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APPENDIX A - Hull City Council

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APPENDIX A - Hull City Council Powered By Docstoc
					Report to the CST 05 July 2006 / Cabinet 24 July 2006       Wards All


             Hull & Humber Ports City Region Development Programme
          (for submission to Northern Way Steering Group / Government -
                                30 September 2006)

                                                                        RD141
Report of the Head of Development & Renewal Services

1.      Purpose of the Report and Summary

1.1 To seek Members‟ approval for the Hull and Humber Ports City Region
    Development Programme. All eight City Regions in the North of England
    have been asked by the Northern Way Steering Group to complete these
    Development Programmes by 30 September 2006.

1.2 The purpose of the City Region Development Programmes is to set out
    medium and long term proposals which will raise the economic
    performance of City Regions and thus contribute to narrowing the output
    gap between the North and the rest of England.

1.3 A “route map” for the production of City Region Development
    Programmes was issued by the Northern Way Steering Group in
    December 2005.

1.4 The City Region Development Programmes will form a part of the
    submission by the North‟s three Regional Development Agencies into the
    Comprehensive Spending Review which is to take place in 2007. The
    Comprehensive Spending Review will involve an examination of the key
    long term trends and challenges that will shape the next decade. The
    Northern Way Steering Group will make a Comprehensive Spending
    Review submission directly to the Treasury and the submission will
    cover:
     Knowledge and innovation
     Transport
     Skills Investment
     Incapacity benefit into work
     Sustainable Communities
     City Region Development Programmes.1

1
    Northern Way Steering Group, Communique, 16 May 2006.


                                                                          1
1.5 It has been established that the Northern Way Steering Group‟s
    submission to Comprehensive Spending Review 2007 will receive an
    official response from the Treasury.2

2.   Recommendations

2.1 That Members approve the Hull and Humber Ports City Region
    Development Programme in principle in its current draft form.

2.2 That Members welcome the contribution this initiative will make to
    enhance the economic performance and the reputation of the City of
    Hull.
      .
2.3 That the Head of Development and Renewal Services in consultation
    with the Portfolio Holder for Economy be authorised to agree the
    programme in detail.

     This is a key decision. This matter is in the Forward Plan (reference:
     0055/06)

3.   Background

3.1 Launching “Making It Happen – The Northern Way” in February 2004,
    the Government asked the Northern region of England to respond by
    bringing forward proposals to develop an inter-regional growth strategy
    which will contribute to closing the prosperity gap between London and
    the South East and the rest of the country.

3.2 In response, the North‟s three Regional Development Agencies
    established a Northern Way Steering Group to draw up proposals for an
    inter-regional growth strategy for the North of England. In September
    2004, The Northern Way Steering Group published “Moving forward –
    the Northern Way: First Growth Strategy Report”.

3.3 “The First Growth Strategy Report” has two key features
    (i) It specifies that eight city regions in the North of England are “driving
        the economic growth of the North and will continue to do so”.3 Hull is
        located in the Hull and Humber Ports City Region (which comprises
        the four local authority areas in the Humber sub-region).

     (ii) It specifies that ten policy/investment priorities must be concentrated
          upon to accelerate the rate of economic growth in the North of
          England:-

2
  Yorkshire Forward representative on Hull and Humber Ports City Region Policy Working
Group (16 June 2006).
3
  The eight City Regions identified by the Northern Way are: Liverpool /Merseyside City
Region, Manchester City Region, Leeds City Region, Tees Valley City Region, Central
Lancashire City Region, Sheffield City Region, Tyne and Wear City Region and Hull and
Humber Ports City Region.


