Docstoc

A Parents Guide to Cub Pack 177

Document Sample
A Parents Guide to Cub Pack 177 Powered By Docstoc
					    Welcome

          To

Cub Scout Pack 177

 St. Agnes Church
   Blackwood NJ


     A Parent‘s Guide
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                                        November 6, 2008




                               TABLE OF CONTENTS
Welcome ..................................................................................................................1
TABLE OF CONTENTS ...............................................................................................2
BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA MISSION AND VISION STATEMENTS .................................4
  Mission Statement .................................................................................................4
   Vision Statement ...................................................................................................4
A BREIF HISTORY OF CUB SCOUTING .......................................................................5
WELCOME TO CUB SCOUTING! .................................................................................6
YOUR ROLE AS A PARENT .........................................................................................6
  Help your Cub Scout along the advancement trail ....................................................7
   Work with your son on projects ..............................................................................7
   Participate in monthly pack meetings ......................................................................7
   Go on family campouts with your son .....................................................................7
   Provide support for your son's Den and the Pack .....................................................8
   Consider becoming a leader or member of the Committee .......................................8
CAMPING .................................................................................................................8
    Cub Scout Day Camp ..........................................................................................8
    Overnight Camping for Cub Scouts ......................................................................8
    Webelos Resident Camp .....................................................................................9
    Family Camping .................................................................................................9
SPECIAL PACK EVENTS .............................................................................................9
    Pinewood Derby .................................................................................................9
    Blue and Gold Banquet .......................................................................................9
    Crossover to Boy Scouts .....................................................................................9
PACK ORGANIZATION ............................................................................................. 10
THINGS YOU CAN DO TO HELP YOUR CUB SCOUT ................................................... 11
BADGES OF RANK ................................................................................................... 12
BOBCAT RANK ........................................................................................................ 13
    Cub Scout Promise ........................................................................................... 13
    Law of the Pack ............................................................................................... 13
    Cub Scout Motto .............................................................................................. 13
    Meaning of WEBELOS ....................................................................................... 13
    Cub Scout Sign................................................................................................. 14
    Cub Scout Handshake ....................................................................................... 14
    Cub Scout Salute .............................................................................................. 14
IMMEDIATE RECOGNITION EMBLEMS ...................................................................... 15
TIGER RANK ........................................................................................................... 16
    Tiger Totem Beads ........................................................................................... 16



                                                            2
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                                         November 6, 2008


    Tiger Track Beads ............................................................................................ 16
    Shared Responsibility........................................................................................ 16
WOLF RANK ........................................................................................................... 17
    Arrow Points .................................................................................................... 17
    Wolf Achievements: Who Does What ................................................................. 18
BEAR RANK ............................................................................................................ 19
    Arrow Points .................................................................................................... 19
    Bear Achievements: Who Does What ................................................................. 20
WEBELOS RANK ...................................................................................................... 21
    Webelos Colors ................................................................................................ 21
    Webelos Activity Pins ........................................................................................ 21
    Community Group ............................................................................................ 22
    Mental Skills Group ........................................................................................... 23
    Outdoor Group ................................................................................................. 24
    Physical Skills Group ......................................................................................... 25
    Technology Group ............................................................................................ 26
    Achievements Usually Done With Family ............................................................ 27
    Compass Emblem and Compass Points .............................................................. 28
    Super Achiever Patch ........................................................................................ 28
ARROW OF LIGHT................................................................................................... 29
OTHER SPECIAL AWARDS ....................................................................................... 30
RELIGIOUS AWARDS............................................................................................... 30
    World Conservation Award ................................................................................ 31
    Recruiter Patch ................................................................................................ 31
    Whitlin‘ Chip..................................................................................................... 32
    Leave No Trace Award ...................................................................................... 32
    Cub Scout Outdoor Activity Award ..................................................................... 33
ACADEMIC AND SPORTS BELTLOOPS AND PINS ....................................................... 34
    Academic Beltloops........................................................................................... 35
    Sports Beltloops ............................................................................................... 37
Appendix ................................................................................................................ 41
  UNIFORMING AND PATCH PLACEMENT ................................................................ 41
     Cub Scout Uniform Patch Placement .................................................................. 41
     Adult Leader Uniform Patch Placement .............................................................. 42
   DEFINITIONS: ..................................................................................................... 43
Works Cited ............................................................................................................ 44




                                                             3
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                November 6, 2008


BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA MISSION AND VISION STATEMENTS


Mission Statement

The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical
and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout
Oath and Law.


                       Scout Oath
                       On my honor I will do my best
                       To do my duty to God and my country
                       and to obey the Scout Law;
                       To help other people at all times;
                       To keep myself physically strong,
                       mentally awake, and morally straight.



                       Scout Law
                       A Scout is:
                              Trustworthy     Obedient
                              Loyal           Cheerful
                              Helpful         Thrifty
                              Friendly        Brave
                              Courteous       Clean
                              Kind            Reverent




Vision Statement

The Boy Scouts of America will prepare every eligible youth in America to become a
responsible, participating citizen and leader who is guided by the Scout Oath and
Law.

(Boy Scouts of America, 2008)




                                          4
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                               November 6, 2008


A BREIF HISTORY OF CUB SCOUTING
Scouting's history goes back to the turn of the 20th century to a British Army officer,
Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell. While stationed in India, he realized he
needed to teach his men many frontier skills, so he wrote a small handbook called
Aids to Scouting, which emphasized resourcefulness, adaptability, and the qualities of
leadership, that frontier conditions demanded. After returning from the Boer War, he
was amazed to find that his little handbook had caught the interest of English boys.
They were using it to play the game of scouting. Baden-Powell had the vision to see
some new possibilities. In August 1907, he gathered about 20 boys and took them to
Brownsea Island in a sheltered bay off England's southern coast. They set up a
makeshift camp that would be their home for the next 12 days. Scouting began on
that island.

About this same time, seeds of Scouting were growing in the United States. Ernest
Thompson Seton was organizing a group of boys called the Woodcraft Indians; and
Daniel Carter Beard, organized the Sons of Daniel Boone. The boys who belonged to
the two organizations had never heard of Baden-Powell or of Boy Scouts, and yet both
groups were destined to become Boy Scouts soon.

But first, an American businessman had to get lost in the fog in England. William D.
Boyce was groping his way through the fog when a boy appeared and offered to take
him to his destination. When they arrived, Boyce tried to tip the boy, but the boy
refused and courteously explained that he was a Scout and could not accept payment
for a Good Turn. Intrigued, he questioned the boy and learned more about Scouting.
He visited with Baden-Powell as well and became captured by the idea of Scouting.
When Boyce boarded the transatlantic steamer for home, he had a suitcase filled with
information and ideas. And so, on February 8, 1910, Boyce incorporated the Boy
Scouts of America. The "unknown Scout" who helped him in the fog was never heard
from again, but he will never be forgotten. His Good Turn is what brought Scouting to
our country.

Back in England, younger boys were eager to become Boy Scouts. In 1914, Baden-
Powell began implementing a program for younger boys that was based on Rudyard
Kipling's Jungle Book. The Wolf Cub program began in 1916. In America, hundreds of
Cub Scout-age boys and their families were clamoring for a program of their own. By
1929, the new Cubbing program (it wasn't called "Cub Scouting" until several years
later) was taking shape and was introduced as a demonstration project. In 1930, Cub
Scouting was formally launched, with 5,102 boys registered at the end of that first
year. By 1933 all experimental restrictions were removed.

