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					               ZIP-RIB               ®

                          by
        Merchant & Evans, Inc.

The Tides @ Seaboard Point




                               The Point @ Moore’s Inlet


         Contractor – Erector
               MANUAL
             Merchant & Evans, Inc.
                  308 Connecticut Drive
              Burlington, New Jersey 08016
                           USA
            Phone 800.257.6215 609.387.3033
                     Fax 609.387.4838
                  http://www.ziprib.com
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®
                                 TABLE OF CONTENTS


    ZIP-RIB SYSTEM – SECTION A

          Specification Data Sheet PS-1

    MATERIAL HANDLING – SECTION B

          Unloading, Storage, Handling
                  Procedure, Weights, Forklift
                  Slings, Spreader Bars, Loading Roof
                  Storage, Standard Package
                  Modified Pack Miscellaneous
          Helicopter Information
          Guidelines for Damage Claims

    EQUIPMENT – SECTION C

          Zip-Rib Tools
                  Zipper Tool Operations and Checkout
                  Zipper Tool Parts, Button Punch and Pan End Tool
                  Un-zipper Tools

    ERECTION SUGGESTIONS – SECTION D

          Erection
                  Check-off, Planning, Layout
                  Uneven Surfaces, Installing Panels
                  Fixing for Thermal Movement, Installation Sequence
                  Fastening to Wood
                  Fastening to Steel, Concrete, Track Systems
                  Track Anchorage

    CLIPS AND FASTENERS – SECTION E

          Zip-Rib System Components
                  Typical Clip Usage
                  Ridge and Hip Closure Details
                  Knee Joint and Leg Clamps
                  Anchor and Fastener Selection Guidelines

    FLASHING AND SEALANTS – SECTION F

          Flashing Details
                  Hip Closure, Zip-Rib End Lap
                  Roof to Fascia Transition
          Diagonal Flashing, Flashing Lap Joints
          Sealants
          Flashing Fabrication
          Engineering Newsletter on Sealants
          Design Guide

    ORDER PLANNING, DELIVERY – SECTION G

          Planning Loads
WARRANTIES, PRODUCT LIMITATIONS – SECTION H

      Product Limitations – Items for Review
      Technical Reviews
      Structural, Finish and Leak Proof Warranties

JOBSITE ROLL FORMING – SECTION I

      Scheduling: Advantages and Disadvantages
      Equipment Space Requirements

ALTERNATE PRODUCTS – SECTION J

      Architectural vs. Structural Systems

JOB TIPS – SECTION K

      Estimating and Purchasing Check-off
      Design and Detailing Check-off
      Planning and Erection Check-off
              Walkways
              Snow Area Precautions
              Snow Guards

PROMOTION – SECTION L

      Zip-Rib Advantages
      Market Opportunities
      Literature

MISCELLANEOUS – SECTION M



PRICING, POLICY FORMS – SECTION N

      Accessory Price Sheet

CURVED ZIP-RIB – SECTION O

      General Information, Factory and Jobsite Curved
      Curving Responsibilities
      Space Requirements, Advantages, Disadvantages
      Costs
      Diagrams
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                        B-1

                                  UNLOADING, STORAGE & HANDLING

                         CAUTION: READ BEFORE RECEIVING MATERIAL
Inspect: Check for broken battens. Look for tie down damage between battens. Inspect for diesel smoke
stain.

Damage claim: See Contractor Manual, pg. B-7; accept delivery; note damage on the receipt; get photo
documentation; get driver's signature (make sure name is legible); protect from further damage; file
notification.

Unloading and Hoisting Bundles: Limit space between lift points to 30 feet and overhangs to 15 feet; use
slats under slings; avoid extending forks beyond bundle; protect bottom panels (see illustrations).

Storage: Slope for drainage; cover all bundles; vent ends; avoid wet ground; on roofs, tie down against wind
and brace on steep slopes.

Maximum Bundle Net Weights: *Standard 36 piece bundles for aluminum and 36 piece bundles for steel.

        Table is for Zip Rib in lbs./lf
         GAUGE            12” Panels        16” Panels
         0.040”                    35               43
         0.032”                    28               35
         22                        73               89
         24                        58               71
        *Smaller bundles available upon request at additional cost

UNLOADING

When using fork trucks:

-Use fiber board or plywood on blades to protect the bottom
of the panels. See figure A.
-Never extend the fork blades beyond the width of any
bundle as the tips may dig into adjoining bundles and
damage panels. See figure A.

-For panels over 34 feet, a spreader bar or strong-back
should be used to spread the load. See fig. B.

NOTES-
      1. Always use slings, not cables or chains which
      will damage panels.
      2. Place bundles on roof where load can be
      supported.
      3. Avoid loading decking, purlins, or bar joists at
      mid-span. Locate bundles over primary structural
      supports near column lines. Consult with the
      architect about safe roof loads.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.                                       B-2

ZIP-RIB®
When using cranes:

-Space between lift points should not exceed 30 feet and
overhangs should be limited to 15 feet.

-A spreader bar should be used if the distance between
outer pick points is greater than the length of the cable.
See figure C.

-Use spreader bar light enough so that the crane can lift
the combined weight of the bundle and the spreader bar.
Several slings can be supported by a single spreader bar
as shown in figure D.

-Place a spreader plank between sling and bottom of
bundle to prevent damage at corners. If a choker is used,
a spreader may also be required at the top of the bundle.
See figure E.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.                               B-3 

ZIP-RIB        ®

PLACING BUNDLES ON THE ROOF

        Place bundles on the roof at a place where the
        load can be supported. Avoid setting on purlins or
        decking away from trusses or joists; locate over
        beams at column lines. Check with the architect
        regarding safe roof loads.

        Since long panels are difficult to turn end for end, it
        is important that bundles placed on the roof be set
        with the ribs oriented for the direction of
        installation. Normally, the big hook is laid over the
        small hook with the small hook pointing in the
        direction of installation.

        See section D for a discussion on optional lay-
        outs. With pre-installed hook clips, reverse lay-out
        can be accomplished with installation in the
        direction of the big hook.




                                                   Normal Laying Direction




                                 Reversed Laying Direction; Possible only with pre-installed #2080
                                                       Sliding Hook Clips




All panels in a shipment are in the same direction. Check the end
of the bundle to determine which way you want the load to be
placed on the roof. All bundles should be placed on the roof
according to their intended direction of installation.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                       B-4
STORAGE SUGGESTIONS

       Space the bundles on the roof so that they are close to the actual area of installation. If
       bundles are left overnight, tie them down to prevent wind damage. Plan ground storage
       carefully so panels can be removed in the sequence they are needed. Ideally, bundles
       should be unloaded directly onto the roof. If ground storage cannot be avoided, do not allow
       sharp bends or dips that can pond water.




ADDITIONAL RECEIVING INFORMATION

Packaging: While Zip Rib is normally delivered in
standard bundles three stacks wide, 16" Zip Rib must
be packed in alternating 3 wide and 2 wide bundles
because of limitations in truck body widths. Short
lengths may be mixed with longer ones except that a
"staircase" bundle may not permit another bundle to
be loaded on top of it. Painted panels are shipped
with a polyethylene film on the big hook to prevent
transit   abrasion   between     painted    surfaces.
Accessories such as clips and closures are shipped in
cardboard cartons.

       NOTES:
             Remember, one fork lift or crane with
             a spreader bar should be used for
             lengths to 35 feet. Multiple fork lifts or
             a crane with a spreader bar will be
             required for lengths over 35 feet and
             no more than 15 feet should
             overhang at the ends.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                              B-5

MODIFIED DOMESTIC PACKAGING

72 PIECE BUNDLE - 24 PIECES PER SUB BUNDLE


        NOTE: This package can be done only upon special request at additional cost.




USE OF HELICOPTERS
In helicopter operations, quick disconnect cables and slings are used for lifting panels and are applied in a
manner similar to crane operations. If bundles are long and relatively flat, slings may be attached so that the
bundle is on edge when lifted. This minimizes pressure from the downdraft of the rotor and improves stability.
Consult page B-6 in the CE manual for additional information.

MANUAL ROOF LOADING
Panels can be loaded to the roof by hand, however, it is best to handle the panels in pairs on edges for
strength. One man per every 20 to 30 feet of length is usually sufficient. If panels must be curved to go
around corners or to go up a steep slope, panels should be handled individually with the ribs to the outside of
the curve. For long runs, dollies or hand carts can be designed for distributing bundles once they are on the
roof.

JOBSITE ROLLFORMING
If panels are to be formed on site, these and other preparations must be made in advance (see CE manual
section I for details):

1. Sufficient space for roll forming equipment and run-out tables.
         2. A 5000 pound capacity fork lift for loading coils to the pay-off.
         3. Covered storage of the coils on or near the jobsite with means for daily delivery if off site.
         4. Sufficient storage for fabricated panels. The entire job must be run at once, which, is
             normally much faster than panel installation.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                                B-6

                                      HELICOPTER INFORMATION

WHEN TO USE A HELICOPTER
A helicopter can lift an object of awkward size and shape. It can lift that object across a wide area of difficult
access. It can lift an object many, many stories into the air. These things can be done faster by helicopter than
by any other way. A helicopter should be considered where there are schedule problems, expensive ground
crews or standby crews, large quantities of material or minimum and accessibility problems.

OPERATING CREWS
A helicopter crew normally consists of three operating engineers: two signalmen and the pilot. One signalman
is at the pickup sight and one at the delivery point. For safety and expediency, all three members of the
helicopter crew are in constant radio contact.

Once you have decided to use a helicopter, you are in partnership with the helicopter company as the rigger.
This means that you will assume the cost of the ground and roofing crews. You will need a ground crew at the
pickup site and a roofing crew at the delivery site. The responsibility of the site crews is to hook up the cables
of the units and to guide the units into place at the delivery site. The number of personnel to be used at the
pickup and delivery sites will depend upon the size and weight of the units to be lifted. This is decided by the
helicopter company.

The roof and ground crews are usually selected from the union which claims jurisdiction over the materials to
be lifted.

SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
Before starting an operation, the pilot will brief the ground and roofing crews, go over safety precautions and
explain how the job is to be done. Hard hats and goggles must be worn for protection from flying debris. Loose
bundles may be moved by the down draft unless secured. No one can work under a helicopter except its crew.
Therefore, a helicopter cannot set material on a factory that is in production unless workers are cleared from
the flight pattern of the helicopter. On certain large construction projects with a large number of workers of
various trades, the helicopter must fly early in the morning, late in the afternoon or on a weekend.

SITE PREPARATION
The construction site must be properly prepared. Loose materials on the roof and on the ground must be
cleared from the area or weighted or tied down. Trash such as paper, plastic coverings and sheet metal would
be blown about, if loose, and possibly cause damage to persons or property. All extension cords for power
tools must be removed from the roof area.

PERMITS
In most large cities it is necessary to get permits for a helicopter airlift. The permits are usually obtained by the
helicopter company. In some cases streets surrounding the area of operation must be blocked off by police. In
smaller areas it is usually only necessary to advise the local authorities of the contemplated airlift.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                           B-7

                       GUIDELINES FOR SALESMEN AND CUSTOMERS
                                   in matters relating to
                           FREIGHT LOSS AND DAMAGE CLAIMS
                      based on the general terms and conditions of a contract sale.

A sales contract is much more than just an order for goods. It contains the binding agreements between the
buyer and seller relating to the responsibilities of one to the other.

When these responsibilities are faithfully performed the change of possession and title of goods and the
payment of the invoice follow in natural course.

Usually the general terms and conditions of this contract include five important terms which have a bearing on
freight loss and damage problems. (1) The payment of transportation charges is fixed; (2) delivery and
change of title are defined; (3) the seller warrants that the goods will be in merchantable condition as they
pass the FOB point; (4) the buyer agrees to be responsible for conditions resulting from his default, which
include all of the normal functions of receiving and recording; (5) the remedy for the injured party is usually
described.

This contract is between the buyer and the seller. Only in exceptional situations can a carrier be involved and
then only with his consent.

The sales contract is the authority for a shipper to negotiate a bill of lading contract with a carrier, which
contract can be concluded only by the signature of the customer on the delivery receipt. This contract is
binding, first on the shipper and the carrier, and when perfected by signature of consignee, between that
consignee and the carrier.

The carrier can transact claim settlement with either the shipper or the receiver and can lawfully require the
claimant to prove title to the goods by furnishing a copy of the invoice and bill of lading.

The carrier when settling claims may also require an inspection report and a delivery receipt. The
responsibility for obtaining the documents is provided for in the term and conditions of the sales contract
variously under warranty, default and remedy.

To the end that these affairs may be handled efficiently, the following guidelines for specific actions are
presented:

A. DEFINITIONS
      1.     Carrier Claim

                A Carrier Claim is a demand for monetary reimbursement for damage to a
                product and is filed when, for reasons of negligence, a transportation
                company fails to deliver a shipment to a customer in the same condition as it
                was when it was shipped.

        2.      Carrier Claim-Concealed Damage

                Same as above, except that the damage is not visible at the time of delivery,
                and may not be discovered for an undetermined length of time.