                                                                                     2
     (a)   bringing more people into work;
     (b)   strengthening the knowledge base to support innovation by every
           company;
     (c)   building a more entrepreneurial culture;
     (d)   supporting the expansion of key clusters of companies;
     (e)   investing in meeting the skills needs of employers;
     (f)   improving surface access to Manchester Airport and prepare a
           Northern Airports Priorities plan;
     (g)   improving access to the North‟s sea ports;
     (h)   investing in better integrated public transport services within and
           between our city regions (and in particular to invest in better rail
           links between the city regions centred on Manchester and Leeds);
     (i)   a bolder approach to creating truly sustainable communities (and
           calls for an acceleration in the rate of stock renewal and the
           provision of affordable housing); and
     (j)   marketing the North to the world.


3.4 All eight of the North‟s City Regions produced City Region Development
    Programmes in May 2005.            The Northern Way Steering Group
    responded by saying “These first versions of the eight City Region
    Development Programmes provide for the first time an overview of the
    economic development potential and requirements of the North‟s major
    urban economies”.        Of the Hull and Humber Ports City Region
    Development Programme (May 2005), the Northern Way Steering Group
    commented (in July 2005); “By comparison with six months ago, the
    stakeholders in the Hull and Humber Ports City Region have made very
    exceptional progress in formulating a set of proposals”. The then
    Minister for Housing and Planning commented on the first Hull and
    Humber Ports City Region Development Programme, “We strongly
    support the City Region in working together and pulling in the same
    direction and would welcome the continued input of all partners to ensure
    that this first version of the Development Programme is built upon and
    made as strong as possible”.4 All eight City Regions were then asked by
    the Northern Way Steering Group to further develop their City Region
    Development Programmes. The deadline for the second iteration of the
    North‟s City Region Development Programmes is 30 September 2006.

     How the Hull and Humber Ports City Region Development Programme
     has been developed

3.5 The Northern Way initiative was launched on 18 September 2004. Hull
    City Council took the lead in calling a meeting of sub-regional partners
    for 9 November 2004. A further meeting of sub regional partners was
    held on 15 December 2004. Hull City Council has continued since then,
    to take the lead on the production of the City Region Development
    Programme (May 2005) and the current iteration.

4
  Yvette Cooper MP, Minister for Housing and Planning, Office of the Deputy Prime Minister,
letter of 28 July 2005 to Council‟s Head of Development and Renewal.


                                                                                         3
3.6 A Hull and Humber Ports City Region Policy Working Group, led and
    serviced by Hull City Council, has been meeting on a fortnightly basis
    since July 2005 to ensure that sub regional stakeholders contribute fully
    to the second iteration of the Hull and Humber Ports City Region
    Development Programme.           This Policy Working Group comprises
    officers from the four local authorities, the Humber Economic Partnership
    Ltd., (formerly the Humber Forum Ltd.), Government Office for Yorkshire
    and the Humber, Yorkshire           Forward (the Regional Development
    Agency). In addition, since March 2005, the Policy Working Group has
    also included a representative of KPMG LL Ltd., (the consultancy which
    has been engaged by Yorkshire Forward to draw up the revised Humber
    Sub Regional Investment Plan and Humber Strategic Economic
    Assessment). From time to time, the Hull and Humber Ports Policy
    Working Group has been joined by representatives of the business
    sector. Each organisation represented on the Policy Working Group is
    responsible for ensuring communication and input from its respective
    constituencies. The fortnightly meetings of the Policy Working Group
    receive agendas, papers, minutes and briefings from the “secretariat”
    provided by Hull City Council.

3.7 A consultation event was held on 24 April 2006, organised by the Hull
    and Humber Ports Policy Working Group. Representatives from a wide
    range of stakeholders attended from within and beyond the City Region.5
    The outputs of the intensive workshops held on 24th April have
    contributed to the working draft of the Hull and Humber Ports City Region
    Development Programme.

3.8 Two further consultation events are to be held on 27th June; the first
    involving the Humber Economic Partnership‟s Council and the second,
    organised by the Hull and Humber Ports Policy Working Group, a wider
    range of participants and stakeholders drawn from those organisations
    and sectors represented at the 24th April consultation.

