual student. The faculty advisor provides oversight to
the student regarding options for his/her capstone project and the selection of a capstone
committee chair and possible committee members. Upon successful completion of all MPH
program requirements, the student meets with her/his faculty advisor to conduct an exit interview
where a formal assessment of MPH core competencies occurs.




                                               138
An introduction to the new credentialing exam for public health (CPH) was provided to faculty
and our CAB in the fall of 2007. Since the exam is brand new with the first exam not being
given until August, 2008, the faculty and CAB representatives had a number of questions about
the use of the exam as a benchmark to measure the competencies of our MPH students. It was
decided to assess the results of the exam for the first year, review the process, and exam
improvements, and re-assess the CPH exam and the projected value of a CPH for MPH students
in the 2008-2009 academic year.

2.7b Identification of outcomes that serve as measures by which the program will
evaluate student achievement in each degree program, and presentation of data assessing
the program's performance against those measures over the last three years.

Outcome measures related to student achievement have been developed for research, service and
instruction. Outcome measures related to student achievement in service and research are
provided in Criteria 3.1 and 3.2. The following Table presents the data assessing the Program’s
performance against instructional measures for the last three years.

            Objectives                              Actual                         Status
Instruction
 100% of students who complete a     2005-2008                              Met
minimum of 42 credits in the         Average GPA for graduates &
MPH program will graduate with       students expected to graduate in
a B average or better                2008 = 3.69. GPA range= 3.0-4.0
80% of students who complete         Exit interviews for 2007-2008          Not met
the MPH program will report
proficiency in at least 70% of the   47% of all students reported being
core public health competencies      confident/very confident in at least
                                     70% of all 48 core competencies.

                                     87% of all students reported being
                                     confident/very confident in at least
                                     60% of all 48 core competencies.

90% of students and alumni           2005-2006 – not measured               Met for 2005-2008.
completing the MPH will report       2006-2007 – not measured               Will monitor
satisfaction with the overall                                               annually in future
education/instruction received in    Students (2005-2008) - 91%
TJU’s MPH program                    Alumni (2005-2008) - 94%

100% of MPH core course syllabi      2005-2006 – not measured               Met for 2007-2008 .
will have learning objectives        2006-2007 – not measured               Monitoring will be
addressing core public health                                               on-going in future
competencies                         2007-2008 - 100.00%




                                              139
            Objectives                             Actual                       Status
90% of students and alumni will     Students (2007-2008) –              Partially met-
rate the overall quality of their   Biostatistics – 87%                 Survey raised
education in the 5 core areas as    Epidemiology – 97%                  concerns about
good or better.                     Environmental Health – 79%          several courses
                                    Health Policy – 77%                 particularly
                                    Behavioral and Social - 86%         Environmental
                                                                        Health and Health
                                    Alumni (2005-2008) -                Policy. The Program
                                    Biostatistics – 89%                 Director and Chair of
                                    Epidemiology – 100%                 the Curriculum
                                    Environmental Health – 74%          Committee meet with
                                    Health Policy – 95%                 all faculty to address
                                    Behavioral and Social - 83%         course evaluations
                                                                        and make
                                                                        recommendations for
                                                                        improvement
75% of full-time MPH students       No full time students have          NA
will complete their degree          graduated to date. Full time
requirements in 18 months or less   program initiated in Fall 2007

80% of part-time MPH students       2005-2006 – 80%                     Met
will complete their degree          2006-2007 – 57%
requirements in 36 months or less   2007-2008 – 93%

                                    Overall – 81%
80% of MPH graduates will be        See discussion below                Met
employed in a public health         2006-2007 100%
position or using public health     2007-2008 79%
skills in current employment
within 12 months of graduation

80% of graduating students will     This was not included in the exit   Revise Exit Interview
have participated in at least one   interview survey                    survey for on-going
public health continuing                                                evaluation based on
education program offered at TJU                                        continuation of this
or in the greater Philadelphia                                          objective
region


In the winter of 2008, the MPH program surveyed all current students and alumni. Of the 29
alumni surveyed, two students were not reached due to inaccurate contact information and 19 of
the 27 alumni reached answered the survey (response rate – 70%). In addition all current MPH
students were surveyed and 33 of 54 current students responded (response rate – 61%). The data
from the surveys, course evaluations and data maintained by the University such as GPA are



                                             140
presented in this section as well as the sections on Research, Service and Workforce
Development.

Cumulative GPA

The cumulative GPA distribution as of the end of the first Spring term, 2008 for the 54 students
enrolled in the TJU Public Health Program is shown below.




Between 2005-2008 the average GPA for graduates & students expected to graduate in 2008 (N=47) was 3.69.
Overall Grade point averages for graduates and students expected to graduate in 2008 ranged from 3.0 to 4.0. The
cumulative GPA distribution as of the end of the first Spring term, 2008 for the 54 students enrolled in the TJU
Public Health Program is shown above.

Time to Graduation

The average time to graduation overall is 2.6 years (range over the three year period is 2.4 to
2.9). In 2006, 80% of students completed the program in three years or less; 57% in year 2007;
and the graduation completion rate in 2008 for three years or less is 93%. Overall, 81% of
students graduated within three years or less.




                                                      141
Years to Graduation                2006                        2007                    2008
                               # of Students               # of Students           # of Students
1                         1                        1                          1
1.5                       2                        1                          6
2                         2                        1                          1
2.5                       7                        3                          2
3                         2                        2                          1
3.5                       1                        0                          3
4                         0                        0                          0
5                         0                        0                          0
6                         0                        0                          1
Total Graduates               15                       7                          15

There were 15 MSPH graduates in summer 2008. The program has been solely part-time prior
to fall 2007 so that the vast majority of students who completed their MSPH have taken several
years to complete the degree. Many students are working full-time and/or have families and take
only 1-2 courses per term. With the beginning of our full-time one-year plus curriculum in fall
2007 and the addition of more course sections and courses being offered in several terms, we
expect an increasing percentage of our student body to take the MPH full-time and complete
their degree requirements in 1 ½ to 2 years. However, it is important to note that the number of
students considered inactive is increasing (19 in 2007-2008) and is not factored into the tables
above. Greater outreach to these students is needed to encourage completion of the program.

Professional Development

Responses from the alumni survey indicate that a majority of the graduates have presented their
thesis/capstone findings. In fact, one person has made five presentations of his/her Capstone
findings at professional meetings. To date, two alumni have published his/her thesis findings in
a professional journal. However, three students returning the student survey that has been
distributed indicated that they have published their thesis/Capstone findings Six MPH students
indicated that they had presented results of public health projects while a student at Jefferson and
two students reported having published results of a project on which they worked. We certainly
plan on working more closely with our students to help them publish their work. Our new
Capstone Seminar was offered for the first time in summer of 2008. A total of 17 students
completed the Seminar. One session was devoted to publication of their work. It was offered by
a local editor and publisher. The Seminar should reinforce the value of the individual work by
generating interest and feedback from their peers. This may encourage publication of results.

2.7c If the outcome measures selected by the school do not include degree completion
rates and job placement rates, then data for these two additional indicators must be
provided, including experiential data over the last three years. If degree completion rates,
in the normal time period for degree completion, are less than 80 percent, an explanation
must be provided. If job placement rates, within 12 months following award of the degree,
are less than 80 percent, an explanation must be provided.

Not applicable. Discussed in 2.7b above.


                                                142
    2.7d   A table showing the destination of graduates for each of the last three years.

    Graduates Employment Status: Destination of graduates for each of the last three years.

    The destination of our graduates has been documented both through the JCGS annual alumni
    survey and through a survey that sent to MPH alumni by the MPH Program in order to improve
    the Program’s ability to document employment specific to public health.

    The following Table (2.7d) shows the destinations of graduates for each of the last three years.
    The template below shows the findings from the 2008 alumni survey collected in response to the
    following question: "Where in public health are you currently working?" Twenty seven alumni
    were sent the Alumni survey in February 2008 (Response rate = 52%). The results below reflect
    the 14 of 19 students who responded to the survey and answered the current employment
    question. Students who graduated during the 2007-2008 academic year will be surveyed in
    January 2009.

    Survey results show that 4 of our graduates are not working in public health. Because the survey
    was anonymous, we do not know the reasons for their responses. Since all of the graduates
    attended the program on a part-time basis and were already employed, perhaps they chose not to
    work in public health even though their skill set has been enhanced by completion of the
    program. As evidence for this, half the respondents to the alumni survey 'absolutely' believe that
    the MPH "helped me advance in my career" or "enabled me to better understand the ethical
    dilemmas faced when trying to solve public health problems."

Table 2.7d. Destination of MPH Graduates by Program Area (Alumni Survey) 2005-2008
      Government Non- Health Private University/ Proprietary Further          Non                  Not
                     Profit Care Practice Research                Education Health               employed
                                                                             Related
      #      %       # % # % #        % #        %    #     %     #    %     # %                 #       %
2005
      1      11      0 0 0 0 0        0    1     11   4     44    0    0     1 11                2       22
2006
2006
                                           1     33                                              2       67
2007
2007
2008

    2.7e In public health fields where there is certification of professional competence, data
    on the performance of the program’s graduates on these national examinations for each of
    the last three years.

    Not applicable.




                                                   143
2.7f Data describing results from periodic assessments of alumni and employers of
graduates regarding the ability of the program's graduates to effectively perform the
competencies in a practice setting.

These data are partially available from the survey of alumni completed in early 2008. It does not
include feedback from employers. In the alumni survey, we asked several questions about
performance. They were all structured as follows:

The Jefferson Public Health Program:

   •   helped me advance in my career (73% 'absolutely' or 'very much so')
   •   enabled me to better understand the ethical dilemmas faced when trying to solve public
       health problems (80% ‘absolutely’ or ‘very much so’)
   •   helped me become more involved in community service (67% 'absolutely' or 'very much
       so')

   •   helped me be more effective in serving my community (64% 'absolutely' or 'very much
       so')

   •   enabled me to be a better researcher (85% ‘absolutely’ or ‘very much so’)

   •   enabled me to be a contributing member of the public health workforce (79% 'absolutely'
       or 'very much so')

   •   enabled me to be a better health advocate (86% 'absolutely' or 'very much so')
   •   enabled me to better evaluate health policy (79% 'absolutely' or 'very much so')

2.7g   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met with commentary. The program currently collects key data on student
progress, completion, and employment but data currently available from the past three years
reflects our MSPH part-time program which to date, does not fully meet the criterion. We have
improved our data collection policies and procedures with both students and alumni to track self
assessment of public health competencies, degree completion and career status. We expect that
with enhanced proactive faculty monitoring and advising, a process to assess student
competencies, increased student involvement, and an increasing proportion of full-time MPH
students, that we will see a marked improvement in number of inactive students and professional
public health employment rates.




                                              144
Criterion 2.8 Academic Degrees

Not applicable. The TJU MPH program is a generalist program and no other academic degrees
are awarded.




                                           145
Criterion 2.9 Doctoral Degrees

Not Applicable. TJU’s public health program does not offer a doctoral degree.




                                             146
Criterion 2.10         Joint Degrees

JD/MPH, MJ/MPH - Two joint degree programs were established by agreement between
Widener University and Thomas Jefferson University during the 2006-07 academic year to begin
in the subsequent academic year. The Master of Jurisprudence-Master of Public Health (MJ-
MPH) degree, and the Doctor of Jurisprudence-Master of Public Health (JD-MPH) are joint
degrees offered by TJU College of Graduate Studies and the Widener University Law School.

MJ-MPH. The demand for masters law graduates (MJ) with a joint degree comes from health
institutions, departments, and voluntary organizations. The master of jurisprudence (MJ)
candidates are typically individuals who pursue administrative careers in healthcare and wish to
add legal expertise that will strengthen their knowledge base and skills. Many MJ candidates are
nurses or risk managers who do not plan to sit for the bar exam. Legal topics that have special
relevance to their administrative aspirations include confidentiality (HIPAA), bioethics,
disability law, contracts, risk management, administrative law, and discrimination law. Given
that so many MJ graduates pursue careers in health care, the addition of an MPH degree should
strengthen their list of competencies for their career endeavors. The combination of legal
education with the added core areas of public health (biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental
health, behavior, management and policy) is perceived to be a career combination of high value
to health institutions.

The MJ-MPH requires two years of law school and the MPH degree. Since many MJ candidates
are part-time students, it is expected that the joint degree will require 4-5 years. Students apply
to both schools and tuition goes to the school that offers the appropriate courses. Nine credits are
counted toward both degrees for courses taken by MJ students that are directly related to public
health. MJ-MPH students receive only 2 credits for their experiential Clerkship though the time
commitment is expected to be the same as the minimum time commitment for regular MPH
students. Examples include Introduction to Health Law, Health Law I and II, Public Health Law.
GRE’s are required for admission to TJU. A typical schedule for an MJ/MPH student appears
below.

JD-MPH. Doctor of Jurisprudence (JD) graduates take the bar exam and, if they are interested in
health care issues, often become counsels to medical institutions. Those who choose private
practice can also focus on health problems, medical issues, legal and policy issues related to
public health, healthcare businesses, intellectual property, etc. The core MPH courses are a
useful content area for lawyers who choose these careers.

Candidates for an JD/MPH degree may begin their 4 year undertaking at either institution. They
complete a prescribed 3-year program at the law school as well as the course and credit
requirements of the MPH degree. It is expected that they will complete two years of law school
and then interpose a year of MPH training followed by the Capstone project and electives which
may be completed subsequently during their second or third year of law school. Students apply
to both schools and tuition goes to the school that offers the appropriate courses. Nine credits are
counted toward both degrees for courses taken by JD students that are directly related to public
health. Examples include Introduction to Health Law, Health Law I and II, Public Health Law.
They receive only 2 credits for their experiential Clerkship though the time commitment is
expected to be the same as the minimum time commitment for regular MPH students.


                                                147
A small number of part-time JD students may require more time to complete the curriculum.
The attached timetable is an example of a course schedules for a full-time JD-MPH student. The
fully focused Jefferson year shown on the schedule is year 2; but it could be year 3, or 4. The
Capstone Project and remaining courses would be completed in the final year.

There are currently two students who have declared their interest in the combined JD/MPH
degree. One is a Widener JD student, the other a TJU MPH student. Students will apply to both
schools and tuition will go to the school that offers the courses. Nine elective credits that come
from the Widener portion of the education may be counted toward both degrees. LSAT’s are
required for admission. A typical schedule for a JD/MPH student appears below.




                                               148
TABLE: JD/MPH – Model Sequence (42 Credits) 1
 Years 1 & 2                 Year 3                                                 Year 4
   Widener                   Thomas                                                 Widener
  University                Jefferson                                              University
                           University
Fall Semester    Course   Fall Semester  Course Titles                                Fall           Course
                  Titles                                                            Semester          Titles
              TBD by                    Statistical                                                TBD by
              Widener                   Methods for                                                Widener
              University                Data Analysis                                              University
                                        (3)*
                                        Intro Public
                                        Health (2)*
                                        Behav/ Soc
                                        Theories in PH
                                        (3)*
Spring        Course     Spring I                                                 Spring           Course
Semester      Titles                                                              Semester         Titles
              TBD by                    Management                                                 TBD by
              Widener                   Skills or                                                  Widener
              University                Mgt/Policy                                                 University
                                        Course* (3)
                                        Fundamentals
                                        of Epi (3)*
                                        Intro Hlth
                                        Srvcs Rsrch
                                        (3)*

                                        Spring II
                                                              Planning &
                                                              Eval (3)*
                                                              Clerkship (2)*
                                        Summer
                                               Qualitative
                                               Research* 2 (2)
                                               Intro Envir                                         Capstone
                                               Health (3)*                                         Project (3)
                                               Capstone
                                               Seminar* (3)
Credit Total (42) =30 + 9 Widener Transfer Credits + 3 MPH Credits




1
    All required courses are marked by an asterisk *.
2
    Students may substitute Applied Regression Models offered in Spring I for Qualitative Research Methods


                                                        149
MD/MPH. Physicians and public health professionals with MD and MPH degrees have an
expansive career track available to them. Over the past couple of years, an increasing number of
Jefferson Medical College students have inquired about getting a graduate degree in public
health. Previously, the MSPH program was available to physicians who wanted to obtain
graduate education in public health and several physicians applied and admitted to TJU’s MSPH
program.

Beginning in the summer of 2007, Thomas Jefferson University initiated plans for a joint
MD/MPH degree to begin in the 2008-2009 academic year. A series of meetings were held with
the Jefferson Medical College (JMC) administrators and key faculty to develop the joint degree
program. Dr. Rika Maeshiro, Director of the MD/MPH program for the American Association
of Medical Colleges (AAMC) was invited to come to Jefferson to meet with key JMC and MPH
Program representatives to share information on various administrative options from the growing
number of MD/MPH in the US. Meetings were held with the University Registrar’s Office and
the Financial Aid Office to provide a smooth administrative process that would not burden either
the medical or public health educational process. In addition, formal and informal meetings with
current JMC students were held to discuss the program. It was decided to provide a five year
MD/MPH program.

Students admitted to Jefferson Medical College can apply to the MPH program anytime after
admission to the JMC. The application process is the same as other students with the exception
that the application fee is waived and the GRE is not required as the student’s MCAT scores
replace that requirement. Once admitted, students may take the full-time, one year plus MPH
program at any time. Typically, students would enter the MPH program after two years of
medical school (after their board exams), or after three years (after their clinical rotations),
although some students may begin their MPH education prior to beginning their medical
education by deferring their medical education for a year.

The MPH Curriculum Committee carefully reviewed the JMC curricula and proposed the
granting of up to nine elective transfer credits into the MPH program. The two year, required
Introduction to Community Medicine (ICM) course includes 72 lecture hours on public and
community health themes, not counting four hours of discussion in small groups. The
Curriculum Committee recommended six (6) hours of transfer credit for ICM I and II. In
addition, many JMC students take a number of elective courses and participate in a number of
elective community health programs such as Bridging The Gaps or fellowship programs like the
Albert Schweitzer Fellowship program. They also take elective programs in the fourth year of
their medical education that can include community health programs. The MPH Curriculum
Committee recommended that students who choose to participate in these organized elective
programs can receive up to three (3) elective credits for the MPH program. Therefore, JMC
students could receive from 6-9 elective credits for the MPH, depending on their selection of
electives in medical school. This proposal went to the MPH Program Committee in March, 2008
which was approved. It then was submitted to the Jefferson College of Graduate Studies (JCGS)
Curriculum Committee which reviewed the proposal and gave its approval. The proposal was
then submitted to the Graduate Council of the JCGS which gave its approval in May, 2008.




                                               150
Students in Jefferson Medical College can begin their MPH in the fall term and complete all
course requirements including the clerkship by the end of the summer of the following year.
During the summer, they will take their Capstone Seminar and begin their Capstone research
project. Although possible to complete their Capstone research by the end of that summer, the
vast majority of JMC students will likely complete their Capstone project during the next
academic year. All tuition credits would need to be paid for during the single academic year so
as not to negatively impacts on medical school financial aid which be reinstated on September 1
of the following year. A summary of the MD/MPH joint degree schedule is highlighted below.




                                              151
TABLE: MD/MPH – Model Sequence (42 Credits) 3
 Years 1 & 2                  Year 3                             Year 4 & 5
  Jefferson                   Thomas        MPH Program           Jefferson
  Medical                    Jefferson                            Medical
   College                   University                            College
Fall Semester Course       Fall Semester     Course Titles     Fall Semester                           Course
                   Titles                                                                              Titles
                                          Statistical         Possible
                                          Methods for Data student
                                          Analysis (3)*       community
                                                              health elective
                                                              (3 credits)
                                          Intro Public
                                          Health (2)*
                                          Behav/ Soc
                                          Theories in PH
                                          (3)*
Spring          Course    Spring I                            Spring                                Course
Semester        Titles                                        Semester                              Titles
                                          Management
                                          Skills or
                                          Mgt/Policy
                                          Course* (3)
                                          Fundamentals of
                                          Epi (3)*
                                          Hlth Srvcs Rsrch
                                          (3)*
                                          Applied
                                          Regression*4
                          Spring II
                                          Planning & Eval
                                          (3)*
                                          Clerkship (3)*
                                          Elective (3)
                          Summer
                                          Qualitative
                                          Research* 4 (2)
                                          Intro Envir                                               Capstone
                                          Health (3)*                                               Project (3)
                                          Capstone
                                          Seminar* (3)
Credit Total (42) =30 MPH + 6-9 JMC Transfer Credits + 3 Capstone Project


3
    All required courses are marked by an asterisk *.
4
    Students may substitute Applied Regression Models offered in Spring I for Qualitative Research Methods


                                                        152
To date, there are two JMC students who have expressed interest in taking the MPH program
after their second or third year of medical school. We have provided information on the joint
program to entering first year medical students and to current 2nd and 3rd year students and
expect several more medical students to enter the MPH program during the 2008-2009 academic
year.




                                             153
Criterion 2.11 Distance Education or Executive Degree Programs

Through discussions with students and alumni, and in the student survey conducted in 2008,
students frequently commented that greater flexibility in program offerings was desired. In
response, the program is actively pursuing alternative learning methodologies and expansion of
course offerings.