        3.      Exception Report

                Delivery Receipt copy of the freight bill with notes of the damage signed by
                the truck driver and the consignee
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                       B-8

     4.      Inspection Report

             A formal report made by a trained damage inspector who may either be an
             employee of the carrier or one of many inspection bureaus.

B.   JOINT INVOLVEMENT AND RESPONSIBILITY ON CARRIER CLAIMS
     1.     Three parties have rights and responsibilities in all Carrier Claims

             a. Customer
             b. Carrier
             c. Shipper

     2.      Who is Protected

             a. The interests of ALL THREE are protected, PROVIDING that the injured party (parties)
             TAKES ACTION PROMPTLY AND AS DIRECTED.

             b. The TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE further confirm this protection
             by indicating that (1) goods will be merchantable at the FOB point; (2)
             consignee is in default if he fails to take steps to protect all interests; (3)
             remedy requires timely notification in writing.

     3.      Carrier -Negotiating Obligation

             a. A Carrier is legally bound to negotiate claims ONLY with the PARTY
             HOLDING BENEFICIAL TITLE to the damaged goods. TITLE PASSES
             under terms of the Sales Contract.

             b. Usually when F.O.B. ORIGIN . . . . The CUSTOMER files the claim.
             When F.O.B. DESTINATION . . . . Seller files the claim.

     4.      When any one or more of the three parties deviates from the following
             responsibilities and instructions, full settlement among all parties may be
             delayed, and collection from the Carrier jeopardized.

                     RESPONSIBILITIES WHEN A CARRIER CLAIM OCCURS
A.   THE CUSTOMER
     1.    MUST take exception by BRIEFLY DESCRIBING THE DAMAGE on the
           delivery receipt and SECURING THE DRIVER'S SIGNATURE as a witness,
           at the time of the original delivery. KEEP A COPY. Take photographs when
           possible. EXAMPLE: "1 crate broken" or "2 pallet short" or "1 coil wet".

     2.      MUST receive all shipments unless the goods are totally worthless. Any
             goods which have a scrap value cannot be classed as worthless. Refusal to
             accept goods invokes Section 4 of the Bill of Lading Contract and may be
             found to be a default in the Contract of Sale resulting in back charges to
             consignee.

     3.      MUST store and protect the damaged goods from further deterioration and
             assist in repair or salvage. All costs can be claimed.

     4.      MUST call the Carrier's local office and request an inspection. If inspection
             not made within five days, must inspect and record his findings.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                     B-9

      5.    MUST contact the Seller IMMEDIATELY for claim action and ultimate
            disposition of the damaged goods.

      6.    If CONCEALED DAMAGE, not visible at time of delivery, is discovered later,
            the customer...
            a. Keeps all packaging and goods. Takes photos.
            b. MUST call Carrier for inspection within 15 days and confirm to him IN WRITING.
            c. Contact the Seller as per note 5 above.

B. THE CARRIER

      1.    MUST acknowledge damage at time of original delivery by DRIVER
            SIGNING EXCEPTION on delivery receipt, and leaving a copy with the
            customer.

      2.    MUST promptly provide inspection services on demand from customer.

      3.    SHOULD assist with mitigation by transporting the goods back to origin, or
            nearest place of repair, or dispose of salvage when appropriate and as
            instructed by the claimant.

C. THE SALESMAN

      1.    MUST accept COMPLETE RESPONSIBILITY for acquainting his customers,
            in his normal customer account coverage activity, of the customer's
            responsibilities when a Carrier Claim situation arises as outlined in Section
            "C" above.

      2.    MUST promptly investigate the complaint after it is reported to him by the
            customer, and arrive at the mutually agreed upon and verified amount of
            product in claim.

      3.    SHOULD refrain from expressing an opinion or committing for a settlement
            where there is any reasonable doubt that a bonafide claim exists.

      4.    MUST promptly advise pertinent details to the shipping facility traffic
            representative by wire or phone.

      5.    MUST prepare a full report for the shipping plant traffic manager and include
            copies of:

            a. Exception Report (Obtained from customer-See C-1 above)

            b. Inspection Report (Obtained from customer -See C-4 above)

            c. Contingency Cost Invoice (Obtained from customer - If applicable)

            d. Photographs (Obtained from customer - If available)

            Remarks should be sufficiently explanatory to enable traffic representative to
            proceed without delay.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                          B-10

              IMPORTANT: It will be the prerogative of the Shipping Facility Traffic
              Representative to RETURN to the Salesman for resubmitting any report
              which is incomplete or unsupported by the necessary documents to the
              extent that the Seller's recovery from the Carrier is jeopardized.

      6.      SHOULD undertake normal follow-up with Facility Traffic Representative on
              (a) salvage disposition instructions, (b) customer's compliance with same,
              and (c) proper credit to customer.

D. THE SHIPPING FACILITY- TRAFFIC REPRESENTATIVE

      AFTER preliminary notification from the Salesman that a Carrier Claim is in process (See E-
      4) AND receipt of the report and supporting documents (See E-5), the Shipping Facility Traffic
      Representative accepts complete responsibility for.......

      1.      Control of the claim investigation.

      2.      Accumulation and evaluation of all standard claim documents.

      3.      Recommendations which would mitigate loss, where this is possible.

      4.      Disposition of scrap or salvage.

      5.      Approval of and authorization to issue credit to the customer, if claim is valid.

      6.      Keeping the Salesman informed on status of claim and customer's credit.

      7.      Forward the freight Loss/Damage Claim. In some companies, claims are
              filed by shipping plants, in others claims may be filed by Corporate Traffic
              Department.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                             C-1


                                              ZIP RIB TOOLS
GENERAL:

Standard Zipper Tool operates on 110V for closing the hook rib over the bulb rib of panels.

Standard Unzipper Tool is used for opening the seams of previously installed Zip-Rib panels. This tool may
be used manually or pulled by the zipper tool when connected to it by means of a hitch.

Crimping Tool is used where there is not enough clearance for the zipper tool, for holding panels temporarily
prior to zipping or for closing the rib where the zipper cannot be started at the end.

Pan End Tool is used to form a raised end at ridges, and walls, etc., to back up the foam filler in the Low Pitch
Ridge Closure. Clearances of at least 3" beyond the end of the panel and 30" vertically are required for
operation of the tool.

Button Punch is used to fix panels against thermal movement by dimpling the sides of the rib into the clips
without penetrating the panel. Replacement die sets are also available.

ZIPPER TOOL OPERATION

The zipper tool normally is started and fed onto the end of the panel in the closed position. It does not need to
be opened and clamped on unless clearances at the panel end are restricted. When the zipper tool must be
clamped on, it is desirable to first use the Hand Crimper to close the seam over about a 6" length. Forcing the
machine closed over a rib will cause excess wear on the tie rods and gear teeth.

The top handle must be removed to place the tool, which weighs 27 lbs. in the box, but OSHA requires the
top handle in place whenever the tool is in operation. Always use a three-wire grounded electrical supply of
110 volts and maintain adequate voltage at the machine by properly sized service lines. (Machines wired for
220 volts are available on special order.) In extreme cases, a voltage control device may be required to keep
the power up. If the machine slows down or stalls, it is a good indication of low voltage.

This tool with standard rolls is engineered for all available gauges of Zip-Rib. Shafts are mounted in pre-
lubricated ball bearings that need no maintenance unless the machine has been submerged or filled with dirt.
External guide bearings and tie rods should be kept lubricated with light machine oil.

MAIN CHECKOUT POINTS

Electrical:     Grounded plug with good wire insulation; cord end connections tight; drill
                motor brushes at least 5/16" long; off-on switch working.

Rolls & Guides: Front and rear rolls in right position and right side up; guide bearing free
                turning and in alignment; extension bells tight and round.

Closing:Meeting faces clean; handle closes firmly.

Tighten any screws which are loose. Repair or replace items as necessary. Custom parts or major repairs
may be obtained through your Zip-Rib supplier. Standard commercial items may be procured locally.

Follow normal safety practice in checking to be sure that the machine is properly grounded and that the supply
cord is not cut or frayed. When the brushes inside the drill motor measure less than 5/16" long they should be
replaced. Short brushes can result in a burned armature.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                              C-2

ZIPPER TOOL

CHECKING FORMING ROLL POSITIONS

If the forming rolls have been removed for any
reason they should be checked to insure they
are installed right side up and right size front to
back. Rolls are marked (F) front and (R) for rear.
With the machine closed, the opening of the rear
rolls is slightly over 5/8" wide and the opening
gap of the front rolls (next to the guide end) is
slightly over 3/4" wide. The outside diameter of
the edge of the rolls closest to the machine is
larger than the other. There should be about
3/16" clearance between rolls at the edge away
from the machine, if not, one or more of the rolls
is upside down.

NOTE:   DISCONNECT           POWER       BEFORE
CHECKING ROLLS

Tie rods normally need no adjustment, but with
wear of the closing cam the lock nut may need to
be reset so the machine closes firmly. The
meeting halves of the machine must be clean. If
the cam handle does not close firmly, the
machine may come open during use. This is
particularly hazardous on steep roof or on walls.
If the machine is loose, adjust tie rod nuts and
lock nuts so that there is a small but noticeable
resistance to closing the cam handle.

Side guide rolls prevent the machine from tipping
sideways.       Machines equipped with 1-1/4"
diameter plastic wheels are designed to ride in
the flats of either 12" or 16" Zip-Rib. Machines
equipped with 7/8" diameter steel bearings ride
on the pencil ribs of 12" Zip-Rib and should not
be used on 16" panels.


CHECKING ALIGNMENT OF FRONT GUIDE
BEARINGS

The front guide bearing struts may become bent.
If so, realign to a 5/8" diameter rod placed
through the machine as shown below. To check
alignment of top front guide bearing, hold the rod
in the center and up against the top of both front
and back forming rolls as shown in the "middle
position" in the detail. The top front guide should
be within 1/16" of the rod. If the bearing is
touching the rod it should turn without resistance.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                            C-3

To check alignment of the bottom front guides pull the rod down and to the side as shown in the "side position"
of the detail. Again, the bearings should be within 1/16" of the rod or barely touching and free to turn. After
checking one side move the rod to the other side to get the opposite guide.

NOTE: DISCONNECT POWER BEFORE CHECKING TOOL

PAN END TOOL




STANDARD UNZIPPER TOOL OPERATION

1. Starting at the most convenient end of the panel, pry open the seam slightly with a screw
   driver or claw hammer.
2. Installer ZIPPER Tool over panel seam just slightly ahead of pried open end. Do not
   close the ZIPPER Tool at this point. Machined Aluminum Block should be bolted to rear
   of ZIPPER Tool. This part can remain on the tool during standard ZIPPING operations.
3. Insert Wheel Bracket into Machined Aluminum Block as illustrated.
4. Close the ZIPPER Tool at the point on the panel seam where the Tapered Wheel
   engages with the pried open seam.
5. Operate the ZIPPER Tool in the forward direction. As the tool moves forward, the
   tapered wheel will pry open the panel seam.
6. Depending on the location of the panel near transitions, flashings, etc., the last few feet of
   panel may require hand prying of the seam since the ZIPPER Tool may be obstructed
   from running off the end of the panel.
7. When working with mill finish materials and/or unzipping large areas of roof, application of
   light oil to the tapered wheel may reduce scuffing, scratching, and abrasions.
8. Vertical height adjustment of the Tapered Wheel is accomplished by moving the set-
   screw in the Wheel Bracket up or down which in turn changes the location of the Wheel
   Bracket in the Machined Aluminum Block. If panels are to be re-used, the seam should
   be opened just enough to allow disengagement of the big hook from the small hook of the
   panel. Too low of a setting will not open the seam sufficiently while too high of a setting
   will severely deform the big hook and make re-use difficult.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                         C-4




Un-ZIPPER Tool Mounted to back of ZIPPER Tool   Hand Crimping Tool
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                              D-1

                        ZIP-RIB CHECKOFF LIST, PLANNING AND INSTALLATION


PRELIMINARY PLANNING

*Check material delivery schedule: Anticipate rate of usage; insure adequate supply of basic parts and
accessories.

*Plan Storage: Provide abuse and weather protection, keep in mind proper alignment of Zip-Rib sides.

*Handling Equipment: Provide for lifting gear, slings, panel protection.

*Specs. & Details: Get approval on exceptions, file drawing & approved samples. Check field dimensions
against plans and lengths on order.


RECEIVING, STORAGE, HANDLING (REFER TO SECTION B)

*Inspect: Check battens, look for tie down damage between battens, diesel smoke.

*Damage Claim: See B-7; accept delivery; note damage on receipt; get driver's signature; protect from
further damage; file notification.

*Unloading and Hoisting Bundles: Limit overhangs to 15' and limit space between supports to 30'; use
slats under slings; avoid extending fork beyond bundle, use stop block; protect bottom panels.

*Handling: Pairs are stronger; if flexing is necessary, single panels may be curved with the ribs out to avoid
kinks.

*Storage: Slope for drainage; cover bare (unpainted) bundles; vent ends; avoid wet ground; on roofs, tie
down against wind and brace against sliding on steep slopes.

INSTALLATION

*Layout: Establish straight side and crosswise benchmarks; check for true structure.

*Verify Fasteners: Use proper size and length for strength requirements: proper head size for clip hole yet
provide for clearance from Zip-Rib.

