Institutional Program Planning and Review _IPPR_ Template by linzhengnd

VIEWS: 6 PAGES: 117

									BUSINESS EDUCATION DIVISION
The following CPPRs are in this document:


CAOA                               page 18

HOSPITALITY                        page 48


The APPWs for the Business Education Division are in the
Bus Education APPW All Programs 2011-2012 file.
 Institutional Program Planning and Review (IPPR)
                 Template 2011-2012




                    Includes:
  Annual Program Planning Worksheet (APPW)
Comprehensive Program Planning & Review (CPPR)
            Two, Four & Five Year
                    Unit Plan
                    Cuesta College Planning and Funding Allocation Cycle




This figure illustrates the integration of the Mission Statement, the Strategic Plan, and the Educational Master
Plan with the Planning and Funding Allocation Process. The dotted boxes and arrows indicate plans and
pathways that will exist once the Master Plans and operational plans are approved and put into practice.
                                IPPR Table of Contents


     OVERVIEW OF IPPR TEMPLATE                                                      Page 5
      Overview
      Updates and Tips
      Glossary
      Explanation of Terms


A.   COLLEGE PLANNING DOCUMENTS                                                     Page 12

B.   INSTITUTIONAL MEASUREMENTS: DATA AND EVIDENCE                                  Page 13
      College-Wide Measurements
      Program-Specific Measurements


Annual Program Planning Worksheet (APPW):
The APPW is to be completed by ALL programs annually. The APPW is replaced by the
CPPR in the year that the program is scheduled for comprehensive program review.

C.   ANNUAL PROGRAM PLANNING WORKSHEET (APPW)                                       Page 14
      Narrative
      Faculty Hiring/Prioritization Information (if applicable)

Unit Plan:
The Unit Plan is to be completed by ALL Programs Annually.
D.   UNIT PLAN                                                                      Page 15
      Narrative
      Worksheet D:   UNIT PLAN — Prior Year Funding Requests Report
      Worksheet E:   UNIT PLAN — Unit Plan Funding Requests
      Worksheet T:   UNIT PLAN —Technology Funding Requests
      Worksheet F:   UNIT PLAN — Overall Unit Needs
      Worksheet G:   UNIT PLAN — Immediate Unit Needs
                                 IPPR Table of Contents


Comprehensive Program Planning and Review (CPPR):
The CPPR is only to be completed by those programs scheduled to do so as notified by the Cluster
Administrators.

E.   INSTRUCTIONAL CPPR                                                                    Page 16
      Narrative
      Faculty Hiring Prioritization Information (if applicable)
      Course Program Assessment Summary (CPAS) for each course
      Worksheet B – Course-Level SLOs and Assessment (alternate option to CPAS)


F.   CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION (CTE) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM REVIEW Page 18

G.   STUDENT SERVICES CPPR                                                               Page 19
      Narrative
      Faculty Hiring Prioritization Information (if applicable)
      Course Program Assessment Summary (CPAS) for each course
      Worksheet B – Course-Level SLOs and Assessment (alternate option to CPAS, if applicable)


H.   ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES CPPR                                                          Page 21
      Narrative


I.   SIGNATURE PAGE                                                                        Page 23
     To be completed by ALL programs submitting an IPPR.


J.   SUPPLEMENTAL DOCUMENTS                                                                Page 24
      Faculty Hiring/Prioritization Information
      Course Program Assessment Summary (CPAS)
      Worksheet B – Course-Level SLOs and Assessment
                                         Cuesta College
                                   Overview of IPPR Template
                                      2nd Ed. (2011-2012)


The Institutional Program Plan and Review Template is a college-wide document that allows all
departments and divisions to use the IPPR for the purposes of comprehensive program review and for
annual program review updates, as well as annual unit plan funding requests.

The Institutional Program Plan and Review (IPPR) Template contains the following primary elements:
     The Comprehensive Program Plan and Review (CPPR)
     Career Technical Education Two-year Program Review
     Annual Program Planning Worksheet (APPW)
     Unit Plan including Excel Worksheets

These elements are to be submitted electronically as two files, the IPPR Template (a Word document)
and the Unit Plan worksheets (Excel documents). The signature page needs to be submitted as a hard
copy. On the deadline established, they are submitted to the cluster administrator responsible for the
management of the program, division, and/or department.

Also included in the IPPR template are supporting resources and supplemental templates used when
completing the IPPR:
     College Planning Documents – the College Mission, Vision and Values, the Cuesta College
        Strategic Plan, the 2001-2011 Educational and Facilities Master Plan and the 2006 Update to
        the 2001-2011 Educational and Facilities Master Plan
     College-Wide Measurements/Data – Cuesta College Institutional Effectiveness Outcomes (IEO’s)
        and the Student Characteristics Report 2005-2009
     Faculty Hiring/Prioritization Information
     Course Program Assessment Summary (CPAS)
     Worksheet B: CPPR Course-level SLOs and Assessment – as an alternative to CPAS
     Signature Page

Annual Processes – The Annual Program Planning Worksheet (APPW) and Unit Plan
Annually, each program completes an APPW, and each division or department completes a Unit Plan.

APPW
All college-wide programs in the Academic Affairs Cluster, the Student Services Cluster, the
Administrative Services Cluster and the President’s Cluster use the same Annual Program Planning
Worksheet included in the IPPR.
      IPPR Worksheet C – Annual Program Planning Worksheet
      Additionally, instructional programs are asked to include the Faculty Hiring/Prioritization
         Information if applicable
Unit Plan
All college Divisions and Departments use the same Unit Plan template and worksheets. Unit plans are
the vehicle used to tie Program Review to resource allocation.
      Unit Plan Narrative
      Unit Plan Worksheet D: Prior Year Unit Funding Requests
      Unit Plan Worksheet E: Funding Requests
      Unit Plan Worksheet T: Technology Funding Requests
      Unit Plan Worksheet F: Overall Unit Needs
      Unit Plan Worksheet G: Prioritized List of Immediate Unit Needs

Scheduled Process – The Comprehensive Program Planning and Review (CPPR)
On a cycle of four or five years – four for Career Technical Education (CTE) programs and five for non-
CTE programs – each program must complete a Comprehensive Program Plan and Review (CPPR).

In the IPPR template, required CPPR documents are organized by Cluster:

Instructional CPPR – To be completed by all Academic Affairs Clusters
     Instructional CPPR narrative sections
     Faculty Hiring Prioritization Information (if applicable)
     Course Program Assessment Summary (CPAS) or
     IPPR Template Worksheet B – Course-level SLOs and Assessments

Student Services CPPR – To be completed by the VP Student Services Cluster
    Student Services CPPR narrative sections
    Faculty Hiring Prioritization Information (if applicable)
    Course Program Assessment Summary (CPAS) or
    IPPR Template Worksheet B – Course-level SLOs and Assessments (if applicable)

Administrative Services CPPR – To be completed by the President’s Cluster and VP Administrative
Services Cluster
    Administrative Services CPPR narrative sections

Submit the CPPR to the cluster administrator responsible for the program. When submitting the CPPR,
submit the completed, relevant sections of the IPPR Template and Excel Worksheets electronically to
your cluster administrator by the due date provided, with the Unit Plan included.

The CTE Two-Year Program Review
The CTE Two-year Program Review has been added to the 2011-2012 IPPR. Career Technical Education
programs will operate on a four-year cycle, and every second and fourth year, programs, as per Ed
Code 78016, will submit a brief CTE Two-year Program Review to supplement other program planning
documents. Therefore, vocational programs will adhere to the following four-year schedule:
       Year One: APPW with Unit Plan
       Year Two: APPW with Unit Plan and CTE Two-year Program Review
       Year Three: APPW with Unit Plan
       Year Four: CPPR with Unit Plan and CTE Two-year Program Review
The following elements of the IPPR Template must be completed for a successful CTE Two-year
Review:
    IPPR Template: CTE Two-year Review Narrative


                               IPPR –2011-2012 Updates and Tips

APPW: Worksheet C, Programs SLOs and Assessments, found in the 2010-2011 IPPR has been
removed from the 2011-2012 IPPR. The APPW now includes narrative prompts related to program
outcomes and assessments.

CPPR: Worksheet A, Program-level Outcomes has been removed from the 2011-2012 CPPR in favor of
narrative description in Section V of the CPPR.

You still must complete Worksheet B about Course-level student learning outcomes. As a substitute
for Worksheet B, you can attach Course Program Assessment Summary (CPAS) forms for each course in
your program. If you choose to submit CPAS forms instead of completing the worksheet, please delete
references to raw data results from the CPAS since that data should remain internal to the faculty
program.

The Unit Plan: The annual Unit Plan is the vehicle that links program review to resource allocation.

Worksheet D – Prior Year Funding Requests Report: Indicate which prior year top ten requests were
funded and which were not and briefly describe the impact on your program. If you only received
“partial funding,” please indicate this in the description. If funded, please indicate the source of the
funding: Categorical=C, Foundation=F, Associated Students of Cuesta College =AS, Grant=G, General
Fund=GF or Other Revenue Sources=R. An example of other revenue sources would be ticket sales for
Performing Arts or parking citations for Public Safety.

Worksheet E – Unit Plan Funding Requests: List all funding requests under the categories of personnel,
instructional supplies, non-instructional supplies, instructional equipment, non-instructional
equipment and new facilities requests and/or renovations. Do not include technology requests in
Worksheet E. A new technology Worksheet T has been added.

Under personnel, there is not an “hourly” category because Cuesta College has discontinued the
practice of hiring hourly employees. The classified personnel area includes regular classified
employees, short-term employees and substitute employees. Short-term employees are those
described as employed to perform a service for a specific period of time for work that will not be
extended or needed on a continuing basis. Substitute employees are filling a vacancy for no more than
60 days. For further clarification of short-term or substitute employees, contact the Human Resources
Office.

The Justification section on Worksheet E is central to the planning and resource allocation process.
Please provide a concise explanation of need citing relevant Strategic Goals, Program Review
recommendations, analysis of outcomes assessment or other factors.
Worksheet T – Technology Funding Requests: This worksheet is new to the Unit Plan. All technology
requests, regardless of anticipated funding source are to be listed on Worksheet T. The Technology
Committee will review all technology requests and provide recommendations for technology funding
priorities to the Planning and Budget Committee. Additionally, technology included in IPPRs will be
included in the annual Technology Plan and Review. Please note that if technology is purchased that
has not been included in an IPPR, Computer Services may not support that technology.

Worksheet F – Overall Unit Needs: This is a summary sheet, not prioritized, of all requests submitted in
Worksheet E and T and includes immediate, intermediate and long-term needs, except for new faculty
requests. Please identify in the description for each if the need is immediate, intermediate or long-
term – and if the need is one-time or on-going. You may choose to cut and paste requests from
Worksheets E and T to this worksheet.

Worksheet G – Prioritized List of Immediate Unit Needs: This worksheet is a report of the top-ten
immediate needs for your unit, except for new faculty requests. Please indicate if the need is one-time
or on-going in the description for each need.


If you have any other questions, please contact members of the 2010-2011 IPPR Committee for
technical assistance:

   2010-2011 Academic Affairs IPPR Committee team: Linda Harris (Co-Chair), Deb Wulff, Carolyn
   Lorimer, Cathleen Greiner, Don Norton, Sally Demarest, and Petra Clayton

   2010-2011 Student Services IPPR Committee team: Patrick Schwab, Peggy Hudson, Sally Demarest

   2010-2011 Administrative Services IPPR Committee team: Sandee McLaughlin (Co-Chair),
   Amy Pike, Toni Sommer

                                              Glossary
Acronyms
ARCC Report: The Accountability Reporting for Community Colleges Report
APPW: Annual Program Planning Worksheet
BOT: Board of Trustees (Cuesta College)
CPPR: Comprehensive Program Plan and Review
CPAS: Course Program Assessment Summary
CTE: Career Technical Education formerly known as Vocational Education Programs
FTES: Full-Time Equivalent Student
FTEF: Full-Time Equivalent Faculty
IEOs: Institutional Effectiveness Outcomes
IPPR: Institutional Program Plan and Review
SLOs: Student Learning Outcomes
TSCH: Total Student Contact Hours
WSCH: Weekly Student Contact Hours
                                       Explanation of Terms

Annual Program Planning Worksheet (APPW): The APPW is the annual update of the Comprehensive
Program Plan and Review (CPPR) with specific institutional measures the program is addressing on an
annual basis. The narrative portion of the APPW includes writing prompts addressing program
outcomes, program connections to the college mission, vision and values and college plans,
institutional measurements/data, program outcomes assessment, program improvement, program
forecasting, anticipated program changes, facility changes, staffing projections and overall budgetary
issues.

ARCC Report (ARCC): The Accountability Reporting for Community Colleges (ARCC) Report, released
annually by the Chancellor’s Office, evaluates local data on student success, retention, and other
student demographics. At Cuesta College, the ARCC Report functions as a portion of the assessment
data in measuring institutional effectiveness outcomes (IEOs) at Cuesta College. The College Council
recently adopted Institutional Effectiveness Outcomes for Cuesta College which include ARCC
measurements as well as other institutional measures.

Career and Technical Education (CTE): Formerly know as Vocational Education, CTE are organized
educational programs offering sequences of courses directly related to preparing individuals for paid or
unpaid employment in current or emerging occupations requiring other than a baccalaureate or
advanced degree.

Career Technical Education Two-year Program Review: The Career Technical Education Two-year
Program Review template has been moved to the IPPR, now folding in the requirement to meet the
two year CTE comprehensive review cycle with the college planning process.

Comprehensive Program Plan and Review (CPPR): The CPPR is an in-depth and extensive program
plan and review conducted and reported by all instructional, service, and administrative programs on
either a 2-year or a 5-year basis, depending on the nature of the program. The comprehensive report
addresses categories of program information that include general information and program outcomes,
program connections to college mission, vision and values and college plans, program data analysis and
program specific measurements, curriculum review (academic programs), program outcomes
assessment and improvement, end notes and the Unit Plan. For academic programs the CCPR
requires completion of Worksheet B – Course-level Student Learning Outcomes and Assessments or
the newly developed Course Program Assessment Summary (CPAS).

Course Program Assessment Summary (CPAS): A form approved by the Academic Senate to help
faculty document and track student learning outcomes, assessment plans, assessment results, and
efforts towards program and course improvement. The CPAS can serve as a living document (to be
amended whenever key parts of an assessment cycle are completed), or program faculty may elect to
generate a new CPAS for each year or assessment cycle. CPAS forms can be used at both the program
and Course-levels. If program faculty have CPAS forms for their courses, those forms can be used in
place of Worksheet B in the CPPR. More information about the CPAS and other Institutional
Assessment Plan documents can be found at http://academic.cuesta.edu/sloa.
Educational and Facilities Master Plan: Educational and Facilities Master Plans establish long-range
educational and enrollment goals and plans, which, along with shorter term strategic planning, enable
the college to fulfill its mission, vision and values. Continued as a ten-year plan, the 2001-2011
Educational and Facilities Master Plan was an update of the 1991 Educational and Facilities Master
Plan. An important element of the 2001 plan was the assessment of progress and changes made since
the 1991 District and 1999 North County Campus Master Plans. The 2001-2011 Educational and
Facilities Master Plan was again reviewed and updated in 2006 in conjunction with the college decision
to conduct a local bond campaign. The College has decided to split the plan into an Educational Master
Plan and a separate Facilities Master Plan. The College is beginning the process of writing the new
Educational Master Plan in fall 2010.

Equipment: Expenditures for the purchase of tangible property with a purchase price at least $200
and a useful life of more than one year, other than land or buildings and improvements thereon.
(Examples – microscopes, copiers, welding equipment)

Facilities (new and renovation): The term facilities encompasses “housing” for all college programs
owned and/or leased by the college. (Examples: buildings, classrooms, labs, offices, fields, the pool etc.)

Full Time Equivalent Student (FTES): The State statutes deem one full-time student as a student that
attends one or more approved courses for an annual total of 525 hours – one FTES represents 525
class contact hours of student instruction/activity in credit and noncredit courses. Full-time equivalent
student (FTES) is one of the workload measures used in the computation of state aid for California
Community Colleges.

Institutional Effectiveness Outcomes (IEOs): Cuesta College IEOs were deliberated in College Council
and a final set of outcomes was approved during the October 12th meeting. The College IEOs include
outcomes as defined in the annual ARCC Report, as well as additional outcomes related to career
education, student diversity/campus climate, and fiscal responsibility. The Strategic Planning
Committee evaluates the IEO’s annually based on the ACCJC Rubric on Institutional Effectiveness.

Institutional Program Plan and Review (IPPR) Committee: The Institutional Program Planning and
Review Committee is responsible for assessing and improving the IPPR process, refining and updating
the IPPR Template and for offering technical assistance in completing the entire IPPR Template,
including assistance with the APPW, Unit Plan and CPPR.

Instructional Supplies: Instructional supplies are expenditures for supplies to be used by students,
faculty, and other personnel in connection with an instructional program. Instructional supplies are
those items consumable and non-consumable materials and supplies used for classroom instruction.
(Examples: DVDs, test tubes, chemicals, pottery clay, drawing paper, maps, history, charts etc.)

Instructional Technology: Instructional Technology is used in direct connection with an instructional
program. (Examples: Smart Screen, classroom computers, data projectors, clickers etc.)
Non-Instructional Supplies: Non-instructional Supplies are expenditures for supplies and materials
used in institutional support services. Non-instructional supplies would include consumable and non-
consumable materials and supplies not used for classroom instruction. (Examples: ink cartridges for
office computers, paper, tablets, pens etc.)

Non-Instructional Technology: Non-Instructional Technology is used in college support services.
(Examples: office computers, scanners, printers etc.).

Program Outcomes: Program Outcomes describe measurable knowledge, skills, abilities, and
attributes associated with a program whether academic, student service or administrative.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs): Student Learning Outcomes describe the knowledge, skills,
abilities, and attributes that students attain by the end of a course, sequence of courses, program or
degree.

Strategic Plan 2010-2013 and Strategic Goals: The Cuesta College Strategic Plan describes how the
College will put into action various plans and operations to effectively address the mission of the
College. It organizes a host of complex activities, identifies key operational plans, and defines the roles
and responsibilities of various committees and constituent groups. A key feature of the Strategic Plan
is the annual assessment of the integrated planning process. The plan is composed of seven Strategic
Directions with Strategic Goals addressing each Direction. Included in the IPPR is a link to the Strategic
Plan for reference as a key resource.

Technology Plan: Now termed the Annual Technology Plan and Review, this plan is a comprehensive
report of the current status of technology on campus combined with a detailed compilation of
completed, in process and proposed project outcomes. All funded projects, regardless of the source of
funding, are tracked by this document which derives its information from and informs the IPPR.

Total Student Contact Hours (TSCH): Includes all student contact hours rather than only Weekly
Student Contact Hours (WSCH). Courses coded as Daily Contact Hours and Positive Attendance are
included in the total.

Vocational Education: See Career Technical Education

Weekly Student Contact Hours (WSCH): The number of hours or student contacts during an average
week of course instruction for weekly census courses – those coterminous with the primary terms.
Attendance contact hours may either be derived by the published class hours, by actual hours, or, in
cases such as independent study, the number of hourly-equivalent units.
A. COLLEGE PLANNING DOCUMENTS

     College Mission, Vision and Values

     Cuesta College Strategic Plan 2010 – 2013
      Strategic Direction One: Participatory Governance
       Strategic Goal 1.A: Board policies and administrative procedures
       Strategic Goal 1.B: College-wide committee structure and leadership retreat

      Strategic Direction Two: Integrated Operational Planning
       Strategic Goal 2.A: Continuous improvement of institutional effectiveness
       Strategic Goal 2.B: 2011-2016 Educational Master Plan
       Strategic Goal 2.C: 2011-2016 Facilities Master Plan
       Strategic Goal 2.D: Technology Master Plan
       Strategic Goal 2.E: Long-Term Fiscal Plan
       Strategic Goal 2.F: Equal Employment Opportunity Plan
       Strategic Goal 2.G: Enrollment Management Plan
       Strategic Goal 2.H: Resource Development Plan
       Strategic Goal 2.I: Annual Assessment and Update of IPPR Template

      Strategic Direction Three: Institutional Effectiveness
       Strategic Goal 3.A: Institutional Assessment Committee

      Strategic Direction Four: Student Access and Success
       Strategic Goal 4.A: Enrollment management and scheduling strategies
       Strategic Goal 4.B: ESL and Developmental Education
       Strategic Goal 4.C: Transfer Education
       Strategic Goal 4.D: Distance Education
       Strategic Goal 4.E: Career Technical Education (CTE)

      Strategic Direction Five: Advancement of Programs and Services
       Strategic Goal 5.A: Foundation outreach to community

      Strategic Direction Six: Multiple Site College
       Strategic Goal 6.A: Single College, multiple site vision
       Strategic Goal 6.B: Instructional and student services at North and South County Centers
       Strategic Goal 6.C: Opportunity to participate in College life at all College sites

      Strategic Direction Seven: Professional Development
       Strategic Goal 7.A: Faculty Professional Development
       Strategic Goal 7.B: Staff and Manager Professional Development

     2001-2011 Educational and Facilities Master Plan
     2006 Update to the 2001-2011 Educational and Facilities Master Plan
B.   INSTITUTIONAL MEASUREMENTS: DATA AND EVIDENCE

     College-Wide Measurements/Data

         Current Assessment of Institutional Effectiveness Outcomes (IEOs)
         Student Characteristics Report 2005 – 2009

     Program Specific Measurements/Data

     Instructional Programs

     The Office of Institutional Research will submit the following information to each instructional
     program manager in order for the program faculty to complete the APPW and CPPR. This may
     include instructionally related programs in Student Services. The information provided is to be
     used in the completion of the APPW and CPPR.

