Overview by 3UhYGM

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									Funding Opportunity
                                                                      




 RFA# HAA-0718-08




HIV
PREVENTION
and Care Interventions
DEADLINE: Monday, August 18, 2008       Late Applications will not be accepted




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Important Information:
Letter of Intent due date:
            Thursday, July 31, 2008

Pre-application Conferences:
            Monday, July 21, 2008

                   And

            Thursday, July 24, 2008



Location:   Government of the District of Columbia

            HIV/AIDS Administration

            64 New York Avenue, NE

            5th Floor Conference Room

            Washington, DC 20002




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TABLE OF CONTENTS
OVERVIEW ................................................................................................................................................. 1
       Purpose .................................................................................................................................................. 1
       Available Funding .................................................................................................................................. 1
            AREA 1: Comprehensive HIV Prevention Strategies, $2,000,000 available. ................................. 1
            AREA 2: Locally Funded Prevention, Linkage and Support, $840,000 available. .......................... 1
            AREA 3: Partner Services Expansion, $140,000 available. ........................................................... 1
       Eligible Applicants .................................................................................................................................. 1

ADDRESSING THE COMPLEXITY OF INDIVIDUALS’ LIVES THROUGH A NETWORK OF SERVICES ................. 3

DESCRIPTION OF FUNDED AREAS ...................................................................................................... 4
1.0         AREA 1: COMPREHENSIVE HIV PREVENTION STRATEGIES ....................................... 4
1.4 SAFE RE-ENTRY – RISK REDUCTION FOR YOUNG MEN ABOUT TO BE RELEASED FROM JAIL .............. 6

2.0             AREA 2: LOCALLY FUNDED PREVENTION, LINKAGE, AND SUPPORT ................. 6
3.0         AREA 3: PARTNER SERVICES EXPANSION ......................................................................... 7
PROGRAM ACTIVITY DETAILS ............................................................................................................ 8
PROGRAM ACTIVITY DETAILS—AREA 1 ......................................................................................... 8
1.1         PREVENTION FOR PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS ......................................................10
1.2         PREVENTION FOR PEOPLE OF HIV-NEGATIVE OR UNKNOWN STATUS..................13
1.3 YOUTH PREVENTION INTERVENTIONS.....................................................................................16
1.4 SAFE RE-ENTRY – RISK REDUCTION FOR YOUNG MEN ABOUT TO BE RELEASED
FROM JAIL .................................................................................................................................................19
PROGRAM ACTIVITY DETAILS—AREA 2 ........................................................................................22
2.1 NAVIGATOR SERVICES ...................................................................................................................22
2.2 YOUTH SERVICES: HIV MAINSTREAMING AMONG YOUTH-SERVING PROVIDERS .24
2.3 FAITH-BASED LEADERSHIP AND HIV MAINSTREAMING ...................................................26
2.4 COUPLES HIV COUNSELING AND TESTING SERVICES (CHCT) ........................................29
2.5 FOSTER PARENTS MATTER! .........................................................................................................31
2.6 INNOVATOR INTERVENTIONS .....................................................................................................33
PROGRAM ACTIVITY DETAILS—AREA 3 ........................................................................................35
3.1 PARTNER SERVICES—CAPACITY BUILDING FOR COUNSELING, TESTING, AND
REFERRAL PROVIDERS (CDC-FUNDED)...........................................................................................35
APPLICATION ELEMENTS ....................................................................................................................38
I.     HAA ASSURANCE PACKET...........................................................................................................38
II.         EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (REQUIRED TEMPLATE) ............................................................38
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III.         BACKGROUND, NEED, AND IMPACT DESCRIPTION (UP TO 7 PAGES).......................38
IV.          ORGANIZATIONAL CAPACITY DESCRIPTION (UP TO 10 PAGES) ..............................38
V.       PARTNERSHIP, LINKAGES AND REFERRALS DESCRIPTION (UP TO 5 PAGES) ...........38
VI.  PROGRAM ACTIVITY PLAN (ONE FOR EACH ACTIVITY—UP TO 15 PAGES FOR
EACH ACTIVITY) .....................................................................................................................................38
VII.         ATTACHMENTS ...........................................................................................................................38

  *LIMITED APPLICATION: ADD-ON FOR PRIMARY CARE AND CASE MANAGEMENT
PROVIDERS ...............................................................................................................................................38
APPLICATION SUBMISSION PROCEDURES .....................................................................................39
1.       PRE-APPLICATION CONFERENCES ........................................................................................................39

2.       INTERNET ..............................................................................................................................................39

3.       SUBMIT LOI (NOT REQUIRED BUT REQUESTED) ..................................................................................40
APPLICATION EVALUATION CRITERIA ..........................................................................................41
I.       HAA ASSURANCE PACKET...........................................................................................................41
II.          EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (REQUIRED TEMPLATE) ............................................................41
III.         BACKGROUND, NEED, AND IMPACT DESCRIPTION .......................................................42
IV.          ORGANIZATIONAL CAPACITY DESCRIPTION ..................................................................42
V.       PARTNERSHIP, LINKAGES AND REFERRALS DESCRIPTION............................................44
VI.          PROGRAM ACTIVITY PLAN* ..................................................................................................45
*LIMITED APPLICATION: ADD-ON FOR PRIMARY CARE AND CASE MANAGEMENT
PROVIDERS ...............................................................................................................................................45
REVIEW PROCESS AND FUNDING DECISIONS ...............................................................................46
POST-AWARD ACTIVITIES ...................................................................................................................47
BUDGET DEVELOPMENT AND DESCRIPTION ................................................................................49
ASSURANCES ............................................................................................................................................50
AREA 1: CRITICAL TOOLS AND INFORMATION ...........................................................................50
I.       LIST OF PRIORITY TARGET POPULATIONS ..........................................................................50
II.          UNDERSTANDING RISK BEHAVIORS ...................................................................................51
      PREVENTION NEEDS OF HETEROSEXUALS ...............................................................................................52
      PREVENTION NEEDS OF MEN WHO HAVE SEX WITH MEN (MSM) ...........................................................53
      PREVENTION NEEDS OF INJECTING DRUG USERS (IDUS).......................................................................53
      PREVENTION NEEDS OF YOUTH................................................................................................................54
III. LIST OF RECOMMENDED CORE APPROVED EFFECTIVE BEHAVIORAL
INTERVENTIONS (EBI) ...........................................................................................................................56




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IV. ADAPTING APPROVED CORE INTERVENTIONS ...................................................................58
V.       CRITERIA FOR NEW CORE INTERVENTIONS (NOT EBI) ....................................................59
TEMPLATES AND TOOLS ......................................................................................................................64
I.       LETTER OF INTENT .......................................................................................................................64
II.          APPLICATION CHECK-LIST ....................................................................................................64
III.         EXECUTIVE SUMMARY TEMPLATE .....................................................................................64
IV.          ORGANIZATIONAL SERVICE SUMMARY CHECK-LIST..................................................64
V.       WORK PLAN TEMPLATE ..............................................................................................................64
VI.          CATEGORICAL BUDGET SAMPLE ........................................................................................64
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES ....................................................................................................................64
      HIV/AIDS IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ...............................................................................................64
      INFORMATION ON EFFECTIVE INTERVENTIONS, FROM THE CDC................................................................64
      A. OTHER INTERVENTIONS ....................................................................................................................65
      B. RESOURCES FOR PREVENTION WITH POSITIVES ............................................................................66
      C. OTHER RESOURCES ...........................................................................................................................66
HAA CONTACTS .......................................................................................................................................66
ATTACHMENTS ........................................................................................................................................74




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OVERVIEW
Purpose
The purpose of this request for applications (RFA) is to support local qualified applicants
to develop to provide culturally appropriate, science-based programs with evidence
based effectiveness, and which target persons at risk for infection, re-infection and/or
transmission of HIV and support persons living with HIV for continuity of care services in
all eight wards of the District of Columbia. The long-term goals include
decreasing the number of new HIV infections, eliminating stigma,
increasing individual, family, and community-level responses to HIV,
and increasing successful utilization of HIV testing, care, and
treatment services.

Available Funding

             AREA 1: Comprehensive HIV Prevention Strategies, $2,000,000 available.

             AREA 2: Locally Funded Prevention, Linkage and Support, $840,000
              available.

             AREA 3: Partner Services Expansion, $140,000 available.

Eligible Applicants
The following are eligible organizations/entities who can apply for grant funds under
this RFA:

      Private non-profit and for-profit organizations

      Private entities include community development corporations, community
       action agencies, community-based and faith-based organizations




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Using Data to Drive Program Planning

In December 2007, HAA released the first data on AIDS in five years and the first-ever
data on HIV in the District of Columbia. The data showed that the District is impacted by
a modern HIV/AIDS epidemic – modern because of its sheer size and complexity, unlike
any jurisdiction in the country. In size, the District has the highest burden of disease of
any city, twice as high as New York City and four times as much as Detroit. In
complexity, the transmission of the District’s new infections were led by heterosexual
contact, followed closely by men who have sex with men (MSM) and still a substantial
portion attributable to injection drug use (IDU).

The milestone was not only the breadth of the data, but that the District is now entering
into a new era of using data to drive program planning. No longer will prevention and
care activities be based on assumptions, but on concrete information from case-based
surveillance and other sources. Planning and program design will benefit from new
studies on behavior – such as an upcoming survey of high-risk heterosexuals to be
followed by MSM and IDU – and other population-based data. The heterosexual study
yields significant findings for the direction of prevention and intervention programs:

      Missed opportunities for HIV testing in clinical settings
      High rates of concurrent partnerships and low rates of awareness of partner status and
       condom use

      Substantial use of non-injection drugs and alcohol

This critically valuable data is not intended to sit on a shelf. HAA encourages all
applicants to use the data in their program designs. We believe only by applying locally
relevant data to evidence-based approaches and interventions and incorporating front-
line experience will we be able to generate a powerful local response that will
fundamentally impact the trajectory of the epidemic.
You may obtain HIV/AIDS statistics and HIV needs assessment data from the HAA
website:

              2007 Epidemiology Annual Report

              http://doh.dc.gov/doh/cwp/view,A,1371,Q,603431.asp

              HIV Prevention Plan for 2006-2009

              http://doh.dc.gov/doh/cwp/view,a,1371,q,598727.asp

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In addition, you may use data from research studies and other valid data sources.

Addressing the Complexity of Individuals’ Lives through a Network of Services
The District seeks proposals to implement comprehensive HIV prevention strategies that
use several components – either integrated fully or through connections to collaborative
providers – to protect as many people at risk for HIV as possible and address the needs
of residents in diverse communities, including broad-based efforts to reach individuals
who do not perceive themselves to be at high risk for HIV.

HAA does not expect that a single organization can provide every element in a
comprehensive prevention program. However, organizations should develop the
strategic connections to be closely linked to a package of services so that an individual’s
needs can be addressed. Those linkages must include HIV counseling and testing (CTR),
linkage to primary HIV care, individual-level prevention counseling when appropriate,
including interventions that promote safer sexual behaviors for both members of a
couple, and group-level and community-level programs to reach large numbers of
people.
A comprehensive program should:
      Provide or be closely linked to services that ensure early access to, and
       continuous participation in prevention interventions, including counseling and
       early testing for HIV, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and hepatitis, and
       continuous health care for HIV-positive individuals.
      Provide evidence-based, culturally competent and language appropriate
       prevention strategies that meet the needs of at-risk populations and those of
       individuals who are HIV infected.
      Address factors that put individuals at risk for HIV infection and transmission,
       such as awareness of personal risk, communications skills, prevention message
       burnout, fear of social rejection due to disclosure, lack of information about
       services and limited access to care.
      Address multiple needs and create linkages to a wide range of human service
       programs and providers.




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Additional Non-funded Resources and Opportunities

HAA encourages applicants to consider adding complementary activities and resources
to its core prevention programs when appropriate. The following add-on opportunities
are available to address key District goals for reducing transmission of HIV.

         Condom Distribution Recruitment: condom use is a critical tool in preventing the
          transmission of HIV, as well as STDs and Hepatitis. Yet, new surveys of District
          residents show that many are not using condoms regularly. Increasing the
          quantity and accessibility of condoms is a high priority for HAA. Studies show
          that public free condom distribution programs increase use – in Louisiana,
          among African-American women with more than one sex partner by 50% and by
          one-third among African-American men without an increase in sex partners –
          and encourages take up rates. A recent survey revealed that three-quarters of
          District residents would use more condoms if they were available for free.
          Applicants could include recruitment of non-stigmatized locations within their
          geographic or population group communities to receive free condoms from
          HAA.

         Needle Exchange Program: in December 2007, Congress lifted the nearly 10 year
          ban on the District from using its local dollars for needle exchange programs.
          HAA sees this new start with needle exchange as a tremendous opportunity for
          the District to test new models of integrating needle exchange services into
          existing service delivery models. Applicants can consider partnerships with
          District needle exchange programs or taking advantage of the technical
          assistance provided by HAA to initiate needle exchange services as part of the
          DC NEX Program.

         CTR technical/test kit supports: the District is committed to purchasing and
          providing free oral rapid HIV tests to community partners to make this non-
          invasive technology available to broader segments of the population. HAA
          offers test kits, training for providers, and technical assistance.



DESCRIPTION OF FUNDED AREAS

1.0       AREA 1: Comprehensive HIV Prevention Strategies



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Funding Period: January 1, 2009-December 31, 2010. One year continuation through
December 31, 2010 based on availability of monies, fiscal and programmatic grant
performance, and alignment with developing data and community planning priorities.

Amount Available: A total of $2,000,000 in CDC-based funding is available for
comprehensive HIV prevention strategies that are effective for the populations
prioritized by the DC HIV Prevention Community Planning Group (HPCPG). Up to 20
awards, ranging from $50,000 to $250,000 each (with average awards of $100-150,000
each) will be awarded for specific program activities.

Purpose of Area 1 Awards: This area is intended to support core, evidence-based
behavioral prevention interventions with linkages to comprehensive services for at-risk
populations, in order to achieve District-wide decrease in new HIV infections. Successful
implementation of these strategies requires: sufficient technical expertise and
adherence to evidence-based interventions; creativity and resiliency in identifying,
recruiting, retaining and following-up the most-at-risk individuals; a true and current
understanding of the issues faced by the populations served; and dedicated linkages to
core HIV services. For maximum community impact through a combination of breadth
and depth, an overall mixture of community-level, group-level, and individual-level
interventions is sought.

Area 1 Program Activities: Program Activities for Area 1 are categorized in terms of
target populations and related effective behavioral interventions (see Area 1 Critical
Tools and Information for complete lists). The following Program Activities are available
for competition under this announcement. Organizations may apply for more than one
program activity. Each program activity listed below requires a dedicated narrative,
budget, and work plan. In addition, a strong organizational capacity section is required,
that demonstrates clear ability to deliver interventions to the targeted populations.
Note: Program activities intended to serve multiple populations allow for simplified
budgeting/shared resources of staff, but require a substantive explanation and
justification as to how the intervention will fully and appropriately serve or be adapted
and tailored to each population. Projected single population targets must be included in
the narrative and work plan.

   1.1 Prevention for People Living with HIV/AIDS

           1.11       Single Population Activities (gender, race, risk characteristics)

           1.12       Multiple Population Activities


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          1.13     Prevention as Part of Care (For Primary HIV care and Medical Case
              Management Providers Only—See Limited Application* Instructions)

   1.2 Prevention for People who are HIV-negative or of unknown HIV status

          1.21       Single Population Activities (gender, race, risk characteristics)

          1.22       Multiple Population Activities

   1.3 Youth Prevention


   1.4 SAFE RE-ENTRY – Risk Reduction for young men about to be released from Jail



2.0 AREA 2: LOCALLY FUNDED PREVENTION, LINKAGE, AND
SUPPORT
Funding Period: October 1, 2008-September 30, 2009. One year continuation through
September 30, 2010 based on availability of monies, fiscal and programmatic grant
performance, and alignment with developing data and priorities.

Amount Available: A total of $840,000 is available from the FY09 DC Budget Support
Act for new competitively-funded awards. [Note that additional BSA monies for HIV
prevention, linkage, and support services are dedicated to select named entities and
continuing and sole source grants. Services receiving support include: services for
transgendered persons; food and nutritional supports for persons living with HIV/AIDS;
counseling, testing, and referrals; bereavement and burial assistance; DC government
services training and youth social marketing.] Up to 8 awards, ranging from $50,000 to
$200,000 each will be awarded for specific program activities.

Purpose of Area 2 Awards: This area is intended to support critical priorities and
innovative services that respond to local District needs and are intended to complement
and enhance the impact of the Comprehensive Prevention Interventions from Area 1.
These activities fill important programming gaps, lead to the development of new and
innovative District strategies, and may form the basis of future Comprehensive
Prevention Interventions if shown to be effective for our communities.

Area 2 Program Activities: The following program activities are available for
competition under this announcement. Organizations may apply for more than one
program activity. Each program activity requires a dedicated narrative, budget, and


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work plan. In addition, organizational capacity section should demonstrates clear and
unique abilities to deliver the innovative interventions to the targeted populations.

   2.1 Navigator Services

              2.11    Latinos Living with HIV and Navigator Capacity-building

              2.12 Pregnant Women and Prevention of Mother-to-Child
              Transmission

   2.2 Youth Services: HIV-mainstreaming among Youth-Serving Providers

   2.3 Faith-based Leadership and HIV Mainstreaming

   2.4 Couples HIV Counseling and Testing Services

   2.5 Foster Parents Matter!

   2.6 Innovator Activity


3.0    AREA 3: Partner Services Expansion
Funding Period: 9/15/2008-5/31/2009. At this time, CDC has indicated that this may
be one-time funding. If continued funding becomes available, this grant will be eligible
for a one-year continuation based on fiscal and programmatic grant performance and
alignment with developing data and priorities. [These monies are available to initiate
activities as soon as the decision and award processes are complete.]