*Train Crews: To allow for thermal movement; to avoid crimps in ribs; to avoid crews into ribs at clips; to
avoid fasteners into end lap joints of flashing; and to avoid attaching gable flashing to Zip-Rib. Crew training is
important even with experienced roofers since common practice are often not adequate for the installation of
the Zip-Rib system.

*Zip As You Go: Tie down last edge at night. Tie down all bundles and loose pieces.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                              D-2

EQUIPMENT CHECK LIST

        Unloading or hoisting rig.
        Spreader bar or strong-back.
        Slings & spreader planks.
        Under panel protection.
        Long tape for layout.
        Transit or line level.
        Chalk-line, piano wire.
        Marking pen, crayon, soapstone.
        Ladders, roof-protection at top.
        Duck-boards, chicken ladders.
        Power Generator - gas.
        Electric extension cords.
        Three-way pigtails.
        Drill motors.
        Extra chuck keys.
        Drill bits - in proper sizes for anchors.
        Aircraft snips L/R.
        Circular saw/metal cutting blades.
        Screw guns/bits/drive sleeves.
        Rivet gun/rivets.
        Explosive fastener tool/loads.
        Caulking gun/tubes.
        Vise grip pliers.
        Zipper Tool.
        Skylight Rolls.
        Hand Crimp Tool.
        Pan End Tool.
        Unzipper Tool.
        Button Punch Tool.

INSTALLATION LAYOUT

Rectangular roofs should be checked for square and straightness. Gable ends may not be straight. A
crooked gable will look bad on the finished job. If clips are badly out of line they may wear holes in the roof
with thermal movement. Set a true line for the gable clips and flashing with string line or transit. If the gable
trim will not easily cover the variation in the edge of the roof, the building may be straightened, clips shimmed,
or a new detail developed with the architect. Wind loads are highest at the edge of the roof, be sure gable
clips are securely anchored to solid material; do not attach gable clips to extension or overhangs unless
engineered for uplift.

Measure the roof lengthwise to confirm panel lengths, overhangs, coverage of flashing at eaves and at ridges,
and verify clearance for thermal movement. For example, be sure that eave drip angles have room for the
roof to shrink when it gets cold. If the structural eave and ridge are uneven, some adjustment of the flashing
may be required to keep the eave line and ridge cap straight. Again, if the end conditions do not have
sufficient tolerance, the building may need to be straightened.

Measure crosswise to the panels to see how the panel width module works out. To get the proper gable end
conditions, panels may be spread slightly - up to 1/4" over normal width. This must be a uniform spread -
abrupt changes in spacing can cause side pressure on clips that will accelerate wear with thermal movement.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.                                                                               D-3

ZIP-RIB®
UNEVEN SURFACES

Inspect visually for dips or undulations in
the plane of the roof and check problem
areas with a Zip-Rib panel or with a taut
wire. Longer fasteners may be required if
clips are shimmed.

Specific conditions to check carefully are
where there are transitions in the
structure under the roof. One example is
where the roof runs from steel purlins to
the top of a wall. This can be especially
out of line if the purlins are long and sag
or rise from either too little or too much
camber.


Another condition that can
produce a sharp change of
direction in the roof panel is
where joists on the structural
supports for purlins meet a
column      line   or    main
structural member. This is
especially true with wood
framing under a plywood deck.

When re-roofing over an existing deck, there may be large irregularities caused by settlement as well as
smaller undulations in the applied roofing material. If an existing structure is extended, look for sharp changes
of direction where the new work joins.

During installation, low spots in
an uneven roof will show up
because the roof panel will have
to be forced down on the clip.
When excessive force is needed
to bring a rib down to the level of
the clip, thermal movement can
cause the clip to wear through
the rib and low purlins must be
straightened or clips shimmed.
When structures are not true, it
is     generally    the    general
contractor's responsibility to correct the problem, but the difficulty must be reported as early as possible.
Another problem is appearance. The installed roof panels will follow the contour of the structure and the
strong linear pattern of the vertical ribs may emphasize the appearance of an irregular structure. There are no
hard and fast rules for what is "acceptable appearance" on an architectural project and requirements can vary
with the viewing position. When in doubt, get the architect's approval before proceeding with Zip-Rib
installation over any undulating surface.
From the standpoint of performance of the roof, Zip-Rib can tolerate variations crosswise to the panels but
lengthwise the pressure required to make the panels conform to the surface must not restrict thermal
movement or be enough to accelerate clip wear. The best way to verify this is to lay a 5 lb. weight (such as a
hammer) on the panel next to the rib before installing the clip and to shim any gaps that remain.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                                D-4

INSTALLING PANELS

Make sure that crews are using fasteners of the required size and length for the strength into the structure.
The head size must be large enough to hold the clip but small enough that it does not protrude above the
base where it can wear a hole in the roofing.

To avoid possible difficulties due to wind, installation of Zip-Rib panels should proceed in the direction of the
prevailing winds unless specified otherwise on the shop drawings.

When opening bundles, be careful that panels don't slide or get blown off the roof. Panels are best lifted in
pairs for easier handling.

Important specifications for clip type spacing and fasteners must be followed to assure the integrity of the
finished installation. They have been determined carefully on the basis of anticipated thermal movement (both
expansion and contraction), uplift loads, and overall building structure.

FIXING - FOR THERMAL MOVEMENT

Of particular importance is the correct placement of the clips "fixing" the panels against thermal movement.
To keep panels from working off the roof, at least one row of clips must be "fixed" to the panels. Normally,
panels are fixed at their midpoint to allow thermal movement in both directions. On steep roofs or long lengths
it may be necessary to fix panels at two or more adjacent rows of lips to provide the required holding power.
Fixed clips must be in a straight line to prevent panels from moving relative to each other. Where roof shape
or large opening prevent such a straight line attachment at the middle, the panels must be fixed at some point
away from their center. Hip roofs are fixed at the eave. Roofs with valleys are fixed at the ridge. Some
flashing conditions require fixing at one end or the other. Design rules for locating the fixed point are found in
the Design Guide section C-11.

There are several ways to "fix" the rib to the clip.                                  PINCH
                                                                                      CLOSED

Bolt and Nut: This is a more positive way to fix the
ribs at a clip. It requires drilling or punching a hole
through the stainless clip and the rib. To prevent                                     1/4" DIA. STAINLESS
                                                                                       STEEL NUT & BOLT
leakage, a neoprene faced washer needs to be                                           W/ NEOPRENE WASHER
                                                                                       ON EACH SIDE
placed on both sides of the rib. Always use stainless
steel nut bolt and washers to prevent rust. Never use
pop rivets.                                                                 PINCH BASE OF CLIP CLOSED
                                                                            TO PREVENT CLIP FROM SLIDING.
Screw into Structure: This is the most positive way
to secure a roof against movement because it is not                        # 2080 FIXED CLIP
limited by the strength of the clip. To eliminate leaks,
this method is usually employed where the fastener is               FLASHING FASTEN
                                                                    TO CLOSURE.
not exposed. When the roof is fixed at the ridge,
screws may be installed behind the foam closure. In
the case of a roof with end tapped panels, if the lap
point is the fixed point, the same screws that close
the lap may be used to fix the panels to the structure.             FOAM & MEATAL
                                                                    CLOSURE.                                   PAN
In all cases, avoid depressing the roof at the fastener                                                        END
by inserting a spacer equal to the clip base height,
and always use fasteners with neoprene faced
washers to avoid leaks. Never use nails to secure
                                                                    FASTEN THROUGH
Zip-Rib.                                                            PANEL BEHIND CLOSURE,
                                                                    FOR FIX POINT (2 FASTENERS
                                                                    PER PANEL). UTILIZE A 3/8"
                                                                    SHIM BETWEEN PANEL & SUBSTRATE.


                                                                           FIX PT. BEHIND CLOSURE
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                    D-5

INSTALLATION SEQUENCE

To install the first panel, start with gable clips. The hook rib must
be zipped or hand crimped ahead of time to fit loosely enough
for thermal movement. The gable clips also serve as attachment
parts for gable caps of flashing. Flashing should not be
fastened to the Zip-Rib panels because of thermal
movement of the panels relative to the roof.

If job conditions permit, it is usually more efficient to install clips
before panels are set. But don't get too far ahead of the panel
installation until you are sure the spacing is correct.

Job sequence is as follows:

1. Set panels: Align with gable clip or previous panel. Check
benchmarks every 10 or 20 feet. Apply rib sealant as specified.

2. Insert clips in rib and secure to structure.

3. Zip seams closed.

4. Fix panels at fix point.

5. Install flashing for penetrations as adjoining panels are
installed.

Avoid heavy traffic in any local area. Use duck-boards where
necessary to protect panels. Avoid walking on panels before
they are zipped. Take special care on painted panels since they
are especially susceptible to abuse.

Secure the edge of the last panel installed each evening. Do not
leave panels unzipped overnight. As a minimum, panels should
be hand crimped at each clip. Don't crimp the bulb over the clip,
crimp the hook over the bulb.

Zipping as the panels are installed distributes the walking loads
on the roof and also simplifies securing the job overnight. As a minimum, edges should be clamped down and
the hook rib of panels hand crimped over the bulb at the clips before they are left overnight. Do not crimp the
bulb rib of the last panel over the clip since this will interfere with thermal movement.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                             D-6

FASTENING ZIP-RIB ANCHOR CLIPS TO WOOD

Nails should not be used for fastening clips since they do not provide pull-out resistance. Self-tapping sheet
metal screws with type A points are preferred over wood screws since they are fully threaded and designed
for application by power tools.

Only self-drilling screws specifically designed for wood should be used, as self-drilling screws for metal do not
have the same holding strength. When power screwdrivers are used, they must be properly matched to the
fastener to prevent overdriving. This recommendation of the equipment manufacturer should always be
followed. In addition an extension may be needed to enable the tool to get close enough to the standing rib of
the panel.

FASTENING ANCHOR CLIPS TO STEEL

Screws in tapped holes or explosive driven drive pins in heavy structural steel exceed the requirements of
most Zip-Rib clips. Care must be exercised, however, in the selection of fasteners for light gauge steel or
steel decking. The fastener manufacturer should be able to demonstrate that its fasteners will provide an
adequate factor of safety. Note that most manufacturers publish ultimate pullout values which must be
reduced by at least half for safe design loads.

Self drilling fasteners have tips designed for specific steel thicknesses and should be used only within the
allowable ranges. Screws will not develop their rated strength if used in material thinner than for which they
were designed.

Steel decks designed for uniform loads must be checked for the concentrated or straight line load of the Zip-
Rib anchors.

FASTENING ANCHOR CLIPS TO CONCRETE

Make sure the concrete will provide a good base for the clips and that anchors will not produce any spalling.
Explosive or powder-actuated fasteners can be used for attaching clips to concrete, but in order to assure a
true surface, it is better to use an intermediate steel member or track that can be shimmed.

With lightweight insulating concrete and poured decks, fasteners must be attached to the structural support
underneath, since this type of concrete does not have adequate strength for holding the fasteners.

ANCHORING SUB-PURLINS TO IRREGULAR SURFACES

Find the high point on the roof deck with string-line or transit. Then lay out the roof to clear this point. Shim
the sub-purlin to this plane. Avoid high stacks of thin shims and avoid using plastic material which will creep
and loosen with time. Steel shims are preferred since they will not creep and the stacks can be welded
together to make them more rigid.

Anchor bolts usually carry the load of several clips and must be connected securely to the structure. They
must be rigid enough to resist the side pressure of thermal movement of the roof panels. If there is any
question about the strength of anchor bolts, refer to the section of "Anchor and Fasten Guidelines" in the Zip-
Rib Design Guide.

Spacing for sub-purlin anchors are determined by the holding strength of the anchor and the bending strength
of the sub-purlin. As a general rule, the end distance to the first anchor should not exceed one fourth the
allowable spacing between anchors. If the end distance at a joint is more than a foot, the sections of sub-
purlin should be spliced together.

If sub-purlin spacing is not critical the ends may be lapped side by side.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                            E-1

                                  ZIP-RIB SYSTEM COMPONENTS
CONCEALED ANCHOR CLIP SYSTEM WITHOUT PANEL PERFORATION

In the Zip-Rib roofing & siding system, concealed anchor clips are available which meet nearly any condition
of thermal movement, positive and negative loads and structure type.

Zip-Rib sales representatives and technical personnel can assist you in clip selection to meet the
requirements of your roof or side-wall project.

Consult the Zip-Rib Design Guide for additional technical information on clips and substrates.

Basic panel design is simple. Rugged, attractive 2-1/2" standing rib supplies high girder strength and puts
closure high above runoff levels.

Standing seam is roll-formed by zipper tool to locked position.

#2080 Sliding Hook Clip                                                       #2002 Gable Clip




#2006 Fixed-Point Clip                                                            #2050 Leg Clamp




Foam Closures                                                                      Metal Closures
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                  E-2

3 Piece Hip Closure Components                Keyhole Closure




Typical Ridge Closure Assembly with Pan End




Bearing Plate on Rigid Insulation                     #2080 Clip on Bearing Plate
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                               E-3

ACCESSORY DESCRIPTIONS and APPLICATIONS

PLYWOOD DECKING OR WOOD PURLINS
#2080 Sliding Hook clips and #2002 Gable clips can be mounted to plywood, tongue and groove wood
decking, or wood purlins and are spaced and anchored to comply with specified design loads.