A strong influence from Kipling's Jungle Book remains today. The terms "Law of the
Pack," "Akela," "Wolf Cub," "grand howl," "den," and "pack" all come from the Jungle
Book. At the same time, the Gold and Silver Arrow Points, Webelos emblem, and
Arrow of Light emblem are taken from our American Indian heritage.(Boy Scouts of
America, 2008)


                                           5
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                November 6, 2008




WELCOME TO CUB SCOUTING!
Since 1930, the Boy Scouts of America has helped younger boys through Cub Scouting.
It is a year-round family program designed for boys who are in the first grade through
fifth grade (or 7, 8, 9, and 10 years of age). Parents, leaders, and organizations work
together to achieve the purposes of Cub Scouting. Currently, Cub Scouting is the largest
of the BSA's three traditional membership divisions. (The others are Boy Scouting and
Venturing.)

The 10 purposes of Cub Scouting are:

   1. Character Development
   2. Spiritual Growth
   3. Good Citizenship
   4. Sportsmanship and Fitness
   5. Family Understanding
   6. Respectful Relationships
   7. Personal Achievement
   8. Friendly Service
   9. Fun and Adventure
   10. Preparation for Boy Scouts


(Boy Scouts of America, 2008)

YOUR ROLE AS A PARENT
Cub Scouting encourages closeness to family. The program will give you opportunities
to take part in activities with your son that you normally might not do. It provides a
positive way for parent and son to grow closer together, and encourages you to spend
quality time together. In this way, Cub Scouting is a program for the entire family, and
your involvement is vital to the program's success.
Some things you can do to help your son in Cub Scouting are:

          Help your Cub Scout along the advancement trail
          Work with your son on projects
          Participate in monthly Pack meetings
          Go on family campouts with your son
          Provide support for your son's Den and the Pack
          Consider becoming a leader or member of the Committee




                                           6
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                 November 6, 2008


Help your Cub Scout along the advancement trail
With the Cub Scout handbooks as a resource, parents and boys work together to
complete the achievements required for each badge. While Cub Scouts learn skills and
begin projects in their den meetings, the parent remains at the center of the
advancement program. As each task is done or each skill is demonstrated, the parent
signs the Cub Scout's handbook to record its completion. It is important for the scout to
take his handbook to den meetings to allow the Den Leader to see the parent‘s sign-off
on the achievements. And when the boy has completed all of the requirements to earn
an award, the completion is acknowledged before the entire pack of scouts at the next
pack meeting.

Work with your son on projects
Boys often begin projects at den meetings and finish them at home with the help of a
parent. Because the purpose of a project is to teach a boy new skills, a project will
challenge a boy to do tasks that he hasn't already mastered. It's not uncommon,
therefore, for a boy to need help from his family to complete some of his projects. In
Cub Scouting, boys are not expected to do things entirely on their own. So long as a
boy does his best to do as much as he's capable of, it's perfectly acceptable for a parent
or sibling to help him.

Participate in monthly pack meetings
The pack meeting is for the entire family of every Cub Scout. At pack meetings,
parents see their sons in action with their friends, meet other parents, and join with
neighbors in caring and sharing. These opportunities are scarce, and pack meetings
highlight how Cub Scouting teaches boys cooperation and collaboration.

The pack meeting is also a monthly showcase for all that the boys have worked on in
their den meetings. Craft projects are on display, skills are demonstrated, and skits are
performed to show the boys' command of the monthly theme. While boys at this age
seem to be struggling toward independence, having the approval of their parents and
other adults whom they admire remains important to them - so your presence at these
meetings is critical to underscore the importance of the lessons your son has learned.

Go on family campouts with your son
Cub Scout pack families enjoy camping in local council camps and other council-
approved campsites. Camping programs combine fun and excitement with doing one's
best, getting along with others, and developing an appreciation for ecology and the
world of the outdoors. (Boy Scouts of America, 2008)




                                            7
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                  November 6, 2008


Provide support for your son's Den and the Pack

It's important to remember that the adult leaders of your son's den and pack are
volunteers who give their own time to provide a quality program for your son. While
they have been carefully selected and extensively trained for their roles, there are
always times when they could use help from parents in the pack.

Pack events such as the pinewood derby, blue and gold banquet, or field days take a lot
of effort—more than the monthly meetings. The pack's leaders would likely welcome
any help you can give. Likewise, den leaders will be grateful to parents who can lend a
hand with field trips and outings. By pitching in as needed, you can show your son the
importance of helping others. So be on the lookout for opportunities for you to help the
den, the pack, and its leaders.

Consider becoming a leader or member of the Committee
Cub Scouts is a parent-led program. Being a leader or committee member is an
excellent way to help guide the entire pack and impact your son's scouting experience.
No experience is necessary. Just bring a willingness to have fun! ―Putting on a shirt‖ is
not for everyone, but it is truly a rewarding and worthwhile experience.

(Boy Scouts of America, 2008)

CAMPING
One of the benefits of Scouting is exposing our sons to the Great Outdoors; to put and
keep the ‗outing‘ in ‗Scouting‘. One excellent way to achieve this is Camping. Besides
being fun, family camping is an opportunity for quality time together and an enriched
family life. This program is a recreational opportunity - it's not on a tight time schedule.
Family leadership rests with the adult member(s). This leadership might be yielded
from time to time as the family chooses to take part in activities, such as swimming,
where specific camp policies must be followed for safety and proper operation.

Cub Scout Day Camp
Cub Scout Day camp is part of the camping program of the BSA. Our pack attends Pine
Hill Scout Reservation – Day Camp.

Overnight Camping for Cub Scouts
Our council offers a few of these throughout the year.




                                             8
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                 November 6, 2008


Webelos Resident Camp
To earn Cub Scouting's highest honor, the Arrow of Light, a boy must participate in a
Webelos overnight campout or a day hike. First year Webelos scouts (entering into the
Fourth Grade or 9 years old) attend a Webelos Resident Camp, a five-day, four-night
event at Pine Hill Scout Reservation. Boys and leaders sleep in Boy Scout canvas tents
on Boy Scout cots. Activities include swimming, Bow & Arrow and BB Gun Shooting,
Nature Lodge, and a camp-wide campfire.

In addition to Summer Camps, Webelos scouts have opportunities through the year to
go camping with Boy Scout Troop 177. These events are opportunities for the Webelos
(who are getting ready to cross over) to experience what the Troop is about.

Family Camping
As if the summer camping programs were not enough, families are encouraged to go
camping together as well. These are a time for the whole family to get outdoors
together, to have a good time, and to discover new facets about everyone. Family
camping is purely optional, and many boys may put up some argument about younger
siblings camping with them, but it is highly encouraged. It‘s a great time together as a
family and as a collection of families that makes up a Cub Scout Pack.

SPECIAL PACK EVENTS
Pinewood Derby
The Pinewood Derby is an event that almost every boy loves. They have the chance to
build their very own race car (within specific limitations) with the help of an adult. Our
pack generally has its Pinewood Derby in February, and the district usually has a
district-wide Pinewood Derby in March.

Blue and Gold Banquet
The Blue and Gold Banquet is the highlight of the year's program. It brings families and
neighbors together for a meal and a time of fun and inspiration. The banquet is usually
held in place of the March pack meeting, and it's an event the boys look forward to with
excitement.

Crossover to Boy Scouts
March has become our Pack‘s customary time to ―Cross Over‖ our second year Webelos
scouts into a Boy Scout troop. Members of the Boy Scout troop are present to receive
the Scout as he crosses over a wooden bridge, symbolizing the departure from the
Pack. Many people find this to be a very moving ceremony.




