Levi Heath

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					              e.           allied families

                            1. swinson
           Family of Prudence Swinson, wife of Levi Heath (see Chapter B)


                         I. RICHARD SWINSON I
Our earliest proven Swinson ancestor is Richard Swinson, b abt 1650, probably in
England. He married Elizabeth //, and died between 24 April and 17 June 1716 in
Chowan Precinct, Albemarle County, North Carolina.

The first record of Richard in America is a Virginia headright deed dated 1675:

Col. Robt. Abrahall, 1200acs., Gloster County, NE side of Mattapony Riv., 20 Oct. 1675,
p. 585. Beg. at Mr. Holland's; along Mr. Sandford's, &c. Granted to Wm. Lewis 25 May
1654; assigned to Jonath. Parson, & by him lapsed for want of seating; & now granted by
order, &c. Trans. Of 24 person: Marg. Williams, Arther Parker, Abra. Karr, Jno
Symonds, Sarah Hawman, Rich. Swinson, Patrick Cossell, Samll. Cellinger, Wm. Bray,
Der Johnson, Robt. Lee, Edw. Gogson, Wm. Boulton (Boalton), Fra. Wood, Fra. Lacy,
Eliz. Westbrook, Eliz. Hooke, Rosamond Pruett, Ra. Harding, Wm. Smith, Wm. Brand,
Martin Norris, Thp Wheeler, Sa. Johnson.

(Cavaliers and Pioneers, Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants, Vol. II: 1666-
1695, Patent Book 6, p. 169, Nell Marion Nugent, Virginia State Library, Richmond,
1977)

Richard appears inexplicably on a second headright, involving many of the same people,
in the same general area in 1678:

Col. Robert Abrahall, 1000 acs., New Kent Co., NE side of Mattapony Riv. 26 Sept.
1678, p. 654. Behind land of Maj. Wm. Taylor & Mr. Edwd. Diggs. Granted to Thom.
Peck 8 June 1658 deserted & now granted by order, &c. Trans. of 20 pers: Fra. Wood,
Fra. Lacy, Eliz. Westbrooke, Eliz. Hooke, Rosamond Brett, Rachall Hardine, Wm. Smith,
Wm. Brand, Martin Morris, Thos. Wheeler, Margtt. Wms. (Williams), Arth. Parker, Ara.
Carr, Jno. Simonds, Sarah ?, Rich. Swinson, Pat. Cassell, Samll. Sallenger, Wm. Bray.

(Cavaliers and Pioneers, Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants, Vol II: 1666-
1695, p. 188 Nell Marion Nugent, Virginia State Library, Richmond, 1977)




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It is speculated that Col. Abrahall was claiming these people twice, a common (and
fraudulent) practice in the early days of the colony to amass acreage.

Richard Swinson is listed on the Quitrent Rolls of 1704 for King and Queen County,
Virginia; although the number of acres is not stated it appears that he remained in the
same general area of the land grated to Abrahall.

Sometime between 1704 and 1711, Richard moved to the south shore of Albemarle
Sound, Chowan Precinct, North Carolina. He purchased land there in 1712 (Chowan
County Deed Book W #1, p. 38) He is also listed as a resident of Perquimans Precinct,
north of Chowan across the Sound:

Isaac Wilson of Perquimons Pct. and Ann his wife to Richard Swinson, of ye said
Pct. Aforesaid, planter 31 July 1712 20L (pounds) current money of this province 500
acres more or less, ye Plantation in ye Fork of Kindrick Creek commonly called Hawkins
Neck on ye south shore in the precinct of Chowan all Houses, Barns, Stables, Orchards,
Gardens, etc. Wit: John Norkom (X) his mark, Richard Leary, Edward Moseley
Registered         (Not given).

Chris Swinson adds the following explanatory information: “When inspecting this deed
one must be cognizant of the surrounding historical events. Documented court
proceedings in Colonial Records of North Carolina and history texts show that on the
morning of September 22, 1711, the Catechna Creek Tuscarora Indians attacked the town
of New Bern, massacring settlers and burning everything that stood, beginning The
Tuscarora Indian War. (See Tuscarora Indian War~1711-1713 for more information)
To raise provisions for the war, the government of North Carolina imposed a levy of corn
on every tithable citizen in the colony, in 1712. Tallies of bushels provided by the
colonists survive as "corn lists", many of which are undated. Though hard to read, it
appears Richd Swinson's tithe is recorded on such a list. The levy was one bushel per
head and Richard provided three bushels; one each for himself and his wife. One must
wonder who the third person in the household was. The document reviewed was an
original record book that had been scanned into a computer. Portions of it are badly faded
and difficult to decipher. However, the top of the title page is clearly legible and reads as
follows:

             "An Accompt of what Corne has Been recd of the Levy of one Bushel per
head on the Tythables of the Government and how dispos'd of..." (undated)

       Divided into two columns, the top left column of the title page prominently states:
"Chowan Pret." Three-quarters down right hand column one can recognize an entry for
"...Worly's List". As the page begins to fade, three entries down, one can make out a
name that appears to read "Richd Swinson -3". Interestingly enough, and individual who
will be seen later in this narrative, one "Wm. Ffryly - 2" is listed immediately above.
       The Indians had swept through the Carolinas, from New Bern to Bath Town and
farther north, on that September morning. Bath Town was attacked and many valuable
buildings and documents were destroyed. The house of Jno Lillington, surveyor, was one


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of the houses burned, and many completed surveys were lost. Evidence of this is found in
the Journal of the Governor's Council.

      The Journal of the Governor's Council of 11 August 1714, states the following:

       " Upon petition of Mr. Jno Lillington that about four years since by virtue of a
commission from Edwd Moseley Esqr the Surveyor Genll he made diverse surveys in ye
County of Bath but had not made returns thereof into ye Sectys Office by reason he
intended to make returne of those with some others at ye next Octor Genll Court, and it
happening afterwards that ye Indyans burnt his house where his papers were by which he
is incapable of returning those surveys therefore prays that he may have leave to resurvey
and returne those surveys he had then made &c and ye matter being duly considered by
the Board.
       "It is hereby ordered that ye said John Lillington have power and authority to
resurvey such lands as he has already surveyed & make returns of ye same to ye Sectys
Office and that he be then empowered to demand & receive his usuall ffees for ye same."
(Colonial Records,Vol. II, p. 141)
       The Indians drove the settlers of the south shore of Albemarle Sound before them,
fleeing for their lives north to outrun the onslaught. As we shall see in the records,
Richard Swinson and his family were among those who fled the indian attacks,
explaining his presence in "Porquimans" Precinct at that time. Judge Moore includes
excerpts from Colonial Records, Vol. II. They are included here to illustrate indian
activity as a reality of everyday life as late as 1713 on the south shore of Albemarle,
making it unsafe to return.
        On 10 March 1715, Richard Swinson filed a petition at a Council meeting held at
the home of Richard Sanderson at Little Creek, providing clear evidence that he owned
his 500 acre plantation on the south shore of Albemarle Sound before the 1712 date on
the deed from Isaac Wilson above. In fact, Richard was on his property before September
1711, when the Indian attacks sent him fleeing north.”
             (http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/w/i/Chris-Swinson/GENE25-0001.html)

" Att a councill holden at ye house Capt. Richard Sanderson at Little River on Thursday
the 10th day of Mar 1715.