Amount Available: Up to $140,000 is available in CDC-based funding is available for
capacity-building for partner services expansion. One Award of up to $140,000 will be
awarded for specific program activities.

Purpose of Area 3 Award: This area is intended to enhance the impact of current
DOH/HAA expansion of Partner Counseling and Referral Services in order to diagnose
more HIV-infected persons earlier in the course of their disease and to link more known
HIV-infected persons back into prevention and care services. Activities will focus on
building the capacity of public, private, and community HIV counseling and testing
partners to understand the availability of DOH/HAA Partner Services and to perform
initial assessments for follow-up by the DOH/HAA Partner Services team.

Area 3 Program Activities:



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    3.1 Partner Services—Capacity Building for Counseling, Testing, and Referral
        Providers



PROGRAM ACTIVITY DETAILS

PROGRAM ACTIVITY DETAILS—AREA 1
SEE ALSO: Area 1 Critical Tools and Information for more in-depth technical guidelines
and descriptions for successful selection, design, and implementation of Area 1
programs.
This area is intended achieve a reduction in new infections of HIV among various groups and
populations in the District. Taken as a whole, the portfolio of projects supported through this
funding should contribute to an overall positive impact on HIV in the District.

In order to maximize District-level reductions in new infections, the final portfolio of
prevention activities must not only address specific a variety of priority risk groups and at-risk
individuals, but must also deliver a combination of breadth and depth. To achieve meaningful
breadth, we are encouraging substantial attention to overall community-level and group-level
interventions that are designed to reach large numbers of at-risk persons over time and to
foster community and group action for HIV prevention. To achieve depth, we maintain that the
role of individual-level interventions is critical to supporting substantial and enduring safer
behaviors among most-at-risk persons.

Specific target populations for Program Area 1 described in the Area 1 Critical Tools and
Information section, and include: HIV-positive heterosexual men and women, injecting drug
users (IDU), black men who have sex with men (MSM) and youth (13-24); individuals who are
HIV negative or do not know their status, including Black heterosexual men and women
(including couples and men about to be released from jail), youth, Latino men and women, male
injecting drug users and all men who have sex with men. Proposals for interventions targeting
additional populations and access groups, such as HIV-infected white MSM, transgendered
persons, sex workers, and mixed groups will also be accepted.

To maximize impact, we have an overriding interest in the delivery of comprehensive
interventions—that is programs that provide linkages to a essential HIV services, and that also
recognize the importance of social networks and linked groups. Some examples of naturally
linked groups are injecting drug users and their sexual partners; heterosexual men, women and
couples; and HIV-positive and HIV-negative heterosexuals or men who have sex with men.
Funding proposals should clearly explain the links among the different groups and how your
program would address those links, in addition to addressing the specific prevention needs of
each group. Note that programs are NOT expected to ‘do it all’—they should deliver based on

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core competencies and client access and identify which strategic linkages with external partners
are most important.

For Area 1, all applicants must form their program around a core prevention intervention—an
evidence-based and effective behavioral intervention for at-risk persons with linkages to
comprehensive services. These activities will be supported by CDC funds, and therefore must
meet criteria for behavioral interventions that have been shown to be effective. A targeted list
of CDC-approved interventions is provided, and a more extensive list of CDC recommended
interventions is also available. For the most part, to achieve effect, these interventions require
routine and repeated contact with clients over time. Fidelity to the basic elements of the
interventional design is required.

Selection and implementation of a core prevention intervention is necessary but insufficient
for success—additional elements are also required. Implementation success also requires
creativity and resiliency in identifying, recruiting, retaining and following-up the most-at-risk
individuals as well as a true and current understanding of the issues faced by the populations
served. Development of concrete linkages for core HIV services is critical. Thus a common
theme for successful implementation and improvement of programs is: know your clients,
know your population(s), know your population(s) as they are now, given that specific needs
and barriers may change over time.

Assessments of the risk behavior and the factors that contribute to those behaviors among your
population currently are very important. Failure to review real-time data or to conduct an
assessment could result in using an intervention that is not the most appropriate for your
target. Area 1 Critical Tools and Information section provides additional suggestions and details
on conducting needs assessments and establishing mechanisms for ongoing feedback from your
targeted populations.

Problem solving and creative efforts have been particularly important to maintaining service
delivery to and participation of clients over time. Recruiting and then retaining high-risk
individuals for individual counseling and group-level interventions can be challenging. Non-
traditional and creative approaches are often necessary. One organization has had success
conducting individual counseling sessions over the phone with clients who have a difficult time
coming into the office for their sessions, and another organization meets with clients at their
homes. To deal with retention for group level interventions, where clients must return for
several sessions, several organizations have had success conducting the interventions during
weekend retreats.

Another challenge has been the reluctance of clients to open up to different counselors,
describing intimate details of their lives, because of staff changes. Transition planning and
transition supports to clients around staffing changes may be needed.



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Recruitment has been more successful for organizations that use a social network approach,
asking individuals who have successfully completed an intervention to spread the word on the
benefits they received from their participation. Incentives are used to promote this networking.

Note: Program activities intended to serve multiple populations allow for simplified
budgeting/shared resources of staff, but require a substantive explanation and justification as
to how the intervention will fully and appropriately serve or be adapted and tailored to each
population. Projected single population targets must be included in the narrative and work
plan.


1.1 Prevention for People Living with HIV/AIDS
1.11    Single Population Activities (gender, race, risk characteristics)

1.12    Multiple Population Activities

For this Program Activity, Prevention for People Living with HIV/AIDS, HCPCG and HAA
recommend you select from among the following core interventions. These
interventions are recommendations are based on population relevance and availability
of training now or in the near future. Some of these interventions have been
successfully implemented in DC.

1.11, 1.12: People Living with HIV
Organizations serving this population must provide one of the evidence-based interventions listed below. They must also
provide either Individual Prevention Counseling or Comprehensive Risk Counseling and Services (CRCS).

Healthy Relationships                               Group Level (GLI)                  All

Safety Counts                                       GLI                                IDUs and crack users

Together Making Choices (previously Teens           GLI                                HIV-positive Youth (13-24)
Linked to Care)



Specific Required Program Elements:

             o Selection and implementation of core intervention (EBI/etc) –including
               approaches to adaptation to new population if needed. Non-EBI
               interventions should provide appropriate documentation of/explanation
               of how they meet the criteria described in the Area 1 Critical Tools and
               Information Section.



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           o Direct Linkages to key HIV services (such as CTR, condoms, STD diagnosis
             and treatment, HIV care and treatment, mental health, substance abuse,
             etc.)
           o Population assessment, access, recruitment, retention, and follow-up
             plans.
           o Approach to capacity-building or preparations for this intervention (TA
             needs, training needs, etc).
           o Performance and monitoring/evaluation plan, including targets and
             projected impact of persons served/risk reduction achieved.

Program Activity Plan Evaluation Criteria:

In addition to general evaluation criteria and standard evaluation criteria for Area 1
Programs that are list in the Program Activity Evaluation Criteria section and the Area 1
Critical Tools and Information Section, including the “Summary of Standard
Elements—Area 1 Program Design and Implementation” the additional specific criteria
will be applied to 1.11 and 1.12 activities:

      Willingness to accept referrals from a variety of other providers, including
       primary medical providers, STD clinic, Partner Services Team, etc, for higher risk
       HIV-infected clients in need of services.

      Effective demonstration of the required program elements described above,
       including:

           o Documented experience with and knowledge of the population(s) to be
             served, including approaches to updating data or applying updated data
             on specific population needs and requirements;

           o Feasible implementation plan of a population-appropriate approach,
             including effective and innovative recruitment and retention plans,
             adequate staffing and delineated training or capacity-building;
             integration of persons living with HIV/AIDS into service delivery when
             possible and appropriate;

           o Appropriate linkages to specific critical services for HIV-infected persons;

           o Adequate monitoring and evaluation plan including reasonable and
             achievable targets.




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1.13 Prevention as Part of Care: (For current Primary HIV care and Case management
Providers Only—See Limited Application Instructions), multiple awards of $25-50,000

Note: A current Assurance Packet and *Limited Application only are required for this
option.

Participating in ongoing medical care is a strong predictor of lower risk behaviors among
persons living with HIV/AIDS. However, clients may still benefit from additional and
explicit individual-level prevention supports. Clinical care settings provide opportunities
to deliver enhanced prevention supports routinely and repeatedly during routinely
scheduled visits, and are a platform to provide unscheduled access during higher need
or higher risk times. Moreover, individual clinical and medical issues, such as acute
STDs, may provide clear indications for more intensive prevention supports that may be
invisible to non-care providers. Currently, HAA does not specifically fund enhanced
prevention activities in clinical care settings.

Two basic approaches to individual-level prevention supports are CRCS and IDL. CRCS is
a structured and scheduled set of counseling sessions that are effective for risk
reduction. However, stand-alone CRCS programs have encountered challenges in
retaining clients throughout the program or sometimes are at a loss to provide follow up
services after the initial sessions are completed. IDL uses similar techniques as CRCS,
but does not have a pre-determined schedule or fixed set of deliverable sessions. This
Program Activity requires that implementers be trained in CRCS and IDL (HAA can
provide this training) and that CRCS or IDL be used as a main approach to risk reduction.
CRCS/IDL should be complemented in the care setting by instituting limited but
coordinated prevention messages across the entire team of care providers.

Specific Required Program Elements and Evaluation Criteria:

              Access to higher risk population: Overall goal is to provide prevention
               services targeting especially the highest risk clients at the highest risk
               times. Describe indicators of need for prevention with positive services
               among your clientele, including rates of new STD infections, reported
               unsafe sex practices, issues surrounding disclosure, patterns of
               discontinuity of care or loss to follow-up. Description should highlight
               specific issues, practices, or risks of the client population to be addressed
               by this program.

              Provision of Services and Continuity of Access: Describe how CRCS
               and/or IDL will be provided. Prevention services must be available during

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              routine appointments/visits; program should also describe innovative
              methods for service delivery and prevention support, such as telephone,
              evening, or weekend drop-in access. Also, plan should consider ways to
              engage multiple providers in the routine care setting to reinforce limited
              and targeted prevention messages.

             Innovative Staffing and Strategies: Programs are strongly encouraged to
              consider effective use of persons living with HIV/AIDS as volunteer, part-
              time, or full time providers of prevention with positive services.
              Description should highlight training or capacity-building needs for CRCS
              and IDL skills. These trainings can be mobilized by HAA for providers. In
              addition, describe how repeated interaction with individual clients over
              time will be achieved.

             Performance and Evaluation Plan: Include targets in terms of number of
              persons to be reached with these services and targets for reduction in
              risky behavior. Describe how program will be monitored and how success
              will be determined.

             Priority for funding will be given to Primary HIV Care Providers and to
              Medical Case Management Providers who are co-located with clinical
              services. Case Management Providers who are not co-located with
              clinical services should describe the direct linkages and communications
              with Primary HIV Care Team that will allow these Prevention Services to
              be truly integrated into care.


1.2 Prevention for People of HIV-negative or Unknown Status
1.21   Single Population Activities (gender, race, risk characteristics)

1.22   Multiple Population Activities

For this Program Activity, Prevention for People Living with HIV/AIDS, HCPCG and HAA
recommend you select from among the following core interventions. These
interventions are recommendations are based on population relevance and availability
of training now or in the near future. Some of these interventions have been
successfully implemented in DC.




                                            13
                                                                                                    
1.2 Heterosexuals
Organizations serving this population must provide one of the evidence-based interventions listed below. They may also
provide either Individual Prevention Counseling or Comprehensive Risk Counseling and Services (CRCS).

PROMISE                                             Community Level (CLI)              Men or women and their sex
                                                                                       partners (adults)

PROMISE                                             Community Level (CLI)              Men or women and their sex
                                                                                       partners (youth 13-24)


Real AIDS Prevention Project (RAPP)                 CLI                                Women and their sex partners

SISTA                                               GLI                                African American women

Project Connect                                     ILI/GLI                            Black Heterosexual
                                                                                       Couples/Black men and women

1.2 Injecting Drug Users
Organizations serving this population must provide one of the evidence-based interventions listed below. They may also
provide either Individual Prevention Counseling or Comprehensive Risk Counseling and Services (CRCS).

PROMISE                                             Community Level (CLI)              Men or women and their sex
                                                                                       partners

Safety Counts                                       GLI                                IDUs and crack users

Modelo de Intervención Psicomédica (MIP)            ILI                                Hispanics/Latinos and Blacks

1.2 MSM
Organizations serving this population must provide one of the evidence-based interventions listed below. They may also
provide either Individual Prevention Counseling or Comprehensive Risk Counseling and Services (CRCS).

d-up!                                                CLI                               Black MSM

Mpowerment                                           CLI                               White, Hispanic/Latino MSM

Popular Opinion Leader                               CLI                               White MSM

PROMISE                                             CLI                                Black, Latino or white MSM

Many Men, Many Voices                                GLI                               Black MSM

Sex Workers

PROMISE                                             CLI                                Black, Latino or white MSM



                                                   14
                                                                                    
 Safety Counts                              GLI                          Black heterosexual females,
                                                                         transgender women and MSM



Specific Required Program Elements:

            o Selection and implementation of core intervention (EBI/etc) –including
              approaches to adaptation to new population if needed. Non-EBI
              interventions should provide appropriate documentation of/explanation
              of how they meet the criteria described in the Area 1 Critical Tools and
              Information Section.
            o Direct Linkages to key HIV services (such as CTR, condoms, STD diagnosis
              and treatment, HIV care and treatment, mental health, substance abuse,
              etc.)
            o Population assessment, access, recruitment, retention, and follow-up
              plans.
            o Approach to capacity-building or preparations for this intervention (TA
              needs, training needs, etc).
            o Performance and monitoring/evaluation plan, including targets and
              projected impact of persons served/risk reduction achieved.

Program Activity Plan Evaluation Criteria:

In addition to general evaluation criteria and standard evaluation criteria for Area 1
Programs that are list in the Program Activity Evaluation Criteria section and the Area 1
Critical Tools and Information Section, including the “Summary of Standard
Elements—Area 1 Program Design and Implementation” the following additional
specific criteria will be applied to 1.2 activities:

      Effective demonstration of the required program elements described above,
       including:

            o Documented experience with and knowledge of the population(s) to be
              served, including approaches to updating data or applying updated data
              on specific population needs and requirements;

            o Feasible implementation plan of a population-appropriate approach,
              including effective and innovative recruitment and retention plans,
              adequate staffing and delineated training or capacity-building;
              integration of persons living with HIV/AIDS into service delivery when
              possible and appropriate;


                                           15
                                                                                             
            o Appropriate linkages to specific critical services for HIV-infected persons;

            o Adequate monitoring and evaluation plan including reasonable and
              achievable targets.


1.3 Youth Prevention Interventions

This area is intended to expand prevention intervention strategies to young people and diversify
the portfolio of approaches to best address the diversity and dynamic nature of the epidemic’s
impact on District youth. The combination of high risk behavior, incomplete or misinformed
health education, a lack of self-risk perception and prevention fatigue are fueling increases in
HIV transmission and disease. DOH/HAA considers this funding as a critical opportunity to
engage young people at community and group levels effectively to change behavior leading to
increase recognition of HIV risk, maintain negative status, prevent further transmission among
young people living with HIV, raise level of safe behavior activity, equip young people to better
utilize health resources, and negotiate relationships successfully. Healthy behaviors adopted by
young people at an early age will remain with them as they grow older.

Roughly one out of every 100 young people ages 13 to 24 in the District is HIV infected or has
full-blown AIDS. HIV infection rates among District young people tripled for the period 2000 to
2005 compared to the previous five years while chlamydia rates are nearly three times the
national average at up to 9%. While youth under age 25 have represented up to 6% of all the
reported DC AIDS cases, HIV incidence among young people for 2001 through 2005 – reported
for the first time in 2007 and depicting the current trend in infections – was nearly double at
10% of all HIV cases. HIV incidence among certain high-risk populations has increased in the last
five reported years at an alarming rate. Since 2001, young men who have sex with men ages 13
to 24, particularly among young men of color, experienced a 900% increase of reported HIV
infection and young heterosexual women of color by more than a third when compared to the
previous five year period. Despite the high rates of disease and risky behavior, only about half
of all District young adults under 25 are aware of their HIV status or have actively sought an HIV
test.

DOH/HAA wants support a comprehensive HIV prevention approach to the scale and size of the
epidemic’s impact to address successfully the needs of District youth. Under Mayor Fenty’s
Child Health Action Plan, the District has set goals for adolescents of increasing awareness of
HIV status by 25% and reducing HIV transmission by 25% through the year 2010.

The purpose of this Program Activity for Youth Prevention is to fund organization(s) to support a
range of prevention strategies. In reviewing the Youth and HIV Initiative Plan and the list of
available interventions, HAA has considered the following evidence-based initiatives to address
the needs of District young people:

                                                16
                                                                                               
1.3 Youth Prevention
Organizations serving this population must provide one of the evidence-based interventions listed below. They
may also provide either Individual Prevention Counseling or Comprehensive Risk Counseling and Services
(CRCS).