The MPH program at Thomas Jefferson University had not used distance learning methodologies
to date. The advantages of small classes allow for a wide range of discussion using case studies
and in some courses, problem based learning strategies to actively involve our students in their
learning. There has been initial discussion of distance learning technologies and further
development of a couple of pilot courses that would include both distance learning and in-person
classroom education. A course called Cultural Humility and Competence in Health Professions
and Population Health will be offered as this type of hybrid course in conjunction with the
College of Health Professions in the fall of 2008. As we expand our interdisciplinary
educational initiatives, especially with the College of Health Professions (particularly the School
of Nursing and programs in Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy) which use more
distance learning methodologies, we will consider such pilot courses in the future. TJU has
increased its electronic capabilities to provide the needed technology and technical support for an
increasing number of online courses primarily with the College of Health Professions. MPH
Faculty using distance learning methodologies must be fully competent of such technologies.
Any curriculum using distance learning methodologies would still be required to meet the
criteria for new course review which include a review by our MPH Curriculum Committee,
MPH Program Committee, and if approved, the College of Graduate Studies Curriculum
Committee and Graduate Council.

The MPH program offers courses predominantly in the late afternoons and evenings during the
week. Shorter term Saturday Institute courses are being planned to begin in the 2008-2009 year.
 Institute courses are defined as courses that have the same number of required hours (12 hours
for one credit) but are not delivered in a weekly format. For example, a one credit institute
course may be offered in four, three hour sessions spread out over a 12 week period as compared
to a weekly course of one hour in duration. This is especially attractive for students and faculty
for courses that will be offered on Saturdays.

Our first two pilot Institute courses, GIS mapping, and Cultural Humility and Competence
courses are planned for the 2008-2009 academic year. Any courses considered to be offered as
an Institute must meet the same educational criteria as any other regular term course for the MPH
program.




                                               154
Criterion 3.0 – Creation, Application and Advancement of Knowledge

Criterion 3.1 Research

The program shall pursue an active research program, consistent with its mission, through
which its faculty and students contribute to the knowledge base of the public health
disciplines, including research directed at improving the practice of public health.

3.1a A description of the program’s research activities including policies, procedures and
practices that support research and scholarly activities

The MPH Program Goal related to Research is:
To provide opportunities and train all MPH students in the development and translation of public
health research through coursework and the capstone research project.

Objectives by which this goal is measured are:

   •   90% of students will successfully complete a capstone research project approved by
       her/his capstone committee resulting in a paper of publishable quality, an oral
       presentation to faculty, community preceptors, and student colleagues, and a submitted
       abstract to a national, regional, state, or local public health- related conference
   •   80% of graduating students will successfully complete research methods courses with a
       grade of B or better (PH 660 - Statistical Methods of Data Analysis, PH580 –
       Fundamentals of Epidemiology, PH 506 – Health Services Research, PH670 – Applied
       Regression Methods, PH606 – Qualitative Methods, and PH 615– Program Planning and
       Evaluation)
   •   90% of graduating students will report competency in understanding of basic public
       health research methods (exit interview, student and alumni surveys)
   •   80% of MPH faculty will participate in public health research or evaluation initiatives
   •   25% of students who complete the MPH will prepare and submit an article for
       publication

In accord with the Bylaws of the JCGS, graduate faculty members are responsible for the
academic and research programs of the College. Expectations for faculty to conduct research are
clear, as the majority of faculty conduct research and many serve as advisors to graduate students
who are also learning research skills. Participation in research is not, however, an absolute
requirement for membership on the Graduate Faculty. Some faculty members serve exclusively
as teachers or program leaders. A copy of the JCGS bylaws is available in Appendix D.

Article V, Section 1 of the Bylaws of JMC states the following research policy: "It is the policy
of the College to encourage scientific investigation by its faculty. This includes the endorsement
and support of acceptable proposals for contracts gifts or grants. Sponsored and non-sponsored
research must be integrated with regular educational and service functions of the College.
Regulations governing sponsored as well as non-sponsored research and the acceptance of gifts,
contracts, and grants for research may be established in the Rules of the College." (Last
amended September, 2003). A copy of the JMC bylaws will be available in the on-site Resource
File.


                                                 155
The MPH program itself does not have any formal agreements for conducting research. Such
agreements are addressed via the individual faculty member as a principal or co-principal
investigator on any research project and the department of her/his faculty appointment. All MPH
faculty and students must complete an IRB training and all research contracts are coordinated
through TJU’s Office of Research Administration.

The MPH program has created an MPH Community Advisory Board with membership
constituted from intramural and extramural departments, agencies and organizations.
The Advisory Board meets at least twice annually to advise the MPH program, including current
research issues and opportunities within their respective agencies, departments, and
organizations. Such research opportunities are communicated to faulty and MPH students for
potential Capstone Projects.

MPH faculty have been recruited who maintain: a) active health care and public health research
programs, and b) significant linkages to community-based organizations to provide effective
community based participatory research opportunities.

The MPH Thesis/Capstone Coordinator assures that student Thesis/Capstone research projects
provide a thorough understanding of the research process including: formulation of the
objectives and specific aims of the research, literature review, proposal preparation, development
and execution of a research plan, completion of appropriate IRB forms, data interpretation,
presentation and preparation of an article of journal quality to disseminate results. In addition,
the Thesis/Capstone options have been expanded to allow for a wider variety of research and
scholarly projects. The MPH Program Committee also has representation on one of the six
Thomas Jefferson University’s Institutional Review Boards and on the TJU Research
Committee. All students must prepare for and pass the Institutional Review Board examination
prior to conducting research. MPH Core Faculty, serving as faculty advisors, must sign off on the
student’s Thesis/Capstone Project.

All students are required to submit abstracts of their Thesis/Capstone work for consideration by
the College of Physicians of Philadelphia Public Health Section’s annual Poster Presentation
Program held each Spring, or an abstract to another Regional or National meeting such as the
APHA, SOPHE, and/or the Pennsylvania Public Health Association meetings.

For the 2008-2009 academic year, the MPH Program has budgeted resources to provide some
financial assistance for students for students to present their projects at local, regional and
national meetings.

3.1b A description of current community-based research activities and/or those
undertaken in collaboration with health agencies and community-based organizations.

Faculty involvement in community-based public health initiatives is a basic tenet of the MPH
program at Jefferson. Core MPH faculty are encouraged to develop and maintain relationships
with a variety of government, community-based organizations and coalitions, allowing for a
variety of community based research and evaluation projects. Faculty research/evaluation



                                               156
interests reflect the diversity of the faculty and include health literacy, health communication,
access to care, quality of care, chronic disease prevention and self-management, coalition
building and sustainability, and health equity particularly among the most vulnerable populations
in Philadelphia (minorities, immigrant groups and the homeless). Students have been involved
in at least 17 of the projects related to Core Faculty research/evaluation. Highlighted below are
several research and evaluation projects that demonstrate the breadth and depth of the research
accomplishments of each of the Core Faculty over the past three years.

Rob Simmons, DrPH, MPH, CHES

Dr. Simmons has participated in research/evaluation projects related to the effectiveness of
mobile van that provides eye examinations and glasses for youth, evaluation of cancer education
programs funded by the State of Pennsylvania Cancer Control Program and an Anger
Management Program developed for older adults through funding from Philadelphia’s area
agency on aging. Over the past three years Dr. Simmons has partnered with Drexel University
faculty and been involved in grants valued at more than $200,000.

Evaluation of Eagles Eye           Philadelphia Eagles         9/2005-            $50,000
Mobile                             Youth Partnership           12/2006
Cancer Education Evaluation        State of Pennsylvania,      7/2006-9/2008      $150,000
                                   Cancer Control
                                   Program
Managing Anger for Older           Philadelphia                7/2007-6/2008      $9,700
Adults                             Corporation on Aging


Mona Sarfaty, MD

Dr. Sarfaty’s research interests are primarily related to cancer prevention, particularly colorectal
cancer. Over the past three years she has been involved with projects funded by the Agency for
Health Care Research and Quality, the American Cancer Society and the Pennsylvania General
Assembly. Dr. Sarfaty was involved in grants between 2005-2008 valued at approximately
$490,000.

Dissemination of Strategies to     Agency for Health Care      10/2007-           $250,000
Increase Screening and Follow-     Research and Quality        9/2008
up for Colorectal Cancer
Dissemination of Strategies to     American Cancer             6/2007-            $45,000
Increase Screening for             Society                     10/2007
Colorectal Cancer
Report on Colorectal Cancer        PA General Assembly         6/2006-            $150,000
Screening, Co-Investigator         (Legislative Budget and     10/2006
                                   Finance Committee)




                                                157
Development of a teaching         American Cancer            2004-2006         $45,000
manual for family physicians      Society

James Diamond, PhD, MS

Dr. Diamond, head of the Greenfield Research Center in the Department of Family and
Community Medicine is particularly interested in health literacy and health beliefs. He has
developed a Health Belief Scale that has been used in multiple research projects including the
SHAPE-IT program, a multiple year grant funded by the Pennsylvania Department of Health
through tobacco settlement funding. The SHAPE-IT program assessed the attitudes, beliefs and
behaviors of African American men aged 35+ and then, based on findings and input from the
Project Advisory Committee (neighborhood residents and professionals from the African
American community) developed a culturally relevant intervention. Dr. Diamond oversaw the
research component of the project. Dr. Diamond has also participated in research related to
asthma (Allies Against Asthma) and assists students and faculty in developing and implementing
appropriate research designs.

Reducing Stroke and Prostate      Commonwealth of            2005-2008         1.2million
Cancer in Black Males, Ages       Pennsylvania –
35+                               Pennsylvania
                                  Department of Health

James Plumb, MD, MPH

Dr. Plumb is the Director of the Office to Advance Population Health (OAPH) in addition to
being a faculty member of the Jefferson Medical College and the MPH program. The role of
OAPH is to work in partnership with communities to better understand health and psychosocial
needs, develop programs that are culturally relevant, and to assess program effectiveness, as well
as conduct research, particularly CBPR related research. Interventions are held in transitional
housing sites, homeless shelters, faith-based institutions and senior centers. Dr. Plumb is the PI
for a Pennsylvania Department of Health Grant focusing on obesity management that utilizes the
chronic care model in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at Jefferson and a
City Health Center run by the Philadelphia Department of Health in a Latino community. In
addition, he was instrumental in the SHAPE-IT project discussed above. Research and
evaluation projects in which Dr. Plumb is involved are in excess of $5.8 million.

Breast Health Education           Avon Foundation            2008-2010         $250,000
Breast Health Education           Komen Foundation           2008-2009         $75,000
Center of Excellence in Obesity   Pennsylvania               2006-2010         $4.1 million
Research                          Department of Public
                                  Health
Faith-based Diabetes Self         Philadelphia               9/04-9/07         $35,000
Management Education              Department Public
Agency                            Health
Healthy Environments              Philadelphia Dept.         2004-2007         $35,000
Collaborative                     Public Health


                                               158
Stroke and Prostate Cancer         Pennsylvania               2005-2007         $1.2 million
Mortality Reduction in African     Department of Public
American Men – 35+                 Health
Breast Health Education in         Komen Foundation           2005-2006         $75,000
Sheltered Women
– Faith Based DMSE                 Fuller Foundation          2005-2006         $20,000
Nutrition Education and Mobile     Pa State Attorney          2005-2006         $32,000
Market project                     General’s Office


Rickie Brawer, PhD, MPH, CHES

Dr. Brawer is particularly interested in research related to health literacy, obesity and the built
environment, breast cancer prevention and early detection, and coalition building and
sustainability. Most recently she has been involved with evaluation of a Kellogg funded project
in Philadelphia that addresses obesity through community based participatory approaches related
policy and system changes dealing with access to healthy, affordable, locally grown food and
access to safe places for physical activity. She is also involved with creating and evaluating low
literacy materials and a low literacy/easy to use website designed to raise awareness about breast
health and diabetes self management. In addition, she participates in the Center of Excellence in
Obesity and SHAPE-IT grants described above. Over the past three years Dr. Brawer has
participated in research projects that involve more than $6.4 million.

Comprehensive Breast Health        Susan B Komen Breast       2008-2009         $69,000
Grant                              Cancer Foundation
Enhancing Breast Health and        Avon Foundation            2008-2009         $250,000
Care in an Urban Environment
W.K. Kellogg Foundation Food W.K. Kellogg                     2007-2009         $500,000.
and Fitness Initiative       Foundation
Preferences of AME church          DHHS – subcontract         2006-2007         $25,000
members for Healthy Lifestyle      with Delaware Valley
choices and systems changes        Hospital Healthcare
                                   Council’s Health Care
                                   Improvement
                                   Foundation
Replication Of The Value           Dissertation research      2005-2007         unfunded
Template Process In A
Community Coalition:
Implications For Social Capital
And Sustainability




                                               159
Center of Excellence in Obesity Commonwealth of              2006-2010         $4.1million
Research                        Pennsylvania –
                                Pennsylvania
                                Department of Health

Reducing Stroke and Prostate      Commonwealth of            2005-2008         $1.2million
Cancer in Black Males, Ages       Pennsylvania –
35+                               Pennsylvania
                                  Department of Health
Breast Health in Homeless         Susan B Komen Breast       2005-2006         $65,000
Women                             Cancer Foundation
The Relationship Of The Built     Robert Wood Johnson - 2004-2005              $10,000
and Social Environment To         Active Living By
Physical Activity In The          Design
Haddington Community
Improving HbA1c                   Quality Insights of        2004-2005         $125,000
Determinations in African         Pennsylvania
American Medicare
Beneficiaries
STEPS to A Healthier              DHHS through               2004-2006         $35,000
Philadelphia - Faith-based        Philadelphia
Diabetes Self-Management          Department of Public
Education                         Health subcontract
Faith-based Diabetes Self-        Fuller Foundation          2003-2007         $20,000
Management Education

Allied Health Center for          U. S. Department of        2003-2006         $1,500
Excellence in eHealth             Health & Human
Promotion Programs for            Services, Bureau of
Underserved Populations           Health Professions

Elaine Yuen, PhD, MBA

Dr. Yuen is the PI for a research project that is a collaborative effort with the Center for
Research in Medical Education and Health Care located in Italy. The research project seeks to
better understand health care utilization patterns, particularly related to preventive health
behaviors. Dr. Yuen has also been the PI for projects related to asthma and GERD in minority
populations. Most recently she is partnering with WHYY (public television) in a project to
better understand the health and social needs of the growing Asian community in Philadelphia.
Dr. Yuen has been involved with grant projects valued at over $1.3 million over the three years.

Media Partnerships for             Sound Partners for         2007-2010          $39,088
Community Engagement in            Community Health
Southeast Asian Health



                                              160
Profiling Severity of Illness and   State of Pennsylvania       2007-2009          $166,260
Ambulatory Care Sensitive
Conditions in Pennsylvania
Identifying disparities in          Astra Zeneca                2006-2007          $109,372
knowledge, attitudes and care
patterns for GERD in minority
populations
Treating Childhood Asthma in        Aetna Foundation            2004-2005          $49,948
Philadelphia: Linking asthmatic
children with high absenteeism
to health care services and
resources
Collaboration between the           Regione Emilia              2007-2010          $1,000,000
Center for Research in Medical      Romagna, Italy
Education and Health Care and
the Agenzia Sanitaria
Regionale/Regione Emilia-
Romagna, Italy

Vittorio Maio, PharmD, MS, MPH

Dr. Maio’s research interests are predominantly related to health care utilization, access to
pharmaceuticals, pharmaceutical prescribing practices and medication safety practices in Italy
and the United States. Locally he has been funded by the Health Federation of Philadelphia to
evaluate the impact of a pharmaceutical assistance program on the uninsured. He is also
interested in prevention of medication errors particularly in the elderly. Dr. Maio is responsible
for almost $1 million in funding over the past three years.

To develop analyses and             Agenzia Sanitaria         1/1/2007-         $660,000
reports examining access and        Regionale Emilia          12/31/2009
utilization of health care          Romagna, Italy
services by selected groups of
the population and by patient
sub-groups in the Regione
Emilia Romagna. 2) To
examine the quality of care
provided to Emilia Romagna
residents by investigating
specific issues for selected
diseases, including components
of cancer care, analyses of beta
blocker use post AMI, analyses
of drug use in special
populations such as the elderly
and pregnant women



                                               161
 To estimate the extent of        Local Health Unit         9/1/2006-        $296,039
inappropriate medication          Parma, Emilia             12/31/2009
prescribing for elderly           Romagna, Italy
ambulatory patients, and to
help design educational
activities to improve
physicians’ prescribing. 2) To
outline patterns of utilization
and costs of health care
resources of primary care
physicians
To conduct a qualitative          Thomas Jefferson          4/1/2006-        $10,000
investigation of physician        University                4/1/2007
prescribing practices, beliefs,
and attitudes
To evaluate the impact of a       Health Federation of      2006-2007        $19,890
pharmaceutical assistance         Philadelphia
program on the uninsured

A complete list of faculty community based projects is provided in Appendix I.




                                              162
3.1c A list of current research activity of all primary and secondary faculty identified in
4.1.a and 4.1.b., including amount and source of funds, for each of the last three years. This
data must be presented in table format and include at least the following: a) principal
investigator, b) project name, c) period of funding, d) source of funding, e) amount of total
award, f) amount of current year’s award, g) whether research is community based, and h)
whether research provides for student involvement.

The Table below provides the research activity of all primary and secondary MPH faculty for the
past three years. Overall, faculty have been involved in more than 90 research/evaluation
projects. More than half of the projects were community based (58 of 95) and a third involved
students. Research projects ranged from international to local neighborhood, from epidemiology
to health literacy and culture, and involved funding at the national and state level, pharmaceutical
company funding as well as funding from national organizations such as Robert Wood Johnson,
Avon and Kellogg, and local organizations such as Komen, Fuller and ACS. Faculty are
encouraged to attend national and state conferences to disseminate research findings. The list of
presentations provided by faculty during the past three years is provided in Appendix J.




                                                163
Fac.      Project Name            Principal         Funding Source      Funding        Amount     Amount    Community-   Student
member                            Investigator &                        Period         Total      Current   Based Y/N    Participation
                                  Department                            Start/End      Award      Year                   Y/N
                                                                2005-2006
Rickie    Allied Health Center    Kevin Lyons       U. S. Department    2003-2006      $4,500     $1,500    N            N
Brawer    for Excellence in       PhD, College of   of Health &
          eHealth Promotion       Health            Human Services,
          Programs for            Professions       Bureau of Health
          Underserved                               Professions
          Populations
Jessica   Urban Diabetes Study    Jessica Robbins   NIDDK/NIH              7/2003-     $204,000   $0        N            N
Robbins                                                                    6/2006
Elaine    Treating Childhood      Elaine Yuen       Aetna Foundation       2004-2005   $49,948    $0        Y            Y
Yuen      Asthma in
          Philadelphia:
          Linking asthmatic
          children with high
          absenteeism to
          health care services
          and resources
Rickie    The Relationship Of     Rickie Brawer     Robert Wood            2004-2005   $10,000    $0        Y            Y
Brawer    The Built and Social    MPH, Office to    Johnson - Active
          Environment To          Advance           Living By Design
          Physical Activity In    Population
          The Haddington          Health
          Community
Rickie    Improving HbA1c         Rickie Brawer     Quality Insights of    2004-2005   $125,000   $0        Y            Y
Brawer    Determinations in       MPH, Office to    Pennsylvania
          African American        Advance
          Medicare                Population
          Beneficiaries           Health
Rickie    STEPS to A              Rickie Brawer     DHHS through           2004-2006   $35,000    $0        Y            N
Brawer    Healthier               MPH, Office to    Philadelphia
          Philadelphia - Faith-   Advance           Department of
          based Diabetes Self-    Population        Public Health
          Management              Health            subcontract
          Education




                                                                     164
Fac.         Project Name            Principal           Funding Source         Funding     Amount    Amount    Community-   Student
member                               Investigator &                             Period      Total     Current   Based Y/N    Participation
                                     Department                                 Start/End   Award     Year                   Y/N
Mona         Development of a        Mona Sarfaty        American Cancer        2004-2006   $45,000   $0        N            N
Sarfaty      teaching manual for                         Society
             family physicians
Elaine       A Forum for                                 Local Societies        2004-2007   $30,000   $0        Y            Y
Yuen         Spirituality and                            Initiative,
             Science at Jefferson                        Metanexus
                                                         Institute on
                                                         Science and
                                                         Religion
James        Healthy                 James Plumb,        Philadelphia           2004-2007   $35,000   $0        Y            N
Plumb        Environments            MD, MPH             Department
             Collaborative                               Public Health
Rickie       Faith-based             Rickie Brawer       Fuller Foundation      2003-2007   $20,000   $20,000   Y            N
Brawer       Diabetes Self-          NPH, Office to
             Management              Advance
             Education               Population
                                     Health
                                     James Plumb,
                                     MD, DCFM
Laura T.     Economic Analysis of    Jennifer Lofland,   Ortho McNeil           04/01/05-   $95,256   $0        N            N
Pizzi        Productivity Data       former              Janssen Scientific     12/31/06
             from the Topiramate     Department of       Affairs
             Trials                  Health Policy,
                                     JMC
Diane        Surgical Outcomes:      Neil Goldfarb       Depuy                  9/12/05-    $25,000   $25,000   N            N
Richardson   Evaluation of Charite                                              12/31/05
             Artificial Disc
             Replacement
             Outcomes
Rickie       Breast Health in        James Plumb,        Susan B Komen          2005-2006   $65,000   $0        Y            Y
Brawer       Homeless Women          MD, MPH -           Breast Cancer
                                     DFCM                Foundation
Neil         Relationships           N. Goldfarb         Glaxo Smith Kline      2005-2006   $98,410   $0        N            N
Goldfarb     between Changes in
             Glycemic Control and
             Changes in Diabetes
             Pharmacotherapy