                                            9
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                  November 6, 2008



PACK ORGANIZATION
All Cub Scout packs have similar organizations. Our Chartered Organization is St Agnes
Church in Blackwood, NJ. The Pack Committee is headed by the Committee Chair and
consists of the registered Members of Committee and concerned parents. The Pack
Committee decides the programs and events that make up the Pack‘s calendar. The
Cubmaster is responsible for implementation and execution of the programs and
activities specified by the Pack committee. The Cubmaster provides all needed support
to the Den Leaders, who are the real people who keep Cub Scouting alive and fun for
our boys.




There are other positions outside of this organization which play important parts in the
Scouting program. Each Cub Scout Pack has a Unit Commissioner, who meets with the
Committee Chairman and the Cubmaster at periodic intervals to review the status of the
Pack‘s programs. At the Council level, there are District Executives and District
Directors who provide greatly needed support and direction to local units. Not to
mention all the other volunteers on the District Training Staff, District Roundtable Staff,
and a host of other Scouting Support organizations.



                                            10
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                November 6, 2008



THINGS YOU CAN DO TO HELP YOUR CUB SCOUT

  1. Be sure your boy attends every Den Meeting possible. Remind him to be on his
     best behavior while he is there. He is a guest at the Den Meeting site.
  2. Remember to sign his handbook for the requirements and electives he completes
     under your guidance, and remind him to bring his handbook to every Den
     Meeting. To help keep Pack leadership advised as to your son‘s achievements.
  3. Remind him to wear his uniform to school on Den Meeting days and Pack
     Meeting days, or at least have it laid out and ready to go so he can change into
     it quickly. Have his uniform clean and have all appropriate patches sewn on in
     their correct places so he looks great at all scout functions.
  4. Be willing to help out with transportation for den meetings, field trips, etc. Help
     him to provide den snacks when it is his turn.
  5. HELP HIM TO ACHIEVE! Read his handbook, familiarize yourself with his rank
     requirements; many of them are done with the family or at home. Read the
     parents' supplement at the front of his book. Ask questions of your pack leaders
     if you are unclear about anything.
  6. Make sure that your Cub Scout is doing his very best. Don't sign off on
     achievements unless he has really earned each part of it. Don't count things he
     did as a Wolf cub towards his Bear rank. He needs to do each item during that
     rank year.
  7. Attend Pack Meetings with your son. The entire family is invited to attend every
     Pack Meeting. Be alert to his behavior during the meeting; the Den Leader is not
     solely responsible for him or his actions during the pack meeting. This also holds
     true with camping experiences. Have fun, and correct and praise as needed.
  8. Be willing to assist with costumes, skits, crafts, songs, outings, refreshments,
     etc.
  9. Always remember that Cub Scouting is Family Oriented. It is designed to help
     parents with their boys. The Den and Pack cannot help your boy grow without
     your help.


         As the Law of the Pack states,
    ―... The Cub Scout helps the Pack go.
   The Pack helps the Cub Scout grow. ...‖


                                          11
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177              November 6, 2008



BADGES OF RANK
                          A diamond-shaped cloth badge, gold
              Bobcat      and black embroidered on light blue
                          background with gold trim
                          A diamond-shaped cloth badge,
               Tiger      black, gold and white embroidered
                          on orange background with gold trim
                          A diamond-shaped cloth badge,
               Wolf       brown and black embroidered on red
                          background with gold trim
                      A diamond-shaped cloth badge,
               Bear   brown and black embroidered on
                      aqua background with gold trim
                      Either: A diamond-shaped cloth
                      badge, gold and light blue
                      embroidered on dark blue
             Webelos background with gold trim, or an
                      oval-shaped cloth badge, gold and
                      light blue embroidered on brown
                      background with brown trim
                      A rectangular cloth badge, gold
                      embroidered on a khaki background
                      with blue trim. This is the highest
             Arrow of
                      award in Cub Scouting and is the
               Light
                      only Cub Scouting badge that may
                      also be worn on the Boy Scout
                      uniform


                                  12
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                              November 6, 2008



BOBCAT RANK
The Bobcat Badge is the first rank that every Cub Scout must earn. It sets a common
base for all Cub Scouts to share. The Cub Scout must learn the Cub Scout Promise, the
Law of the Pack, the Cub Scout Motto, the meaning of Webelos, the Cub Scout Sign,
Handshake, and Salute. They must also complete the exercises in the "Child Abuse
Prevention" booklet at the front of their handbook with their parents. The Bobcat
badge is worn at the top of the left pocket.




Cub Scout Promise
I, (your name), promise to do my best;
to do my duty to God and my country;
to help other people;
and to obey the Law of the Pack


Law of the Pack
The Cub Scout follows Akela.
The Cub Scout helps the Pack go.
The Pack helps the Cub Scout grow.
The Cub Scout gives goodwill.


Cub Scout Motto
Do Your Best!


Meaning of WEBELOS
We'll Be Loyal Scouts


                                         13
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177        November 6, 2008




Cub Scout Sign



Cub Scout Handshake




Cub Scout Salute



                                  14
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                 November 6, 2008



IMMEDIATE RECOGNITION EMBLEMS

                                        Tiger Cubs earn the Tiger Cub Immediate
                                        Recognition Emblem when they are able to
                                        demonstrate to the Den Leader or Cub Master
                                        that they can:

                                           1. Show the Cub Scout Sign (required for
                                        Bobcat Rank)
                                           2. Show the Cub Scout Salute (required for
                                        Bobcat Rank)
                                           3. Say the Tiger Cub Motto (―Search,
                                        Discover, Share‖)

                                        It may be presented to the Tiger Cub in either
                                        a Den Meeting (usually upon completion of the
                                        one of the Den parts of an achievement) or in a
                                        Pack Meeting in front of the whole Pack.

This is worn on the right pocket of the Tiger Cub‘s uniform shirt until he has been
awarded his Tiger Cub badge, or until he begins working on his Wolf badge.



Wolf and Bear cubs earn the Cub Scout Immediate
Recognition Emblem upon completion of the first three of
the twelve required achievements for their rank, after
having completed the requirements of the Bobcat Rank.

It may be presented to the Cub Scout in either a Den
Meeting or in a Pack Meeting in front of the whole Pack.

This emblem is also worn on the right pocket button of the
Cub Scout‘s uniform shirt, replacing the Tiger Cub
Immediate Recognition Emblem. It remains there until he
has either earned the Bear badge or until he begins
working on his Webelos badge.




                                           15
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                 November 6, 2008


TIGER RANK
Tiger Cubs is the rank for boys entering First Grade or who are six years old as of the
first day of the new school year.

An Adult Companion (AC) must accompany the Tiger Cub to all den meetings, pack
meetings, and outings known as "Go-See-Its." The AC is usually a parent or guardian
of the Tiger Cub, but must be at least 18 years of age. The AC could be an uncle, aunt,
grandparent, or even an older sibling or cousin. The AC does not have to be the same
person for every event attended by the Tiger Cub, but consistency will greatly improve
the Cub Scout experience for both the Tiger Cub and the Adult Companion.

In the Tiger Cub year, which runs from the date the scout is registered as a Tiger Cub
until May 31st, there are five groups of events: Making My Family Special, Where I Live,
Keeping Myself Healthy and Safe, How I Tell It, and Let‘s Go Outdoors. Each of these
groups has three parts: a Den Meeting part, a Family part, and a Go-See-It part. By
definition, the Den Meeting part usually happens during a Den Meeting; the Go-See-It
part is done in a group Go-See-It outing; and the Family part is done at home with the
whole family.