Community Promise                                    CLI                         All Youth

Real AIDS Prevention Project (RAPP)                  CLI                         Black Heterosexual and
                                                                                 YMSM

d-up!                                                CLI                         Black YMSM

Together Learning Choices                            GLI                         Latino, Black, White Youth
                                                                                 living with HIV (13-24)

Popular Opinion Leader                               CLI                         Black YMSM

Street Smart                                         GLI                         Female, Male Youth (11-18)

FOK + ImPACT (Focus on Youth with                    GLI                         Black Youth (9-15) and their
ImPACT)                                                                          parents



Prevention for Positive Youth

Together Learning Choices is a group-level intervention that is proven to assist youth in
achieving core secondary HIV prevention goals. It achieves the goals through skills building
support groups.

Community Level Interventions

With the scale of the epidemic’s impact on District young people – and current statistics likely
undercount the full extent of risky behavior and infection rates – HAA seeks to support
community-level interventions targeting youth. Providers can propose among the following:

Community Promise is adaptable to all population groups, but is effective when one group is
designated. Providers can consider several populations, including heterosexual young men or
women.

Real AIDS Prevention Project (RAPP) can be effectively implemented among heterosexual
young people and young men who have sex with men, and has been used in the District
previously.

d-up! has been adapted from Popular Opinion Leader and targets black young men who have
sex with men. Recently, the CDC reported a 93 percent increase in infections among this

                                                17
                                                                                            
population from 2001 to 2006 (as reported from 33 states). District data shows a 22 percent
increase from 2001 to 2006 from code-based reporting, which is likely an undercount. Note this
is a relatively new intervention, and has generated considerable excitement for specifically
addressing the rising rates of HIV among young MSM.

Like RAPP, Popular Opinion Leader has been adapted to reach young men who have sex with
men. The District saw an overall increase of nearly 25 percent in infections among 13 to 24 year
old men who have sex with men.

Group-Level Interventions

HAA has identified two group-level interventions that is interested in seeing implemented for
young people: Street Smart has had very promising results among young people aged 11-18
and FOK + Impact (Focus on Youth with ImPACT) integrates intervention approaches for black
youth ages 9 to 15 and their parents.




Specific Required Program Elements:

       Selection of core intervention with identification of youth population to be reached and
        implementation plan addressing the particular needs of District young people.

       Demonstrated integrated or linkages to key HIV services, including counseling, testing
        and referral, condom distribution, STD diagnosis and treatment, HIV care and
        treatment, mental health, housing and other support services.

       Assessment and analysis of population(s), access to services, and recruitment and
        retention of participants.

       Capacity building approach and preparations to effectively implement the intervention
        that encompass technical assistance needs, training, and other resources.

       Performance and monitoring evaluation plan.


Program Activity Plan Evaluation Criteria:

       Demonstrates knowledge of and experience in best practices in youth prevention
        interventions. On-the-ground implementation experience in delivering youth services.

       Demonstration of cultural sensitivity and diversity with youth populations.



                                               18
                                                                                           
       Completeness of approach that address the HIV co-factors that contribute to adolescent
        decision-making and perception of risk behaviors to modify health behavior and avoid
        certain health choices or actions.

       Established relationships with other community providers to coordinate and link
        services; developing partnerships with youth serving organizations, particularly to
        extend prevention activities in non-stigmatized locations; promotion of safe sex
        information and materials, especially condoms, in community locations accessible to
        young people.

       Detailed work plan on training and technical assistance to build capacity for delivering
        effective interventions; also, quality assurance program for appropriate performance of
        prevention activities.

       Performance and evaluation plan for documenting the reach, effectiveness, and impact
        of youth prevention activities. Includes targets for number and types of young people
        to be reached and outcomes for intervention goals.


1.4 SAFE RE-ENTRY – Risk Reduction for young men about to be
released from Jail
Up to one award

This area is intended to address the HIV prevention needs of individuals who are about
to be released from jail by providing them with risk-reduction information and
counseling on HIV and other STDs both shortly before and after their release back into
the community.

Studies have shown that prisoners re-entering the community have higher rates of
serious infectious diseases, including HIV and AIDS; substance abuse, including injecting
drug use and addiction, compared with non-incarcerated person. Of the estimated
21,000 individuals that pass through the D.C. Department of Corrections facilities in any
given year approximately 80% are Black males, of which about 87% spend 120 days or
less in the jail.

Importantly, re-entry may be a particularly vulnerable time for new infection with or
transmission of HIV. One study in Rhode Island, Mississippi, California, and Wisconsin
found that men engaged in unprotected sexual activity soon after release from prison,
with 51% engaging in unprotected sex on the first day and 86% by the end of the first
week. In DC, with the high rates of HIV in the community, high rates of unprotected sex
place the returning individual at real risk for new infection.



1.4 Men about to be release from jail

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                                                                                      
 Individual-level risk reduction intervention for   ILI                    Men about to be released from
 men soon to be released from jail, such as                               jail
 START



One intervention that targets this issue is START, the goal of which is to eliminate or
reduce risk behaviors for HIV, STD and hepatitis. This 6-session individual-level HIV, STD,
and hepatitis risk reduction intervention for men features prevention case
management, motivational interviewing and incremental risk reduction. It consists of 2
individual sessions conducted within the 2 weeks before release and 4 individual
sessions at 1, 3, 6, and 12 weeks after release. Pre-release sessions deal with personal
risk-reduction and community reentry needs (referrals for housing, employment,
finances, substance abuse, mental treatment, legal issues, and avoiding re-
incarceration). The post-release sessions involve discussion of the facilitators and
barriers to implementing the risk reduction plan.
The purpose of this Program Activity for Incarcerated/Re-entry HIV Prevention is to fund
one organization to implement an evidenced-based intervention, preferably the CDC-
recommended START program, that spans from pre-release to re-entry to reduce HIV
infection and transmission.
Specific Required Program Elements:

    o Description of the core
      elements and goals of
      the intervention to be
      implemented (START or
      another intervention)
      and how they apply to
      the HIV/STD prevention
      needs of DC and inmates
      at the DC jail.
    o Implementation plan
      that includes: capacity
      to assess the risk
      behavior, access,
      recruitment and
      retention of the target population including a plan to ensures that participants
      will complete the intervention; plan to link clients to key HIV and social services,
      such as CTR, condoms, housing, job-training, STD screening, mental health,
      substance abuse, etc. upon discharge from corrections; projected impact
      through number of persons reached and amount of risk reduction achieved.


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                                                                                    
  o Demonstrated experience working with the target population and the ability
    (access) to provide services within and outside the jail.
  o Identification of staff training and technical assistance needs to implement the
    funded intervention, and obtain and/or provide training within a reasonable
    time after funding is awarded.
  o Plan to assess the organization’s performance and to and measure and analyze
    the outcomes of the intervention.


  Program Activity Plan Evaluation Criteria
     Demonstrates experience working with the target population both within and
      outside the jail, as well as experience providing HIV prevention services to this
      and/or other risk groups in the District of Columbia.
     Demonstrates access to the population during incarceration and ability to follow
      up upon release. Letter of support from collaborating agencies will strengthen
      application.
     Understands or has a realistic plan to assess the risk behaviors and contributing
      factors of the target population and how the intervention will address them,
      including a description of the core elements, goals and objectives of the
      intervention.
     Provides feasible implementation plan that includes projections of possible
      impact through targets of number of persons reached and amount of risk
      reduction achieved.
     Describes systems and protocols in place to make and track referrals and
      linkages to the health and social services needed by the target population.
     Evaluation plan/protocol will adequately assess the performance of the program,
      including monitoring reported behavior changes in the target population.
      Willingness to collaborate with HAA should opportunities for more intensive
      evaluation of outcomes and impact arise.


Note: final award will be dependent on full approval and concurrence
of program activity plan by both DOH/HAA and DC Department of
Corrections




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                                                                                        
PROGRAM ACTIVITY DETAILS—AREA 2

2.1 Navigator Services
2.11    *One award for Latino Navigator-services and Navigation Capacity-Building, $200,000

2.12   Up to one award for “Pregnancy Navigator”, including access to peer supports, up to
$100,000

The journey between testing HIV-positive and reaching a medical home for
comprehensive care services can be unnecessarily confusing and difficult. Nationwide,
only about 50% of persons are in care within 12 months of testing positive. In DC, a
system of HIV services is available, but not always immediately easy to access or to
understand. Language and cultural factors can present additional barriers to learning
the system and effectively connecting to care. Moreover, special circumstances such as
pregnancy present an additional urgency to rapid connection to HIV care for prevention
of mother-to-child transmission, and also may present unique needs for social supports
and planning assistance. It is estimated that between 50 to 100 women might benefit
from Pregnancy Navigator services each year.
This program activity is designed to augment, but not replace, existing systems of
referral and case management, and ensure that clients with HIV are intensively
supported and thereby successful in their initial entry or re-entry into HIV services and
especially HIV primary care. It is intended to reduce the time between testing positive
and accessing primary HIV care and case management, to increase the number of
persons previously diagnosed and out-of-care who establish a medical home, and to
reduce the mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Expert navigator organizations will also
help to refine the navigator model and share best practices for expansion of navigator
services across other providers and to expand the model over time to include navigation
to prevention-for-positive programs and partner services.
The purpose of this Program Activity for Navigator Services is to fund one organization
for Latino Navigator Services and Navigation Capacity-building and one organization to
develop and provide Navigator services for pregnant women (‘Pregnancy Navigator’).

Specific Required Program Elements:

      Identify partners, sites and locations at which potential clients for the
       ―navigator‖ service can be found. In addition to established HIV
       counseling and testing sites, the successful applicant(s) will identify
       innovative strategies to become a connection point for clients from a

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                                                                                          
       variety of settings including emergency rooms, family planning centers,
       pre- and post-natal care providers and the like.

      Implementation approach: Creating strategies that ensure that the
       potential client is not lost to care following diagnosis with HIV. Developing
       methods to assist potential clients to addressing and reduce the impact of
       any barriers potential clients might experience in enrolling in care.
       Ensuring an appropriate level and kind of support to family members of
       potential clients and surrounding issues of disclosure.

      Targeted additional services: Navigation to prevention-with-positive
       programs for clients assessed to have specific needs for ongoing risk
       reduction; assessment for and assistance accessing partner services.

      Quality and efficiency: Creating or maintaining partnerships to minimize
       cost, maximize coordinator and avoid unnecessary duplication of services.
       Ensuring that all services are provided in ways that are culturally
       appropriate and linguistically competent.

      For Latino Navigator: Collaboration with HAA to help establish best
       practices to navigator services, including willingness to provide targeted
       technical assistance to new navigator providers. Willingness to accept
       referrals from all providers identifying Latino clients with navigator needs.

      For Pregnancy Navigator: Linkage to or direct access to HIV-infected
       women who have and who can serve as peer supports during pregnancy.
       Special consideration should be given to engagement of women living with
       HIV/AIDS as navigation service providers. Follow up with clients after
       delivery to ensure that mother is still connected to primary HIV care for her
       ongoing health. Willingness to accept clients from all providers identifying
       HIV-infected pregnant women and to establish direct partnerships with the
       select group of District HIV primary care providers who have committed to
       enroll pregnant women within 72 hours of initial diagnosis.

      Performance monitoring and evaluation plan, including approach to
       ensuring that navigated clients remain in care 6 months and 12 months
       after initial linkage. Targets for number of clients served and projected
       navigation success rate should be included.


Program Activity Plan Evaluation Criteria:

      Demonstrates experience working with the target population – Latino residents or
       pregnant women – as well as experience providing HIV prevention services to this
       and/or other risk groups in the District of Columbia.


                                            23
                                                                                           
       Demonstration of cultural sensitivity and diversity with target populations. For
        Pregnancy Navigator: provides access to interaction with HIV-positive women who have
        formerly gone through pregnancies and prevention of mother-to-child transmission
        interventions.

       For Latino Navigator: willingness to work with HAA to build capacity of other
        organizations for navigator services.
       Established relationships with other community providers to recruit potential clients to
        coordinate and link services.
       Provides feasible implementation plan that includes projections of possible impact
        through targets of number of persons reached and amount of risk reduction achieved.
       Describes systems and protocols in place to make and track referrals and linkages to the
        health and social services needed by the target population.
       Evaluation plan/protocol will adequately assess the performance of the program,
        including monitoring reported behavior changes in the target population.


2.2 Youth Services: HIV Mainstreaming among Youth-serving
Providers
*One award for increasing mainstreaming among youth providers up to $115,000

Additional youth-programming opportunities under Area 1 / CDC funding.

Capacity Building to Mainstream HIV/AIDS among Non-HIV/AIDS Youth Serving Providers

There are many youth development and other social service agencies with long-standing
relationships with at-risk youth that are well-positioned to assist District young people in
meeting their HIV prevention needs and healthy sexual behavior choices. The agencies could be
very effective with hard-to-reach young people, who are either unable or unwilling to access
stand-alone HIV/AIDS service programs. Characteristics of these young people may include:

       Routinely accessing non-HIV/AIDS youth services
       Uninterested in accessing explicit HIV/AIDS services
       Unaware of their HIV status
       Living in high prevalence wards
       Unaware of their personal risk for HIV infection
       Unaware of and unfamiliar with how to navigate HIV/AIDS social service systems
       Already diagnosed as positive but not in care, treatment or support services

These youth may be more open to receiving HIV prevention education from agencies they
already are participating with than from an unfamiliar HIV/AIDS service provider. With proper
training and planning, general youth programs could seamlessly incorporate HIV prevention
intervention elements into their program offerings as part of routine service delivery. The

                                               24
                                                                                               
mainstreaming of HIV and sexual health behavior prevention will contribute to the reduction of
stigma associated with the disease and persons at-risk for the disease – a significant barrier to
healthy choices. An effective component of mainstreaming will be the recruitment and training
of peer educators, especially in reach hard-to-reach young people.

The goal of this program will be to have HIV prevention service offerings in the majority of
entities engaging District teens and young adults.

The purpose of this Program Activity for Youth Services: HIV Mainstreaming among Youth-
serving Providers is to fund one provider to build capacity for HIV prevention interventions and
other sexual health behavior change approaches to mainstream HIV/AIDS among non-HIV/AIDS
youth serving agencies. The provider will identify and form partnerships, assess the capacities
and barriers of agencies, and discern the most appropriate HIV/AIDS prevention components.
The provider will also work with the agencies on recruiting and training peer educators.

In developing the program activity, applicants are encouraged to refer to the 2007 HIV/EPI
report, the 2007 Youth and HIV Prevention Initiative Plan, and the 2007 Youth Risk Behavior
Survey. Also, please note that services now available in the District include: expanded urine-
based testing for STDs; youth and HIV social marketing campaign with internet texting service.

Specific Required Program Elements:

       Assessment and analysis of District youth provider community, and recruitment and
        retention of partner organizations.

       Development of a capacity-building plan that clearly defines number and types of
        providers to be reached; strategies for engaging non-HIV/AIDS youth serving
        organizations; stigma reduction approaches, and training and implementation of peer
        educators.

       Develop and implement a capacity-building approach that includes: training tools for
        providers, follow-up technical assistance, identifies key provider facilitators and barriers
        for uptake, recognizes potential provider issues.

       Collaborates with HAA on development of best practices for linkages between HIV/AIDS
        services providers and non-HIV/AIDS youth serving organizations.

       Performance and evaluation plan.

Program Activity Plan Evaluation Criteria:

       Demonstrates knowledge of and experience in best practices in youth serving
        community. On-the-ground implementation experience in delivering youth services and
        establishing partnerships with organizations.


                                                25
                                                                                           
      Demonstration of cultural sensitivity and diversity with youth populations, especially
       program approaches for stigma reduction and peer educator recruitment and training.

      Detailed work plan on training and technical assistance to build capacity for delivering
       effective interventions; also, quality assurance program for appropriate performance of
       prevention activities.

      Performance and evaluation plan for documenting the reach, effectiveness, and impact
       of capacity building activities. Includes targets for number and types of providers to be
       reached and outcomes for program goals.




2.3 Faith-based Leadership and HIV Mainstreaming
Up to one Award, up to $150,000



Faith-based organizations fill a unique and meaningful role in our society. It has
been estimated that over 80% of the world‘s population identifies with some type
of religion. Communities of faith have deep historical roots and have profoundly
shaped human culture. They possess tremendous legitimacy, credibility and
authority for many people. The faith community is among the most important
structures at the community level in reaching people on a regular and repeated
basis.

When HIV/AIDS originally emerged as a devastating
threat to District residents, many members of the
faith community rose to the challenge and offered
compassion and care to countless individuals with
dignity and grace. Twenty-five years later, the
District of Columbia is experiencing a ―modern HIV
epidemic‖—modern in both its sheer size and
complexity, that sees a greater number of persons
and diversity of risk than ever before. In this
environment where HIV is so present, individuals
may not recognize their own personal risk and may
not know where to turn for support and assistance.
For the District to achieve major gains in the fight
against HIV, we must empower all residents to
engage in responses for themselves, their families,


                                              26
                                                                               
and their communities. Thus, the District is committed to reaching residents
through the communities in which they live and the health services that they use.

As part of this commitment, the District is seeking to galvanize participation of
faith-based organizations in to increase the number of individuals who: are aware
of the current state of HIV in our communities; have access to accurate
information on HIV and have the ability to assess their personal risks and risk
behaviors; understand what actions can protect them from HIV infection or help
stay healthy if they are HIV-positive; are willing to engage in meaningful dialogue
on individual, family, and community-level responses; understand what HIV
prevention and care services are available and how to access them; are willing
and skilled in communicating with their children and family members on sensitive
issues including relationships, sex and drugs, and HIV/AIDS; are empowered to
demand a standard-of-care from their medical providers to deliver routine HIV
testing services.