3.9 At both events on 27th June, a draft of the Hull and Humber Ports City
    Region Development Programme will be available. Input and buy-in to
    the propositions in the Hull and Humber Ports City Region Development
    Programme will be sought from both of these consultation events.




5
  Organisations represented included: Business Link, the Humber Forum, the Environment
Agency, the Department for Trade and Industry, the Highways Agency, Yorkshire Forward,
the four Humber local authorities, Government Office for Yorkshire and the Humber, Sheffield,
Leeds and Central Lancashire City Regions.


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4. Main Body of Report

   The Hull and Humber Ports City Region Development Programme:
   Working Draft June 2006.

4.1 The Hull and Humber Ports Policy Working Group held a day-long
    meeting to discuss a working draft of the Hull and Humber Ports City
    Region Development Programme on 16 June 2006.It should be stressed
    that many (if not all) of the propositions outlined in the first Hull and
    Humber Ports City Region Development Programme (May 2005) are
    included in the June 2006 working draft.

4.2 It should also be noted that there are a number of outstanding reports
    and publications are due to be published in the coming months which are
    likely to have a bearing on the nature of the Hull and Humber Ports City
    Region Development Programme (and the other seven City Region
    Development Programmes). These include:
     Guidance from HM Treasury on how submissions to Comprehensive
        Spending Review 2007 are to be made;
     The Eddington review into the long-term impact of transport decisions
        on the UK‟s productivity, stability and growth is due to report in June
        or July 2006;
     The Examination in Public of Yorkshire and Humber‟s Regional
        Spatial Strategy (autumn 2006)
     The Treasury‟s review of sub national economic development
        arrangements (autumn 2006)
     The Lyons Inquiry into the role, function and funding of local
        government which will feed into CSR 2007;
     The Local Government White Paper (due in September 2006)
     The Yorkshire and Humber Regional Economic Strategy (“Shaping
        the Agenda”) will be signed-off by Government in July 2006.

4.3 At sub regional level over the next four to six weeks a number of
    economic reviews (each with a different purpose/ perspective), are due
    to be published:
     “Anticipating Change” sets the scene for development work on
        managing economic restructuring. To be published on 23 June 2006
        by the Humber Economic Partnership;
     “Progress in the Humber 2006” is a monitoring report on regionally
        agreed indicators. This is to be published mid July 2006 by the
        Humber Economic Partnership;
     The Humber Sub Region Strategic Economic Assessment and Sub
        Regional Economic Development Investment Plan, is being
        undertaken for Yorkshire Forward by KPMG and sets out the sub
        regional priorities for public sector investment in the Humber Sub
        Region. This work is likely to be published before September 2006.

4.4 The Hull and Humber Ports City Region Development Programme is the
    fourth of these economic review which are being circulated for



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    consultation and further development during June 2006. It should be
    noted that the Hull and Humber Ports Policy Working Group has had
    access to pre-publication versions of the three sub regional reviews
    mentioned in paragraph 4.4. (Indeed, authors of the three other
    economic reviews have been active participants in the Hull and Humber
    Ports Policy Working Group.)

4.5 It should be noted that the Hull and Humber Ports City Region
    Development Programme (like the Leeds City Region and Sheffield City
    Region Development Programmes) is awaiting input from Yorkshire
    Forward specifically on an econometric modelling exercise (which will be
    common to all City Region Development Programmes in Yorkshire and
    Humber).

    Key Points from the Hull and Humber Ports City Region
    Development Programme (working draft of 15 June 2006)

4.6 The working draft of the Hull and Humber Ports City Region
    Development Programme comes in at 158 pages (without maps, graphs,
    photographs). However, the “heart” of the City Region Development
    Programme – the propositions section – builds on the preceding
    evidence base and can be “detached” to form a more concise document.

4.7 The City Region Development Programme has been structured around
    the route map laid down by the Northern Way steering group and the
    need to ensure that the evidence base which has been produced is
    compelling.