Tiger Totem Beads
For each Den Meeting part of an achievement completed, the Tiger Cub earns an
orange bead, to be placed upon the Tiger Cub Immediate Recognition Emblem. For
each Family part of an achievement completed, he earns a white bead. For each Go-
See-It part of an achievement completed, he earns a black bead. When the Tiger Cub
has earned five orange, five black, and five white beads, he has earned his Tiger Cub
Badge.

Tiger Track Beads
Additionally, there are electives that a Tiger Cub and his Adult Companion may
complete, and for every ten electives completed, a Tiger Track bead (a yellow ring) is
earned and placed upon the Tiger Cub Immediate Recognition Emblem.

The beads and rings may be presented in either a Den Meeting or in a Pack Meeting,
but the overall objective is to recognize the completion of the portion of the
achievements very soon after completing them.

Shared Responsibility

During the Tiger Cub year, responsibility is shared among all the Adult
Companion / Tiger Cub combinations. Although there may be one registered
Tiger Cub Leader, each pair of Adult and Tiger Cub should take turns in directing
the Den Meeting activities.



                                           16
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                November 6, 2008


WOLF RANK
Wolf Cub is the rank for boys entering Second Grade, or who are seven years old as of
the first day of the new school year.

Wolf Cubs gather in dens of five to eight boys with a registered Den Leader and
Assistant Den Leader. Den meeting frequency may be determined by the Den Leader
and the scouts' parents / guardians.

In the Wolf Cub year, which runs from either the date the scout is registered as a Wolf
Cub or from June 1st until May 31st, there are twelve achievements each consisting of
many parts. This is more challenging than the Tiger Cub year, and it is appropriate to
the level of development of the Cub Scout.

When the Wolf Cub completes three achievements and for every three achievements
completed thereafter, he is presented with a yellow bead to be placed on his Cub Scout
Immediate Recognition Emblem. When the Wolf Cub has earned four yellow beads, he
has completed the requirements of the Wolf Badge.


Arrow Points

In addition to the requirements specified for the Wolf rank,
there are additional electives that the scout may complete
in the Den Meeting or at home with family. There are over
140 electives that may be completed, and they are
specified in the rear of the Wolf Cub Handbook.

After a Wolf Cub has completed the requirements of the
Wolf badge, he then may receive credit for electives
completed. For completing the ten electives, he will
receive a gold arrow point. For every ten electives
completed after that, he will receive a silver arrow point.

Please reference the section on Uniforming and Patch
Placement for specifics on where to place his Wolf badge
and arrow points.




                                            17
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                    November 6, 2008



Wolf Achievements: Who Does What

   Required          Do     Do w/ Family Family or Den Do w/ Den
                  A thru E                  A thru E
 Feats of Skill   Plus 1 of                Plus 1 of
                  F thru L                  F thru L
   Your Flag         All                   A, C, D, G    B, E, F
  Keep Your
                    All             A         B, C
 Body Healthy
  Know Your
  Home and          All           A, D, E    B, C, F
  Community
   Tools for
  Fixing and        All                        All
    Building
    Start a
                    All                        All
   Collection
  Your Living
                    All                        All
     World
 Cooking and
                    All      B, C, D, E        A
     Eating
  Be Safe at
  Home and          All            B, C      A, D, E
 On the Street
                   A
 Family Fun    Plus 2 of            All
               B thru G
 Duty to God      All               All
                   A
Making Choices Plus 4 of                       All
               B thru K




                                        18
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                 November 6, 2008



BEAR RANK
Bear Cub is the rank for boys entering Third Grade, or who are eight years old as of the
first day of the new school year.

Bear Cubs gather in dens of five to eight boys with a registered Den Leader and
Assistant Den Leader. Den meeting frequency may be determined by the Den Leader
and the scouts' parents / guardians.

In the Bear Cub year, which runs from either the date the scout is registered as a Bear
Cub or from June 1st until May 31st, the scout chooses to complete twelve of twenty-
four requirements, with specific limitations:

       One for God (1 of either #1 or #2);
       Three for Country (3 of #3, 4, 5, 6, and 7);
       Four for Family (4 of #8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13); and
       Four for Self (4 of #14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24).

When the Bear Cub completes three achievements and for every three achievements
completed thereafter, he is presented with a red bead to be placed on his Cub Scout
Immediate Recognition Emblem. When the Bear Cub has earned four red beads, he
has completed the requirements of the Bear Badge.


Arrow Points

In addition to the requirements specified for the Bear rank,
there are additional electives that the scout may complete
in the Den Meeting or at home with family. There are over
140 electives that may be completed, and they are
specified in the rear of the Bear Cub Handbook.
Additionally, any parts of achievements not counting
towards the twelve for the Bear badge may be counted as
electives for arrow point purposes.

After a Bear Cub has completed the requirements of the
Bear badge, he then may receive credit for electives
completed. For completing the ten electives, he will
receive a gold arrow point. For every ten electives
completed after that, he will receive a silver arrow point.

Please reference the section on Uniforming and Patch Placement for specifics on where
to place his Bear badge and arrow points.



                                            19
 A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                        November 6, 2008



 Bear Achievements: Who Does What

                                                Do w/      Family      Do w/
        Achievement                   Do
                                                Family     or Den       Den
       Ways We Worship                All         All
       Emblems of Faith               All         All
                                    A+J+                   A, B, C,
 What Makes America Special?                       G                   F, H, I
                                     any 2                   D, J
          Tall Tales                  All                     All
Sharing Your World with Wildlife    Any 4                     All
                                                A, D, E,
   Take Care of Your Planet          Any 3                  B, C, G
                                                   F
 Law Enforcement is a Big Job        Any 4      C, D, E      A, F           B
   The Past is Exciting and
                                   G + Any 2      All
          Important
      What‘s Cooking?                Any 4        All
         Family Fun                    All        All
                                   A thru E +
          Be Ready!                               All
                                       G
  Family Outdoors Adventure          Any 3        All
  Saving Well, Spending Well         Any 4        All
                                                           A, B, C,
          Ride Right               A + any 3       G
                                                           D, E, F
    Games, Games, Games!             Any 2                    A            B, C
       Building Muscles              All 3                   A, B           C
      Information Please           A + any 3     A, F        D, E          B, C
          Jot It Down              H + any 4                  All
      Shavings and Chips             All 4                    All
      Sawdust and Nails              All 3                    All
                                                           A, B, D,
         Build a Model             G + any 2                                C
                                                           E, F, G
        Tying It All Up              Any 5                    All
                                                           A, B, C,
     Sports, Sports, Sports          All 5         D
                                                              E
          Be a Leader              F + any 2                  All



                                      20
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                      November 6, 2008


WEBELOS RANK
Webelos is the rank for boys entering Fourth or Fifth Grade, or who are nine years old
as of the first day of the new school year.

Webelos gather in dens of five to eight boys with a registered Den Leader and Assistant
Den Leader. Den meeting frequency may be determined by the Den Leader and the
scouts' parents / guardians.

Continuing the practice of increasing the level of complexity as the scout matures,
Webelos is the bridging time between the traditional Cub Scouts and the Boy Scouts.
Your Webelos scout will become more self-reliant, more confident in being able to do
things himself, and gradually readier for the scout-led Boy Scout troop.