The purpose of this Program Activity for Faith-based Leadership and HIV
Mainstreaming is to fund a single organization to support faith-based leaders to
upgrade their current knowledge of the HIV situation and response, to effectively
and accurately mainstream the topic of HIV into their current programs, to link
their members with and promote uptake of existing HIV prevention and care
services, to develop additional innovative programs and services when
appropriate, and to encourage greater networking and partnership among faith
leaders and faith organizations on strengthening the HIV response.

Applicants are encouraged to refer to the 2007 Epi Profile and Fact Sheets in
preparation of their submission. Also, applicants should be aware of that a
―Places of Worship Needs Assessment‖ is anticipated to be completed in August
and September 2008 by HAA and the Places of Worship Advisory Board. The
results of this assessment should be used to help guide program implementation.

Specific Required Program Elements:

       Recruit, train and provide technical assistance to faith-based leaders to
        mainstream HIV messages, education and prevention activities into
        current services, as well as develop new programs when appropriate.
       Partner faith organizations/places of worship with long-standing effective
        HIV programs and expertise with faith organizations that are newly
        starting to engage in or scale up HIV activities for mentorship, support,
        and sharing of strategies/best practices.
       Support the faith community with appropriate and accurate tools and
        resources for HIV-related activities.

                                         27
                                                                                           
      Incorporate local information and data, including the ―Places of Worship
       Needs Assessment‖ into ongoing project development and
       implementation
      Participate in District activities intended to share best practices on HIV
       and faith-based organizations. Specifically, participate with and assist in
       leading HAA‘s Places of Worship Advisory Board.
      Performance monitoring and evaluation plan, including targets of the
       number of leaders to effectively mainstream HIV and the number of
       persons reached through those mainstreaming efforts.


Program Activity Plan Evaluation Criteria:

      Organization with demonstrated experience leading Inter-faith activities and engaging
       faith leaders, and experience in recruiting and engaging the faith community in health
       and/or community concerns.

      Demonstrated knowledge of HIV/AIDS issues and services and has established linkages
       to community providers for a range of HIV prevention, testing, care, treatment and
       other supports for people living with HIV and their caregivers.

      Organization will develop plan to apply available data/assess capacity of faith based
       community, determine which of organizations would benefit from this capacity building
       assistance, what programs or activities are already in place, and what activities would
       best accomplish the goal of increasing the participation of faith-based groups in
       stemming the HIV epidemic in the district.

      Implementation plan for establishing partnership/mentorship/twinning relationships
       among faith organizations, including identification of and support for expert faith-based
       organizations as mentors, and identifying, adapting or developing appropriate tools and
       resources.

      Participation and shared coordinating role in HAA Faith Based Advisory Board.

      Data collection for ongoing assessments and tracking of progress of measurable
       outcomes. Outcomes include increased number of faith leaders with up-to-date
       knowledge/skills in HIV, increased number of faith organizations mainstreaming HIV into
       existing activities, increase number of persons reached with HIV information, increased
       number of persons accessing HIV prevention and/or care services, and increased
       number of faith organizations accessing technical assistance and best practices from
       other faith organizations.




                                              28
                                                                              
2.4 Couples HIV Counseling and Testing Services (CHCT)
Up to one award, CTR provider, up to $100,000

A recent DC survey of heterosexuals found that many persons were in stable
committed relationships, and that condom usage was low. However, about half
of those persons did not know their partner‘s HIV status. The combination of not
using condoms and not knowing your own and your partner‘s status may lead to
HIV exposure or infection within a relationship that may be perceived as ‗safe‘
due to its intimacy and commitment level. These risks are magnified in
relationships where one or both partners have additional sex partners outside the
relationship. This is true for all types of couples: heterosexual, homosexual,
transgendered, young, mature, married and unmarried.

Currently, HAA funds no counseling and testing services that are formally
designed for couples to get tested together and receive their results together.
General principles of couples‘ services include:

      Providing clear, accurate, and culturally sensitive prevention messages
       tailored to the couple‘s life stage and reasons for seeking HIV testing
       services
      Mitigating tension and diffusing blame by focusing on the present and
       future
      Dispelling myths about HIV transmission
      Creating an environment that is safe for disclosure of HIV status among
       partners

Couples HIV counseling and testing services (CHCT) are may require a
substantive shift from individual-level counseling and testing approaches.
Current overall DOH counseling, testing, and referral priorities remain on
routinizing HIV testing services for individuals and identifying HIV-infected
persons earlier in the course of their disease so that they may adopt preventive
behaviors and receive appropriate care services. In addition however, CHCT
may serve a primary prevention purpose by promoting dialogue and safer, more
informed decision-making regarding HIV within stable couples, also enhancing
family and community-level awareness and responses to HIV.

In CHCT, the couple‘s issues are more important than individual issues. In a safe
environment, the couple may reveal feelings that have not been discussed
previously within the couple. CHCT is NOT marriage or relationship counseling:
the couple—not the counselor—is ultimately responsible for what happens in the
relationship. Research shows that with support, couples do make it through the
difficulties and challenges that may arise from being tested for HIV together.



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                                                                                               
The purpose of this Program Activity for Couples HIV Testing Services is to fund
an existing HIV counseling, testing and referral provider to develop and
implement a program that provides couples-level counseling and testing
services, and to gain early experience that will inform the potential expansion of
CHCT in DC.

Applicants are encouraged to refer to the following information in preparation of
their program: National HIV Behavioral Survey slide set; EBI Project Connect,
addressing counseling in black heterosexual couples; Couples HIV Counseling
and Testing Intervention and Training Curriculum—PEPFAR.
http://www.cdc.gov/nchstp/od/gap/CHCTintervention/page2.htm Note that while this
curriculum is not designed for/not directly appropriate for use in the US, it provides a useful
platform for adaptation and effectively highlights key principals of couples-level testing services.
Some of the information in this announcement was derived directly from these materials.



Specific Required Program Elements:

       Develop of protocols/adaptation of training materials

       Provide of couples-level HIV testing services

       Implement an approach to recruiting couples for these services and
        linkages for positive persons to care and treatment.

       Evaluate services and program effectiveness

       Demonstrate a willingness to share lessons learned, approaches, and
        materials for use and adaptation by other CTR providers in
        DC/participation in CTR providers‘ forum/willingness to participate as
        technical implementation expert in capacity-building exercises & trainings
        for other CTR providers

Program Activity Plan Evaluation Criteria:

       Demonstrated experience working with target population, as well as experience
        providing counseling and testing services specifically and HIV prevention services in
        general to this and/or other risk groups in the District of Columbia.

       Demonstration of cultural sensitivity and diversity with target populations.

       Established relationships with other community providers to recruit potential clients to
        coordinate and link services.

                                                 30
                                                                                         
      Provides feasible implementation plan that includes projections of possible impact
       through targets of number of persons reached and amount of risk reduction achieved.
      Willingness to collaborate with HAA in the sharing of best practices and implementation
       experiences with other providers for the expansion of couples services over time.
      Describes systems and protocols in place to make and track referrals and linkages to the
       health and social services needed by the target population.
      Evaluation plan/protocol will adequately assess the performance of the program,
       including monitoring reported behavior changes in the target population. Willingness to
       collaborate with HAA should expanded opportunities for more intensive evaluation
       become arise.




2.5 Foster Parents Matter!
Up to one award, to support roll-out with CFSA/foster-parents, up to $75,000

The CDC-developed Parents Matter! Program is a community-based family
intervention designed to promote positive parenting and effective parent-
child communication about sexuality and sexual risk reduction. Its ultimate
goal is to reduce sexual risk behavior among adolescents. PMP offers parents
instruction and guidance in general parenting skills related to decreased
sexual risk behavior among youth (e.g., relationship building, monitoring)
and sexual communication skills necessary for parents to effectively convey
their values and expectations about sexual behavior—as well as critical HIV,
STD, and pregnancy prevention messages—to their children. It was originally
developed as a skills-building intervention for parents of pre-sexual children,
ages 4th to 6th grade, to establish early patterns of effective communications
to last a lifetime.

Children in the foster care system are at even higher
risk of lacking stable positive parenting and effective
parent-child communication. Foster parents are often
dedicated people who care for multiple children over the
course of their parenting experience. Some foster
parents may routinely care for specific age groups of
children, such as pre-teens or teenagers; other foster
parents may care for children of substantially different ages over time. While
foster parents may sometimes face unique challenges in establishing effective
parent-child communication regarding sexuality and sexual risk reduction, we
believe there are also unique opportunities for Parents Matter! to impact parents
and children in the foster care system.


                                              31
                                                                               
The purpose of this Program Activity for Foster Parents Matter! is to fund one
organization that has established capacity in the traditional Parents Matter!
program to support the adaptation and implementation for foster parents and for
parents working to regain custody of their children as part of existing DC Child
and Family Services Administration (CFSA) meetings, trainings, and activities.
Note that program plan must be approved by both HAA and CFSA prior to award
being made.

A summary of elements of the CDC Parents Matter! Program can be found at the
following link:
http://www.cdcnpin.org/2007_National_HIV_Prev_Conf/Public/ViewDocume
nt.aspx?DocumentID=d402235f-c897-43a0-a942-dd8d1779f6b6

Specific Required Program Elements:

      Plan for adapting and implementing Parents Matter! among foster parents
       and/or parents working to regain guardianship. Plan should identify
       possible critical new issues and barriers related to working with this parent
       population, and should provide potential for successfully addressing
       unique issues that arise. Should highlight approaches to recruiting and
       training the parent leaders of the sessions.

      Delivery of adapted Parents Matter! Program to foster parents and/or
       parents working to regain guardianship of their children in conjunction with
       CFSA activities for parents. Projected impact based on number of parents
       reached and average or actual number of children in the pre-teen or teen
       years that they care for each year.

      Monitoring and Evaluation Plan

Program Activity Evaluation Criteria:

      Organization has completed training and has experience implementing
       Parents Matter! Program. Preference will be given to organizations who
       have at least 12 months experience in implementation and present data
       regarding parents trained. If organizations without Parents Matter
       experience would like to be considered, they must make a strong
       argument as to their relevant skills and experience and present a capacity-
       building plan.

      Highlights foreseeable barriers to implementing Parents Matter! among
       this new group of foster parents and/or parents working to resume


                                         32
                                                                                          
       guardianship of their children. Provides a feasible implementation plan
       that addresses these barriers or allows the opportunity to respond to
       barriers and new issues as they arise.

      Willingness to work with HAA and CFSA to adapt Parents Matter! as
       needed and to organize delivery of intervention in accordance with
       existing CFSA activities and processes.

      Performance monitoring and evaluation plan is reasonable and sufficient.
       Targets and timeline are well defined. Willingness to work with HAA and
       CDC if opportunities for a more intensive evaluation of the adapted
       program arise.


2.6 Innovator Interventions
At least one award of $25,000-$100,000.

Note that while non-funded proposals will not be made public, all ideas and programs submitted
will be kept on file by HAA and may be used to develop future competitive funding opportunities
open to all applicants.

The District is seeking to lead the nation in creating a ‗modern response‘ to our
‗modern epidemic.‘ Core principals in this response are using relevant data and
information to identify and implement evidence-based practice that are
appropriately targeted and serve the large scale of the epidemic here. There is
also a need, however, to continue to identify unique approaches that are efficient,
effective and sustainable. This may include addressing some of the core drivers
or associated complex social factors related to HIV risk. It may include
innovative solutions that lead to ward-level ‗social tipping points‘ for risk
reduction, uptake of prevention and treatment services, or empowerment of
individuals and communities to demand high quality and standard of care health
services. It may include bridging the gaps between specialty providers and
services such as reproductive health services and HIV/AIDS services. It may
include combining existing services into desirable packages of care/interventions that
are more appealing and more effective together than when taken alone.

The purpose of this Program Activity for Innovator Interventions is to fund one or more
innovative HIV prevention programs that address the specific needs of the residents of
DC. Ward-level activities are encouraged, and if successful the program approach may
be expanded to other wards and other providers over time. Of particular interest are
activities that promote community mobilization and stigma reduction through regular


                                              33
                                                                                    
and repeated activities, or that serve extremely hard-to-reach populations at high risk
for HIV, or that promote collaboration and synergies between usually disparate services.

Specific Required Program Elements:

      Intervention with: defined goals and objectives; core elements of the intervention
       that are clearly defined and maintained in the delivery; prevention approach that
       is reasonable and preferably is embedded in a broader context that is relevant to
       the target population.
      Population assessment, access, recruitment, retention, and follow-up plans.
      Approach to capacity-building or preparations for this intervention (TA needs,
       training needs, staffing needs, etc) .
      Performance monitoring and evaluation plan, including targets and projected
       impact of persons served/risk reduction achieved. Special evaluation approach if
       needed to assess the prevention outcomes of the intervention.

Program Activity Plan Evaluation Criteria:

      Proposal demonstrates: experience with the target population; adherence to
       sound principals and key elements of successful behavior change or other
       evidence-based interventions; knowledge of HIV/AIDS issues and services;
       linkages to community providers for a range of HIV prevention, testing, care,
       treatment and other supports for people living with HIV and their caregivers.

      Proposed activity responds to clear public health need, has high probability of
       success and is likely to have important impact on the target population, by
       reaching large numbers of people, accomplishing significant harm reduction, or
       markedly enhancing the effectiveness of an existing intervention; demonstrates
       a high degree of innovation or creative combination of services; effectively
       leverages existing community resources;

      If the program is demonstrated to be effective, the model/approach lends itself
       to expansion to greater number of clients or to other wards; replication by other
       providers is feasible;

      Organization is willing to share lessons learned, and to collaborate with HAA in
       providing support and technical assistance to additional providers for
       implementation;




                                           34
                                                                                        
      Performance monitoring and evaluation plan is reasonable and sufficient.
       Targets and timeline are well defined. Willingness to work with HAA and CDC if
       opportunities for a more intensive evaluation of the adapted program arise.


Program Activity Details—AREA 3

3.1 Partner Services—Capacity Building for Counseling, Testing,
and Referral Providers (CDC-funded)
Up to one award, up to $140,000

This area is intended to enhance the impact of current DOH/HAA expansion of Partner
Counseling and Referral Services in order to diagnose more HIV-infected persons earlier
in the course of their disease and to link more known HIV-infected persons back into
prevention and care services. A substantial proportion—up to 25%--of HIV-infected
individuals are not aware of their infection. Lack of awareness creates missed
opportunities for both prevention of ongoing transmission and for maintaining the
health of the infected person.

There are emerging date that indicates that Partner Counseling and Referral Services
(PCRS), long a mainstay of traditional sexually transmitted disease (STD) control efforts,
is one of a number of public health strategies to control and prevent the spread of both
STDs and HIV. Through PCRS, many of whom are unsuspecting of their risk, are
informed of their possible to STDs including HIV and are provided with counseling,
testing, and referral services.

Early experience with PCRS for HIV in DC reveals that approximately 80% of persons
newly testing HIV-positive will participate in partner service activities if these services
are offered. Nearly all identified partners have accepted testing, with approximately
30% testing positive—many of whom were not aware of their risk or status. Partner
services also allows the opportunity to connect known HIV-positive partners back into
care and prevention services.

DOH/HAA wants to ensure that all newly diagnosed persons have access to partner
services from the time of their initial positive test. To achieve this goal, DOH/HAA is
committed to scaling up the availability of partner services, and to building the capacity
of District HIV counseling and testing providers to facilitate their clients’ access to and
use of partner services. DOH/HAA scale-up efforts entail full integration of HIV partner


                                             35
                                                                                             
services into the routine STD PCRS system, and are intended to achieve scale of offering
services to at least 500 newly diagnosed persons in the next year, and up to 1000 newly
diagnosed persons in the following year. Innovative programs such as internet partner
notification and social network testing supports will also be expanded.

The purpose of this Program Activity for Partner Services is to provide up to $140,000 in
CDC-based funding to a single organization to build the capacity of public, private, and
community HIV counseling and testing partners to understand the importance and
availability of DOH/HAA Partner Services and to perform initial partner or social network
assessments for follow-up by the DOH/HAA Partner Services team.

Specific Required Program Elements:

      Provides credibility as a trainer and capacity-builder for partner services through direct
       knowledge and experience working with newly diagnosed clients.

      Development of a capacity-building plan that clearly defines number and types of
       providers to be reached, with prioritization of partners to reflect volume of testing,
       feasibility and potential impact of increasing uptake of partner services. Note that
       awardee will be provided with information on partners currently directly funded by or
       receiving free test kits from DOH/HAA as a group of priority providers.

      Develop and implement a capacity-building approach that includes: training tools for
       providers, follow-up technical assistance, identifies key provider facilitators and barriers
       for uptake, recognizes potential client barriers and facilitators to partner services.

      Collaborates with HAA on development of best practices for linkages between
       counseling and testing providers and the scale up of partner services in the
       context of evolving CDC Guidelines.

      Performance and evaluation plan.

Program Activity Plan Evaluation Criteria:

      Demonstrates knowledge of and experience in best practices in STD or HIV PCRS.
       On-the-ground implementation experience in delivering partner services,
       counseling newly diagnosed persons, conducting social network outreach is
       highly desirable.

      Experience in training or capacity-building, especially for implementation of new
       approaches to services and use of new tools and standard operating procedures
       such as those needed to support partner reviews. Demonstrates and

                                               36
                                                                                
    understanding of how providers may need to tailor supports and approaches to
    address specific population needs in a culturally relevant way.