Present the honorable Charles Eden Esqr Govr Capt Genll and Admll. The Honble Thos
Pollock, Nath Chovin, Chr Gale, FFra Ffoster, T Knight Esqrs Ids proptrs Dupetys.

"Upon petition of Richard Swinson setting forth that one Robert Ffendall being lawfully
seized and possessed of a certain parcell of land in ye forks of Kendricks Creek by entry
and survey sold ye same to one Wm Browne who Impowered one Isaac Wilson to
dispose of ye same of whos he ye said Swinson bought the same for a valluable
consideration of Eighteen pounds Six shillings as he can make appeare by rects for ye
same undr ye hand of the said Wilson But so it was that ye platt of the afsd land being in
ye keeping & custody of Jno Lillington was burnt at Pamplicough (Bath) in ye massacre
1711 since which one Wm Ffryly intending ye utter ruin of ye said Petitioner (who hath
already lost most of his stock corne and moveable by incursions of ye Enemy Indyans)
hath entered and surveyed the same land and gives out that ye right of ye afsd land is in


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him and that he will take out pattont for ye same in his owne name and further sitting
forth that his great poverty and age render him incapable of subsisting if he should lose
his land. Such sinister practices of ye said Ffryly humbly prays that ye survey of ye said
Ffryly may be set aside Seeing it is of latter date then the said survey lost in the ye
massacre and that he may have the liberty of surveying and pattenting the same, and the
said Ffryly appearing and ye matter being debated on both side and duly considered of by
this Board.

       "It is ordered that ye afsd survey of Ffryly be sett aside and that ye Surveyr Genll
doe returne ye same in ye said Swinson name. (Colonial Records, Vol. II, p. 171)

Before going to Court in March of 1715, it appears Richard had made provisions in the
event of his failure to retain his 500-acre tract, because he obtained a grant for an
additional 230 acres at the head of Kendricks Creek from the Lord Proprietors on 19
January 1715. This transaction is recorded in Province of NC 1663-1729 Abstracts of
Land Patents, by Mary M. Hoffman, Patent Book Eight.

"Richard Swainson 19 January 1715/16 230 acres in Chowan precinct, joining
the head of Kindricks creek, the main desert, and the dismall Witnesses: Charles
Eden, Nath. Chevin, T. Knight, C. Gale, Fra Foster." (Land Grant Office Book 8, p. 90)

Also, on an unidentified date, Richard Swinson was granted 640 acres, same reference as
above, as follows:

"Richard Swinson 640 acre in Chowan precinct, joining ye head of Kindrick's Creek, ye
mouth and meanderings of Hawkins Branch, the sd. Swinson, and ye Crooks and turnings
of ye main desart Witnesses: Cha. Eden, Nath. Chevin, T. Knight, C. Gale,
Fra. Foster."

Richard Swinson’s Will is recorded as follows:

NORTH CAROLINA
In the Name of God, Amen. This twenty-fourth day of April One Thousand Seven
Hundred and sixteen years. I Richard Swinson of the south shoor of Chowan and County
of Abelmarle being aged and sick and weak in body but of sound mind and perfect
memory (thanks be to God) Do make and ordain this my Last Will and Testament hereby
revoking and making null and void all former wills by me made either by word or writing
and this only to be taken for my last will and no other in the manner and form as after
follows (viz)

Impris I give and bequeath my soull into the hands of Almighty God who gave it to me
hoping full and free pardon of all my sins throu the merits of Jesus Christ my ever
blessed Redeemer and my body to the earth to be Interred according to the descretion of
my Exert. Hereafter mentioned and as for my Temporal estate which it hath pleased God
in his mercy to bestow upon me,
I give and bequeath as followeth



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Item. I give and bequeath unto my son Richard Swinson the plantation I now live on
(after the death of my dear and loving wife) with all houses and appurtonances thereunto
belonging or roputed deemed taken and known to portain and belong to the said
plantation to him the said Richard and to his heirs forever.

Item. I give and bequeath unto Richard Kanaday my son in law that plantation whereon
he now lives containing One hundred acres more or less and bounding upon the pocoson
to the little bridges to him the said Richard and to his heirs forever.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my son John Swinson Two hundred acres of land lying up
the Creek and binding on the land given to Richard Kanaday going quott across the Neck
with all its appurtenances to the said John and to his heirs and assigns forever.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my son Richard my gun and one chestnut colored mare
with her increase as also a cow called Buck and her increase and further it is my will that
Richard dwell on the Manner plantation with his mother and to be aiding and assisting
her for her future living after my decease.

It. I give unto my son John an heifer called Good Luck and her increase to him and his
heirs and assigns forever.

It. I give and bequeath all the rest and remainder of my estate both real and personall unto
my dear and loving wife for her future support and mentinance during all the days of her
naturall life and after her death to be equally divided among all my children each having
an equall share.

Item..I give and bequeath unto my oldest son William One Hundred and Fifty acres of
land lying up the Creek and bounding upon the land given to my son John to him and his
heirs (with this proviso only and no otherwayes) that is to say that he my said son
William shall come and dwell upon the land with his wife as a good Christian ought to
doe but and if my son William shall bring any other evil person or the person or body of
one Ann Green or any of her relatives by blood then the said land to be at the full
disposal of his Mother my dear and loving wife to be given by her to any of my children.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my two sons Richard and John to each of them one ewe
with the increase.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my son William one ewe lamb in full of all my estate both
real and moveable and no more to be given unto him after the decease of his mother.

Item. My will and desire is that none of my sons nor my son in law if they have a mind
not to live in the Neck that they soll their land to no stranger but that it either desond to
their heirs or be sold to one of their brothers or their heirs and I hereby constitute my dear
and loving wife Elizabeth Swinson and with her Richard Kanaday my son in law to be
Exet and Exectx of this my last will and testament. In witness wherof I have hereunto sett
my hand and seall the day and year first above written.



                                                                                           40
                     Signum
                     Richard ~E~ Swinson (Wax Seal)

Signed Sealed and Published and declared by Richard Swinson to be his last will and
testament before and in the presence of

                                          Mary Swinson
                                          Gi Halliday

Children of Richard Swinson and Elizabeth // were:
1. William Swinson, b abt 1677 in Virginia, d Tyrell County, North Carolina, m Mary //
   a. Sadie Elizabeth Swinson, m 1st // Williams, 2nd Samuel Durrance, 3rd // Harrison
2. John Swinson (see below)
3. Katharine Swinson, b in Virginia, m Richard Kanady
   a. John Kanady
   b. Kezia Kanady
4. Richard Swinson, Jr.


                              II. JOHN SWINSON
John Swinson was b abt 1679 in Virginia, m Elsie //. He was a bricklayer by profession.
John is attested in the records as follows:

1716 - Jno. Swinson witnessed deed of Bath Town Commissioner to Thomas Roper,
bricklayer, of Bath County on 6 Oct 1716. (Beaufort Deed Book 1, p. 192) He witnessed
deed of Commissioners to Rhoda Marsh on the same day. (Beaufort Deed Book 1, p.
194)

1719 - John is identified in a deed executed by his older brother William on 20 July 1719.
William sold his brother, Richard, 60 acres for £20. John is listed as an adjoining
property owner.