     1.   Mission, Vision and Value Statements
     2.   Current Accountability Reporting for the Community Colleges (ARCC) Report
     3.   Program-level FTES, FTEF, and Enrollment Reports
     4.   Program-level Student Success, Persistence, and Retention Rates
     5.   Program Degree/Certificate Completions
     6.   Total Student Contact Hours (TSCH and WSCH) Report
     7.   Current program-level full-time faculty and Part-time faculty totals
     8.   Average number of sections offered per semester for each program

     Student Services and Administrative Services Programs

     1. Program specific data as identified and provided by The Office of Institutional Research
     2. Program Outcome Assessment Results
     3. Other institutional measurements as identified by the Offices of Student Services and
        Administrative Services
     4. Reference(s) to relevant statutory authority/program regulation and related compliance issues
     5. Annual Audits – Annual college fiscal audit and other outside agency audits
C. ANNUAL PROGRAM PLANNING WORKSHEET (APPW)

  Program:                   Planning Year:     Last Year CPPR Completed:

  Unit: Business Education Cluster: WED                   Next Scheduled CPPR:

  NARRATIVE: APPW
  For the first eight segments of the APPW, use the following narrative outline:
  I.     Program Outcomes: List the outcomes established for your program.



  II.    Program Connections to College Mission, Vision and Values, Strategic Goals and/or
         College Master Plans: Identify how your program addresses or helps fulfill one or more of
         the following: the College Mission, Vision and Values; a specific Strategic Goal(s); and/or
         elements of the College Master Plans.




  III.   Appropriate Institutional Measurements/Data: Analyze the institutional and program
         specific measurements (data and evidence) that are most relevant to your current program
         status, and indicate how attention to these measurements is reflected in program outcomes
         and assessment and/or student learning outcomes and assessment.



  IV.    Program Outcomes Assessment: Summarize recent assessment efforts and assessment
         methods within the program. Include an assessment cycle calendar if one is established.




  V.     Program Improvement(s): Briefly summarize program changes and improvements since
         the prior APPW and/or CPPR based on analysis of outcome assessment results.



 VI.     Program Development/Forecasting


  VII. Anticipated Program and/or Scheduling Changes


  VIII. Facility Changes

  IX.    Staffing Projections
X.      Overall Budgetary Issues



     D. UNIT PLAN

Unit:                           Cluster:                              Planning Year:

NARRATIVE: Unit Plan
The unit plan ties program review to resource allocation. For this first segment of the Unit Plan,
write a narrative analysis of the fiscal assumptions and needs for your division/department for the
upcoming year (e.g. continued categorical funding, support staff not funded, etc.).

EXCEL WORKSHEETS: Unit Plan
For the remainder of the Unit Plan, complete the following Excel Worksheets:

    Worksheet D: UNIT PLAN — Prior Year Unit Funding Requests Report
    Worksheet E: UNIT PLAN — Unit Plan Funding Requests
    Worksheet T: UNIT PLAN – Technology Funding Requests
    Worksheet F: UNIT PLAN — Overall Unit Needs
    Worksheet G: UNIT PLAN — Prioritized List of Immediate Unit Needs
Business Education Division



CAOA    CPPR


2011- 2012
E.   INSTRUCTIONAL COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAM PLANNING AND
     REVIEW (CPPR)

     Only to be completed by those programs scheduled for the year according to the institutional
     comprehensive planning cycle for instructional programs (i.e., every four years for CTE programs
     and five years for all other instructional programs), which is produced by the Office of Academic
     Affairs.

     Program: Computer Applications/Office Administration Planning Year: 2011-2012
                                        Last Year CPPR Completed: 2009-2010

     Unit: Business Education Division             Cluster: WED

     NARRATIVE: Instructional CPPR
     Please use the following narrative outline

     I.   GENERAL INFORMATION AND PROGRAM OUTCOMES
          A. General Description about the Program

          Program Mission Statement
           The mission of the Computer Applications/Office Administration program is to prepare the
           CA/OA student to be proficiently skilled in the area of computer-technical knowledge and
           administrative skills intertwined with social and ethical makeup that enables the student to
           go out into the workplace and be productive, responsible, and ethical components of society.

          History of the Program
           Computer technology and applications have exploded over recent years. One is hard pressed
           to think of any occupation in which computers have not made impressive inroads.

           From the beginning of the program in the early 1970s, the name of this program has evolved
           along with technology itself. Once called Secretarial Science, then Office Technology, and
           now Computer Applications/Office Technology—all indicative of the integral, expansive,
           and changing faces of the program and of assiduous attempts to keep abreast of ever-
           changing technology.

           From manual to electric typewriters, carbon paper/printers, brass paper fasteners/staplers,
           clocks, timekeeping, copy machines, rubber stamps, push pins, scotch tape/post-it notes,
           modems, emails, rolodexes, databases, calculators/spreadsheets, typing erasers/ white
           out,/delete and backspace keys, dictation machines/voice recognition, etc.— we have run the
           gamut of change. In fact, this revolving door is permanently the underlying theme of all the
           courses and textbooks used within the CAOA framework.

           The CA/OA program is proud to boast that it has kept up with change, and has piloted the
           entire college on this exciting wave of technology. With the opening of the North County
           Campus in 1999, CA/OA now has a thriving program at both the San Luis Obispo Campus
           and the North County Campus. With the progressive plans to open a new South County
           Campus with computer labs, the CA/OA program will have the opportunity to offer
           valuable choices for students looking to gain exceptional training for employment
           opportunities.

                 Include the broad history of the program and significant changes/improvements
           since the last program review

           This program provides students with the vocational skills necessary to secure entry, mid,
           and higher-level administrative professional employment. Students within this program
           can achieve a fast-track training approach by selecting among nine (9) certificate
           programs, four (4) of which are ―block‖ programs. The latter ―block‖ programs can be
           achieved within a one-semester time period. For students whose long-term goals are to
           spend more time achieving these skills, a Computer Applications/Office Administration
           Associate of Arts Degree is also available.

           Because the world of technology is intricately intertwined with administrative
           professional skills and has reached beyond the grasps of ‗office workers only‘, change
           has proven to be rapid and constant—almost ‗revolutionary‘. The Computer
           Applications/Office Administration program has been able to successfully meet the
           demands, changes, and progress of this worldwide transformation in offering courses to
           prepare students for the most up-to-date software applications and requisite soft skills
           that co-exist with all training skills—the result is producing, not only skilled employees,
           but responsible and ethical individuals ready for job placement proudly reflecting
           Cuesta‘s mission within the administrative professional atmosphere.


Distance Education Courses

      Continue to monitor course offerings and implement changes/improvements

       Several CA/OA online courses have been redesigned to include some face-to-face on-campus
       class meetings. Responding to feedback from students, the face-to-face class sessions provide
       direct instructor-to-student interaction to enhance the successful learning of course concepts and
       skills. In addition, these meetings enable students to network and communicate with one another
       for support and socialization.

      Reach students in different geographic areas

       Students interested in our program from areas outside of the local area are able to experience
       Cuesta College and the expertise of the CAOA faculty and programs. On-campus exams can be
       arranged at a proctored off-campus location.

      Reach students with various needs (socio-economic, disability, family, work)

       The CAOA program attracts widely diverse segments of students from all walks of life including
       single/married parents with children at home, working individuals, disabled individuals, and
       economically disadvantaged individuals. The online programs provide an educational
       opportunity that these students would not have in traditional face-to-face classes.
Hardware and Software

In order to facilitate health of the CAOA program, we strive to offer up-to-date content.

      Continue to provide current technology in computers and printers

       The classrooms and open-computer labs at the San Luis Obispo and North County campuses are
       equipped with computers that serve the CAOA classes, but also CIS, Paralegal, E-Commerce, as
       well as other programs across the Cuesta campus. Collaborating and sharing technology
       resources with students from different programs provides a vast number of Cuesta students with
       current computer technology for their learning success.

      Continually update software to current versions

       In order for students to stay competitive in the job market, it is imperative for classes to utilize
       the most current versions of software available. CAOA full-time and part-time faculty participate
       in Webinars, on-campus training, and on-line tutorials in order to stay current with the newest
       software versions required in their classes.

      Continuous Quality Improvements for Faculty

       CAOA instructors strive to remain on the cutting edge of technology and software programs by
       regularly participating in workshops, training, and individual preparation. Faculty are continually
       learning new versions of software, dealing with upgrading equipment, reviewing and adopting
       new textbooks, self-teaching, and training. A major strength within the CAOA program is a staff
       that is highly motivated to learn new course content with the primary goal(s) of always desiring
       to be exceptionally prepared for teaching courses that fall within the highest standards of today‘s
       technology.

       This field is in constant flux, and it is mandatory that the CAOA instructors stay on top of what
       is current in this industry.

      Describe how the Program Review was conducted and who was involved

       This program review was started Fall 2010 semester. Information was gathered from collaboration with
       the CAOA full-time faculty members, part-time faculty members, and Advisory Committee members.
       In addition, information from previous program reviews, institutional research data, U.S. Bureau of
       labor Statistics, Employment Development Department statistics, and California Community Colleges
       Chancellor‘s Office statistical database is being incorporated throughout this report.

      List current and/or new faculty, including part-time faculty

Name: Leila Chambers - Full-time instructor

Educational Background:

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
Microsoft Office Certified Specialist in Excel and Word
Credentialed Teacher in Business Education
Published author of several office procedure manuals



CAOA Courses Taught:
Specializing in CAOA 264 Access, CAOA 261 Excel, CAOA 123, CAOA 227, CAOA 126, also
have taught CAOA 120A, CAOA 120B, CAOA 128, CAOA 129, CAOA 246, CAOA 154, CAOA
156, CAOA 162, CAOA 265, CAOA 266, CAOA 268, CIS 210

Relevant Work Experience:
15 years in Administrative, Managerial, and Executive Office Professional positions.



Name: Marilyne Cleeves
Educational Background:

Brooks College - Degree Fashion Merchandising
UCLA - Vocational Education Teaching Credential Instructional Methods
Cuesta College - General Education Courses, Computer Science & Computer Programming
San Francisco State - Marketing Education

CAOA Courses Taught:
CAOA 120A/120B, CAOA 123, CAOA 252, CAOA 153, CAOA 252, CAOA 261, CAOA 162,
CAOA 264, CAOA 266, CAOA 167, CAOA 173
Relevant Work Experience:
Began teaching at Cuesta in August of 1989. Over ten years experience working in the private
sector with consistent profits contributing to millions of dollars of production in the United States
and the Orient. Extensive computer background including Expert MOUS certification in Word and
Excel; database production using Access and Dbase IV. Computer programming; web page
design; Photoshop; Outlook; QuickBooks Pro; and Windows. Written and published instructional
books for Windows applications and Introduction to the Internet.

General Management
Managed various computer labs with a total responsibility of maintaining the software and disk
operating system for 64 machines. Managed production for nationally known garment
manufacturers in the United States and in the Orient. Established a nationwide sales force and
maintained its management. Managed special computer coursework for "at risk" youth from the
ages 11-18 and produced promotional materials for two youth programs managed by the CA
National Guard.

Production
1993-2004 developed curriculum guidelines and procedures for the Angel Gate Academy (youth
11-13) and the Turning Point Academy (youth 14-18) academic programs using the CA
Curriculum Standards.

High School Instructor
Through the CA National Guard, I taught computers and careers to adjudicated youth from the
ages 14-18. Over 80% of the graduates were able to pass MOUS certification tests in Word and
Excel.

College Instructor
In addition to credit courses, I have taught several non-credit courses which include coursework
for College for Kids; Institute for Professional Development (IPD); Community Programs;
Independent Learning Program (ILP) and numerous special products.


Name: Jennifer Hubbard
Educational Background:

Business Credential- California Lutheran University
Cross Cultural Language and Academic Development Credential- University of San Diego
Bachelor's of Arts in Organizational Communication and Advertising - Purdue University

CAOA Courses Taught:
CAOA 172 - Adobe Photoshop Elements
CAOA 265 - Adobe InDesign

Relevant Work Experience:
14 years as a Business Education Instructor
I did work in marketing and public relations for 2 years.


Name: Juliet Knowles
Educational Background:

BA, UCSB; MA, SFSU

CAOA Courses Taught:
CAOA 168A, CAOA 268, CAOA 172, CAOA 153

Relevant Work Experience:
I taught for 3 years while in graduate school, then another 2 years for Mac Teacher as well as 3
years for Hancock College.


Name: Norma Ortiz Maldonado
Educational Background:

BA – Hunter College of the City University of N.Y.; MA & doctoral candidacy – Indiana
University, Bloomington, IN.; M. Ed & doctoral candidacy – University of Arkansas, Fayetteville,
AR.

CAOA Courses Taught:
CAOA 123 and Introduction to the Keyboard – Spanish-friendly.

Relevant Work Experience:
Professor of English and Literature, the University of San Andres, La Paz, Bolivia, English teacher
at the Centro Boliviano Americano, La Paz, Bolivia, and English tutor and Instructor of ACASK
150 Writing Fundamentals at Cuesta College, Paso Robles, CA.
Name: Amity Perry-Boada
Educational Background:

BS in Business Administration from Cal Poly, 1988
MCSE, MCDBA

CAOA Courses Taught:
CAOA 156 – Test Prep for MOS Certification
CIS 210 – Introduction to Computer Applications
CAOA 120A – Beginning Computer Keyboarding
CAOA 128 – Office Technology and Telecommunications
CAOA 153 – Essentials of MS Publisher

Relevant Work Experience:
Administrative Services Officer for County of San Luis Obispo 2001-2006
Configurations Manager for a Fortune 200 Company 1997-2000


Name: Susan Pierce Scholl
Educational Background:

B.S. in Vocational Rehabilitation with an emphasis in Special Education at University Wisconsin
– Stout in 1980. Have also taken numerous Accounting and Computer courses since that time.

CAOA Courses Taught:
Introduction to Windows 2000; PowerPoint, Keyboarding, Publisher, CIS 210

Relevant Work Experience:
Vocational Evaluator, Business Manager, Full-charge Bookkeeper; Computer Lab Assistant for
nearly all CAOA Computer courses.


Name: Jill Schubert
Educational Background:

M.A. Women‘s Studies in Religion from Claremont Graduate University; Double Major B.A.
from U.C. Santa Cruz- Women‘s Studies and English Literature

CAOA Courses Taught:
Dreamweaver; Photoshop; Keyboarding & Word Processing; PowerPoint; MS Publisher; MS
Word; MS Access; Windows; Word/Access/Excel.
Relevant Work Experience:
Webmaster and Secretary of Uniphi Foundation, a non-profit organization with 300+ domain
names; Webmaster for San Mateo County Psychological Association; local school districts:
substitute teacher K-12 (1999-2006); multiple webmaster positions as independent contractor.
Instructor, Columbia College: Sociology 310: Women in Society (2002-2006).
Name: Cynthia Wilshusen
Educational Background:

AA from Cuesta College, BS with concentration in Enterprise Accounting from Cal Poly, and
MBA from University of Phoenix.

CAOA Courses Taught:
Introduction to Computers, Intro to Windows, Micro Computers, Desktop Publishing,
Keyboarding, MOUSE Certification, Word, Excel, Access, Office Technology
Relevant Work Experience:
Administrative Assistant for 9 years, Own private computer training and desktop publishing
business, Instructor for vocational school, Instructor at Cuesta College for 11 years.


Additional CAOA Instructors:
       Claudia Hayner
       Jennifer Henderson
       Priscilla Simoes
       Diane Stevens
       Mike Stevens


            B. Program Goals: Broad statements about what this program will accomplish – its
               anticipated development and achievements

IDENTIFY AREAS FOR CHANGE OR DEVELOPMENT TO FACILITATE PROGRAM HEALTH AND
GROWTH

Online Courses

       Continue to monitor course offerings
       Reach broader groups of students
       Reach students in different geographic areas
       Reach students with various needs (socio-economic, disability, family, work)

Hardware and Software

In order to facilitate health of the CAOA program, we need to offer up-to-date content.

       Need to provide current technology in computers and printers
       Need to continually update software to current versions

Marketing

Continue to market program to the community, local businesses, departments on campus, employees on
campus

Degree and Certificates
Continue to monitor degree and certificate requirements

Excellence in Teaching

CAOA instructors strive to remain on the cutting edge of technology and software programs by
regularly participating in workshops, training, and individual preparation. Faculty are continually
learning new versions of software, dealing with upgrading equipment, reviewing and adopting new
textbooks, self-teaching and training. A major strength in the CAOA program is a staff that is highly
motivated to learn new course content on an ongoing basis in order to be exceptionally prepared for
teaching courses.

It is necessary that the instructors receive training and the time off from teaching to go to workshops,
conferences, etc. This field is in constant flux, and it is mandatory that the CAOA instructors stay on top
of what is new in this industry.

CAOA faculty are responsive to student suggestions and feedback. An example is Cynthia Wilshusen,
CAOA part-time instructor, who responded to student feedback in her classes. Students asked for more
hands-on projects in class. Cynthia implemented various in-class projects where students can brak up
into small groups and work on projects related to lecture topics. Students connect with one another in
small groups, and build relationships that expand outside the classroom. Cynthia also observed how this
type of acticity gives students the opportunity to explain to fellow classmates the process or share
solutions to problems.

Students in the CAOA program report that while they are working on learning new skills, they feel more
confident in applying these skills in the workplace. In addition, these new skills contribute to the
possibilities of a promotion or new employment in the future.


                  May include program pathway(s) for students such as transfer, career technology
                   education, basic skills enrichment, certificate, degree, etc.
                  May include a program map/description


                                   STUDENT PROGRESSION FOR
                    COMPUTER APPLICATIONS/OFFICE ADMINISTRATION A.A. DEGREE
                                           2011-2012

                   The courses in the CAOA A.A. degree that have prerequisites are shown in the table
                   below:

                                 Prerequisite                              for
                                 Course
                                 CAOA 123                                  CAOA 227
                                                                           Business
                                 Business English
                                                                           Communication
                                 CAOA 246                                  CAOA 250
                                                                           Advanced
                                 Beginning WORD
                                                                           WORD
                 The remaining courses (listed below) can be taken in the sequence that best fits each
                 student‘s lifestyle needs.

                 CAOA 120B          Intermediate Computer Keyboarding and Document Processing
                 CAOA 125           Business Calculations
                 CAOA 126           Voice Recognition Software/Document Application or
                 CAOA 250           Advanced WORD
                 CAOA 128           Office Technology and Telecommunications
                 CAOA 129           Computer Application/Office Administration Internship
                 CAOA 261           Introduction to Spreadsheets (EXCEL)
                 CAOA 264           Introduction to Database Management (ACCESS)
                 CAOA 265           Adobe InDesign: Business Applications or
                 CAOA 268           Introduction to Photoshop: Business Applications or
                 CAOA 271           Using Flash for Business Applications
                 CAOA 167           PowerPoint and
                 CAOA 153           Essentials of MS Publisher

                 BUS 251 Elements of Accounting
                 or BUS 201A Principles of Accounting

                 BUS 201B Principles of Accounting
                 or CAOA 252 Computerized Accounting Using QuickBooks Pro



          C. Program Outcomes
              List the student learning outcomes established for your program

                        Intended Student Learning Outcomes – Detail
                     Computer Applications/Office Administration Program


1. Employ a code of ethics and standards consistently and appropriately in the workplace to
develop skills for leadership, teamwork, and personal improvement to achieve one’s potential.

          a. Identify the ethical standards/code, stated or implied, of the workplace discipline.
          b. Utilize time management skills to meet schedules and deadlines in academic and
                 professional responsibilities.
          c. Demonstrate observance of rules and standards related to the academic or work
                 environments.
          d. Demonstrate ability to complete assigned tasks on time.
          e. Work effectively with others on group projects.
          f.   Utilize resources to empower coworkers.
          g.   Prioritize work load to maximize efficiency.
          h.   Demonstrate professionalism in dealing with others
          i.   Interact with individuals with different cultural backgrounds in a respectful manner

.
2. Develop verbal and non-verbal communication skills that empower students to be credible and
promotable in a diverse workplace.

          a. Demonstrate the ability to read, comprehend, and retain appropriate professional
          materials.
          b. Write legibly using correct grammar, vocabulary, spelling, and punctuation.
          c. Demonstrate verbal and non-verbal public speaking skills using correct grammar,
          vocabulary, and pronunciations.
          d. Demonstrate the ability to follow written and/or oral directions.
          e. Utilize language appropriate to the respective discipline.
          f. Apply evaluations and feedback to improve communications skills as a writer and a
          speaker.
          g. Demonstrate awareness of diverse audiences and purposes for both written and oral
          communications.
          h. Develop a basic awareness of individual and cultural differences and similarities
          i. Resolve conflicts in a rational and respectful manner


3. Exhibit the ability to evaluate information sensibly and consistently in making decisions and
solving problems dealing with professional and personal issues/concerns.

          a. Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant data.
          b. Analyze new information as it relates to known concepts.
          c. Prioritize tasks in the workplace
          d. Collaborate effectively with others to accomplish common goals
          e. Use evaluation tools appropriate to the work environment.
          f. Apply specific information learned to solve problems commonly encountered in the
          workplace.

4. Utilize technology, software applications, and mathematical operations to effectively complete
daily workplace responsibilities.

          a. Demonstrate basic computer proficiency including familiarity with a keyboard, operating
              system, and/or word processing/database/spreadsheet software relevant to the needs of
              the industry/workplace.
          b. Demonstrate the effective and efficient use of calculators and computers to solve
              mathematical problems.
          c. Demonstrate the use of numbers and mathematics in the performance of common, daily
              activities or functions.
          d. Use tables, graphs, and descriptions to document an activity, process, or procedure.
          e. Select and use tools and equipment necessary for a given procedure.
          f. Apply the technical skills of the discipline in a simulated or actual work environment.
          g. Demonstrate the competencies required for professional certification.
Program outcomes description on above pages. Courses include
CAOA prefix.