4.8 The full structure of the City Region Development Programme covers:

        The physical geography of the Hull and Humber Ports

        The City Region’s Main Settlements and Markets

        i.   Main settlements
       ii.   Travel to Work patterns
      iii.   Transport within the City Region
      iv.    Retail markets
       v.    Housing markets
      vi.    Culture and Higher Education
     vii.    Business and Investment markets

         The City Region’s Productivity Drivers
        i. An overview of the City Region‟s economy
       ii. Employment
      iii. Enterprise
      iv. Innovation
            Chemicals
            Food and drink
            Logistics


                                                                          6
           Bio science and healthcare
           Culture and tourism
           Engineering / advanced manufacturing
           Retail
           Energy and environmental technologies
       v. Education and Skills
      vi. Investment
           The Ports

        Competition
        Hull and Humber Ports City Region Development Programme
          Foreword
          Introduction
          The City Region Agenda and Place-Shaping
          The Regional Context
          Physical geography
          Population and demography
          The Hull and Humber Ports Global Gateway
          Hull: the economic driver at the heart of a competitive City Region
          Planning for growth and change in the City Region
          Connecting the City Region
          Bringing more people into employment
          A quality residential offer – quality of place
          A more entrepreneurial City Region
          An innovative City Region
          Meeting the skills needs of employers
          Implementing the City Region agenda.

4.9 The vision is of a Hull and Humber Ports City Region – a Global
    Gateway – with a thriving, outward-looking, sustainable economy
    building on it unique assets of location, the estuary, ports connectivity
    and physical environment, perpetually changing for the benefit of people,
    businesses and the environment, whilst making significant and distinctive
    contributions to the sustainability of regional, national and European
    economies.

4.10 The need for leadership and new ways of working between stakeholders
     is also addressed, particularly in relation to the recent publication from
     the Lyons Inquiry, in which Sir Michael says: “Effective local
     government and place-shaping can be about recognising when it is
     necessary to build coalitions or seek support outside an authority’s
     own boundaries to achieve certain outcomes.                 Wider local
     outcomes will be improved by a broader view of the locality’s
     interests now and in the future”.6

6
 National prosperity, local choice and civic engagement: a new partnership between central
                                  st
and local government for the 21 century, Lyons Inquiry into Local Government, 08 May
2006 (par 3.4)



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4.11 Connectivity is the basis of the City Region‟s strategic contribution to
     improved economic performance, with a Global Gateway provided
     through the ports. The City Region‟s location on the Trans-Pennine
     motorway and rail routes are part of the North European Trade Axis and
     E220 Trans-European Network running from the Mersey to the Humber
     Ports and onward to the continent and the Baltic. Specific strategic
     propositions to enhance the Global Gateway are: Improved road and rail
     access to the Humber Ports as part of a national ports access strategy.

       South Humber Main Line: The growth of the Port of Immingham is
        generating additional rail traffic on the South Bank and a number of
        improvements need to be made on the South Humberside Main Line to
        meet this increasing demand. Amongst improvements needed are
        signalling, increased speed limits, and junction reconfiguration. These
        improvements will address the increased capacity of the Humber
        International Terminal which will increase capacity from 6.5 million
        tonnes to 12.5 million tonnes. The pan-Northern significance relates to
        the investment priority of improving access to the North’s sea ports.

       A63 Castle Street, Hull: Implementation of a “cut and cover scheme”.
        Highways Agency estimates cost (at today‟s prices and including a
        substantial contingency figure) at £190m.7 Such an investment will
        serve the dual purpose of enabling the Port of Hull to grow and to
        regenerate the city centre in accordance with Hull City Centre Master
        Plan. The pan-Northern significance relates to the investment priority
        of improving access to the North’s sea ports embedding future
        Associated British Ports and other private sector and related
        investments in the shipping and logistics sectors. This proposition also
        relates to the Northern Way investment priorities of capturing a larger
        share of global trade, addressing worklessness and developing a
        quality residential offer through the transformation of the city centre,
        which includes its growing role as a place of residence as well as work.
        The Northern Way investment priority of marketing the North to the
        world would also be captured here – by the Global Gateway brand.