                                                                          165
Fac.         Project Name              Principal          Funding Source         Funding      Amount       Amount     Community-   Student
member                                 Investigator &                            Period       Total        Current    Based Y/N    Participation
                                       Department                                Start/End    Award        Year                    Y/N
Daniel Z.    Development of a          Daniel Z. Louis    Regional Health        2005-2006    $595,348     $0         Y            Y
Louis        longitudinal,                                Care Agency,
             population-based,                            Emilia-Romagna
             health care utilization
             database.
Rob          Evaluation of Eagles      Lisa Ulmer,        Philadelphia           9/2005-      $50,000      $0         Y            N
Simmons      Eye Mobile                Drexel             Eagles Youth           12/2006
                                       University         Partnership
Diane        Economic Evaluation       Laura Pizzi        Cephalon, Inc.         9/12/2005-   $212,289     $212,289   Y            N
Richardson   of Breakthrough Pain                                                12/31/2005
James        Breast Health             Rickie Brawer      Komen                  2005-2006    $75,000      $0         Y            Y
Plumb        Education in              PhD, MPH           Foundation
             Sheltered Women
James        – Faith Based             James Plumb,       Fuller Foundation      2005-2006    $20,000      $0         Y            N
Plumb        DMSE                      MD, MPH
James        Health and Human          James Plumb,       State of               2005-2006    $50,000      $0         Y            N
Plumb        Services Team             MD, MPH            Pennsylvania

Neil         Colorectal cancer         R. Myers           PA Legislative         2005-2006    $116,736     $116,736   Y            N
Goldfarb     screening capacity                           Budget Committee
             and insurance
             coverage in PA
James        Nutrition Education       James Plumb,       Pa State Attorney      2005-2006    $32,000      $0         Y            Y
Plumb        and Mobile Market         MD, MPH            General’s Office
             project

Kathryn      Screening for Distress    Kathryn M. Kash,   DoD                    September    $600,000     $0         Y            N
Kash         in Women at Risk for      PhD – Dept. of                            2003 –
             Ovarian Cancer            Psychiatry                                December
                                                                                 2007
James        Reducing Stroke           Michael            Commonwealth of        2005-2008    $1,200,000   $0         Y            N
Diamond      and Prostate Cancer       Rosenthal, MD,     Pennsylvania –
             in Black Males, Ages      DFCM               Pennsylvania
             35+                                          Dept. of Health




                                                                           166
Fac.       Project Name           Principal        Funding Source         Funding     Amount     Amount     Community-   Student
member                            Investigator &                          Period      Total      Current    Based Y/N    Participation
                                  Department                              Start/End   Award      Year                    Y/N
Neil       College for the        N. Goldfarb      Administered in        2005-2008   $90,000    $90,000    N            N
Goldfarb   Advanced                                concert with
           Management of                           HealthCare21 and
           Health Benefits – A                     the National
           training program on                     Business Coalition
           value-based                             on Health. Funded
           purchasing of                           by Johnson &
           employee health                         Johnson Health
           benefits                                Care Systems,
                                                   AstraZeneca,
                                                   Pfizer, Blue Cross
                                                   Blue Shield of
                                                   Tennessee, and
                                                   Sanofi-Aventis, and
                                                   participant
                                                   registration fees
Neil       Predictive Model       N. Goldfarb      ExcelleRx              2005-2008   $47,550    $20,000    N            N
Goldfarb   Evaluation Using the
           Medicare Current
           Beneficiary Survey
           (MCBS)
Albert     Outpatient Quality     David B. Nash,   Numerous (~25)        ongoing      $200,000   $200,000   Y            Y
Crawford   Improvement            MD, MBA          outpatient quality
                                                   improvement
                                                   projects
                                                                 2006-2007
Rickie     Replication Of The     Rickie Brawer    Dissertation           2005-2007   unfunded   unfunded   Y            Y
Brawer     Value Template         MPH, Office to   research
           Process In A           Advance
           Community              Population
           Coalition:             Health
           Implications For
           Social Capital And
           Sustainability




                                                                    167
Fac.         Project Name           Principal           Funding Source         Funding      Amount       Amount     Community-   Student
member                              Investigator &                             Period       Total        Current    Based Y/N    Participation
                                    Department                                 Start/End    Award        Year                    Y/N
James        Stroke and Prostate    Vanessa Briggs      Pennsylvania           2005-2007    $1,200,000   $0         Y            Y
Plumb        Cancer Mortality       Health              Department of
             Reduction in           Promotion           Public Health
             African American       Council
             Men – 35+
Laura T.     Impact of the          Natalie             HRSA                   09/01/04-    $20,000      $0         Y            N
Pizzi        Philadelphia           Levkovich,          H22CS03824             08/31/08
             Community              Health Federation
             Pharmacy Network
             Program
Laura T.     Economic Impact of     Laura Pizzi,        Cephalon Inc           09/12/05-    $212,289     $212,289   N            N
Pizzi        Breakthrough Pain      Department of                              12/31/08
                                    Health Policy,
                                    JMC
Laura T.     Productivity Loss      Laura Pizzi,        Watson                 10/25/05-    $119,983     $119,983   N            N
Pizzi        Associated with        Department of       Laboratories           03/31/08
             Overactive Bladder     Health Policy,
                                    JMC
Rickie       Reducing Stroke        Michael             Commonwealth of        2005-2008    1,200,000    $0         Y            N
Brawer       and Prostate Cancer    Rosenthal, MD,      Pennsylvania –
             in Black Males, Ages   DFCM                Pennsylvania
             35+                                        Department of
                                                        Health
Tom Bunz     Secondary Analysis     N. Goldfarb,        DePuy Spine            2006         $10,000      $0         N            N
             of Productivity Data   Health Policy
             from the Charite
             Approval Study
Diane        Economic Evaluation    Neil Goldfarb       Johnson and            5/18/06-     $100,000     $100,000   N            N
Richardson   of Relax Stress                            Johnson                12/31/07
             Management Program
Mona         Report on              Mona Sarfaty        PA General             June 2006-   $150,000     $0         N            N
Sarfaty      Colorectal Cancer                          Assembly               October
             Screening, Co-                             (Legislative           2006
             Investigator                               Budget and
                                                        Finance
                                                        Committee)



                                                                         168
Fac.         Project Name            Principal         Funding Source          Funding     Amount     Amount    Community-   Student
member                               Investigator &                            Period      Total      Current   Based Y/N    Participation
                                     Department                                Start/End   Award      Year                   Y/N
Diane        Medication Use,         Neil Goldfarb     ExcelleRx, Inc.         9/27/06-    $40,000    $40,000   N            N
Richardson   Hospitalization, and                                              1/27/07
             Mortality in Medicare
             Beneficiaries with
             CHF using the MCBS
             Cost and Use Data.
             An Evaluation of
             Medication Outcomes
             based on ExcelleRx
             Prescribing
             Guidelines.
Rickie       Preferences of AME      Rickie Brawer     DHHS –                  2006-2007   $25,000    $0        Y            Y
Brawer       church members for      PhD, MPH,         subcontract with
             Healthy Lifestyle       Office to         Delaware Valley
             choices and systems     Advance           Hospital
             changes                 Population        Healthcare
                                     Health            Council’s Health
                                                       Care
                                                       Improvement
                                                       Foundation
Neil         Evaluation of the       N. Goldfarb       Siemens                 2006-2007   $60,000    $0        N            N
Goldfarb     Impact of Soarian
             Workflow
             Management on
             Inpatient Operations
Neil         Evaluation of Disease   D. Nash           Healthways              2006-2007   $350,000   $0        N            N
Goldfarb     Management
             Interventions
Tom Bunz     Literature Review of    T. Bunz, Health   Merck                   2007-2008   $80,000    $80,000   N            N
             Staphylococcal and      Policy
             Meningococcal
             Infections
Tom Bunz     Factors Associated      N. Goldfarb,      Pfizer                  2006-2007   $110,000   $0        N            Y
             with Nosocomial         Health Policy
             Candidemia Costs




                                                                         169
Fac.       Project Name           Principal        Funding Source         Funding     Amount     Amount     Community-   Student
member                            Investigator &                          Period      Total      Current    Based Y/N    Participation
                                  Department                              Start/End   Award      Year                    Y/N
Neil       Research Awards        L. Pizzi         Bristol Myers          2006-2007   $100,000   $0         N            N
Goldfarb   Program for the IAQ                     Squibb
           Instrument
Vittorio   To evaluate the        David Nash,      Health Federation      2006-2007   $19,890    $0         Y            Y
Maio       impact of a            DHP              of Philadelphia
           pharmaceutical
           assistance program
           on the uninsured
Neil       Improving hospital     D. Nash          Commonwealth of        2006-2007   $400,000   $400,000   Y            N
Goldfarb   quality for rural                       PA
           hospitals in
           Pennsylvania
Elaine     Identifying            Elaine Yuen      Astra Zeneca           2006-2007   $109,372   $0         Y            Y
Yuen       disparities in
           knowledge, attitudes
           and care patterns
           for GERD in
           minority
           populations
Neil       Improving              N. Goldfarb      Sanofi-Aventis         2006-2007   $185,000   $135,000   Y            N
Goldfarb   stakeholder
           knowledge of cardio-
           metabolic risk
Rob        Cancer Education       Lisa Ulmer,      State of               7/2006-     $150,000   $75,000    Y            Y
Simmons    Evaluation             Drexel           Pennsylvania,          9/2008
                                  University       Cancer Control
                                                   Program
Neil       Prevalence of and      E. Yuen          AstraZeneca            2006-2008   $109,372   $55,000    Y            Y
Goldfarb   Attitudes toward
           GERD in Minority
           Populations
Neil       Economic modeling      T. Bunz          Medimedia/Pfizer       2006-2008   $113,398   $25,000    N            N
Goldfarb   and patient
           identification
           algorithms for
           candidemia



                                                                    170
Fac.       Project Name             Principal        Funding Source         Funding       Amount       Amount     Community-   Student
member                              Investigator &                          Period        Total        Current    Based Y/N    Participation
                                    Department                              Start/End     Award        Year                    Y/N
Neil       Evaluation of Patient-   A. Crawford      Horizon Blue Cross     2006-2008     $109,157     $45,000    Y            N
Goldfarb   oriented Interventions                    Blue Shield
           to Improve Quality of
           Care
Neil       Development of a         N. Goldfarb      Ortho-McNeil           2006-2008     $439,503     $100,000   Y            N
Goldfarb   National Quality                          Janssen
           Measurement Set for
           Migraine
Neil       Economic Evaluation      N. Goldfarb      Johnson & Johnson      2006-2008     $100,000     $25,000    N            N
Goldfarb   of a Stress
           Management Program
Neil       Outcomes Evaluation      N. Goldfarb      Clinical Connexion     2006-2008     $148,854     $20,000    Y            N
Goldfarb   of the Charite
           Artificial Disc
Neil       Impact of the Charite    T. Bunz          DePuy Spine            2006-2008     $25,000      $10,000    N            N
Goldfarb   Artificial Disc on
           Indirect Costs
Vittorio   To conduct a             Christine        Thomas Jefferson       4/1/2006-     $10,000      $0         Y            Y
Maio       qualitative              Hartmann, DHP    University             4/1/2007
           investigation of
           physician
           prescribing
           practices, beliefs,
           and attitudes
Kathryn    Mindfulness-Based        Daniel Monti,    NIH                    September     $1,000,000   $0         Y            N
Kash       Art Therapy for          MD- Dept of                             2005 – June
           Women with Breast        Emergency                               2010
           Cancer                   Medicine

Albert     Outpatient Quality       David B. Nash,   Numerous (~25)         ongoing       $200,000     $200,000   Y            Y
Crawford   Improvement              MD, MBA          outpatient quality
                                                     improvement
                                                     projects
Neil       Evaluation of On-site    V. Maio          Health Federation      2006-2008     $20,000      $10,000    Y            Y
Goldfarb   Pharmacy Access for                       of Philadelphia
           Community Health
           Centers


                                                                      171
Fac.        Project Name            Principal        Funding Source         Funding      Amount       Amount    Community-   Student
member                              Investigator &                          Period       Total        Current   Based Y/N    Participation
                                    Department                              Start/End    Award        Year                   Y/N
Neil        Impact of               N. Goldfarb      American Board of      2006-2008    $10,000      $5,000    N            N
Goldfarb    Performance                              Internal Medicine
            Improvement
            Modules in a Group
            Practice Plan
Albert      PQRI Quality            David B. Nash,   Centers for            8/06-7/08    $100,000     $50,000   N            N
Crawford    Measure                 MD, MBA          Medicare &
            Development                              Medicaid Services
James       Reducing Stroke         Michael          Commonwealth of        2005-2008    $1,200,000   $0        Y            N
Diamond     and Prostate Cancer     Rosenthal, MD,   Pennsylvania –
            in Black Males, Ages    DFCM             Pennsylvania
            35+                                      Dept. of Health
Daniel Z.   1) To estimate the      V. Maio          Local Health Unit      9/1/2006-    $296,039     $0        Y            N
Louis       extent of                                Parma, Emilia          12/31/2009
            inappropriate                            Romagna, Italy
            medication
            prescribing for
            elderly ambulatory
            patients, and to help
            design educational
            activities to improve
            physicians’
            prescribing. 2) To
            outline patterns of
            utilization and costs
            of health care
            resources of primary
            care physicians

                                                                 2007-2008
Rob         Cancer Education        Lisa Ulmer,      State of            7/2006-         $150,000     $75,000   Y            Y
Simmons     Evaluation              Drexel           Pennsylvania,       9/2008
                                    University       Cancer Control
                                                     Program
Albert      PQRI Quality            David B. Nash,   Centers for         8/06-7/08       $100,000     $50,000   N            N
Crawford    Measure                 MD, MBA          Medicare &
            Development                              Medicaid Services


                                                                      172
Fac.       Project Name            Principal         Funding Source         Funding      Amount      Amount       Community-   Student
member                             Investigator &                           Period       Total       Current      Based Y/N    Participation
                                   Department                               Start/End    Award       Year                      Y/N
Vittorio   1) To estimate the      V. Maio           Local Health Unit      9/1/2006-    $296,039    $0           Y            N
Maio       extent of                                 Parma, Emilia          12/31/2009
           inappropriate                             Romagna, Italy
           medication
           prescribing for
           elderly ambulatory
           patients, and to help
           design educational
           activities to improve
           physicians’
           prescribing. 2) To
           outline patterns of
           utilization and costs
           of health care
           resources of
           primary care
           physicians
Rickie     Center of Excellence    Bonita Falkner,   Commonwealth of        2006-2010    4,100,000   $1,000,000   Y            Y
Brawer     in Obesity Research     James Plumb       Pennsylvania –
                                   (Department of    Pennsylvania
                                   Endocrinology;    Department of
                                   Department of     Health
                                   Family and
                                   Community
                                   Medicine)
Laura T.   Examination of          Laura Pizzi,      Watson                 06/01/07-    $49,994     $49,994      N            N
Pizzi      Health Plan and         Department of     Laboratories           12/31/07
           Purchaser               Health Policy,
           Mechanisms for          JMC
           Managing Specialty
           Pharmaceuticals
Mona       Dissemination of        Mona Sarfaty      American Cancer        June 2007-   $45,000     $0           N            N
Sarfaty    Strategies to                             Society                October
           Increase Screening                                               2007
           for Colorectal
           Cancer




                                                                      173
Fac.       Project Name           Principal          Funding Source         Funding     Amount     Amount     Community-   Student
member                            Investigator &                            Period      Total      Current    Based Y/N    Participation
                                  Department                                Start/End   Award      Year                    Y/N
Rickie     Faith-based            Rickie Brawer      Fuller Foundation      2003-2007   $20,000    $20,000    Y            N
Brawer     Diabetes Self-         NPH, Office to
           Management             Advance
           Education              Population
                                  Health
                                  James Plumb,
                                  MD, DCFM
Laura T.   Cost of Blood in the   Neil Goldfarb,     NovoNordisk Inc        01/16/07-   $119,976   $119,976   N            N
Pizzi      United States          Department of                             12/30/08
                                  Health Policy,
                                  JMC
Tom Bunz   Economic Evaluation    L. Pizzi, Health   Watson                 2007-2008   $50,000    $50,000    N            N
           of the DRIVE Study     Policy
Tom Bunz   Patient Experiences    L. Pizzi, Health   Johnson and            2007-2008   $90,000    $90,000    N            Y
           with Subcutaneous      Policy             Johnson
           Use of Enbrel and
           Humira
Tom Bunz   Literature Review on   N. Goldfarb,       PhRMA                  2006-2007   $62,000    $0         N            N
           the Role of            Health Policy
           Pharmaceuticals in
           Managing Chronic
           Diseases
Rob        Managing Anger for     Rob Simmons,       Philadelphia           7/2007-     $9,700     $9,700     Y            N
Simmons    Older Adults           Thomas             Corporation on         6/2008
                                  Jefferson          Aging
                                  University
Mona       Dissemination of       Mona Sarfaty       Agency for Health      October     $250,000   $250,000   Y            N
Sarfaty    Strategies to                             Care Research          2007-
           Increase Screening                        and Quality            Septebmer
           and Follow-up for                                                2008
           Colorectal Cancer




                                                                      174
Fac.       Project Name             Principal        Funding Source         Funding      Amount     Amount     Community-   Student
member                              Investigator &                          Period       Total      Current    Based Y/N    Participation
                                    Department                              Start/End    Award      Year                    Y/N
Vittorio   To develop analyses      Daniel Louis,    Agenzia Sanitaria      1/1/2007-    $660,000   $0         N            Y
Maio       and reports              Center for       Regionale Emilia       12/31/2009
           examining access         Research in      Romagna, Italy
           and utilization of       Medical
           health care services     Education
           by selected groups of
           the population and
           by patient sub-
           groups in the
           Regione Emilia
           Romagna. 2) To
           examine the quality
           of care provided to
           Emilia Romagna
           residents by
           investigating specific
           issues for selected
           diseases, including
           components of
           cancer care,
           analyses of beta
           blocker use post
           AMI, analyses of
           drug use in special
           populations such as
           the elderly and
           pregnant women
Rickie     W.K. Kellogg             Rickie Brawer    W.K. Kellogg           2007-2009    $500,000   $250,000   Y            Y
Brawer     Foundation Food          PhD, MPH,        Foundation
           and Fitness              Office to
           Initiative               Advance
                                    Population
                                    Health




                                                                      175
Fac.        Project Name             Principal         Funding Source         Funding     Amount       Amount     Community-   Student
member                               Investigator &                           Period      Total        Current    Based Y/N    Participation
                                     Department                               Start/End   Award        Year                    Y/N
Daniel Z.   Collaboration with       Daniel Z. Louis   Regional Health        2007-2009   $1,000,000   $335,000   Y            Y
Louis       the Regional Health                        Care Agency,
            Care Agency of the                         Emilia-Romagna
            Emilia-Romagna
            Region of Italy.
            Projects address a
            wide range of issues
            in health care
            organization,
            financing, and quality
            improvement
            activities.

Elaine      Profiling Severity of    Elaine Yuen       State of               2007-2009   $166,260     $100,000   N            Y
Yuen        Illness and                                Pennsylvania
            Ambulatory Care
            Sensitive Conditions
            in Pennsylvania
Rickie      Academic                 Howard            HRSA                   2007-2010   $225,000     $0         N            N
Brawer      Administrative           Rabinowitz,
            Units Grant              Dept Family and
                                     Community
                                     Medicine
Elaine      Media Partnerships       Giang Nguyen,     Sound Partners         2007-2010   $39,088      $9,246     Y            Y
Yuen        for Community            University of     for Community
            Engagement in            Pennsylvania      Health
            Southeast Asian
            Health




                                                                        176
Fac.       Project Name             Principal        Funding Source         Funding     Amount       Amount     Community-   Student
member                              Investigator &                          Period      Total        Current    Based Y/N    Participation
                                    Department                              Start/End   Award        Year                    Y/N
Elaine     Collaboration            Daniel Louis,    Regione Emilia         2007-2010   $1,000,000   $330,000   N            N
Yuen       between the Center       Center for       Romagna, Italy
           for Research in          Research in
           Medical Education        Medical
           and Health Care          Education and
           and the Agenzia          Health Care,
           Sanitaria                TJU
           Regionale/Regione
           Emilia-Romagna,
           Italy
Laura T.   Epidemiology and         Laura Pizzi,     Johnson & Johnson      01/01/08-   $88,784      $88,784    N            N
Pizzi      Cost of Adverse          Department of                           12/31/08
           Reactions to anti-       Health Policy,
           TNF Therapy in           JMC
           Patients with
           Rheumatoid Arthritis
Vittorio   To profile patterns      V. Maio          Local Health Unit      1/1-12/31   $53,027      $0         Y            N
Maio       of utilization and                        Reggio Emilia,         2008
           costs of health care                      Emilia Romagna,
           resources of                              Italy
           primary care
           physicians
Laura T.   Incidence and Cost of    Laura Pizzi,     Ortho McNeil           3/01/08-    $122,224     $122,224   N            N
Pizzi      Side Effects Related     Department of    Janssen Scientific     12/31/08
           to Opioid Use in         Health Policy,   Affairs
           Post-Surgical Patients   JMC
Rickie     Comprehensive            Rickie Brawer    Susan B Komen          2008-2009   $69,000      $69,000    Y            N
Brawer     Breast Health Grant      PhD, MPH,        Breast Cancer
                                    Office to        Foundation
                                    Advance
                                    Population
                                    Health




                                                                      177
Fac.        Project Name           Principal        Funding Source         Funding       Amount       Amount        Community-   Student
member                             Investigator &                          Period        Total        Current       Based Y/N    Participation
                                   Department                              Start/End     Award        Year                       Y/N
Rickie      Enhancing Breast       Rickie Brawer    Avon Foundation        2008-2009     $250,000     $125,000      Y            N
Brawer      Health and Care in     PhD, MPH,
            an Urban               Office to
            Environment            Advance
                                   Population
                                   Health
James       Breast Health          Rickie Brawer    Avon Foundation        2008-2010     $250,000     $125,000      Y            N
Plumb       Education              PhD, MPH

James       Breast Health          Rickie Brawer    Komen                  2008-2009     $75,000      $75,000       Y            N
Plumb       Education              PhD, MPH         Foundation

James       Faith-based            James Plumb,     Philadelphia           9/04-9/07     $35,000      $0            Y            Y
Plumb       Diabetes Self          MD, MPH          Department
            Management                              Public Health
            Education
            Agency

James       Center of Excellence   Bonita Falkner   Pennsylvania           June 2006-    $4,100,000   $ 1,000,000   Y            Y
Plumb       in Obesity Research    MD - Medicine    Department of          May 2010
                                                    Public Health
Albert      Outpatient Quality     David B. Nash,   Numerous (~25)         ongoing       $200,000     $200,000      Y            Y
Crawford    Improvement            MD, MBA          outpatient quality
                                                    improvement
                                                    projects
James       Reducing Stroke        Michael          Commonwealth of        2005-2008     $1,200,000   $0            Y            N
Diamond     and Prostate Cancer    Rosenthal, MD,   Pennsylvania –
            in Black Males, Ages   DFCM             Pennsylvania
            35+                                     Dept. of Health
Kathryn     Mindfulness-Based      Daniel Monti,    NIH                    September     $1,000,000   $0            Y            N
Kash        Art Therapy for        MD- Dept of                             2005 – June
            Women with Breast      Emergency                               2010
            Cancer                 Medicine

* Bolded rows indicate research done by core faculty



                                                                     178
3.1d Identification of measures by which the program may evaluate the success of its
research activities, along with data regarding the program’s performance against those
measures for each of the last three years.