     120   120   123   125   126   2   1   129   246   250   2   153   1   1   261   1   264   265   266   167   268   168A   269   270   271   172   173
     A     B                       2   2                     5         5   5         6
                                   7   8                     2         4   6         2
1a
1b
1c
1d
1e
1f
1g
1h
1i
2a
2b
2c
2d
2e
2f
2g
2h
2i
3a
3b
3c
3d
3e
3f
4a
4b
4c
4d
4e
4f
4g
     II.   PROGRAM CONNECTIONS TO COLLEGE MISSION, VISION AND VALUES,
           STRATEGIC GOALS, AND/OR COLLEGE PLANS
           A. Identify how your program addresses or helps fulfill one or more of the following:
              the College Mission, Vision and Values; a specific Strategic Goal(s); and/or elements
              of the College Master Plans

College Mission:

At Cuesta, students acquire the tools to be academically successful, develop critical thinking skills and
expertise, and learn to appreciate the contributions of all people in a diverse society.
At Cuesta, we work together with dignity and respect toward the common goal of serving our students.
At Cuesta, we respond effectively to the personal, academic and professional needs of the community.

Vision:

Cuesta College is dedicated to accessible, high-quality education for the support and enhancement of
student success, professional development, and the community we serve.

Values:

Access, Success, Excellence

    As of Spring 2011, the CA/OA department has one full-time faculty, losing one full-time
    faculty member to retirement in December 2010. There are 11 part-time faculty within
    Computer Applications/Office Administration. However, the remaining full-time faculty has a
    40% release time for Interim Division Chair duties. All faculty spend countless hours learning
    new and modified existing software programs in order to deliver training to students to meet
    the demands of today‘s administrative/business employee. Faculty are deeply committed to
    quality education and a practical understanding of what industry is currently requiring.
    Through lectures, labs, internships, advisory committees, and other outreach endeavors, faculty
    have successfully produced new and revised curriculum to enhance programs that embody
    superior and distinct training. Faculty consistently are enrolled in professional development
    workshops and classes in order to learn programs as they become part of the trade/skills for
    administrative professionals workers. Many times, textbooks and workshops are unavailable, in
    which case faculty are obligated to spend numerous hours teaching themselves—from
    beginning to advanced skills.

    Much of the advising/counseling for CA/OA students is made possible by the CA/OA faculty
    on an ―in-house‖ basis. If the college counselors have questions, they usually call and ask
    CA/OA faculty. Because there are so many certificates and such a wide variety of computer
    classes that are constantly being added or changed, it can be challenging to a counselor who is
    not on the ground floor of this process. CA/OA faculty are most current on the rotation of
    classes offerings at the different campuses, which semester these classes are scheduled to be
    offered, and the version being taught. The trust and responsibility factors are ever present
    in the contact and advising of students.
Because computer applications is a skill/knowledge set sought after by a extensive crossing of
the community, classes offerings must meet a wide range of skills—from entry to advanced
levels.   When considering skill level, other factors are also brought into the realm of
consideration:

       Who will take this class?          What is the skill level?
       Is English the primary language?
       Is the student a re-entry student that has been away from education for a lengthy period?
       Is the student currently in the workforce and wants to update his or her skills?
       Is the student a recent high school graduate that used the computer from a young age?
       Does the student have learning or physical disabilities?

The above factors are ever present when developing curriculum and teaching Computer
Applications/Office Administration courses and are encountered on a daily basis thus
embracing diversity in the truest sense of the word and striving to meet the needs of all
involved.

Expertise beyond the basic operation of computer application programs is a goal the CA/OA
program sets for itself. The ability to teach others how to use the programs, troubleshoot when
problems arise, and understand how to stretch the capabilities of the various programs is
interwoven into each class. Computer technology and applications have exploded over recent
years. In today‘s increasingly technological world, almost every career is becoming more
dependent on technology, and consequently, CA/OA courses have been in a constant stream
of change to respond to the needs of the working student (online, weekend and evening
courses), students who desire to learn their skills at a fast pace and get into the workplace
(accelerated courses), and students who want to combine their skills with general education
courses and earn an Associate of Arts degree.

All of the above demonstrate how the Computer Applications/Office Administration program
has awareness for and reaction to flexible options and continuous change within this industry.

Computer Applications/Office Administration has equipment and classroom facilities that meet
the needs of all students. The majority of CAOA classes have a lecture and lab component.
The lab segment of the class is where students complete class work inside the computer lab
with the CA/OA instructor present to assist, guide, support, and demonstrate the fundamental
knowledge of a particular computer program so students can easily achieve understanding and
success.

When new curriculum is being considered or modification to an existing course is
suggested, the Computer Applications/Office Administration faculty meet to draft a well-
thought-out plan of how this meets with today’s changing technology and the needs of the
students. Mutual consent is strived for in all of these situations. Full-time and part-time
faculty are actively involved in separate campus committees (Technology Committee, Re-Entry
Committee, Foundation Board, Distance Education Committee, etc.) that bring usable
knowledge to the program and the division at large.
                PROGRAM DATA ANALYSIS AND PROGRAM-SPECIFIC MEASUREMENTS
                (Data provided by Office of Institutional Research – Ryan Cartnal)
         A. Data Summary – Relevant Comments and Analysis
             Include enrollment, retention, success, FTES/FTEF, degree and certificate completion
                o May include other pertinent information
                o Response to specific ARCC data
Enrollment Data
                          COURSE ENROLLMENTS OVERALL
                                                            YEAR
                                    2005-06    2006-07     2007-08       2008-09     2009-10
                                    COUNT      COUNT       COUNT         COUNT       COUNT
         Summer                         31          21            79        140            .
         Fall                          572         521        647           591         639
TERM
         Spring                        636         683        727           776         680
         TOTAL ENROLLMENTS            1239        1225       1453          1507        1319


Retention

                              COURSE FILL RATES OVERALL
                                                                  YEAR
                                       2005-06    2006-07     2007-08       2008-09     2009-10
                                         Sum        Sum           Sum         Sum         Sum
Summer      FILL RATE   ENROLLMENT       34.8%      35.6%         68.7%       55.1%             .
Fall        FILL RATE   ENROLLMENT       60.9%      60.2%         73.9%       60.7%       86.7%
Spring      FILL RATE   ENROLLMENT       70.9%      73.9%         59.9%       74.3%       81.2%
ANNUAL      FILL RATE   ENROLLMENT       64.3%      66.3%         65.9%       66.3%       83.8%


FTES

                  FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT STUDENTS OVERALL
                                                 YEAR
                         2005-06    2006-07    2007-08     2008-09       2009-10
                           FTES      FTES        FTES       FTES          FTES
         Summer              3.11      2.05        5.55       8.09               .
         Fall               66.01     59.62       64.94      59.68         71.07
TERM
         Spring             66.36     66.53       65.32      77.74         72.05
         TOTAL FTES       135.48     128.20      135.81     145.51        143.12


In the WED Cluster for the 2010/2011 academic year, CAOA was #2 in CREDIT FTES:

Computer Appl/Office Administration                       122.7
Degree and Certificate Completion

The data provided by Cuesta Institutional research is NOT valid. Every year CAOA students apply for
certificates as well as the AA degree. After conducting a survey among students in only 5 classes this
year, close to 50 students confirmed they are working toward a CAOA certificate or AA degree.

           B. Offer interpretations of data, and identify areas for change to facilitate program quality
              and growth

Because the world of technology is intricately intertwined with administrative professional skills
and has reached beyond the grasps of ‗office workers only‘, change has proven to be rapid and
constant—almost ‗revolutionary‘. The Computer Applications/Office Administration program has
been able to successfully meet the demands, changes, and progress of this worldwide
transformation in offering courses to prepare students for the most up-to-date software applications
and requisite soft skills that co-exist with all training skills—the result is producing, not only
skilled employees, but responsible and ethical individuals ready for job placement proudly
reflecting Cuesta‘s mission within the administrative professional atmosphere.


     III. CURRICULUM REVIEW
           A. Review courses including all course delivery modalities for currency in teaching
              practices and compliance to current policies, standards, and/or regulations
              All CAOA courses contain objectives, topic and scope, and student learning outcomes.
              Due to the ever-changing content of computer applications classes, CAOA faculty are
              constantly updated course content to reflect the software and technology necessary to
              enhance the learning opportunities for students as well as employment opportunities for
              students.
           B. Review Prerequisite/Co-requisite/Advisory validations
           As per the previous CPPR, all courses continue to be current and accurate for the validation
           of these items.
           C. May include comparisons to other college course descriptions, faculty development
              activities that make contributions to the program, etc.
              CAOA faculty attend numerous web trainings, self-trainings, web tutorials, publisher
              provided trainings to keep up-to-date on new software versions. In addition, for
              administrative content courses the CAOA Advisory Committee is consulted on a regular
              basis for advice on attitudes in the workplace, soft skills for employees, and qualities
              employers are looking for in their employees.
           D. List changes and recommendations to curriculum
              Several CAOA courses have been offered as hybrid classes. This venue appeals to the
              working and reentry students.

     IV. PROGRAM OUTCOMES, ASSESSMENTS AND IMPROVEMENTS: Narrative
       A. Summarize assessment results for program-level Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)


       Assessments are in progress. Please review Assessment Planning Calendar in Section D below.

      ASSESSMENT OF PROGRAM STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
                     Computer Applications/Office Administration Program

Assessment of the needs and goals of students starts at the beginning of each semester. Through
introductions and discussions instructors can identify the skills and abilities of students as well as
their current employment status. In addition, quizzes, exams, office hours, and practical assessment
exercises/projects are utilized to evaluate whether objectives are met. Campus support services,
announcements, and guest speakers are provided to inform students of campus wide support.


The CA/OA program offers a CA/OA 129 Internship course where the student is placed in an
administrative setting to get ―hands on‖ experience. Internships have become a key element for
students to become more competitive. Internships help students bring out their skills and strengths
and serve as test runs for different positions. In addition, internships offer opportunities for students
to challenge themselves and expand their horizons. Future employers see internships as a way to
secure well-rounded and experienced entry-level employees.


During the semester students prepare portfolios of their work in order to ―showcase‖ their skills in
business correspondence, desktop publishing, spreadsheet design, digital images, and Website
creation.
Students completing the courses based on the Microsoft Office suite can take an industry
certification exam to prove their technical expertise in a specific software program. These
certifications are often recognized by employers in recruitment of new employees to verify reported
skills. In addition, students who achieve certification and are currently working have been awarded
raises by their employers after becoming certified.
Many students enrolled in CA/OA classes are attending to acquire a specific skill. They are not
in a sequential program and may complete a single course or a personal selection of courses. A
primary mission of Cuesta College is to ―provide courses and programs in occupational education to
prepare students for employment and to further occupational competence through advanced training
and re-training― and the CA/OA classes continue to fulfill this important mission whether students
complete an entire program or one specific class.
At this time, Cuesta College administrative support does not provide a system to track students once
they have left Cuesta College. Some recommendations for future assessment include the following:
Implement a vocational student completion and placement tracking system
Follow up with current and past graduates using web-based surveys
Track job placement through a graduate database
       B. Identify connections of program-level SLOs to broad program goals

PROGRAM GOALS:

The goal of the Computer Applications/Office Administration program is to prepare the CA/OA
student to be proficiently skilled in the area of computer-technical knowledge intertwined with a
social and ethical makeup that enables the student to go out into the workplace and be a productive,
responsible, and ethical component of society.


       C. Describe connection of course-level SLOs to program-level SLOs

                        CONNECTIONS TO PROGRAM GOALS

                             INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES

Employ a code of ethics and standards consistently and appropriately in the workplace to
develop skills for leadership, teamwork, and personal improvement to achieve one’s potential.
In order for students to be thoroughly prepared to enter the workforce, it is imperative to take the
initiative to uphold an environment of ethical conduct and academic integrity. This will contribute to
students‘ success in demonstrating professionalism, working with others, and accomplishing future
goals.

Develop verbal and non-verbal communication skills that empower students to be credible and
promotable in a diverse workplace.
These skills are key for students to further their career goals, enrich their relationships with
coworkers in diverse work environments, and secure advancement in a company. In a high-tech
society, students with first-rate communication skills will succeed where others won‘t.

Exhibit the ability to evaluate information sensibly and consistently in making decisions and
solving problems dealing with professional and personal issues/concerns.
This is important for success not only in an office environment, but also in personal situations.
Evaluating information and collaborating effectively with others to accomplish common goals are
skills that lead to a productive employee.

Utilize technology, software applications, and mathematical operations to effectively complete
daily workplace responsibilities.
With the application of learned technical skills, students will solve problems, document processes,
create digital and web-based publications in the workplace. These four learning outcomes are
collectively to build the foundation for students to grow and be successful professionally and
personally throughout their lives.



       D. Recommend changes and updates to program funding goals based on assessment of SLOs
                 Include elements that require funding as well as those that do not
                 For elements that require funding, complete Section D — Unit Plan Funding Requests
                 For faculty hiring needs, attach Section H – Faculty Prioritization Process

Assessments are in progress. Please review the Assessment Planning Calendar below:

                                      Assessment    Analyze         Discuss/Recomm    Plan for
                                      Surveys       Results &       end               Implementati
                                                    Plan            Improvement       on
                                                    Improvements    Plans              of
                                                                                      Improvements



        120
CAOA     A    Beg Keybd; Doc Proc     S2011         F2011           F2011             S2012
        120
CAOA     B    Int Keybd; Doc Proc     S2011         F2011           F2011             S2012
CAOA    123   Business English        S2011         F2011           F2011             S2012
CAOA    125   Bus Calculations        S2011         F2011           F2011             S2012
CAOA    126   Voice Rec /Doc App      S2012         F2012           F2012             S2013
CAOA    128   Office Technology       F2011         S2012           S2012             F2012
CAOA    129   Internship              F2011         S2012           S2012             F2012
CAOA    153   Essen. Ms Publisher     F2011         S2012           S2012             F2012
CAOA    154   Essen Of Ms Outlook     F2011         S2012           S2012             F2012
CAOA    156   Test Prep For MOS       F2011         S2012           S2012             F2012
CAOA    162   Beg Cmptr Keyboard      F2011         S2012           S2012             F2012
CAOA    167   Powerpoint              F2011         S2012           S2012             F2012
        168
CAOA     A    Photoshop-Level 2       F2011         S2012           S2012             F2012
CAOA    172   Photoshop Elements      S2011         F2011           F2011             S2012
CAOA    173   Adobe Acrobat           S2011         F2011           F2011             S2012
CAOA    227   Business Commun         S2011         F2011           F2011             S2012
CAOA    246   Word Processing         S2011         F2011           F2011             S2012
              Advanced Word
CAOA    250   Processing              S2011         F2011           F2011             S2012
CAOA    252   Quickbooks Pro          F2011         S2012           S2012             F2012
CAOA    261   Intro To Sprdsheets     S2011         F2011           F2011             S2012
CAOA    264   Intro To Database       S2011         F2011           F2011             S2012
CAOA    265   Adobe Indesign          F2011         S2012           S2012             F2012
CAOA    266   Intr Computer Basics    F2011         S2012           S2012             F2012
CAOA    268   Intro To Photoshop      F2011         S2012           S2012             F2012
              Dreamweaver Web
CAOA    269   Pub                     F2011         S2012           S2012             F2012
CAOA    271   Flash                   F2011         S2012           S2012             F2012




                                                                                                 37
V.   PROGRAM STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES/ASSESSMENTS: Worksheets
     For this segment of the Instructional CPPR, fill out and attach Course Program Assessment
     Summary (CPAS) worksheets for each course in the program OR Worksheet B from the
     2010-2011 IPPR Template. Note: Before attaching CPAS documents, please do not include
     the raw data results of course-level and program-level SLO assessments, which should
     remain only with program faculty.
        CPAS Worksheets for Each Course (with raw data results deleted); OR
        Worksheet B: CPPR—Course-level SLOs and Assessments (2010-2011 IPPR Template)
 PLEASE SEE FILE WITH WORKSHEET B -- CAOA COURSE LEVEL SLOs

VI. END NOTES (If Applicable)
    If applicable, you may attach additional documents or information, such as assessment forms,
    awards, letters, samples, lists of students working in the field, etc.

Student Success Stories

Debra N. was able to successfully identify inconsistencies in the Quickbooks data entry at
her job, and persuaded her partners that they needed to take more internal control over the
bookkeeping processes. She completed CAOA 252 Quickbooks class and is confident that
her learned skills will contribute to the business success.

Naomi completed CAOA 246 and 250 Word and Advanced Word classes in the distance
ed mode. She communicated that her acquired skills from CAOA classes contributed to her
success in finding a job.

Stuart H. landed a job as an Administrative Support Specialist in Florida. He
communicated that the skills he learned in CAOA classes such as Access, Excel, Word,
and business communications are making him a valuable employee.




                                                                                             38
        CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION (CTE) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM REVIEW

        Program: Computer Applications/Office Administration                    Planning Year: 2011-2012

        Unit: Business Education Cluster: WED               Last Year of CPPR/Voc. Ed Review: 2008-
        2009

        INSTRUCTIONS: CTE programs will complete and submit the below Two-year Program
        Review as part of a regular two-year program review cycle (Ed Code 78016). In addition, CTE
        programs will complete and submit an APPW on an annual basis and an Instructional
        Comprehensive Program Planning and Review (CPPR) every four years according to the
        institutional comprehensive planning cycle for instructional programs.

        California Ed Code 78016
        A. Every vocational or occupational training program offered by a community college district
           shall be reviewed every two years by the governing board of the district to ensure that each
           program, as demonstrated by the California Occupational Information System, including the
           State-Local Cooperative Labor Market Information Program established in Section 10533 of
           the Unemployment Insurance Code, or if this program is not available in the labor market
           area, other available sources of labor market information, does all of the following:
           1) Meets a documented labor market demand.
           2) Does not represent unnecessary duplication of other manpower training programs in the
              area.
           3) Is of demonstrated effectiveness as measured by the employment and completion success
              of its students.
        B. Any program that does not meet the requirements of subdivision (A) and the standards
           promulgated by the governing board shall be terminated within one year.
        C. The review process required by this section shall include the review and comments by the
           local Private Industry Council established pursuant to Division 8 (commencing with Section
           15000) of the Unemployment Insurance Code, which review and comments shall occur prior
           to any decision by the appropriate governing body.
        D. This section shall apply to each program commenced subsequent to July 28, 1983.
        E. A written summary of the findings of each review shall be made available to the public.

        NARRATIVE: Review your CTE program according to the following three prompts with
        analysis of data provided by the State. If assistance is needed to retrieve data, please contact the
        Dean of Workforce and Economic Development.

        Provide a written summary for each prompt. If yes, explain why and/or how. If no, explain why.

   I.      Meets a documented labor market demand.

Office and Administrative Support occupations account for almost 28,000 jobs in the Cuesta College
service area. They serve a variety of industries in the region and are projected to grow five percent
through 2015. While median hourly earnings are modest ($15.20 per hour), the skill sets and acquired
competencies in these occupations present the potential for career advancement in and across industries.

                                                                                                               39
Labor Market Demands
     Employs almost 28,000 workers in the Cuesta College service area
     New jobs projected to grow by over 1,400, or five percent through 2015
     New and replacement jobs increase the number of openings to 4,559, or over 912 jobs
      annually


            Multi-Year Summary Office and Administrative Support Occupations

                              2010 – 2015 2010-2011
               ONE                2010 Occupational             27,786
               YEAR               Jobs
               2011 Occupational Jobs                           28,253
               Total Change                                     467
               Total % Change                                   1.70%
                                     2010-2013
               THREE              2010 Occupational             27,786
               YEAR               Jobs
               2013 Occupational Jobs                           28,955
               Total Change                                     1,169
               Total % Change                                   4.22%
                                     2010-2015
               FIVE               2010 Occupational             27,786
               YEAR               Jobs
               2015 Occupational Jobs                           29,213
               Total Change                                     1,427
               Total % Change                                   5.15%
                                     2010-2019
               NINE               2010 Occupational             27,786
               YEAR               Jobs
               2019 Occupational Jobs                           29,453
               Total Change                                     1,667
               Total % Change                                   6.00%

  Office and administrative support occupations are projected to experience modest, but
  increasing growth through 2019. A total of 467 new jobs are expected this year for an overall
  increase of almost two percent. The growth percentage climbs to 4.22 percent through 2013
  with the creation of over 1,100 new jobs. A steady job increase is projected through 2019 to
  cap off at six percent (1,667 new jobs). New and replacement jobs increase the number of
  openings to 4,559 through 2015. This represents a 16 percent increase in employment
  opportunities and creates over 912 jobs annually.



                                                                                              40
    This information is from the Environmental Scan Report – Cuesta College—Rural
    opportunities Study June 2010.

According to the Employment Development Department (―EDD‖) of the State of California, the
annual job openings for San Luis Obispo, Kern, Fresno, Monterey and Santa Barbara Counties in
the following professions related to Office Technology/Office Computer Applications from 2008 -
2018 is as noted below (information current as of March 1, 2011 from
http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/commcolleges/):

    Annual Job Openings

    SLO                      42
    Kern                     101
    Fresno                   93
    Monterey                 47
    Santa Barbara            82

       II.     Does not represent unnecessary duplication of other manpower training programs
         in the area.

     THIS IS TRUE. There are no other community colleges or other training programs in the
     County that provide ongoing training in business communication, business English,
     bookkeeping, office technology, computer applications including Word, Excel, Access,
     Outlook, PowerPoint, Publisher, Photoshop, Flash, Dreamweaver, Photoshop Elements,
     InDesign, and Windows operating system as does Cuesta College.