       A160/A180 improvements: These consist of a series of components to
        upgrade the A160 and A180 to serve the towns of Grimsby and
        Immingham (particularly the Port of Immingham and the Humber Sea
        Terminal). The costs of the components (dualling of the middle section
        of the A160 and reconstruction of the A180/A160 Brockelsby
        interchange was estimated at £56million (2002 prices).8 The purpose

7
  Evidence base: M62 Route Management Strategy Liverpool to Hull, Hyder Consulting for the
Highways Agency, June 2002; Business Case for Transport Investment in the Humber Sub
Region, Ove Arup Partners for Yorkshire Forward Ltd, September 2004; Economic Value of
Ports and Waterway to Yorkshire & Humber, Arup Transport Planning for Yorkshire Forward,
January 2003; A63 Castle Street – Supplementary Economic Impact Study, Steer Davies
Gleave for Hull Citybuild Ltd, November 2004.
8
  Evidence base: Business Case for Transport Investment in the Humber Sub Region, Ove
Arup & Partners for Yorkshire Forward, September 2004; A160/A180 Improvements, Carl


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        of this investment would be the provision of additional highway capacity
        encouraging businesses to locate and expand. The pan-Northern
        significance relates to the Northern Way investment priority of
        improving access to the North’s sea ports and meeting the needs of
        the South Humber Bank Master Plan. Additionally, capturing a larger
        share of global trade and marketing the North to the world.

       Adjustment of national investment priorities:
        The M62/A63 east of the A1 to be designated as being a route of
        strategic national importance,9 and designate rail freight routes to the
        Humber Ports as being of national importance

       M62 road and Trans-Pennine Rail improvements: (i) Upgrade the
        structure of Trans-Pennine rail to provide additional paths for both
        passenger and freight services (ii) Upgrade Trans-Pennine rail freight
        routes to accommodate 9‟ 6” containers and, if possible „piggyback‟
        services (iii) Implement a Route Management Strategy for the M62
        motorway – to improve safety, reduce congestion and contribute to
        modal integration.10 This would to improve connectivity between the
        six contiguous city regions which run across the “M62 belt” city regions
        and contribute to efficient and environmentally friendly movement of
        freight. The pan -Northern significance of this investment would be in
        contributing to EU and UK policy on increasing rail‟s share of freight
        and to facilitate the development of the North European Trade Axis.

4.12    Additional propositions on the Global Gateway theme include:
         A Humber Ports Development Plan – to provide a comprehensive
          framework for the alignment of public and private investment which
          is ports-related;
         Building on the City Region‟s global reach – for trade, tourism and
          cultural development;
         The possibility, as part of the Northern Way‟s commitment to the
          development of public art installations, of using new,
          environmentally friendly lighting techniques on the Humber Bridge.

4.13    Planning for growth and change in the City Region – ensuring that
        sites for economic development arising out of the Global Gateway
        proposition are available and attainable. The need for this integrated
        development is particularly important in Hull as the City continues its

Bro/Parkman, Highways Agency 2003; A160/A180 Improvements: Economic Impact Report,
Ove Arup & Partners for Yorkshire Forward, September 2004.
9
   There are four criteria for designation as a strategic national route: (i) it is part of a
designated international route (ii) it provides a link between a major city and an international
port or airport (iii) it carries a high proportion of HGVs (iv) average daily vehicle flows exceed
60,000 per day. On these criteria the A63 (just) fails on the last one. However, The Hull
East-West Corridor Multi Modal Study, final report, July 2002, Government Office for
Yorkshire & the Humber, study showed that Castle Street carried an average of 53,700
vehicles a day in 1999, and on a „do minimum‟ scenario, flows were projected to rise to
73,000 vehicles in 2016.
10
   Yorkshire & the Humber Strategic Transport Priorities, Yorkshire Forward 2002



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       physical and economic resurgence. The key proposition here concerns
       the City Region‟s ability and willingness to collaborate at the relevant
       spatial level.