   Willingness to collaborate with HAA on development of partner service protocols
    for communications and referrals between counseling and testing providers and
    the DOH/HAA PCRS team, and to incorporate CDC Guidelines for Partner Services
    into trainings and implementation once they become available.

   Performance and evaluation plan for documenting the reach, effectiveness, and
    impact of capacity-building activities. Includes targets for number and types of
    providers to be reached, and indicates willingness to collaborate with HAA on
    development of final list and timeline for priority providers.




                                       37
                                                                                   

   APPLICATION ELEMENTS

       I.     HAA Assurance Packet


       II.    Executive Summary (Required Template)


       III.   Background, Need, and Impact Description (up to 7
              pages)


       IV.    Organizational Capacity Description (up to 10 pages)


       V.     Partnership, Linkages and Referrals Description (up to
              5 pages)


       VI.    Program Activity Plan (one for each activity—up to 15
              pages for each activity)
              i.      Program Activity Narrative, including evaluation plan (xx
                      pages)

              ii.     Work Plan (Required Template)

              iii.    Budget (Required Template)


       VII. Attachments


 *Limited Application: Add-on for Primary Care and Case
  Management Providers
The Limited Application applies ONLY to Program Activity 1.13: For eligible applicants
who are established HIV Primary Care and Case Management Providers, and who are
applying ONLY for activity 1.13 in this RFA, a Limited Application will be accepted.
Limited Application consists of:


                                           38
                                                                                                
        I. Assurance Packet

        II. Brief Description of Organization and Services (1-2 pages)

        III. Program Activity and Monitoring Description: (3-5 pages)

                See Program Details Section 1.13 for more information.

        IV. Budget: (1 page)


        APPLICATION SUBMISSION PROCEDURES
            1. Pre-application Conferences
        Two Pre-Application Conferences will be held, on July 21 and July 24, 2008. On each day,
        the morning session, from 10:30 am to 12 pm, will provide an overview of the
        requirements that are common to all RFAs issued on July 18, 2008. The afternoon
        sessions, from 1:30 pm to 3:30 pm, will address issues specific to the programmatic
        requirements of each RFA.

        The conferences will be held in the 5th Floor Conference Room at the HIV/AIDS
        Administration, 64 New York Avenue NE, Suite 5001.


            2. Internet
        Applicants who received this RFA via the Internet shall provide the District of dependent
        Columbia, Department of Health, and Office of Partnerships and Grants Services with
        the information listed below, by contacting Terrell.Powell@dc.gov*. Please be sure to
        put “RFA Contact Information” in the subject box.

                   Name of Organization
                   Key Contact
                   Mailing Address
                   Telephone and Fax Number
                   E-mail Address
* Please note the NOFA released on Julybe used to provide updates and/or addenda to the Prevention
          This information shall 11, 2008 incorrectly listed this contact information.
          and Intervention Services RFA.




                                                      39
                                                                                
 3. Submit LOI (not required but requested)
    A letter of intent (LOI) is not required, but this information will assist HAA in
    planning for the review process. Please fax only one LOI per application to HAA,
    using the template in Attachment A, no later than 5 p.m. on July 31, 2008. The
    letter of intent should be faxed to Ricardo Branic at (202) 671-4860.



 4. Check Assurances, complete and submit Assurance packet, confirm with HAA
    Assurance Review Team that the packet is complete and sufficient.

        a. We recommend that assurance packet is submitted to Sheree Avent by
           August 11 and that applicants CONFIRM assurance packet has been
           judged complete PRIOR TO the close date of this RFA. Applications with
           incomplete assurance packets after the close of the RFA will not be
           reviewed. Ms. Avent may be reached at (202) 671-4900 and
           sheree.avent@dc.gov.

 5. Prepare application according to the following format:

        a. Font size: 12-point unreduced
        b. Spacing: Double-spaced
        c. Paper size: 8.5 by 11 inches
        d. Page margin size: 1 inch
        e. Numbering: Sequentially from page 1 (Application Profile, Attachment B)
           to the end of the application, including all charts, figures, tables, and
           appendices.
        f. Printing: Only on one side of page
        g. Binding: Only by metal (binder) clips or by rubber bands; do not bind in
           any other way

 6. Submit one original hardcopy, and one CD of your application to HAA by 5 p.m.
    on August 18, 2008. Applications delivered after that deadline will not be
    reviewed or considered for funding. Applications must be delivered to:

District of Columbia Department of Health

HIV/AIDS Administration

                                          40
                                                                                    
  1st Floor Conference Room

  64 New York Avenue NE

  Washington DC 20002

  The CD must have the following separate components of your application:

   1. Executive Summary

   2. Applicant Profile

   3. Background, Need and Impact Description

   4. Organizational Capacity Description

   5. Partnership, Linkages and Referral Description

   6. Program Activity Plan (one for each activity)

                              i.   Program Activity Narrative, including evaluation plan

                              ii. Work Plan (Required Template)

                              iii. Budget (Required Template)

   7. Attachments

The original hard copy and CD must each be submitted in separate envelopes. Each of
the envelopes must have attached a copy of the Application Receipt (Attachment C).




APPLICATION EVALUATION CRITERIA

       I.     HAA Assurance Packet
              Required, not scored. [1 packet in good standing required from each
              organization]


       II.    Executive Summary (Required Template)
              Required, not scored.


                                            41
                                                                                  
       Template includes Summary Budget


III.   Background, Need, and Impact Description
       15 points

       The extent to which the applicant:

       I.     demonstrates a clear understanding of the needs, gaps, and issues
              affecting the selected population(s) and documents a clear need for the
              proposed program activities;

       II.    includes data and other supporting evidence to justify the proposed
              approach and target audience(s) and presents sources of such data;

       III.   demonstrates the potential for significant impact and success in
              achieving the selected goal for the selected priority population;

       IV.    describes how the proposed activities enhance or complement existing
              or planned activities of the applicant’s organization.




IV.    Organizational Capacity Description
       20 points

       i.     Demonstrated experience in serving the target population(s). (Please
              explain how long you have provided services and describe what
              kinds of services have been provided, the outcomes of services
              you provided, and your relationship with the community.)

       ii.    Evidence of staff and organizational expertise and performance in
              activities and services related to those proposed in this application.
              (Please present any relevant performance results from prior or related
              activities.)

       iii.   Structure, management and staffing, and administrative/fiscal
              management supports: Describe how you will ensure that staff


                                     42
                                                                          
       members reflect the target population and have a history of
       experience working with the proposed target population or can
       demonstrate proven effectiveness in working with the target
       population or on the proposed interventions. (Please describe, as
       a group, the characteristics of your key program staff in terms of
       experience working with the target population, gender,
       race/ethnicity, HIV serostatus, area of risk expertise, or other
       relevant factors.) Describe past management of governmental
       grant funds, and/or current administrative structure in place to
       support effective management.

iv.    Overall monitoring & evaluation system and expertise—please
       describe: current system of data collection and methods for
       reporting HIV prevention activities including data system
       specifications and data management information systems;
       capacity to collect and report client-level data for HIV prevention
       services and the effect of those services on client HIV risks and
       health service utilization; any barriers and facilitators to the
       collection of client level demographic and behavioral
       characteristics; plans to ensure data quality and security; any
       technical assistance needs to meet evaluation and monitoring
       requirements.

v.     Services Checklist—describe the core services your agency directly
       provides and the core services for which direct linkages to other service
       providers currently exist. This checklist will be kept on file as part of
       cataloguing available services and service providers in DC.

vi.    Effi Barry Program Participation (+5 points): Year-1 and Year-2 Effi Barry
       Program participants who have: attended 80% or more of required
       trainings/workshops; completed the signing of NOGAs for current year
       grant funds; completed the assigned program improvement plan.
       Please briefly describe how the Effi Barry Program has impacted
       your ability to provide HIV services.

vii.   Note: Organizations should only apply for the program services
       areas they can effectively support and implement during the
       upcoming year. That is, if an organization applies for multiple
       program activities, the organizational capacity evaluation will be


                              43
                                                                                     
                       based on the ability to realistically implement all of the proposed
                       plans, in keeping with the resource and scale-up approaches of
                       the application.


       V.      Partnership, Linkages and Referrals Description
               15 points

As stated in the Overview to this RFA, recognizing the complexity of individuals’ lives
means mobilizing a variety of existing services to meet critical needs. We DO NOT
encourage organizations to try to ‘do it all’ themselves. Organizations that are most
successful are often those that have well-defined missions and implement programs
within their comparative advantage, extending or changing their mission strategically
and consciously over time.
We do, however, encourage organizations to be aware of critical partnerships that are
available and can provide complementary services to clients. In this section, we are
NOT looking for general information on referrals to each and every service that might be
available. Instead, we ARE looking for you to identify the complementary services that
are most often most critical to the clients you serve, and to describe the direct linkages
you have established or plan to establish with a handful of close providers to serve your
clients’ needs.
Specifically, describe your plans for a referral and linkage network to ensure that clients
identified through your program have access to comprehensive services, including
additional prevention services as well as primary care and essential support services
(substance abuse treatment, mental health services, housing, etc.) that will maintain
HIV-positive individuals in systems of care and potentially provide relevant services to
most-at-risk HIV-negative individuals.
      Provide documentation of any agreements with providers and other agencies
       where your clients may be referred. Funded organizations must develop a formal
       agreement such as an MOA with core collaborating agencies within six months of
       funding.
      Explain how you will track linkages and their outcomes, as well as how you will
       collect and report data on referrals.
Specific areas of comment should include:
      How will you coordinate HIV prevention services with organizations that also
       serve your target population?
      How will you link to treatment providers for individuals living with HIV?




                                            44
                                                                                   

       VI.    Program Activity Plan*
              50 points

              Overall, the program activity plan will be scored on the feasibility of
              being fully and successfully implemented and having prevention
              impact on the target population(s). TARGETED POPULATION(S)
              MUST BE CLEARLY IDENTIFIED FOR EACH ACTIVITY. Approach
              includes overcoming barriers to reaching participants effectively over
              time, and including a reasonable plan to assess performance and
              effect. Proven capacity to deliver same or related services
              strengthens the feasibility of successful performance. Plan should
              explicitly include organizational and/or client-level targets.

              Each Program Activities Details section highlights specific
              required elements that should be included in your plan and
              specific evaluation criteria that will be applied in scoring. For
              applications for Area 1 Programs, please also review “Summary of
              Standard Elements—Area 1 Program Design and Implementation
              ” This summary provides a thorough description to routine best
              practices and required elements for strong Area 1 programs, on which
              the technical evaluation of your application will be based. It also
              highlights details to evaluating descriptions of these programs.

              i.      Program Activity Narrative, including Evaluation Plan (10
                      points for performance and evaluation plan component)

              ii.     Work Plan (Required Template Attachment D)

              iii.    Budget (Required Template Attachment E) –not scored


*Limited Application: Add-on for Primary Care and Case Management
Providers
The Limited Application applies ONLY to Program Activity 1.13: For eligible applicants
who are established HIV Primary Care and Case Management Providers, and who are
applying ONLY for activity 1.13 in this RFA, a Limited Application will be accepted.
Limited Application consists of:

       I. Assurance Packet (required, not scored)



                                           45
                                                                                             
        II. Brief Description of Organization and Services (35 points)

        Provide overview of your current organization and its mission, including number
        of clients routinely served with HIV Primary Care or Case Management Services,
        demographics and ward of clients, and additional experience demonstrating
        fiscal and programmatic organizational capacity.

        III. Program Activity and Monitoring Description (65 points)

        See Program Details Section 1.13 for complete description of evaluation criteria
        and funding priorities. Program Activity evaluation will be based on feasibility of
        prevention impact, either through high number or high risk of persons reached
        and opportunities for continued interactions over time.

        IV. Budget (required, not scored)



REVIEW PROCESS AND FUNDING DECISIONS


Applications will be reviewed by HAA staff and a panel of external reviewers. The applications
will be reviewed and scored based on the criteria below. It would be helpful for applicants to
review the criteria as that will give guidance on what will be considered a successful application.


Technical Review Panel

The technical review panel will be composed of HAA staff members who will examine each
application for technical accuracy and program eligibility prior to the applications evaluation by
external reviewers.


External Review Panel

The external review panel will be composed of neutral, qualified, professional individuals who
have been selected for their unique experiences in human services, public health, data analysis,
health program planning and evaluation, social services planning and implementation. The
review panel will review, score and rank each applicant’s application, and when the review
panel has completed its review, the panel shall make recommendations for awards based on the
scoring process. DOH/HAA shall make the final funding determinations. Applicants' submissions
will be objectively reviewed against the following specific scoring criteria listed below.


                                                46
                                                                                    
In addition to your application’s comprehensive objective review, the following factors
may affect the funding decision:

   Preference for funding will be given to ensure that:
   Considerations will be given to both high and lower prevalence areas: the number of
    funded organizations may be adjusted based on the burden of infections in the
    jurisdiction as measured by AIDS reporting.
   Funded applicants are balanced in terms of targeted racial/ethnic minority groups.
    (The number of funded applicants serving each racial/ethnic minority group may be
    adjusted based on the burden of infection in that group as measured by HIV or AIDS
    reporting.)
   Funded applicants are balanced in terms of targeted risk behaviors and HIV
    serostatus. (The number of funded applicants serving each risk group may be
    adjusted based on the burden of infection in that group as measured by HIV or AIDS
    reporting.)
   Funded applicants are balanced in terms of geographic distribution. (The number of
    funded applicants may be adjusted based on the burden of infection in the jurisdiction
    as measured by HIV or AIDS reporting.)
   Funded organizations have substantial experience serving the proposed target
    population.


Award amounts are dependent upon receipt of funds obtained through the District’s
cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for
calendar year 2009 and through District appropriations for the 2009 fiscal year.



POST-AWARD ACTIVITIES
Successful applicants will receive a Notice of Grant Award (NOGA) from the DOH HAA
Grants Management Office. The NOGA shall be the first binding, authorizing document
between you and DOH HAA. The NOGA will be signed by an authorized grants
management officer and mailed to the fiscal officer or executive director identified in
the application. Next you will be required to meet DOH HAA staff and submit final Table
A’s (describe) and budget and justification revisions, AND sign a grant agreement
between you organization and the DOH HAA

Grantees must submit monthly data reports and quarterly progress and outcome
reports using the tools provided by HAA and following the procedures determined by


                                            47
                                                                                  
HAA. If you are funded, reporting forms will be provided during your grant-signing
meeting with HAA. For FY09, we performing an in-depth review of reporting forms and
variables, and will be both soliciting input on streamlining reports and selecting key
variables, and also implementing data quality measures to ensure the reported data are
valid and consistent across providers.

Continuation funding for Year 2 is dependent upon the availability of funds for the
stated purposes, fiscal and program performance under the Year 1 grant agreement,
and willingness to incorporate new District-level directives, policies, or technical
advancements that arise from the community planning process, evolution of best
practices, or other locally relevant evidence.




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BUDGET DEVELOPMENT AND DESCRIPTION
You will need to provide a detailed line-item budget and budget
justification that includes the type and number of staff you will need to
successfully put into place your proposed activities. You must follow
the model of the sample budget included Attachment E.



HAA may not approve or fund all proposed activities. Give as much
detail as possible to support each budget item. List each cost
separately when possible.



Provide a description for each job, including job title, function, general
duties, and activities related to this grant: the rate of pay and whether it is hourly or salary; and
the level of effort and how much time will be spent on the activities (give this in a percentage,
e.g., 50% of time spent on evaluation).



The applicant should list each cost separately when possible, give as much detail as possible to
support each budget item, and demonstrate how the operating costs will support the activities
and objectives it proposes.



The applicant shall use a portion of their proposed budget for evaluation activities.

Indirect Costs

If your organization has a Federally Negotiated Indirect Cost Agreement, you will be required to
submit a copy of that agreement in lieu of providing detail of costs associated with this line. You
may charge indirect at a rate not to exceed 10% of the total projected direct costs of your
program.

If your organization does not have a Federally Negotiated Indirect Cost Agreement, you will be
required to provide detail of what costs are captured in your indirect cost line not to exceed
10% of the total projected direct cost of your program.




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ASSURANCES
        The HIV/AIDS Administration requires all applicants to submit various Certifications,
Licenses, and Assurances. This is to ensure all potential sub-grantees are operating with proper
DC licenses. The complete compilation of the requested documents is referred to as the
Assurance Package.

        The HIV/Administration classifies assurances packages as two types: those “required to
submit applications” and those “required to sign grant agreements.” Failure to submit the
required assurance package will likely make the application ineligible for funding consideration
[required to submit assurances] or in-eligible to sign/execute grant agreements [required to sign
grant agreements assurances].

          A list of current HAA sub-grantees with valid assurance packages on file with HAA will
be available for review at the pre-bidders conference. Current sub-grantees who do not attend
the pre-bidders conference may contact their grant monitor after the conference to review the
list of their valid assurance packages on file. Organizations with confirmed valid assurance
package on file will not be required to submit additional information.

The envelope with the assurances must have attached a copy of the Assurance Checklist
Attachment F.



AREA 1: CRITICAL TOOLS AND INFORMATION

        I.        List of Priority Target Populations
The below list is based on CDC target population definitions as prioritized by the HPCPG.
Additional populations may also be supported by program activities. Please identify the target
populations in your program narrative.