1720 - John Swinson of Chowan appears on 1720 Perquimans County Tax List, owning
250 acres. (NC Archives, Colonial Court Records, Taxes and Accounts, 1679-1754, CCR
190, Tax Lists, Perquimans County, 1702-1754)

1722 - John Swinson witnessed a deed from John Edwards to Captain John Powell on 30
October 1722. (Chowan Deed Book C, Vol. 1, p. 309)

1727 - John Swinson, bricklayer, sold the 200 acre tract he inherited in his father's Will to
James Brown for £15 on 28 November 1727. (Chowan Deed Book C., Vol. 1, p. 310)

1735 - John Swinson and his brother William are among persons appointed by Tyrrell



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County Court to help lay off road. (Tyrrell County Court Minutes, September 1735
Session).

1739 - John Swinson on Tyrrell County Grand Jury (Tyrrell County Court Minutes,
September 1739 Session)

1740 - John Swinson and his brother Richard are among persons appointed by Tyrrell
Court to help lay off Road. (Tyrrell County Court Minutes, March 1739/40)

1743 - John Swinson, bricklayer, sold 134 acres on Kendricks Creek to Richard Draper
for £100on 2 March 1743. (Tyrrell County Deed Book 1, p. 225)

1744 - John Swinson, bricklayer, purchased 300 acres for £35 on the west side of
Tranters Creek from Benjamin Saunders and Elizabeth Sanders on 27 October 1744.
(Tyrrell County Deed Book 1, p. 295)

1751 - Moses Dean, Jon Swinson, Sr., and Samll Durance are identified as chain carriers
for the survey of John Swinson, Jr.'s 569 acre grant -- " Dp Sur Plat reads "Survey'd for
John Swinson, Jr." The land was recorded as "in the disputed bounds of Tyrrell and
Beaufort counties." ( The Granville District of NC, 1748-1763, Abstracts of Land Grants,
Vol. II, by Margaret M. Hoffman, Abstract #2430)

1755 - A Beaufort County Tax List in the State Archives shows: John Swinson...John
Swinson Jun.

1756 - John Swinson served on the Grand Jury on 2 June 1756 at Bath Town according to
Beaufort County Court Minutes.

1757 - Jno Swinson is described in the March 1757 Beaufort Court Minutes (State
Archives) as a delinquent taxpayer. Also, Joseph Turton filed a petition against Jno.
Swinson at the same session. Case was continued with the notation "not to be found."

1757 - Beaufort Court Minutes for the June 1757 session state that the case against John
Swinson was continued with notation that says debt and cost paid to Thomas Williams,
the late deputy sheriff.

1761 - John Swinson was issued a warrant on 9 January 1761 for 700 acres "in the
disputed bounds of Tyrrell and Pitt counties." The grant, which was issued 20 June 1761,
was for 689 acres. (Land Grant Book 12, p. 93, Tyrrel County Deed Book 4, p. 329)

"John Swinson, 20 June 1761, 689 acres in the disputed bounds of Tyrrell and Pitt
counties on Bare grass Swamp, joining the mouth of Calf Branch, pine log Branch,
Will Willis, the sd. swamp, and Joseph Gainer OR: /s/ John Swinson Wit: Fr. Ward,
Rachell Ward examined by Jona Bood and Wm. Matthews surveyed 30 Apr 1761 CC
[abbreviation for Chain Carriers]: John Swinson, Jr., Levi Swinson John Hardison
surveyor."



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(The Granville District of NC, 1748-1763, Abstracts of Land Grants, Vol. II, Margaret
M. Hoffman, Abstract #2435)
This land was east of Tranters Creek, south of Beargrass Swamp, north of Log Branch,
and west of Calf Branch, and joining Joseph Gaines' line. The land currently lies on both
sides of the Beaufort-Martin County.
1762 - John Swinson, Sr. conveyed to his son, "Osten" (Austin) Swinson..."for an(d) in
consideration of the love and good will which I have and do bair unto Osten Swinson...2
hundred akers of land in Pitt County on the east side of Tranters Creek". (Pitt County
Deed Book B, pg. 379) Witnesses to this deed were John Swinson, Junr and Elizabeth
"X" Carnell.

1762 - Pitt list of taxables includes John Swinson and Levi Swinson listed together (p.
19) and John Swinson listed on p. 23. (Journal of North Carolina Genealogy, pp. 2216-
2217)

1763 - Pitt list of taxables include John Swinson and Levi, listed together, and John
Swinson, Jr., who is listed seperately. (State Archives)

1764 - Pitt list of taxables include John Swinson and Levi, listed together, and John
Swinson, Jr., listed separately. (State Archives)

1764 - John Swinson conveys an unspecified acreage in Pitt County to Joseph Jolley on 8
August 1764. Witness Peter Jolley. (Deeds of Record of Pitt County, NC; Vol. I, Deed
Book C, p. 198)

1764 - John Swinson, John Swinson, Jr., and Levi Swinson witnessed deed of James
Howel to John Persey on 25 September 1764. (Pitt County Deed Book C, p. 173) Land
was 50 acres on west side of Tranters Creek first settled by Benjamin Sanders, deceased.

1774 - John Swinson, bricklayer, of Pitt County, and Elsie Swinson, his wife, sold 300
acres to John Holoday Hudson on 1 October 1774. (Pitt County Deed Book F, p. 48)

1775 - John Swinson of Duplin County sold 489 acres to Wm. Mizzell on 2 January
1775. (Beaufort County Deed Book 29, p. 124; also recorded in Martin County Deed
Book A, p. 96) This was the remainder of the land that John Swinson, Sr. received by
patent on 20 June 1761. The deed states the land joined Austin Swinson's line. The new
Martin County line passed through this property, which is why the deed was recorded in
both counties.

Children of John Swinson and Elsie // were:
1. John Swinson, Jr. (see below)
2. Levi Swinson
3. Austin Swinson




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                          III. JOHN SWINSON, JR.
John Swinson, Jr. was b. bef. 1730 in Tyrrell County, North Carolina, d. abt. 1800, New
Hanover County, North Carolina. He married 1st //, 2nd Susannah Parker.

1751 - John Swinson, Jr. applied for a 579-acre land grant on 19 October 1751. The
application was submitted to the agents of John Carteret, the Earl of Granville, who
owned the vacant land in that part of North Carolina. The land for John, Jr.'s grant was
surveyed on 5 Febuary 1751/2 with John Swinson, Sr. serving as one of the chain carriers
for the surveyor. Samuel Durrance, the first husband of Elizabeth Swinson, William
Swinson's daughter, was also a chain carrier. The grant was issued 21 January 1761.
(North Carolina Land Grant Book 12, p. 94). The warrant states the land was on "Pitch
hole branch on the west side of Tranters Creek." The surveyor's plat refers to it as "lying
in the disputed bounds of Tyrrell and Beaufort counties, beginning at a pine in John
Messer's line...." (The Granville District of NC, 1748-1763, Abstracts of Land Grants,
Vol. II, by Margaret M. Hoffman, Abstract #2430), describes the deed as follows:

JOHN SWINSON 21 January 1761 579 acres in ye Disputed bounds of Tyrrell
and Beaufort countys in the parish of St. Andrews, joining John Messon and the
pocoson OR:/s/ JOHN SWINSON, JR. examined by W Lucas and Jos Montfort
surveyed 5 February 1751/2 SCC: Moses Dean, Jon Swinson, Sr., Samll Durance
- Dp Sur Plat reads "Survey'd for John Swinson, Jr."
      (Tyrrell County Deed Book 4, Pg. 291; Tyrrell County Deed Book 12, Pg. 94;
Land Grant Office, Raleigh, NC)

1755 - Beaufort County Tax List in the State Archives shows John Swinson and John
Swinson Jun.