     III. Is of demonstrated effectiveness as measured by the employment and completion success
       of its students.

According to the California Colleges Reporting Services 2010-2011 Summary Performance Detail
Report by College-6 Digit TOP Codes, accessed online at http://reports.cccco.edu on March 1,
2011, Cuesta College’s report for Office Technology/Office Computer Applications, TOP CODE
051400 indicates

        Core 1 Skill Attainment (GPA 2.0 & Above: 79.19% Performance Goal) at 90%, with a
    statewide percentage of 87.76%

      Core 2 Completions (Certificates, Degrees and Transfer Ready: 78.95% Performance
    Goal) at 77%, with a statewide percentage of 84%

Office and Administrative Support occupations account for almost 28,000 jobs in the Cuesta College
service area. They serve a variety of industries in the region and are projected to grow five percent
through 2015. While median hourly earnings are modest ($15.20 per hour), the skill sets and acquired
competencies in these occupations present the potential for career advancement in and across industries.
Environmental Scan Report – Cuesta College—Rural opportunities Study June 2010

                                                                                                      41
                                                  APPW
Program: Computer Applications/Office Administration (CAOA)
Planning Year: 2011-2012

Unit: Business Education                                 Cluster: Workforce Development

NARRATIVE: APPW

For the first six segments of the APPW, use the following narrative outline:

     XI.     Institutional Measures: Please outline the specific institutional measures you are addressing in the
             upcoming year.

           The goal of the Computer Applications/Office Administration program is to prepare the
           CA/OA student to be proficiently skilled in the area of computer-technical knowledge
           intertwined with a social and ethical makeup that enables the student to go out into the
           workplace and be a productive, responsible, and ethical component of society.

           We enable students to achieve their academic, transfer, workforce preparation, career
           advancement, and personal goals. Building on our tradition of excellence, we serve our
           community by providing programs and services that produce students who can succeed in a
           diverse and rapidly changing society, participate effectively in their local communities, and
           live responsible and rewarding lives. As a learning college, we provide a supportive
           environment for students and employees, assess student and institutional outcomes,
           improve performance, forge strategic partnerships, and maximize opportunities for learning.

           The mission of Cuesta College is met in every realm by the Computer Applications/Office
           Administration program. This program provides students with the vocational skills necessary
           to secure entry, mid, and higher-level administrative professional employment. Students
           within this program can achieve a fast-track training approach by selecting among nine (9)
           certificate programs, four (4) of which are “block” programs. The latter “block” programs
           can be achieved within a one-semester time period. For students whose goals are to spend
           more time achieving these skills, a Computer Applications/Office Administration Associate of
           Arts Degree is also available.

           Because the world of technology is intricately intertwined with administrative professional
           skills and has reached beyond the grasps of ‘office workers only’, change has proven to be
           rapid and constant—almost ‘revolutionary’. The Computer Applications/Office
           Administration program has kept up with the demands, changes, and progress of this
           worldwide transformation in offering courses to prepare students for the most up-to-date
           software applications and requisite soft skills that co-exist with all training skills—the result is
           producing, not only skilled employees, but responsible and ethical individuals that proudly
           reflect Cuesta’s mission within the administrative professional atmosphere.




                                                                                                            42
Cuesta College Values and how the Computer Applications/Office Administration
embraces, models and integrates those values:

Excellence—Currently the department has one full-time faculty (who is also the Division
Chair) and 11 part-time faculty within Computer Applications/Office Administration. The full-
time faculty has a 40% release time for Division Chair duties. All faculty spend countless
hours learning new and modified existing software programs in order to deliver training to
students to meet the demands of today’s administrative employee. All faculty are deeply
committed to quality education and a practical understanding of what industry is currently
requiring. Through lectures, labs, internships, advisory committees, and other outreach
endeavors, faculty have successfully produced new and revised curriculum to enhance
programs to produce superior and distinct training. Faculty are constantly enrolled in
professional development workshops and classes in order to learn programs as they become
part of the trade for administrative professionals workers. Many times, textbooks and
workshops are unavailable, in which case faculty are obligated to spend countless hours of
teaching themselves—from beginning to advanced degrees—these skills.

Integrity—we strive to maintain public trust by being responsible, honest, and trustworthy
with our students, staff, and community.

Much of the advising/counseling for CA/OA students is made possible by the CA/OA faculty
on an “in-house” basis. If the college counselors have questions, they usually call and ask
CA/OA faculty. Because there are so many certificates and such a variety of computer
classes that are constantly being added or changed, it can be challenging to a counselor who
is not on the ground floor of this process. CA/OA faculty are most current on the rotation of
classes offerings at the different campuses, which semester these classes are scheduled to
be offered, and the version being taught. The trust and responsibility factors are ever
present in the contact and advising of students, advertising in the community, and the
printed flyers and certificate/degree information readily available to students, the college,
and the community at large.


Diversity – we embrace diversity by respecting the dignity of every individual, accepting
differences, and striving to be inclusive.

Because computer applications is a skill/knowledge set sought after by a extensive crossing
of the community, classes offered must meet a wide range of skills—from entry to advanced
levels. When considering skill level, other factors are also brought into the realm of
consideration: who will take this class, what is the skill level, is English the primary language,
is the student—a re-entry student that has been away from education for a lengthy period;
or a student who is currently in the workforce and wants to update his or her skills; or a
recent high school graduate that used the computer from a very young age; or a student
with learning or physical disabilities, etc.

The above factors are ever present when developing curriculum and teaching Computer
Applications/Office Administration courses because all of the above are encountered on a


                                                                                               43
       daily basis thus embracing diversity in the truest sense of the word and striving to meet the
       needs of all involved.

       Responsiveness – we respond to the changing needs of our students and communities
       through open access, flexible learning options, and adapting to change.

       Expertise beyond the basic operation of computer application programs is a goal the CA/OA
       program sets for itself. The ability to teach others how to use the programs, troubleshoot
       when problems arise, and understand how to stretch the capabilities of the various
       programs is interwoven into each class. Computer technology and applications have
       exploded over recent years. In today’s increasingly technological world, almost every career
       is becoming more dependent on technology, and consequently, CA/OA courses have been in
       a constant stream of change to respond to the needs of the working student (online,
       weekend and evening courses), students who desire to learn their skills at a fast pace and get
       into the workplace (accelerated courses), and students who want to combine their skills with
       general education courses and earn an Associate of Arts degree.

       All of the above demonstrate how the Computer Applications/Office Administration program
       has awareness for and reaction to flexible options and continuous change within this
       industry.

       Caring – we provide a safe, supportive, and participative environment that treats everyone
       respectfully and fairly and allows students and employees to recognize their strengths,
       clarify their goals, achieve success, and enrich their lives.

       Computer Applications/Office Administration has equipment and classroom facilities that
       meet the needs of all students. Most of the classes have a lecture and lab component. The
       lab segment of the class is where students complete class work inside the computer lab with
       the CA/OA instructor present to assist, guide, support, and demonstrate the fundamental
       knowledge of a particular computer program so students can easily achieve understanding
       and success.

       Collaboration – we are committed to creating an internal environment that fosters a sense
       of community to achieving success through collaboration with business, community, and
       educational partners.

       When new curriculum is being considered or modification to an existing course is suggested,
       the Computer Applications/Office Administration faculty meet to draft a well-thought-out
       plan of how this meets with today’s changing technology and the needs of the students.
       Mutual consent is strived for in all of these situations. Full-time and part-time faculty are
       actively involved in separate campus committees (Technology Committee, Re-Entry
       Committee, Foundation Board, Distance Education Committee, etc.) that bring usable
       knowledge to the program and the division at large.

XII.    Program Development/ Forecasting



                                                                                                  44
      As technology changes, so does the CAOA courses, certificates and degrees change. It is in
      continual flux—always with ears and eyes open to industry, the CAOA Advisory Committee,
      and computer technology periodicals. Development of new courses and programs is a built-
      in feature and ongoing.

      The forecasting into the future includes the following:
                to teach the most up-to-date software
                 to collaborate across the curriculum with other disciplines, when necessary
                to recruit instructors that are knowledgeable and able to interact in a lecture/lab
       setting within the computer lab setting
                to market and offer Spanish Friendly computer courses at the North County and
       South County campuses (when feasible)


XIII. Anticipated Program and/or Scheduling Changes

Established courses will be offered in the Distance Ed mode that will enable students to learn
online and face-to-face computer courses that are sought after by employers—CAOA 271 (hybrid),
CAOA 268 (hybrid) and CAOA 265 (hybrid). The face-to-face portions of these courses include
orientation meetings, field trips, classroom meetings for presentations, exams.


XIV. Facility Changes

The CAOA Department is upgrading the Adobe software version to CS5 for Photoshop, Photoshop
Elements, Dreamweaver, Flash, Adobe Acrobat, and InDesign, as well as upgrading to Office 2010.
The expense for upgrading the Adobe software is shared with the Engineering/Automotive
Department as several classes in this area use the software as well. In order for our students to
stay competitive in these areas, it is imperative for our classes to utilize the most current version
of the software available. The faculty members teaching these classes are dedicated, hard-working
professionals who are enthusiastic and interested in the success of our students in their career
fields.


XV.    Staffing Projections

The CAOA department currently has one full-time faculty (one is the Division Chair). Finding
qualified faculty is a challenge in this field because many people working in these high-end
computerized fields are employed full time and making greater salaries than can be offered to an
adjunct faculty member. Therefore, CAOA advertises, interviews, and recruits on a continual basis
for talented individuals willing to teach.


XVI. Overall Budgetary Issues

                      Adobe Software Upgrade         $9,000
                      Microsoft License Upgrade      $ 400

                                                                                                  45
The budget for the CAOA program is part of the whole for the Business Education Division. Equipment
replacement and software updates are a major part of the expenses to keep these programs operable
and are reflected in the Business Education Division’s Unit Plan.




                                                                                                46
Business Education Division



Hospitality CPPR


2011- 2012




                              47
INSTRUCTIONAL COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAM PLANNING AND
REVIEW (CPPR)

Only to be completed by those programs scheduled for the year according to the institutional
comprehensive planning cycle for instructional programs (i.e., every four years for CTE programs
and five years for all other instructional programs), which is produced by the Office of Academic
Affairs.

Program: HOSPITALITY          Planning Year: 2011-2012       Last Year CPPR Completed: 2009

Unit: BUSINESS EDUCATION Cluster: WED

NARRATIVE: Instructional CPPR
Please use the following narrative outline

VII. GENERAL INFORMATION AND PROGRAM OUTCOMES
     D. General Description about the Program

            Program Mission Statement

         The mission of the Cuesta College Hospitality Program is to educate current hospitality
         employees to successfully assume leadership and management positions in the hospitality
         industry and in turn, make meaningful contributions to the hospitality and tourism industry and
         their communities; in addition, to introduce potential hospitality workers to an exciting and
         accessible career path.

            History of the program

         In August of 2002, Cuesta College partnered with Santa Barbara City College and local hotel
         managers to develop a work-based Hospitality program. A group of 4 educators and 8 industry
         professionals met on a monthly basis to develop a Hospitality curriculum which would comply
         with the educational standards set out by the Chancellors office of the California Community
         Colleges and the American Hotel and Lodging Association (AH&L).

         Industry professionals informed us that a vicious workforce cycle was plaguing the hospitality
         industry. The number of unfilled entry-level positions was increasing and there simply were not
         enough qualified applicants. As a result of these unfilled positions, current employees were
         overworked and unable to participate in any training opportunities. Without training, promising
         employees were stuck in entry-level jobs with salaries that did not provide a living wage for our
         community. In many cases, these promising workers got discouraged and left the industry which
         resulted in an even greater number of unfilled positions.


         Therefore in May 2003, course work was developed and the Hospitality program received formal
         approval from the California Community Colleges Chancellor‘s Office. In Fall 2003, the first
         course offerings in Hospitality were offered at Cuesta College.



                                                                                                48
           Include the broad history of the program and significant changes/improvements
            since the last program review
        
    The Cuesta College continued as a work-based program until Fall 2010. At this point, the
    program was revamped to better meet the needs of the Hospitality Industry and to better prepare
    the students before entering the Hospitality workforce. All Hospitality courses were changed
    from a 9-week course (two hour lecture with a 6 hour lab) to an 18-week (three hour lecture)
    course. After much deliberation with faculty, the conclusion was made that it was necessary to
    increase the amount of lecture time each week in order to integrate all of the curriculum
    requirements into each course. As a result, this required that the curriculum for each class had to
    be rewritten and approved which was finalized Fall 2009. An internship class was added to
    replace the lab. Also, the Hospitality program added an online class- Intro to Hospitality to
    complement the existing program.

       Describe how the Program Review was conducted and who was involved

    With the collaboration of the hospitality advisory committee, faculty, the program coordinator
    and the Business Education Division chair, information was collected and assembled. The prior
    Comprehensive Program and Planning Review and current data from institutional research was
    also referenced.

       List current and/or new faculty, including part-time faculty

Currently, there are four part-time faculty members teaching, one faculty member in the faculty pool
and one coordinator in the Hospitality program. We have full coverage at this time pending any
events that would decrease the current staff.

   Katy Davis
    Katy Davis has over 30 years experience in the Hospitality Industry. She has vast
    experience as an Owner/Operator of a successful hotel and restaurant—The Apple Farm
    in San Luis Obispo, California. From her background, she brings to the classroom her
    proficient skills and expertise in restaurant management, customer service and relations,
    staff development and marketing. Currently she is teaching Supervision in the
    Hospitality Industry and Hospitality Marketing.

   Teresa Staller-Beck

    Teresa has over 30 years‘ experience in hospitality. She graduated with a B.S. degree in
    Business Administration specializing in Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management at
    California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, California. In 1987, she joined Westin
    Hotels and Resorts at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel and later went on to be the senior
    financial analyst for Westin‘s most complex resort to-date, The Westin Kauai. In 1992,
    Teresa formed TSB International Hospitality Consulting, specializing in operations and
    financial management. She consulted on-site for large scale hotels in Singapore, Tokyo,
    Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston, Denver, and Seattle as well as 4-star resorts in Malta,
    Palm Springs, Tucson, Hawaii, and Florida to include The Walt Disney Swan and the
    Portofino Bay Hotel and Resort at Universal Studios.
    Teresa designed and developed an 18-week distance education course, Introduction to
    Hospitality, which she is teaching for the fall 2010 and spring 2011 semester. Previously,
                                                                                                 49
    she taught an AH & L Certification class, Management of Food and Beverage Operations
    at Cuesta College.
   Sandra Reisz

    Sandra has over twenty years experience in the hospitality industry, working for
    companies such as Taco Bell, Starbucks and Universal Studios Hollywood. She currently
    owns and operates the Parkfield Café and Lodge in San Luis Obispo county. Sandra
    received a B.A degree in Communications with a minor in Linguistics from U.C. Santa
    Barbara and went on to receive her Master of Science in Business from the University of
    Phoenix. She currently teaches Hospitality Security and Loss prevention and Front
    Office Operations
   Carol Janssen
    Carol Janssen graduated cum laude with a Juris Doctorate degree from Southwestern
    University School of Law. Admitted to the California State Bar in 1991, Ms. Janssen‘s
    legal practice has focused on civil litigation with an emphasis in employment law and tort
    liability. Her prior experience includes pre-trial matters, jury trials, court trials and
    appeals in state and federal courts primarily in Los Angeles, Orange, Santa Barbara and
    San Luis Obispo counties. Ms. Janssen has represented businesses in the hospitality and
    service industries and has brought actions against those businesses, giving her a unique
    perspective on the industry and methods to limit liability. In addition, she has provided
    counseling services to businesses including restaurants and franchises regarding choice of
    business entity, incorporation, partnership agreements, preparation of employee
    handbooks, establishment of employment policies and procedures, and advice concerning
    employee discipline and terminations. In addition to Hospitality Law, she teaches
    Business Law and Introduction to Law at Cuesta College.

   John Fairweather
    John Fairweather comes to Cuesta with an extensive background in the hotel industry.
    Some of his titles are Front Desk Supervisor, Night Supervisor, Assistant Manager and
    General Manager. While he was working in the hospitality industry, he received a BA in
    Organizational Communications from Sacramento State University. Currently John is
    the Operations Support Manager and Trainer for Martin Resort, a local resort with five
    properties and over 100 employees. He has taught a variety of hospitality classes over
    the past few years including Front Office Operations and Housekeeping Operations. He
    is currently listed in the Hospitality Faculty Pool.

   Julie Franklin
    Julie Franklin comes from a retail background. She has over 20 year‘s retail buying
    experience for a multi store sporting goods company. She was responsible for buying,
    merchandising, managing, and marketing various soft-goods product categories
    throughout her career. She also planned and facilitated new store openings, product
    placement within existing stores and off site Sales Events. She has been teaching Retail
    Buying at Cuesta College for five years and recently began advising cooperative work
    experience students and teaching a Fashion Marketing course. She has been in the
    position of Lead Instructor for the Hospitality program for four years. She plans and
    facilitates their Hospitality Advisory meetings, assisted in rewriting the program‘s
    curriculum, planned and helped with the hospitality cooperative tours and most recently,
                                                                                           50
   composed, collected and assembled the Hospitality Comprehensive Program and
   Planning Review. She assists with any and all areas involved with the Hospitality
   Program.

E. Program Goals: Broad statements about what this program will accomplish – its
   anticipated development and achievements

   Goals:

               i. Provide a Hospitality curriculum to prepare and challenge students for
                  employment in the industry and/or career advancement.
              ii. Provide students with an educational environment that promotes critical thinking,
                  creativity and problem solving so that active and integrated learning may occur.
             iii. Promote and model the development of soft skills for success in the workplace.
             iv. Enhance the partnership between our Hospitality Program and the Hospitality
                  Business community by communicating and sharing information.
              v. Provide articulated core courses to facilitate student transfer from and to other
                  education institutions.
             vi. Promote diversity by enabling all students regardless of age, economic status,
                  disability or ethnic background to meet their intended educational objectives.


      May include program pathway(s) for students such as transfer, career technology
       education, basic skills enrichment, certificate, degree, etc.)

       The Hospitality program offers students either an A.S. Hospitality, a Certificate of
       Achievement - Hospitality Fundamentals or a Certificate of Achievement - Hospitality (see
       attached degree patterns). In addition, students receive completion certificates from the
       American Hotel and Lodging for completing each course. All courses within the Hospitality
       program are transferable. All courses have been reviewed and at this time no changes are
       needed. Each hospitality course is independent and can be taken in any sequence, thus no
       pre-requisite is required.

F. Program Outcomes-
   List the student learning outcomes established for your program

   Hosp 201 - Intro to Hospitality
       Identify the basics components of the Hospitality industry.
       Describe the operating factors and the basic organizational structure of the Hotel
         industry.
       Describe the relationship between market, concept and menu in commercial and
         retail food service.
       Describe the association between travel and tourism management and the
         hospitality industry.

   Hosp 205 - Front Office   Operations
       Summarize the front-office operations and the four stages of the guest cycle.


                                                                                          51
      Identify the seven steps of the registration process and discuss creative
       registration options.
      Summarize the front office accounting fundamentals.
      Identify functions and procedures related to the check out and settlement process.

Hosp 210 - Hospitality Marketing and Sales
    Describe the importance of marketing as it relates to the success of the hospitality
      operation
    Explain reasons for the growth in hospitality services and the benefits of
      marketing them.
    List internal and external influences on consumer behavior.
    Compare and contrast two types of marketing plans – strategic and tactical.

Hosp 215 - Housekeeping Operations
    Identify the roles of housekeeping.
    Summarize the planning and organization of the housekeeping department and the
      dilemma of human resources.
    Describe the impact of controlling expenses and managing inventory.
    Discuss the benefits of environmental and energy management policies.

Hosp 220 - Supervision in the Hospitality Industry
    Describe the term management and identify the basic management principles
    Describe the communication process and the impact it can have on the
      organization.
    Describe the function of training and explain the importance of training within the
      organization.
    Review how supervisors determine productivity standards and business volumes
      using separate forecasting methods

Hosp 225 - Hospitality Law
    Describe rights and liabilities of hotelkeepers under common law.
    Describe the implications of the Americans with Disabilities Act.
    Describe the Fair Labor Standards Act

Hosp 230 - Food and Beverage Operations
    Compare and contrast between commercial and noncommercial food service
      operations.
    Identify a variety of food service personnel positions and describe the roles these
      positions play in the food service industry.
    Explain the steps involved in Menu Planning and Design and determine standard
      food and beverage costs to assist in the menu planning.



                                                                                      52
      Identify the major functions and basic principle of food production; describe how
       provide good food service to guests.

Hosp 235 - Hospitality Security and Loss Prevention
    Describe the elements to a security system and evaluate the security system‘s
      effectiveness.
    Evaluate security procedures and guest concerns.
    Summarize the Protection of Funds and accounting control procedures.
    Summarize the Emergency Management plan and communicating with media.

Hosp 240 - Hospitality Training and Development Skills
    Describe the factors that a diverse work force, stategic planning, and technology
      have on the hospitality training industry.
    Summarize how training is an investment in the organizaion and differentiate the
      budgeting process for training in today's organizaions.
    Differentiate between measurement and evaluation and identify criteria that
      training directors use to validate training activities.
    Compare and contrast the different types of training exercises and activities used
      in training sessions and identify the advantages and disadvantages of using
      various types of technology based training.

Hosp 245 - Hospitality Internship
    Identify all the roles and responsibilibies of an employee in the Hospitality
      environment.
    Evaluation by instructor of the skills and qualities needed for student success.
    Examine, learn, and discover different elements that may be of interest in
      Hospitality.
    Demonstrate in a supervised professional setting knowledge gained and essential
      experience.




                                                                                      53
VIII. PROGRAM CONNECTIONS TO COLLEGE MISSION, VISION AND VALUES,
    STRATEGIC GOALS, AND/OR COLLEGE PLANS

    B. Identify how your program addresses or helps fulfill one or more of the following:
       the College Mission, Vision and Values; a specific Strategic Goal(s); and/or elements
       of the College Master Plans

    Cuesta College Mission:

    At Cuesta, students acquire the tools to be academically successful, develop critical thinking
    skills and expertise, and learn to appreciate the contributions of all people in a diverse
    society.
    At Cuesta, we work together with dignity and respect toward the common goal of serving our
    students.
    At Cuesta, we respond effectively to the personal, academic and professional needs of the
    community.

    Vision:

    Cuesta College is dedicated to accessible, high-quality education for the support and
    enhancement of student success, professional development, and the community we serve.