METAL PURLINS AND METAL DECKING
-#2080 Sliding Hook Clips and #2002 Gable clips can be mounted to steel purlins. Use 1 to 3 screws per clip
depending on uplift load conditions. Fasteners must penetrate flange a minimum of 1".
-#2080 Sliding Hook clips and #2002 Gable clips can be mounted to purlins with draped blanket insulation.
Utilize wood sleeper or high density rigid board insulation to compress insulation and act as a thermal block.
-#2080 Sliding Hook clips and #2002 Gable clips can be installed on rigid board insulation (2 pound per cubic
foot minimum density) and 22 GA min. metal decking provided a 22 GA, 6" square bearing plate is used
between clip and insulation to spread load and keep edges of clip from cutting into insulation.

GABLE CLIP
#2002 Gable clips secure panel edges at ends of roof. These can also provide means of securing fascias,
side-wall flashings, building expansion joint covers which are fastened to the lip of the clip to allow thermal
movement of Zip-Rib panels.

CLAMPS
Standard #2050 leg clamps are available for securing accessories such as hand railings, catwalks, platforms
and snow rails without penetrating the Zip-Rib panels.

RIDGE CLOSURE PART NUMBERS
12" bare- #3071
12" painted- #3073
16" bare- #3074
16" painted- #3075

12” Rubber Inserts- #3070
16” Rubber Inserts- #3080

The ridge closure assembly consists of a flexible foam filler (Rubber Inserts) that resists air and water
penetration and it is protected and supported by a formed metal channel which attaches to the top of each rib.

The ridge cap covers the closure screws so there is no exposed penetration into the panel itself. Ridge cap
screws should fasten into metal closures ONLY and NOT into panel ribs which may cause leakage into the
building envelope. For additional protection, a pan end formed by the Zip-Rib Pan End Tool has the effect of
raising the upper end of the panel pan approximately 1-1/2". In severe climates, two ridge closure assemblies
are often recommended. The closure assembly may be further sealed by embedding the insert in wet sealant
and applying a seal tape across the top of the channel.

HIP CLOSURE SYSTEM
Hip Closure Channel- #3093
Hip Closure Support- #3094
Hip Foam Closure- #3095
The parts shown are field cut to diagonal requirements from 10' lengths of channel and support strip, and 25'
rolls of closure. Pan ending of diagonal cuts at hips is difficult hand work, and it is desirable to follow the same
procedures outlined for ridge closures in extreme climates. For slopes below 2:12 or in extreme climate
areas, two rows of closures are reasonable requirements. Refer to the Design Details for more specific
performance notes. The hip cap is screwed to this closure assembly between ribs, and covers the closure - to
- rib screws so there is no exposed penetration of the roof.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                              E-4

KEYHOLE CLOSURE
#3096 Keyhole Closures close off the vertical stem of the ZIP-RIB standing seam at eaves and valleys.
These should be installed as panels are placed into position and the locations thereof are as illustrated in the
ZIP-RIB Detail Plates which are available.

KNEE JOINT TRIM
Available in mill finish or standard Zip-Rib colors, this formed molding is used for various transition treatments
such as gambrels, fascia-to-soffit, etc. See Detail Plates for typical applications of the #7090 Knee Joint Trim.

LEG CLAMP (STAINLESS STEEL)
#2050 Leg Clamps are utilized for the securing of hand railings, guy wires, catwalks, machinery platforms,
snow guards, solar panels, etc. to completed installations without penetrating the Zip-Rib roofing. The
attachment accessory may be wood or metal, but must not interfere with roof panel thermal movement. The
maximum total dead load (roof and accessory) should not exceed 20 lbs. per clamp. See the ZIP-RIB Design
Guide for additional information.




                                                                                                               K
                                                                                                             AC
                                                                                                          ST
                                                                                                         UE
                                                                                                       FL
                                                                                                     TO
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                           E-5

ANCHOR AND FASTENER SELECTION GUIDELINES

ARCHITECT-ENGINEER RESPONSIBILITY

The strength of the individual components of the Zip-Rib system has been determined by air pressure load
testing. Zip-Rib design load recommendations for panels are based on minimum factors of safety as
recommended by national associations for the material involved.

The contractor should have the architect or engineer verify that the fasteners and the support
structure to which the clips are capable of carrying the intended loads.

Since there are many different materials and proprietary anchors (bolts, self drilling screws, masonry anchors)
the fastener manufacturer is frequently the best source of safe values for the architect or engineer to use
under specific job conditions. However, note that these sources usually provide average test values which
must be reduced by appropriate factors of safety to arrive at design values.

FASTENING TO WOOD

NAILS

Nails of any type are not recommended for use where direct pullout or withdrawal resistance is a
design factor.

SCREWS

The safe holding strength for screws is a function of length, screw size and dry density of the wood. For
attachment of Zip-Rib clips, self-tapping sheet metal screws (Type A point) are preferred over wood screws
since they are fully threaded and are designed for economical placement with power screw drivers. Safe
design values for standard threads are published by NFPA.

Self drilling screws (other than those designed specifically for wood) are not acceptable.

Screws especially designed for wood, as well as standard screws with Type A points are available from
Fabricated Products Division of Townsend Co. (Fabco WSD) the Buildex Division of Illinois Tool Works (Tru
Grip) or Construction Fasteners Inc. (Wood Grips or Type A point screws).

NATIONAL FOREST PRODUCTS ASSOCIATION SPECIFICATION NFPA

The "National Design Specification for Stress-Grade Lumber and Its Fastenings" of the National Forest
Products Association provides allowable load values that are recognized by code agencies.

For Coast Douglas Fir, Larch and Southern Pine with specific gravity of 0.51, the long-term holding power of
#12 (.216") and #14 (.242") screws would be 160#/inch and 179#/inch respectively. A 1/3 increase is allowed
for short duration loads, such as for wind, making these values 212 and 238.

Plywood values published by the American Plywood Association are not as broadly recognized as the above.
For Group I species CDX. average pullout values of tests indicate allowable pullout values should be 139#/in.
for #12 and 156#/ion. for #14 screws to resist wind loads.

In cases where fasteners pass through plywood decking into the structural framing, the plywood
thickness should not be figured in the embedment to allow for screws installed through joints in the
decking.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                             E-6

POWER SCREW DRIVERS
With the use of power screw drivers, the fastener and driver must be properly matched to prevent overdriving
and stripping of threads. Be sure to follow the recommendations of the manufacturer in driving equipment
used.

FASTENING TO CONCRETE
GENERAL
One method of attachment to concrete is the use of explosive or powder actuated fasteners. The condition of
the concrete must be such that it will make a good base for the Zip-Rib and accept the anchor without
spalling.

Lightweight insulating concrete, cement-fiber plants or poured decks do not have adequate strength
for individual fasteners.

The attachments for these roofs will have to be made to the structural support deck underneath.

Consult the codes and fastener manufacturers for safe holding values and minimum embedments for
anchors of this type.

Because holes drilled under field conditions tend to be less precise than those drilled for laboratory tests, the
codes may be significantly more conservative than most manufacturers' tables.

Code values "with special inspection" may be double the allowable loads for these fasteners installed without
special inspection, and the inspection cost may warrant the savings in fastener material and installation labor.

Make certain that tracks do not span construction joints in a way that the track must resist building movement.

FASTENING TO STEEL
Screws in tapped holes or explosive driven drive pins in heavy structural steel exceed the requirements of
most Zip-Rib clips. Care must be exercised, however, in the selection of fasteners for light gauge steel or
steel decking. The fastener manufacturer should be able to demonstrate that its fasteners will provide an
adequate factor of safety.

Self-drilling fasteners of the same screw size can have markedly different strengths because of variations in
the size of the starting hole they make. Some are small for thin sheet (lap joint fasteners); others are for
heavier gauge. When joining heavy gauge track to thinner gauge deck, the screw must be sized for the deck
gauge to develop its rate strength. Steel decks designed for uniform loads must be checked for the
concentrated or straight line load for the Zip-Rib anchors.

FLASHING FASTENERS
Wherever possible, fasteners should not penetrate the Zip-Rib panel or flashing in such a way that leakage
will pass on to the interior. Where screws must penetrate the building, a self-sealing type, such as with an
integral sealing washer on the exposed surface, should be used.

Tubular rivets, such as pop-rivets, will leak and should never be used in this manner unless they are
sealed individually with a good grade of exterior sealant.

Zip-Rib recommends that fasteners be no smaller than #14 screws or 3/16" diameter rivets for attaching
flashing, drip angle, closures or trim members to Zip-Rib panels or to each other.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                            F-1

FLASHING DETAILS
SPECIAL CLOSURE ASSEMBLY FOR ZIP-RIB ROOF HIP
The closure support may be continuous or cut into individual
pieces long enough to span between ribs. Attach closure support
to ribs and to channel at several places with pan head screws.


END SPLICES



                                                                    UPPER PANEL.


                                                                    APPLY TWO ROWS OF
                                                                    SEALANT TAPE AS SHOWN

                                                                    UTILIZE 9 BULB TITE
                                                                    RIVETS AT LAP FOR 16"
                                                                    WIDE PANEL AS SHOWN
                                                                    BELOW & 6 RIVETS FOR
                                                                    12" PANEL, ONE ON EACH
                                                                    SIDE OF LAP BTW. BEADS.
                                                                     2"1
                                                                    AP
                                                                 RL
                                                            VE
                                                            DO
                                                          DE
                                                        EN
                                                      MM




     DAB OF
     SEALANT
                                                   CO
                                                RE




                                                      LOWER PANEL.          PLAN
                                           NOTE: EVERY OTHER PANEL LAP
                                               IS TO BE STAGGERED 24"

                              ZIP RIB - PANEL LAP
     STEP 1 - Close bulb rib of underlap panel for length of lap and install.

                  Close Underlap               Open Overlap
                      (Step 1)                    (Step 3)
     STEP 2 - Apply two lines of sealant across the underlap panel. Apply a dab of sealant
     to the bulb at the end of the underlap panel, before setting down the upper panel. Be
     careful not to block capillary groove at male leg.
     STEP 3 - Open bulb rib of overlapping panel for length of lap and press panel into place.
     STEP 4 - Hand crimp hook and the bulb ribs of the overlap panel for tight nesting of the
     ribs. Put a dab of sealant below the end of the overlapping bulb rib.
     STEP 5 - Install fasteners above the bottom line of sealant in each flat. Use rivets as
     specified above.
     STEP 6 - Zip the assembled rib immediately.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                                                                                    F-2

GAMBREL ROOF JOINT OR ROOF TO MANSARD, FASCIA OR SIDING- Good for all gauges

                                                                                                                       KNEE JOINT TRIM
                                                                                                                       UTILIZE BACK TO BACK
                                                                                                                       SPLICE PLATES SO FINISH
                                                                                                                       IS ON BOTH SIDES.
                          = ROOF PITCH
                                                                                                                       FILL VOID WITH SEALANT.
                                         COPE VERTICAL PANEL RIBS TO
                                         FIT INSIDE ROOF RIBS.                                                         FIELD CUT PANEL RIB DOWN
                                                                                                                       THROUGH STIFFENING BEADS.
                                                                                                                       SEAL AS REQUIRED.
                                                                                                                       NOTE : STIFFENING BEADS IN
                                                                                                                       MIDDLE OF PANEL WILL TAKE
                                  .                                                                                    THE BEND. (DO NOT CUT THEM)
 COPE DETAIL              4"
                               MIN
                                                                                                     SECTION "A"



                                                                                                                   A                                               CUTTING DETAIL
                                                      #7090 KNEE JOINT TRIM.
           4" MIN.




                                                RIVET PANEL RIBS TOGETHER.




                                                                                      4" MIN. TYP.
                                                                                                                                         KNEE JOINT TRIM.
                                          JOINT ANGLE, RIVET TO ROOF PNL.                                                   A
                                                                                                                                FIELD CUT PANEL RIB AND
                                          & VERT. PNL. @ 3" 0.C. ( MAX.).                                                       BEND PANEL TO SUIT
                                                                                                                                FASCIA CONDTION.
                                          BACKER ROD & SEALANT IN STIFFENING                                                    INSTALL BACK TO BACK
                                                                                                                                SPLICE PLATES AS EACH
                                          BEAD. ALSO SEAL BETWEEN PANELS                                                        PANEL IS INSTALLED.
                                          AND JOINT ANGLE.                                                                      PLATES CAN NOT BE IN-
                                                                                                                                STALLED AFTER PANELS
                                                                                                                                ARE ZIPPED TOGETHER.
                                          SEALANT IN VERTICAL RIB.
                                                                                                                                RIVETS OPITIONAL OUT OF
                                          F5 RIVETS REQUIRED IN                                                                 SNOW AREAS.
                                          SNOW AREAS.                                                                                                       1/4"



                                                                                                               ONE PIECE ROOF TO FASCIA DETAIL
                     KNEE JOINT DETAIL - TWO PIECE                                                             * THIS DETAIL WILL ONLY WORK IN 22 GA. STEEL

    Product :            Application :               Plate :                                              Product :         Application :                              Plate :

    ZIP-RIB              KNEE JOINT                 ZR-15                                                 ZIP-RIB           KNEE JOINT                                 ZR-16



DIAGONAL FLASHING                                                              RIDGE FLASHING.
When there is unbalanced thermal movement on                                   METAL & FOAM CLOSURE
opposite sides of a diagonal flashing member, the                              SYSTEM. (Do not set in
                                                                               sealant if second row is used.)
assembly must provide for longitudinal slippage as well
as flexing crosswise to the roof. This condition occurs                        CONT. SLIP JOINT CLEAT.
                                                                               (Mandatory at diagonal cuts.)
on diagonal cut gables or ridges where there is roofing
on only one side of the joint. It may occur at valleys or                      #2080 SLIDING
                                                                               HOOK CLIP.
hips where the slope length or pitch is not the same on
both sides. In these cases an interlocking slip joint,                         ZIP RIB
                                                                               PANEL.
such as shown below will keep the sections together
yet allow both kinds of motion.