1762 - Pitt list of taxables includes John Swinson and Levi Swinson listed together (p.
19) and John Swinson listed on p. 23. (Journal of NC Genealogy, pp. 2216-2217)

1763 - Pitt list of taxables include John Swinson and Levi, listed together, and John
Swinson, Jr., listed separately. (State Archives)

1764 - Pitt list of taxables include John Swinson and Levi, listed together, and John
Swinson, Jr., listed separately. (State Archives)

1764 - John Swinson of Pitt County sold 200 acres to Joseph Jolley, Sr. on 28 August
1764. (Pitt County Deed Book C, p. 198)

1764 - John Swinson, John Swinson, Jr., and Levi Swinson witnessed deed of James
Howel to John Persey on 25 September 1764. (Pitt County Deed Book C, p. 173) Land
was 50 acres on west side of Tranters Creek first settled by Benjamin Sanders, deceased.

John Swinson, Jr. left Pitt/Martin County for Duplin County sometime between 25
September 1764 and 29 January 1770. This is when John Swinson of Duplin County sold


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350 acres west of Tranters Creek to Levi Swinson of Tyrrell County. (Pitt County Deed
Book D, p. 135) The land joined that of John Butler and was part of the land granted to
John Swinson, Jr. on 21 January 1761.

1772 - John Swinson and Charles Ward witnessed a deed in Duplin County of Richard
Miller to Borthick Gillespie on 16 January 1772. (Duplin County Deed Book 3, p. 286)
The land was south of Goshen Swamp and west of Northeast Cape Fear River, the first
area in which John Swinson was known to have lived after moving to Duplin.

1774 - John Swinson bought three axes, eight grubbing hoes, one bridle, one hatchet, and
one hat from the estate of John Matchet at a sale held on 13 August 1774 in Duplin
County. (Matchet Estate Papers, State Archives) The estate also paid Swinson £20 for
unspecified services. Matchet lived on the south side of Goshen Swamp, north of the
present town of Kenansville.

1775 - John Swinson of Duplin County sold 489 acres to Wm. Mizzell on 2 January
1775. (Beaufort County Deed Book 29, p. 124; also recorded in Martin County Deed
Book A, p. 96)

1782 - John Swinson sold two tracts of land in Duplin County to Elizabeth Foley. (Duplin
County Deed Book 7, p.366) The deed was not dated but it was ordered registered by the
July 1782 Court. It's not known how Swinson obtained the land. One tract consisted of
100 acres that had been granted to Benjamin Folsom on 13 October 1765. The other tract
consisted of 20 acres that Swinson said he purchased from Folsom and Folsom had
purchased from John Matchet, Sr. The land was located south of Goshen Swamp near
present day Pearsall Chapel.

1783 - John Swinson witnessed deed of Frederick Glisson to Jesse Brock on 6 December
1783. (Duplin County Deed Book 4A, p. 141) This deed was for land on the north side of
Goshen where John is believed to have moved after selling his land on the south side of
the swamp.

1785 - John Swinson is one of the inhabitants living along Goshen Swamp in Duplin
County who is ordered to help clear the Swamp for navigation. (Duplin County Court
Minutes, July 1785)

Navegation Project on Goshen Swamp Duplin Co. 1785
The committee reported to the April 1785 Court:
"From the great abundance of water in the said swamp-- there is a practicability of
making it navigable by clearing the main run during the dry season. The justices then
instructed the committee to search the run of Goshen, lay it off in districts and obtain
a list of inhabitants living near each district."

The committee reported to the July 1785 court that it had layed off the run of Goshen
Swamp into 17 small districts.
2ND DISTRICT - FROM TREE WITH 1 NOTCH UP TO TREE WITH 2 NOTCHES,
INCLUDING CHAMBERS FOARD shows Theophilus Swinson, Absalon Swinson &


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negro Jo., Richd Swinson and Auston Swinson.

8TH DISTRICT - UPPER END OF SAMPSON GRIMES SLEW TO HEARD OF
OUTLAWS SLEW shows John Swinson's Negro 'Bristo', and Jesse Swinson

1786 - State Census of Duplin County shows John Swinson living in the area of Capt.
Bowden's Company. Jesse Swinson, his nephew, lives nearby. Census returned April
1786.
       John Swinson
       1 male 21-60
       2 males under 21 or over 60
       1 female
       1 black 12-50

1787 - John Swinson sold Jesse Branch a tract of land he owned in Duplin County and
Jesse Branch sold John Swinson a tract of land he owned in New Hanover County for the
same price. In essense, they swapped land. (Duplin County Deed Book F, p. 117; New
Hanover County Deed Book H, p. 583) The Duplin land came into John's hands when he
married the Susannah parker, the widow of William Parker. The date of their marriage is
unknown, but is believed to have been around 1782 when John sold his land on the south
side of Goshen Swamp.

1793 - John Swinson of New Hanover County bought 100 acres of land from Jesse
Peacock on 27 May 1793. (New Hanover County Deed Book N, p. 396)

1795 - John Swinson sold the 100 acres of land in New Hanover that he purchased in
1793 from Jesse Peacock to John Maddock Matchet "for Matchet's lifetime and his eldest
son forever." Deed is dated 19 December 1795. (New Hanover Deed Book L1, p. 263)

1797 - John Swinson of New Hanover County sold 440 acres of land in Pitt County to
George Jenkins of Bertie County on 13 January 1797. (Pitt County Deed Book N, p. 518)
The land was on Meadow Branch Pocoson and formerly belonged to Levi Swinson.
Witnesses were Joseph Eakins and Wm. Jenkins. (This deed proves that the John
Swinson in New Hanover is the same John that lived earlier in what became Pitt County.
Although the acreage is different, this is the same tract that John Swinson sold to Levi
Swinson in 1770 as 350 acres.

1798 - New Hanover County Court Minutes for 21 September 1798 show that a deed
from John Swinson to Joseph Starr was ordered registered.

1800 - On 21 February 1800, John Swinson, Sr. gave his "beloved son" (son-in-law) John
Maddock Matchet a total of 400 acres of land in two tracts while reserving for himself
and his wife, Susannah, lifetime rights to the property. (New Hanover Deed Book M, p.
183)

Children of John Swinson and his unknown first wife were:



                                                                                      46
1. Theophilus Swinson (see below)
2. Ebenezer E. Swinson
   a. Richard Swinson
   b. Ann Swinson
3. Daughter Swinson, m John Maddock Matchet
4. Possibly Zebedee Swinson, Sr.


                      IV. THEOPHILUS SWINSON
Theophilus Swinson was b 14 August 1754 in Pitt County, North Carolina, d 18 February
1835 in Duplin County, North Carolina. He married 1st //, 2nd Elizabeth Thally, abt 26
November 1819 in Duplin County. His unknown first wife was the mother of our
ancestor Prudence.

Theophilus probably came to Duplin County with his father and brother Ebenezer abt
1770 from Tranter’s Creek, Pitt County. He and Ebenezer settled on Goshen Swamp in
1773. In that year, John Matchet conveyed 250 acres to Theophius on Goshen at the
mouth of Brice's Branch. (Book 5, pg. 266, Office of the Register of Deeds, Duplin
County). Later, He and Ebenezer moved to Maxwell's Creek and Carr Branch in southern
Duplin County. (Book DFTU, pg. 25; Book 7A, pg. 206; Book E, pg. 306; Book G, pg.
285; Book L, pg. 128; Book 3A, pg. 322; Office of the Register of Deeds, Duplin
County.)