Identification of measures used to evaluate research initiatives are listed in the Table below.

In addition, information about funding, publications and presentations related to faculty
research/evaluation are provided. The majority of the objectives have been met, but increased
emphasis needs to be placed on student publication of their research for Thesis/Capstone
projects. While objectives related to faculty research funding are not included, Core Faculty
alone were involved in unduplicated project funding of more than $8 million dollars over the
past three years. In addition between 2005 and 2008, 18 of the 23 current faculty surveyed
participated in research, 17 faculty participated in more than 157 research related presentations
involving 35 students, and 18 faculty published more than 140 articles in predominantly peer
reviewed journals (students were involved in 15 of the publications). See Appendix J for lists of
publications and presentations.


Objectives                        Actual                            Status
Research
90% of students will              2005-2006 - 100% (abstract        Met
successfully complete a           not required)
capstone research project         2006-2007 – 100% (abstract
approved by her/his capstone      not required)
committee resulting in a paper
of publishable quality, an oral   2007-2008 – 100% (abstract
presentation to faculty,          required)
community preceptors, and
student colleagues, and a
submitted abstract to a
national, regional, state, or
local public health- related
conference

80% of graduating students        2005-2008 - Graduated             Met
will successfully complete        students
research methods courses with
a grade of B or better (such as   Average GPA for research =
660, 580, 506, 670, 606, 615)     3.64 (A-)
                                  45 of 47 students had GPA
                                  >3.0 (96%)




                                              179
Objectives                       Actual                           Status
90% of graduating students       Alumni Survey – 85%              Not met - Review and
will report competency in                                         improve quality and quantity
understanding of basic public    Not included in exit interview   of research methods courses
health research methods                                           and experiences

80% of MPH faculty will          2005-2006 – 12 of 18 faculty     Met
participate in public health     2006-2007 – 12 of 18 faculty
research or evaluation           2007-2008 - 12 of 18 faculty
initiatives                      2005-2008 – 89%

25% of students who complete     4 alumni/students indicated      Not met
the MPH will prepare and         publishing out of 48 surveys
submit an article for            returned                         Increase emphasis on research
publication                                                       methodologies and publishing,
                                                                  enhancement of skills within
                                                                  courses and continuing
                                                                  education opportunities,
                                                                  particularly in the Capstone
                                                                  Seminar.




3.1e   A description of student involvement in research.

A third of all students have participated in faculty research projects listed in Table 3.1.c. In
addition, from 2005-2008, MPH and other Jefferson faculty contacts were responsible for 30
(91%) of Capstone projects. Compared to the previous self study, more Thesis/Capstone
projects have been generated due to faculty (MPH and TJU) research and gains have been
realized in connecting MPH students to TJU faculty research outside the MPH program (see
table on page 37). Student and alumni surveys indicate that they would like increased
opportunities for involvement in research. While this is desired, meaningful involvement of full-
time students outside of their regular coursework and Thesis/Capstone projects may be
constrained or impractical. Faculty advisors assist students expressing research interest in
finding appropriate opportunities either with Jefferson faculty or with external researchers. The
Thesis/Capstone Table included in Appendix G, portrays the variety of research interests of
students and the spectrum of public health research activities that include epidemiology and data
analysis, health services research, program planning and evaluation, health communication and
community health assessment.

3.1f   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met with commentary. MPH faculty are involved in a number of public health
related research and evaluation projects. To accomplish the MPH Program research objectives, a
greater emphasis on instruction of research methods within courses and as part of the Capstone


                                            180
projects is needed. In addition, faculty will be encouraged to involve their students as much as
possible within their research initiatives by providing funded and unfunded opportunities for
student involvement. As the MPH program is becoming increasingly known throughout TJU,
there are expanded opportunities for interdisciplinary work that will involve the MPH program
via its faculty and it students. One example is the Jeff Health Mentors program that will involve
public health students teaming up with medical, nursing, and allied health students working with
a “mentor” from the community who has a chronic health condition. Students will meet with
their mentor over the year including in her/his home and participate in discussion groups on
lessons learned from the experience, including learnings about the other health disciplines. Such
cross-discipline opportunities will allow MPH students to work with other health professional
students both in service and research initiatives.




                                            181
Criterion 3.2 Service

The program shall pursue active service activities, consistent with its mission, through
which faculty and students contribute to the advancement of public health practice.

A strength of the MPH program is the active involvement of faculty and students in service to
community partners and organizations in the greater Philadelphia region. We define service as
both structured and unstructured volunteer assistance by TJU’s faculty, students, and staff to the
overall health of the communities within the Greater Philadelphia region and the health and
human service organizations that serve those communities. Our extensive linkages with
organizations and agencies in the community have been essential to the success of the program
in meeting its overall objectives. The faculty is committed to integrating service into the MPH
program as a way of meeting our core commitments to students and community partners. Service
is incorporated in a program goal of providing structured service-learning opportunities for
students through clerkship and thesis/capstone work, as well as participating in continuing
education opportunities, and encouraging faculty to participate in, and model, public health
community service.

The TJU MPH Community Advisory Board has been a way for the community to participate in
the work of the program, from assessing the relevance of curricula, to participating in teaching,
to serving as community preceptors for clerkship or capstone projects, and to begin serving as
career mentors to MPH students

Service is an integral part of our program’s values, specifically related to:

   •   Social justice as an underpinning of the program
   •   Active community involvement
   •   Open and honest communication with community partners

The TJU MPH Core Faculty shares a commitment to professional development and leadership,
and so makes a particular commitment to serving the public health and health education
profession through elected and other volunteer positions in professional associations, and by
collaborating with organizations in community building and serving on boards of professional
and community groups. We are particularly interested in community and professional service
that builds community capacity, contributes to social justice, and works to eliminate health
disparities.

MPH students are encouraged to participate in the student association of public health education
(SAPHE) which is involved with several health-related service projects along with other
Jefferson student organizations. In addition, beginning in 2008-2009, the MPH program will be
a volunteer participant in the Jeff Health Mentors project (http://jeffline.jefferson.edu/jcipe)
Jeff Health Mentors is an interdisciplinary student initiative where students from medicine,
nursing, allied health professions, and public health work in teams in a structured two-year
initiative with a person with chronic condition(s) who serves as a “mentor” for the students who
meet with the mentor in small teams to address issues such as access to health care, supportive
health services, among others.



                                               182
The TJU MPH Program’s Service Goal and Objectives reflect the way in which the faculty
encourage and reinforce service throughout the program.

Goal: To provide structured service-learning opportunities for students through clerkship,
capstone and other continuing education initiatives as formal and informal components of the
MPH program and to encourage faculty to participate in public health community service.

Service Objectives:

   •   60% of students will complete a community-based clerkship experience of 72-144 hours
       as approved by their community preceptor and faculty clerkship advisor with a grade of
       pass. As of Fall 2008 the requirement will be 120 hours for three credits.
   •   90% of students will report satisfaction with her/his clerkship project
   •   50% of graduating students will have participated in at least one community service
       activity in addition to their clerkship or capstone experience
   •   90% of MPH faculty will provide consultative or direct service to international, national,
       state, and/or local community or professional health organizations
   •   The MPH program will provide or promote at least 10 TJU sponsored continuing
       education/workforce development programs for the Philadelphia region public health
       community annually, based on input from alumni, the CAB and other partners.

3.2a A description of the program’s service activities, including policies, procedures and
practices that support service.

   •   University faculty recruitment procedures identify instruction, research and
       community service as important components of a TJU faculty position. Each MPH
       faculty member is expected to provide community service activities to local, state,
       national and even international health-related organizations and initiatives.
   •   University faculty retention, tenure, and promotion policies require a sustained
       pattern of professional and/or community service. Faculty and departments have
       considerable latitude in defining service in the way that is appropriate for their discipline
       and expertise.
   •   Support for SAPHE, the MPH Student Association in the form of faculty advising,
       seed money for service projects, and enthusiastic faculty participation in all student-
       initiated service events.
   •   The MPH Program Director and two Core Faculty are members of TJU’s Community
       Benefit Committee and provide regular input into the services provided by the university
       to the greater Philadelphia area which include active involvement of TJU students,
       faculty, and staff in all graduate education programs including the MPH program.
   •   Active leadership and participation in the Albert Schweitzer Fellowship, a program
       for the great Philadelphia region as the TJU Department of Health Policy and the MPH
       program provide direct leadership for this unique national graduate fellowship program
       that provides health-related community service.




                                             183
3.2b A following is a list of TJU MPH faculty participation in community service for
2005-2008. The key below describes the kind of involvement that faculty provide to the
activity.

Key: 1 - Leadership roles, 2=Board memberships, 3=Membership/leadership in professional
organizations, 4=Testimony, 5=Membership in community coalition advisory boards,
6=Membership in community coalitions, 7=Grant reviewing, 8=Editorial review for
publications, 9=Television/other media presentations, 10=Providing technical assistance to
organizations, 11=Other
Faculty      Service or Contribution/ Activity     Type of         Level of        Student
member                                             Involvement Involvement Involvement
Helen
Black
             Editorial Board, Journal of Aging     2,8             International Y
             Studies
             Editorial Board, Journal of           2,8             International Y
             Gerontology
             International Journal of Aging        8               International Y
             Studies, Journal of Men’s Studies,
             The Sociological Quarterly, Social
             Behavior and Personality, Medical
             Anthropology Quarterly, Journal of
             Cross Cultural Gerontology, Health
             & Quality of Life Outcomes
             Department of Pastoral Care,          2               Local           N
             Thomas Jefferson University
             National Institute on Aging Studies   7,11            National        N
             WHYY                                  6,9             National        Y
             Calvary Chapel                        6               Local           Y
Lee Blum
             American Industrial Hygiene           3               National        There are
             Association                                                           opportunities
                                                                                   within the
                                                                                   organization
                                                                                   for student
                                                                                   activities
Rickie
Brawer
             United Way – Review community         7               Local           N
             agency applications for funding
             Delaware Valley Healthcare and        1,10            Local           N
             Hospital Council – Health Care
             Improvement Foundation -
             Coordinating Committee Fight
             MRSA Initiative


                                            184
Faculty      Service or Contribution/ Activity     Type of       Level of    Student
member                                             Involvement   Involvement Involvement
             Pennsylvania Immigrant Care           6             Local       Y
             Coalition
             Pennsylvania Diabetes Coalition –     5             State       N
             Evaluation Workgroup
             Urban Tree Connection – Board         2             Local       Y
             College Of Physicians Of              1             Local       N
             Philadelphia – Executive Committee
             Of The Section On Public Health
             And Medicine
             Philadelphia Department of Public     6             Local       Y
             Health – Healthy Environment
             Collaborative
             Pennsylvania Advocates for            1             Local       N
             Nutrition and Activity- Statewide
             Leadership Committee Active
             Community Environments
             United Way of Southeastern            5             Local       N
             Pennsylvania - Network Relations
             Committee
             Nicetown-Tioga Improvement Team       6             Local       Y
             – Health Committee
             Pennsylvania Public Health            1             Local       N
             Association – Board Member,
             membership chair
             Southeastern Pennsylvania Area        1             Local       N
             Health Education Center – Board
             Member, Chairperson
             Delaware Valley Health Care           1             Local       N
             Council - Community Health
             Advisory Committee, Co-chair
             Haddington Community Health           6             Local       Y
             Project – Founding member and
             Health Committee
             Southeast Philadelphia Stakeholders   6             Local       N
             Women’s Health and Environment        5             Local       N
             Network

Linda
Chatterton
             COMPREHENSIVE PAIN                    Strategic     Local       N
             MANAGEMENT                            Planning,
             Columbia, MD                          Seeking
                                                   investors



                                           185
Faculty    Service or Contribution/ Activity        Type of        Level of    Student
member                                              Involvement    Involvement Involvement
           MRI COALITION                            Chair          State       Y
           Group formed of 14 practices
           fighting the insurer rules/state &
           federal rules restricting the use of
           imaging by physicians other than
           radiologists
           (Orthopedics, Urology, Cardiology
           are three of the specialties involved)
           Issue of access and single stop for
           patient – rather than an exam – go
           for film – return for 2nd visit.
Albert
Crawford
           Lead Analyst, Jefferson University       Lead staff     Local       Y
           Physicians (faculty practice plan)       analyst on
                                                    faculty
                                                    practice plan
                                                    responsible
                                                    for outpatient
                                                    quality and
                                                    safety; re:
                                                    “student
                                                    involvement”,
                                                    I have
                                                    recruited
                                                    Jefferson
                                                    MPH students
                                                    for clerkships
                                                    and thesis
                                                    projects
           Associate Editor, American Journal       Associate      National    N
           of Medical Quality                       Editor
James
Diamond
           Journal of the American Medical          8              National    N
           Association
           Journal of the American Board of         8              National    N
           Family Medicine
Neil
Goldfarb
           Jewish Family and Children’s             10             Local       N
           Service of Philadelphia
           Health Federation of Philadelphia        10             Local       Y



                                            186
Faculty    Service or Contribution/ Activity    Type of         Level of    Student
member                                          Involvement     Involvement Involvement
           National Nursing Centers             10,7            National,   Y
           Consortium                                           Local
Kathryn
Kash
           Young Survivor Coalition             Medical         National    Y
                                                Advisory
                                                Board
                                                member
           NIH – DoD                            Review          National    N
                                                grants for
                                                government
                                                on an ad-hoc
                                                basis. Was a
                                                member of
                                                study section
                                                Behavioral
                                                Medicine:
                                                Interventions
                                                and
                                                Outcomes for
                                                4 years


Jennifer
H.
Lofland
           Quality of Child Care Education      5               State       N
Vittorio
Maio
           Local Health Unit Reggio Emilia,     11              Local       Y
           Emilia Romagna, Italy
           Agenzia Sanitaria Regionale Emilia   11              State       Y
           Romagna, Italy
           Local Health Unit Parma, Emilia      11              Local       Y
           Romagna, Italy
           Health Federation of Philadelphia    11              Local       Y




                                         187
Faculty    Service or Contribution/ Activity      Type of       Level of    Student
member                                            Involvement   Involvement Involvement
Laura T.
Pizzi
           Health Federation of Philadelphia  10, 11            Local           N
                                              (Evaluation
                                              of a HRSA
                                              grant aimed
                                              at improving
                                              access to
                                              medications
                                              in 6
                                              Philadelphia
                                              clinics)
           Maternity Care Coalition of        5 (Member of      Local           N
           Philadelphia                       Mother’s Day
                                              Campaign
                                              Committee)
           US House of Representatives        4 (Testified      National        N
           Committees on Ways and Means       regarding
                                              Medicare
                                              costs
                                              attributable to
                                              overuse of
                                              anemia
                                              treatments by
                                              US dialysis
                                              centers)
           American Pharmacists Association – 9 (Upon           Local,          N
           Media Advisor                      request, speak    National
                                              to local and
                                              national news
                                              media
                                              regarding the
                                              role of the
                                              pharmacist as
                                              well as cost,
                                              safety, and
                                              access to
                                              medications)
James
Plumb
           Consultant – Barefoot Artists          1,2 3,4 10    International
           Executive Committee; Co-Chair –        1,2,3,4, 10   National        N
           Social Justice Committee
           Physicians for Social Responsibility


                                           188
Faculty   Service or Contribution/ Activity     Type of       Level of    Student
member                                          Involvement   Involvement Involvement
          Council on Graduate Programs in       11            National    N
          Public Health – Resource Sharing
          and Mentoring Group
          Prevention Work Group,                10            State       N
          Pennsylvania Diabetes Coalition
          Co-Chair – Environment and Policy     1,10          State       Y
          Committee Pennsylvania
          Cardiovascular Consortium
          President, Philadelphia Physicians    1,2,3,4,10    Local       Y
          for Social Responsibility
          Chair, College of Physicians –        1,2,3,4,10    Local       Y
          Section on Public Health and
          Preventive Medicine
          Member, Public Health Committee –     2,3           Local       Y
          Philadelphia County Medical
          Society
          Board Member, Prevention Point        2,10          Local       Y
          Philadelphia
          Consultation/Grant writing,           2,10          Local       Y
          Southeast Philadelphia
          Collaborative
          Consultation/Grant Writing, Journey   2,10          Local       Y
          HOME
          Board Member, Hep Trec                2,10          Local       Y
          Community Assessment, Project         10            Local       Y
          HOME
          Consultation, Grant Writing,          10            Local       N
          Bethesda Project
          Consultation, Grant Writing, To Our   5,6,10        Local       Y
          Children’s Future With Health
          Co-Chair – Active Living Action       1,10          Local       Y
          Team – Philadelphia Urban Food
          and Fitness Alliance
Jessica
Robbins
          American Public Health Association    3 (Member of National     N
                                                Epidemiology
                                                Section
                                                Program
                                                Planning
                                                Ctte)




                                        189
Faculty   Service or Contribution/ Activity   Type of       Level of      Student
member                                        Involvement   Involvement Involvement
          American Journal of Preventive      8             National and N
          Medicine, American Journal of                     international
          Public Health, BMC Health Services
          Research, Diabetes Research and
          Clinical Practice, Epidemiologic
          Reviews, Ethnicity and Health,
          Journal of the National Medical
          Society, Medical Care, Medical
          Science Monitor, and Social Science
          and Medicine
          ZonMw - The Netherlands             7             International   N
          Organization for Health Research
          and Development
          Philadelphia Department of Public   10 (Primary   Local           Y
          Health                              employer)




Mona
Sarfaty
          Albert Schweitzer Fellowship         Advisory     Local           N
          Program of the Greater Philadelphia Board
          Area
          American Journal of Public Health,   Reviewer     National        N
          American Journal of Preventive
          Medicine, Medical Care, American
          Journal of Quality Medicine, Journal
          of Health Care for the Poor and
          Under Served




                                        190
Faculty   Service or Contribution/ Activity     Type of           Level of    Student
member                                          Involvement       Involvement Involvement
          American Public Health Association    Medical Care      National    Y
          (1982 – present)                      Section:
                                                Secretary
                                                (2006-07),
                                                Chair Elect
                                                (‘07-’09),
                                                Governing
                                                Councilor
                                                (‘07,’08,’09),
                                                Advisory
                                                Committee on
                                                National
                                                Public Health
                                                Week
          National Colorectal Cancer            Represent the     National       N
          Roundtable (2005- present)            APHA
                                                Professional
                                                Practices
                                                Task Group
          Advisory Committee on Universal       Developed a       Local          N
          Access for the Philadelphia Health    plan for
          Department                            universal
                                                access to
                                                health care
                                                for the city of
                                                Philadelphia.
                                                2004-06
          Presentations to Physicians and       Teaching          State, local   N
          American Cancer Society staff on      Sessions -
          Cancer Control, and Screening for     Oral
          Colorectal Cancer (15 presentations   Presentations
          since 2005)                           (A couple
                                                were web-
                                                based. Most
                                                were local, a
                                                couple
                                                national)
Rob
Simmons
          Society for Public Health Education   1 - President,    National,      Y
          (SOPHE) National, Pennsylvania        2,3,4,8,9,10      State
          Chapter




                                         191
Faculty   Service or Contribution/ Activity     Type of          Level of    Student
member                                          Involvement      Involvement Involvement
          American Public Health                3,7,8            National,   Y
          Association, Pennsylvania Public                       State
          Health Association
          Philadelphia Corporation on Aging     5,9              Local       N
          American Heart Association,           1,2,3,4          State       N
          Pennsylvania-Delaware Affiliate
          Philadelphia College of Physicians,   1,3,11           Local       Y
          Public Health Section                 (collaborative
                                                course
                                                development,
                                                public health
                                                week)
          Chester County Coalition on           1,2              Local       N
          Children and Families
          Healthy Delaware Foundation, Inc.     1,2,5,10         State       Y
          Jefferson Medical College, Health     8                National    N
          Policy Newsletter Editorial Board
Elaine
Yuen
          STEPS to a Healthier Philadelphia,    Co-Chair,        Local       N
          Philadelphia Department of Public     Evaluation
          Health                                and
                                                Monitoring
                                                Committee,
                                                Member
                                                Leadership
                                                Team
          STEPS to a Healthier Philadelphia,    Co-Chair,        Local       N
          Philadelphia Department of Public     Consortium
          Health                                and
                                                Leadership
                                                Team
          American Public Health Association    3                National    N
          Association for Health Services       3                National    N
          Research
          Temple University Health              3                National    N
          Administration Alumni Association




                                         192
3.2c Identification of the measures by which the program may evaluate the success of its
service efforts, along with data regarding the program’s performance against those
measures for each of the last three years.