                                                                                                             SECOND ROW OF
                                                                                                             CLOSURES IS OPTIONAL
                                                                                                             WHERE PAN ENDING
                                                                                                             CAN NOT BE ACHIEVED,
                                                                                                             ON DIAGONAL CUTS. SET
                                                                                                             IN SEALANT.
                                                                                                             EXPOSE FASTEN FLASHING.




                                                                                Product :                      Application :                                        Plate :
                                                                                                              SHED ROOF RIDGE /
                                                                                ZIP-RIB                        DIAGONAL RIDGE                                      ZR-32
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                            F-3




             1. COVER PLATES FOR RIDGE & GUTTER ARE 6" WIDE
                FASTEN TO EACH SIDE OF JOINT. APPLY SEALANT
                100% TO EACH END OF COVER PLATE.
                          O/S CP                  1/4" BUTT JT.




             1a. COVER PLATES FOR FASCIA'S ECT... ARE 6" WIDE
                 WITHOUT THE USE OF FASTENERS. APPLY SEALANT
                 100% TO EACH END OF COVER PLATE.

                          I/S CP.                 1/4" BUTT JT.




             2. LAP JOINTS ARE 4" LONG MIN. AND 100% SEALED.
                DO NOT FASTEN LAPS TOGETHER. LAPS SHOULD BE
                SHINGLED IN DIRECTION OF FLOW.
                (NOT RECOMMENDED FOR HORIZONTAL RUNS.)
                                            4" MIN.




                                    DIRECTION OF FLOW




             3. FLASHING EXPANSION JOINTS ARE AT EVERY THIRD
                JOINT IN ALUMINUM & EVERY FIFTH JT. IN STEEL.
                FASTEN AND SEAL OUTSIDE COVER PLATE TO ONE
                SIDE OF JOINT. FASTEN & SEAL INSIDE COV. PL. TO
                OTHER SIDE OF JOINT. LEAVE 1/2" GAP AT JOINT
                BETWEEN FLASHINGS. OFFSET COV. PL. 1" FROM ONE
                ANOTHER SO THAT RIVETS DO NOT INTERFERE WITH
                EXPANSION & CONTRACTION. (SEE BELOW)
                                          1/2"                 1"




                          O/S CP                      I/S CP




Merchant & Evans Inc.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                             F-4

                                                  SEALANTS

The Zip-Rib roofing and siding system is designed and manufactured to give 20 plus years of service. DO
NOT USE A 5-YEAR SEALANT WITH A 20-YEAR ROOF SYSTEM.

For exposed conditions, use only good quality sealants that will cure to a rubber-like consistency. Do not use
oil base or asphalt-type caulking or mastic. For concealed applications a non-hardening sealant may be used.
In any case, the sealant must have good adhesion, retain its properties at temperature extreme, and resist
deterioration from water heat and sunlight.

A major factor in the successful application of sealants is surface preparation. Make certain that the surface is
prepared in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations.

Sealant will function best if installed between parts when they are assembled rather than being forced into the
completed joint.

Except in heavy freeze areas where ice may spread joints apart, it is best to apply sealant away from the open
face of joints so that the metal will shield the seal and protect it from direct exposure to water or sunlight.

                                              FLASHING BENDS

Aluminum sheet must be fabricated with a large bend radius to avoid cracking the metal and/or the paint.
When metal is formed to a zero “T” (“T” = metal thickness) bend, the metal and paint will usually fracture. To
avoid metal and paint fractures a minimum inside bend of 3T is suggested.

To get a larger bend radius on a sharp steel die it may be necessary to add a bent strip of the desired
thickness to the nose of the male die. This can be held in place with masking tape.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                         F-5

                                      ENGINEERING NEWSLETTER

                                   IN-HOUSE SEALANT/CAULK TESTS

In-house tests were performed on randomly chosen sealants and caulks recommended by manufacturers for
the metal roofing and siding industry. The sealants tested are from one of four categories:

        1.      Gun Grade Butyl Sealants
        2.      Silicone Sealants
        3.      One Part Polyurethane Sealants
        4.      Butyl Tapes

All were observed over a three (3) day period. Gun Grade Butyl Sealants and Butyl Tapes are primarily used
for little or no joint movement. The sealant should remain soft and tacky after 48 hours. They are normally
used as a gasket type seal held in compression. Silicone and One Part Polyurethane Sealants are primarily
used where there are dynamically moving joints. Both can be exposed to the elements and should remain
“rubber-like”. Silicone Sealants should be non-acetic acid cured.

Three beads of each sealant were applied to a 3” x 4” piece of metal. Characteristics such as skinning over,
tackiness, becoming “rubber-like”, curing, and texture were observed. Also, one bead of each sealant was
applied between two pieces of metal. Adhesion and bonding characteristics were observed.

For the Butyl Tapes, a 2 ½” piece was applied between two pieces of metal.           Adhesion and bonding
characteristics were also observed.

The proceeding is the manufacturers brief description and application of each product tested, followed by my
observation after testing. For product limitations and complete technical information, refer to the
manufacturer or Merchant & Evans Engineering Department.

                                                Butyl Tapes

MB – 10A Sealant Tape/ Gulf Seal Specialties, Inc.
Description: Butyl Rubber Based Extruded Sealant on Silicone Release Paper.
Application: Applied between two flat surfaces (normally held in compression). EG: Lap joints and a variety
of construction joints.
Observation: After three (3) days, Tape held a relatively strong bond. It exhibited little tackiness.

TC-95 Modified Isobutylene Tripolymer Tape/ Chemseco
Description: High Performance Permanently Elastic Modified Butyl Tape on Silicone Release Backing
Paper.
Application: Ideally for standing seam roof systems and endlaps. Applied between two flat surfaces where
superior tensile strength, extensibility, weathering, and good adhesion are required.
Observation: After three days, Tape held a very strong bond. Tape also remained very tacky.

                                        Gun Grade Butyl Sealants

PSI – 301 Butyl Rubber Caulk/ Polymeric Systems, Inc.
Description: A One Part Gun Grade Butyl Rubber Caulking Compound.
Application: For little or no joint movement for sealing panel perimeters, copings and flashings. Durable and
long lasting.
Observation: After three days, sealant was still tacky to touch. Seal was fairly easy to pull apart and
remained soft.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                           F-6

SM-532/ Chemseco
Description: A High Solid, Non-Skinning, Non-Drying, Modified Polyisobutylene Caulk.
Application: Ideal for sealing batten cleats of standing seam roofs and wall panel joints. Can withstand joint
movement.
Observation: After three days, sealant was very tacky to touch. Seal was fairly easy to pull apart and
remained soft.

Chemcaulk 300/ Chem Caulk
Description: A One Part Polymeric Butyl Rubber Caulk.
Application: For non-moving joints when long life, minimum maintenance, and weathering characteristics are
desirable.
Observation: After three days, sealant skinned over and was not tacky to touch, however, the inside stayed
tacky. Seal was fairly easy to pull apart and remained soft.

                                              Silicone Sealants
  PSI 631 RTV/ Polymeric Systems, Inc. (non-acetic acid cured)
  Description: A Non-Corrosive One Part, Neutral Cure, Moisture Curing Sealant. Cures to a tough flexible
  rubber and has excellent adhesion to metals.
  Application: Ideal for all building components of non-porous material.
  Observation: After three days, sealant became “rubber-like”. Seal was difficult to pull apart. Inside of seal
  did not completely cure.

  Silglaze -N- Sealant SCS 2500/ General Electric (non-acetic acid cured)
  Description: A General Purpose Sealant with a 50% Dynamic Movement Capability.
  Application: Good adhesion to a wide variety of substrates such as Kynar 500 resin based paints, glass,
  copper, mill anodized finish aluminum, galvanized steel, etc.
  Observations: After three days, sealant became “rubber-like” and flexible. Of the three tested, this sealant
  was the most difficult to pull part and the most cured.

  MB-45A Polymer Seam Sealer/ Gulf Seal
  Description: A Medium Viscosity, High Performance, Elastomeric Sealant. Exhibits “rubber-like”
  characteristics.
  Application: For sealing joints on roofs or side walls on materials such as galvanized steel, aluminum and
  gutters.
  Observation: After three days, sealant exhibited a soft “rubber-like” texture. Outside skinned over. Inside
  was not very tacky. Seal did not completely cure.

                                      One Part Polyurethane Sealants
PSI – 901/ Polymeric Systems, Inc.
Description: A Non-Sagging, Low Modulus Sealant – ideal for dynamically moving joints. Has extraordinary
adhesion and cohesion characteristics.
Application: Ideal for sealing expansion joints and perimeter caulking.
Observation: After three days, sealant became “rubber-like” and not completely cured. Seal was very
difficult to pull apart.

Sikaflex 201/ Chemseco
Description: A General Purpose Industrial Sealant with excellent adhesion to painted materials, aluminized
steel, Galvalume, etc. Non-corrosive.
Application: Ideal for standing seam endlaps, roof curbs, jacks, gutters, eaves, valleys, skylights, windows
and doors.
Observation: After three days, sealant remained soft but skinned over. This sealant was the most difficult to
pull apart.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                          F-7

Chemcaulk 900 / Chemcaulk
Description: A One Part Gun Grade Sealant which cures by reaction with humidity in air to a rubbery highly
Elastomeric Sealant.
Application: Ideal for moving exterior joints and most common building materials.
Observation: After three days, sealant exhibited a hard “rubber-like” texture. Seal was very difficult to pull
part and not completely cured.

A typical application properties chart is available upon request. For future inquires, Merchant & Evans would
like to recommend the following sealants, caulks, and tapes from each category:

        1.      Gun Grade Butyl Sealant          -       SM-532/ Chemseco
        2.      Silicone Sealant                 -       Silglaze -N- Sealant, SCS 2500/ GE
        3.      One Part Polyurethane Sealant    -       Sikaflex 201/ Chemseco
        4.      Butyl Tapes                      -       TC-95/ Chemseco

In closing, before choosing a sealant, refer to the manufacturer’s complete technical information on each
product. Also, it is recommended that the sealant be field tested in its environment to determine its
effectiveness.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                                 G-1

                                      ESTIMATING TRUCK LOADS

Standard available trucks have a 40 ft. long by 8 ft. wide bed and can carry eight standard bundles for a total of
288 pieces 12” ZIP-RIB or 240 pieces 16” ZIP-RIB up to 40 ft. long. 12” ZIP-RIB is packed in 3-wide bundles
and 2 bundles wide per truck. 16” ZIP-RIB is packed in alternating 3-wide and 2-wide bundles and is packed 2
bundles wide like 12” ZIP-RIB. Most trucks available for Zip-Rib cannot overhang in the front, but some states
allow overhanging loads. Contact Merchant & Evans for permissible overhangs in various states.

Panels longer than this will require a stretch trailer which can be extended up to 85 ft. and with the maximum
overhangs accommodate lengths up to 100 ft. Note: Multiple lengths (i.e., bundles of 30 ft. panels) cannot be
shipped end-to-end on a stretch trailer. Lengths over 45 ft. require special trucking, and permits may not be
available in all states. Before quoting a price on any project involving lengths over 45 ft., consult the nearest Zip-
Rib plant for an indication of possible shipping problems.

When quantities of specific sizes do not make a full 36 piece bundle, shorter lengths can be packed on top of
longer lengths, however, “stair-cased” bundles are extremely inefficient since stacking is limited. When less than
4 bundles are required in a shipment, the size of the bundle may be increased or decreased slightly to make the
load more efficient. Some partial bundles may be feasible on full loads, depending upon height limits of the
route.

In planning to lay short panels over longer ones, several short panels may be laid end-to-end in each layer to fill
out the lengths. As a general rule, to avoid packaging extras, there should be at least six pieces of any given
size. In loading the truck the shorter bundles must be on top. Each space, except the uppermost layer, must
contain a nested pair of panels.