The 1784-1786 State Census of North Carolina, Sampson-Duplin Counties, records
Theophilus Swinson in Gillespie's District, with 1 male over 16, 2 males under 16, and 3
white females (presumably wife and two daughters).

Duplin County Deed Book 1A, Pg. 136:
"THEOPHILUS (T) SWINSON to JOHN MATCHET, both of Duplin Co., 22 Mar 1785,
for 55 pds. current money 250 acres on the SS of Goshen Swamp, beg. at the mouth of
Briery Baranch marked trees M.B. & W.B., to a pine Anthony Miller's & George Miller's
corner, Joseph Wells' corner, the upper tract of land granted to Benjamin Fulsam 1767.
Wit: Chas. Ward, Anthy. Miller. Apr Ct. 1785."

Theophilus appears on the 1806 Tax List, Duplin County.
1806 Duplin County Census shows one male 16-25 and one male 45 and older, 2
females 26-44, one female over 45 and three slaves.

1810 Census, Duplin County, North Carolina
1 male 16-25, 1 male 26-44, 1 female 26-44, 1 female 45 and over, 3 slaves

1816 - Andrew Thally dies, leaving a widow, Elizabeth Thally. Theophilus Swinson is
administrator of the Will.




                                                                                      47
1819 - Raleigh Register of 26 Nov 1819 reports Theophilus Swinson married Mrs.
Andrew Thally in Duplin Co., NC.




                                               1810 Duplin County, North Carolina,
                                                         Census Images




1830 Duplin County, North Carolina, Census shows Theophilus Swinson with one
male 70-80. Next door to Theophilus is John Swinson, with 2 males under 10 and one
male 40-50, 3 females under 15 and one female 50-60. Alexander Heath and John Heath
are neighbors, they may be first cousins of Theophilus's son-in-law Levi Heath.

The Raleigh Register of 6 Jul 1827 reported:
"...on the 25th inst. in Duplin County, Mrs. Elizabeth (Swinson died) in the 75th year of
her age." (Death: 25 Jun 1827)

On 12 Sep 1833, Theophilus devised his Will. Twelve days later, he appeared before the
Duplin Court of Pleas and Quarters Sessions, Fall Term 1833. He applied for a pension
based on his Revolutionary War service. This was his second attempt to gain a pension,
his first being February 26 of the same year, when he was evidently denied. He declared
his age as "seventy nine years as of the 14th of August."

Theophilus served in the American Revolution enlisting in the Duplin Militia in either
January or February of 1776 and serving in the Moore's Creek campaign. In his pension
(Revolutionary War Pension# S9489) he states that he resided "in Duplin County on
Goshen" when called into service the first time, in the first of the year 1776 and that he
served a total of 4 times between 1776 and the fall of 1780, first, in a company of Duplin
militia under Capt. Charles Ward, and again, in the spring of 1776. He volunteered a third
time in the Duplin militia under Capt. Abram Maultby in the summer of 1777. His last
declared service was in the Duplin militia under the command of Capt. Charles Ward in
the fall of 1780. He names nine individuals who could testify to his service: Robert
Sloan, Osborne Carr, Alex'r Heath, James Dickson, Dempsey Taylor (his son-in-law),
Rev. Peter Carlton, John Linton, Esq. and Gibson Sloan, Esq. A statement from Jesse
Swinson, aged 74 years, appears also.


                                                                                        48
April 1835 - The Will of Theophilus Swinson filed for probate. John Swinson & William
Swinson (sons) are named executors.

IN THE NAME OF GOD, AMEN.
I, THEOPHILUS SWINSON, of the State of North Carolina and County of Duplin, being
in a State of mind perfectly sound and well disposing do this the 12th day of September
A.D. 1833 make and ordain this my last will and Testament in manner and form
following, viz:
First. I commend my Soul into the hands of Almighty God who gave it trusting in the
merits of the Savior for its redemption and my body I consign to the earth to be buried in
a decent and Christian-like manner at the discretion of my surviving friends and as to the
worldly goods with which it has pleased God to bless me I dispose of as follows:
It is my will and desire that all of my just debts and funeral expenses be paid out of the
sales of my perishable property.
1st. I give and bequeath to my son John Swinson my Negro man Lulcreek and my Negro
boy Tom to him and his heirs forever, also one bed and furniture which he has received.
2nd. I give and bequeath to my son Wm. Swinson my Negro man Jack to him and his
heirs forever, also one bed and furniture which he has received.
3rd. I give and bequeath to my grand daughter Patsey Eliza Swinson my Negro girl Lucy
to her and her heirs forever.
4th. I lend unto my beloved daughter Sarah Taylor and her husband Dempsey Taylor
during their lifetime my Negro girl Saritah and all of her future increase and after the
deaths of my daughter Sarah and her husband Dempsey Taylor I give and bequeath the
said Negro girl Saritah and all of her future increase to my three children, viz: John
Swinson, William Swinson and Prudence Heath, to them and their lie equally forever;
also, I give unto my daughter Sarah one bed and furniture which she has received to her
and her heirs forever.
5th. I lend unto my son John Swinson during his lifetime my Negro gorl Rose and all of
her future increase and after his death I give and bequeath her first living child to my
grand daughter Mary Eliza Swinson and I give and bequeath the said girl Rose and the
balance of her increase to my grand daughters Susan Jane and Margaret Ann Swinson to
them and their heirs forever to be equally divided.
6th. I give and bequeath to my daughter Prudence Heath one bed and furniture which she
has received and also the cattle that she has received and the money that I advanced for
the payment of the lands, all of which she has received.
It is my will that my Negro woman Betty be sold on a credit of six months and also all of
my other property not named in this will and that two hundred and fifty dollars of the
money arising from the sale of the said Negro woman and the other perishable property
be equally divided between my two grand children Theophilus Heath and Kitty Heath
and the balance of the money arising from the sale of my perishable property, etc., I wish
to be equally divided between my children John Swinson, Wm. Swinson, Sarah Taylor
and Prudence Heath to them and their heirs equally forever.
Lastly. I nominate and appoint my sons John and Wm. Swinson Executors to this my last
will and Testament declaring this to be my last will and testament and revoking all other
heretofore made by me. Signed, sealed, published and declared in presence of day and



                                                                                       49
date above written.
Theophilus (his mark) Swinson Seal\\
Wit: James Dickson Ozborn Carr
State of North Carolina, Duplin County, Court of Pleas and Quarters Sessions, April term
1835
The within, the last will and Testament of Theophilus Swinson, is proved in open Court
in due form of law by the oath of James Dickson, a subscribing witness thereto, and it is
ordered by the Court that the will be recorded.
Test: James Dickson, Clk.

