Materials Engineering MEng

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					                            LOUGHBOROUGH UNIVERSITY

                                Programme Specification

                              Materials Engineering - MEng


Please note: This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of
the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be
expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning
opportunities that are provided. More detailed information on the learning outcomes,
content and teaching, learning and assessment methods of each module can be
found in Module Specifications and other programme documentation and online at
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/
The accuracy of the information in this document is reviewed by the University and
may be checked by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education.

Awarding body/institution;             Loughborough University

Teaching institution (if different);   As above

Details of accreditation by a          Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining
professional/statutory body;

Name of the final award;               M.Eng. (Hons) or M.Eng. (Hons), DIS

Programme title;                       Materials Engineering

UCAS code;                             J502, J503

Date at which the programme            May 2002
specification was written or           Latest revision September 2010
revised.

1. Aims of the programme:

To provide a fully accredited honours degree programme in the field of materials
engineering which satisfies the needs of industry for graduates of outstanding ability
who have a very strong academic background with especially outstanding business
and interactive skills. Greater in-depth knowledge of materials engineering will be
included compared with the BEng counterpart programme and we aim to graduate
high calibre materials engineers equipped with skills required to play a leading,
technical role at an executive level.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal
reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

QAA Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/academicinfrastructure/FHEQ/default.asp
QAA Benchmark Statements for Materials
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/academicinfrastructure/benchmark/honours/materials.asp
Institute of Materials Guidelines for Accreditation
http://www.iom3.org/content/accredited-courses


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Loughborough University, Learning and Teaching Strategy
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/admin/ar/policy/learning_and_teaching/
Annual and periodic Programme Reviews from related programmes
External Examiners’ reports and discussion by the departmental external advisory
board

3. Intended Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding:

On successful completion of the programmes, graduates should be able to
demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

   Relevant mathematical methods and principles of materials science as applied to
    materials engineering;
   A number of specialist materials topics connected with metals, ceramics,
    polymers, and composites;
   The role of information technology and library resources in providing support for
    materials engineers;
   Engineering principles relevant to materials selection;
   The materials and engineering aspects of design;
   The professional and engineering responsibilities of materials engineers;
   A systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current
    problems and/or new insights, much of which is at the forefront of materials
    engineering practice.

Teaching Learning and Assessment Strategies to Enable the Above Outcomes
to be Achieved and Demonstrated

Acquisition of the above knowledge and understanding is through a combination of
lectures, tutorials, seminars, co-operative projects with industry, internal group and
individual projects, practical laboratory work, industrial training coursework
assignments, and industrial visits.

Assessment is through a combination of written examinations and continuously
assessed coursework. Coursework assessment includes the evaluation of laboratory
reports, technical reports, project reports, design project reports, problem solving
exercises, computer-assisted assessment, oral presentations, poster presentations,
and viva-voce examinations.

Key transferable skills are taught in Part A and students abilities are tested through a
group projects in Parts B and D and an individual year project in Part C.
Assessments include written reports, presentations, poster presentations and viva
voce.

In-depth understanding of materials engineering principles and material
characterisation stems from Part D modules which include a Group Design Project,
Materials Modelling, Industrial Case Studies, Microscopy and a variety of Language
and Management studies options.


Skills and Attributes

a. Subject specific: intellectual/cognitive


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On successful completion of this programme student should be able to:

   Select and identify an appropriate material and manufacturing route for the
    design of a component;
   Utilise materials engineering principles to develop new materials/processing
    routes for improved performance of engineering systems;
   Solve materials engineering problems, and, where appropriate, propose new
    hypotheses;
   Select and apply appropriate IT tools to a variety of materials problems;
   Select materials from an environmentally appreciative viewpoint;
   Analyse materials aspects of components;
   Interpret numerical data and apply sophisticated mathematical methods to the
    analysis of materials engineering problems.

Teaching Learning and Assessment Strategies to Enable the Above Outcomes
to be Achieved and Demonstrated

Acquisition of the above skills is through a combination of lectures, tutorials,
seminars, co-operative projects with industry, internal group and individual projects,
practical laboratory work, industrial training coursework assignments, and industrial
visits.

Assessment is through a combination of written examinations and continuously
assessed coursework. Coursework includes the evaluation of laboratory reports,
technical reports, project reports, design project reports, problem solving exercises,
computer-assisted assessment, oral presentations, poster presentations, and viva-
voce examinations.