Remember to allow for accessories. Heavy flashing sheet cannot be placed on top of the Zip-Rib without danger
of crushing the panels.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                                  H-1
                                             Product Limitations
CERTAIN PROJECTS HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED AS HAVING THE KIND OF RISK FOR ZIP-RIB THAT
REQUIRES A TECHNICAL REVIEW OF SPECIFICATIONS AND ARCHITECTURAL PLANS PRIOR TO
QUOTING OR SUPPLYING MATERIALS FOR THAT PARTICULAR END USE. SHOP DETAILS ON
THESE MUST BE REVIEWED PRIOR TO SHIPMENT OF MATERIAL. IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF
THE CONTRACTOR OR DESIGNER TO MAKE MERCHANT & EVANS AWARE OF ANY SPECIAL
PROJECT CIRCUMSTANCES THAT MAY REQUIRE A REVIEW BY THE MANUFACTURER. THESE
USES ARE AS FOLLOWS:

CURVED SURFACES - WARPED SURFACES

Any applications involving Zip-Rib on surfaces that are curved relative to the length of the panel must be
reviewed. (Surfaces curved relative to the width of the panel pose no special problems.) Thermal movement is
critical and load capacity is modified by the bending of the panel. Warped roof surfaces (with twisted panels)
must be reviewed to verify that the dimensions are within the panel limitations.

LONG LENGTHS

Lengths in excess of 85 feet are difficult to ship and handle. Thermal movement and temperature stress are
major considerations in these long lengths. Numerous jobs have been successfully installed in lengths to 100
feet and some others up to 290 feet, but contractors should have the benefit of the past experience with these
longer lengths. Long lengths includes spliced (end lapped) sheets that make the total run over 85'.

SPLICED PANELS AND END LAPS

Experience with field made, close fitting, splice end laps has been successful in 24 GA steel and .032"
aluminum Zip-Rib when the proposed staggered-joint is used with suitable sealant and fasteners. Only offset
(separated) end laps should be considered in .040" and 22 GA steel. Some variations are feasible to suit
project conditions, but a job review to resolve the position of the laps, the fixed point and lap details is essential.

TAPERED PANELS AND CONICAL SURFACES

Within certain limits, Zip-Rib has the capability of manufacturing tapered panels for conical surfaces. A job
review is necessary to verify that the project conditions can be met.

JOBS OVER 400 SQUARES

Jobs of this size can pose significant losses if problems develop, so a job review of specifications and details is
required to make certain that the Contractor-Erectors are alerted to potential problem areas.

JOBS OUTSIDE THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES

Any job outside the continental limits of the United States except Alaska and Hawaii. This policy is necessary
because of the cost and difficulty of servicing these areas. Specific terms and conditions apply to orders
coming from foreign countries, and a Zip-Rib training session is required for all erectors.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                        H-2
                                           TECHNICAL REVIEWS

In order to protect Zip-Rib and our customers from unnecessary risk, certain Zip-Rib projects require a
technical review prior to quoting. While we prefer plans and specifications, the information can be given by
telephone. If we are successful bidders, we will require technical review of shop drawings prior to shipment
of material. These projects are those involving:

        Over 400 squares
        Lengths over 85 ft.
        Spliced or end-lapped panels.
        Curved or tapered panels
        Export from US (except Alaska and Hawaii)


INFORMATION REQUIRED FOR REVIEW INCLUDES:

 Roof plan: lengths, hips, valleys, penetrations, knee joints.
        Section details: slopes, perimeter conditions.
        Supports: materials, spacings, insulation( specific type).
        Specifications: uplift and down load, codes, performance standards, warranty, scope of work.
        Special conditions: snow, snow-guards, harsh environment, fumes, delivery dates.

MAIL INFORMATION TO:

(U.S. Mail Service)
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
PO Box 1680
Burlington, NJ 08016
Attn: Dan McAuliffe, Engineering Manager

(Other Carrier)
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
308 Connecticut Drive
Burlington, NJ 08016
Attn: Dan McAuliffe, Engineering Manager

Phone (609)-387-3033
Phone (800)-257-6215
Fax (609)-387-4838
                                                  Merchant & Evans, Inc.                                                                 H-3
                                              LIMITED ROOFING WARRANTY
PROJECT: ___________________________ OWNER: _______________________________
           This Limited Warranty is issued by Merchant & Evans, Inc., 308 Connecticut Drive, Burlington, New Jersey 08016, herein after referred
to as "The Company" and “The Installing Contractor” designated herein and runs to The Building Owner, herein after referred to as “The Customer”.
The Terms and Conditions of this Limited Warranty shall constitute the entire agreement and understanding between The Company, The Installing
Contractor and The Customer with respect to the Warranted Roofing System on the Project specified above, only.
I.         PERFORMANCE STANDARDS:
           The Company solely warrants that the Warranted Roofing System as herein defined will, under normal atmospheric conditions and
ordinary wear and tear by the elements as herein defined, perform as follows:

     The Warranted Finish will not blister, peel, chip, check or crack, lose adhesion, chalk in excess of eight or fade in excess of five for a period of
     _____________ years. Cracks or checks are defined as breaks in the coating as distinguished from microchecking at the radii, which shall be
     considered normal and acceptable. Failure due to mechanical damage of the coating after manufacturing is outside this Warranty. Additionally,
     the panel system will not fail to remain weather-tight for a period of _______________ years or structurally fail [up to a design wind speed of
     __ miles per hour] for a period of ________________ years from defective materials, manufacturing workmanship, perforation of the base
     metal, or system design.


            The Installing Contractor solely Warrants for the designated periods stated above, that the Warranted Roofing System as herein defined
will be installed in a workmanlike manner and in accord with The Company’s published installation guidelines and/or specific instructions for the
project.
II.         FAILURE TO COMPLY:
            If the Warranted Finish and/or Warranted Roofing System fails to perform in accordance with the PERFORMANCE STANDARDS noted
above, The Company's and the Installing Contractor’s liability under this Warranty will be limited to refinishing or replacing or repairing that portion
of panels having a defective Warranted Finish and/or defective Warranted Roofing System. Refinishing and/or repairing shall be performed using
standard field practices and materials (not necessarily the Warranted Finish) selected by The Company and/or The Installing Contractor. Refinishing
and/or replacing and/or repairing shall be done only on areas deemed non-performing and not necessarily on performing areas.
            The Company and/or The Installing Contractor will, in all instances, at its own discretion, determine whether refinishing and/or replacing
and/or repairing is required in order to fulfill the original performance guarantee without extension of the duration thereof. Claims or defects must be
made by the Customer in writing to The Company and The Installing Contractor within thirty (30) days after initial discovery of the defect.
Notwithstanding anything to the contrary stated in this Warranty, Liability, corporate or otherwise, in examining, replacing, repairing, and refinishing
the non-performing warranted finish or warranted roofing system shall be limited to costs not to exceed the purchase price from The Company of the
original product.
III.        EXCLUSION AND MODIFICATION OF WARRANTIES:
            There are no Warranties which extend beyond the description on the face hereof and except as provided herein.
THIS LIMITED WARRANTY IS IN LIEU OF AND EXCLUDES ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING ANY
WARRANTY OR MERCHANTABILITY OR THAT THE GOODS ARE FIT FOR, OR CAN BE FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE BY THE
CUSTOMER. THE COMPANY AND THE INSTALLING CONTRACTOR DISCLAIMS AND THE CUSTOMER WAIVES ALL REMEDIES
NOT PROVIDED HEREIN INCLUDING ANY LIABILITY OF THE COMPANY AND THE INSTALLING CONTRACTOR IN TORT, STRICT
OR OTHERWISE, FOR DAMAGES OR INJURIES TO PERSONS OR PROPERTY OR FOR LOSS OF USE, OR REVENUE OR PROFIT,
WHETHER DIRECT, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL INCLUDING MOLD CLAIMS, RESULTING FROM ANY DEFECT IN DESIGN,
MATERIAL WORKMANSHIP OR MANUFACTURE, WHETHER OR NOT CAUSED BY NEGLIGENCE ON THE PART OF THE COMPANY
AND THE INSTALLING CONTRACTOR, ORAL STATEMENTS MADE BY THE COMPANY'S AND THE INSTALLING CONTRACTOR’S
REPRESENTATIVES ABOUT THE PRODUCT AND WRITTEN DESCRIPTIONS OF THE PRODUCT APPEARING ELSEWHERE THAN ON
THE FACE HEREOF ARE NOT WARRANTIES AND SHALL NOT BE RELIED UPON BY THE CUSTOMER.
            Purchase Orders and Contracts of the Customer, acknowledgements by The Company and The Installing Contractor, product literature,
promotional material or advertising shall in no way affect, alter, or modify any of the Terms or Conditions of this Warranty. The Terms and
Conditions of the Warranty shall constitute the entire agreement, understanding and responsibilities by and between The Company, The Installing
Contractor and The Customer with respect to the Warranted Finish and/or Warranted Roofing System on the PROJECT specified above. None of the
Terms and Conditions of the Warranty may be modified by any party unless done so in writing. If any of the Terms, Conditions, Limitations of this
Warranty are violated by the Customer then the Terms, Conditions and Provisions are absolutely void and of no legal effect. If any party ceases to
exist, other surviving parties are not bound to obligations of the non-surviving party.
            This Warranty is subject to the Conditions and exclusions printed in Schedule A, and incorporated as a part of this Warranty.
                                                                     SCHEDULE A
I.          DEFINITIONS:
            As used in this Warranty, the following words shall be ascribed the respective meanings as herein set forth:
            A. “CUSTOMER”- The Person, Firm or Corporation to whom this Warranty runs, or, building “Owner”.
            B. “NORMAL ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS” AND “ORDINARY WEAR AND TEAR BY THE ELEMENTS”- This
                  term shall exclude corrosive or aggressive atmospheres, including but not limited to those atmospheric conditions set forth
                  in Paragraph II hereof.
            C. “WARRANTED FINISH”- When applicable, these are approved colors of the exterior finish noted herein when applied
                  to coil coated panels manufactured by The Company and installed by The Installing Contractor that are exposed to normal
                  atmospheric conditions.
            D. “REPLACEMENT”- Replacement includes repairing or replacing non-performing products supplied by The Company
                  and/or non-performing installation provided by The Installing Contractor but does not include the cost of other materials
                  and labor required for removal and/or re-installation of other materials not supplied by The Company or The Installing
                  Contractor.

           E.    “WARRANTED ROOFING SYSTEM”- The standing seam metal roof system (SSMRS) manufactured by The Company
                 and installed by The Installing Contractor.
                                                                                                                                        H-4
           F.     “MECHANICAL DAMAGE”- Refers to any physical damage such as scratches and abrasions to the Warranted Finish
                  after the Warranted Roofing System is manufactured by The Company.
II.         WARRANTY LIMITATION
            This Warranty shall apply only to the Warranted Finish and/or the Warranted Roofing System as herein defined which has been exposed to
normal atmospheric conditions, and shall not apply where any failure of the Warranted Finish and/or the Warranted Roofing System is the result of
fire, vandalism, radiation, harmful fumes, dissimilar metals, foreign substances in the atmosphere inside or outside, including corrosive aggressive
atmospheres such as those contaminated with chemical fumes or salt spray, mishandling or non-compliance with The Company’s published product
information, falling objects, acts of God including: hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, damage from wind-storm, etc., or deliberate damage from riots,
civil commotions, acts of war, or mechanical or any other physical damage to the Warranted Finish and/or the Warranted Roofing System. In
addition, this warranty shall not apply to any failure of, or damage to, the Warranted Finish and/or Warranted Roofing System as the result of
moisture entrapment or other contamination, or to a defect in design such as ice-damming, improper drainage, failure of guttering, etc. which is
detrimental to the Warranted Finish and/or Warranted Roofing System prior to or after its use by the Customer; nor to damage to the Warranted Finish
and/or Warranted Roofing System as the result of edge corrosion or failure of the metal substrate from aggressive atmospheres, storage, fabrication,
shipping, or processing by the installing contractor; nor to any damage to the Warranted Finish and/or Warranted Roofing System resulting from
circumstances where it is subjected to continuously generated abrasive forces or continual or periodic submersion in water; nor does this warranty
apply to any air dry touch up paint systems and/or non coil coated finishes.
III.        TERRITORIAL RESTRICTIONS
            Subject to WARRANTY LIMITATIONS as herein above set forth, this Warranty shall extend to the Warranted Finish and Warranted
Roofing System which is installed as an exterior building component anywhere in the Continental United States, but excluding the States of Hawaii
and Alaska.
IV.         DISCONTINUANCE OF WARRANTIES
            The Company reserves the right to discontinue issuance of Warranties. Discontinuance of future warranties will not affect the Terms and
Conditions of this written Warranty since it shall remain in effect for the full WARRANTY PERIOD, unless the WARRANTY PERIOD is reduced or
discontinued by mutual agreement of all parties. If the Company shall determine to liquidate, dissolve or sell its building products business, The
Company may give notice to you and if no written notice of complaint is received by The Company within four (4) months after the date of such
notice, this Warranty shall terminate and expire and The Company shall not have any further liability hereunder.
V.          USE OF TRADE MARKS AND ADVERTISING
            The Company trade names, product names, names of the Warranted Finish and Warranted Roofing System described herein or the Terms
and Conditions of the Warranty shall not be used by the Customer in any of its advertising, promotional material, technical reports, or any other
published communications without the prior written permission of The Company.
VI.         ASSIGNMENT
            This Warranty is extended to the Customer as the original purchaser. It is non-transferable and non-assignable. No rights against The
Company or The Installing Contractor shall be created by any transfer or assignment nor shall any rights against The Company or The Installing
Contractor survive any transfer or assignment.
VII.        CLAIMS
            In the event of alleged failure of the Warranted Finish and/or Warranted Roofing System, written notice containing particulars sufficient to
identify the Customer and PROJECT and also reasonably obtainable information with respect to the time, place and circumstances thereof shall be
given by or on behalf of the Customer to The Company and The Installing Contractor WITHIN THIRTY (30) DAYS of the detection of such failure.
The Company and The Installing Contractor reserves the right to examine and investigate each complaint and to jointly determine with the Customer
(or any party authorized by the Customer) the exact cause of any failure. If the failure of the Warranted Finish and/or Warranted Roofing System is
not the result of any act or omission on the part of The Company and/or The Installing Contractor then The Company and The Installing Contractor
shall have no further obligation on the CLAIM and all examination and investigative costs such as traveling expenses, laboratory analyses, and
professional services will be paid for entirely by the Customer. The Customer shall further provide any information and personnel having knowledge
of, or information pertaining to, the CLAIM of an alleged failure of the Warranted Finish and/or Warranted Roofing System in question.
            The Company and The Installing Contractor will not participate in any CLAIMS or pay any CLAIMS until the full contract price for all
work performed and materials furnished is received by The Company and The Installing Contractor.
________________________________________________________________________________
By: _______________________________
Daniel T. McAuliffe, Engineering Manager                               Print Name:
Merchant & Evans, Inc.                                                 Installing Contractor’s
                                                                       Firm:

Date:                                                                  Date:


Print Name:
Owner’s
Representative:

Date: _____________________________
________________________________________________________________________________
                           NOTE: Must be signed by all parties with one copy returned to The Company for its records.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                              I-1

                                          JOB SITE ROLL FORMING

SCHEDULING

Since there is only one portable roll former, several factors must be considered to insure its availability at the
time your job will be ready. These are: (1) other jobs scheduled for the equipment, (2) your job site location,
(3) production schedules at the coil fab mills to assure that adequate metal will be available, (4) weather.

Merchant & Evans needs to know tentative schedules 8 weeks prior to rolling. Schedule must then be
confirmed 4 weeks prior to rolling. Keep in mind that changes made by the customer may cause a complete
re-scheduling depending on confirmed commitments we have with other customers.

Contact your project manager well in advance so that these things can be coordinated to have the machine
and the metal arrive at the job site when the roof is ready.

MAJOR ADVANTAGES

1.      No transit damage or transit delays.

2.      Lengths beyond allowable transportation limits are possible.

3.      Savings in material handling at the job site are possible. Plans can be made to hoist all the panels at
        one time rather than separately for each truck load as it arrives.

4.      On large projects, there is the possibility of a significant reduction in freight costs.


MAJOR DISADVANTAGES

1.      Timing is critical to get the roll former and the metal at the job site at the proper time.

2.      Weather may be a determining factor. Heavy winds, rain or snow make job site roll forming difficult
        or, in some cases, impractical. Extended exterior exposure of the metal or panels can lead to water
        stains.

3.      In some areas, unions will not permit production at the job site with non-union personnel. Get this
        point cleared well in advance, in writing, prior to shipment of the roll forming equipment.

4.      When the roll former and metal arrive at the job site, the entire job must be run continuously and
        placed in storage.

5.      A large storage area is required to accommodate the finished panels. The storage area must be dry
        and graded to prevent ponding water. All metal must be covered and ventilated to prevent water
        stain.

COSTS

There are so many variables on each job that it is impossible to provide a rule of thumb on costs. They must
be figured on a job-by-job basis. Contact your Zip-Rib representative at the earliest possible time with
information on job location, size and timing requirements so that an accurate cost study can be made.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                             I-2

                                        JOB SITE RESPONSIBILITIES

ZIP-RIB Manufacturer

1.     Insure that sufficient metal arrives at the job site on time with freight paid.

2.     Insure that arrival of the roll forming equipment at the proper time with freight paid.

3.     Maintain production schedules and product quality.

4.     Provide (1) mechanic to feed coil and operate roll former only.

5.     Provide wood battens, nails, steel banding strap and strap tensioning equipment for standard
       Zip-Rib packaging. Extra cost may be involved for non-standard size bundles.

6.     All scrap metal will be removed by the manufacturer.

CONTRACTOR ERECTOR

1.     Provide written confirmation of the union's approval to allow job site roll forming at the proposed site at
       least 60 days prior to roll forming. Contact the general contractor for the project to determine what
       union would be involved.

2.     Arrange for a 5,000 pound capacity fork lift and operator for the duration of the roll forming for daily
       movement of coils from their storage place to the roll forming equipment. The lift must be suitable to
       the terrain at the job site, e.g. sand, rocky, uneven. Charges for the lift will be paid by the contractor-
       erector.

3.     Make available weather tight storage for the rolls of coil in the vicinity of the job site or make
       arrangements with a local warehouse to deliver the daily coil requirements to the roll forming
       equipment. Any charges here will be paid by the contractor-erector.

4.     Provide a complete bill of materials prior to start of production. The need for running the order in a
       particular sequence must be approved prior to the time that the roll former arrives at the job.

       Roll former production cannot be restricted once it has started. The entire job must be run at one
       time. Normally, the job will be rolled faster than it can be installed. Objective is to run 12 hrs/day 7
       days/wk.

5.     Provide laborers to handle panels once cut-to-length. Figure one man per 20' length plus one.

6.     Provide the proper work area for the roll-forming equipment.

       (a) There must be a solid foundation for the roll former as it weighs 16,000 lbs. A solid foundation is
       also required to maintain the alignment of the roll former and maneuverability of the truck and trailer.

       (b) There must be adequate storage space to accommodate the finished panels for the entire job.

Any costs incurred to accomplish (a) and (b) above will be paid by the contractor. Any moves of roll former
after the one original set-up will be done by equipment furnished by the contractor and cost $500 per move.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                                  I-3

                           JOB SITE ROLLFORMING - EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS

Equipment space provides for coil storage, coil reel, roll former, cutoff saw, and for access with fork truck for
changing coils. This should be a clean, hard surface such as blacktop (minimum 20 ft. x 40 ft.). Note: all
equipment is pre-set and mounted on a 40' closed trailer.

Run-out tables space allows for panels to be nested and banded prior to assembly in bundles. This can start
5 ft. or 15 ft. from the edge of the equipment area.

Storage area size is determined by pieces required. It should have a surface suitable for moving light loads
on small wheeled carts. The maximum height stack (which nets out to 24 pieces per foot of ground space) is
based upon long lengths which must be manually placed by the roll forming crew. Short length bundles which
can be picked up by the forklift can be stacked higher. In this case figure 40 pieces per foot of ground space.
If the size of the project requires a storage area width greater than 75 ft., the contractor will have to arrange for
moving bundles to another area or provide for storage on the opposite side of the run out tables.

Bundles produced at the job site are usually smaller than the standard pack. They are 36 piece bundles for
12” panels and 24 piece bundles for 16” panels.

A- Equipment Storage Space
B- Equipment, Truck, and Trailer Space
C- Coil Loading Area
D- Run-Out Tables
E- Panel Storage Area
***- Determined by the amount of panels to be stored. Figure 24 pieces to a 37” wide bundle. Bundles can
be stacked 2 high.




                                       A
                           25’
                                   15’

                                                 B
                     30’
                                                                                       D                                15’
                                           68’

                                           C
                                                                                       E
                                 40’
                                         10’
                                                                                                                          ***




                                                                           Panel Length Plus Seven Feet
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                             J-1


                            ARCHITECTURAL SYSTEMS

-   3:12 MINIMUM PITCH
-   REQUIRES SOLID DECK AND UNDERLAYMENT
-   PANEL LENGTHS LESS THAN 45'-0"
-   SEAM HEIGHTS BETWEEN 1" AND 2"
-   LIGHT GAGE CLIPS SPACED LESS THAN 24" O.C.
-   NO WEATHERTIGHT WARRANTIES AVAILABLE
-   PERFORMANCE TESTING LIMITED
-   NOT USUALLY ENGINEERED TO MEET CODES, THUS NOT FOR PROJECTS WITH HIGH WIND
    LOADS


                              STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS

-   1/4:12 MINIMUM PITCH
-   PANEL LENGTHS GREATER THAN 45'-0"
-   SEAM HEIGHTS GREATER THAN 2"
-   HEAVIER GAGE CLIPS SPACED MORE THAN 24" O.C.
-   SPANNING CAPABILITIES
-   WEATHERTIGHT
-   MECHANICALLY SEAMED (MOST SYSTEMS)
-   FULLY ENGINEERED AND TESTED
-   CAN BE USED IN ARCHITECTURAL APPLICATIONS
Merchant & Evans, Inc.                            SEALANT                                   K-1

ZIP-RIB®                                          -Polyethylene Rod & diameter.
                                                  -Polyethylene Rod 3/8 diameter.
                                                  -Caulking (Tubes/Tape)
ZIP RIB CHECK OFF LIST – ESTIMATING &
PURCHASING                                        SPECIAL TOOLS

                                                  -Zipper Tool
ZIP-RIB
                                                  -Pan End
                                                  -Button Punch
-Gauge (.040-.032, 24ga-22ga)
-Width (12"-16")                                  -Hand Crimp
                                                  -Unzipper
-Finish (Side) Extra Packing?
-Lengths (Extra Pieces in longest)
-Non-standard Tolerance on Length                 HOISTING
-Bundle Size Limits
                                                  -Unloading Equipment (Forklift/Crane)
-Special Packaging
-Freight Costs (No. of loads)                     -Hoisting Slings (Bottom Pads)
                                                  -Spreader Bar of Strong Back
-Structural Certification or UL Label
                                                  -Bracing for Sloped Storage on Roof
FASTENERS
                                                  LABOR COST VARIABLES FOR:
-Clip Screws
-"Top Seal" for Flashing (Stainless) #14          -Siding (Vertical Travel)
                                                  -Roofing
-Pan Head for Closure
                                                  -Soffits (Awkward handling-scaffold)
-Pop Rivets (3/16" aluminum or stainless steel)
-Explosive Fasteners                              -Height
                                                  -Steepness (Safety gear or ladders)
-Concrete Anchors
                                                  -Size (learning curve) Cuts
-Fab-Loks or Bulb-Tites (for end splice)
                                                  -Access - Panel Storage Location
FLASHING

-Material (Finish)                                ZIP RIB CHECK OFF LIST-
-Eave Closure (for frieze board)                  DESIGN & DETAILING
-Drip Angle
-Fascia                                           STRUCTURAL ADEQUACY
-Gutter
-Gable or Rake Trim                               Zip-Rib span: positive load, negative load, walking
                                                  loads.
-Side wall
                                                  Clip strength in Zip-Rib for negative load.
-Headwall
-Ridge Cap                                        Fastener head size for clip for uplift (head clearance
                                                  with Zip-Rib)
-Ridge Closures (12" or 16")
                                                  Fastener into support material for uplift.
-Hip Cap
-Hip Closures (Foam, Channel, Backer)             Possible ice load on steep roof.
                                                  Snow Guards
-Pipe Jacks
                                                  Adequate distance of clips from panel end.
-Formed Skylight or Hatch opening.
-Valley
-Knee Joint Trim                                  THERMAL MOVEMENT PROVISIONS
                                                  Specify fixed anchor line for minimum movement or
-Touch-up Paint
                                                  minimum flashing problems.
                                                  Is the ridge and eave free to flex or slide? Adequate
ANCHORS
                                                  end clearance?
                                                  Make sure gable edge is free to slip between
-Gable Clips
                                                  flashing and roof.
-Bulb Clips
-Barb Clips                                       Remember, box ends of gutters, gables, ridge caps,
                                                  etc. are not free to flex.
-Hook Clips (Use #2080 for 16" & Steel)
                                                  Is gutter length free to move relative to roof and
-Straps
-Clamps                                           structure?
Merchant & Evans, Inc.                                                                                  K-2
ZIP-RIB
Provide for two way movement at all diagonal              Storage: slope for drainage; cover bare (unpainted)
conditions.                                               bundles; vent ends; avoid wet ground; on roofs, tie
Provide independent anchorage at both sides of            down against wind and brace on steep slopes.
expansion joint.
Are flashing joints free to slip? (Sealant ok in short    INSTALLATION
lengths 10-12 ft.)                                        Handling: pairs stronger; if flexing is necessary,
Omit sealants on sliding connections.                     bend ribs out to avoid kinks.
Make certain that skylight and roof penetrations are      Layout: establish straight side and crosswise
fixed to roof, to structure or both at fixed line only.   benchmarks; check for true structure.
Give notice to owner regarding roof penetrations by       Verify fasteners: proper size and length for
others.                                                   strength; proper head size for clip hole and
                                                          clearance.
                                                          Train Crews: allow thermal movement; avoid
MISCELLANEOUS                                             crimps in ribs; avoid screws into ribs at clips; avoid
                                                          fasteners into lap joints of flashing.
Consider break up of wide flats on flashing or use        Zip-as-you-go. Tie down last edge at night. Tie
heavy gauge material to keep lines straight.              down all open bundles.
Check fastener spacings.
Detail open hems on exposed edges for stiffness           EQUIPMENT LIST CHECK
and water block.
Include drip angle for a straight eave line and uplift    Unloading or Hoisting rig
strength.                                                 Slings and Battens for hoist
Check side wall and gable details for Zip-Rib width       Spreader Bar
module. Consider optimum laying direction.                Hoisting Frame
Show minimum 1/8" radius bend to avoid cracking at        Rope Falls
corners.                                                  Rope
Is there adequate slope to drains for gutters?            Tape 100' or 50'
Request supplemental alignment for concrete               Transit or Long Level
anchorage where possible.                                 Chalk line, Piano Wire
Concealed sealant.                                        Marking Pen, Crayon, Soapstone
Vapor barrier on the warm side of insulation.             Scaffold, Planking
                                                          Ladders
PRIMARY PLANNING                                          Duck boards, Chicken Ladder
                                                          Generator-Gas
- Check material delivery schedule; anticipate rate       Electric Extension Cords
of usage; insure adequate supply.                         Three -Way Pigtails
- Plan storage: abuse and weather protection,             Drill Motors
alignment of Zip-Rib sides.                               Drill Bits-Sizes
- Equipment: unloading, slings, blocking, power           Aircraft Snips L/R
distribution required.                                    Screw Guns/Bits
- Specs, & Details: approval on exceptions, file          Hammer
drawings & approved samples.                              Vise Grips
- Check field dimensions against order quantity           C. Clamps
and lengths.                                              Rivet Gun
                                                          Zipper Tool
DELIVERY, STORAGE, HANDLING                               Skylight Rolls
                                                          Hand Crimp Tool
Inspect: check battens, look for tie downs between        Pan End Tool
battens, diesel smoke.                                    Scrap Fold Tool
Damage claim: see manual, p. B-7; accept delivery;        Unzipper Tool
note damage on receipt; get driver's signature;           Caulking Gun/Tubes
protect from further damage; file notification.           Button Punch
Unloading and Hoisting Bundles: limit overhangs           Drill Chuck Keys
to 15' and space between supports to 30': use slats       Skil Saw/Blades
under slings; avoid extending fork beyond bundle -        Ramset Tool/Loads
use stop block: protect bottom panels.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                            K-3