Children:
1. Prudence Swinson (See Chapter B. Levi Heath)
2. John Swinson (m Charity Hollingsworth)
3. William Swinson
4. Sarah Swinson (m. Dempsey Taylor)




                               2. clark
   Family of Margaret Elizabeth Clark, wife of William Ellis Heath (see Chapter C)

I. WILLIAM CLARKE

Our earliest known Clark (Clarke) ancestor was William Clark, born 1553 in Stevenage,
Hertsfordshire, England. He is said to be the son of Sir Thomas Clarke. He married
Margaret Walker on 22 January 1570 in Foulmere. Children of William Clark and
Margaret Walker were:

1. John Clarke (see below)
2. Agnes Clarke
3. Susan Clarke
4. William Clarke
5. Katheryn Clarke
6. Thomas Clarke

II. JOHN CLARK

John Clark was born abt 1572 in Thriploe, Cambridgeshire, England. He married Sybil
Farrar in St. Mary Morton, Stepney Parish, London, England. Children of John and Sybil
Clark were:



                                                                                      50
1. Edward Clarke (see below)
2. William Clarke
3. Catherine Clarke
4. George Clarke

III. EDWARD CLARKE

Edward was born abt 1603 in England. He married Diana Hayward or Haywood. Their
children were:

1. Anne Clarke
2. Christopher Clarke
3. Nathaniel Clarke
4. Francis Clarke
5. Michael Clarke (see below)

IV. MICHAEL CLARKE

Michael Clarke was b abt 1620 in Poss, Hampshire, England. He died 5 October 1678 in
Christchurch, Barbados, British West Indies. He married Margaret //. His children were:

1. Francis Clark
2. Edward Clark
3. John Clark (see below)
4. Roger Clark
5. William Clark
6. Christopher Clark
7. Thomas Clark
8. Micajah Clark

V. JOHN CLARK

John was born abt 1660 in Isle of Wight County, Virginia, and died 27 July 1689 in
North Carolina. He married Mary Palin, daughter of John Palin and Sarah // . They were
the parents of:

1. John Clark (see below)

VI. JOHN CLARK

John Clark was b in 1689 and died in 1764. He was part of the Indian Trader community
that was centered at Occoneechee Neck (where the main East Coast Indian trail forded
the Roanoke River) during the early 1700s. He later became a land speculator with the
recently opened Indian territories along the frontier. In the early 1740s he received among
the first land grants in western Bladen County, North Carolina, which would shortly




                                                                                        51
become Anson County. By 1744 he had moved to the eastern side of the Pee Dee River
near Bear Island.

He and his second wife, Mary, settled in Bertie Precinct south of the Roanoke River in
what in now Edgecombe County, North Carolina. In 1754 he moved to a new land grant
along the Broad River, and after that, to Grindle Shoals on the Pacolet River near where it
meets the Broad. His son Allston settled on John's Broad River property. Other grants
from John to his sons include: Elijah, land along the Pee Dee River, the same to John Jr.
and Lewis; land near New Bern, North Carolina to William. When John died, Gibson
went to live with Elijah, who by then was in Wilkes County, Georgia.

It is believed that John married 1st Ann Alston, daughter of Col. John Alston and Mary
Clark. Col. Alston was born 5 December 1673 in Felmersham, Bedfordshire, England,
died 1758 in Bennett's Creek, (now Gates County), Pasquotank, North Carolina. In 1725
he was appointed revenue collector for the King and in 1746, Sheriff of Chowan County.

Col. Alston was the son of John Alston (b 13 August 1637 in Pavenham Parish,
Bedfordshire, England) and Ann Wallis. John Alston was the son of John Alston (b 1610
in Parvenham, Bedfordshire, England) and Dorothy Lee Temple. Dorothy Temple was
the daughter of Sir John Temple (b 1593 in Biddleson, Buckinghamshire, England, see
below) and Dorothy Lee. Dorothy Lee was the daughter of Edward Lee of Stranton
Barry, Buckinghamshire, England, who traced his descent from Benedict Lee (b 1428 in
Quarendon, Buckinghamshire, England). Dorothy Lee’s mother was Dorothy Browne,
daughter of Anthony Browne. Anthony was the son of Sir Anthony Browne, K. G.,
Viscount Montagu (b 1528 in Easebourne, Sussex, England), and Jane Radcliffe (see
below). Sir Anthony Browne, K. G. was the son of Sir Anthony Browne, K. G. (b 29 June
1500 in Bechworth, Sussex, England) and Alice Gage. Sir Anthony Browne, K.G. was
the son of Sir Anthony Browne (b 1443 in Bechworth, Sussex, England) and Lucy
Neville (see below). He was Standard Bearer to King Henry VII. Sir Anthony Browne
was the son of Sir Thomas Browne (b1402 in Bechworth, Sussex, England), Treasurer of
the Household to King Henry VI, and Eleanor FitzAlan (see below)

Further information on collateral lines above:

Sir John Temple was b 1593 in Biddleson, Buckinghamshire, England, the son of Thomas Temple,
Baronet, and Hester Sandys. Thomas Temple was b 9 January 1566/67 in Stowe, Buckinghamshire,
England, the son of John Temple and Susanna Spencer. John Temple was b 1542 in Stowe,
Buckinghamshire, England, the son of Peter Temple and Millicent Jekyll (daughter of William Jekyll, Esq.
and Margaret Stoker). Peter Temple was b 1516 in Burton Dassett, Warwickshire, England, the son of
Thomas Temple and Alice Heritage. Thomas Temple was b 1496 in Stantonbury, Buckinghamshire,
England, the son of William Temple and Isabel Everton. William Temple was b abt 1450 in Whitney,
England, the son of Thomas de Temple and Mary (daughter of Thomas Gedney, Esq.). Thomas de Temple
(b 1418 in Whitney, Oxfordshire, England) was the son of Richard de Temple and Joan (daughter of John
Shepey of Sheepy Magna, Leicester). Richard de Temple was b 1379 in Temple, Dorset, England, the son
of Nicholas de Temple and Maud, daughter of John Burguillon. Nicholas de Temple, b 1335, was the son
of Richard de Temple (b 1297 in Temple, Dorset, England) and Agnes, daughter of Sir Ralph Stanley.
Richard de Temple was the son of Nicholas de Temple and Margery, daughter of Sir Roger Corbett.
Nicholas de Temple (b January 1264/65 in Temple, Dorset, England) was the son of Richard de Temple,




                                                                                                      52
Baron of Temple Manor, and Catherine de Langley. Richard de Temple, b 1231 in Temple, Dorset,
England, was the son of Henry de Temple.