             Prevention for PLWHA

P1           HIV-positive Heterosexuals (men, women and /or couples)


P2           HIV-positive Injecting Drug Users (men, women)

P3           HIV-positive Black Men who Have Sex with Men



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P4       HIV-positive Men who have Sex with Men (White, Latino, Other)

P5       HIV-positive youth
      Prevention for Individuals Who are HIV-negative or Whose Status is Unknown:

N1       Black Heterosexuals (men, women and or couples)

N2       Latino Heterosexuals (men, women and or couples)

N3       Heterosexual Youth (men, women and or couples)

N4       Injecting Drug Users (men, women, and their sex partners)

N5       Black MSM

N6       White MSM

N7       Latino MSM

N8       Young Black MSM
         Prevention for Other Important Groups (not formally ranked by HPCPG)

X1       *Transgendered Persons (male-to-female, female-to-male, and their sex partners)

X2       *Sex Workers: Note—sex workers may belong to one or more of the categories
         above. However, the common issues relating to sex work and the complexity of
         related risks may require targeted interventions addressing this risk.
X3       *Previously incarcerated persons/re-entry residents (men, women, and their sex
         partners)
X4       *Other or mixed population—please identify or explain




       II.     Understanding Risk Behaviors
Different groups engage in different risk behavior, and there are different factors that
contribute to that risk behavior. To be effective, comprehensive HIV prevention
programs should use several components and strategies to address different risk
behaviors and the factors that contribute to those behaviors.

The District faces a “modern” epidemic, characterized by a large and complex
prevalence of the disease. Recent data show that heterosexual sexual contact is
becoming one of the leading modes of HIV transmission in the District, and substantial
new infections are still occurring among MSM and IDU. Among newly reported HIV (not
AIDS) cases, the proportion of cases attributed to heterosexual transmission accounted
for 37.4% of cases diagnosed from 2001 to 2006, while MSM transmission accounted for

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25.8% of cases. HIV cases attributed to injecting drug use accounted for 13% of cases
diagnosed in 2001-2006.

Links to additional information, including the 2007 Epidemiology Annual Report and fact
sheets on Injection Drug Users, Heterosexuals, Men Who Have Sex with Men, Women
and Youth, as well as fact sheets on HIV/AIDS in the eight wards, can be found on this
page: http://dchealth.dc.gov/doh/cwp/view,A,1371,Q,603431.asp

Prevention needs of Heterosexuals
A study conducted for HAA in 2006-2007 found that transmission of HIV among
heterosexuals in the District is impacted by three major factors:

      Stable committed relationships are not without risk: Most persons in stable
       committed relationships did not use condoms; yet approximately half of those in
       a stable relationship also did not know their partner’s HIV status. In addition,
       nearly half of the respondents who said they were in a relationship said they
       suspected their partner had other sex partners at the same time. In many cases,
       the responding individual also reported that they themselves had sex outside of
       the relationship.
      Lack of accurate risk perception and low rates of risk reduction behaviors: Old
       stereotypes of HIV remain, and many persons have not translated the context of
       our ‘modern epidemic’ into the perception that unsafe sex and lack of
       knowledge of HIV status give sufficient opportunities for HIV exposure. More
       than 70 percent of the 750 participants in the study did not use condoms when
       having vaginal sex. The study indicates that even though many men and women
       are having sexual relationships outside their primary relationship, and suspect
       that their partner is having sex outside the relationship, they engage in risky
       sexual behavior.
      Many missed opportunities for HIV screening: Although ongoing outreach to
       encourage HIV testing is important, studies show that many persons who are
       ALREADY being reached by health care providers are not being offered
       testing. Overall, half of the respondents who had seen a physician in the
       past 12 months had not been offered an HIV test. Moreover, ¾ of persons
       newly testing HIV-positive had seen a health care provider in the past year
       without having been diagnosed with HIV.
      Non-injection drugs and alcohol use are frequent and remain strong
       drivers of risky sexual behaviors.




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The majority of the participants in this study was African American (92%), over 30 years
old (61%) and lower income (60% had an annual household income under $10,000).
However, the above themes are likely important with a broad range of heterosexuals in
DC.

Prevention Needs of Men who have Sex with
Men (MSM)
Unprotected anal intercourse between an HIV+ and
an HIV- man remains a major risk for HIV
transmission among MSM. Correct and consistent
condom use has remained a major challenge for HIV
prevention, as does HIV disclosure and assumptions
regarding HIV status when not discussed. The
intimacy of skin-to-skin contact during intercourse is
a powerful and important draw. Some MSM feel their
sexual identity, as well as the hard-won goals of gay
sexual liberation, are based on having sex in a free
and un-constricted manner.
But men who have sex with men (MSM) are not a
single homogenous group, but represent a wide
variety of people, lifestyles and health needs. From
middle class gay men, to homeless runaways, to
injection drug users (IDUs) to incarcerated men, MSM have many different
identities and associated risks for HIV and other infectious diseases. MSM refers
to any man who has sex with a man, whether he identifies as gay, bisexual or
heterosexual.
Risk for HIV may also be embedded in other core issues such as dating and
intimacy, sexual desire and love, as well as alcohol and recreational drug use,
homophobia, abuse and coercion, racism and self-esteem. Some MSM face
challenges learning about dating, intimacy and forming relationships. Discomfort
with one's sexuality and identity can lead to sexual risk taking. Substance use
can serve as a trigger or an excuse for unprotected sex.


Prevention needs of Injecting Drug Users (IDUs)
The Department of Health estimates that there are between 10,000 and 12,000
injecting drug users (IDU). in the District. The District of Columbia HIV/AIDS
Epidemiology Annual Report 2007 reports that one-fifth of new HIV/AIDS infections in
2001-2006 were attributed to injection drug use. The Report also documents that the
District has the highest rate of HIV/AIDS infection in the country.



                                           53
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The primary risk factors that arise from injection drug use are sharing of injection
equipment (needles, syringes, cookers, etc.) and having unprotected sex with an
injection drug user. In addition to HIV, viral hepatitis may be even more easily
transmitted through the same behaviors. Comprehensive programs should target both
of these behaviors, including interventions that address the needs of the sexual partners
of injection drug users

To adequately address the intersection between drug use and HIV programs must consider the
challenge of working with different groups of IDUs.
Most difficult to reach, yet with the highest potential for preventing chronic infections, are new
injectors. Many drug users go for substantial periods of time before they become full-fledged
addicts. These users are still integrated into the general population and thereby bring the
danger of HIV infection into their social networks. This easily can go on anywhere from several
months to several years during which time the drug user may have numerous sexual partners
and share syringes with any number of other addicts. By contrast, many long-term users have
eventually been ostracized from “normal” communal relations, and more easily self-identify for
services and have less ongoing contact with non-injectors.
The challenge for reducing HIV transmission in this population includes creating public health
systems that foster meaningful contact between providers and “self-Identified” drug users as
well as new users who do not routinely self-identify. One important approach is needle
exchange programs that include linkage to other more fundamental services such as primary
medical care, mental health services, and addiction services. However, new users only rarely
participate in these needle exchange programs.
Programs for this population should help drug users cross the barriers presented by stigmas
associated with both HIV and drug use so that they might be better able to access the services
they need. They must also address the challenge of reaching drug users who have not yet
admitted to themselves the dangers associated with their drug use.



Prevention needs of Youth
HIV and other STDs are having a tremendous impact on young people ages 13 to 24 in
the District of Columbia. The combination of high risk behavior, incomplete or
misinformed health education, a lack of self-risk perception and prevention fatigue are
fueling increases in disease. Roughly one out of every 100 young people ages 13 to 24
in the District is living with HIV and HIV infection rates
tripled for the period 2000 to 2005 compared to the previous




                                                54
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five years, while Chlamydia rates are nearly three times the national average at up to
9%.

While youth under age 25 have represented up to 6% of all the reported DC AIDS cases,
HIV incidence among young people for 2001 through 2005 was nearly double at 10% of
all HIV cases. HIV infection among District youth is mostly the result of unprotected
sexual behavior. Among senior high school students, more than 40% report that they
are engaged in sexual intercourse with more than one partner and nearly one-third are
not using condoms. One out of eight middle school students have reported multiple sex
partners. Only about half of all District young adults under 25 are aware of their HIV
status or have actively sought an HIV test.

Addressing the needs of District youth will require a comprehensive HIV prevention
approach that addresses maintaining the negative status of young people, preventing
positive youth from further transmission and building capacity among non-HIV/AIDS
youth service providers to mainstream behavior change in non-stigmatized settings.
Moreover, given that most new infections in the District are occurring among persons in
their 30s and 40s, youth programs need to build skills and decision-making perspectives
that will prepare young persons for adulthood and last them a lifetime.

Research demonstrates the most successful HIV prevention programs are those that can
developmentally “meet the client where they are,” consider the cultural and
environmental context of that client’s decision-making experience and comprehensively
address the factors that contribute to the client’s decision-making and perception of
risk.

With young MSM, particularly black YMSM, at acute risk of infection, there is a
compelling need for effective community-level interventions that reach a larger portion
of the population than is possible with individual counseling or group-level
interventions.

There is also a need to build the capacity in non-HIV/AIDS youth serving programs to
incorporate HIV/AIDS prevention into the services they are already providing. Young
people may be more receptive to receive HIV information and counseling through
programs where HIV prevention is a complementary service.




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        III.     List of Recommended Core Approved Effective
                 Behavioral Interventions (EBI)
If you receive funding for Area 1 you must implement one of the Effective Behavioral
Interventions (EBI) listed below or recommended in the DC HIV Prevention Plan for
2006-2009.
http://doh.dc.gov/doh/frames.asp?doc=/doh/lib/doh/services/administration_offices/
hiv_aids/pdf/hiv_prevention_plan.pdf. Additional information on adapting EBIs or
choosing a non-EBI as a core intervention is provided in subsequent sections.

The below interventions were selected as priority interventions because they are relevant
to our populations, and because training is currently available or will be made available
shortly. Additional approved EBIs with less training support available are listed in the
above prevention plan.

Interventions                                       Type of Intervention               Target Population

1.11, 1.12 People Living with HIV
Organizations serving this population must provide one of the evidence-based interventions listed below. They must also
provide either Individual Prevention Counseling or Comprehensive Risk Counseling and Services (CRCS).

Healthy Relationships                               Group Level (GLI)                  All

Safety Counts                                       GLI                                IDUs and crack users

Together Making Choices (previously Teens           GLI                                HIV-positive Youth (13-24)
Linked to Care)

1.2 Persons who are HIV-negative or of unknown status: Heterosexuals
Organizations serving this population must provide one of the evidence-based interventions listed below. They may also
provide either Individual Prevention Counseling or Comprehensive Risk Counseling and Services (CRCS).

PROMISE                                             Community Level (CLI)              Men or women and their sex
                                                                                       partners (adults)

PROMISE                                             Community Level (CLI)              Men or women and their sex
                                                                                       partners (youth 13-24)


Real AIDS Prevention Project (RAPP)                 CLI                                Women and their sex partners

SISTA                                               GLI                                African American women




                                                   56
                                                                                                    
Interventions                                       Type of Intervention               Target Population

Project Connect                                     ILI/GLI                            Black Heterosexual
                                                                                       Couples/Black men and women

1.2 Persons who are HIV-negative or of unknown status: Injecting Drug Users
Organizations serving this population must provide one of the evidence-based interventions listed below. They may also
provide either Individual Prevention Counseling or Comprehensive Risk Counseling and Services (CRCS).

PROMISE                                             Community Level (CLI)              Men or women and their sex
                                                                                       partners

Safety Counts                                       GLI                                IDUs and crack users

Modelo de Intervención Psicomédica (MIP)            ILI                                Hispanics/Latinos and Blacks

1.2 Persons who are HIV-negative or of unknown status: MSM
Organizations serving this population must provide one of the evidence-based interventions listed below. They may also
provide either Individual Prevention Counseling or Comprehensive Risk Counseling and Services (CRCS).

d-up!                                                CLI                               Black MSM

Mpowerment                                           CLI                               White, Hispanic/Latino MSM

Popular Opinion Leader                               CLI                               White MSM

PROMISE                                             CLI                                Black, Latino or white MSM

Many Men, Many Voices                                GLI                               Black MSM

1.1, 1.2 Sex Workers

PROMISE                                             CLI                                Black, Latino or white MSM

 Safety Counts                                      GLI                                Black heterosexual females,
                                                                                       transgender women and MSM

1.3 Youth Prevention
Organizations serving this population must provide one of the evidence-based interventions listed below. They
may also provide either Individual Prevention Counseling or Comprehensive Risk Counseling and Services
(CRCS).

Community Promise                                       CLI                            All Youth

Real AIDS Prevention Project (RAPP)                     CLI                            Black Heterosexual and
                                                                                       YMSM


                                                   57
                                                                                       
Interventions                                       Type of Intervention   Target Population

d-up!                                                    CLI               Black YMSM

Together Learning Choices                                GLI               Latino, Black, White Youth
                                                                           living with HIV (13-24)

Popular Opinion Leader                                   CLI               Black YMSM

Street Smart                                             GLI               Female, Male Youth (11-18)

FOK + ImPACT (Focus on Youth with                        GLI               Black Youth (9-15) and their
ImPACT)                                                                    parents
1.4 Safe Re-entry: Men about to be release from jail

 Individual-level risk reduction intervention for   ILI                     Men about to be released from
 men soon to be released from jail, such as                                jail
 START




         IV.      Adapting Approved Core Interventions
You may adapt an approved core ‘EBI’ intervention originally designed for a different
target population to serve your particular target population, using the criteria described
in the HIV Prevention Plan for 2006-2009. If you are funded, you may request technical
assistance through HAA to make the adaptation. Your application must describe how
you have adapted or plan to adapt the intervention.

Organizations that wish to adapt an EBI intervention must complete the steps listed
below:

         1. Formative Evaluation: Before adapting an intervention, you must conduct an
         assessment or formative evaluation to determine the risk behaviors and other
         factors that put them at risk for HIV infection, including what message/s you
         need to be giving, and how best to deliver the messages and time your
         intervention to have the best chance of reaching the target population. You must
         find out whether risk determinants that were used in an intervention that has
         been shown to work apply to your new target population.



                                                    58
                                                                                    
       2. Conduct focus groups to learn what issues are most important to members of
       your new target population and their community. If what you find is similar to
       what was found in the original evidence-based intervention, then the
       intervention may be the one to choose for adapting. Focus groups should find
       out whether each of the core elements of the evidence-based program is doable
       and appropriate for the new target population and settings.

       3. Develop a logic model, a plan (often shown in a flow chart or table) that
       shows a sequence of activities that will be used to address a problem statement.
       These activities are then linked to measurable outcomes that show reduced HIV
       risk. Your logic model should fully describe the core elements of an intervention
       or strategy and how these activities work together to help prevent HIV. Links to
       information on logic models can be found on this CDC web page:
       http://www.cdc.gov/eval/resources.htm#logic%20model



       4. Review the logic model with HAA for comments and approval

       5. Pilot test to check how the intervention works in a small subgroup of the
       population you will serve. Pilot testing allows for real-life application of the
       adapted intervention to identify mismatches or problems that need to be fixed
       prior to full roll-out.


       V.     Criteria for New Core Interventions (not EBI)
You may choose to implement a theory-based intervention that is not included in the
list of recommended interventions, but you must meet the following CDC criteria.
Implementing a new core intervention requires considerable technical expertise and
implementation experience. The program must:

       1. Be based on behavior change theory or theoretical models.
       2. Have an intervention logic model. A description of the logic model must
          explain how the program is supported by formative research (e.g., needs
          assessment, evaluation). The logic model must illustrate the relationship
          between the intervention activities, behavioral determinants, and the
          intended short-term and long-term behavior outcome(s) of the intervention
          activities.
       3. Make appropriate use of additional effective behavior change strategies such
          as:


                                           59
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            (a) Building interpersonal skills, or

            (b) Using multiple delivery methods (e.g., counseling, group discussions,
            lectures, live demonstrations, and role plays/practice), or

            (c) Including two or more intervention sessions and an increased length of
            sessions, which have been shown in meta-analyses to be related to
            effectiveness of prevention interventions, or

            (d) Including more than four hours of total contact time, or

            (e) Including exposure to the intervention activities for three weeks or
            more.

       4. Have a recruitment strategy to reach persons at high risk of HIV acquisition
          or transmission (e.g., social networking).
       5. Have a stable history of implementing the proposed intervention for 12
          months or more (include a summary of initial target measures/goals with the
          outcome measures and actual number of contacts).
       6. Have documented history of successful recruitment and retention of the
          target population for the past 12 months.
       7. Have conducted process evaluation activities and outcome monitoring.