Webelos rank involves even more choices than the Bear rank does. In Webelos, there
are twenty activity pins that could be earned, divided into five groups of four each.
Your scout will naturally favor one group over another, but the intent is to make a well-
rounded scout.

Webelos Colors
As mentioned, there are twenty activity pins to be earned at
the Webelos level. But first there needs to be a place to keep
them. Webelos don‘t have an Immediate Recognition
Emblem to show their achievements. They have the Webelos
Colors.

Webelos colors are an optional Webelos Scout uniform item
whose use is determined at the Pack level. It consists of
woven green, red, and gold streamers (tabs) on a blue metal
bar with the border and word "Webelos" in gold. If no Den
number is worn, the colors are worn on the right sleeve
immediately below and touching the U.S. flag. If a Den
number is worn, the colors are worn under and touching the
Den number.

It is to this that the activity pins are attached, for all to see.
Generally, the colors are awarded upon completion of the first
activity pin.

Webelos Activity Pins
The twenty Webelos activity pins are divided into five groups
of four each. The groupings are: Community Group, Mental
Skills Group, Outdoor Group, Physical Skills Group, and the
Technology Group.



                                             21
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                November 6, 2008


Community Group
            Citizen
            One of the purposes of Scouting is "Developing habits and attitudes of
            good citizenship." A Scout promises to do his duty to his country. The
            Citizen activity helps Webelos to understand what a good citizen is and
            teaches him the history of our flag. Citizen is required to earn the Webelos
            badge.
            Objectives: To foster citizenship in Webelos scouts. To teach boys to
            recognize the qualities of a good citizen. To introduce boys to the
            structure of the U.S. government. To familiarize boys with the basics of
            American history. To convince boys that laws are beneficial. To
            encourage Webelos scouts to become community volunteers.


            Communicator
            The activities required for the Communicator Pin help a Webelos scout
            to understand how he and others communicate.
            Objectives: To learn about various forms of communication problems
            that other people may have. To become aware of different ways that
            people can communicate.


            Family Member
            One of the purposes of Scouting is "Improving understanding within the
            family." The Family Member activity has the Webelos scout working and
            planning with his family.
            Objectives: To help Webelos scouts develop a sense of family
            responsibility. To help the boys see how finances affect their families.
            To help Webelos scouts gain insight into the running of a household.


            Readyman
            The Boy Scout motto is "Be Prepared." Should someone ask, "Prepared
            for what?", "Prepared for anything," is the answer. The Readyman
            activity prepares the scout for First Aid "hurry cases"; teaches how to
            get help when needed; and teaches safety. Readyman is required to
            earn the Arrow of Light rank.
             Objectives: To teach Webelos scouts simple first aid and emergency
             first aid for the "hurry cases". To make Webelos scouts more aware of
             safety around the home, bicycle safety, and car safety.




                                         22
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                              November 6, 2008



Mental Skills Group
            Artist
            The Artist activity is an excellent way for a Webelos scout to express
            himself and an opportunity for him to try working in a new art medium.
            Objectives: To allow Webelos to experiment with different art media.
            To give boys a sense of pride and accomplishment in their work. To
            familiarize Webelos with the color wheel. To introduce Webelos to
            various supplies.



             Scholar
             The Scholar activity experience can help to improve the Webelos scout's
             relationship with their school. It will help the scout understand why an
             education is important. When presented with interest and enthusiasm
             from the leader, this activity will not seem like drudged up school work!
             Help the boys learn there is more to school than just homework.
            Objectives: To familiarize Webelos scouts with the "roots" of a school
            system. To convince Webelos scouts that schooling is essential. To
            introduce Webelos scouts to careers in education. To teach Webelos
            scouts the benefits of a good education.



            Showman
            The Showman activity offers a choice of puppetry, music, or drama. A
            Webelos scout can pick the area that suits him best while sampling a
            little from each area.
            Objectives: To instill an appreciation of the fine arts. To expose boys
            to entertainment professions. To expand the imagination and creativity
            of Webelos scouts. To increase boys' self-confidence in front of
            audiences.



            Traveler
            The Traveler activity explores the preparations involved in taking a trip,
            by car, bus, rail, sea and air.
            Objectives: To introduce Webelos scouts to the excitement of traveling
            to see new places and meet new people. To show scouts some of the
            practical skills that are needed to get "there" successfully and efficiently
            so that when "there", they can have a rewarding experience. To have
            the scouts practice planning in a fun way.


                                        23
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                             November 6, 2008



Outdoor Group
            Forester
            By completing the Forester activity, the Webelos scouts will learn how to
            identify trees around them, how trees grow, and how to prevent forest
            fires.
            Objectives: To make boys more observant and appreciative of trees.
            To instill the idea of conservation in Webelos scouts. To teach boys the
            value and uses of trees. To make Webelos scouts aware of
            devastation due to wildfires.



            Geologist
            While completing the Geologist activity, Webelos scouts discover the
            world of volcanoes and learn why there are earthquakes. They find out
            what minerals are used in everyday lives.
            Objectives: To teach boys to recognize common rock specimens. To
            acquaint boys with uses of different rocks and minerals. To make boys
            aware of the earth and its resources. To introduce boys to earth's
            devastating forces.



            Naturalist
            Scouting and the outdoors go hand-in-hand. The Naturalist activity
            makes a Webelos scout aware of all the living things in the outdoors.
            Objectives: To increase boys' awareness of animal behavior. To
            kindle a love of nature. To teach wildlife conservation. To encourage
            Webelos to visit local animal preserves. To introduce boys to animal
            kingdom classifications.



            Outdoorsman
            While working on the Outdoorsman activity, Webelos scouts learn the
            basics of camping and cooking in order to live outdoors and be
            comfortable. Outdoorsman is required to earn the Arrow of Light rank.
            Objectives: To encourage Webelos scouts to camp with their families.
            To introduce Webelos to Boy Scout camping. To familiarize boys with
            fire safety. To emphasize the "outing" in Scouting.




                                       24
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                              November 6, 2008



Physical Skills Group
            Aquanaut
            Every Scout is a swimmer! The Aquanaut activity teaches swimming
            skills, water and boat safety, and snorkeling.
            Objectives: To teach safety precautions on, in, or near the water. To
            increase the boys' swimming skills and endurance. To introduce
            Webelos to snorkeling.



            Athlete
            Athlete is an activity where a scout can really "Do His Best".
            Objectives: To encourage pride in growing strong in mind and body.
            To foster a sense of personal achievement by developing new skills and
            interests. To convince boys that fitness is essential to good health.



            Fitness
            Fitness is important to everybody. The Fitness activity teaches what is
            necessary to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Fitness is required to earn the
            Webelos badge.
            Objectives: To show Webelos scouts how to be strong in body and to
            make them aware of substances which will weaken their bodies.



            Sportsman
            To be a true sportsman is more than just playing games. The
            Sportsman activity will teach a scout how to conduct himself with good
            sportsmanship.
            Objectives: To teach boys good sportsmanship. To introduce boys to
            a variety of sports. To familiarize boys with the care and handling of
            sports equipment. To emphasize the need for safety in sports.




                                        25
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                             November 6, 2008



Technology Group
            Craftsman
            Craftsman is a favorite of most boys because it offers the opportunity to
            use real tools and feel the satisfaction of making something useful.
            Objectives: To introduce boys to possible life-long hobbies. To
            increase boys' proficiency in the handling of tools. To increase boys'
            knowledge of tool terminology and safety. To develop Webelos scouts'
            creativity.