Jane Radcliffe was b 1532 in Cowdray, Sussex, England. She was the daughter of Robert Radcliffe and
Margaret Stanley*. Robert Radcliffe, 10th Baron FitzWalter, 1st Earl of Sussex, was b 1475 in Sussex,
England. He was the son of John Radcliffe and Margaret Whetehill, daughter of Adrian Whetehill and
Margaret Worsley. John Radcliffe was b 1 January 1450 in Woodhouse Walter, Essex, England. He was
executed in Calais, France 24 November 1496. He was the son of John Radcliffe, Baron Fitzwalter, who
was b 1426 in Attleborough, Norfolk, England. John Radcliffe, Baron Fitzwalter, was the son of John
Radcliffe and Katherine Burnell. Katherine Burnell (b 1404 in Billingford, Thurning, Norfolk, England),
was the great-granddaughter of Michael de la Pole, 1st Earl of Suffolk, who was b 1331 in Hull, Yorkshire,
England. Michael de la Pole fought in France in the Hundred Years War under Edward the Black Prince.
He became the trusted adviser of Richard II, who made him Chancellor (1383) and Earl of Suffolk (1385).
In the Parliament of 1386 his enemies forced his dismissal, and he was impeached and imprisoned. Richard
soon released and reinstated him, but when the baronial opposition again demanded his arrest, de la Pole
fled (1387) to France. “Appealed” of treason and sentenced to death in the Merciless Parliament of 1388,
he died in exile.
*Margaret Stanley was the daughter of Thomas Stanley, Earl of Derby, and Anne Hastings. Thomas
Stanley (b 1483 in Knockin, Shropshire, England) was the son of George Stanley, Lord le Strange, and
Joan le Strange**. George Stanley was b 1460 in Knowsley, Lancashire, England, the son of Thomas
Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby, and Eleanor Neville. Thomas Stanley was b 1435 in Lathom, Lancashire,
England. During the Wars of the Roses, Stanley supported the Lancastrian Henry VI, but he had Yorkist
sympathies, as he had married Eleanor, sister of the Yorkist Richard Neville, earl of Warwick. In the battle
of Blore Heath (1459), Stanley did not use his troops on the king’s behalf; and in 1461, after the Yorkist
Edward IV had become king, he was appointed chief justice of Cheshire. He held office continuously under
both Edward IV and Richard III, becoming Lord Steward, a Privy Councilor, and Constable of England—
this despite his support of the brief Lancastrian restoration in 1471 and his marriage (1482) to Margaret
Beaufort, the mother of Henry Tudor, the Lancastrian claimant to the throne. In the battle of Bosworth
(1485) he took the field nominally in support of Richard III but took no part in the fighting; after the battle
he crowned his stepson Henry VII on the battlefield. He was created (1485) earl of Derby and remained
powerful at court until his death. Thomas Stanley was the son of Sir Thomas Stanley, Lord Stanley of Man
and the Isles, K. G., and Joan Goushill. Sir Thomas Stanley, b 1406, was the son of Sir John Stanley and
Isabel Harrington (daughter of Sir Robert Harrington, Lord Harrington, K.B.). Sir John Stanley, b abt 1386
in Lathom, Lancashire, England, was the son of Sir John Stanley and Isabel Lathom. Isabel Lathom was the
great-granddaughter of Sir John de Ferrers, 1 st Baron Ferrers of Chartley. Sir John de Ferrers, b 20 June
1271 in Chartley, Staffordshire, England, was the son of Robert de Ferrers, 6 th Earl of Derby, and Eleanor
de Bohun (who descended from the de Bohuns, Earls of Hereford).
**Joan le Strange was the daughter of John le Strange and Jacquetta Woodville. Jacquetta was the daughter
of Sir Richard Wydeville, Earl Rivers, K.G. and Jacquetta of Luxembourg. Jacquetta Woodville’s sister
Elizabeth Woodville, married 1st John Gray of Groby, and 2nd Edward IV, King of England. Queen
Elizabeth d 7 June 1492 in Bermondsey Abbey, Surrey.

Lucy Neville was b 1466 in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England, the daughter of John Neville. John Neville was b
1431 in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England, and d 13 April 1471, at the Battle of Barnet, Hertfordshire, England.
He was the son of Sir Richard Neville, Earl of Salisbury, and Alice Montagu.* Sir Richard Neville was b
abt 1400 in Raby, Durham, England, and d 30 December 1460 at the Battle of Wakefield. He was the son
of Sir Ralph de Neville, Earl of Westmoreland, K.G. and Joan Beaufort**. Ralph de Neville was b abt 1363
in Raby, Durham, England, the son of John de Neville and Maud de Percy (daughter of Sir Henry Percy,
Lord Percy, K.G.).
*Alice Montagu, b 1406 in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England, was the daughter of Sir Thomas Montagu, Earl
of Salisbury, K.G. and Eleanor de Holland. He was b 1388, and d 27 October 1428 in Meung, France of
wounds received during the siege of Orleans. He fought with Henry V at Harfleur and Agincourt, and
served as Lieutenant-General of Normandy, Governor of Champagne and Brie, and Lieutenant-General of
the Field. Called by Henry's biographer Desmond Seward "the most brilliant commander of the entire
Hundred Years War after Henry himself. A complete professional, he was a daring raider into enemy



                                                                                                            53
territory who could extricate his men from the most dangerous situations; at the same time he was a skilled
artilleryman and expert in siegecraft ... Above all, he had a shrewd grasp of strategy and tactics. He was
popular with the troops and dreaded by the enemy." Eleanor de Holland was the daughter of Thomas
Holland, Earl of Kent, and Alice FitzAlan (daughter of Richard FitzAlan, 9 th Earl of Arundel). Thomas
Holland (b 1354 in Upholland, Lancashire, England) was the son of Thomas Holland, Earl of Kent, and
Joan Plantagenet. Joan, b 29 September 1328 in Woodstock, Kent, England, was known as “The Fair Maid
of Kent”. She was the daughter of Edmond of Woodstock, Earl of Kent, Prince of England, son of King
Edward I and Margaret of France.
**Joan Beaufort, b abt 1375 in Chateau de Beauf, France, was the daughter of John of Gaunt, K.G., Duke
of Lancaster, Prince of England, son of King Edward III and Philippa of Hainault.

Eleanor FitzAlan was the granddaughter of John FitzAlan and Elizabeth le Despencer. Elizabeth le
Despencer was a descendant of Sir Hugh le Despencer, Earl of Winchester. Sir Hugh and his son were
supporters of King Edward II and his favorite, Piers Gaveston, against the intrigues of Queen Isabella and
Mortimer. Both were executed when the Queen's armies were victorious.John FitzAlan was the grandson
of Sir Richard FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel, K.G., Admiral of the Western Seas, Governor of Caernarvon
Castle, and Elizabeth Plantagenet. Elizabeth Plantagenet was the great-granddaughter of King Henry III
and Eleanor of Provence.

Children of John Clark and Ann Alston were:

1. Allston Clark (see below)
2. Mary Clark
3. Ann Clark

John Clark married 2nd Mary Gibson (daughter of John Gibson and Martha Browne of
Occoneechee Neck on the Roanoke River, now Halifax County, North Carolina). Their
children were:

4. Thomas Clark, m. Mary Elizabeth //
5. Maj. Gen. Elijah Clark, m. Hannah Arrington
   a. John Clark b 28 February 1766 in North Carolina, d 12 October 1832 in St.
     Andrews Bay, Florida; served two terms as Governor of Georgia, m Sarah
     Williamson (John and Sarah died of yellow fever while he was serving as Indian
     Agent for Florida
  b. Elijah Clark, Jr., b 1781, d 1830, m Margaret Long
     (1) Edward Clark, b 1 April 1815 in New Orleans, Louisiana, d 4 May 1880 in
          Marshall, Texas. Served as Governor of Texas, succeeding Sam Houston.
6. John Clark, Jr., m. Judith Mallett
7. Lewis Clark
8. William Clark, m. Mary Willis
9. Jemima Clark, m. Benjamin Dumas, Jr.

John Clark married 3rd Martha Pickens (widow of Israel Pickens, brother of General
Andrew Pickens).
10. Gibson Clark




                                                                                                         54
                                        Maj. General Elijah Clark (1733 – 1799)
                             He was colonel of militia, serving at times under Pickens, and was
                             brigadier-general in I78I-83. His name occurs in various skirmishes
                             of the far South, at Alligator Creek in I778 where he was wounded; at
                             Kettle Creek in I779, where he shared with Pickens the credit of the
                             victory, displaying foresight in occupying the higher ground; at
                             Musgrove's Mill in August 1780, where he was severely wounded
                             and had a narrow escape; at Fish Dam and Blackstocks in October
                             I780; at Long Cane, where he was again wounded; and at Beattie's
                             Mill, where he defeated the British leader Dunlap. He served at both
                             sieges of Augusta--in September I780 when he was repulsed, and the
                             next year when he cooperated with Pickens and Lee in the reduction
                             of the town. In recognition of his services Wilkes County and the
                             legislature of Georgia granted him an estate. After the war Clarke by
                             turns negotiated with the Indians and fought against them, inflicting a
                             defeat at Jack's Creek, Walton County, Ga., in 1787.