The programme requires the students to be able to select and identify suitable
materials and manufacturing routes for selected components taught in Part B and
further assessed in both the individual project (Part C) and in the Group Project (Part
B&D). Design and Project Management are used for materials selection, CAD and
Mat lab. IT tools are used ubiquitously. Selection of materials with an
environmental appreciation is taught in Sustainability, Recycling and Environmental
Issues in Part C. Mathematics skills will be developed throughout the course.

In-depth skills and enhanced cognitive skills will be developed through the extra
demands of the individual Masters Project and the Masters Group Design Project. In
these modules new hypotheses, in addition to simple interpretation of data, will be
expected outcomes.

b. Subject Specific: Practical Skills

On successful completion of the programmes, students should be able to:

   Use, and have a comprehensive understanding of, appropriate mechanical
    testing, corrosion testing, optical and electron metallographic, and chemical
    analysis methods for the study of materials;
   Manipulate systems for the processing of polymers, ceramics and metals;
   Use appropriate computer software for design and modelling exercises;
   Evaluate and present practical data in a format that shows originality in the
    application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how



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    established techniques are used to create and interpret materials engineering
    knowledge;
   Explain experimental results in terms of theoretical mechanisms and concepts;
   Compile clear and well-structured technical reports;
   Acquire and use sources of information appropriately;
   Demonstrate project management skills.


Teaching Learning and Assessment Strategies to Enable the Above Outcomes
to be Achieved and Demonstrated

Acquisition of the above skills is through a combination of lectures, tutorials,
seminars, co-operative projects with industry, internal group and individual projects,
practical laboratory work, industrial training coursework assignments, and industrial
visits.

Assessment is through a combination of written examinations and continuously
assessed coursework. Coursework includes laboratory reports, technical reports,
project reports, design project reports, problem solving exercises, computer-assisted
assessment, oral presentations, poster presentations, and viva-voce examinations.

These skills are developed in Experimentation, Part A; with modules covering
Materials Characterisation and Mechanics, and Processing and Structure of Metals,
Polymers and Ceramics, Part B; culminating in the individual Masters Project.
Explanation of practical results in terms of theoretical concepts and mechanisms is
taught in the Materials Characterisation and Mechanics in Part B, and in the
individual Masters Project in Part C.

In-depth aspects of materials engineering practical skills will be included in the wider
range of experimental modules taught in this programme compared to the BEng
programme. These include the Group Design Project Part D, Project Management
and Microscopy.


c. Key Transferable Skills

On successful completion of the programmes, students should be able to:

   Organise and manage time and resources effectively;
   Apply constructive, creative, and structured approaches to complex problem
    solving;
   Exercise the independent learning ability required for continuing professional
    development;
   Make decisions in complex and unpredictable situations;
   Work effectively, both as part of a team and/or independently;
   Organise and manage time and resources effectively; for short-term and longer-
    term commitments;
   Possess skills needed to communicate effectively through written, graphical,
    inter-personal, and presentation media;
   Demonstrate a high level of numeracy; appropriate to the cognitive skills
    required;
   Compile clear and well-structured technical reports;
   Acquire and use sources of information appropriately;
   Demonstrate project management skills;


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   To plan, monitor and record personal, educational and career development
    issues using the fast track route towards chartered status.


Teaching Learning and Assessment Strategies to Enable the Above Outcomes
to be Achieved and Demonstrated

Acquisition of the above skills is through a combination of lectures, tutorials,
seminars, co-operative projects with industry, internal group and individual projects,
practical laboratory work, industrial training coursework assignments, and industrial
visits.

Assessment is through a combination of written examinations and continuously
assessed coursework. Coursework includes laboratory reports, technical reports,
project reports, design project reports, problem solving exercises, computer-assisted
assessment, oral presentations, poster presentations, and viva-voce examinations.

Team work is taught and learning strategies, which encourage team work, are
introduced in Part A modules. Group projects are carried out in Part B and D and
independent work is also supported in the Individual Masters Project in Part C. Part
A modules provide skills to assist communication in presentational and written forms.
The required numeracy is provided by the modules taught by the Mathematics
Department with help from the Mathematics Learning Support Centre.

In-depth treatment key/transferable skills appropriate to MEng level programmes will
be found in the management topics Teamwork and Leadership, and Project
Management. Modules enhance the team building and project administration skill
that provide successful project outcomes to problem solving exercises. Exceptional
communication skills will be encouraged through the Materials Modelling module and
project work.