            Engineer
            Boys have a natural interest in how things work. The Engineer activity
            gives an introduction to how the big things in our lives work, such as
            things that we take for granted in our houses and communities.
            Objectives: To introduce Webelos scouts to a variety of engineering
            careers. To give the Webelos scouts some insight into the kinds of
             problems engineers solve. To keep in mind that an engineer's job is to
             apply the laws of physics and chemistry to solve a variety of problems in
             construction, manufacturing, and other areas.



            Handyman
            The Handyman activity teaches scouts how to make minor repairs at
            home and around the garage. They also learn how to take care of tools
            and their proper use.
            Objectives: To acquaint Webelos scouts with odd jobs that they could
            do to help out around their homes. To help Webelos learn the proper
            care and storage of tools. To make Webelos aware of the importance
            of the proper storage of household chemicals.



            Scientist
            Everyone likes to experiment. The Scientist activity will teach some of
            the basic laws of science and how to prove them through experiment.
            Objectives: To acquaint Webelos scouts with basic laws of physics.
            To give boys the opportunity to perform experiments. To introduce
            boys to atmospheric science. To teach boys a little about optics. To
            demonstrate a few "mysteries" of science.




                                        26
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                 November 6, 2008



Achievements Usually Done With Family
Artist activity
   # 4: Profile of a family member

Family Member activity
All Family Member activities

Fitness activity
   # 1: Child and drug abuse in handbook and do three items
   # 3: Five effects of smoking
   # 4: Tell about drugs
   # 5: Tell about a balanced diet
   # 6: Tell about alcohol

Handyman activity
  # 1: Wash a car
  # 2: Change a tire
  # 3: Replace a bulb in car taillight, turn signal, parking light or headlight
  # 4: Check oil level and tire pressure
  # 9: Arrange storage area for household cleaners and materials
  # 10: Build a sawhorse and stool for household use
  # 11: Mow a lawn
  # 12: Arrange storage area for hand tools or garden tools
  # 13: Clean and properly store hand tools or garden tools
  # 14: Mark hand tools or garden tools for identification

Naturalist activity
  # 3: Visit a museum of natural history, nature center, or zoo

Outdoorsman activity
  # 4: Help with a two-night campout away from home or two one-night campouts
  # 5: An evening outdoor activity that includes a campfire
  # 6: Cook own meal outdoors

Scholar activity
   # 7: Ask parents school survey questions

Traveler activity
   # 4: Take a trip by boat, bus, train, or airplane to someplace that interests you
   # 5: List and map out four trips. Be navigator on one trip of at least 25 miles with
         at least six turns
   # 6: Pack a suitcase
   # 7: Check a car first aid kit


                                           27
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                November 6, 2008



Compass Emblem and Compass Points
The compass emblem is worn on the right
pocket button of a Webelos uniform. It is
presented when the Scout has earned a total
of seven activity pins (including the three
required to earn the Webelos badge). A
metal compass point is added for each
additional four activity pins earned. When
the Webelos Scout has completed the
requirements for eleven activity pins, the
compass point is placed at the East location.
When fifteen activity pins have been earned,
a compass point is placed at the West
location. And when nineteen activity pins
have been earned, a compass point is placed
at the South location.




Super Achiever Patch
―But what if I earn all twenty Webelos activity pins?‖

                                           They are not available at all Scout Shops, but
                                           there is a special patch, the Super Achiever
                                           patch, that may be presented to the Webelos
                                           Scout who completes all twenty activities
                                           before crossing over into the Boy Scouts.

                                           This patch may be worn on the scout
                                           uniform in a plastic temporary patch holder
                                           which dangles from the right pocket button.
                                           It is not an official rank emblem, and as such
                                           it is never sewn onto the Scout‘s uniform.




                                            28
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                 November 6, 2008



ARROW OF LIGHT
                       The highest award a Cub Scout can earn is the Arrow of Light.
                       This badge is worn immediately below the left pocket, and is
                       the only Cub Scout rank award that may be worn on the Boy
                       Scout uniform.

To earn the Arrow of Light award, a Webelos Scout must:

   1. Be active in his Webelos den for at least six months after earning his Webelos
      badge.

   2. Repeat from memory and explain in his own words the Boy Scout Oath and the
      Twelve Points of the Scout Law, and tell how he has practiced them in everyday
      life.

   3. Give and explain the Boy Scout motto, slogan, sign, salute, and handshake which
      are all different from those of the Cub Scouts.

   4. Understand the significance of the First Class Scout badge. Know its parts, and
      tell what each part stands for.

   5. Tell how a Boy Scout uniform is different from a Webelos Scout uniform.

   6. Earn a total of eight Webelos activity pins including: Citizen, Fitness,
      Outdoorsman, and Readyman. The Scout must earn at least one from each of
      the five groups.

   7. With his Webelos den, he must visit at least one Boy Scout troop meeting and
      attend one Boy Scout-oriented outdoor activity.

   8. Participate in a Webelos overnight campout or day hike.

   9. After completing the above requirements, he must fill out an application to
      become a Boy Scout and return it to the Webelos Den Leader.




                                          29
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                           November 6, 2008



OTHER SPECIAL AWARDS
There are other special awards that a Scout may earn; some only once,
others repeatedly.

RELIGIOUS AWARDS
Duty to God is a key point at all levels of Scouting. ―The Boy Scouts of
America maintains that no member can grow into the best kind of citizen
without recognizing an obligation to God and, therefore, recognizes the
religious element in the training of the member, but it is absolutely
nonsectarian in its attitude toward that religious training. Its policy is that
the home and organization or group with which a member is connected
shall give definite attention to religious life.‖

Regardless of the award earned, a Cub Scout completing
one of the God and Country activities will earn the
Religious Square Knot to be worn on his Scout uniform
immediately above his left pocket.

                     Adults may also earn a Religious Square Knot, but they
                     must be nominated for it and have to have done some
                     action(s) to have earned it.

For more information about the various Religious Awards available, please
contact your Cubmaster or Committee Chairperson.




                                       30
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                          November 6, 2008



World Conservation Award

                  The Cub Scout version of the World Conservation Award
                  can be earned by Wolf or Bear Cub Scouts and by
                  Webelos Scouts. This award can be earned only once
                  while you are a Cub Scout.


As a Wolf Cub Scout, you can earn the Cub Scout World Conservation
Award by doing the following:
    Complete achievement #7 - Your Living World
    Complete all Arrow Points in two of the following three Electives:
            #13 - Birds
            #15 - Grow Something
            #19 - Fishing
    Participate in a den or pack conservation project

As a Bear Cub Scout, you can earn the Cub Scout World Conservation
Award by doing the following:
    Complete achievement #5 - Sharing your world with wildlife.
    Complete all Arrow Points in two of the following three Electives:
            #2 - Weather
            #12 - Nature Crafts
            #15 - Water and Soil Conservation
    Participate in a den or pack conservation project

As a Webelos Scout, you can earn the Cub Scout World Conservation
Award by doing the following:
    Earn the Forester activity badge.
    Earn the Naturalist activity badge.
    Earn the Outdoorsman activity badge.
    Participate in a den or pack conservation project.
Recruiter Patch
                        Cloth strip presented to boys for recruiting another boy
                        into the program. Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts center
                        this strip below and touching the right pocket.



                                     31
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                November 6, 2008


Whitlin’ Chip
                                    The Whitlin‘ Chip patch is earned along with a
                                    wallet card, usually by scouts in the Bear Cub year
                                    (Third Grade). The patch may be worn on the
                                    pocket flap of the right pocket on the Cub Scout
                                    uniform. The patch does not transfer to the Boy
                                    Scout uniform, although the scout may carry the
                                    wallet card for the rest of his life.