VI. ALLSTON CLARK

Allston Clark was b bef 1730 in Pasquotank Precinct or Bertie Precinct, North Carolina,
and died aft 1780, Camden District (now Lancaster Co.), South Carolina. In 1771 he
bought 150 acres on Cedar Creek near the Wateree River from Thomas and Sarah
Arrington (Thomas was the brother of Hannah Arrington, who married Allston's brother
Elijah). He appears on a jury list in 1778/79 in Camden District. He married Rachael
Owen. Allston Clark served in the Revolutionary War in Capt. Jesse Tillman’s Company
of Col. John Marshall’s Regiment. He is listed in the rolls as “Austin Clark”.

1820 Lancaster District, South Carolina, Census: Eli, Absolem, and Alston Jr. are
living in close proximity to each other

Children of Allston Clark and Rachel Owen:
1. Ely Clark (see below)
2. Absolem Clark, m. Mary Bailey
3. Alston Clark, m. Margaret //
4. John Clark
5. Richard Clark, m. Nancy //
6. Patience Clark, m. Joseph Coile
7. Mourning Clark, m. James Hood
6. Margaret "Mattie" Clark

VIII. ELY CLARK

Ely or Eli Clark was born 1765-1770 in Lancaster District, South Carolina, and died bef.
28 November 1842 in Lancaster District. Ely Clark witnessed five land transactions along
with documented sons of Alston Clark, Sr.: Absolem Clark, Sr. to Rachel Clark, 18
September 1809; Rachel Clark to Alston Clark, Sr., 3 September 1810; Rachel Clark to


                                                                                             55
Richard Clark, 11 September 1810; John Clark to Henry Hudson, 13 April 1818; and
Alston Clark and Richard Clark to Robert Cunningham 3 January 1827. On 28 November
1842 Susannah Clark sold to William Russell 57 acres on Cedar Creek where her
"husband Ely Clark formerly lived."

Children of Ely Clark and Susannah //:
1. Alston Clark (see below)
2. Elijah Clark, m. Sarah //, Martha C.
3. Jesse Clark, m. Elizabeth //
4. Greenberry Clark
5. Jonas Clark
6. Aaron Clark
3 other sons; 4 daughters whose names are not known

IX. ALSTON CLARK

Allston Clark was born 8 July 1798 in Lancaster District, South Carolina, and died aft
1870 in Haw Ridge, Coffee/Dale County, Alabama. He moved to Georgia (probably
Sumter County) between 1842 and 1844, and to Dale County, Alabama before 1850. He
married Frances A. Sims bef 1825 in South Carolina. Frances was b 19 January 1801 in
Lancaster District, South Carolina and d aft 1870 in Haw Ridge, Coffee/Dale County,
Alabama.

1850 Dale County, Alabama, Census: Austin Clark 51, farmer, $300 RE, b South
Carolina; Frances 50, b North Carolina, Gincy 18, Henry K?, 16, farmer, Furney 15,
farmer; James 13, Albert 9, Matilda 8, Frances 6, Julia 6. Frances and Julia are b Georgia,
all others b South Carolina.

1860 Coffee County, Alabama, Census (Haw Ridge): Auston Clark, 62, farmer with
$600 RE; Frances A., 59, Frances 16, Julia A. 13, Jefferson A. 21, and Patsy 21.
Jefferson and Patsy are listed last, presumably she is his wife. Henry T. Clark, 23, b SC,
appears in the household of neighbor Joseph Ethington, age 20.

1870 Coffee County, Alabama, Census (Township 5 Range 22): Austin Clark, 71, $150
RE, $130 PE; born South Carolina; Frances 70, shown on this Census as born in Virginia;
Frances 26, Julia Ann 23.

Children of Allston Clark and Frances Sims Clark were:
1. Eleanor Clark, m. John E. Hudson
2. Lucinda Clark, m. John Alexander Davison
3. Ely J. Clark, m. Matilda Edgar
4. George W. Clark
5. Martha Ann Clark, m.Thomas Jefferson Waters
6. Tabitha Clark
7. Jane "Jincy" Clark, m.Hiram King
8. Henry T. Clark



                                                                                         56
9. Margaret Elizabeth "Nancy" Clark (see Chapter D. William Ellis Heath)
10. James A. Clark, m. Mary A. Miller
11. Furney Clark, m. Catherine Frances Snellgrove
12. Albert Jefferson Clark, m. Samantha Amanda Hornsby
13. Matilda Clark
14. Lenora Clark
15. Frances Clark
16. Julia Ann Clark




    CONFEDERATE MILITARY RECORDS – SONS OF ALLSTON CLARK


                                 Albert Jefferson Clark
  b March 1839 in Lancaster District, South Carolina, d 22 February 1910 in Redland,
                    TexasUnit unknown. Captured at Gettysburg.

                                       Furney Clark

                                    3rd Sgt., Co. A, 54th Alabama Infantry Regt.
                                    b 8 October 1834 in Lancaster District, South
                                    Carolina, d 26 June 1916 in Pinckard, Alabama
                                    Enlisted at Tabernacle, Coffee County, Alabama, 4
                                    September 1861, Promoted to 3rd Lt. 23 October
                                    1861 and afterwards to 2nd Lt. Captured 7 April
                                    1862 at Island 10, imprisoned at Camp Chase, Ohio;
                                    transferred to Johnson's Island, N.Y. on 24 April
                                    1962. Exchanged at Vicksburg 1 September 1862.
                                    Paroled 26 April 1865 at Columbus, Georgia



 Dear Mother and Father,

 I retire to my seat to inform you that I am in fine health with the exception of a cold. You have no
 doubt heard of the surrender of the force at Island 10. Our company was among that number -- a
 good many of them made their escape. Lieut. O'Neill is supposed to have made his escape. The
 privates were sent to Chicago, Illinois. I am getting along better than I expected I would. We are
 treated very well. I am without money and clothes both, though I will get some clothes in a few
 days now. The people here have been very kind in furnishing the prisoners clothes. Mother and
 Father, I don't want you to give yourselves any uneasiness about my welfare. It is true that I am
 Camp Chase, Ohio


placed in rather an unhappy condition, but I am in hopes that I will not be here long.


                                                                                         57
Your affectionate son,
Furney Clark

Henry was at Fort Pillow when we surrendered - he got away I expect.
Direct your letter - Lieut. Furney Clark
Prisoner of War



                                   Henry T. Clark
                       Pvt., Co. A, 54th Alabama Infantry Regt.
                      b 1833 in Lancaster District, South Carolina
 died of pneumonia at Camp Chase, Ohio, 22 January 1865; buried #837 at Camp Chase

                                     Ely J. Clark
                        Pvt., Co. A, 54th Alabama Infantry Regt.
                       b 1825 in Lancaster District, South Carolina
                          Captured near Atlanta 7 August 1864
  died of smallpox at Camp Chase, Ohio, 15 October 1864; buried #466 at Camp Chase




                                                Furney Clark
                                         Oct. 8, 1834 - June 24, 1916
                                              Masonic Emblem
                                      "Defer not till to-marrow to be wise
                                    To-marrow's sun to thee may never rise"

                                       Ebenezer Cemetery, Dale County




                                                                                 58
               Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio
                  Burial place of Henry T. Clark and Ely J. Clark


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