4.14   Hull: the economic driver at the heart of a competitive City Region
       – this proposition derives from the recent Treasury paper11 on the role
       of cities in promoting economic growth and acknowledges Hull‟s role in
       the City Region. This role derives from the agglomerative benefits of its
       size but also from the City‟s concentration of leisure, culture, sports
       and retail facilities; higher education institutions, transport hubs and its
       national and international profile.12 In addition, as recent work by the
       “Anticipating Change” project has shown, Hull is leading the City
       Region‟s recovery, with its marked improvement in terms of Gross
       Value Added and business growth.13

4.15   Connecting the City Region – public transport within the City region
       lacks a comprehensive overview. There is a need to connect
       communities with high levels of worklessness to employment centres
       across the City Region. A City Region perspective and closer
       collaboration is also required to address freight issues, which given the
       shared zone of opportunity provided by the Humber Ports, concerns all
       local authorities and partners in the City Region. The Hull and Humber
       Ports City Region Development Programme also supports the
       recommendation by the Town and Country Planning Association for a
       major infrastructure project to enhance east-west Trans -Pennine rail
       links.14 Improvement to the A1079 corridor which links Hull, Beverley
       and York is also discussed.

4.16   Bringing more people into employment. Despite increased levels of
       employment, worklessness is a pressing issue particularly in the urban
       areas of the City Region. “Pathways to Work” programmes need to be
       further developed in the City Region. Additionally, freedom for
       Jobcentre Plus, the Learning and Skills Council and other related
       organisations to produce bespoke programmes which address the
       multi -faceted nature of worklessness is necessary.




11
   Devolving Decision Making: 3 – meeting the regional economic challenge: the importance
of cities to regional growth, HM Treasury, Department for Trade and Industry, Office of the
Deputy Prime Minister, March 2006 (par 2.4. p 7)
12
   Cities, Regions and Competitiveness, M. Parkinson et al, for Office of the Deputy Prime
Minister, June 2003.
13
   Anticipating Change: How the economy of the Humber has changed and what may be
expected to come – a review for comments, Anticipating, European Union Article 6 funded
transnational project, MTL Consultants Ltd for Humber Economic Partnership, May 2006. (p.
10).
14
  Connecting England: A Framework for Regional Development, Town and Country Planning
Association, May 2006



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4.17   The City Region should also benefit (on grounds of equity and the need
       to deepen the pool of highly skilled workers in the City Region) from
       central government civil service and agency relocations.

4.18   A quality residential offer – quality of place. The Northern Way
       places great emphasis upon the need to ensure that the relationship
       between economic growth, quality of place and the provision of a
       quality residential offer is understood and taken into account in City
       Region Development Programmes. It is important to situate the City
       Region‟s residential offer as part of an approach to quality of place,
       which forms part of the quality of life offer. As well as the
       implementation of the Hull and East Riding Housing Market Pathfinder
       Renewal and the renaissance programmes in the City Region, work
       needs to continue on housing market assessments. The aim will be to
       ensure that holistic spatial development plans allow for the possibility of
       growth and that housing numbers and locations are sensitive to the
       environmental and economic need to build on previously developed
       land.

4.19   A more entrepreneurial City Region. Increasing the rate of new
       business start ups in the Hull and Humber Ports City Region is, as the
       evidence base for the City Region Development Programme shows, an
       imperative. Participation in the Northern Way‟s Northern Enterprise in
       Education Programme and the Northern Enterprise Initiative; increased
       use of Enterprise Areas; implementation of Local Enterprise Growth
       Initiatives; support for enterprising young people and the 4th block of
       Local Area Agreements suggested. Procurement issues are also an
       issue for collaboration.