MPH Program Service objectives listed in 1.1 include:

Objective                         Actual                         Status
Service Goal
60% of students will complete     2005-2006 – 5 out of 9 =       Met
a community-based clerkship       56%                            Considerable improvement
experience of 72-144 hours as     2006-2007 – 3 out of 7 = 43%   has been made since 2005.
approved by their community       2007-2008 - 14 out of 17 =     However, for gains to be
preceptor and faculty clerkship   82%                            sustained faculty will need to
advisor and will receive a                                       continue to promote
grade of pass (student records)   2005-2008 – 22 out of 33 =     community based experiences.
                                  67% (community based
                                  organization or health
                                  department or federal gov.
                                  agency)
90% of students will report       2005-2008 – 100% of current    Met.
satisfaction with her/his         students who competed the
clerkship project (exit           survey
interview, student/alumni
survey)                           2005-2008 – 90% of alumni
                                  who completed the survey.
50% of graduating students        Exit interviews for 2007-: 6   Not Met –
will have participated in at      of 14 (43%) of graduating      Service activities for part time
least one community service       students indicated             students who work full time is
activity in addition to their     involvement in service.        difficult according to survey
clerkship or capstone                                            results.
experience (exit interview)       15 of 32 current students
                                  surveyed in 2008 belong to     Based on exit interview
                                  SAPHE and 8 students           comments, this should
                                  reported involvement in        improve as the number of full
                                  APHA, the Global Health        time students increases.
                                  Council, Move4Health,
                                  PPHA, Planned Parenthood
                                  and SOPHE.

90% of MPH faculty will           2005-2008 - 89% (16 of 18      Almost met
provide consultative or direct    faculty surveyed)              Continue to encourage faculty
service to international,                                        to provide community service.
national, state, and/or local                                    Promote opportunities for
community or professional                                        service through e-mail and
health organizations                                             website for students and
                                                                 faculty


                                            193
The MPH program will              2005-2006 – 12 programs          Met
provide or promote at least 10    2006-2007 – 13 programs
TJU sponsored continuing          2007-2008 - 17 programs
education/workforce
development programs
annually for the Philadelphia
region public health
community annually, based on
input from alumni , the CAB
and other partners


3.2d   A description of student involvement in service.

The MPH Core Faculty strives to create an organizational context that facilitates community
service as a core component of professional practice. To that end, the faculty is always seeking
ways in which students can contribute to the health of populations in our local, state, Regional
and International communities. The following organizational structures of the MPH program
facilitate student service:

   •   The clerkship provides meaningful opportunities for students to provide service to local
       communities and organizations. Clerkship experiences stress the importance of providing
       service to the placement sites. During the self-study period, 67% of clerkships have been
       with community based or local public health agencies. In the past year 82% of all
       clerkships were in community based sites, a significant increase over the previous two
       years. Faculty will continue to encourage students to choose community sites; however,
       for part time working students this can be a hardship.

   •   Capstone/Thesis Projects are another way in which community-based service is
       structured into the requirements of the TJU MPH program. The multiple
       Thesis/Capstone project options provide ample opportunities for fulfilling the
       university’s graduation requirement has always allowed the potential for community
       service through choice of problem or population. Refer to Appendix G for a list of
       Thesis/Capstone Projects.

   •   Faculty advisors assist students in identifying local opportunities for service such as the
       Nationalities Service Center, Philadelphia Corporation of Aging, Maternity Care
       Coalition, Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania and the student organization
       sponsored by the College of Physicians that encourages area public health students to
       coordinate efforts to address health needs in Philadelphia.

   •   Engagement and collaboration with other service organizations on the Jefferson campus,
       such as:




                                             194
          o Jeff HOPE (Health Opportunities, Prevention and Education) which provides
            weekly clinical, advocacy and health education sessions at 4 shelters and a needle
            exchange
          o Student Physicians for Social Responsibility, which locally focuses on
            interpersonal violence and environmental degradation
          o Jeff Recycles, which focus on greening of the Jefferson campus. This is a major
            plus of Jefferson as students are very engaged in service.
          o Beginning in the Fall of 2009, MPH students will be integrated into the Jeff
            Health Mentors Program, an interdisciplinary initiative involving medical,
            nursing, physical and occupational therapy students, and community based
            Mentors. The interdisciplinary team meets their Mentors in their homes and
            performs a series of four interviews.
          o Student International Health Organizations provide services for immigrant
            population groups

   •   A SAPHE yearly event, where a Community-based organization is chosen by the
       students for an award for outstanding contribution to the health of the public. Recent
       winners have been the Village of Arts and Humanities, Project HOME, the Mural Arts
       Program, the Maternity Care Coalition and, in 2008, Barbara Watson from the
       Philadelphia Department of Public Health.

   •   Conference attendance and service to the professional associations are very much part of
       the culture of the TJU MPH program. Each year, the program supports a contingent of
       students to Pennsylvania Public Health Association, APHA, and most recently, SOPHE
       Advocacy workshops and local and State meetings.

   •   SAPHE - the Student Association of Public Health Education provides on-going
       opportunities for community service. SAPHE is an eclectic group of students dedicated to
       public health education, awareness, safety, promotion, and prevention. The primary goal
       is to provide information to its members and the community at large about activities,
       current trends and academic developments in public health and also to have an
       opportunity to give back to the community. SAPHE has been involved in a clothing drive
       for local shelters, health education programs during National Public Health Week and a
       Web cast – 2% Solution.

   •   The Rieders Renaissance Foundation Graduate Student Recognition Award – a
       community service award established in 1998 to honor those graduate students at
       Jefferson College of Graduate Studies who have made outstanding contributions to the
       University environment above and beyond academic achievement. Each year, a student is
       recognized at the JCGS Alumni Day, for going that “extra mile” by demonstrating an
       outstanding commitment to Jefferson and to his or her peer community.

3.2e   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met with commentary. TJU’s MPH program has emphasized community service
from its inception due to strong roles played by the Jefferson Medical College’s Family and



                                            195
Community Medicine and Health Policy departments. It will be expanding its community
service role and initiatives of both students and faculty in the future, and will increase student
and faculty connections with our MPH Community Advisory Board. In addition, opportunities
for community service will be posted on the MPH website, promoted through e-mail, flyers will
be posted in the MPH office and advisors will counsel students during advising meetings.




                                             196
Criterion 3.3 Workforce Development

The program shall engage in activities that support the professional development of the
public health workforce.

3.3a A description of the program’s continuing education activities, including policies,
needs assessment, procedures, practices, and evaluation that support continuing education
and workforce development strategies.

The MPH Program provides a wide variety of professional development opportunities for both
faculty and students and encourages active participation in the planning, implementation and
evaluation of such development programs. Public health education is one of lifelong learning;
hence it is important for the MPH program to provide a variety of continuing education
opportunities for our students, alumni, faculty, and the communities we serve, and to encourage
participation in continuing public health education throughout ones career.

The MPH Program directly provides and collaborates with other Jefferson Departments and
programs, other public health academic programs in the region, and community health
organizations in a variety of seminars, lectures, forums and informational sessions to students,
alumni, faculty, and staff at TJU. It is a goal of the MPH program to create, seek out and advance
opportunities to provide continuing education opportunities in Public Health disciplines.
Students are encouraged to attend these events, which are publicized through the student listserv,
in the MPH Public Health Link newsletter, and through various communication channels across
the TJU campus. In the recent alumni survey, alumni indicated their interest receiving notice of
upcoming continuing education programs through e-mail. The determination of opportunities for
workforce development in public health is based on MPH administration and faculty
communication within Jefferson, city, state, and national public health organizations, community
organizations, student and faculty interests, student fellowship programs, among others. Some
examples over the past academic year include:

   •   Collaboration with the Philadelphia College of Physicians, Public Health Section for
       development of National Public Health Week seminars around climate change
   •   Availability of Dr. Davidson Hamer from Boston University School of Public Health
       who was in Philadelphia at the time to present on the Burden of Infectious Disease – A
       Public Health Response
   •   Collaboration with the Albert Schweitzer Fellowship program on seminars on Health
       Care Access: Ethical and Cultural Issues, and serving the Underserved: Perspectives on
       Improving Access to Healthcare for the Homeless
   •   Collaboration with the Jefferson Department of Family & Community Medicine for a
       presentation by Dr. Adelwale Troutman, Commissioner of the Louisville Dept. of Public
       Health on Racism and Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease
   •   Collaboration with the Jefferson Dept. of Health Policy on former Surgeon General,
       Richard Carmona on Chronic Disease Management who was in Philadelphia at the time
   •   Collaboration with the Jefferson Dept. of Health Policy on 2007 summer seminar on Rx
       for Pennsylvania on the state’s health care insurance plan to cover all children in the state
   •   Availability of CDC webinar via the University of North Carolina on Global Health – An
       Innovative Approach to Fighting Disease In Uganda


                                             197
   •   Based on expressed interests by our CAB and within Jefferson, the development of a
       two-hour symposium on Public Health Informatics with presentations by John Loontz of
       CDC and others.

Multiple TJU Departments sponsor educational activities that periodically relate to Public
Health. The MPH Program takes an active role in the development of continuing education
programs through input from various departments and committees within TJU, the MPH
Community Advisory Board (CAB), and faculty research and service relationships in a variety of
community health initiatives and coalitions.

The Family and Community Medicine and the Health Policy Departments within the Jefferson
Medical College offer regular seminars and symposia that often have public health themes.

In 2005, the Department of Family and Community Medicine was awarded a three year
residency training grant – with didactic and experiential components in the following areas:
Population Health Principles and Strategies, Health Literacy, Protection Against Environmental
Hazards, Promotion of Healthy Behaviors, and Accessibility of Health Services. MPH faculty
(Drs Brawer and Plumb) took leadership roles in the development and implementation of these
components, and MPH students have been offered opportunities to attend the didactic sessions
and become involved in the experiential activities. In 2007, the Department and Family and
Community Medicine was awarded a HRSA grant to develop an enhance Community
Medicine/Health component of the Department. Again, Dr Plumb serves a Chair of the
Community Medicine Section and has been developing a series of opportunities to training
professional health students, residents, fellows, and faculty in key areas of Public Health related
to community medicine and working/practice in neighborhoods.

With the rich public health tradition and resources in the greater Philadelphia area, there is a
wealth of public health learning opportunities available to faculty and students. MPH Program
Directors meet on a regular basis to share ideas and collaborate on public health initiatives such
as public health week, public health student presentations, and even future shared courses such as
one on the History of Public Health. In addition, TJU MPH students and faculty are encouraged
to participate in web-based continuing education seminars which are being made available with
increased frequency. Student travel and registration scholarships have been budgeted to
encourage students to participate in public health training programs including the Pennsylvania
Public Health Association Annual Meetings and the APHA national meetings, particularly the
2009 meeting scheduled for Philadelphia.

Many of the continuing education offerings conduct a simple evaluation which inquires about
future professional development opportunities of interest. These evaluations, input from MPH
alumni through annual surveys, input from the CAB and other public health professionals
pertaining to public health trends and workforce needs provide valuable information for
continuing education and workforce development workshops. . As examples, input from the
Public Health Informatics symposium has resulted in a presentation on the topic in the
Introduction to Public Health course in fall, 2008. Feedback from the climate change
symposium has encouraged the development of additional environmental health professional
development opportunities in the future.



                                              198
3.3b Description of certificate programs or other non-degree offerings of the program,
including enrollment data for each of the last three years.

Since 1999, the Graduate Center for Education and Training of the Jefferson College of Graduate
Studies has offered graduate certificate programs in the following three areas: Clinical Research/
Trials, Public Health/ Health Systems Research, and Research Administration.

These programs are designed to provide industry, academic, and health professionals with
contemporary skills and knowledge for continued success in today’s changing environment.
Each program requires fifteen credit hours of graduate course work. Unlike the Master of
Science programs, the graduate certificate programs do not require a clerkship or a research
thesis. The certificates represent a body of knowledge and may be suitable as continuing
education for professionals with other graduate degrees who want to branch out into another
field, or who want to explore another interest. The graduate certificate in Public Health/Health
Systems Research and Clinical Research/Trials are coordinated with the requirements for the
Master of Public Health and Master of Science in Pharmacology so that interested students could
transfer credits earned in the graduate certificate programs into the appropriate Masters programs
at Jefferson. Courses for the Public Health certificate program must be taken for academic credit
and students must take 15 required credits and earn a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.0 to receive a
certificate. Qualified candidates for certificate programs include graduates of baccalaureate
programs in basic sciences, nursing, health professions, engineering, or business. Graduates of
doctoral and professional programs in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, or law can take
these programs to gain specialized training for career advancement.

Since 2005, 11 public health certificate students have transferred into the MPH program.

                         2005-2006                 2006-2007               2007-2008
Total student            22                        27                      33
enrollment
Number completing        3                         4                       8
Number transferred       2                         4                       5
to MSPH/MPH


3.3c A list of the continuing education programs offered by the program, including
number of students served, for each of the last three years. Those that are offered in a
distance learning format should be identified.

The Table below is a listing of public health professional development programs that have been
made available to TJU students and faculty and the Philadelphia public health community
between 2005 and 2008.




                                             199
Date       Type         Title                        Speaker                    Estimated
                                                                                Attendance
September Population    The Community Health         PHMC Staff                 3 students
2005      Health        Database – Philadelphia                                 8 faculty
          Forum         Health Management
                        Corporation
October    Population   “Community                   Lynette Kvasny PhD -       2 students,
2005       Health       Empowerment Through          Assistant Professor -       5 faculty
           Forum        Technology”                  School of Information
                                                     Sciences and Technology
                                                     – Penn State University
November Population     “Promoting a Trauma          Ted Corbin MD –            3 students,
2005     Health         Informed Approach to         Emergency Medicine –       6 faculty
         Forum          Break the Cycle of Youth     Thomas Jefferson
                        Violence”                    University

December   Population   “Health Literacy- A          James Plumb MD, MPH        4 students,
2005       Health       Public Health Challenge”     and Rickie Brawer          7 faculty
           Forum                                     PhD,MPH –– Thomas
                                                     Jefferson University and
                                                     Hospital
January    Population   “Childhood Origins of        Bonita Falkner MD –        2 students,
2006       Health       Diseases of Adults”          Department of Medicine –   5 faculty
           Forum                                     Thomas Jefferson
                                                     University

January    Health       Smallpox and Beyond          Stanley Music              3 students,
2006       Policy                                                               5 faculty
           Forum
February   Population   “Asthma – A Population       Michael Rosenthal MD –     4 students,
2006       Health       Health Perspective”          Department of Family and   5 faculty
           Forum                                     Community Medicine –
                                                     Thomas Jefferson
                                                     University
March      Population   “Hepatitis A to Z:           Amy Jessop PhD, MPH –      3 students,
2006       Health       Examining Disparities in     Director of Research and   5 faculty
           Forum        viral hepatitis incidence,   Education of
                        prevalence and               HEPTREC
                        treatment”

April      Population   “The Social and Health       Dennis P Andrulis PhD,     2 students,
2006       Health       Landscape of Urban and       MPH – Director, Center     6 faculty
           Forum        Suburban Areas”              for Health Equality –
                                                     Drexel School of Public
                                                     Health



                                         200
Date        Type         Title                     Speaker                    Estimated
                                                                              Attendance
May 2006    Population   Environmental Health      David Masur – Penn         13 students
            Health       Advocacy in               Environment                9 faculty
            Forum        Pennsylvania
May 2006    Disease      Combating Avian Flu –     David Moskovitz,           4 students
            Management                                                        12 faculty
            Colloquium   Personalized Patient      Earl Steinberg
                         Messages to Induce
                         Behavior Change
                                                   Claude Mondiere,
                         Weight Loss-A Non-
                         Pharmaceutical Houston
                         Experience,

June 2006   Health       Recent Rise in            David Levin MD             8 students
            Policy       Diagnostic Imaging                                   5 faculty
            Forum
September   Population   Rwanda Health and         James Plumb MD, MPH        12 students
2006        Health       Healing Project                                      6 faculty
            Forum
September   Population   Pennsylvania Health Law   Gene Bishop MD             3 students,
2006        Health       Project                                              5 faculty
            Forum
October     Health       Improving Health and      James O’Hara               4 students,
2006        Policy       Lives of Community                                   5 faculty
            Forum        Members
November    Health       Eliminating Racial        David Smith PhD –          6 students,
2006        Policy       Disparities in Health     Temple University          6 faculty
            Forum        Care
November    Population   Food Insecurity          Marianne Chilton PhD –      15 students
2006        Health                                Drexel School of Public     10 faculty
            Forum                                 Health
December    Population   Immigrant Health         Nan Feyler JD, MPH –        16 students
2006        Health                                Nationalities Service       13 faculty
            Forum                                 Center
January     Population   Aging and Public Health Nancy Chernett MPH –         11 students
2007        Health                                Center for Applied          8 faculty
            Forum                                 Research and Aging
January     Seminar      Darfur – what can we do? Jerry Ehrlich MD –          20 students
2007                                              Doctors Without Borders     15 faculty
February    Population   Harm Reduction and       Scott Burris – James        4 students,
2007        Health       Needle Exchange: an      Beasley Professor of Law,   6 faculty
            Forum        historical and           Temple University
                         contemporary perspective



                                         201
Date        Type         Title                     Speaker                    Estimated
                                                                              Attendance
March       Population   HPV Vaccine – present     Christopher Chambers       3 students,
2007        Health       and future                MD, Department of          6 faculty
            Forum                                  Family and Community
                                                   Medicine - TJU
May 2007    Population   Arthritis – A Public      Cathy Benson – Arthritis   2 students,
            Health       Health Issue              Foundation                 4 faculty
            Forum
May 2007    Disease      Meeting the Challenges    Nora Dowd Eisenhower       12 faculty,
            Management   of the Aging Population                              4 students
            Colloquium
                         Chronic Care              Richard Wender MD
                         Management: Cancer as a
                         Chronic Disease
                                                   Michael O’Neill
                         Consumer Health
                         Education on the Internet
                                                   Dester Shurny
                         Consumer Engagement:
                         Whole Person Health
                                                   James Schbaroff
                         Managing Diabetes

July 2007 Health         Rx for Pennsylvania,      multiple presenters        12 students
          Policy         Healing the Health Care   including reps. from       15 faculty
          Forum          System                    Governor’s Office
September Health         Household Survey and      Cindy Fillman              4 students,
2007      Policy         Consumer Driven Health                               7 faculty
          Forum          Care
September Webinar        Public Health is Global   Webinar – moderated by     17 students
2007                     Health – An Innovative    Rob Simmons DrPH           9 faculty
                         Approach to Fighting
                         Disease In Uganda
October     Seminar      Advances in the           Mark Sulkowski MD          13 students
2007                     Treatment of HCV and                                 8 faculty
                         HIV
November Webinar         Global Burden of          Davidison Hamer MD         18 students
2007                     Infectious Disease – A                               4 faculty
                         Public Health Response
November Schweitzer      Health Care Access:       Elaine Yuen PhD and        20 students
2007     Program         Ethical and Cultural      Caryl E. Carpenter MPH     2 faculty
                         Issues                    PhD




                                         202
Date       Type         Title                      Speaker                    Estimated
                                                                              Attendance
November Schweitzer     Serving the Underserved:   Roosevelt Darby, Stephen   60 students
2007     Program        Perspectives on            Metraux, PhD, James        7 faculty
                        Improving Access to        Plumb MD, MPH
                        Healthcare for the
                        Homeless

January    Health       ,Building a               Jeff Brenner                6 students,
2008       Policy       Comprehensive Health                                  9 faculty
           Forum        Database for Use in City-
                        wide Health Management
                        Systems Serving
                        Camden, NJ
January    Web cast     2% Solution               Focus the Nation, GSA,      4 students
2008                                              Physicians for Social       3 faculty
                                                  Responsibility, JEFF
                                                  Earth and SAPHE

February   Health       MedMining and             James Peters                5 students,
2008       Policy       Electronic Health Record                              8 faculty
           Forum        Data
February   DFCM         Racism and Disparities in Adewale Troutman MD,        30 students
2008       Grand        Cardiovascular Disease    MPH                         20 faculty
           Rounds
March      Schweitzer   Understanding the US       Glenn Ellis Sr, Nan        30 students
2008       Program      Healthcare System:         Feyler, MPH JD, and        10 faculty
                        Accessing Health           Helena Kwa Kwa MD
                        Services and Treatment
                        for the
                        African Immigrant in the
                        Phila Area

April      Schweitzer   Health & Human Rights      Nan Feyler JD MPH,         25 students
2008       Program                                 Sabina Neem MSS            14 faculty
                                                   MLSP, Alex Otieno MPH
                                                   PhD candidate

March 15- Council of    Health Education           Dr Janet Collins, Dr       2 students
17, 2008  National      Advocacy Summit            Wayne Giles, and others
          Health
          Education
          Programs




                                        203
Date         Type           Title                        Speaker                Estimated
                                                                                Attendance
April        College of     The Crisis of Childhood      Rear Admiral Steven K. 40 students
2008         Physicians     Obesity: Is it Reversible?   Galson MD MPH, Donald 5 faculty
             Seminar                                     F Schwarz MD MPH,
                                                         Calvin B. Johnson MD
                                                         MPH,

April        Public         Climate Change and           Mona SarfatyMD               9 students,
2008         Health         Philadelphia                                              11 faculty
             Week
April        Symposium      Public Health Informatics Dr John Loontz                  8 faculty, 7
2008                                                                                  students
April        JMC            Chronic Disease              Dr Richard Carmona           12 students,
2008         Symposium      Managment                                                 6 faculty
May 2008     Grandon        Bridging the Worlds of       John Agwunobi MD,            19 students
             Lecture        Business and Public          MPH – Senior Vice            32 faculty
                            Health                       President, Health and
                                                         Wellness - WalMart

In the summers of 2005 and 2006, Dr Rickie Brawer taught in Health Literacy in TJU’s Summer
e-Health Institute, which attracts Physical and Occupational Therapy practitioners from around
the country.