       VI. Summary of Standard Elements:

       Area 1 Program Design and Implementation:
Programs funded under Areas 1 should adhere to the following basic planning and
implementation tenets. These items should be discussed in the project narrative or other
sections of the application. Specific elements for evaluation of proposed programs are also
highlighted below. Programs must:

      Implement a recruitment strategy to reach persons at greatest risk for HIV
       acquisition or transmission (for example, a social networking component).
      Identify baseline, annual target levels, and design a method to collect critical
       process evaluation and outcome monitoring data and report required data
       monthly or quarterly to your HAA program and grant monitors .
      Identify a mechanism for ongoing feedback from your target clients for continuous
       improvement of your program. This may include convening an advisory board of your
       target population to assist you with programmatic decision-making and ensure

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                                                                                  
    your services are responsive to the needs of the target population. The target
    population should be involved in the design of the program, including the
    selection of the recruitment strategy and determining the use of incentives for
    the program.
   Link HIV-positive clients to medical care, Ryan White services providers and
    other relevant services (including screening for STDs, tuberculosis, and hepatitis)
    and to prevention services (including Partner Counseling and Referral Services),
    when appropriate, if your organization is unable to provide these services
    directly.
   Link high-risk individuals to other HIV prevention programs, and to HIV testing,
    STD screening, mental health and substance abuse services, when appropriate, if
    your organization cannot provide these services directly.
   Follow up on linkages and referrals to determine if your clients have accessed
    the services they were referred to, and follow up with those clients that did not
    access the services within two (2) weeks after the linkage was made.
   Within the first two months of funding develop a protocol to make and track
    linkages to care and prevention services and submit it to your program monitor
    for approval. Guidance on the content of the protocol and on a referral tracking
    form will be provided after grant awards have been made
   Within the first two months of funding, develop a formal agreement, such as a
    Memorandum of Agreement (MOA), with each agency that you intend to make
    referrals to or collaborate with on providing services to individuals identified
    through the program.
   Collaborate and coordinate HIV prevention services with other AIDS Service
    organizations and other relevant health care providers who provide care or
    prevention services to persons living with HIV/AIDS and to high-risk HIV-negative
    individuals.
   Collaborate and participate in the HIV prevention community planning process
    with the Department of Health. Participation can include attending HPCPG and
    HPCPG committee meetings or serving as a member of the HPCPG.
   Identify and address the capacity building needs of your program and participate
    in HAA-sponsored training on program development, implementation or
    evaluation.
   Send a copy of any proposed materials that are funded through this RFA to your
    program monitor, who will submit it to the Materials Review Committee for
    approval. Information on the criteria used to review materials and on how to
    submit materials will be provided after grant awards have been made. Materials
    paid with funds from this grant must include the name or logo of the DC
    Department of Health.

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The following questions translate the above Area 1 program elements and approaches to
how they may be evaluated in this proposal, and should be used to assist your preparation of
the program plan.

For each target population you will be providing services to:

      What program model did you select, why was this model chosen for the target
       population and what specific behavior and contributing factors will you target?
      How will you adapt and implement this program model?
      If you plan to implement an intervention that is not listed among the
       recommended interventions, provide the following information:
           o The behavior change theory or theoretical models that the intervention is
             based on.
           o An intervention logic model that explains how the program is supported
             by formative research and illustrates the relationship between the
             intervention activities, behavioral determinants, and the intended short-
             term and long-term behavior outcome/s of the intervention activities.
           o A description of the behavior change strategies used in the interventions,
             such as building interpersonal skills, using multiple delivery methods
             (e.g., counseling, group discussions, role plays/practice), the number of
             intervention sessions and contact hours and the program’s recruitment
             and retention strategies.
           o The organization’s history implementing the proposed intervention for 12
             months or more, including experience in recruitment and retention of the
             target population and process and outcome monitoring data.
      How will you ensure that program services reach high risk members of your
       selected target population and their partners?
      If you will target HIV-positive individuals, how will you ensure that program
       services reach members of your population who are living with HIV and provide
       services to their high risk partners who are HIV negative or who do not know
       their HIV status?
      What personal factors may act as barriers to adoption of HIV risk reduction
       strategies and behavior change of the target population and how will your
       program address them?
      What is/are your recruitment strategy/strategies? How did you involve the
       target population in selecting the recruitment strategy/strategies and


                                             62
                                                                                  
    determining the use of incentives for your program? List and describe how
    incentives will be used throughout your program.
   How will you maintain and retain individuals in your HIV prevention program
    model?
   How will your program activities address barriers to HIV prevention and issues of
    stigma and discrimination based on infection status, race, sexual orientation, or
    gender identity?
   Where will you provide HIV prevention services? Please describe the setting
    (describe all, if more than one).
   How will you ensure that your service delivery location is located in an area that
    is safe and easily accessible for the target population?
   How did you determine this setting was appropriate for and appealing to the
    target population (e.g., youth drop-in center, mental health and support
    services, bars/clubs, and other non-conventional settings)?
   What are your quality assurance strategies?
   How will you ensure services are culturally sensitive and relevant?
   How will you ensure client confidentiality?
   How will you collect and report process and monitoring data for this program
    model?
   What qualifications will you require of staff providing HIV prevention services?
   How will you train, support, and retain staff to provide these program models?




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TEMPLATES AND TOOLS

       I.     Letter of Intent


       II.    Application Check-list


       III.   Executive Summary Template


       IV.    Organizational Service Summary Check-list


       V.     Work Plan Template


       VI.    Categorical Budget Sample


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
HIV/AIDS in the District of Columbia
2007 Epidemiology Annual Report for the District of Columbia and Fact
Sheets on Injection Drug Users, Heterosexuals, Men Who Have Sex with Men, Women,
Youth and other populations, as well as Fact Sheets on HIV/AIDS in the District’s eight
wards:

http://dchealth.dc.gov/doh/cwp/view,A,1371,Q,603431.asp

District of Columbia HIV Prevention Plan for 2006-2009:

http://doh.dc.gov/doh/frames.asp?doc=/doh/lib/doh/services/administration_offices/
hiv_aids/pdf/hiv_prevention_plan.pdf



Information on Effective Interventions, from the CDC
      CDC’s Updated Compendium of Evidence-Based Interventions:
       http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/research/prs/evidence-based-interventions.htm

                                           64
                                                                                             
   Information on the Best-Evidence Interventions can be found here:
    http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/research/prs/best-evidence-intervention.htm#completelist
   Information on the Promising Evidence Interventions can be found here:
    http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/research/prs/promising-evidence-interventions.htm
   Additional information on several of the interventions describe above can be found
    on the following web sites:
         Provisional Procedural Guidance for Community Based Organizations (January
         2008):
         http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/prev_prog/AHP/resources/guidelines/pro_guidance.htm
         The Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions Project (DEBI)

         http://www.effectiveinterventions.org/index.cfm/fuseaction/ViewPage/page_id/1?
         CFID=471470&CFTOKEN=18308681&

         Replicating Effective Programs Plus., a CDC that site provides information on
         “boxed” interventions that can be ordered from the organizations that developed
         them. Training is also available on how to implement the interventions.
         http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/projects/rep/default.htm

    A.       Other Interventions
   The Intervention Selection Tool at this site run by the HIV/AIDS Research
    Program, University of California, will help you find appropriate interventions by
    behavioral risk group, race/ethnicity, gender and type of intervention. It includes
    information on interventions that are not part of the CDC’s compendium.
    http://choicehiv.org/interventions/interventions.php

   Model programs for different populations from the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies

    http://www.caps.ucsf.edu/projects/

   Principles of HIV Prevention in Drug-Using Populations, from the National Institute of
    Drug Abuse: http://drugabuse.gov/POHP/

   HIV Prevention Among Injecting Drug Users, from the CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/idu/

   A compendium of links related to constructing logic models (not HIV specific)
    from CDC's Evaluation Working Group:
    http://www.cdc.gov/eval/resources.htm#logic%20model

   The Center for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment Services (CHIPTS)
    is a collaboration of researchers from UCLA, Charles Drew University of
    Medicine and Science, Friends Research Institute, and RAND, has
    information on several interventions that are not part of the CDC compendium.


                                              65
                                                                                         
     http://chipts.ucla.edu/interventions/manuals/index.asp

     B.      Resources for Prevention with Positives
    Shortcut to CDC's Advancing HIV Prevention: New Strategies for a Changing
     Epidemic
     http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5215a1.htm

    Shortcut to Incorporating HIV Prevention into the Medical Care of Persons
     Living with HIV
     http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5212a1.htm

    Designing Primary Prevention for People Living with HIV:

     http://ari.ucsf.edu/pdf/primaryprevention.pdf

    Prevention with Positives: A Guide to Effective Programs and several other publications
     related to HIV risk reduction interventions for HIV-positive individuals:

     http://ari.ucsf.edu/programs/policy/pwp_resources/Effective_PWP_Programs.doc

    Prevention with Positives Resources, including curricula:

     http://ari.ucsf.edu/programs/policy_pwpresources_general.aspx

    Manual containing a variety of resources, U.S. Conference on AIDS Prevention with
     Positives Institute

     Prevention with HIV Positive People: What Is It? How to Do It!

     C.      Other Resources
 The University of Kansas' Community Tool Kit provides practical skill-building
 information on over 250 different topics. Topic sections include step-by-step
 instruction, examples, check-lists, and related resources:

 http://ctb.ku.edu/




HAA CONTACTS



                                            66
                                                                                     
II.    Who May you Contact for more Information?
Applicants are encouraged to e-mail or fax their questions to the contact person listed
below on or before July 31, 2008. Questions submitted after the deadline date will not
receive responses. Please allow ample time for questions to be received prior to the
deadline date.

Contact Person:

 Ricardo Branic                                                 E-Mail: ricardo.branic@dc.gov

 Chief, Prevention and Interventions Services Bureau

 District of Columbia, Department of Health                     Fax (202) 671-4860

 HIV/AIDS Administration

 64 New York Avenue NE, Suite 5001

 Washington DC 20002



General Questions: Ricardo Branic, ricado.branic@dc.gov

Budget Questions: Jonathan Alston, jonathan.alston@dc.gov




                                             67
                                                              
List of Attachments


Attachment A: Letter of Intent

Attachment B: Applicant Profile

Attachment C: Applicant Receipt

Attachment D: Work Plan

Attachment E: Budget Format and Guidance

Attachment F: Assurance Checklist

Attachment F1: Federal Assurance

Attachment F2: Tax Certificate of Good Standing Application

Attachment F3: Certification Regarding Lobbying

Attachment G: Application Checklist

Attachment H: Organizational Services Summary

Attachment I: Executive Summary




                                             68
                                      Attachment A: Letter of Intent

               Letter of Intent to Apply for Prevention Funding from HAA

Although a letter of intent is not required, this information will assist
the HIV/AIDS Administration in planning for the review process.

Please fax your letter of intent to Ricardo Branic at
(202) 671-4860 by July 31, 2008
The purpose of this letter is to inform you that our organization is
interested in applying for funding under RFA #________.

Name of Organization


Mailing Address

City_________________________________State_______Zip
_______                          Ward ____ .

Contact Name:

E-mail:


Phone                                   Ext                  Fax




                                          69
                             Attachment A: Letter of Intent

Category Applying Under

(If you wish to apply to provide services to more than one target
population you must note them on this letter of intent.)


___ Program Area 1: Comprehensive HIV Prevention Strategies
       1. Prevention for People Living with HIV/AIDS

       2. Prevention for People who are HIV-negative or of
          unknown HIV status
       3. Youth Prevention
       4. SAFE RE-ENTRY – Risk Reduction for young men about
          to be released from Jail


___ Program Area 2: Locally Funded Prevention, Linkage, and
                    Support
       1. Navigator Services
       2. Youth Services: HIV-mainstreaming among Youth-Serving
          Providers

       3. Faith-based Leadership and HIV Mainstreaming
       4. Couples HIV Counseling and Testing Services

       5. Foster Parents Matter!
       6. Innovator Activity

___ Program Area 3:        Partner Services Expansion
       1. Partner Services Expansion Partner Services—Capacity Building
          for Counseling, Testing, and Referral Providers




                                   70
                                               Attachment B: Applicant Profile

       APPLICANT NAME:

TYPE OF ORGANIZATION:
                                ____ Non-Profit Organization ______ Small Business _____ Other:
           Contact Person:
                       Title:
           Street Address:
            City, State ZIP:
                Telephone:
                        Fax:
            Email Address:

        Agency Web -site:
Names of Agency Officials: Board President:
                                Board Treasurer:
                                Executive Director:


         PROGRAM AREA:

                 Project Title:
       Total Funds Requested $ _____________




Signature of Authorized Official:            __________________________________________


                                                      71
                                     Attachment C: Applicant Receipt

Date/Time Stamp:
                                  District of Columbia
                                 Request for Applications

STATEMENT OF APPLICATION RECEIPT

ORGANIZATION NAME: ____________________________________________________

SERVICE CATEGORY NAME: _______________________________________________
(One Receipt per Service Category Application)

TOTAL FUNDING REQUEST:                $___________________________

REPRESENTATIVE DELIVERING APPLICATION: ______________________________
                                                                   (please print name)
Statement of Application Receipt
This certifies that one (1) original plus four (4) copies were delivered to the District of
Columbia Department of Health

Date: _____________________                  Time: ______________________________

Received by: ______________________________________________________
                            (Signature of DOH Staff)

                       AFFIX TO ―ORIGINAL‖ APPLICATION

Date/Time Stamp:
                                 Request for Applications

STATEMENT OF APPLICATION RECEIPT

ORGANIZATION NAME: ____________________________________________________

SERVICE CATEGORY NAME: _______________________________________________

TOTAL FUNDING REQUEST:                       $___________________________

REPRESENTATIVE DELIVERING APPLICATION: ______________________________
                                                             (please print name)
Statement of Application Receipt
This certifies that one (1) original plus four (4) copies were delivered to the District of
Columbia Department of Health
Date: _____________________                        Time: ______________________________
Received by: ______________________________________________________
                                  (Signature of DOH Staff)
                                 RETURN TO APPLICANT




                                            72
                                                                                  Attachment D: Work Plan

Agency:                                                                               Program Period:
Grant #: TBD                                                                          Submission Date:
Target Population /Service:                                                           Submitted by:
Total Budget $                                                                        Telephone #

GOAL 1:
                                                                  Measurable Objectives/Activities:
Process Objective #1: [Example: By December 31, 2008, provide 2,500 face-to-face outreach contacts for 500 unduplicated injection drug users in Wards 5 & 6]

Key activities needed to meet this objective:                                                       Start Date/s:        Completion Date/s:    Key Personnel (Title)
                                                                                                   
                                                                                                   
                                                                                                   
                                                                                                   
Process Objective #2:

Key activities needed to meet this objective:                                                       Start Dates:         Completion Dates:     Key Personnel (Title)




Process Objective #3:

Key activities needed to meet this objective:                                                       Start Dates:         Completion Dates:     Key Personnel (Title)





  Please duplicate this page as needed for each Program Goal. Ensure that there are goals and objectives linked to each of the interventions covered under this grant.

  HAA Use Only:
  Approved by: _______________________________Date: ___/ ___/ ___                                            P.I.S. DB Entered: ______ (Initials) DATE: ___/___/___


                                                                                 73
                                                   Attachment E: Budget Format

Name of Organization
Funding Source
Service Area


Personnel Schedule
                                Option No.
                                1                   Option No. 2
         Position        Site     Annual     FTE     Hourly      Hours   Monthly     No.       Budget   Benefits   Benefits    TOTAL
          Title                   Salary             Wage         per    Salary or   of        Amount    Ratio     Amount     Budgeted
                                                                 Month    Wage       Mo.                  %




TOTAL


Consultant/Contractual
           Item          Site         Unit              Unit   Cost      Number            Budget


                                                                                           -




TOTAL                                                                                      -




                                                       74
                                               Attachment E: Budget Format

Occupancy
Schedule
             Facility            Site   Unit       Unit   Cost   Number   Budget


Rent                                                                      -


                                                                          -
Utilities (Gas/Electric/Water)


TOTAL                                                                     -


Travel / Transportation Schedule
               Item              Site   Unit       Unit   Cost   Number   Budget


                                                                          -




TOTAL                                                                     -


Supplies
               Item              Site   Unit       Unit   Cost   Number   Budget


                                                                          -




TOTAL                                                                     -
                                                  75
                                     Attachment E: Budget Format


Capital Equipment Schedule
        Item           Site   Unit       Unit   Cost   Number   Budget




TOTAL


Client Cost Schedule
        Item           Site   Unit       Unit   Cost   Number   Budget


                                                                -




TOTAL                                                           -



Communications Schedule
        Item           Site   Unit       Unit   Cost   Number   Budget


                                                                -




                                                                -

TOTAL                                                           -

                                        76
                                     Attachment E: Budget Format

Other Direct Costs Schedule
        Item                  Unit       Unit   Cost   Number   Budget




TOTAL


Indirect Costs Schedule
        Item                  Unit       Unit   Cost   Number   Budget




TOTAL




                                        77
                                             Attachment F: Assurances

    CERTIFICATIONS, LICENSES AND ASSURANCES REQUIRED FOR SUBMITTING
                     APPLICATION TO RFA # _____________



Name of Organization: ____________________________________________

Applicants are required to submit one copy of certifications, affidavits, and assurances in a
sealed envelope. The assurance checklist found below should be completed and placed in
the envelope of each packet. The outside of each envelope must be conspicuously marked
as follows:



   1. Assurances in response to RFA #______________________.


   2. Indicate whether content is ―original‖ or ―copy.‖


                                 ASSURANCE CHECKLIST


□ 1. Signed Federal Assurances (Attachment # _______)

□ 2. A Current Business license, registration, or certificate to transact business in the
       relevant jurisdiction:

       Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs

       941 North Capitol St., NE 1st Floor

       Contact Person -Ms. Wilson

       or www.dcra.dc.gov Licenses Basic Business License  Get Basic Business
       License requirements Charitable Solicitation




□ 3. 501 (C) (3) Certification. For non-profit organizations


                                              78
                                              Attachment F: Assurances
                                                                           □
       4. Current Certificate of Good Standing from local tax authority:

       Department of Tax and Revenue

       941 North Capitol St., NE 5th Floor.

       Contact person-Alicia Brown 202-442-6593




□ 5. List of Board of Directors
□ 6. Medicaid Certification if applicable.