4.20   An innovative City Region. Here the City Region Development
       Programme concentrates upon clusters and sectors, as well as the
       contribution to be made by the City Region‟s higher education
       institutions (including the need for university level provision on the
       south bank of the Humber). The pan-Northern effort around Science
       Cities (including York, in the Leeds City Region) and Knowledge
       Transfer Partnerships and the setting of science and technology
       priorities for the North of England are all themes which the Hull and
       Humber City Ports needs to build upon, particularly with regard to
       specialities and collaboration. Clusters and sectors to be championed
       include:
       Those sectors and clusters which need to be deepened and widened:
       ports and logistics; chemicals; engineering / advanced manufacturing,
       and tourism;
       Those sectors and clusters which need to be moved up the value
       chain: food and drink;
       Those clusters which need further development: health and
       bioscience; environmental technologies, energy renewables.

4.21   Meeting employer skills needs. Broad areas of intervention have
       been identified from a demand-led perspective. It is recognised, from


                                                                               11
       the City Region‟s evidence base that          addressing skills issues is
       critical to improving the economic performance of the City Region.
       More effort also needs to go into encouraging employers to recognise
       the necessity of improving the skills of the existing workforce.

4.22   Implementing the City Region agenda. Here the working draft City
       Region Development Programme suggests, that in line with European
       Commission guidelines and the logic of the Lisbon agenda (about the
       need to enhance productivity), those resources which are available in
       the 2007-2013 Structural Funds programming period should be
       targeted upon urban areas in order to underpin the Northern Way
       initiative.

4.23   The City Region Development Programme recognises that the
       developing City Regions agenda and the twenty year time horizon of
       the Northern Way requires new ways of working between stakeholders
       and political leaderships in the City Region. This is being actively
       addressed by the development of a revised and revitalised Humber
       Economic Partnership.

5.     Council‟s Aims and Objectives

5.1    This matter relates to the Council‟s aims and objectives because
       participation in development of a Hull and Humber Ports City Region
       Development Programme is effectively a Government requirement for
       implementation of the Northern Way Growth Strategy. The Council‟s
       contribution is a practical exercise of the power contained in S.2 Local
       Government Act 2000 to promote the social, economic and
       environmental well-being of the area.
5.2    In addition, Hull‟s leadership on the Hull and Humber Ports City Region
       Development Programme serves to strengthen the Council‟s
       relationship with partner local authorities and organisations.

6.     Option Appraisal and Risk Analysis

6.1    Option 1 – is for Members to agree the outline of the Hull and Humber
       Ports City Region Development Programme as described in this report.
       This option offers the greatest benefit in confirming the Council‟s
       participation and leadership of this work.

6.2 Option 2 – is for Members to agree or amend some of the proposed
    strategic priorities. The deadline for submission of the Hull and Humber
    Ports City Region Development Programme to the Northern Way
    Steering Group is 30 September 2006. However, allowing for publication
    preparation and recognising that other local authorities (and
    stakeholders) in the sub region are also in the process of considering the
    draft City Region Development Programme, this option would pose the
    risk of delay.




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6.3 Option 3 – is for Members to reject the draft City Region Development
    Programme outlined in this report. This option would constitute a high
    risk, particularly to the Council‟s leadership of this process and to its
    reputation amongst stakeholders at sub regional, regional and national
    level.

6.4 Thus Option 1 is strongly recommended, particularly as the
    recommendations include the Head of Development and Renewal,
    agreeing, with the Portfolio Holder for Regeneration, any amendments
    which may arise from the partnership process and the results of studies
    and reports (such as the econometric modelling work, mentioned at point
    4.5) which are still outstanding.

7.   Comments of the Director of Corporate Governance

7.1 S.2 Local Government Act 2000 confers powers on the Council to
    promote the economic and social well-being of its area.