                                   The Official Whitlin‘ Chip may be earned by Bear
Cub Scouts mastering the "Knife Safety Rules":

"A Cub Scout knife is an important tool. You can do many things with its blades. The
cutting blade is the one you will use most of the time. With it you can make shavings
and chips and carve all kinds of things. You must be very careful when you whittle or
carve. Take good care of your knife. Always remember that a knife is a tool, not a toy.
Use it with care so that you don't hurt yourself or ruin what you are carving."




Leave No Trace Award
                      The patch is worn on the uniform shirt, as a "temporary" patch,
                      centered on the right pocket. Only one temporary patch may be
                      worn at a time.




                       Tiger Cub, Cub Scout, Webelos Scout
1.    Discuss with your leader or parent/guardian the importance of the Leave No
      Trace frontcountry guidelines.
2.    On three separate outings, practice the frontcountry guidelines of Leave No
      Trace.
3.    Boys in a Tiger Cub den complete the activities for Achievement 5, Let's Go
      Outdoors; boys in a Wolf den complete Requirement 7, Your Living World; boys
      in a Bear den complete Requirement 12, Family Outdoor Adventures; boys in a
      Webelos den earn the Outdoorsman activity badge.
4.    Participate in a Leave No Trace-related service project.
5.    Promise to practice the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines by signing the
      Cub Scout Leave No Trace Pledge.
6.    Draw a poster to illustrate the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines and
      display it at a pack meeting.



                                           32
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                November 6, 2008



Cub Scout Outdoor Activity Award
All Ranks Must...
Attend Cub Scout day camp or Cub Scout /
Webelos Scout resident (overnight) camp.

Rank-Specific Requirements
Tiger Cubs must complete one requirement in Achievement 5, "Let's Go Outdoors"
(Tiger Cub Handbook) and complete three of the outdoor activities listed below.

Wolf Cub Scouts must assemble the "Six Essentials for Going Outdoors" (Wolf
Handbook, Elective 23b) and discuss their purpose, and complete four of the outdoor
activities listed below.

Bear Cub Scouts must earn the Cub Scout Leave No Trace Award (Bear Handbook,
Elective 25h) and complete five of the outdoor activities listed below.

Webelos Scouts must earn the Outdoorsman Activity Badge (Webelos Handbook) and
complete six of the outdoor activities listed below.

OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES
With your den, pack, or family:
1. Participate in a nature hike in your local area. This can be on an organized,
     marked trail, or just a hike to observe nature in your area.
2. Participate in an outdoor activity such as a picnic or park fun day.
3. Explain the buddy system and tell what to do if lost. Explain the importance of
     cooperation.
4. Attend a pack overnighter. Be responsible by being prepared for the event.
5. Complete an outdoor service project in your community.
6. Complete a nature/conservation project in your area. This project should involve
     improving, beautifying, or supporting natural habitats. Discuss how this project
     helped you to respect nature.
7. Earn the Summertime Pack Award.
8. Participate in a nature observation activity. Describe or illustrate and display your
     observations at a den or pack meeting.
9. Participate in an outdoor aquatic activity. This can be an organized swim meet or
     just a den or pack swim.
10. Participate in an outdoor campfire program. Perform in a skit, sing a song, or take
     part in a ceremony.
11. Participate in an outdoor sporting event.
12. Participate in an outdoor Scout's Own or other worship service.
13. Explore a local city, county, state, or national park. Discuss with your den how a
     good citizen obeys the park rules.



                                           33
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                November 6, 2008



ACADEMIC AND SPORTS BELTLOOPS AND PINS
The Academics and Sports Program of the Cub
Scouts is yet another way to acknowledge personal
achievement on the part of the Cub Scout while
promoting a balance between the physical and
intellectual development of the scout.

There are two levels of achievement in thirty-three
subjects: twelve under Academics and twenty-one
under Sports. The first level is the belt loop. Each
Academics and Sports belt loop has three
requirements, and they are not very difficult for a
scout to achieve. The intent is to expose the scout
to new areas to build a more-rounded Scouting
experience.

The second level is the Academics and Sports pin. This level is significantly more
challenging and requires completion of the belt loop achievements in addition to at least
five other achievements for the pin.

The belt loops are metal, and are designed to slide over the Cub Scout webbing belt.
The pins are not to be worn on the Cub Scout uniform; instead they are placed on /




through the Cub Scout letter "C",            which may be sewn onto a patch vest or
patch blanket.

Belt Loops and pins are earned only by Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts
(not by adults). Requirements may be adjusted to accommodate the special needs of
boys with disabilities. Webelos Scouts may earn a belt loop a second time to qualify for
Webelos activity badges. Boys may earn belt loops more than once; however, leaders
should encourage boys to try different requirements and earn the pin.

Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts may complete requirements in a family,
den, pack, school or community environment. Tiger Cubs must work with their parents
or adult partners.




                                           34
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                       November 6, 2008


Academic Beltloops

          Art
           Make a list of common materials used to create visual art compositions.
           Demonstrate how six of the following elements of design are used in a drawing: lines,
            circles, dots, shapes, colors, patterns, textures, space, balance or perspective.
           Identify the three primary colors and the three secondary colors that can be made by
            mixing them. Use the primary and secondary colors to create a painting.


          Chess
               Identify the chess pieces and set up a chess board for play.
               Demonstrate the moves of each chess piece to your den leader or adult partner.
               Play a game of chess.



          Citizenship
           Develop a list of jobs you can do around the home. Chart your progress
             for one week.
           Make a poster showing things that you can do to be a good citizen.
           Participate in a family, den, or school service project.

          Communicating
           Tell a story or relate an incident to a group of people, such as your
            family, den or members of your class.
           Write a letter to a friend or relative.
           Make a poster about something that interests you. Explain the poster to
            your den.

          Computer
           Explain these parts of a personal computer: central processing unit
            (CPU), monitor, keyboard, mouse, modem and printer.
           Demonstrate how to start up and shut down a personal computer
            properly.
           Use your computer to prepare and print a document.

          Geography
           Draw a map of your neighborhood. Show natural and manmade
            features. Include a key or legend of map symbols.
           Learn about the physical geography of your community. Identify the
            major landforms within 100 miles. Discuss with an adult what you
            learned.
           Use a globe or map to locate the continents, the oceans, the equator
            and the northern and southern hemispheres. Learn how longitude and
            latitude lines are used to locate a site.


                                               35
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                                     November 6, 2008


          Heritages
           Talk with members of your family about your family heritage: its
            history, traditions and culture.
           Make a poster that shows the origins of your ancestors. Share it with
            your den or other group.
           Draw a family tree showing members of your family for three
            generations.

          Mathematics
           Do five activities within your home or school that require the use of
            mathematics. Explain to your den how you used everyday math.
           Keep track of the money you earn and spend for three weeks.
           Measure five items using both metric and non-metric measures. Find
            out about the history of the metric system of measurement.

          Music
           Explain why music is an important part of our culture.
           Pick a song with at least two verses and learn it by heart.
           Listen to four different types of music, either recorded or live.



          Science
           Explain the scientific method to your adult partner.
           Use the scientific method in a simple science project. Explain the
             results to an adult.
           Visit a museum, a laboratory, an observatory, a zoo, an aquarium or
             other facility that employs scientists. Talk to a scientist about his or her
             work.