                                              79
                                             Attachment F: Assurances

 CERTIFICATIONS, LICENSES AND ASSURANCES REQUIRED TO SIGN SUB-GRANT
                        AGREEMENT _____________




Name of Organization: ____________________________________________




Applicants are required to submit one unbound original and one copy of certifications,
affidavits, and assurances in two separate, sealed envelopes. The assurance checklist found
below should be completed and placed in the envelope of each packet. The outside of each
envelope must be conspicuously marked as follows:



   1. Assurances in response to RFA #_____________.


   2. Whether content is ―original‖ or ―copy.‖


                                 ASSURANCE CHECKLIST




□ 1. Certification Regarding Lobbying; Debarment, Suspension and Other Responsibility
       Matters; and Drug-Free Workplace Requirements (Attachment _____)




□ 2. Commercial General Liability

□ 3. Professional Liability

□ 4. Worker‘s Compensation Insurance
                                                 80
                                             Attachment F: Assurances


□ 5. Comprehensive Automobile Insurance, if applicable for organizations that use
       company vehicles to administer programs for services funded by HAA




□ 6. Home Health/Home Hospice License, if applicable


□ 7. Certification of current/active Articles of Incorporation from DCRA:
       Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs

       941 North Capitol St., NE 1st Floor

       or www.dcra.dc.gov  Corporate Registration  Search Registered Organizations




                                             81
                                  Attachment F1: Federal Assurances


                                    FEDERAL ASSURANCES
The applicant hereby assures and certifies compliance with all Federal statutes, regulations, policies,
guidelines and requirements, including OMB Circulars No. A-21, A-110, A-122, A-128, A-87; E.O. 12372
and Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements - 28 CFR, Part 66,
Common Rule, that govern the application, acceptance and use of Federal funds for this federally-
assisted project.

Also, the Application assures and certifies that:

1. It possesses legal authority to apply for the grant; that a resolution, motion or similar
   action has been duly adopted or passed as an official act of The applicant’s governing
   body, authorizing the filing of the application, including all understandings and assurances
   contained therein, and directing and authorizing the person identified as the official
   representative of The applicant to act in connection with the application and to provide
   such additional information as may be required.


2. It will comply with requirements of the provisions of the Uniform Relocation Assistance
   and Real Property Acquisitions Act of 1970 PL 91-646 which provides for fair and equitable
   treatment of persons displaced as a result of Federal and federally-assisted programs.


3. It will comply with provisions of Federal law which limit certain political activities of
   employees of a State or local unit of government whose principal employment is in
   connection with an activity financed in whole or in part by Federal grants. (5 USC 1501, et.
   seq.).


4. It will comply with the minimum wage and maximum hour’s provisions of the Federal Fair
   Labor Standards Act if applicable.


5. It will establish safeguards to prohibit employees from using their positions for a purpose
   that is or gives the appearance of being motivated by a desire for private gain for
   themselves or others, particularly those with whom they have family, business, or other
   ties.


6. It will give the sponsoring agency of the Comptroller General, through any authorized
   representative, access to and the right to examine all records, books, papers, or
   documents related to the grant.




                                                    82
                                  Attachment F1: Federal Assurances
7. It will comply with all requirements imposed by the Federal-sponsoring agency concerning
   special requirements of Law, program requirements, and other administrative
   requirements.


8. It will insure that the facilities under its ownership, lease or supervision which shall be
   utilized in the accomplishment of the project are not listed on the Environmental
   Protection Agency’s (EPA), list of Violating Facilities and that it will notify the Federal
   grantor agency of the receipt of any communication from the Director of the EPA Office of
   Federal Activities indicating that a facility to be used in the project is under consideration
   for listing by the EPA


9. It will comply with the flood insurance purchase requirements of Section 102(a) of the
   Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973, Public Law 93-234-, 87 Stat. 975, approved
   December 31, 1976. Section 102(a) requires, on and after March 2, 1975, the purchase of
   flood insurance in communities where such insurance is available as a condition for the
   receipt of any Federal financial assistance for construction or acquisition purposes for use
   in any area that has been identified by the Secretary of the Department of Housing and
   Urban Development as an area having special flood hazards. The phrase “Federal
   Financial Assistance” includes any form of loan, grant, guaranty, insurance payment,
   rebate, subsidy, disaster assistance loan or grant, or any other form of direct or indirect
   Federal assistance.


10. It will assist the Federal grantor agency in its compliance with Section 106 of the National
    Historic Preservation Act of 1966 as amended (16 USC 470), Executive Order 11593, and
    the Archeological and Historical Preservation Act of 1966 (16 USC 569a-1 et. seq.) By (a)
    consulting with the State Historic Preservation Officer on the conduct of investigations, as
    necessary, to identify properties listed in or eligible for inclusion in the National Register
    of Historic Places that are subject to adverse effects (see 36 CFR Part 800.8) by the
    activity, and notifying the Federal grantor agency of the existence of any such properties,
    and by (b) complying with all requirements established by the Federal grantor agency to
    avoid or mitigate adverse effects upon such properties.


11. It will comply with the provisions of 28 CFR applicable to grants and cooperative
    agreements including Part 18. Administrative Review Procedure; Part 22, Confidentiality
    of Identifiable Research and Statistical Information; Part 42, Nondiscrimination/Equal
    Employment Opportunity Policies and Procedures; Part 61, Procedures for Implementing
    the National Environmental Policy Act; Part 63, Floodplain Management and Wetland
    Protection Procedures; and Federal laws or regulations applicable to Federal Assistance
    Programs.


12. It will comply, and all its contractors will comply with; Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of
    1964, as amended; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended; Subtitle A,


                                                    83
                                   Attachment F1: Federal Assurances
    Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) (1990); Title IIX of the Education
    Amendments of 1972 and the Age Discrimination Act of 1975.


13. In the event a Federal or State court or Federal or State administrative agency makes a
    finding of discrimination after a due process hearing on the grounds of race, color,
    religion, national origin, sex, or disability against a recipient of funds, the recipient will
    forward a copy of the finding to the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Justice.


14. It will provide an Equal Employment Opportunity Program if required to maintain one,
    where the application is for $500,000 or more.


15. It will comply with the provisions of the Coastal Barrier Resources Act (P.L 97-348), dated
    October 19, 1982, (16 USC 3501 et. seq.) which prohibits the expenditure of most new
    Federal funds within the units of the Coastal Barrier Resources System.




_____________________________________


Signature                                                     Date




                                                      84
                                          Attachment F3: Certification for Lobbying,
                                                       Debarment, and Suspension
                            GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
                                      OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER
                                           OFFICE OF TAX AND REVENUE




                            Certificate of Good Standing Request

                                                                      Date: ___________________


Office of Tax and Revenue
Collection Division
941 North Capitol Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002

Attn: A. Brown, 5th Floor

I am hereby requesting a Certificate of Good Standing for the following entity:

Entity/Name:

Address:

Telephone:

FEIN / SSN:

Contact Person:


                             Signed:

                             Title:

Certificates of Good Standing take approximately 7-14 days to process. We will contact you upon
completion of your request. If this is a third-party request, please furnish copies of the Power of
Attorney. For additional information, please call Ms. A. Brown at (202) 442-6593 or Ms. C. Wills at
(202) 478-9250. You may also fax your request form to the attention of Ms. Brown or Ms. Wills at (202)
442-6885.

Fee: $15.00 for pick-up (Customer Service Center, 941 North Capitol Street, NE, Washington, DC 20002, 1st floor)
$16.00 for mail delivery



Rev. 6/03



                                                             85
                                Attachment F3: Certification for Lobbying,
                                             Debarment, and Suspension
               GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

                            Certifications Regarding
            Lobbying; Debarment, Suspension and Other Responsibility
                Matters; and Drug-Free Workplace Requirements

Applicants should refer to the regulations cited below to determine the certification to which
they are required to attest. Applicants should also review the instructions for certification
included in the regulations before completing this form. Signature of this form provides for
compliance with certification requirements under 28 CFR Part 69, ''New Restrictions on
Lobbying" and 28 CFR Part 67, "Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Non-
procurement) and Government-wide Requirements for Drug-Free Workplace (Grants)." The
certifications shall be treated as a material representation of fact.

1. LOBBYING


   As required by Section 1352, Title 31 of the U.S. Code. and implemented at 28 CFR Part
   69, for persons entering into a grant or cooperative agreement over $100,000, as defined at
   28 CFR Part 69, the applicant certifies that:


   (a) No Federally appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid, by or on behalf of the
       undersigned, to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or
       employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress,
       or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with the making of any Federal
       grant, the entering into of any cooperative agreement, and the extension, continuation,
       renewal, amendment, or modification of any Federal grant or cooperative agreement;


   (b) If any funds other than Federally appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid to
       any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any
       agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of
       a Member of Congress in connection with this Federal grant or cooperative agreement,
       the undersigned shall complete and submit Standard Form - lll, ''Disclosure of
       Lobbying Activities," in accordance with its instructions;

   (c) The undersigned shall require that the language of this certification be included in the
       award documents for all sub awards at all tiers including subgrants, contracts under
       grants and cooperative agreements, and subcontracts) and that all sub-recipients shall
       certify and disclose accordingly.

2. Debarment, Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters (Direct Recipient)




                                               86
                                 Attachment F3: Certification for Lobbying,
                                              Debarment, and Suspension
   As required by Executive Order 12549, Debarment and Suspension, and implemented at 28
   CFR Part 67, for prospective participants in primary covered transactions, as defined at 28
   CFR Part 67, Section 67.510—


   A. The applicant certifies that it and its principals:

(a) Are not presently debarred, suspended, proposed for debarment, declared ineligible,
    sentenced to a denial of Federal benefits by a State or Federal court, or voluntarily
    excluded from covered transactions by any Federal department or agency;

(b) Have not within a three-year period preceding this application been convicted of or had a
    civil judgment rendered against them for commission of fraud or a criminal offense in
    connection with obtaining, attempting to obtain, or performing a public Federal, State, or
    local) transaction or contract under a public transaction; violation of Federal or State
    antitrust statutes or commission of embezzlement, theft, forgery, bribery, falsification or
    destruction of records, making false statements, or receiving stolen property;

(c.) Are not presently indicted for or otherwise criminally or civilly charged by a governmental
     entity (Federal, State, or local with commission of any of the offenses enumerated in
     paragraph (1)(b) of this certification; and

(d) Have not within a three-year period preceding this application had one or more public
    transactions (Federal, State, or local) terminated for cause or default; and

B. Where the applicant is unable to certify to any of the statements in this certification, he or
   she shall attach an explanation to this application.

1. Drug-Free Workplace (Grantees Other Than Individuals)

   As required by the Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988, and implemented at 28 CFR Part 67,
   Subpart F. for grantees, as defined at 28 CFR Part 67 Sections 67.615 and 67.620—

A. The applicant certifies that it will or will continue to provide a drug-free workplace by:

(a) Publishing a statement notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution,
    dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in the applicant's
    workplace and specifying the actions that will be taken against employees for violation of
    such prohibition;

(b) Establishing an on-going drug-free awareness program to inform employees about—

(1) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace;

(2) The applicant's policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace;


                                                87
                                Attachment F3: Certification for Lobbying,
                                             Debarment, and Suspension

(3) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee assistance programs; and

(4) The penalties that may be imposed upon employees for drug abuse violations occurring in
    the workplace;

(c) Making it a requirement that each employee to be engaged in the performance of the grant
    be given a copy of the statement required by paragraph (a);

(d) Notifying the employee in the statement required by paragraph (a) that, as a condition of
   employment under the grant, the employee will—

(1) Abide by the terms of the statement; and

(2) Notify the employer in writing of his or her conviction for a violation of a criminal drug
    statute occurring in the workplace no later than five calendar days after such conviction;

(e) Notifying the agency, in writing, within 10 calendar days after receiving notice under
    subparagraph (d)(2) from an employee or otherwise receiving actual notice of such
    conviction. Employers of convicted employees must provide notice, including position title
    to: HIV/AIDS Administration, 717 14th St., NW, Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20005.
    Notice shall include the identification number(s) of each effected grant;

(f) Taking one of the following actions, within 30 calendar days of receiving notice under
    subparagraph (d)(2), with respect to any employee who is so convicted—

(1) Taking appropriate personnel action against such an employee, up to and incising
    termination, consistent with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as
    amended; or

(2) Requiring such employee to participate satisfactorily in a drug abuse assistance or
    rehabilitation program approved for such purposes by a Federal, State, or local health, law
    enforcement, or other appropriate agency;

(3) Making a good faith effort to continue to maintain a drug-free workplace through
    implementation of paragraphs (a), (1), (c), (d), (e),. and (f).

B. The applicant may insert in the space provided below the sites) for the performance of
   work done in connection with the specific grant:

   Place of Performance (Street address, city, county, state, zip code)

Drug-Free Workplace (Grantees who are Individuals)




                                               88
                                 Attachment F3: Certification for Lobbying,
                                              Debarment, and Suspension
As required by the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988, and implemented at 28 CFR Part 67,
subpart F, for grantees as defined at 28 CFR Part 67; Sections 67 615 and 67.620—

A. As a condition of the grant, I certify that I will not engage in the unlawful manufacture,
   distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance in conducting any
   activity with the grant; and

B. If convicted of a criminal drug offense resulting from a violation occurring during the
   conduct of any grant activity, I will report the conviction, in writing, within 10 calendar
   days of the conviction, to:

HIV/AIDS Administration, 717 14th St., NW, Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20005.




                   As the duly authorized representative of the applications,
          I hereby certify that the applicant will comply with the above certifications.



1. Grantee Name and Address




2. Application Number and/or Project Name                    3. Grantee IRS/Vendor Number




4. Typed Name and Title of Authorized Representative




5. Signature                                                 6. Date



                                               89
                               Attachment G: Application Checklist


   The applicant organization/entity has responded to all sections of the Request for
    Application.

   The Applicant Profile, Attachment B, contains all the information requested and is affixed
    to the front of each envelope.

   The Proposed Budget is complete and complies with the Budget format listed in
    Attachment E of the RFA. The budget narrative is complete and describes the categories
    of items proposed.

   The application is printed on 8½ by 11-inch paper, double-spaced, on one side, using 12-
    point type with a minimum of one inch margins. Applications that do not conform to this
    requirement will not be forwarded to the review panel.

   The application is unbound and submitted with rubber bands or binder clips only.

   Your hard copy marked “original” and an electronic copy of your application on CD with all
    attachments are each in individually sealed envelopes. Applications will not be forwarded
    to the review panel if the applicant fails to submit the required submission.

   The application is submitted to the HIV/AIDS Administration no later than 5:00 p.m. on
    the deadline date of August 18, 2008.

   The project narrative section is complete and is within the page limit for this section of
    the RFA submission.

   The Certifications and Assurances, and all of the items listed on the Assurance Checklist,
    are complete and are included in the assurance package.

   The assurance packages is submitted marked “original” .

   The appropriate appendices, including Memoranda of Understanding, job descriptions;
    licenses (if applicable) and other supporting documentation are enclosed.




                                               90
                                                                        Attachment H: Organizational
                                                                                    Services Summary


                                                                    Direct Linkage*    If Direct linkage, Established MOU
            Service Category                    Provide Directly                              (Yes/No), with whom?
                                                                   to Other Agency

1. Primary HIV Care (PLWHA)

2. Medical Case Management (PLWHA)

3. Case Management (non-Medical)
   (PLWHA)
4. Substance Abuse Services

5. Mental Health Services

6. Nutritional Services/Food Bank

7. Emergency Financial Assistance

8. Housing Services

9. Prevention for PLWHA

10. Support Groups

11. Individual-level Prevention, For persons
    who are HIV Negative/Unknown
12. Group-level Prevention Interventions, For
    persons who are HIV Negative/Unknown
13. Community-level Prevention
    Interventions, for persons who are HIV
    Negative/Unknown

                                                                   91
                                                                  Attachment H: Organizational
                                                                              Services Summary

                                                              Direct Linkage*    If Direct linkage, Established MOU
             Service Category             Provide Directly                              (Yes/No), with whom?
                                                             to Other Agency

14. HIV Counseling, Testing, Referral

15. STD Diagnosis and Treatment

16. IDU risk reduction including Needle
   Exchange
17. Condom distribution/Recruitment of
   Condom Distribution sites
18. Childcare or Respite Services

19. Transportation Services

20. Outreach Services

21. Legal Services

22. Viral Hepatitis Screening




                                                             92
                                      Attachment I: Executive Summary Checklist



Organization



We are applying for (Check list of parts & activities):

                                               Target                New Activity/       $$ Requested
                                               Population(s)*        Continuing
                                                                     Activity
  Area 1
  1.1 Prevention for People Living with
  HIV/AIDS
      1.11 Single Population Activities
      1.12 Multiple Population Activities
      1.13 Prevention as Part of Care

  1.2 Prevention for People who are HIV-
  negative or of unknown HIV status
      1.21 Single Population Activities
      1.22 Multiple Population Activities

  1.3 Youth Prevention

  1.4 SAFE RE-ENTRY
  Area 2
  2.1 Navigator Services
     2.11 Latinos Living with HIV and
  Navigator Capacity-building
     2.12 Pregnant Women and
  Prevention of Mother-to-Child
  Transmission

  2.2 Youth Services

  2.3 Faith-based Leadership and HIV
  Mainstreaming

  2.4 Couples HIV Counseling and
  Testing Services

  2.5 Foster Parents Matter!

  2.6 Innovator Activity
  Area 3
  3.1 Partner Services
*See list of Target Populations

           BRIEF Description of Organizational Mission and Target population(s) (1-2 paragraphs only




                                                      93

								
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