7.2 The programme sets out the Council‟s future proposals aimed at
    improving the economic performance of the city. This will, in turn, form
    part of a submission by the Regional Development Agencies to the
    Comprehensive Spending Review. The Council‟s leading role in this is
    to be encouraged as supporting our Vision‟s aim of building strong
    sustainable partnerships.

8.   Comments of the Chief Financial Officer (Section 151 Officer)

8.1 As the report indicates, the City Region Development programme will
    feed into the Government‟s Comprehensive Spending review scheduled
    for 2007, and as such is a document of key strategic importance for the
    sub-region. In covering the concept of the Global gateway and the
    crucial importance of improving connectivity / transport links to (and
    within) the sub-region, the vital role of the City as an economic driver,
    and the need to raise entrepreneurship, innovation, employment and
    residential quality in the City Region, the Programme appears to
    effectively draw together the key themes which underpin the drive of the
    City Council and its partners to develop Hull and its environs in both the
    national and international context.

9.   Comments of the Chief Human Resource Officer

9.1 The Chief Human Resource officer has no comment.


10. Comments of the Portfolio Holder for the Economy

10.1 The portfolio holder recognises the work done to date to provide a policy
     framework consistent with various centrally and regionally driven
     strategies. The portfolio holder also notes the work required to achieve



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     congruency with the numerous other pending reports as outlined in note
     three of “notes and health warnings” which accompanies this report.

10.2 The rational of playing to the regions economic geography is common
     sense and undisputable. The specifics of how that is to be effectively
     packaged and delivered forward to the social and economic well being of
     the regions population remains an issue for resolution and work. But it
     provides an opportunity to be grasped.

10.3 This document provides a broad framework for the council and various
     partners e.g. ERYC and other bodies which need to work together to
     drive forward a sub-regional focussed renewal programme. It highlights
     and draws reference to some fairly self evident needs and priorities with
     regards to basic infrastructures such as roads, rail. The thinking also
     begins work to be built upon to identify key commercial clusters which
     may form the basis going forward of competitive advantage for the region
     and provide a rationale for companies and investors to locate in the
     region.

10.4 The policy holder notes that in a world where transport costs converge to
     zero the fundamental economics of commerce is to drive towards greater
     consolidation and against this backdrop this work as alluded to above
     needs to progress at a pace and an effective delivery strategy needs to
     be decided upon and actioned. One which will require strong civic
     leadership.

11. Comments of Overview and Scrutiny

11.1 The Housing, Neighbourhood Renewal and Urban Regeneration
     Overview and Scrutiny Commission considered the report at its meeting
     held on 27 June 2006. The Commission found that the Council‟s
     Partnership Toolkit had not, as yet, been used during the development of
     the City Regional and Development Plan and due to the extent of
     partnership working which would be involved, the Commission
     recommends that the Toolkit should be used. The Commission also
     agreed that it should receive the action plan when available and that due
     to the strategic nature of the report, able to determine the impact of the
     CRDP on Hull‟s local communities.

12. Conclusions

12.1 It is essential that the City Council plays a leading role in the preparation
     of the Hull and Humber Ports City Region Development Programme. In
     doing so the Council is exercising its well-being responsibilities, showing
     leadership at a variety of governance levels and enhancing the role of
     the City of Hull as the major economic driver at the heart of a competitive
     City Region.




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13. Recommendations

13.1   That Members approve the Hull and Humber Ports City Region
       Development Programme in principle in its current draft form.

13.2 That Members welcome the contribution this initiative will make to
     enhance the economic performance and the reputation of the City of
     Hull.
     .
13.3 That the Head of Development and Renewal Services in consultation
     with the Portfolio Holder for Economy be authorised to agree the
     programme in detail.

Officer Interests: none
Contact Officer: Mark Jones, Head of Development and Renewal Services
Telephone No: - 2162

Background Documents:
Attached: Hull and Humber Ports “Summary” City Region Development
Programme (as at 21 June 2006)




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