    Values:

    Access, Success, Excellence


       The mission statement of Cuesta College is met with the Hospitality Program. The goal of the
       Cuesta College Hospitality Program is to educate current hospitality employees to successfully
       assume leadership and management positions in the hospitality industry and in turn, make
       meaningful contributions to the hospitality and tourism industry and their communities; in
       addition, to introduce potential hospitality workers to an exciting and accessible career path. .
       The Hospitality Program at Cuesta College is a two-year vocational program that is designed to
       provide entry, mid, and higher-level professional employment. With the collaboration of the
       Hospitality Advisory Committee, curriculum was created to prepare students for a career in
       hospitality. Students within this program can achieve a fast-track training approach and can
       achieve Course Completion certificates from the American Hotel and Lodging Association
       and/or may also earn Hospitality Fundamentals Certificate of Specialization (15units) or an A.S.
       in Hospitality. As a result, an industry known for the absence of career leaders, will have gained
       a clearly defined career ladder based upon industry-defined competencies.

       The Hospitality and Tourism industry is one of the largest employers in San Luis Obispo County.
       By offering a Hospitality education program Cuesta College is supporting the community‘s
       largest employment market and provides opportunities to gain knowledge of diverse careers
       within this industry.



                                                                                               54
    IX.         PROGRAM DATA ANALYSIS AND PROGRAM-SPECIFIC MEASUREMENTS
                (Data provided by Office of Institutional Research)
                C. Data Summary – Relevant Comments and Analysis
                    Include enrollment, retention, success, FTES/FTEF, degree and certificate completion
                      o May include other pertinent information (e.g., early alert)
                      o Response to specific ARCC data


                                   COURSE ENROLLMENTS OVERALL

                                                                                      YEAR
                                                                 2005-06   2006-07   2007-08     2008-09   2009-10
                                                                 COUNT     COUNT     COUNT       COUNT     COUNT
                     Summer                                            .         .           2         .         .
                     Fall                                            43        39        46          60        58
TERM
                     Spring                                          43        26        57          69        60
                     TOTAL ENROLLMENTS                               86        65       105         129       118


                                         COURSE ENROLLMENTS BY REGIONa
                                                                                      YEAR
                                                                 2005-06   2006-07   2007-08     2008-09   2009-10
                                                                 COUNT     COUNT     COUNT       COUNT     COUNT
                     Summer                                            .         .           .         .         .
                     Fall                                              .         .           .       13          .
TERM
                     Spring                                          14          .       20          25          .
                     TOTAL ENROLLMENTS                               14          .       20          38          .
a. REGION = North County Campus



                                         COURSE ENROLLMENTS BY REGIONa
                                                                                      YEAR
                                                                 2005-06   2006-07   2007-08     2008-09   2009-10
                                                                 COUNT     COUNT     COUNT       COUNT     COUNT
                     Summer                                            .         .           .         .         .
                     Fall                                              .         .           .         .         .
TERM
                     Spring                                            .         .           .         .       19
                     TOTAL ENROLLMENTS                                 .         .           .         .       19
a. REGION = South County Centers



                                         COURSE ENROLLMENTS BY REGIONa
                                                                                      YEAR
                                                                 2005-06   2006-07   2007-08     2008-09   2009-10
                                                                 COUNT     COUNT     COUNT       COUNT     COUNT
                     Summer                                            .         .           2         .         .
TERM
                     Fall                                            43        39        46          47        58


                                                                                                     Final Version
                     Spring                                            29       26        37           44       41
                     TOTAL ENROLLMENTS                                 72       65        85           91       99
a. REGION = San Luis Obispo Campus



                                             COURSE ENROLLMENTS BY COURSE
                                                                                                YEAR
                                                                                                                      20
                                                                                                                      09-
                                                                            2005-06   2006-07   2007-08     2008-09   10
                                                                                                                      CO
                                                                                                                      UN
                                                                            COUNT     COUNT     COUNT       COUNT      T
                                                         HOSP105                 .         .         .           .       .
                                                         HOSP110                  .         .           .         .      .
                                                         HOSP115                  .         .           .         .      .
                                                         HOSP120                  .         .           .         .      .
                     Summer                              HOSP125                  .         .           .         .      .
                                                         HOSP130                  .         .           .         .      .
                                                         HOSP135                  .         .           .         .      .
                                                         HOSP140                  .         .           .         .      .
                                                         HOSP47                   .         .          2          .      .
                                                         HOSP105                19          .          16         .    30
                                                         HOSP110                24          .          30         .    28
                                                         HOSP115                  .         .           .         .      .
                                                         HOSP120                  .         .           .       13       .
TERM                 Fall                                HOSP125                  .       10            .       15       .
                                                         HOSP130                  .       29            .       32       .
                                                         HOSP135                  .         .           .         .      .
                                                         HOSP140                  .         .           .         .      .
                                                         HOSP47                   .         .           .         .      .
                                                         HOSP105                  .         .           .         .      .
                                                         HOSP110                  .         .          20         .      .
                                                         HOSP115                13          .          9          .    18
                                                         HOSP120                16          .          28         .    23
                     Spring                              HOSP125                  .         .           .         .      .
                                                         HOSP130                14          .           .       25     19
                                                         HOSP135                  .       11            .       17       .
                                                         HOSP140                  .       15            .       27       .
                                                         HOSP47                   .         .           .         .      .


                                     COURSE ENROLLMENTS BY COURSE BY REGIONa
                                                                                                YEAR
                                                                                                                      20
                                                                                                                      09-
                                                                            2005-06   2006-07   2007-08     2008-09   10
                                                                                                                      CO
                                                                                                                      UN
                                                                            COUNT     COUNT     COUNT       COUNT      T


                                                                                                                 56
                                                     HOSP110             .         .           .         .     .
                     Summer                          HOSP120             .         .           .         .     .
                                                     HOSP130             .         .           .         .     .
                                                     HOSP110             .         .           .         .     .
TERM                 Fall                            HOSP120             .         .           .       13      .
                                                     HOSP130             .         .           .         .     .
                                                     HOSP110             .         .          20         .     .
                     Spring                          HOSP120             .         .           .         .     .
                                                     HOSP130           14          .           .       25      .
a. REGION = North County Campus



                                   COURSE ENROLLMENTS BY COURSE BY REGIONa
                                                                                       YEAR
                                                                                                             20
                                                                                                             09-
                                                                   2005-06   2006-07   2007-08     2008-09   10
                                                                                                             CO
                                                                                                             UN
                                                                   COUNT     COUNT     COUNT       COUNT      T
                     Summer                          HOSP130             .         .           .         .     .
TERM                 Fall                            HOSP130             .         .           .         .     .
                     Spring                          HOSP130             .         .           .         .   19
a. REGION = South County Centers



                                   COURSE ENROLLMENTS BY COURSE BY REGIONa
                                                                                       YEAR
                                                                                                             20
                                                                                                             09-
                                                                   2005-06   2006-07   2007-08     2008-09   10
                                                                                                             CO
                                                                                                             UN
                                                                   COUNT     COUNT     COUNT       COUNT      T
                                                     HOSP105             .         .           .         .     .
                                                     HOSP110             .         .           .         .     .
                                                     HOSP115             .         .           .         .     .
                                                     HOSP120             .         .           .         .     .
                     Summer                          HOSP125             .         .           .         .     .
                                                     HOSP130             .         .           .         .     .
                                                     HOSP135             .         .           .         .     .
                                                     HOSP140             .         .           .         .     .
TERM                                                 HOSP47              .         .          2          .     .
                                                     HOSP105           19          .          16         .   30
                                                     HOSP110           24          .          30         .   28
                                                     HOSP115             .         .           .         .     .
                                                     HOSP120             .         .           .         .     .
                     Fall
                                                     HOSP125             .       10            .       15      .
                                                     HOSP130             .       29            .       32      .
                                                     HOSP135             .         .           .         .     .
                                                     HOSP140             .         .           .         .     .

                                                                                                        57
                                                                HOSP47     .    .    .    .    .
                                                                HOSP105    .    .    .    .    .
                                                                HOSP110    .    .    .    .    .
                                                                HOSP115   13    .   9     .   18
                                                                HOSP120   16    .   28    .   23
                     Spring                                     HOSP125    .    .    .    .    .
                                                                HOSP130    .    .    .    .    .
                                                                HOSP135    .   11    .   17    .
                                                                HOSP140    .   15    .   27    .
                                                                HOSP47     .    .    .    .    .
a. REGION = San Luis Obispo Campus



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                                                                                         58
                         COURSE SUCCESS AND RETENTION RATE OVERALL

                                                                               YEAR
                                                     2005-06         2006-07     2007-08   2008-09   2009-10
                                                      Count          Count       Count     Count     Count
                    SUCCESS RATE                          64.6%        76.7%       69.5%     67.9%     69.0%
Fall
                    RETENTION RATE                        93.6%        90.7%       91.5%     89.3%     84.0%
                    SUCCESS RATE                          85.4%        64.7%       70.6%     65.2%     80.0%
Spring
                    RETENTION RATE                        91.5%        79.4%       85.3%     76.8%     91.5%
                    SUCCESS RATE                          75.0%        71.4%       70.1%     66.4%     74.6%
ANNUAL
                    RETENTION RATE                        92.6%        85.7%       88.2%     82.4%     88.1%


                     COURSE SUCCESS AND RETENTION RATE BY REGIONa
                                                                   YEAR
                                                     2005-06         2007-08     2008-09
                                                      Count          Count       Count
                    SUCCESS RATE                                                   46.2%
Fall
                    RETENTION RATE                                                 69.2%
                    SUCCESS RATE                          81.3%        69.2%       52.0%
Spring
                    RETENTION RATE                        87.5%        73.1%       76.0%
                    SUCCESS RATE                          81.3%        69.2%       50.0%
ANNUAL
                    RETENTION RATE                        87.5%        73.1%       73.7%
a. REGION = North County Campus




       COURSE SUCCESS AND RETENTION RATE BY REGIONa

                                                      YEAR
                                                     2009-10
                                                      Count
                    SUCCESS RATE                          68.4%
Spring
                    RETENTION RATE                        83.3%
                    SUCCESS RATE                          68.4%
ANNUAL
                    RETENTION RATE                        83.3%
a. REGION = South County Centers



                           COURSE SUCCESS AND RETENTION RATE BY REGION:
                                                                               YEAR
                                                     2005-06         2006-07     2007-08   2008-09   2009-10
                                                      Count          Count       Count     Count     Count
                    SUCCESS RATE                           64.6%      76.7%       69.5%     74.4%     69.0%
Fall
                    RETENTION RATE                        93.6%        90.7%       91.5%     95.3%     84.0%
                    SUCCESS RATE                          87.5%        64.7%       71.4%     72.7%     85.4%
Spring
                    RETENTION RATE                        93.5%        79.4%       92.9%     77.3%     95.1%
                    SUCCESS RATE                          73.8%        71.4%       70.3%     73.6%     75.8%
ANNUAL
                    RETENTION RATE                        93.6%        85.7%       92.1%     86.2%     89.0%

                                                                                                               59
a. REGION = San Luis Obispo Campus



                                     COURSE SUCCESS AND RETENTION RATE BY COURSE
                                                                                              YEAR
                                                                       2005-06     2006-07   2007-08   2008-09        2009-10
                                                                        Count      Count     Count     Count          Count
                                                      SUCCESS RATE       68.4%                 60.0%                    56.7%
                    HOSP105                           RETENTION
                                                                        100.0%                 85.0%                    77.3%
                                                      RATE
                                                      SUCCESS RATE       62.1%                 74.4%                    82.1%
                    HOSP110                           RETENTION
                                                                         89.3%                 94.9%                    89.3%
                                                      RATE
                                                      SUCCESS RATE                                       46.2%
Fall                HOSP120                           RETENTION
                                                                                                         69.2%
                                                      RATE
                                                      SUCCESS RATE                   71.4%               78.6%
                    HOSP125                           RETENTION
                                                                                     71.4%               92.9%
                                                      RATE
                                                      SUCCESS RATE                   79.3%               72.4%
                    HOSP130                           RETENTION
                                                                                    100.0%               96.6%
                                                      RATE
                                                      SUCCESS RATE                             69.2%
                    HOSP110                           RETENTION
                                                                                               73.1%
                                                      RATE
                                                      SUCCESS RATE       92.9%                 75.0%                    94.4%
                    HOSP115                           RETENTION
                                                                         92.9%                 91.7%                    94.4%
                                                      RATE
                                                      SUCCESS RATE       83.3%                 70.0%                    78.3%
                    HOSP120                           RETENTION
                                                                         94.1%                 93.3%                    95.7%
                                                      RATE
Spring
                                                      SUCCESS RATE       81.3%                           52.0%          68.4%
                    HOSP130                           RETENTION
                                                                         87.5%                           76.0%          83.3%
                                                      RATE
                                                      SUCCESS RATE                   91.7%               94.1%
                    HOSP135                           RETENTION
                                                                                     91.7%               94.1%
                                                      RATE
                                                      SUCCESS RATE                   50.0%               59.3%
                    HOSP140                           RETENTION
                                                                                     72.7%               66.7%
                                                      RATE
                                                      SUCCESS RATE       68.4%                 60.0%                    56.7%
                    HOSP105                           RETENTION
                                                                        100.0%                 85.0%                    77.3%
                                                      RATE
                                                      SUCCESS RATE       62.1%                 72.3%                    82.1%
                    HOSP110                           RETENTION
                                                                         89.3%                 86.2%                    89.3%
                                                      RATE
                                                      SUCCESS RATE       92.9%                 75.0%                    94.4%
ANNUAL              HOSP115                           RETENTION
                                                                         92.9%                 91.7%                    94.4%
                                                      RATE
                                                      SUCCESS RATE       83.3%                 70.0%     46.2%          78.3%
                    HOSP120                           RETENTION
                                                                         94.1%                 93.3%     69.2%          95.7%
                                                      RATE
                                                      SUCCESS RATE                   71.4%               78.6%
                    HOSP125
                                                      RETENTION                      71.4%               92.9%

                                                                                                                 60
                                                           RATE
                                                           SUCCESS RATE     81.3%     79.3%               63.0%          68.4%
                    HOSP130                                RETENTION
                                                                            87.5%    100.0%               87.0%          83.3%
                                                           RATE
                                                           SUCCESS RATE               91.7%               94.1%
                    HOSP135                                RETENTION
                                                                                      91.7%               94.1%
                                                           RATE
                                                           SUCCESS RATE               50.0%               59.3%
                    HOSP140                                RETENTION
                                                                                      72.7%               66.7%
                                                           RATE


                  COURSE SUCCESS AND RETENTION RATE BY COURSE BY REGIONa
                                                                                     YEAR
                                                                          2005-06   2007-08   2008-09
                                                                          Count     Count     Count
                                                           SUCCESS RATE                         46.2%
Fall                HOSP120                                RETENTION
                                                                                                69.2%
                                                           RATE
                                                           SUCCESS RATE               69.2%
                    HOSP110                                RETENTION
                                                                                      73.1%
                                                           RATE
Spring
                                                           SUCCESS RATE     81.3%               52.0%
                    HOSP130                                RETENTION
                                                                            87.5%               76.0%
                                                           RATE
                                                           SUCCESS RATE               69.2%
                    HOSP110                                RETENTION
                                                                                      73.1%
                                                           RATE
                                                           SUCCESS RATE                         46.2%
ANNUAL              HOSP120                                RETENTION
                                                                                                69.2%
                                                           RATE
                                                           SUCCESS RATE     81.3%               52.0%
                    HOSP130                                RETENTION
                                                                            87.5%               76.0%
                                                           RATE
a. REGION = North County Campus




    COURSE SUCCESS AND RETENTION RATE BY COURSE BY REGIONa

                                                                           YEAR
                                                                          2009-10
                                                                          Count
                                                           SUCCESS RATE     68.4%
Spring              HOSP130                                RETENTION
                                                                            83.3%
                                                           RATE
                                                           SUCCESS RATE     68.4%
ANNUAL              HOSP130                                RETENTION
                                                                            83.3%
                                                           RATE
a. REGION = South County Centers



                                   COURSE SUCCESS AND RETENTION RATE BY COURSE BY REGIONa
                                                                                               YEAR
                                                                          2005-06   2006-07   2007-08   2008-09        2009-10


                                                                                                                  61
                                                            Count    Count    Count    Count        Count
                                             SUCCESS RATE    68.4%             60.0%                 56.7%
                    HOSP105                  RETENTION
                                                            100.0%             85.0%                 77.3%
                                             RATE
                                             SUCCESS RATE    62.1%             74.4%                 82.1%
                    HOSP110                  RETENTION
                                                             89.3%             94.9%                 89.3%
                                             RATE
Fall
                                             SUCCESS RATE             71.4%             78.6%
                    HOSP125                  RETENTION
                                                                      71.4%             92.9%
                                             RATE
                                             SUCCESS RATE             79.3%             72.4%
                    HOSP130                  RETENTION
                                                                     100.0%             96.6%
                                             RATE
                                             SUCCESS RATE    92.9%             75.0%                 94.4%
                    HOSP115                  RETENTION
                                                             92.9%             91.7%                 94.4%
                                             RATE
                                             SUCCESS RATE    83.3%             70.0%                 78.3%
                    HOSP120                  RETENTION
                                                             94.1%             93.3%                 95.7%
                                             RATE
Spring
                                             SUCCESS RATE             91.7%             94.1%
                    HOSP135                  RETENTION
                                                                      91.7%             94.1%
                                             RATE
                                             SUCCESS RATE             50.0%             59.3%
                    HOSP140                  RETENTION
                                                                      72.7%             66.7%
                                             RATE
                                             SUCCESS RATE    68.4%             60.0%                 56.7%
                    HOSP105                  RETENTION
                                                            100.0%             85.0%                 77.3%
                                             RATE
                                             SUCCESS RATE    62.1%             74.4%                 82.1%
                    HOSP110                  RETENTION
                                                             89.3%             94.9%                 89.3%
                                             RATE
                                             SUCCESS RATE    92.9%             75.0%                 94.4%
                    HOSP115                  RETENTION
                                                             92.9%             91.7%                 94.4%
                                             RATE
                                             SUCCESS RATE    83.3%             70.0%                 78.3%
                    HOSP120                  RETENTION
                                                             94.1%             93.3%                 95.7%
                                             RATE
ANNUAL
                                             SUCCESS RATE             71.4%             78.6%
                    HOSP125                  RETENTION
                                                                      71.4%             92.9%
                                             RATE
                                             SUCCESS RATE             79.3%             72.4%
                    HOSP130                  RETENTION
                                                                     100.0%             96.6%
                                             RATE
                                             SUCCESS RATE             91.7%             94.1%
                    HOSP135                  RETENTION
                                                                      91.7%             94.1%
                                             RATE
                                             SUCCESS RATE             50.0%             59.3%
                    HOSP140                  RETENTION
                                                                      72.7%             66.7%
                                             RATE
a. REGION = San Luis Obispo Campus



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                                                   63
                                        Full Time Equivalent Students Overall:
                                                                                           YEAR
                                                                 2005-06      2006-07     2007-08     2008-09     2009-10
                                                                   FTES        FTES        FTES        FTES        FTES
                    Summer                                                .           .       .41             .           .
                    Fall                                             8.39        9.25        1.23       14.28        2.46
TERM
                    Spring                                           8.90        2.88       12.73        7.09       14.24
                    TOTAL FTES                                      17.29       12.13       14.37       21.37       16.70


                                     FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT STUDENTS BY REGIONa
                                                                                           YEAR
                                                                 2005-06      2006-07     2007-08     2008-09     2009-10
                                                                   FTES        FTES        FTES        FTES        FTES
                    Summer                                                .           .           .           .           .
                    Fall                                                  .           .           .      3.12             .
TERM
                    Spring                                           3.06             .      3.95        5.33             .
                    TOTAL FTES                                       3.06             .      3.95        8.45             .
a. REGION = North County Campus



                                     FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT STUDENTS BY REGIONa
                                                                                           YEAR
                                                                 2005-06      2006-07     2007-08     2008-09     2009-10
                                                                   FTES        FTES        FTES        FTES        FTES
                    Summer                                                .           .           .           .           .
                    Fall                                                  .           .           .           .           .
TERM
                    Spring                                                .           .           .           .      4.49
                    TOTAL FTES                                            .           .           .           .      4.49
a. REGION = South County Centers



                                     FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT STUDENTS BY REGIONa
                                                                                           YEAR
                                                                 2005-06      2006-07     2007-08     2008-09     2009-10
                                                                   FTES        FTES        FTES        FTES        FTES
                    Summer                                                .           .       .41             .           .
                    Fall                                             8.39        9.25        1.23       11.16        2.46
TERM
                    Spring                                           5.84        2.88        8.77        1.76        9.75
                    TOTAL FTES                                      14.23       12.13       10.42       12.92       12.21
a. REGION = San Luis Obispo Campus



                                             FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT STUDENTS BY COURSE
                                                                                                       YEAR
                                                                              2005-06     2006-07     2007-08     2008-09     2009-10
                                                                               FTES        FTES        FTES        FTES        FTES
                                                       HOSP105                        .           .           .           .           .
TERM                Summer
                                                       HOSP110                        .           .           .           .           .


                                                                                                                              64
                                                    HOSP115                .           .           .           .           .
                                                    HOSP120                .           .           .           .           .
                                                    HOSP125                .           .           .           .           .
                                                    HOSP130                .           .           .           .           .
                                                    HOSP135                .           .           .           .           .
                                                    HOSP140                .           .           .           .           .
                                                    HOSP47                 .           .       .41             .           .
                                                    HOSP105           3.82             .       .47             .        1.26
                                                    HOSP110           4.57             .       .76             .        1.20
                                                    HOSP115                .           .           .           .           .
                                                    HOSP120                .           .           .      3.12             .
                    Fall                            HOSP125                .      2.40             .      3.60             .
                                                    HOSP130                .      6.85             .      7.56             .
                                                    HOSP135                .           .           .           .           .
                                                    HOSP140                .           .           .           .           .
                                                    HOSP47                 .           .           .           .           .
                                                    HOSP105                .           .           .           .           .
                                                    HOSP110                .           .      3.95             .           .
                                                    HOSP115           3.12             .      2.16             .        4.32
                                                    HOSP120           2.72             .      6.61             .        5.43
                    Spring                          HOSP125                .           .           .           .           .
                                                    HOSP130           3.06             .           .      5.33          4.49
                                                    HOSP135                .      2.64             .       .73             .
                                                    HOSP140                .       .24             .      1.03             .
                                                    HOSP47                 .           .           .           .           .