          Weather
           Make a poster that shows and explains the water cycle.
           Set up a simple weather station to record rainfall, temperature, air
            pressure or evaporation for one week.
           Watch the weather forecast on a local television station.

          Wildlife Conservation
             Explain what natural resources are and why it's important to protect and conserve
              them.
             Make a poster that shows and explains the food chain. Describe to your den what
              happens if the food chain becomes broken or damaged.
             Learn about an endangered species. Make a report to your den that includes a
              picture, how the species came to be endangered and what is being done to save it.




                                             36
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                              November 6, 2008


Sports Beltloops

           Archery
            The Archery belt loop must be earned under BSA range-certified
              supervision.




           Badminton
            Explain the rules of badminton to your leader or adult partner.
            Spend at least 30 minutes practicing badminton skills.
            Participate in a badminton game.


           BB-Gun
            The BB-Gun shooting belt loop must be earned at a BSA facility range
             under BSA range-certified supervision.




           Baseball
            Explain the rules of baseball to your leader or adult partner.
            Spend at least 30 minutes practicing baseball skills.
            Participate in a baseball game.


           Basketball
            Explain the rules of basketball to your leader or adult partner.
            Spend at least 30 minutes practicing basketball skills.
            Participate in a basketball game.


               Bicycling
              Explain the rules of safe bicycling to your leader or adult partner.
              Demonstrate the correct fit of a bicycle helmet.
              Show how to ride a bike safely, using all hand signals and following all
               safety and traffic rules. Ride for at least half an hour with an adult
               partner, your family or your den.




                                         37
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                               November 6, 2008


           Bowling
            Explain to your leader or adult partner the rules of courtesy and safety
             for bowling.
            Show how to pick out a ball of proper weight and with finger holes
             that fit your hand.
            Play a complete game with your family or den.

           Fishing
            Review your local fishing regulations with your leader or adult partner.
              Explain why they are important, and commit to following them.
            Demonstrate how to properly bait a hook.
            Try to catch a fish.

               Golf
              Explain the rules of golf to your leader or adult partner. Explain the
               need for caution concerning golf clubs and golf balls.
              Spend at least 30 minutes practicing golfing skills.
              Participate in a round of golf (nine holes).

           Gymnastics
            Explain the six events of men's gymnastics: floor exercise, pommel
             horse, still rings, vaulting/side horse, parallel bars and horizontal bar.
            Participate in three of the six events using the proper equipment.
            Explain the safety rules you should follow to learn gymnastics.

           Marbles
            Explain the rules of Ringer or another marble game to your leader or
             adult partner.
            Spend at least 30 minutes practicing skills to playa the game of Ringer
             or another marble game.
            Participate in a marbles game.

               Physical Fitness
              Give a short report to your den or family on the dangers of drugs and
               alcohol.
              Practice finding your pulse and counting your heartbeats per minute.
               Determine your target heart rate.
              Practice five physical fitness skills regularly. Improve performance in
               each skill over a month. Skills could include pull-ups, curl-ups, the
               standing long jump, the 50-yard dash and the softball throw.




                                         38
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                              November 6, 2008


           Skating
            Explain ways to protect yourself while skating and the need for proper
             safety equipment.
            Spend at least 30 minutes practicing skating skills.
            Go skating with a family member or your den for a total of at least
             three hours. Chart your time.

           Skiing
            Explain the conditioning, clothing, equipment and planning needed for
              a ski activity.
            Be able to explain safety and courtesy codes for a downhill or cross-
              country ski trip.
            Go skiing. Demonstrate how to stop and turn.

           Soccer
            Explain the rules of soccer to your leader or adult partner.
            Spend at least 30 minutes practicing soccer skills.
            Participate in a soccer game.


           Softball
            Explain the rules of softball to your leader or adult partner.
            Spend at least 30 minutes practicing softball skills.
            Participate in a softball game.


           Swimming
            Explain basic rules of safety for swimming. Emphasize the buddy
             system.
            Pass the beginner swim level test.
            Demonstrate the ability to float on your back.

           Table Tennis
            Explain the rules of table tennis to your leader or adult partner.
            Spend at least 30 minutes practicing table tennis skills.
            Participate in a table tennis game.


           Tennis
            Explain the rules of tennis to your leader or adult partner.
            Spend at least 30 minutes practicing tennis skills.
            Participate in a tennis game.




                                        39
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                              November 6, 2008


           Ultimate
            Explain the rules of ultimate to your leader or adult partner.
            Spend at least 30 minutes practicing ultimate skills.
            Participate in a ultimate game.


           Volleyball
            Explain the rules of volleyball to your leader or adult partner.
            Spend at least 30 minutes practicing skills to play the sport of
              volleyball.
            Participate in a volleyball game.




                                        40
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177        November 6, 2008


Appendix
UNIFORMING AND PATCH PLACEMENT

Cub Scout Uniform Patch Placement




                                  41
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177        November 6, 2008


Adult Leader Uniform Patch Placement




                                  42
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                             November 6, 2008


DEFINITIONS:
             A registered youth member of the Boy Scouts of America between the
Cub Scout    ages of six and eleven who is in the First, Second, Third, Fourth or
             Fifth grades.
             A registered youth member of the Boy Scouts of America between the
             ages of eleven (or ten and having completed the Arrow of Light) and
Boy Scout
             eighteen; generally refers to boys who are registered with a Boy Scout
             troop.
             A registered adult member of the Boy Scouts of America; one who
Scouter
             pays to be in Boy Scouts.
Pack         The designation of a chartered unit in Cub Scouting.
Troop        The designation of a chartered unit in Boy Scouting.
             A grouping of Cub Scouts at the same level or rank (usually by grade
Den
             in school).
             A scouter who holds a position of authority and responsibility within a
             Pack; e.g. Committee Chairman; Chartered Organization
Adult Leader Representative; Den Leader; Committee Member; Cub Master; Tiger
             Cub Leader; Webelos Leader; or Assistants to Cub Master, Den
             Leader, Tiger Cub Leader, or Webelos Leader.
Requirement A required achievement for a scout‘s rank.
Elective     An optional achievement for a scout‘s rank.
             A geographic boundary of a local scouting area negotiated and
Council      approved by the National Boy Scout Council. Our council is the
             Greater St. Louis Area Council (GSLAC).
             A subset of a local council with specific geographic boundaries. Our
District
             district is the North Star District (NS).




                                         43
A PARENTS GUIDE TO CUB PACK 177                              November 6, 2008


Works Cited
Boy Scouts of America. (2008). Boy Scouts of America National Council. Retrieved 10
27, 2008, from What is Cub Scouting?: http://www.scouting.org/Media/FactSheets/02-
502.aspx
Boy Scouts of America. (2008). History of Cub Scouting. Retrieved 10 27, 2008, from
Boy Scouts of America National Council:
http://www.scouting.org/CubScouts/AboutCubScouts/history.aspx
Boy Scouts of America. (2008). Mission and Vision. Retrieved 10 27, 2008, from Boy
Scouts of America National Council: http://www.scouting.org/Legal/mission.aspx
Boy Scouts of America. (2008). Your role as a parent. Retrieved October 27, 2008, from
Boy Scouts of America National Council:
http://www.scouting.org/cubscouts/parents/role.aspx
Bump, P. (2007, July Thursday, July 26 - 5:09:00 PM). BLACKWELL CUB SCOUTS.
Retrieved October 27, 2008, from BLACKWELL CUB SCOUTS:
http://cubsinblackwell.clubspaces.com/object.aspx?id=8




                                         44

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:10
posted:11/15/2011
language:English
pages:44