Dr Plumb has been involved in developing a History of Public Health Course with Public Health
Faculty from Drexel, Temple, and Penn. The Course will be offered in the Fall of 2008, and will
be offered to Public Health Practitioners as well as students from local Colleges and Universities

As President of the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) this year, Dr. Simmons has
shared a wide range of public health education materials, resources and continuing education
opportunities for TJU MPH students and faculty in the area of public health education and health
promotion. He has also spoken to MPH students in some of the courses regarding national, state,
and local public health initiatives and encouraged active student involvement in public health.
Two TJU MPH students accompanied Dr. Simmons to the National Health Education Advocacy
Summit in March of 2008, met directly with health legislative aides of Pennsylvania members of
Congress and have written a summary of their experience that was published in the current issue
of the MPH program newsletter.

Dr Sarfaty has been active in a statewide effort to enhance screening for colorectal cancer,
through physician and patient education.

3.3d A list of other educational institutions or public health practice organizations, if any,
with which the program collaborates to offer continuing education.

Drs Simmons and Brawer collaborated with PHMC and Health Promotion Council in a program
entitled, “Addressing Health Promotion Using Community-Based Participatory Approaches:


                                             204
National, State, and Local Examples. The MPH program is looking to collaborate with the
Philadelphia Department of Public Health, other academic institutions, community health
agencies, and other organizations to expand our continuing education opportunities.

3.3e   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

 This criterion is met with commentary. The MPH program has greatly expanded its offerings of
continuing education opportunities. The program will work on a more formal assessment
process to determine future student and faculty interests in continuing education and will work
on a more systematic evaluation process for such offerings. In addition, increased collaboration
with other organizations and institutions will expand the breath and depth of TJU’s public health
continuing education initiatives.




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Criterion 4.0 – Faculty, Staff and Students

Criterion 4.1 Faculty Qualifications

The program should have a clearly defined faculty which, by virtue of its distribution,
multidisciplinary nature, educational preparation, research and teaching competence, and
practice experience, is able to fully support the program’s mission, goals and objectives.

4.1a A table showing primary faculty who support the degree programs offered by the
program.

Template F presents data on the seven primary faculty members who teach in TJU’s MPH
program. Our Core Faculty are those that serve on MPH committees, review and interview
applicants, and serve as faculty advisors in addition to teaching courses in the MPH Program.
Primary faculty include Drs. Brawer, Diamond, Maio, Plumb, Sarfaty, Simmons, and Yuen

Four of the seven primary faculty provide at least 50% FTE to the MPH program. Three of the
Core Faculty are female and four are male. Four of the current MPH Core Faculty have graduate
public health degrees. MPH primary faculty come from a range of disciplines, and all have
extensive professional experience in public and community health policies and programs, and
possess a wealth of public health-related instruction, research, and community service.

Additional primary faculty will be considered for the MPH program as the need for faculty
advising and administrative responsibilities warrant.




                                            206
            Template F (4.1.a) Faculty who Support Degree offerings of the School or Program
            Table 4.1.a Current Core Faculty supporting Degree Offerings of School or Program by Department /Specialty Area
Dept/       Name       Title/       Tenure      FTE    Gender   Race or        Graduate   Institution     Discipline       Teaching         Research           Current/ Past
Specialty              Academic     Status      or %            Ethnicity      Degrees                                     Area             Interest           PH Activity
Area                   Rank         or          Time                           Earned
                                    Classifi-
                                    cation*
Public      Rickie     Adjunct                  90     Female   Caucasian      PhD,       PhD -           Health           Program          Community          Yes
Health      Brawer     Faculty                                                 MPH        Temple          Studies;         Planning and     assessmentCom
                                                                                          University      Community        Evaluation,      munity building,
                                                                                          Department      Health           Social and       Literacy,
                                                                                          of Public       Sciences         Behavioral       Health
                                                                                          Health; MPH                      Theories of      behaviors and
                                                                                          - Temple                         Health,          attitudes
                                                                                          University                       Capstone
                                                                                          Health                           Seminar
                                                                                          Education
                                                                                          Department
Public      James      Research                 15     Male     Caucasian      PhD, MS    PhD -           Psychology       Biostatistics,   Health Beliefs,    Yes
Health      Diamond    Professor,                                                         University of                    Psychometric     literacy
                       Family and                                                         Akron; MS -                      s
                       Community                                                          Syracuse
                       Medicine                                                           University
Public      Vittorio   Research                 10     Male     Caucasian      PharmD,    PharmD -        Pharmacy;        Health           Health Policy,     Yes
Health      Maio       Assistant                                (Internation   MSPH,      Pharmacy        Public Health;   Policy: An       Health services
                       Professor                                -al)           MS         School,         Pharmacol-       International    research,
                                                                                          Perugia,        ogy              Perspective      Internation-al
                                                                                          Italy; MSPH                                       health policy
                                                                                          - Thomas
                                                                                          Jefferson
                                                                                          University,
                                                                                          MS - Thomas
                                                                                          Jefferson
                                                                                          University




                                                                                 207
Dept/       Name      Title/        Tenure      FTE    Gender   Race or     Graduate     Institution     Discipline      Teaching        Research         Current/ Past
Specialty             Academic      Status      or %            Ethnicity   Degrees                                      Area            Interest         PH Activity
Area                  Rank          or          Time                        Earned
                                    Classifi-
                                    cation*
Public      James     Associate                 80     Male     Caucasian   MD,          MD -            Medicine,       Intro to        Program          Yes
Health      Plumb     Professor –                                           MPH          Jefferson       Public Health   Public          planning and
                      Department                                                         Medical                         Health,         evaluation;
                      Family and                                                         College;                        Social and      Behavioral
                      Community                                                          MPH -                           Behavioral      health;
                      Medicine                                                           Bloomberg                       Foundations     International
                                                                                         School of                       of Public       Health
                                                                                         Public Health                   Health
                                                                                         Johns
                                                                                         Hopkins
                                                                                         University
Public      Mona      Assistant                 50     Female   Caucasian   MD           State           Medicine        Health Policy   Health Policy,   Yes
Health      Sarfaty   Research                                              Certificat   University of                   and             Program
                      Professor                                             e in         New York at                     Advocacy,       planning and
                                                                            Public       Stony Brook                     Capstone        evaluation
                                                                            Health                                       Seminar
Public      Rob       Director,                 100    Male     Caucasian   Dr.PH,       DrPH -          Community       Program         Health policy,   Yes
Health      Simmons   MPH                                       (Spanish-   MPH          UCLA            Health          Planning and    Program
                      Program/Cli                               speaking)                School of       Sciences;       Evaluation,     Planning and
                      nical                                                              Public          Health          Health Policy   Evaluation,
                      Associate                                                          Health; MPH     Education       and             Behavioral
                      Professor                                                          - Loma Linda                    Advocacy,       Health, Health
                                                                                         University,                     Cultural        Education
                                                                                         School of                       Humility and
                                                                                         Public Health                   Competence
                                                                                                                         Health
                                                                                                                         Communicati
                                                                                                                         ons




                                                                               208
Dept/       Name     Title/        Tenure      FTE    Gender   Race or     Graduate   Institution     Discipline       Teaching       Research       Current/ Past
Specialty            Academic      Status      or %            Ethnicity   Degrees                                     Area           Interest       PH Activity
Area                 Rank          or          Time                        Earned
                                   Classifi-
                                   cation*
Public      Elaine   Research                  10     Female   Asian       PhD,       PhD -           Department of    GIS            Asian health   Yes
Health      Yuen     Associate                                             MBA        University of   City and         Mapping,
                     Professor,                                                       Pennsylvania    Regional         Cultural
                     Department                                                       ; MBA -         Planning;        Humility and
                     of Health                                                        Temple          Health           Competence
                     Policy with                                                      University      Administration
                     secondary
                     appointment
                     in Family
                     and
                     Community
                     Medicine
                     Jefferson
                     Medical
                     College




                                                                             209
4.1b   Secondary Faculty

Template G presents data on secondary faculty who teach courses in the MPH program.
Secondary faculty include those with faculty appointments in the TJU system while others are
outside the system and are considered adjunct faculty to address specific course areas of need.
Secondary faculty come from a wide range of public health and health service disciplines and
several are public health practitioners and specialists in their field who bring years of health
practice and research to TJU’s MPH program.

Currently, there are 23 secondary faculty for the MPH program. Fourteen are males and nine are
females. Only one is non-Caucasian. As described in Criterion 4.3, the MPH program
recognizes the need to greatly expand the diversity of our primary and secondary faculty.




                                             210
Template G (4.1.b.) Other Faculty Used To Support Teaching Programs (adjunct, part-time, secondary appointments, etc
Table 4.1.b Current other Faculty Used to Support Teaching Program (Adjunct, Part-time, secondary, etc.)
Department/    Name          Title/Academic    Title &           FTE    Gender   Race or     Highest    Discipline              Teaching
Specialty                    Rank              Current           or %            Ethnicity   Degree                             Areas
Area                                           Employer          Time                        Earned
CGS            Paul          Adjunct           Assistant         15     Male     Caucasian   PhD, MBA   Health Administration   Management
               Arsenault     Member            Professor, West                                                                  Skills
                                               Chester
                                               University
CGS            Kyounghwa     Adjunct           American          5      Female   Asian       PhD        Biostatistics           Statistical
               Bae           Member            College of                                                                       Methods
                                               Radiology
JCHP -         Helen Black   Research          Jefferson         5      Female   Caucasian   PhD        Qualitative Research,   Qualitative
CARAH                        Associate         College of                                               Senior Health           Research
                                               Health                                                                           Methods
                                               Professions
                                               Center for
                                               Applied
                                               Research in
                                               Aging and
                                               Health
CGS/           Lee Blum      Adjunct Faculty   Director of       5      Male     Caucasian   PhD        Environmental Health,   PH 505 & 507
                                               Occupational                                             Occupational Health     Environmental
                                               and                                                                              &
                                               Environmental                                                                    Occupational
                                               Toxicology,                                                                      Toxicology
                                               National
                                               Medical
                                               Services, Inc.
CGS            Theodore      Adjunct           Project           10     Male     Caucasian   EdD        Data Management         Information
               Bross         Member            manager, Data                                            Systems                 Systems
                                               Integration
                                               Services,
                                               Princeton
                                               University
Immunology     Jerome        Assistant         Thomas            5      Male     Caucasian   PhD        Microbiology            Diagnostic
&              Buescher      Professor         Jefferson                                                                        Microbiology
Microbiology                                   University                                                                       Presentation
                                                                                                                                Skills



                                                                      211
Department/     Name         Title/Academic     Title &          FTE    Gender   Race or     Highest          Discipline              Teaching
Specialty                    Rank               Current          or %            Ethnicity   Degree                                   Areas
Area                                            Employer         Time                        Earned
Health Policy   Tom Bunz     Research           Department of    5      Male     Caucasian   Pharm.D.         Health Economics and    Economic
                             Instructor         Health Policy,                                                Outcomes Research       analysis of
                                                Thomas                                                                                Healthcare
                                                Jefferson                                                                             Interventions
                                                University




CGS             Linda        Adjunct Faculty    Jefferson        10     Female   Caucasian   MBA              Health                  GC 620 and
                Chatterton                      College of                                                    Administration-         605
                                                Graduate                                                      Management,             Financial
                                                Studies                                                       Financing, Operations   Management
                                                                                                              For Health Care
                                                                                                              Delivery Models         Performance
                                                                                                                                      Improvement
                                                                                                                                      (Quality
                                                                                                                                      Management)

Health Policy   Albert       Assistant          Department of    15     Male     Caucasian   PhD              Sociology               Statistical
                Crawford     Professor –        Health Policy,                                                                        Methods
                             Tenure-track       Thomas                                                                                Applied
                                                Jefferson                                                                             Regression
                                                University                                                                            Models

Molecular       John Flynn   Tenured            Jefferson        10     Male     Caucasian   PhD              Research                Research
Physiology                   Professor          Medical                                                                               Ethics
And                                             College
Biophysics
Health Policy   Neil         Research           Department of    5      Male     Caucasian   completed all    Health Care             Quality
                Goldfarb     Assistant          Health Policy,                               course work      Management              Measurement
                             Professor of       Thomas                                       toward PhD                               and Outcomes
                             Health Policy,     Jefferson                                    in health care                           Analysis in
                             Jefferson          University                                   management                               Health Care
                             Medical College                                                 (“ABD”)
Public Health   Myra         Adjunct faculty-   Health Policy    5      Female   Caucasian   PhD              Biophysics              Intro to Env
                Karstadt     non-tenure         Consultant                                                    Law                     Health



                                                                      212
Department/     Name          Title/Academic    Title &           FTE    Gender   Race or     Highest    Discipline               Teaching
Specialty                     Rank              Current           or %            Ethnicity   Degree                              Areas
Area                                            Employer          Time                        Earned
Health Policy   Kathryn       Associate         Department of     5      Female   Caucasian   PhD        Behavioral health,       Health Services
                Kash          Professor – Non   Health Policy,                                           Public Health Services   Research
                              Tenure            Thomas                                                   Research
                                                Jefferson
                                                University
CGS             Frank Leone   Professor         University of     5      Male     Caucasian   MD, MS     Tobacco Control          Database
                                                Pennsylvania                                  (epi)      Research                 Design and
                                                                                                                                  Management
Health Policy   Dan Louis     Research          Jefferson         5      Male     Caucasian   MS         Health Services          Health Policy:
                              Associate         Medical                                                  Research                 An
                              Professor of      College,                                                                          International
                              Family            Thomas                                                                            Perspective
                              Medicine and      Jefferson
                              Community         University
                              Medicine
Health Policy   Laura T.      Research          Department of     5      Female   Caucasian   Pharm,D,   Pharmacy                 Economic
                Pizzi         Associate         Health Policy,                                MPH        Epidemiology/            Analysis of
                              Professor, non-   Thomas                                                   Quantitative             Health
                              tenure            Jefferson                                                Healthcare Methods       Interventions
                                                University                                               Track
Health Policy   Diane         Research          Department of     10     Female   Caucasian   PhD        Biostatistics            Statistical
                Richardson    Instructor        Health Policy,                                                                    Methods
                                                Thomas
                                                Jefferson
                                                University
CGS             Jessica       Lecturer,         Philadelphia      5      Female   Caucasian   PhD        Epidemiology Public      Principles of
                Robbins       Adjunct           Department of                                            Health                   Epidemiology
                                                Public Health
CGS             Patricia      Adjunct           Independent       5      Female   Caucasian   PhD        Microbiology             Health
                Sidelsky      Member            consultant                                                                        Sciences
JMC             Bruce Smith   Professor         Thomas            5      Male     Caucasian   MD         Rheumatology             Regulatory
                                                Jefferson                                                                         Issues in
                                                University                                                                        Scientific
                                                School of                                                                         Research
                                                Medicine –
                                                Director of IRB



                                                                       213
Department/   Name        Title/Academic   Title &         FTE    Gender   Race or     Highest    Discipline            Teaching
Specialty                 Rank             Current         or %            Ethnicity   Degree                           Areas
Area                                       Employer        Time                        Earned
CGS           Vic Spain   Adjunct          Philadelphia    5      Male     Caucasian   DVM, PhD   Epidemiology/Public   Principles of
                          Member           Department of                                          Health                Epidemiology
                                           Public Health
CGS           David       Adjunct          Fox Chase       5      Male     Caucasian   MD, M.S    Gastro-Enterology     Clinical
              Weinberg    Member           Cancer Center                                                                Epidemiology
CGS           David       Adjunct          Self-Employed   5      Male     Caucasian   PhD        Communications        Scientific
              Woods       Member                                                                                        Writing




                                                               214
4.1c   Faculty Complements Integrative Perspectives From The Field of Practice.

TJU’s MPH program has significantly increased the professional diversity of its primary and
secondary faculty representing a wide range of health-related disciplines. This is exemplified in
the types of graduate degrees, disciplines, teaching areas and areas of research interest that are
depicted in Templates F and G and as well in criterion cited previously addressing instruction,
research, and service.

The MPH Program Director along with the MPH Core Faculty and the MPH Curriculum
Committee review the needs for MPH faculty on an ongoing basis. As part of the TJU Inter-
Professional Education system initiative (Dr. Simmons sits on the initiative’s steering
committee), the MPH program seeks out existing Jefferson faculty in all three of its colleges who
could potentially teach in the MPH program. As a result of such communication across the
system, two new courses planned for the 08-09 academic year, Cultural Humility and
Competence for Health Care and Population Health Workers, and Introduction to Global Health
include faculty from the College of Health Professions and the College of Medicine in
partnership with existing MPH Core Faculty.

In addition to current TJU faculty, the MPH program regularly seeks out potential adjunct
faculty to teach public health courses through its constant contact with public health
practitioners. Communication with our MPH Community Advisory Board (CAB) is a formal
channel of communication for potential future adjunct MPH faculty. Examples of course areas
currently using adjunct faculty, in addition to TJU faculty include Epidemiology (City of
Philadelphia Department of Public Health), Biostatistics, and Environmental Health. A new
course in Health Communications will be offered in January 2009 in Delaware in collaboration
with the University of Delaware. A proposed course in Public Health Informatics using expert
practitioners as adjunct faculty is being considered in the future.

In addition, many faculty use guest lecturers to supplement their course work and look to those
out in the field to participate in the program. Depending on the amount of time they spend in the
classroom, they may be considered guest or voluntary faculty.

4.1d   Outcome Measures.

The MPH Core Faculty along with the MPH Program, Curriculum and Accreditation and
Program Evaluation Committees have developed the MPH Program goals and objectives.
Objectives for the faculty include:

Instruction

   •   90% of students and alumni completing the MPH will report satisfaction with the overall
       education/instruction received in TJU’s MPH program.

This objective is currently assessed via student and alumni surveys that were conducted by the
MPH program. When asked about overall satisfaction of the education/instruction, 91 % of our




                                             215
students and 95% of our alumni reported satisfaction with the instruction in the MPH program.
Copies of the student and alumni surveys are found in Appendix A.

We have recently initiated a formal exit interview process for our graduating students with their
faculty advisors. That interview includes information about student assessment of our
instruction. We will also be revising individual course evaluations to obtain more specific
instructional information and will be reporting on that information in the future.

Research

   •   80% of MPH faculty will participate in public health research or evaluation initiatives

This objective is assessed via a faculty survey administered in 2008 and is reported in Criterion
3.1. Overall, the MPH primary and secondary faculty have exceeded this objective with
extensive research and evaluation projects. Over the past three years, 89% of our faculty have
conducted public health research or evaluation initiatives. One of the future goals in this area is
to more actively involve our MPH students in research and evaluation projects of our faculty.

Service

   •   90% of MPH faculty will provide consultative or direct community service to
       international, national, state, and/or local community or professional health organizations

This objective is assessed via a faculty survey administered in 2008 and is reported in Criterion
3.2. MPH faculty participate in an extensive amount of community service with a significant
number of local, regional, and national organizations. As cited in Table 1.2c, over the past three
years, 89% of our faculty have provided consultative or direct service at an international,
national, state and/or local level.

Of the faculty listed in Templates F and G, 93% (26 of 28) have doctoral credentials in their
disciplines (DrPH, MD, PhD, EdD) and all have prior university teaching experience. Some
have multiple degrees that give them special expertise particularly advantageous to a young and
expanding program such as ours. As a relatively new program we are incorporating new faculty
into the program and will work hard to create an atmosphere of collegiality to encourage sharing
and mentoring among all faculty.

In addition to the overall program objectives addressing faculty listed above, TJU’s MPH
program strives for MPH faculty to represent diverse disciplinary and practice diversity.
Through the expansion of our program’s core and secondary faculty and with input from
departments within TJU, our MPH Community Advisory Board members, and from the public
health community at large, we look forward to expanding our professional diversity in the future.

4.1e   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

Overall TJU faculty are highly qualified to teach in an MPH program to support the program’s
mission, goals and objectives. Areas of need for the future include the expansion of the number



                                              216
of our primary and secondary faculty who possess a professional degree in public health and
increasing the racial and ethnic diversity of our faculty. As we increase our resources and see
new opportunities for faculty, the MPH program will seek out faculty with additional public
health training and faculty with greater racial and ethnic diversity.




                                             217
Criterion 4.2 Faculty Policies

The program shall have well-defined policies and procedures to recruit, appoint and
promote qualified faculty, to evaluate competence and performance of faculty, and to
support the professional development and advancement of faculty.

4.2a   Faculty Rules and Regulations

MPH faculty have their primary faculty appointments in the Jefferson Medical College or
Jefferson College of Health Professions and are subject to the selection and advancement
procedures of their specific departments and colleges. The JCGS is involved only in an advisory
capacity with respect to faculty advancement. A complete faculty handbook that outlines faculty
rules and regulations Faculty recruitment, appointment, funding, development, and evaluation
procedures for the JMC can be found at www.jefferson.edu/jmc/faculty. Formal establishment
of academic standards and policies by the Jefferson College of Graduate Studies is set via the
bylaws of the College. Ad hoc committees for study of College bylaw changes are appointed by
the Dean. Changes to the bylaws must be approved by a one-third vote of the College’s Graduate
Faculty.