                                  FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT STUDENTS BY COURSE BY REGIONa
                                                                                            YEAR
                                                                   2005-06     2006-07     2007-08     2008-09     2009-10
                                                                    FTES        FTES        FTES        FTES        FTES
                                                    HOSP110                .           .           .           .           .
                    Summer                          HOSP120                .           .           .           .           .
                                                    HOSP130                .           .           .           .           .
                                                    HOSP110                .           .           .           .           .
TERM                Fall                            HOSP120                .           .           .      3.12             .
                                                    HOSP130                .           .           .           .           .
                                                    HOSP110                .           .      3.95             .           .
                    Spring                          HOSP120                .           .           .           .           .
                                                    HOSP130           3.06             .           .      5.33             .
a. REGION = North County Campus



                                  FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT STUDENTS BY COURSE BY REGIONa
                                                                                            YEAR
                                                                   2005-06     2006-07     2007-08     2008-09     2009-10
                                                                    FTES        FTES        FTES        FTES        FTES
TERM                Summer                          HOSP130                .           .           .           .           .

                                                                                                                   65
                    Fall                                 HOSP130              .           .           .           .           .
                    Spring                               HOSP130              .           .           .           .        4.49
a. REGION = South County Centers



                                     FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT STUDENTS BY COURSE BY REGIONa
                                                                                               YEAR
                                                                      2005-06     2006-07     2007-08     2008-09     2009-10
                                                                       FTES        FTES        FTES        FTES        FTES
                                                         HOSP105              .           .           .           .           .
                                                         HOSP110              .           .           .           .           .
                                                         HOSP115              .           .           .           .           .
                                                         HOSP120              .           .           .           .           .
                    Summer                               HOSP125              .           .           .           .           .
                                                         HOSP130              .           .           .           .           .
                                                         HOSP135              .           .           .           .           .
                                                         HOSP140              .           .           .           .           .
                                                         HOSP47               .           .       .41             .           .
                                                         HOSP105         3.82             .       .47             .        1.26
                                                         HOSP110         4.57             .       .76             .        1.20
                                                         HOSP115              .           .           .           .           .
                                                         HOSP120              .           .           .           .           .
TERM                Fall                                 HOSP125              .      2.40             .      3.60             .
                                                         HOSP130              .      6.85             .      7.56             .
                                                         HOSP135              .           .           .           .           .
                                                         HOSP140              .           .           .           .           .
                                                         HOSP47               .           .           .           .           .
                                                         HOSP105              .           .           .           .           .
                                                         HOSP110              .           .           .           .           .
                                                         HOSP115         3.12             .      2.16             .        4.32
                                                         HOSP120         2.72             .      6.61             .        5.43
                    Spring                               HOSP125              .           .           .           .           .
                                                         HOSP130              .           .           .           .           .
                                                         HOSP135              .      2.64             .       .73             .
                                                         HOSP140              .       .24             .      1.03             .
                                                         HOSP47               .           .           .           .           .
a. REGION = San Luis Obispo Campus



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                                                                                                                      66
            TOTAL WEEKLY STUDENT CONTACT HOURS PER FULL-TIME
                           EQUIVALENT FACULTY

                                                                          YEAR
                                                               2006-       2007-     2008-      2009-
                                                    2005-06     07          08        09         10
                                                     Sum        Sum        Sum        Sum        Sum
                                          SECTION
Summer          TSCH/FTEF                                  .          .          .          .          .
                                          TSCH
                                          SECTION
Fall            TSCH/FTEF                            1887.3    2081.0       50.5      389.4      368.6
                                          TSCH
                                          SECTION
Spring          TSCH/FTEF                            1335.6     648.8      347.1      709.0     1424.0
                                          TSCH
                                          SECTION
ANNUAL          TSCH/FTEF                            1556.3    1364.9      235.2      457.9     1001.8
                                          TSCH

       TOTAL WEEKLY STUDENT CONTACT HOURS PER FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT FACULTY BY
                                     REGIONa
                                                                          YEAR
                                                               2006-       2007-     2008-      2009-
                                                    2005-06     07          08        09         10
                                                     Sum        Sum        Sum        Sum        Sum
                                          SECTION
Summer          TSCH/FTEF                                  .          .          .          .          .
                                          TSCH
                                          SECTION
Fall            TSCH/FTEF                                  .          .          .    255.2            .
                                          TSCH
                                          SECTION
Spring          TSCH/FTEF                            1379.1           .    323.4     1600.0            .
                                          TSCH
                                          SECTION
ANNUAL          TSCH/FTEF                            1379.1           .    323.4      543.4            .
                                          TSCH
a. REGION = North County Campus



       TOTAL WEEKLY STUDENT CONTACT HOURS PER FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT FACULTY BY
                                     REGIONa
                                                                          YEAR
                                                               2006-       2007-     2008-      2009-
                                                    2005-06     07          08        09         10
                                                     Sum        Sum        Sum        Sum        Sum
                                          SECTION
Summer          TSCH/FTEF                                  .          .          .          .          .
                                          TSCH
                                          SECTION
Fall            TSCH/FTEF                                  .          .          .          .          .
                                          TSCH
                                          SECTION
Spring          TSCH/FTEF                                  .          .          .          .   1346.3
                                          TSCH
                                          SECTION
ANNUAL          TSCH/FTEF                                  .          .          .          .   1346.3
                                          TSCH
a. REGION = South County Centers



       TOTAL WEEKLY STUDENT CONTACT HOURS PER FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT FACULTY BY
                                     REGIONa
                                                                          YEAR
                                                               2006-       2007-     2008-      2009-
                                                    2005-06     07          08        09         10
                                                     Sum        Sum        Sum        Sum        Sum

                                                                                                           67
                                                           SECTION
Summer          TSCH/FTEF                                                    .          .          .         .          .
                                                           TSCH
                                                           SECTION
Fall            TSCH/FTEF                                               1887.3   2081.0       50.5     456.4      368.6
                                                           TSCH
                                                           SECTION
Spring          TSCH/FTEF                                               1313.9    648.8      358.9     263.6     1462.9
                                                           TSCH
                                                           SECTION
ANNUAL          TSCH/FTEF                                               1600.6   1364.9      213.1     415.1      915.7
                                                           TSCH
a. REGION = San Luis Obispo Campus



                        TOTAL WEEKLY STUDENT CONTACT HOURS PER FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT FACULTY BY COURSE
                                                                                                       YEAR
                                                                                 2005-      2006-      2007-     2008-      2009-
                                                                                  06         07         08        09         10
                                                                                  Sum        Sum       Sum        Sum        Sum
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP105                                    TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP110                                    TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP115                                    TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP120                                    TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
Summer          HOSP125                                    TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP130                                    TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP135                                    TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP140                                    TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP47                                     TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP105                                    TSCH/FTEF             1719.3            .    38.6            .    377.1
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP110                                    TSCH/FTEF             2055.3            .    62.3            .    360.0
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP115                                    TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP120                                    TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .    255.2            .
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
Fall            HOSP125                                    TSCH/FTEF                    .   1079.9           .    294.5            .
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP130                                    TSCH/FTEF                    .   3082.1           .    618.3            .
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP135                                    TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP140                                    TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP47                                     TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP105                                    TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP110                                    TSCH/FTEF                    .          .   323.4            .          .
                                                                       TSCH
Spring
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP115                                    TSCH/FTEF             1403.9            .   176.7            .   1296.0
                                                                       TSCH
                                                                       SECTION
                HOSP120                                    TSCH/FTEF             1223.9            .   541.1            .   1629.7
                                                                       TSCH

                                                                                                                               68
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP125                       TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP130                       TSCH/FTEF             1379.1            .         .   1600.0     1346.3
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP135                       TSCH/FTEF                    .   1187.9           .    218.6            .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP140                       TSCH/FTEF                    .    109.7           .    308.6            .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP47                        TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP105                       TSCH/FTEF             1719.3            .    38.6            .    377.1
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP110                       TSCH/FTEF             2055.3            .   192.9            .    360.0
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP115                       TSCH/FTEF             1403.9            .   176.7            .   1296.0
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP120                       TSCH/FTEF             1223.9            .   541.1      255.2     1629.7
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
ANNUAL   HOSP125                       TSCH/FTEF                    .   1079.9           .    294.5            .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP130                       TSCH/FTEF             1379.1     3082.1           .    828.7     1346.3
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP135                       TSCH/FTEF                    .   1187.9           .    218.6            .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP140                       TSCH/FTEF                    .    109.7           .    308.6            .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP47                        TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                   TSCH

  TOTAL WEEKLY STUDENT CONTACT HOURS PER FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT FACULTY BY REGION BY
                                     COURSEa
                                                                                   YEAR
                                                             2005-      2006-      2007-     2008-      2009-
                                                              06         07         08        09         10
                                                              Sum        Sum       Sum        Sum        Sum
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP110                       TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
Summer   HOSP120                       TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP130                       TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP110                       TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
Fall     HOSP120                       TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .    255.2            .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP130                       TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP110                       TSCH/FTEF                    .          .   323.4            .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
Spring   HOSP120                       TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .          .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP130                       TSCH/FTEF             1379.1            .         .   1600.0            .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP110                       TSCH/FTEF                    .          .   323.4            .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
ANNUAL   HOSP120                       TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .    255.2            .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
         HOSP130                       TSCH/FTEF             1379.1            .         .   1600.0            .
                                                   TSCH

                                                                                                           69
a. REGION = North County Campus



  TOTAL WEEKLY STUDENT CONTACT HOURS PER FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT FACULTY BY REGION BY
                                     COURSEa
                                                                                   YEAR
                                                             2005-      2006-      2007-     2008-     2009-
                                                              06         07         08        09        10
                                                              Sum        Sum       Sum       Sum        Sum
                                                   SECTION
Summer          HOSP130                TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .         .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
Fall            HOSP130                TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .         .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
Spring          HOSP130                TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .         .   1346.3
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
ANNUAL          HOSP130                TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .         .   1346.3
                                                   TSCH
a. REGION = South County Centers



  TOTAL WEEKLY STUDENT CONTACT HOURS PER FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT FACULTY BY REGION BY
                                     COURSEa
                                                                                   YEAR
                                                             2005-      2006-      2007-     2008-     2009-
                                                              06         07         08        09        10
                                                              Sum        Sum       Sum       Sum        Sum
                                                   SECTION
                HOSP105                TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .         .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
                HOSP110                TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .         .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
                HOSP115                TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .         .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
                HOSP120                TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .         .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
Summer          HOSP125                TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .         .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
                HOSP130                TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .         .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
                HOSP135                TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .         .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
                HOSP140                TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .         .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
                HOSP47                 TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .         .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
                HOSP105                TSCH/FTEF             1719.3            .    38.6           .    377.1
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
                HOSP110                TSCH/FTEF             2055.3            .    62.3           .    360.0
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
                HOSP115                TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .         .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
                HOSP120                TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .         .          .
                                                   TSCH
Fall
                                                   SECTION
                HOSP125                TSCH/FTEF                    .   1079.9           .   294.5            .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
                HOSP130                TSCH/FTEF                    .   3082.1           .   618.3            .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
                HOSP135                TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .         .          .
                                                   TSCH
                                                   SECTION
                HOSP140                TSCH/FTEF                    .          .         .         .          .
                                                   TSCH


                                                                                                          70
                                                                      SECTION
                HOSP47                                    TSCH/FTEF                  .        .       .       .        .
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
                HOSP105                                   TSCH/FTEF                  .        .       .       .        .
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
                HOSP110                                   TSCH/FTEF                  .        .       .       .        .
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
                HOSP115                                   TSCH/FTEF             1403.9        .   176.7       .   1296.0
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
                HOSP120                                   TSCH/FTEF             1223.9        .   541.1       .   1629.7
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
Spring          HOSP125                                   TSCH/FTEF                  .        .       .       .        .
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
                HOSP130                                   TSCH/FTEF                  .        .       .       .        .
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
                HOSP135                                   TSCH/FTEF                  .   1187.9       .   218.6        .
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
                HOSP140                                   TSCH/FTEF                  .    109.7       .   308.6        .
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
                HOSP47                                    TSCH/FTEF                  .        .       .       .        .
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
                HOSP105                                   TSCH/FTEF             1719.3        .    38.6       .    377.1
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
                HOSP110                                   TSCH/FTEF             2055.3        .    62.3       .    360.0
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
                HOSP115                                   TSCH/FTEF             1403.9        .   176.7       .   1296.0
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
                HOSP120                                   TSCH/FTEF             1223.9        .   541.1       .   1629.7
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
ANNUAL          HOSP125                                   TSCH/FTEF                  .   1079.9       .   294.5        .
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
                HOSP130                                   TSCH/FTEF                  .   3082.1       .   618.3        .
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
                HOSP135                                   TSCH/FTEF                  .   1187.9       .   218.6        .
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
                HOSP140                                   TSCH/FTEF                  .    109.7       .   308.6        .
                                                                      TSCH
                                                                      SECTION
                HOSP47                                    TSCH/FTEF                  .        .       .       .        .
                                                                      TSCH
a. REGION = San Luis Obispo Campus



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                                                                                                                     71
                                      Cuesta College
                         Requirements for Certificate of Achievement
                                Hospitality Fundamentals


A Certificate of Achievement for Hospitality Fundamentals shall be granted to those
students who have satisfactorily completed the required courses in this specialized area of
study.

Choose 15 units from the following:

Course No.       Required Courses                                                       Units
HOSP 201         Introduction to Hospitality                                                 3.0
HOSP 205*        Front Office Operations                                                     3.0
HOSP 210*        Hospitality Marketing and Sales                                             3.0
HOSP 215*        Housekeeping Operations                                                     3.0
HOSP 220*        Supervision in the Hospitality Industry                                     3.0
HOSP 225*        Hospitality Law                                                             3.0
HOSP 230*        Food and Beverage Operations                                                3.0
HOSP 235*        Hospitality Security and Loss Prevention                                    3.0
HOSP 240*        Hospitality Training and Development Skills                                 3.0
HOSP 245         Hospitality Internship                                                      3.0




*Completion of courses earns American Hotel & Lodging Association Hospitality Certificates




                                                                                                   72
                                       Cuesta College
                         Requirements for Certificate of Achievement
                                        Hospitality


A Certificate of Achievement for Hospitality shall be granted to those students who have
satisfactorily completed the required courses in this specialized area of study.

Required Courses:

Course No.       Required Courses                                                    Units

Hosp 205*        Front Office Operations                                             3.0
Hosp 210*        Hospitality Marketing and Sales                                     3.0
Hosp 215*        Housekeeping Operations                                             3.0
Hosp 220*        Supervision in the Hospitality Industry                             3.0
Hosp 225*        Hospitality Law                                                     3.0
Hosp 230*        Food and Beverage Operations                                        3.0
Hosp 235*        Hospitality Security and Loss Prevention                            3.0
Hosp 240*        Hospitality Training and Development Skills                         3.0
                 TOTAL UNITS                                                         24.0

*Completion of courses earns American Hotel & Lodging Association Hospitality Certificates




                                                                                             73
                                             Cuesta College
                                      Hospitality/Business Education
                                                A.S. Degree
Required Courses (30 units)

Course No.                   Required Courses                                           Units
HOSP 201                    Introduction to Hospitality                                    3.0
HOSP 205*                   Front Office Operations                                        3.0
HOSP 210*                   Hospitality Marketing and Sales                                3.0
HOSP 215*                   Housekeeping Operations                                        3.0
HOSP 220*                   Supervision in the Hospitality Industry                        3.0
HOSP 225*                   Hospitality Law                                                3.0
HOSP 230*                   Food and Beverage Operations                                   3.0
HOSP 235*                   Hospitality Security and Loss Prevention                       3.0
HOSP 240*                   Hospitality Training and Development Skills                    3.0
HOSP 245                    Hospitality Internship                                         3.0


                          TOTAL UNITS                                                     30.0
Plus 4 units from the following:
BUS 201A                Principles of Accounting                                           4.0
 Or Bus 201B            Principles of Accounting                                          (4.0)
Bus 251                 Elements of Accounting                                             4.0
Math 123                Elementary Algebra                                                 5.0

Associate Degree Requirements:
In order to qualify for a degree from Cuesta College, students must complete 60 associate degree
applicable semester units with a 2.0 grade point average. Students must take a minimum of 18 units of
general education coursework and meet the English and Math competency requirements, the Health
Education requirement, and the diversity requirement.

*Completion of courses earns American Hotel & Lodging Association Hospitality certificates .




                                                                                                    74
D. Offer interpretations of data, and identify areas for change to facilitate program quality
   and growth

   Due to the low hospitality class enrollments/fill rates at the North County Campus, it was
   decided that by Spring 2011 all hospitality classes would be offered at the San Luis Obispo
   campus only. This was well received by students and faculty and for Spring 2011 all classes ran
   and most had an 80 % fill rate.




                                                                                        75
X.      CURRICULUM REVIEW
                    A.    Review courses including all course delivery modalities for currency in
                         teaching practices and compliance to current policies, standards, and/or
                         regulations


     Hospitality Program Review - 2011

                                       On
     Course Name & Number              Campus      Online     Lecture   Internship Compliant

     Hosp 201 - Intro to Hospitality                  X          X                      Yes

     Hosp 205 - Front Office                X                    X                      Yes

     Hosp 210 - Marketing & Sales           X                    X                      Yes

     Hosp 215 - Housekeeping                X                    X                      Yes

     Hosp 220 - Supervision                 X                    X                      Yes

     Hosp 225 - Hospitality Law             X                    X                      Yes

     Hosp 230 - Food & Beverage             X                    X                      Yes

     Hosp 235 - Security & Loss             X                    X                      Yes

     Hosp 240 - Training & Develop          X                    X                      Yes

     Hosp 245 - Hospitality
     Internship                             X                    X          X           Yes




                    B. Review Prerequisite/Co-requisite/Advisory validations
                         N/A




                                                                                                76
       C. May include comparisons to other college course descriptions, faculty
          development activities that make contributions to the program, etc.

The Cuesta College Hospitality program was mirrored after the Santa Barbara City
College‘s Hotel Management Program. This unique program mirrors industry standards
by providing training in a realistic work environment which develops skills and
competencies for positions in the hospitality industry. Their program is also certified by
the American Hotel and Lodging Association.


       D. List changes and recommendations to curriculum

As of Fall 2010 all Hospitality courses have been changed from a 9-week course (two hour
lecture with a 6 hour lab) to an 18-week (three hour) lecture course. After much deliberation
with faculty, the conclusion was made that it was necessary to increase the amount of lecture
time each week in order to integrate all of the curriculum requirements into each course. As a
result, this required that the curriculum for each class had to be rewritten and approved which
was finalized Fall 2009. An internship class was added to replace the lab. Also, the Hospitality
program added and online class- Intro to Hospitality to complement the existing program. No
other changes are needed at this time.




                                                                                        77
      XI. PROGRAM OUTCOMES, ASSESSMENTS AND IMPROVEMENTS: Narrative
         E. Summarize assessment results for program-level Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

         The goal of the Hospitality program is to help the students gain knowledge of diverse careers
         within the hospitality industry. An advisory committee which includes current owners and
         general managers of hospitality properties, new and past Cuesta College instructors and
         students that are currently attending or have graduated in the Cuesta College program, meet
         on an annual basis to discuss and dissect the program. The purpose of these meetings is to
         continue to improve the program and continue to meet the needs of our local and global
         hospitality industry.

         Established in 1953, the Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Lodging Association,
         is the premier source for delivering quality hospitality education, training and professional
         certification that serves the needs of hospitality schools and industries worldwide. The
         Cuesta College hospitality program was formed around their textbooks and training
         materials. Currently eighty percent of our courses are accredited by the American Hotel and
         Lodging Association. At the end of the semester you are given a final test developed by the
         American Hotel and Lodging, if you receive a passing grade for the final, you receive a
         Certificate of Achievement from the American Hotel and Lodging. These certificates are
         well recognized within the industry as the ultimate distinction of excellence.

         The following is the Planned Assessment Cycle Calendar for the Hospitality Program:
                                         Assessment    Analyze       Discuss/Recomme   Implementation
                                         Surveys       Results &     nd                 of
                                                       Plan          Improvement       Improvements
                                                       Improvemen    Plans
                                                       ts




HOS                                                                                    When offered
 P     201   Introduction to HOSP        Fall 2011     Spring 2012   Spring 2012       next
HOS          Front Office                                                              When offered
 P     205   Operations                  Spring 2011   Fall 2011     Fall 2011         next
HOS                                                                                    When offered
 P     210   Hospitality Marketing       Spring 2011   Fall 2011     Fall 2011         next
HOS          Housekeeping            *                                                 When offered
 P     215   Operations              *                                                 next
HOS                                                                                    When offered
 P     220   Supervision                 Fall 2011     Spring 2012   Spring 2012       next
HOS                                  *                                                 When offered
 P     225   Hospitality Law         *                                                 next
HOS                                                                                    When offered
 P     230   Food and Beverage           Fall 2011     Spring 2012   Spring 2012       next

                                                                                                      78
HOS                                  *                                                        When offered
 P    235   Security & Loss Prev     *                                                        next
HOS                                  *                                                        When offered
 P    240   Training and Develop     *                                                        next
HOS                                                                                           When offered
 P    245   HOSP Internship              Spring 2011   Fall 2011       Fall 2011              next

            **Courses are not planned to be offered until Spring or Fall 2012, at the earliest, budget
            allowing.




        F. Identify connections of program-level SLOs to broad program goals

        The Cuesta College Mission statement is to enable students to achieve their academic,
        transfer, workforce preparation, career advancement and personal goals. The Cuesta College
        Hospitality program does just that by:
            1.   Providing curriculum to prepare and challenge students for employment in the
                 hospitality industry.
            2. Promoting critical thinking, creativity, problem solving, and development of soft
                 skills.
            3. Employing educated and informed faculty with ―real life‖ experiences and careers in
                 the hospitality industry
            4.   Working closely with the hospitality community to stay current on hospitality trends
                 and make improvements to our program when needed.