4. Programme structures and requirements, levels, modules, credits and
awards:

The MEng (Hons) programme in Materials Engineering is offered as a full-time four-
year programme or a five-year sandwich programme if taken with the optional year of
industrial training usually in year 3 between Parts B and C. The sandwich degree
offers the additional award of Diploma of Industrial Studies (DIS). Students study
modules with a combined weight of 120 credits in each part (academic year) of the
programme. There are options in Part C and D to enable students to follow specific
interests. Each part is taught in two 15-week semesters; weeks 13-15 are spent on
project work in Semester 1 and assessment by examination in Semester 2.

Details of module specifications can be found at:
http://cisbravo.lboro.ac.uk/epublic/wp5016.main?dept=MP&dept2=MP
Modules are listed under the Department primarily responsible for them, e.g. MP, =
Department of Materials, MC = Mechanical Engineering, BS = Business School.

Full details can be found in the Programme Regulations at the following :

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/admin/ar/lps/progreg/year/1011/index.htm




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5. Criteria for admission to the programme:

The URL describing these criteria is found at
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/prospectus/ug/courses/dept/mp/me/index.htm


6. Information about assessment regulations:

The method of assessment for each module is described within the relevant module
specification.

Examinations are held in each subject for which an examination is required in the
assessment period at the end of the semester in which it is taught. This is January
for Semester 1 (Part C and D only) and May/June for Semester 2. At the end of each
year the results from examinations and coursework assessment are combined, as
detailed in each module specification. The results for each module are compiled and
considered by an examination board, which awards credit for each satisfactorily
completed module (≥40%). Students who achieve sufficient credit to meet the
assessment requirements of their programme regulations are allowed to proceed to
the next year of their programme.

Assessment criteria
120 credits out of the maximum possible of 120 are needed for progression in each
year. Readers are directed to the programme regulations for fuller details of this and
the criteria for award of the M.Eng degree.

Re-assessment criteria
Candidates not meeting the criteria for progression have the right to be re-assessed
on one further occasion and, for Parts A,B and C, this re-assessment may take place
in the University’s Special Assessment Period in early September. Re-assessment in
the Special Assessment Period is not allowed for final year candidates or if students
have not achieved 60 credits. Re-assessment is also possible in the next academic
year, but only by allowing the student to repeat the year of study, according to the
regulations of the failed modules.

M.Eng programme transfers
Students may transfer from the B.Eng to the M.Eng programme at the end of Part A if
they have gained a maximum of 120 credits. Transfers are possible at the end of
Part B if students have satisfied the Part A requirement and gained at least 40 credits
at >40%; 40 credits at >50% and 40 credits at >60% in Part B modules.

Final Degree
The final degree mark is made up of 20% of the Part B mark, 40% of the Part C
mark, and 40% of the Part D mark.



7.     What Makes the Programme Distinctive:

The programme particularly encourages teamwork and practical skills, about one
third of the programme is laboratory/project studio-based learning. Hands-on
experience using a range of laboratory equipment, as well as small group
demonstration of specialised equipment is an integral part of the programme.


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The Loughborough Materials Characterisation Centres is housed within the Materials
Department and contains state-of-the-art equipment worth approximately £10m,
much of which has been purchased recently, including FIB (Focused Ion Beam) and
FEGSEM (Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscope). The research of
academic staff feeds into teaching on this programme both through case studies in
taught modules and individual and group project work.

Industrial relevance/involvement is a distinctive aspect of the programme. Industrial
visits are arranged when possible, in recent years students have visited Corus,
Ratcliffe Power Station and Taylor’s Bell Foundry. Industrial relevance is also central
to Part D Industrial Case Studies, in which tutorials are given by speakers from
various industrial backgrounds looking at real-life materials issues.

The (optional) Diploma of Industrial Studies placement year following Part B provides
valuable industrial experience which encourages the development of core skills and
puts taught material into practice. Recent placements have included Perkins
Engines, Cytec Engineered Materials, and Corus; a number of students undertake a
final year project based on/sponsored by their DIS placement company. All other
students are strongly encouraged to undertake shorter vacation jobs in relevant
industrial settings.

Group work is an important feature of the programme. In particular, the Part D
Masters Design Project has involved a group project associated with UK power
generation companies considering the design and use of materials in advanced
applications.

The programme also includes broadening options from other departments such as
Languages, Maths and Business modules, to widen the student experience in areas
appropriate to the degree.

The programme is fully accredited for 5 years from May 2010 by the Institute of
Materials, Minerals and Mining.


8. Particular support for learning:

Refer to the generic information on learning support which can be found at:
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/admin/ar/templateshop/notes/lps/index.htm


9. Methods for evaluating and improving the quality and standards of learning:

Refer to the generic information which can be found at:
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/admin/ar/templateshop/notes/lps/index.htm




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