Recruitment for MPH primary and secondary faculty is coordinated by the MPH Program
Director with assistance from the MPH Program Coordinator and the MPH primary faculty,
particularly Dr. Sarfaty, the Chair of the MPH Curriculum Committee. To date, formal
recruitment for full-time faculty positions are coordinated via the specific departments in the
JMC . Through ongoing communication with key departments such as the Department of
Family and Community Medicine and the Department of Health Policy within the College of
Medicine, and the Schools of Nursing and Health Professions within the College of Health
Professions, Department chairs and other key administrators and faculty are aware of the
interests for future instruction opportunities in the MPH program for new faculty they select to
hire. Such faculty are often referred to the MPH program as part of their overall orientation after
hire and informal discussion of research, instruction and community service interests are
subsequently discussed with the MPH Program Director and MPH primary faculty. In addition
to internal TJU recruitment, potential adjunct faculty are sought to fill specific instructional
needs and regular communication with the MPH CAB members and with public and private
community health organizations, such as the City of Philadelphia Public Health Department are
vehicles for communication of the need for adjunct faculty. An example is the fulfillment of an
additional adjunct faculty position in Epidemiology due to a job change of a faculty member
from the Philadelphia Department. of Public Health. He recommended two other professional
Epidemiologists from that Dept. They were subsequently interviewed and one was hired to teach
a session of one of our Epidemiology courses.

Decisions to address MPH faculty needs are made by the MPH Program Committee upon
recommendation by the MPH Curriculum Committee. Upon approval, the MPH Program
Director submits a formal request for a specific faculty member (both TJU existing faculty and
non-TJU adjunct faculty) to teach a specific course to the Jefferson College of Graduate Studies
Faculty Affairs Committee. Upon review and approval, the Faculty Committee’s
recommendation goes to the JGGS Graduate Council for review and approval. Approved
faculty become Graduate College Members or Adjunct Faculty.


                                             218
4.2b   Provisions for Faculty Development

In addition to the professional development opportunities set by each College and Department,
professional development of MPH faculty is accomplished through the invitation of all faculty to
public health continuing education symposia and forums coordinated by the MPH program and
throughout TJU. Faculty receive regular communication via a faculty email list and other
internal/external announcements of such events.

Most members of the JCGS Graduate Faculty are also members of either Jefferson Medical
College or the Jefferson College of Health Professions and faculty development programs are
publicized through electronic kiosks and posters displayed in prominent locations and by e-mail
distributions that all faculty receive.

Faculty development programs available through the JMC and appropriate to the MPH faculty
are divided into four main content areas: Educational Skills Enhancement, Technical Skills
Enhancement, Research Skills Enhancement and Professional Skills Enhancement. The JMC
faculty website at www.jefferson.edu/jmc/faculty provides details about faculty development
activities. Sabbatical leave with financial support from the department as a rule is limited to
faculty members having at least 6 years continuous full time service and who have attained the
rank of Associate Professor.

In addition, the JCHP's Center for Faculty Development (CFD), established in 1994, offers a
wide variety of activities and services designed to enhance the academic environment within
higher education. The mission of the Center for Faculty Development is to provide leadership
and support for a community of emerging and established scholars while fostering an academic
environment conducive to teaching, learning and scholarship. New faculty orientation, forums,
seminars and workshops constitute regular programming activities of the Center. Individual
services include the Center Associates, classroom videotaping, individual consultation, peer
observation and mentoring, syllabus/test preparation and review, and preparation of teaching
evaluation forms. All information for faculty development through the College of Health
Professions is available at www.jefferson.edu/jchp/facdev/index.cfm.

The Center also provides consultation and expertise in curriculum development and evaluation as
well as student outcomes assessment. In support of faculty development in all areas-teaching
and learning, curriculum development and evaluation, student outcomes assessment, research
and scholarship, and application of technology-the Center maintains a library of books and
journals for faculty use and reference.

While the Center for Faculty Development is organizationally located within the Jefferson
College of Health Professions, its programs, services and publications are available free to the
University community, and include a Faculty Development Day - an annual day-long event at
the end of the spring semester addresses teaching/learning related topics, including curricular
design and evaluation, and student outcomes assessment; a Faculty Research Day devoted to
aspects of research planning, funding, methodology and implementation that provides
opportunities for faculty to share research through poster presentations; and a New Faculty




                                             219
Orientation that introduces faculty to new roles as teacher, scholar, advisor, mentor and member
of the Jefferson community.

Lastly, there are numerous additional opportunities for the MPH faculty to partake in
professional development, not specific to Thomas Jefferson University. These include programs
at the APHA and Pennsylvania Public Health Association meetings, professional meetings by the
Public Health Section of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, as well as other local and
regional conferences, such as those held during National Public Health Week.
These faculty development programs are designed primarily for faculty with regular, full-time
appointments. Faculty with other than regular, full-time appointments are included mostly
through the once-yearly Affiliations Day activities. The day before Affiliations Day, the faculty
development activities take place. These are advertised through the offices of the affiliate
medical directors.

For the first time, the MPH program budget for 2008-2009 will have a faculty professional
development stipend to help support expenses for MPH Core Faculty professional development
activities such as participation in public health national, regional, and local events. Previously,
such expenses had to be covered exclusively by individual faculty through out-of-pocket
expenses or those covered in a received grant. It is incorporated into the non-salary operations in
the proposed budget for 2008-2009 (see Template A, Table 1.6b).

4.2c   Procedures for Faculty Evaluation

Evaluation of faculty teaching in the MPH program, not their faculty appointment in their
respective college, is conducted by the program itself. Student evaluations of MPH courses are
reviewed by the Program Director and the Chair of the MPH Curriculum Committee and
discussions take place between them and individual faculty members regarding course
assessment and improvement. This process follows the individual course review process that
occurs via the MPH Curriculum Committee (see below).

4.2d   Student Course Evaluations and Evaluation of Teaching Effectiveness

Student evaluation of courses is assessed by the MPH Program Director and the MPH
Curriculum Committee Chair on an ongoing basis. In addition, the MPH Program Director and
the MPH Curriculum Committee Chair observe classes and meet with MPH faculty on an annual
basis to review their performance and discuss faculty instruction, research and service activities
involving MPH students. A new process of faculty self-assessment of their courses was
implemented by the MPH Program via the MPH Curriculum Committee with such assessment
using a brief content mapping format that will help lead discussion of our specific MPH courses.
The assessment will ask the faculty to complete information on their goals for the MPH courses
they teach, the content of each of the course sessions, the core public health competencies each
session addresses and the methods of evaluation. Information from such course self-assessment
will be used in faculty discussion of MPH courses with the MPH Curriculum Committee on an
annual basis.




                                             220
4.2e   Emphasis Given to Community Service Activities of Faculty

Community service experience is assessed via the faculty survey that is described in Criterion
3.2 MPH faculty are encouraged to actively participate in public health-related community
service and to involve MPH students in such service as much as possible. As stated earlier,
decisions on promotion and tenure within the university are determined by the faculty member’s
primary department and not the MPH program. MPH faculty are invited to meet with the CAB
at their semi-annual meetings and discussions about community service activities are discussed
at those meetings.

4.2f   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met. General faculty policies and procedures exist through the primary faculty
appointments in the Jefferson Medical College and College of Health Professions. The MPH
program is developing new procedures to evaluate faculty performance in teaching, research and
community service. Such procedures under consideration include tailoring student course
evaluations and an enhanced evaluation mechanism to actively involve faculty members in the
faculty and course evaluation process.




                                            221
Criterion 4.3 Faculty and Staff Diversity

The program shall recruit, retain and promote a diverse faculty and staff, and shall offer
equitable opportunities to qualified individuals regardless of age, gender, race, disability,
sexual orientation, religion or national origin.

4.3a   Summary Demographic Data of Faculty

Demographic data of core and secondary faculty in the MPH program is summarized in
Template H. For MPH Core Faculty, 57% are males and 43% are females. Fourteen percent (1
of 7) are Asian/Pacific Islander with the other six Caucasian. Of the Core Faculty, three of the
seven (43%) have extensive international experience and two are fluent in languages other than
English (Spanish and Italian). Overall, MPH faculty is 40 % female and 93 % Caucasian.
Clearly, our goal is to expand the racial/ethnic diversity of faculty teaching in the MPH program.
We will be expanding our marketing and recruitment efforts for MPH faculty both within TJU
and as adjunct faculty from the community as we focus on increasing the diversity of MPH
faculty, particularly in the recruitment of faculty from diverse ethnic backgrounds.
Communication with MPH Community Advisory Board members will hopefully increase the
likelihood of diversity of the MPH faculty in the future. In 2008-2009, we will be adding Dr.
Hector Lopez from Jefferson Medical College to our secondary faculty as Dr. Lopez will be
teaching a new Introduction to Global Health course. We will also be adding Dr Suet Lim from
the Philadelphia Department of Public Health to reach an Epidemiology Course.




                                             222
Template H (4.3.a.) Summary Demographic Data - Faculty
Table 4.3.a. Summary Demographic Data - Faculty
                           Core Faculty      Other Faculty   Total
                           #       %         #         %     #       %
#% Male                    4       57        14        61    18      60
#% African American        0       0         0         0     0       0
Male
#% Caucasian Male          3       43        14        100   17      94
#% Hispanic/Latino Male    0       0         0         0     0       0
#% Asian/Pacific Islander 0        0         0         0     0       0
Male
#% Native                  0       0         0         0     0       0
American/Alaska Native
Male
#% Unknown/Other Male 0            0         0         0     0       0
#% International Male      1       14        0         0     1       6

#% Female                   3     43          9       39     12      40
#% African American         0     0           0       0      0       0
Female
#% Caucasian Female         2     29          8       89     10      83
#% Hispanic/Latino          0     0           0       0      0       0
Female
#% Asian/Pacific Islander   1     14          1       11     2       17
Female
#% Native                   0     0           0       0      0       0
American/Alaska Native
Female
#% Unknown/Other            0     0           0       0      0       0
Female
#% International Female     0     0           0       0      0       0

Total                       7     100         23      100    30      100




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4.3b    Summary Demographic Data of Staff

Demographic data of the one full-time staff, the Program Coordinator in the MPH program is
summarized in Template I. The MPH Program Director is also a member of the MPH Core
Faculty and has been accounted for in the data on the faculty.

Template I (4.3.b.) Summary Demographic Data – Staff
Table 4.3.b. Summary Demographic Data - Staff
                                 Full Time Staff                     Total
                                 #            %                      #                %
#% Male
#% African American Male
#% Caucasian Male
#% Hispanic/Latino Male
#% Asian/Pacific Islander Male
#% Native American/Alaska
Native Male
#% Unknown/Other Male
#% International Male

#% Female                               1             100            1                100
#% African American Female
#% Caucasian Female                     1             100            1                100
#% Hispanic/Latino Female
#% Asian/Pacific Islander Female
#% Native American/Alaska
Native Female
#% Unknown/Other Female
#% International Female

Total                                   1             100            1                100


4.3c    Program Commitment to Equal Opportunities

Thomas Jefferson University is committed to providing equal educational and employment
opportunities for all persons, without regard to race; color, national and ethnic origin, religion,
sex, sexual orientation, age, disability or veteran’s status. Thomas Jefferson University complies
with all relevant local ordinances and state and federal statutes in the administration of its
educational and employment policies and is an Affirmative Action Employer. Inquiries may be
directed to the Manager of Employee Relations or to the University’s Affirmative Action Officer
at 238 Martin building, (215) 503-7758.

The MPH Program follows TJU policies addressing equitable opportunities and strongly
supports such policies as an important requirement for a MPH program. To date, some progress
towards increased diversity in the faculty has been made, but there is keen recognition of the


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need to seek out a more ethnically diverse faculty. For 2008-2009, at least three new courses,
GIS Mapping, Cultural Humility and Competence, Introduction to Global Health and one
existing course, Fundamentals of Epidemilogy, will be taught by an ethnically diverse faculty.

4.3d   Recruitment and Retention Efforts to Enhance Diversity

The University at large, along with the MPH program is exploring strategies to address the lack
of diversity among the teaching faculty. Special recruitment and marketing of faculty
opportunities are publicized in a variety of diverse professional publications and with diverse
professional organizations such as the National Medical Association and the National Hispanic
Medical Association. The MPH program has directly sought out ethnically diverse faculty for
consideration to teach in the MPH program and to potential adjunct faculty through its
Community Advisory Board and its community contacts such as organizations that serve as
community preceptors for our students. Assessment of such efforts will be based on the referrals
to our program of ethnically diverse internal and external potential faculty members.

4.3e   Efforts to Establish and Maintain An Environment That Supports Diversity

In addition to the efforts mentioned above, MPH professional development activities support
presentations made by a diverse group of public health professionals. Examples of such
diversity are described in Criterion 3.3 on workforce development. MPH courses, clerkship and
capstone activities emphasize diverse cultures and populations in the public health topics
addressed and in the community experiences provided for our students.

4.3f   Outcome Measures of Diverse Faculty and Staff

Given the small number of MPH faculty and staff, the MPH program does not currently have
specific numeric measurements as objectives of the diversity of its faculty and staff. The
diversity of MPH Core Faculty has increased since the previous self-study and ongoing efforts
are being taken to recruit additional primary and secondary faculty from ethnically diverse
backgrounds.

4.3g   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is partially met. Progress has been made since the previous self-study to increase
faculty diversity. Yet, additional marketing and recruiting efforts are needed to expand our
diversity to better reflect the diversity of our students and the populations we serve.




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Criterion 4.4 Student Recruitment and Admissions

The program shall have student recruitment and admissions policies and procedures
designed to locate and select qualified individuals capable of taking advantage of the
program's various learning activities which will enable each of them to develop competence
for a career in public health.

4.4a   Description of the program's recruitment policies and procedures

The Program seeks to recruit individuals who are academically well prepared, and committed to
improving the health and well being of the public. The goal is to attract an applicant pool that
includes those with prior training in the health field and individuals from select undergraduate
majors.

The recruitment of graduate students is a joint effort of the JCGS and the faculty of the
individual degree programs. Printed material describing the programs (Graduate College
Catalogs, brochures, posters and flyers), as well as participation in graduate recruitment fairs are
the primary responsibility of the Graduate Admissions Office. The director of admissions and
recruitment coordinates overall recruitment activities for the JCGS. Faculty members from
various departments strengthen recruitment efforts by attending area fairs and hosting continuing
education programs. The JCGS Admissions Office recruits at 15-20 organized college fairs each
year including programs like Idealist.org graduate fairs and arranges small group class
presentation at colleges and universities through faculty contacts or career service offices.
Minority recruitment efforts include visits to HBCU-Xavier, Morehouse, and Spellman
Universities, Fattah Conference on Higher Education, McNair Scholars Graduate School as well
as meetings at local universities in the greater Philadelphia region such as Cheney and Lincoln
Universities.

Student recruitment into the MPH program is coordinated by the MPH Program Director and
Program Coordinator in association with the JCGS Director of Admissions (who sits on the MPH
Program Committee), the core MPH faculty, and the various committees of the program.

Current students contribute greatly to recruitment initiatives either through their organizational
affiliations, i.e., Graduate Student Association (GSA), Jefferson African-American Student
Society (JAASS), and the Student Association of Public Health Education (SAPHE) - or serve as
hosts for student visits, assist at Open House programs, and serve as tour guides for visitors to
the University.

Prospective students are able to access information regarding the MPH program via the
University and MPH-specific website (www.jefferson.edu/mph). Students are able to download
MPH information materials and TJU application forms or apply on-line.

Through advertisements in various sources, interested parties are able to access information on
TJU’s MPH program. A Jefferson College of Graduate Studies informational booklet is
distributed to academic institutions and to all prospective applicants. General information
regarding the MPH is contained in the MPH program brochure. (See Appendix F)



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As part of our on-going initiatives, Jefferson College of Graduate Studies faculty members and
administration visit a number of undergraduate colleges and universities. In addition, some
faculty members attend area graduate recruitment fairs and meet with prospective applicants at
various seminars and conferences throughout the year. JCGS admissions staff in conjunction
with departmental faculty host quarterly information sessions about graduate programs including
the MPH. In addition, the MPH Program Director, Program Coordinator, Core Faculty, and the
Co-Chairs of the MPH Program Committee meet with prospective students throughout the year
in formal and informal settings. Over the past year, a number of informational sessions on the
MPH program have occurred at Widener University School of Law for the joint degree JD/MPH
and MJ/MPH programs and at Jefferson Medical College events reaching prospective and 1st,
2nd, and 3rd year Jefferson medical students to discuss the new joint MD/MPH degree program
beginning in fall of 2008.

Graduate recruitment fairs provide excellent opportunities for interaction with undergraduate
students. JCGS administrators, faculty and students attend the "grad fairs." While on the various
undergraduate campuses, representatives often meet with faculty and academic advisors.

Internal recruitment for the MPH program within TJU is ongoing by the MPH Program Director,
Program Coordinator, faculty, the CAB Co-Chairs and TJU members on the CAB, and MPH
committee representatives from other TJU Colleges, Schools, and Departments. The MPH
program is increasingly recognized within TJU as evidenced by the number of internal
interdisciplinary committees that has representation from MPH program faculty. The initiation
of the MD/MPH joint degree program this coming fall has afforded the program an expanded
audience within administrators, faculty and students in the JMC.
The Outcomes Research Fellowship offered by the Department of Health Policy in the JMC
provides an opportunity for health policy fellows with an interest in public health to obtain an
MPH and an additional opportunity for program recruitment. The recently received three-year
Department of Family and Community Medicine Academic Administrative Unit (AAU) grant
will provide training opportunities for residents to obtain a MPH degree and serves as a
recruitment vehicle for future Family and Community Health residents.

The 15 credit public health certificate program is also an attractive entry point for some students
who are not sure they want to pursue a MPH or may not meet the requirements for entry into the
program directly from undergraduate education.

4.4b   Statement about admissions policies and procedures

The JCGS Admissions Office directs the admissions policies and procedures for admissions into
all doctoral and masters level programs with the College. Criteria for admission to the JCGS
masters programs are available at: http://www.jefferson.edu/jcgs/admissions/tests/apply_ms.cfm.
Online applications are available at: http://www.jefferson.edu/jcgs/admissions/apponline.cfm.
A completed application to the MPH program includes the following materials:

   •   Completed application form and $50 non-refundable fee
   •   Personal statement highlighting the applicant’s professional objectives and areas of
       interest regarding public health study, research, and career goals.



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   •   Official academic transcripts (two copies each) of all undergraduate and graduate course
       work.
   •   Three letters of recommendation, preferably from individual faculty members or pre-
       professional committee. Letters from professional contacts may be submitted in addition
       to, not in lieu of, letters from faculty members. Letters should be from individuals able to
       assess the applicant's scientific, academic, or other potential in relation to graduate
       program requirements.
   •   Official GRE or other professional test scores (LSAT, MCAT, USMLE).

Qualified applicants to the MPH program include:

   •   Graduates of baccalaureate programs, particularly those in the sciences, nursing and other
       health professions, engineering, business, and the social sciences
   •   Master’s degree candidates or degree holders who also wish to acquire a public health
       degree
   •   Graduates of doctoral level professional programs (i.e., medicine, dentistry, nursing,
       education, pharmacy, and law) who wish to expand/enhance their expertise to include
       public health.

Each applicant to the JCGS is reviewed based on the whole application they submit. A qualified
applicant displays strong academic skills, an interest in or personal history with public health,
and a testimony to their strengths and abilities to pursue master’s studies. Entrance requirements
for TJU and specifically the MPH program have been described in Criterion 1. Grade and test
score requirements are considered flexible such that applicants who do not have a minimum 3.0
GPA or a minimum of 1100 on the GRE exam may be considered based on other aspects of their
application including community (work and volunteer) experience and their motivation to excel
in graduate study in public health.

Applicants to the MPH program are reviewed by the JCGS Admissions Office to verify
completeness of the application. Completed applications are reviewed by the Associate Dean for
Masters Degree and Certificate Programs and forwarded to the MPH Program Office. The MPH
Program Coordinator then arranges interview dates and times with two of the seven MPH Core
Faculty. Each conducts an in-person or telephone interview (those greater than two hours
driving time from Philadelphia are given the option of a telephone interview) and completes a
standard interview form of acceptance or non-acceptance that is forwarded to the MPH Program
Office. Each interviewer completes a standard form which may include additional written
feedback. In the case of agreement between the two faculty interviewers, the Program
Coordinator submits the results of the interview to the JCGS Admissions Office who generates
an appropriate response to the applicant. In the case of a disagreement between the two
interviewers, the applicant file is reviewed by the MPH Program Director who may choose to
have the two faculty members communicate directly with each other about the applicant to gain
consensus or have a third faculty member interview the applicant.

For those applicants who are accepted, an official acceptance letter is sent by the College
Admissions Office. In addition, the MPH program sends a personalized letter to each accepted
applicant asking the applicant to communicate back to the MPH program his/her acceptance



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within three weeks. Positive responses result in establishing a student file, the assignment of a
faculty advisor, and the mailing of a welcome packet to the future student.

A student whose academic record does not qualify him/her for regular admission may be
approved under “special student” status. Provisions of acceptance, goals and expectations of
accomplishment are specified at time of acceptance. Such students are carefully monitored by
the MPH program office and their faculty advisor. After two terms, the student’s academic
records are reviewed to determine whether regular matriculation status should be accorded based
on the student’s GPA.