        G. Describe connection of course-level SLOs to program-level SLOs

        For the Fall 2010 semester, it was decided to offer the first Hospitality class online. This
        class filled quickly and proved to be a huge success. The advantage for teaching a distance
        learning program in hospitality, particularly Introduction to Hospitality, is that it allows a
        broad spectrum of students to learn about the world of hospitality without having to travel to
        attend the class. This allows many students the opportunity to balance their jobs and their
        schedule around the distance learning program. This online course incorporates many
        resources such as an excellent textbook, DVD‘s, videos, along with student access to a newly
        developed Hospitality Interactive Web Site that introduces the students to avatars from
        various managerial positions within the hospitality industry. As a result, the hospitality
        program will continue to offer this intro class online.

        Also Spring 2011, the hospitality program is introducing a separate 3-unit internship class.
        Students benefit from having work site experiences related to their educational goal.
        Combining the on-the-job training with the in-class lectures students gain a deeper
        understanding of the industry and improve their job skills.

                                                                                                             79
H. Recommend changes and updates to program funding goals based on assessment of SLOs

       o Include elements that require funding as well as those that do not

   During the past few years, there has been a great deal of curriculum changes to the
   Hospitality Program and to the degree/certificates. The program has been given a
   complete overhaul to better meet the needs of the Hospitality Industry and to better
   prepare the students before entering the workforce. Increasingly it has become possible to
   simulate real world experiences through interactive software that are often absent in the
   traditional training modes of lecture and case study. The hospitality program would like
   to add a software program to the Front Office Operations class for students to emulate the
   actual Hotel front desk actions and responsibilities.

   At the most recent Hospitality Advisory meeting, marketing was discussed and currently
   a marketing hand- out is being developed to distribute to local hospitality properties to
   continue to increase awareness and enthusiasm for this program.

      For elements that require funding, complete Section D — Unit Plan Funding Requests

      For faculty hiring needs, attach Section H – Faculty Prioritization Process

       Due to the unpredictable responsibilities within our faculty pool, we may need
       additional expertise in specific areas so it may be necessary to open the Hospitality
       faculty pool.




                                                                                               80
     XII. PROGRAM STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES/ASSESSMENTS: Worksheets
          For this segment of the Instructional CPPR, fill out and attach Course Program Assessment
          Summary (CPAS) worksheets for each course in the program OR Worksheet B from the
          2010-2011 IPPR Template. Note: Before attaching CPAS documents, please do not include
          the raw data results of course-level and program-level SLO assessments, which should
          remain only with program faculty.
             CPAS Worksheets for Each Course (with raw data results deleted); OR
             Worksheet B: CPPR—Course-level SLOs and Assessments (2010-2011 IPPR Template)



Please see the Assessment Planning Calendar in Section V for the Assessment Plans. The SLOs are
located on the following pages.




                                                                                                  81
Unit:          Type Program - BUSINESS EDUCATION
Cluster:       Type Cluster WED
Planning Year: 2011-2012


           Please indicate the course-level SLOs and assessment results for each of the courses in the program below

                                                                                                 Sem/Year of
 Course #1                                  Course Number & Title:
                                                                                                 Assessment:
                                                                                                                     Number of Sections Assessed:

                                            201 - Intro to Hospitality                            Spring 2011

                                                                                                                      Assessment Results / Plans for
                      Course SLOs (please fill in fields below for each course SLO)                             Course Improvement           (please fill
                                                                                                                    in fields below for each course SLO)
                 Identify the basic components of the Hospitality Industry.
  SLO #1

                 Describe the relationship between the Hospitality Industry and Travel and Tourism Management
  SLO #2

                 Identify influences affecting the history of the hotel industry.
  SLO #3

                 Describe basic organizational structure of the hotel industry.
  SLO #4

                 Describe the relationship between market, concept, and menu in commercial and retail food
  SLO #5         service.

                 Identify factors that distinguish meetings, conventions, and expositions.
  SLO #6

                 Identify leisure-time activities.
  SLO #7




                                                                                                                                             Final Version
                        Identify different aspects of the history of global gambling.
    SLO #8

                        Identify major factors that affect the hospitality network.
    SLO #9



                                                                                                                                                               Timeline
                                                                                                                                                                for
                                                                                                                                Analysis of Results
                Method of Course SLO Assessment (please indicate one below & attach the instrument(s)                        (indicate one or more below,   Improvement
                                                                                                                                        if any)              s   (check &
                                                                                                                                                            indicate sem/year
                                                                                                                                                             for each below)
                                                                                                                                  Course-level
Student Performance -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                                    improvements                     Course-
                                                                                                                                  needed                           level:
                                                                                                                                  SLO improvements
Student Self-Evaluation/Survey -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                         needed                           SLOs:
                                                                                                                                  Unit Plan funding                Unit
Other -- indicate:                                                                                                                requests needed                  Plan:




                                                                                                              Sem/Year of
  Course #2                                         Course Number & Title:
                                                                                                              Assessment:
                                                                                                                                  Number of Sections Assessed:

                                                  205 - Front Office Operation                                 Spring 2011
                                                                                                                                   Assessment Results / Plans for
                              Course SLOs (please fill in fields below for each course SLO)                                  Course Improvement           (please fill
                                                                                                                                  in field below for each course SLO)
                        Summarize the front office operations and the four stages of the guest cycle.
    SLO #1

                        Discuss the sales dimension of the reservation process and the different types of reservations.
    SLO #2


    SLO #3              Describe how hotels are organized and explain how functional
                        areas within hotels are classified.
                        Identify the seven steps of the registration process and discuss creative registration options.
    SLO #4




                                                                                                                                                                           83
                        Explain the importance of developing and maintaining an effective security program.
    SLO #5

                        Summarize the front office accounting fundamentals, including issues surrounding accounts,
    SLO #6              folios, vouchers, points of sale, and ledgers.

                        Identify the functions and procedures related to the check-out and settlement process.
    SLO #7

                        Summarize the function and steps in the front office audit process.
    SLO #8

                        Explain how management establishes room rates and applies the ratios and formulas used to
    SLO #9              forecast room availability



                                                                                                                                                              Timeline
                                                                                                                                                               for
                                                                                                                               Analysis of Results
                Method of Course SLO Assessment (please indicate one below & attach the instrument(s)                       (indicate one or more below,   Improvement
                                                                                                                                       if any)              s   (check &
                                                                                                                                                           indicate sem/year
                                                                                                                                                            for each below)
                                                                                                                                 Course-level
Student Performance -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                                   improvements                     Course-
                                                                                                                                 needed                           level:
                                                                                                                                 SLO improvements
Student Self-Evaluation/Survey -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                        needed                           SLOs:
                                                                                                                                 Unit Plan funding                Unit
Other -- indicate:                                                                                                               requests needed                  Plan:



                                                                                                             Sem/Year of
  Course #3                                         Course Number & Title:
                                                                                                             Assessment:
                                                                                                                                 Number of Sections Assessed:

                                            210 - Hospitality Sales and Marketing                             Spring 2011

                                                                                                                                  Assessment Results / Plans for
                              Course SLOs (please fill in fields below for each course SLO)                                 Course Improvement         (please fill
                                                                                                                                in fields below for each course SLO)
                        Describe the importance of marketing as it relates to the success of the hospitality operation.
    SLO #1



                                                                                                                                                                          84
                        Explain reasons for the growth in hospitality services and the marketing of these services.
    SLO #2

                        List external and internal influences on consumer behavior.
    SLO #3

                        Define the term market segmentation.
    SLO #4

                        Compare and contrast two types of marketing plans - strategic and tactical.
    SLO #5

                        Outline the importance of distribution systems in hospitality and travel marketing.
    SLO #6

                        Describe the impact of the internet on the hospitality and tourism industry.
    SLO #7

                        Outline the traditional role of price in the marketing mix.
    SLO #8

                        Outline the role of destination marketing organizations (DMOs).
    SLO #9



                                                                                                                                                              Timeline
                                                                                                                                                               for
                                                                                                                               Analysis of Results
                Method of Course SLO Assessment (please indicate one below & attach the instrument(s)                       (indicate one or more below,   Improvement
                                                                                                                                       if any)              s   (check &
                                                                                                                                                           indicate sem/year
                                                                                                                                                            for each below)
                                                                                                                                 Course-level
Student Performance -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                                   improvements                     Course-
                                                                                                                                 needed                           level:
                                                                                                                                 SLO improvements
Student Self-Evaluation/Survey -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                        needed                           SLOs:
                                                                                                                                 Unit Plan funding                Unit
Other -- indicate:                                                                                                               requests needed                  Plan:



                                                                                                              Sem/Year of
  Course #4                                         Course Number & Title:
                                                                                                              Assessment:
                                                                                                                                 Number of Sections Assessed:


                                                                                                                                                                          85
                                                215 - Housekeeping operations                              Spring 2011
                                                                                                                               Assessment Results / Plans for
                             Course SLOs (please fill in fields below for each course SLO)                               Course Improvement          (please fill
                                                                                                                             in fields below for each course SLO)
                        Identify the roles of housekeeping
    SLO #1

                        Describe the benefits of environmental and energy management.
    SLO #2

                        Summarize the planning and organizing of the housekeeping department.
    SLO #3

                        Summarize the housekeeping's human resources issues.
    SLO #4

                        Explain the importance of managing inventories.
    SLO #5

                        Describe the impact of controlling expenses.
    SLO #6

                        Explain the Safety and Security processes of housekeeping.
    SLO #7

                        List the steps of Guestroom Cleaning.
    SLO #8

                        List the procedures used when selecting and cleaning beds, linens, uniforms, and flooring.
    SLO #9



                                                                                                                                                           Timeline
                                                                                                                                                            for
                                                                                                                            Analysis of Results
               Method of Course SLO Assessment (please indicate one below & attach the instrument(s)                     (indicate one or more below,   Improvement
                                                                                                                                    if any)              s   (check &
                                                                                                                                                        indicate sem/year
                                                                                                                                                         for each below)
                                                                                                                              Course-level
Student Performance -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                                improvements                     Course-
                                                                                                                              needed                           level:


                                                                                                                                                                       86
                                                                                                                              SLO improvements
Student Self-Evaluation/Survey -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                     needed                          SLOs:
                                                                                                                              Unit Plan funding               Unit
Other -- indicate:                                                                                                            requests needed                 Plan:




                                                                                                           Sem/Year of
  Course #5                                         Course Number & Title:
                                                                                                           Assessment:
                                                                                                                               Number of Sections Assessed:

                                        220 - Supervision in the Hospitality Industry                       Spring 2011

                                                                                                                                 Assessment Results / Plans for
                                Course SLOs (please fill in fields below for each course SLO)                              Course Improvement         (please fill
                                                                                                                              in fields below for each course SLO)
                        Describe the term management and identify the basic management principles.
    SLO #1

                        Describe the communication process and the impact it can have on the organization and identify
    SLO #2              common obstacles that can interfere with effective communication..

                        Summarize how supervisors work w/the human resources department to recruit employees &
    SLO #3              identify the appropriate questions to ask when conducting an interview.

                        Describe the role of training and explain the importance of training from within an organization
    SLO #4              and the supervisor‘s role in the training process.

                        Review how hospitality supervisor‘s determine productivity standards and business volumes using
    SLO #5              separate forecasting methods.

                        List the benefits of employee performance evaluations and common obstacles that interfere with
    SLO #6              their effectiveness.

                        Discuss the purpose of disciplinary action and how to manage the disciplinary process.
    SLO #7

                        Define the employment laws administered by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and
    SLO #8              how they affect hospitality operations.

                        Differentiate between external and internal forces of change and describe how to manage change
    SLO #9              within the work environment.




                                                                                                                                                                      87
                                                                                                                                                        Timeline
                                                                                                                                                         for
                                                                                                                         Analysis of Results
                Method of Course SLO Assessment (please indicate one below & attach the instrument(s)                 (indicate one or more below,   Improvement
                                                                                                                                 if any)              s   (check &
                                                                                                                                                     indicate sem/year
                                                                                                                                                      for each below)
                                                                                                                           Course-level
Student Performance -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                             improvements                     Course-
                                                                                                                           needed                           level:
                                                                                                                           SLO improvements
Student Self-Evaluation/Survey -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                  needed                           SLOs:
                                                                                                                           Unit Plan funding                Unit
Other -- indicate:                                                                                                         requests needed                  Plan:




                                                                                                        Sem/Year of
  Course #6                                         Course Number & Title:
                                                                                                        Assessment:
                                                                                                                           Number of Sections Assessed:

                                                      225 - Hospitality Law                             Spring 2011

                                                                                                                            Assessment Results / Plans for
                              Course SLOs (please fill in fields below for each course SLO)                           Course Improvement          (please fill
                                                                                                                          in fields below for each course SLO)
                        Describe the rights and liabilities of the hotelkeepers under common law.
    SLO #1

                        Illustrate the circumstances under which a hotel may refuse a guest.
    SLO #2

                        Describe guests' right to privacy.
    SLO #3

                        Describe the implications of the Americans with Disabilities Act for hotels.
    SLO #4

                        Identify the hotel's responsibility to protect guests' property.
    SLO #5

                        Describe the Fair Labor Standards Act.
    SLO #6

                        Apply knowledge and understanding of the National Labor Relations Act.
    SLO #7

                                                                                                                                                                    88
                        Interpret Consumer Protection Laws.
    SLO #8


    SLO #9



                                                                                                                                                                  Timeline
                                                                                                                                                                   for
                                                                                                                                   Analysis of Results
                Method of Course SLO Assessment (please indicate one below & attach the instrument(s)                           (indicate one or more below,   Improvement
                                                                                                                                           if any)              s   (check &
                                                                                                                                                               indicate sem/year
                                                                                                                                                                for each below)
                                                                                                                                     Course-level
Student Performance -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                                       improvements                     Course-
                                                                                                                                     needed                           level:
                                                                                                                                     SLO improvements
Student Self-Evaluation/Survey -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                            needed                           SLOs:
                                                                                                                                     Unit Plan funding                Unit
Other -- indicate:                                                                                                                   requests needed                  Plan:




                                                                                                             Sem/Year of
  Course #7                                         Course Number & Title:
                                                                                                             Assessment:
                                                                                                                                     Number of Sections Assessed:

                                             230 - Food and Beverage Operations                               Spring 2011

                                                                                                                                      Assessment Results / Plans for
                              Course SLOs (please fill in fields below for each course SLO)                                     Course Improvement          (please fill
                                                                                                                                    in fields below for each course SLO)
                        Compare and contrast between commercial and noncommercial food service operations.
    SLO #1

                        Identify a variety of food service personnel positions and describe the roles these positions play in
    SLO #2              the food service industry.

                        Explain the steps involved in menu planning and menu design and the importance of menu
    SLO #3              evaluation.




                                                                                                                                                                              89
                        Determine standard food and beverage costs to assist in menu planning.
    SLO #4

                        Explain the differences in purchasing, receiving, issuing and storing of food production compared
    SLO #5              to alcoholic beverage service.

                        Identify the major functions and basic principles of food production.
    SLO #6

                        Describe how to provide good service to guests and demonstrate a service sequence.
    SLO #7

                        Explain and identify the causes of unsafe food preparation and outline proper food handling and
    SLO #8              cleaning procedures.

                        Explain and identify the most common food service accidents and ways to prevent them.
    SLO #9



                                                                                                                                                              Timeline
                                                                                                                                                               for
                                                                                                                               Analysis of Results
                Method of Course SLO Assessment (please indicate one below & attach the instrument(s)                       (indicate one or more below,   Improvement
                                                                                                                                       if any)              s   (check &
                                                                                                                                                           indicate sem/year
                                                                                                                                                            for each below)
                                                                                                                                 Course-level
Student Performance -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                                   improvements                     Course-
                                                                                                                                 needed                           level:
                                                                                                                                 SLO improvements
Student Self-Evaluation/Survey -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                        needed                           SLOs:
                                                                                                                                 Unit Plan funding                Unit
Other -- indicate:                                                                                                               requests needed                  Plan:




                                                                                                          Sem/Year of
  Course #8                                         Course Number & Title:
                                                                                                          Assessment:
                                                                                                                                 Number of Sections Assessed:

                                       235 - Hospitality Security and Loss Prevention                      Spring 2011

                                                                                                                                  Assessment Results / Plans for
                              Course SLOs (please fill in fields below for each course SLO)                                 Course Improvement          (please fill
                                                                                                                                in fields below for each course SLO)
                                                                                                                                                                          90
                        Describe the elements to a security system and evaluate the security system's effectiveness.
    SLO #1

                        Evaluate security procedures and guest concerns.
    SLO #2

                        Describe the departmental responsibilities in guest and asset protection.
    SLO #3

                        Summarize the Protection of Funds and Accounting Control procedures.
    SLO #4

                        Summarize an Emergency Management plan and communicating with the media.
    SLO #5


    SLO #6


    SLO #7


    SLO #8


    SLO #9



                                                                                                                                                         Timeline
                                                                                                                                                          for
                                                                                                                          Analysis of Results
                Method of Course SLO Assessment (please indicate one below & attach the instrument(s)                  (indicate one or more below,   Improvement
                                                                                                                                  if any)              s   (check &
                                                                                                                                                      indicate sem/year
                                                                                                                                                       for each below)
                                                                                                                            Course-level
Student Performance -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                              improvements                     Course-
                                                                                                                            needed                           level:
                                                                                                                            SLO improvements
Student Self-Evaluation/Survey -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                   needed                           SLOs:
                                                                                                                            Unit Plan funding                Unit
Other -- indicate:                                                                                                          requests needed                  Plan:




                                                                                                                                                                     91
                                                                                                         Sem/Year of
Course #9                                    Course Number & Title:
                                                                                                         Assessment:
                                                                                                                            Number of Sections Assessed:

                              240 - Hospitality Training and Development Skills                          Spring 2011

                                                                                                                             Assessment Results / Plans for
                       Course SLOs (please fill in fields below for each course SLO)                                   Course Improvement          (please fill
                                                                                                                           in fields below for each course SLO)
                  Describe the factors that a diverse work force, strategic planning, and technology have on the
 SLO #1           hospitality training industry

                  Summarize how training is an investment in the organization and differentiate the budgeting
 SLO #2           process for training in today's organizations.

                  Explain methods for identifying the training and development needs of a hospitality organization.
 SLO #3

                  Contrast and compare the different types of training exercises and activities that can be
 SLO #4           incorporated into training sessions.

                  Identify the advantagves & disadvantages of various types of technology based training & describe
 SLO #5           challenges with designing & delivering a web-based course.

                  Differentiate between measurement and evaluation and identify criteria that training directors use
 SLO #6           to validate training activities.

                  Summarize the advantages and disadvantages of outsourcing training.
 SLO #7

                  Summarize how hospitality companies benefit from comprehensive effectively conducted
 SLO #8           employee orientation programs.

                  Describe the socialization process that continues after the initial orientation sessions.
 SLO #9



                                                                                                                                                         Timeline
                                                                                                                          Analysis of Results             for
          Method of Course SLO Assessment (please indicate one below & attach the instrument(s)                        (indicate one or more below,   Improvement
                                                                                                                                  if any)              s   (check &
                                                                                                                                                      indicate sem/year

                                                                                                                                                                     92
                                                                                                                                                        for each below)

                                                                                                                                Course-level
Student Performance -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                                  improvements                   Course-
                                                                                                                                needed                         level:
                                                                                                                                SLO improvements
Student Self-Evaluation/Survey -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                                       needed                         SLOs:
                                                                                                                                Unit Plan funding              Unit
Other -- indicate:                                                                                                              requests needed                Plan:




                                                                                                              Sem/Year of
  Course #10                                        Course Number & Title:
                                                                                                              Assessment:
                                                                                                                                Number of Sections Assessed:

                                                  245 - Hospitality Internship                                Spring 2011

                                                                                                                                  Assessment Results / Plans for
                              Course SLOs (please fill in fields below for each course SLO)                                 Course Improvement          (please fill
                                                                                                                               in fields below for each course SLO)
                        Identify all the roles and responsibilities of an employee in the hospitality environment.
    SLO #1

                        Analyze the needs of the employee in the area of hospitality and the continued education and
    SLO #2              personal growth to meet those needs.

                        Evaluated the skills and qualities each student needs for success in the Hospitality industry.
    SLO #3

                        Compare and apply the classroom textual learning to the actual on-the-job training.
    SLO #4

                        Evaluate their performance in the work environment and discuss this with instructor.
    SLO #5


    SLO #6


    SLO #7


    SLO #8



                                                                                                                                                                       93
    SLO #9



                                                                                                                                          Timeline
                                                                                                                                           for
                                                                                                           Analysis of Results
                Method of Course SLO Assessment (please indicate one below & attach the instrument(s)   (indicate one or more below,   Improvement
                                                                                                                   if any)              s   (check &
                                                                                                                                       indicate sem/year
                                                                                                                                        for each below)
                                                                                                             Course-level
Student Performance -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                               improvements                     Course-
                                                                                                             needed                           level:
                                                                                                             SLO improvements
Student Self-Evaluation/Survey -- aggregation of assessment data from all course sections                    needed                           SLOs:
                                                                                                             Unit Plan funding                Unit
Other -- indicate:                                                                                           requests needed                  Plan:




                                                                                                                                                      94
XIII. END NOTES (If Applicable)
      If applicable, you may attach additional documents or information, such as assessment forms, awards, letters, samples, lists of
      students working in the field, etc.




                                                                                                                                        95
F.   CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION (CTE) TWO-YEAR PROGRAM REVIEW
     Program: Hospitality                              Planning Year: 2011-2012

     Unit: Business Education Cluster: WED             Last Year of CPPR/Voc. Ed Review: 2009

     INSTRUCTIONS: CTE programs will complete and submit the below Two-year Program Review as part of a regular two-year program
     review cycle (Ed Code 78016). In addition, CTE programs will complete and submit an APPW on an annual basis and an Instructional
     Comprehensive Program Planning and Review (CPPR) every four years according to the institutional comprehensive planning cycle for
     instructional programs.

     California Ed Code 78016
     F. Every vocational or occupational training program offered by a community college district shall be reviewed every two years by the
        governing board of the district to ensure that each program, as demonstrated by the California Occupational Information System,
        including the State-Local Cooperative Labor Market Information Program established in Section 10533 of the Unemployment
        Insurance Code, or if this program is not available in the labor market area, other available sources of labor market information, does
        all of the following:
        4) Meets a documented labor market demand.
        5) Does not represent unnecessary duplication of other manpower training programs in the area.
        6) Is of demonstrated effectiveness as measured by the employment and completion success of its students.
     G. Any program that does not meet the requirements of subdivision (A) and the standards promulgated by the governing board shall be
        terminated within one year.
     H. The review process required by this section shall include the review and comments by the local Private Industry Council established
        pursuant to Division 8 (commencing with Section 15000) of the Unemployment Insurance Code, which review and comments shall
        occur prior to any decision by the appropriate governing body.
     I. This section shall apply to each program commenced subsequent to July 28, 1983.
     J. A written summary of the findings of each review shall be made available to the public.

     NARRATIVE: Review your CTE program according to the following three prompts with analysis of data provided by the State. If
     assistance is needed to retrieve data, please contact the Dean of Workforce and Economic Development.


                                                                                                                                             96
       Provide a written summary for each prompt. If yes, explain why and/or how. If no, explain why.

       I. Meets a documented labor market demand.

San Luis Obispo County is located on California’s central coast. San Luis Obispo has many tourist attractions and recreational areas, including
Hearst Castle in San Simeon. All segments of the hospitality industry are in need of highly skilled and effective service-oriented employees.
The wide range of career opportunities in service and management are almost limitless with transferable skills. Lodging, travel, food service,
event planning and recreation attractions are only a small group of career possibilities with many subgroups for each area that are available in
the Hospitality industry.

Following are statistics on Hospitality from the San Luis Obispo Visitors Conference Bureau:

       Tourism employs 16,610 San Luis Obispo County residents, representing a payroll of $369.1 million.
       San Luis Obispo County was the destination of choice for nearly 8.3 million visitors in 2006.
       San Luis Obispo County collected more than $21.8 million in transient occupancy tax (T.O.T.) in 2006/2007. Cities in San Luis Obispo
        County have a T.O.T. of 10%, while unincorporated areas of the county levy a 9% T.O.T.
       The average hotel occupancy rate in San Luis Obispo County for 2007 was 63.7% and the average daily rate (ADR) was $113.28.
       Passengers at San Luis Obispo County Regional Airport (SBP) totaled 368,423 for 2007, which represents a 4.2% increase over 2006.
       Most visited California State Parks by unit type in 2007: State Park – Morro Bay State Park – 1,618,541; State Vehicular Recreation
        Area – Oceano Dunes SVRA – 2,303,871; and State Historic Monument – Hearst Castle – 670,309.
       Wine tourism expenditures total $113 million annually attracting 1.2 million visitors to San Luis Obispo County.


       II. Does not represent unnecessary duplication of other manpower training programs in the area.

        At this time there are no other comprehensive hospitality training programs in San Luis Obispo County.

       III. Is of demonstrated effectiveness as measured by the employment and completion success of its students.

The hospitality program effectiveness is measured by the increase in the success rate from 73.6% in 2008/2009 to 75.8% in 2009/2010 as
documented in the Cuesta College Institutional Research. In addition, the retention rate has also increased from 86.2% to 89.0%.
Furthermore, as documented in the 2010-2011 California Community Colleges Performance summaries, Cuesta College succeeded the State
average in skill attainment as shown below:



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                              Core 1 Skill Attainment

                              Percent Count Total

Program Area Total              100.00      14     14

Female                          100.00       5      5

Male                            100.00       9      9

Non-traditional                              0      0

Displaced Homemaker             100.00       1      1

Economically Disadvantaged      100.00       5      5

Limited English Proficiency                  0      0

Single Parent                   100.00       1      1

Students with Disabilities      100.00       2      2

Technical Preparation                        0      0



District                        100.00      14    14

State                            89.02   1,395 1,567




In 2010, the Hospitality program had one student, Danielle Bremmer, graduate with an A.S. degree.




                                                                                                    98
Core 3 Persistence in Higher Education: Cuesta College‘s performance goal is at 78.57% with a statewide percentage of 83.6%;

         Core 3 Persistence

  Percent       Count       Total

        78.57        11             14

       100.00           5             5

        66.67           6             9

                        0             0

       100.00           1             1

       100.00           5             5

                        0             0

       100.00           1             1

       100.00           2             2

                        0             0


       78.57         11             14

        83.68    1,297        1,550




Cuesta College Hospitality curriculum was incepted as a worked-based training model, while that has changed slightly our students are
encouraged and given opportunities to access training leading to a higher employment rate that the State average as shown below:

                               Core 4 Employment

                              Percent Count Total

Program Area Total                  80.00   4   5

Female                              50.00   1   2

Male                           100.00       3   3


                                                                                                                                        99
Non-traditional                        0      0

Displaced Homemaker                    0      0

Economically Disadvantaged             0      0

Limited English Proficiency            0      0

Single Parent                          0      0

Students with Disabilities     0.00    0      1

Technical Preparation                  0      0



District                      80.00    4     5

State                         63.60   318   500



At the end of each semester, Cuesta College students have the opportunity to receive a course completion certificate from the American Hotel & Lodging
Educational Institute. The AH&LEI certificates ensure instant recognition when students apply for a job in the hospitality industry. Employers know that
students who have completed AH&LEI's hospitality management courses are well prepared to handle supervisory responsibilities and become a valuable
addition to their staff. As displayed below, Cuesta College students were awarded 154 certificates from Fall 2008 to Fall 2010.




 American Hotel and Lodging Hospitality
 Certificates Awarded/Test Scores

                                        Fall 2008 - Fall 2010

                                        Students
 Course Title and number                enrolled        Students passed        % Passed


 Hosp. 205 - Front Office Oper.                    16                     11      69%
 Hosp. 210 - Marketing & Sales                     24                     20      83%
 Hosp. 215 - Housekeeping                          18                     17      94%
 Hosp. 220 - Supervision                           43                     38      88%
 Hosp. 225 - Hospitality Law                       21                     16      76%
 Hosp. 230 - Food & Beverage                       43                     29      67%
                                                                                                                                                       100
Hosp. 235 - Security & Loss      24     22   92%
Hosp. 240 - Training & Develp.   14      1    7%

Total                            203   154   76%

Total Certificates Awarded             154




                                                   101
Following are a few other examples of success stories in Hospitality:
     Maria Soleimankhani – graduated with an AS degree and is a manager for the Baywood Inn in Los Osos. She now serves on our
       advisory committee.

      Julie Cardenaz is currently working on her AS in hospitality and has recently been promoted at Quality Suites in San Luis Obispo.

      Paul Gainz - graduated with an A.S. degree and has worked as an assistant manager for several local lodging properties.

      Sarah Etnyre – is currently working on her A.S. in hospitality and has recently been promoted at the Embassy Suites in San Luis
       Obispo.



                                                                 APPW
Program: Hospitality
Planning Year: 2011-2012

Unit: Business Education       Cluster: Workforce Development
NARRATIVE: APPW
    XVII. Institutional Measures:

           For the 2011-2012 school year, we will attempt to maintain the FTES of last year and increase the number of students earning degrees
           and certificates in the Hospitality Program.

         The goal of the Hospitality program is to have the student gain knowledge of diverse careers within the industry. The
         Hospitality field provides specialization and employment in a variety of careers in the management of: Food & Beverage,
         Housekeeping, Front Office, Event Planning, Travel & Tourism, Convention Services, Resorts, Clubs, Sales Marketing, Loss
         Prevention, Gaming, cruise Lines, Spas, and Human Resources.


                                                                                                                                            102
 Program Development/Forecasting

Over the past year curriculum changes have been made to the Hospitality Program and to the degree/certificates. The program has
been given a complete overhaul to better meet the needs of the Hospitality Industry and to better prepare the students before entering
the workforce in the areas of Hospitality.

As of Fall 2010 all Hospitality courses have been changed from a 9-week courses (two hour lecture with a 6 hour lab) to an 18-week
(three hour) lecture course. After much deliberation with faculty, the conclusion was made that it was necessary to increase the
amount of lecture time each week in order to integrate all of the curriculum requirements into the course. As a result, this required
that the curriculum for each had to be rewritten and approved which was finalized Fall 2009. An internship class has been added to
replace the lab. Also, the Hospitality Program added an online class – Intro to Hospitality to complement the existing program.

As of Fall 2010 the Hospitality Program now offers students either an AA in Hospitality or a Hospitality Fundamentals Certificate of
Specialization which allows the student to choose 5 courses (15 units) from the ten Hospitality courses offered in the program. A
student can now customize a certificate to fit their specific needs and interests. As before, after each course is successfully completed
students earn completion certificates from the American Hotel and Lodging Association.

 1. Anticipated Program/Scheduling Changes
Because of the strength of the Hospitality Industry in San Luis Obispo County and feedback from the students and advisory committee,
a Hospitality course at the South County campus was offered for the first time in Spring 2010. This proved to be very successful. Going
forward the program will continue to expand the offering of Hospitality courses in South County. Regrettably the North County
Hospitality program has had mixed results. Not all courses have been as strong as anticipated thus begins the process of re-evaluating
the Hospitality course offering and scaling back.



 2. Facility Changes
 Hospitality classes are traditionally taught in the evening. Most students are working during the day, and evening classes are a better
for the majority of students. Spring 2010 was the first time Hospitality classes were offered at the South County Campus. Enrollment
was encouraging and South County Campus will continue to offer at least one Hospitality class per semester.

                                                                                                                                        103
In order for greater outreach to students in all areas, including high school students, a new online course—Introduction to
Hospitality—will be offered. Because this is the first time an online Hospitality course has been offered, it is hoped that this class will
attract more students from a wider variety of age, sex, and occupation, and that this class will also serve as a “feeder” course to other
Hospitality courses, degree and certificates.

 3. Staffing Projections
Currently there are two part-time faculty members teaching in the hospitality program and one part-time coordinator. In addition,
there are three new applicants that were interviewed and added to the Hospitality faculty pool in Fall 2009. The Internship class will
require the need for a faculty/advisory to place students at appropriate property sites, supervise students in internships, and to
conduct routine site visits.

  4. Budget
 One of the biggest hurdles the Hospitality program has faced is the need to get the message out to the community about this important
and dynamic program. Over the past two years, the Hospitality Program has had the advantage of using some of the monies provided
by a Collaborative Grant with Hancock & Cuesta Colleges. By working closer with the marketing department, they will assist in putting
together a marketing plan.



       APPW Outcomes for each Hospitality class

Hosp 201-Intro to Hospitality
   Identify the basics components of the Hospitality industry.
   Describe the operating factors and the basic organizational structure
     of the Hotel industry.
   Describe the relationship between market, concept and menu in commercial and retail food service.
   Describe the association between travel and tourism management and the hospitality industry.


                                                                                                                                          104
Hosp 205-Front Office Operations
   Summarize the front-office operations and the four stages of the guest cycle.

   Identify the seven steps of the registration process and discuss creative registration options.
   Summarize the front office accounting fundamentals.
   Identify functions and procedures related to the check out and settlement process.

Hosp 210-Hospitality Marketing and Sales
   Describe the importance of marketing as it relates to the success of the hospitality operation
   Explain reasons for the growth in hospitality services and the benefits of marketing them.
   List internal and external influences on consumer behavior.
   Compare and contrast two types of marketing plans – strategic and tactical.
Hosp 215-Housekeeping Operations
   Identify the roles of housekeeping.
   Summarize the planning and organization of the housekeeping department and the dilemma of human
     resources.
   Describe the impact of controlling expenses and managing inventory.
   Discuss the benefits of environmental and energy management policies.
Hosp 220-Supervision in the Hospitality Industry
   Describe the term management and identify the basic management principles
   Describe the communication process and the impact it can have on the organization.
   Describe the function of training and explain the importance of training within the organization.
   Review how supervisors determine productivity standards and business volumes using separate forecasting
     methods
Hosp 225-Hospitality Law


                                                                                                        105
   Describe rights and liabilities of hotelkeepers under common law.

   Describe the implications of the Americans with Disabilities Act.
   Describe the Fair Labor Standards Act




Hosp 230-Food and Beverage Operations
   Compare and contrast between commercial and noncommercial food service operations.
   Identify a variety of food service personnel positions and describe the roles these positions play in the food
     service industry.
   Explain the steps involved in Menu Planning and Design and determine standard food and beverage costs to
     assist in the menu planning.
   Identify the major functions and basic principle of food production; describe how provide good food service to
     guests.
Hosp 235-Hospitality Security and Loss Prevention
   Describe the elements to a security system and evaluate the security system’s effectiveness.
   Evaluate security procedures and guest concerns.
   Summarize the Protection of Funds and accounting control procedures.
   Summarize the Emergency Management plan and communicating with media.
Hosp 240-Hospitality Training and Development Skills
   Describe the factors that a diverse work force, stategic planning, and technology have on the hospitality
     training industry.

   Summarize how training is an investment in the organizaion and differentiate the budgeting process for
    training in today's organizaions.
                                                                                                               106
    Differentiate between measurement and evaluation and identify criteria that training directors use to validate
     training activities.

    Compare and contrast the different types of training exercises and activities used in training sessions and
     identify the advantages and disadvantages of using various types of technology based training.

Hosp 245-Hospitality Internship
   Identify all the roles and responsibilibies of an employee in the Hospitality environment.

    Evaluation by instructor of the skills and qualities needed for student success.

    Examine, learn, and discover different elements that may be of interest in Hospitality.

    Demonstrate in a supervised professional setting knowledge gained and essential experience.




                                                                                                                   107
G. STUDENT SERVICES COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAM PLANNING AND REVIEW (CPPR)

   Only to be completed by those programs scheduled for the year according to the institutional comprehensive planning cycle (i.e.
   every two or five years).

   Program:                    Planning Year:             Last Year CPPR Completed:

   Unit:                       Cluster:


   NARRATIVE: Student Services CPPR
   Please use the following narrative outline:

   I.      GENERAL INFORMATION AND PROGRAM OUTCOMES
           A. General Description about the Program
               Program Mission Statement
               History of the program
               Include the broad history of the program and significant changes/improvements since the last Program Review
               Describe how the Program Review was conducted and who was involved

           B. Program Goals: Broad statements about what this program will accomplish – its anticipated development and achievements
               May include program students and their future goals (e.g. transfer, vocational, enrichment, etc.)
               May include a Program Map/Description

           C. Program Outcomes: List the program outcomes established for your program as reported on the Student Services Assessment
              Template

   II.     PROGRAM CONNECTIONS TO COLLEGE MISSION, VISION AND VALUES, STRATEGIC GOALS, AND COLLEGE
           PLANS
           A. Identify how your program addresses or helps fulfill one or more of the following:
              the College Mission, Vision and Values; a specific Strategic Goal(s); and/or elements of the College Master Plans.


                                                                                                                                       108
III. PROGRAM DATA ANALYSIS AND PROGRAM-SPECIFIC MEASUREMENTS
   A. Data Summary – Relevant Comments and Analysis
       May include program data that demonstrates the level and kind of effort or volume produced in the previous year.
       May include other pertinent information (e.g. student registrations or DSPS MIS statistics).

   B. Give interpretations of data and identify areas for change to facilitate program quality and growth.




                                                                                                                           109
IV. PROGRAM OUTCOMES, ASSESSMENTS AND IMPROVEMENTS: NARRATIVE
     A. Summarize assessment results for program outcomes
     B. Analysis of program outcomes to broad program goals
     C. Recommend changes and updates to program funding goals based on assessment of
        program outcomes
         Include elements that require funding as well as those that do not.
         For elements that require funding, complete Section D – Unit Plan Funding Requests.
         For faculty hiring needs, see Section H – Faculty Prioritization Process.

V.   ANTICIPATED SERVICE CHALLENGES/CHANGES
     Suggested Elements:
     A. Regulatory changes
     B. Internal and external organizational changes
     C. Student demographic changes
     D. Community economic changes – workforce demands
     E. Role of technology for information, service delivery and data retrieval
     F. Distance Education impact on services
     G. Providing service to multiple off-campus sites
     H. Anticipated staffing changes/retirements

VI. PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT FORECAST
     Suggested Elements:
     A. Description of forecasted program development, based on information collected in I-IV
     B. Effective practices and opportunities for improvement
     C. Interface with college short-term and long term strategic planning
     D. Integration of student and program outcomes evaluation
     E. Integration of recommendations from external agencies
     F. New service coordination and collaboration – internal and external programs.
     G. Anticipated job description revisions based on program changes
     H. Staff training/professional development needs
     I. Program Planning agendas
         Qualitative planning agendas
         Quantitative planning agendas – size/scope

                                                                                                110
VII. OVERALL BUDGET IMPLICATIONS
     Will be reflected in college planning and budget process
     Elements:
     A. Personnel
     B. Equipment/furniture (other than technology)
     C. Technology
     D. Facilities




                                                                111
H.    ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAM PLAN AND REVIEW (CPPR)
     This Comprehensive Program Plan and Review template is only to be completed by programs in the following areas scheduled for the
     year, according to the institutional comprehensive planning cycle (i.e. every five years):
     1) The President‘s Cluster including Human Resources, Institutional Advancement and the College Centers; and
     2) The Administrative Services Cluster including Bookstore, Computer Services, Fiscal Services, General Services, Maintenance and
        Operations, Facilities, and Public Safety.

     Program:                    Planning Year:               Last Year CPPR Completed:

     Unit:                       Cluster:


     NARRATIVE: Administrative Services CPPR

     I.      GENERAL INFORMATION AND PROGRAM OUTCOMES
             A. General Description about the Program
                1. Program (department) mission statement (who are we and who we serve)
                2. Brief summary of program history
                3. Current status of service including changes and improvements since last program review
                4. Reference to relevant statutory authority/program regulation and related compliance issues
                5. Description of primary relationships, internal and external to the college

             B. Program Goals: Broad statements about what this program will accomplish – its anticipated development and achievements

             C. Program Outcomes: List the program outcomes established for your program

     II.     PROGRAM CONNECTIONS TO COLLEGE MISSION, VISION AND VALUES,
             STRATEGIC GOALS AND COLLEGE PLANS
                Identify how your program addresses or helps fulfill one or more of the following: the College Mission, Vision and Values;
                 a specific Strategic Goal(s); and/or elements of the College Master Plans.

     III. PROGRAM DATA ANALYSIS, ASSESSMENT AND IMPROVEMENTS
             A. Data Summary – Relevant Comments and Analysis
                 May include program data that demonstrates the level and kind of effort or volume produced in the previous year.
                                                                                                                                         112
           May include other pertinent information.

     B. Give interpretations of Data and Identify Areas for Change to Facilitate Program Quality and Growth

     C. Summarize Assessment Results for Program Outcomes

     D. Analysis of Program Outcomes to Broad Program Goals

     C. Recommend Changes and Updates to Program Funding Goals Based on
        Assessment of Program Outcomes
         Include elements that require funding as well as those that do not
         For elements that require funding, complete Section D – Unit Plan

IV. ANTICIPATED SERVICE CHALLENGES/CHANGES
     Suggested Elements:
      A. Regulatory changes
      B. Internal and external organizational changes
      C. Student demographic changes
      D. Community economic changes – workforce demands
      E. Role of technology for information, service delivery and data retrieval
      F. Distance Education impact on services
      G. Providing service to multiple off-campus sites
      H. Anticipated staffing changes/retirements

V.   PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT FORECAST
     Suggested Elements:
     A. Description of forecasted program development, based on information collected in I-IV
     B. Effective practices and opportunities for improvement
     C. Interface with college short-term and long term strategic planning
     D. Integration of student and program outcomes evaluation
     E. Integration of recommendations from external agencies
     F. New service coordination and collaboration – internal and external programs.
     G. Anticipated job description revisions based on program changes
     H. Staff training/professional development needs
     I. Program Planning agendas

                                                                                                              113
            Qualitative planning agendas
            Quantitative planning agendas – size/scope

VI. OVERALL BUDGET IMPLICATIONS
    (Will be reflected in college planning and budget process)
     Elements:
     A. Personnel
     B. Equipment/furniture (other than technology)
     C. Technology
     D. Facilities




                                                                 114
I.   SIGNATURE PAGE
     Faculty, Director(s), Manager(s), and/or Staff Associated with the Program


     Instructional Programs: All full-time faculty in the program must sign this form. If needed, provide an extra signature line for
     each additional full-time faculty member in the program. If there are no full-time faculty associated with the program, then the
     part-time faculty in the program should sign. If applicable, please indicate lead faculty member for program after printing
     his/her name.

     Student Services and Administrative Services Programs: All full-time director(s), managers, faculty and/or classified staff in the
     program must sign this form.



Division Chair/Director Name                       Signature                         Date



Name                                               Signature                         Date



Name                                               Signature                         Date



Name                                               Signature                         Date



Name                                               Signature                         Date



                                                                                                                                     115
Name   Signature   Date



Name   Signature   Date



Name   Signature   Date




                          116
                                            SUPPLEMENTAL DOCUMENTS

FACULTY HIRING PRIORITIZATION INFORMATION (If Applicable)

If your program requested a faculty position for consideration, please attach or embed the following worksheets that were presented to the
Shared Governance Council:

   Worksheet A.1: Subjective Ranking Sheet
   Worksheet B.1: Objective Criteria for Teaching Faculty




                                                                                                                                      117

								
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