Applicants who are not initially accepted in the MPH program either under regular or special
student status may be encouraged to pursue the 15 credit public health certificate. If the student
does well in the certificate program, s/he may re-apply to the MPH program and if accepted,
credits earned in the certificate program are applied to the MPH program.
Applications for admission are kept on file for three academic years. Candidates who wish to
reapply must do so in writing and must provide pertinent documentation to update the
application. There is a reapplication fee of $30.

4.4c   Examples of Recruitment Materials and Other Publications

Student recruitment efforts include the MPH Program website (www.jefferson.edu/mph), the
College of Graduate Studies website (www.jefferson.edu/jcgs), the MPH table top exhibit that
was developed for the 2007 American Public Health Association annual meeting, a feature
article in the fall 2007 JCGS Discoveries magazine (Appendix K), the MPH program brochure,
the JD/MPH and MJ/MPH joint degree brochure, the MD/MPH joint degree fact sheet, the MPH
newsletter, a public health core functions magnet, and a MPH program hand sanitizer. The MPH
program faculty and staff coordinate a number of educational symposia and lectures in the
greater Philadelphia region on behalf of public health and the MPH program which also serve as
recruiting vehicles.

Course listings, including prerequisite courses for the MPH program by term are available on the
College of Graduate Studies website (www.jefferson.edu/jcgs), which also contain the academic
calendar and policies of the College. A printed web page depicting the degree requirements is
located in Appendix L.

The Public Health Link is the program’s own newsletter which is sent out electronically to
students, faculty, various departments within the College of Graduate Studies and the
Department of Health Policy, as well as to our external contacts such as our Community
Advisory Board and Adjunct Faculty.

Paid and unpaid advertisements for the MPH program have been used over the past two years.
One of the most successful web-based sources of inquiries for the College of Graduate Studies
and its various graduate programs is Google Ads which drive potential applicants to the JCGS
website and the MPH website.




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Additionally, advertisement about the MPH program has been included as an insert in the
Department of Health Policy newsletter on several occasions over the past three years when
space has been available. This publication is has a mailing list of over 40,000 health
professionals.

The program is represented at the exhibits of a number of national and regional meetings,
including the American Public Health Association (APHA) and the Pennsylvania Public Health
Association. At the APHA annual meeting, the TJU MPH program has provided an information
and recruiting booth since 2005. For the 2007 APHA annual meeting, the MPH exhibit was
greatly enhanced with photos and additional materials to better reflect the graduate education
opportunities of the program.

Along with the Admissions Office, the MPH program is currently assessing which colleges and
universities in the tri-state area have baccalaureate programs related to Public Health and similar
fields in order to directly market to those schools and program coordinators.
Over the past year, the MPH Program Director and the Chair of the MPH Curriculum Committee
have made several personal visits and presentations at Widener University’ Health Care Law
program to talk about public health and law and provide information on the joint JD/MPH and
MJ/MPH program with Widener.

The MPH program and the Office of International Exchange Services is currently working
together to extend its global and international opportunities for students. A relationship with the
Department of Public Health in India is being explored to assist current students from that
country and to develop/strengthen our ability to recruit future students. In addition, the MPH
program is communicating with health science and public health programs in other countries
such as Rwanda, Colombia, and Haiti to develop potential collaborative opportunities for
Jefferson MPH students and students in those countries for public health credit and non-credit
learning opportunities.

4.4d   Quantitative Information on Applicants, Accepted Students, and Enrollees

The MPH program has shown strong growth. Template J, provided below, shows the number of
applicants, acceptances, and enrollment into the MPH program over the past three years. The
number of applicants and accepted applicants has more than doubled since the 2005-2006 year.
It should be noted that the data for the current year of 2007-2008 is not complete since
enrollment for the summer term will not be completed until late June so it is possible, a few
additional students will be accepted for the summer term which will count in the 2007-2008
academic year.

As of April 2008, 60 students were enrolled in the MPH program, meaning that they have taken
at least on course in the past 18 months (See template J, criterion 4.4d).




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Template J (4.4.d.) Quantitative Information on Applicants, Acceptances, and Enrollments
by Specialty Area for the Last 3 Years
Table (4.4.d.) Quantitative Information on Applicants, acceptances, and Enrollments by
Program Area 2005-2008
                                         2005-2006         2006-2007             2007-2008
General     Applied                      17                27                    39
Program Accepted                         16                25                    34
            Enrolled                     60                52                    60
# Applied = number of applicants
# Accepted
# Enrolled = All active (students who have taken at least one course in the past 18 months)

4.4e   Quantitative Information on Enrolled Students

Template K is provided below on the number of enrolled students both full-time and part-time.
In 2007-2008 there were 70 students in the MPH program, 60 of whom met the criteria of fully
enrolled. Of those 60, 33 were taking the MSPH degree (all part-time students). Part-time
students who have not taken a course in the past year and who have not petitioned the JCGS for a
leave of absence are contacted by the MPH program office to obtain information about their lack
of progress, encourage them to contact their faculty advisor, and remind them of the JCGS
requirement of taking at least one course within 18 months to remain active in the program. As
the MPH program matures, it is expected that the number of full-time MPH students will
dramatically rise in the next few years.

Template K. (4.4e) Students Enrolled in each Degree Program (Area of Specialization)
Identified in Instructional Matrix for each of the last 3 years
Table 4.4e. Students Enrolled in Each Degree Program by Area of Specialization, 2005-
2008
              Academic Yr 2005-         Academic Yr 2006-       Academic Yr 2007-
              2006                      2007                    2008
              HCFT HCPT FTE             HCFT HCPT FTE           HCFT HCPT FTE

MPH                                                                 2        25       12.97
General
MSPH          0        54       13.6     0         43      13.4              33         6.7

4.4f   Outcome measures

The MPH program has shown excellent growth over the past three years, more than doubling the
number of applicants and the number of accepted students. Marketing and recruitment has
expanded with several new products and services. The program has enhanced its website and
plans future expansion of its web presence. The program is going through a transition from a
MSPH program to a MPH program with students who entered the program prior to Fall 2007
being able to choose to complete their 40 credit minimum MSPH degree or transfer to the 42
credit MPH degree. In addition, a new full-time program has been initiated beginning in Fall
2007 that allows students to complete the MPH course and Clerkship requirements in a year,


                                             231
with their Capstone to be completed in the following year. This has facilitated the development
of new joint degree programs. As we move forward, we plan to increase our numbers of full-
time students and subsequently change our mix of full-time to part-time students. Although we
have not set an outcome measure for the number of full-time students, we do project that the
program will eventually have a ratio closer to a 40/60 full-time to part-time student ratio. Table
1.2 c reported on our completion rates for our students. Since the full-time program is in its first
year, we do not have any full-time students who have graduated to date. For our part-time
students, our completion rate for the current year is 87%, thereby meeting our objective of 80%
for part-time students.

4.4g   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

The criterion is met with comment. In general, the MPH program has made significant strides in
its recruitment and admissions. As the program expands with new joint degree program
offerings, new courses, and additional faculty, we expect to attract an increasingly diverse set of
MPH students that will result in increased competence in the development of future public health
leaders.




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Criterion 4.5 Student Diversity

Stated application, admission, and degree-granting requirements and regulations shall be
applied equitably to individual applicants and students regardless of age, gender, race,
disability, sexual orientation, religion or national origin.

4.5a   Policies, Procedures and Plans to Achieve a Diverse Student Population

TJU is committed to equal opportunity for professional graduate education and markets its
programs to a wide range of diverse undergraduate and professional audiences to enhance the
diversity of its students. TJU’s Office of Diversity and Minority Affairs (ODAMA) coordinates
university initiatives to recruit and support a diverse student body and faculty at TJU. Their
website is www.jefferson.edu/odama.

As stated in Criteria 4.3 and 4.4, the TJU MPH program recognizes the need to increase our
diversity of both students and faculty. Through marketing directly to diverse undergraduate
students, we plan to expand our student diversity particularly toward African American and
Latino students.

4.5b   Recruitment Efforts

Working with the TJU ODAMA and the JCGS Admissions and Marketing Office, the MPH
program participates in marketing efforts to undergraduate programs with diverse student
populations to increase the ethnic diversity of its graduate public health students. Such efforts
include involvement in a variety of marketing initiatives to both high school and undergraduate
education programs in the greater Philadelphia region and the east coast of the U.S. to educate
students about public health and encourage students of diverse ethnic backgrounds as well as
international students to consider applying to its program. The MPH program has provided
public health and MPH program information for a variety of job and career fairs and events at
area universities. In addition, the MPH program works with the TJU Office of International
Exchange Services to support potential applicants from international countries. The MPH
Program has proposed a 60% increase in program marketing in its budget for 2008-2009 to
enhance its overall and tailored marketing activities. Recruitment efforts are measured via the
numbers of inquiries received via our website, our email address, telephone, and in-person
inquiries. How a potential applicant has heard of TJU’s MPH program is recorded. Basic
demographic data, including race/ethnicity is asked for all applicants although the applicants can
choose to not provide that information.

Entrance requirements for TJU and specifically the MPH program have been described in
Criterion 1. Grade and test score requirements are considered flexible such that applicants who
do not have a minimum 3.0 GPA or a minimum of 1100 on the GRE exam may be considered
based on other aspects of their application including community (work and volunteer) experience
and their motivation to excel in graduate study in public health. In recognition that grade point
averages and test scores do not solely reflect on a student’s ability to be successful in graduate
education, other experiential factors are taken into consideration including one’s background,
and one’s motivation and ability to overcome educationally adverse circumstances. As such,
students from diverse backgrounds who may not meet the standard entrance requirements but


                                             233
have shown indications of other abilities may be granted consideration of entrance under special
circumstances. Such students may be considered for acceptance under special circumstances
with more direct faculty mentoring during the first two terms of entrance into the MPH program.

4.5c   Quantitative Information on Demographics of Students

Demographic of the student body in the MPH program over the past three years is summarized in
Template L below. Overall, the TJU MPH program has shown excellent growth in the number
of students over the past three years. The growth has been exclusively with Caucasian and
Asian/Pacific Islander students as well as with international students. We expect to grow the
number of Asian/Pacific Islander and international students over the next several years.
The MPH program has not shown any growth in the number of African American and Latino
students over the past three years. This is very concerning and has been discussed at Program
Committee and Core Faculty meetings. It will be addressed with our CAB at our next meeting.
Our goal will be to develop a targeted marketing and recruitment plan in our region which will
include increased financial incentives in the way of student scholarships and internships to help
defray some of the costs our graduate public health training program.




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Template L (4.5c) Demographic Characteristics of the Student Body, Including Data on
Applicants and Admissions for each of the last three years
Table (4.5c) Demographic Characteristics of the Student Body from 2005-2008
                                    2005-2006              2006-2007           2007-2008
                                    M           F          M         F         M          F
                     Applied        2           1          0         2         2          0
African
                     Accepted       1           1          0         2         2          0
American
                     Enrolled       1           5          1         3         1          2
                     Applied        3           6          5         7         5          13
Caucasian            Accepted       3           6          5         7         5          11
                     Enrolled       14          23         13        18        14         22
                     Applied        0           0          0         1         1          1
Hispanic/Latino Accepted            0           0          0         1         1          0
                     Enrolled       0           0          0         1         0          0
                     Applied        1           1          3         2         2          8
Asian/
                     Accepted       1           1          2         1         2          8
Pacific Islander
                     Enrolled       4           2          2         3         2          6
Native               Applied        0           1          0         0         0          0
American/            Accepted       0           1          0         0         0          0
Alaska Native        Enrolled       0           1          0         1         0          1
                     Applied        0           1          0         2         1          2
Unknown/Other Accepted              0           1          0         2         1          1
                     Enrolled       1           2          0         3         0          4
                     Applied        0           1          1         4         1          3
International        Accepted       0           1          1         4         0          3
                     Enrolled       4           3          2         5         1          7
                     Applied        6           11         9         18        12         27
Total                Accepted       5           11         8         17        11         23
                     Enrolled       24          36         18        34        18         42
Enrolled = all active students (credits taken in last 18 months). Note: Enrolled students in a
specific year include accepted students for that year, plus non-graduated students previously
enrolled in earlier years.

4.5d   Identification of Measures of a Demographically Diverse Student Body

The MPH program does not currently have specific numeric measurements as objectives of the
diversity of its student body. Working with our Community Advisory Board, we hope to
develop a 3 year strategic plan to increase our student diversity. That plan will include
measurable objectives as we go forward.

4.5e   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is partially met. Progress has been made over the past three years to increase
diversity of the MPH student body with an increase in Asian/Pacific Islanders and international



                                             235
students. Working with our Community Advisory Board, we hope to develop a three year plan
to enhance our student diversity. Additional marketing and recruiting efforts are needed to
expand our diversity to better reflect the diversity of the populations we serve.

Ongoing efforts to recruit additional primary and secondary faculty from ethnically diverse
backgrounds as described in Criterion 4.3 will positively influence the future diversity of our
student body. Through our Community Advisory Board and development of an expanded
diverse list of preceptor organizations with projects targeting African American and Latino
populations, we plan over time, to increase our student diversity to better reflect the populations
we serve.

We recognize the challenge of increasing the diversity of students choosing to go into a public
health career. As a private university, our tuition costs are generally higher than public
universities which certainly can create financial barriers to prospective students. We will be
working to seek student funding opportunities with scholarships/internships and other support
mechanisms to increase the attractiveness of getting an MPH degree at TJU.




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Criterion 4.6 Advising and Career Counseling

There shall be a clearly explained and accessible academic advising system for students, as
well as a readily available career and placement advice.

4.6a Description of the advising and counseling services, including sample orientation
materials such as student handbooks.

Advising

The student advisor system is the primary mechanism through which the students are monitored
and advised from the beginning of their studies. An MPH faculty advisor (see Criterion 2.7) is
assigned to each student at the time of their admission. Students are encouraged to meet with
their advisor prior to their first term and coordinate their entire academic course plan to achieve
their goals. Students prepare their MPH Goals I and Goals II papers at the beginning and end of
the Introduction to Public Health Course (PH 501), outlining their course sequencing, time frame
for program completion, current employment (if applicable), reason(s) for enrolling in the
program, and career plans 3-5 years after completion of the MPH. The questions they answer
are:

   •   What is your current position?

   •   List one or more reasons you enrolled in the MPH program.

   •   What is your time frame for completing your MPH degree? What is your current course
       sequencing plan?

   •   What professional position(s) do you see yourself involved in 3-5 years after graduation?

These documents are shared with each faculty advisor. Using the TJU Banner system, the
faculty advisor tracks the academic progress of the assigned student as s/he progress in their
studies and advises the student if deemed necessary. Advisors can also access student
transcripts. Early planning of the clerkship and capstone projects is also encouraged. Based on
the alumni survey distributed earlier this year, graduates indicated that their faculty advisor "was
available whenever I needed guidance." While it is expected that faculty advisors and students
will be in contact with one another throughout the academic year, they are also encouraged to
establish a regular meeting time to ensure student questions and concerns are addressed, and to
provide feedback to the advisor and the Program on issues and/or suggestions regarding the
Program. We have initiated an exit interview with the faculty advisor prior to graduation as the
final face-to-face meeting between advisor and student. A copy of the exit interview is located in
Appendix A. Students complete a self-assessment of their public health competencies and
discuss those with their advisor along with their assessment of the MPH program and future
career plans. Core Faculty meetings are held on a regular basis and student advising are
typically part of our discussions as we strive to improve our communication with our students.

The MPH Program Coordinator manages the day-to-day operations of the program. This
essential person, under the direction of the MPH Program Director, advises the students of


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relevant announcements regarding the program, upcoming local and national events and
continuing education opportunities, meetings and conferences. She also encourages the students
to join local public health campaigns to gain field knowledge and experience of the practice of
public health. One of the most important roles of the Program Coordinator is to assist the
Clerkship Coordinator and the faculty advisor to monitor and collate clerkship opportunities.

An annual student orientation is held at the beginning of the Fall term, providing students with
information about the MPH program, its mission and goals, its policies and procedures as well as
campus surroundings, communities and social life in order to better integrate them into their new
surroundings. Students who entered in Jan., March, or June of the past year are encouraged to
participate as well as entering students in the fall. Service opportunities through SAPHE and Jeff
Health Mentors are described and primary MPH faculty are introduced to our new students.
Typically local public health practitioners are brought in to public health issues and projects.
Students are given an interactive exercise to reflect and discuss in small groups and to share with
the entire group of new students and the MPH faculty. An informal dinner session follows the
orientation session which provides an excellent venue for students to get to know each other as
well as meet one-on-one with staff and their faculty advisors.

A welcome packet is handed out to all students containing information about student services
and other social activities outside of campus. Sample orientation materials are attached in
Appendix M. A TJU student organization directory is compiled each year and distributed in the
welcome packet so that students can choose their extra-curricular activities.
The MPH brochure (see Appendix F) is the main recruitment material sent to prospective
students along with a packet and letter which describes our program and gives basic information.
Prospective applicants are referred to the MPH Program website at www.jefferson.edu/mph.
The College of Graduate Studies course catalog outlines the academic calendar, grading process,
faculty and academic offerings. This catalog can be referenced at www.jefferson.edu/jcgs.

Career Opportunities and Counseling

Faculty often receive notifications of employment opportunities, internships and fellowships
both locally and outside the region, which are typically shared by the MPH Program Director,
MPH Program Coordinator, and core MPH faculty for distribution via the Jefferson Pulse
intranet site and via direct e-mail to students. The faculty’s connections throughout the
community and region are also conduits to possible future employment and internship
opportunities, or may result in contacts for additional career advice and consultation. The
student’s Clerkship and Capstone preceptor organizations, while not necessarily entrées into a
position following graduation, often provide a network for the student, which can be utilized to
locate future employment opportunities.

The MPH Community Advisory Board (CAB) consists of expert professionals from a wide range
of public health and health service disciplines (see Appendix B). Members are local leaders in a
variety of public and private health settings. Students are encouraged to develop professional
relationships as career mentors with the members of the CAB in order to gain understanding of
the mechanism by which public health is maintained, improved and delivered. The CAB meets
on a semi-annual basis.



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Future career counseling efforts are being considered, including working with MPH alumni to
create opportunities for students to meet local graduates who are working in the public health
field. In addition to the University’s career center’s offerings, the MPH Program is also planning
to provide career information specific to public health to MPH students through formal and
informal forums about public health career opportunities, including inviting public health
practitioners from different disciplines and organizations to participate in such informational
sessions along with MPH faculty.

4.6b Description of the procedures by which students may communicate their concerns
to program officials, including information about how these procedures are publicized and
about the aggregate number of complaints submitted for each of the last three years.

The MPH Program has a newly-formed Student Affairs Committee with a mission to provide an
opportunity for student input to enhance the quality of Jefferson’s MPH program based upon:
Partnerships between students, faculty, and MPH program administration

   •   A communication vehicle to formulate student recommendations for program
       improvement

   •   Advocacy for student rights and responsibilities

   •   The Committee, which is made up of at least an equal number of students and faculty and
       staff, may address any issue related to the MPH program that impacts on students. Those
       issues may include, but not limited to:

   •   MPH Program, College of Graduate Studies or University-wide policies

   •   Any aspect of the MPH program including curriculum, clerkship and capstone
       experiences, program website, use of Pulse, student communication, academic
       counseling, faculty, research opportunities, career support services, student advising,
       public health events, student awards, public health scholarships, among others

   •   Any College of Graduate Studies policy or procedure affecting students such as support
       services, course registration, classrooms, discipline policies, remediation policies, among
       others

   •   Any University policy or procedure affecting students such as financial aid, student life
       issues, among others

   •   Relationship with the SAPHE, the Public Health student association

In addition to the Student Affairs Committee, MPH program staff and faculty are always open to
meet with students to address questions or concerns about the program.




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Over the past three years, there have been no formal student grievances submitted to the College
of Graduate Studies regarding the MSPH/MPH program.

4.6c   Information about student satisfaction with advising and counseling services.

In February, 2008, a survey designed to obtain information about student satisfaction in a
number of areas was sent to all graduates of the program. Multiple attempts were made to
collect alumni responses. To date, nineteen responses were received from the program’s 27
graduates.

One question asked was "How satisfied were you with career support from the program?"
Graduates responded by selecting from four choices: 'Very Satisfied,' 'Satisfied, ' Dissatisfied,'
'Very Dissatisfied.' The median response was 'Satisfied' and only one student indicated
dissatisfaction. The graduates were also asked "How satisfied were you with the interaction you
had with your faculty advisor?" They responded on the same four-descriptor scale and the
median response was 'Very Satisfied' while two students did indicate levels of dissatisfaction.
On the same scale the graduates median responses was 'Very Satisfied' when asked "How
satisfied were you with your thesis/capstone advisor?" Again, one student did indicate a level of
dissatisfaction.

On a five-descriptor scale from 'Absolutely' to 'Not at all,' the median response of the graduates
was 'Absolutely' or 'Very much so' to all of the following questions:

   •   My thesis/capstone advisor was a real advocate
   •   My thesis/capstone advisor well-organized.
   •   My thesis/capstone advisor was professional.
   •   My thesis/capstone advisor understanding.
   •   My thesis/capstone advisor helped me to be successful.
   •   The Jefferson Public Health Program helped me advance in my career.

(See Appendix A for Alumni and Current Student Survey data results)

4.6d   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met with commentary. Advising and career counseling for students is being
enhanced over time as the program expands faculty and staff resources and changes from
exclusively part-time to a mixture of full- and part-time students. It is expected that advising and
career counseling for the full-time students may take on greater importance than it has been to
the part-time students, most of who are already working in a health-related career. With the
addition of a Students Affairs Committee, having students represented on all MPH committees
and an expansion of the student-run, SAPHE organization, it is expected that students will have
an increasing role in the MPH program and that student advising and career counseling will
continue to be enhanced in the future.




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