WALKWAYS

Where continued foot traffic on the roof indicates the need for a permanent walkway, the use of clamps (part
#2050) permits installation without penetrating panels. The design may be in wood or metal but must not
impair the thermal movement of the Zip-Rib. The weight of the walkway must be distributed sufficiently to
prevent excessive wear of the Zip-Rib by the support structure. The total dead load (roof and walkway)
should not exceed 20 pounds per clip. See accessory illustrations for examples of walkways with #2050 Leg
Clamp.

SNOW AREA PRECAUTIONS

SNOW DEPTHS

Snow depths higher than the rib can force water through the roof. On heated buildings the snow will melt first
on the bottom of the snow next to the roofing. If it is not free to run off as fast as it melts, it will back up
several inches deep. To assure against leakage in these cases, the seams should be caulked before the
panels are zipped. When the entire length is sealed, the sealant should fill the capillary groove to prevent
freezing water from prying open the seam.

ICE DAMS

Ice dams result when water from melting snow
freezes on a cold overhang, eave or gutter. This
problem can be prevented by proper design that
eliminates the heat loss through the roof, such as
with a ventilated attic or by heating the roof all the
way to the eave. See the ZIP-RIB Design Guide for
specific illustrations in snow areas.

If ice dams cannot be prevented, the standing ribs at
the eave and all flashing in the affected area must be
caulked well enough to endure standing water.
Thoroughly caulk any seam, standing rib or pencil rib
where standing water could intrude.              It is
recommended that all critical areas be sealed with a
waterproof membrane if an area poses the risk of an
ice dam (see photo).

SNOW SLIDES

Snow slides can be dangerous to gutters, or other structures or roofs below an eave, or to people below.
Slabs of ice slide easily off of even low pitched metal roofs. Snow guards placed only at the eaves can be
subjected to considerable impact from material higher on the roof and must be engineered to resist all implied
forces.

IMPORTANT CONSIDERATION

Roof panels must be secured to the buildings structure well enough to resist the force of any retained ice and
snow. Since most Zip-Rib clips are designed to slide, the "fixed point" for thermal movement is the only point
at which Zip-Rib is secured to the building. Therefore, this fixed point must be strong enough to resist the
force exerted by the snow and ice.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                                         L-1

ADVANTAGES OF ZIP RIB

*Over thirty five years experience with thousands of successful installations all over the world. The system has proved that
it has a reasonable tolerance for normal construction variations.

*Zip-Rib is installed in the United States by experienced and capable Contractor-Erectors authorized by Zip-Rib
manufacturers. Training for overseas projects is available on a job-by-job basis.

*Load span tables are based upon physical load tests which simulate actual service conditions. An appropriate factor of
safety is included in the load span tables. All panel tests are supervised and certified by reputable independent testing
companies. Copies of test procedures and results are available upon request.

*National sales coverage is provided by over 30 professional manufacturers' representatives trained in proper use and
application of Zip-Rib.

*Zip-Rib roofing and siding is an engineered system that includes the attachment clips, accessories and tools needed for a
properly installed product. Custom designed components are available from the manufacturers or the erectors to satisfy
unique requirements.

*Zip-Rib panels are furnished in long lengths--usually in ridge to eave lengths--thus eliminating the problem of end laps.
The panels are attached to the roof structure by hidden anchor clips. Therefore, there is no penetration of the roofing
panels by the anchoring fasteners.

*Zip-Rib is supplied as a standard product in steel or aluminum. Panels may be fabricated in copper, lead coated copper,
zinc, or stainless steel as required.

*Zip-Rib is available with structural, finish and weathertight warranties upon request when specific conditions are satisfied.

MARKET OPPORTUNITIES

NEW CONSTRUCTION
*Schools - Districts like the life-cycle cost opportunity.

*Multi-Family Housing and Shopping Centers - Add sales appeal to draw customers.

*Coverage for Water Supply or Sewage Treatment Facilities - Aluminum's natural corrosion resistance plus the capability
of removing panels for inspection gives Zip-Rib an edge in controlling noxious fumes. Long lengths and corrosion
resistance are favored for reservoir covers.
*Industrial - Commercial Buildings - Life-cycle benefits.
*Port Authority Buildings - Corrosion resistance and long lengths Aluminum Zip-Rib has performed well in severe marine
and industrial atmospheres at Los Angeles, Long Beach, San Francisco and New York port authorities.
*U.S. Government and Military Construction - Life -cycle value for long term projects.

CONTACTS FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION
*Architects and engineers are the primary targets.
*Design - Build Construction Companies.
*Military- Regional Offices of The Corps of Engineers, Naval Facilities Engineering and National Guard Units.

REROOFING CONSTRUCTION
*Military Buildings.
*Municipal, State, County and Port Authority Buildings.
*Industrial-Commercial Buildings. Most roofs are built-up. Inadequate slope requires additional framing. Buildings in this
classification with inadequate insulation offer the best opportunity. Insulation can be added between the new sleepers.
Building owners with leaking metal roofs are most often looking for a real solution - not just the lowest bid. The quick
solution that Zip-Rib offers when installed over the existing deck may permit a negotiated rather than a bid job.

CONTACTS FOR REROOFING JOB LEADS
*At Port Authorities - Chief Engineer
*Commercial and Industrial Building - Maintenance Dept. and Plant Engineers.
Visual inspection from the street or air makes it easy to spot old roofs needing replacement. Look for the patchwork colors
indicating successive repairs.
*Contact the local representative of re-roofing specialists such as roof consultants.
*Military -Individual Bases and Regional Offices.
                                                                                                      M-1
                                  ZIP-RIB GUIDE SPECIFICATIONS
Guidelines to Specifiers Before printing, delete these first three pages of comments as well as all notes
and options in square brackets [ ] that do not apply to your project. The values in empty brackets [ ] need
to be filled in to suit the specific project. To facilitate editing large blocks, we suggest using Set Block (Alt
F4) with the cursor under the first bracket ( [ ) of the text to be eliminated. Use Search (F2) for the second
bracket ( ] Esc) and then delete the block with the (Del Entr y ). Comments on specific sections are:

1.0.A. A recent trend in construction contract bidding is to require General Contractors to name
subcontractors and material suppliers with the bid forms. This greatly reduces bid shopping and virtually
eliminates an architect or owner from being forced into use of non-complying subcontractors and suppliers
because time does not permit as construction schedules tighten and erection is supposed to proceed. In
addition, it is strongly recommended that an additional bid form be added to the contract documents which
ensures that all performance criteria of the specification have been met with the product being proposed. A
sample is made a part of this guide specification. The form is to be signed and sealed by a Registered
Professional Engineer attesting that all criteria are in compliance. This ensures the level of quality
established by the specification is met and creates an awareness that performance criteria will be enforced.

1.04 A. Zip-Rib policy is to routinely review shop drawings for projects over a certain size as well as those
that contain conditions with known potential problems. This review is made to determine if details are
consistent with good sheet metal practice and those that have given good service in similar situations.
Architects may request a review and comments prior to submittal. In making such a review, Zip-Rib
assumes no responsibility for completeness of details, for unique applications or for magnitudes of loads or
for design conditions other than those explicitly stated in the project plans and specifications. The review
implies no warranty other than the express warranty that applies to products manufactured by Merchant &
Evans, Inc.

2.02 A. Zip-Rib may be fabricated in materials or alloys other than those indicated, but strength tests need to
be included as part of the project or the capacity will need to be determined on other information acceptable
to the project engineer.

2.02 C. Coil coated 70% Kynar or Hylar 5000 based fluorocarbon (20 year warranty) is the standard
available finish for Zip-Rib and flashings. Where additional abrasion resistance is desired, a heavier finish is
also available. Other finishes may be available for specific project requirements, this specification contains
the performance requirements for the basic finish.
**Caution, projects located in coastal environments with a steel substrate will contain a “salt spray
exclusion” that effectively voids the paint finish warranty. Aluminum should be considered as the
substrate material.**

2.02 D. Calculations and pull tests do not accurately produce properties of light gauge sheet under air
pressure and are not always conservative. Aluminum Association l982 "Specifications for Aluminum Struc-
tures" requires air pressure testing for some building sheathing profiles including those with interlocking clips.
The AISI "Light Gauge Cold-Formed Steel Design Manual" suggests testing to confirm bending strength
whenever flat width to thickness ratios exceed 500 and requires tests for attachments other than bolts or
welds. ASTM E-330 test method for curtain walls covers the basic principles of a proper air-pressure test,
but some sections require emphasis or revision to eliminate constraints that can seriously overstate the
capacity of sheet metal panels. ASTM E 1592 is also a performance test.

2.02 D.2. Underwriters uplift classification may be included as a requirement where desirable for reduction of
insurance rates but are not recommended as the sole reference for structural integrity. Published safe
design loads for panels with UL 90 ratings range as low as 29 psf by several manufacturers.

2.03 A. The #2080 clip normally comes with a galvanized base. In severe environments, an all stainless
steel version is available for use with aluminum panels.

2.03 B. In some climates, condensation on anchor fasteners could lead to rusting and premature failure, es-
pecially when driven through wood to an interior space. NAIMA and NRCA recommend the use of corrosion
resistant fasteners whenever used to fasten through insulation to a metal deck. Lumber treated with water
soluble salts may lead to corrosion unless stainless is used.
                                                                                                    M-2

2.03 E. This section is a minimum for sealants, and the architect is urged to develop a more detailed speci-
fication section 7900 for the requirements of the project.

2.03 F. Traditional sheet metal practice calls for underlayment between metal roof coverings and wood
decks with perforated asphalt sheets covered by dry rosin paper to avoid sticking. Materials are now
available which will not stick to metal roofing but will prevent water from leaking down into the structure yet
allow water vapor to be vented to the outside. Zip-Rib panels do not always require underlayment for
weather tightness, but when installed over solid decking, this is suggested as inexpensive insurance against
minor leakage at difficult flashing conditions. (See also 3.01 E).

When metal roofing is installed over insulation in cold climates, a good continuous vapor retarder is
recommended on the warm side of the insulation. The mechanical engineer may be consulted for specific
recommendations for a specific project. Refer to ASTM E-241 for comments on good practice for control of
moisture damage in buildings. Underlayment on top of insulation should be vapor permeable but water
repellant.

3.01 B. Zip-Rib provides contractors with information on acceptable limits of surface deviation for roof perfor-
mance in terms of limiting the force required to engage a panel with a clip, but only the architect can
determine acceptable visual limits for surface irregularity.

3.01 E. The Zip-Rib seam without sealant survives dynamic wind and water tests without leakage up to 70
mph. In extreme climate areas and where deep snow or ice dams can force water through unsealed metal
joints, a seam sealant is recommended. Underlayment may also be specified, but total reliance on a
membrane in cold climates is not recommended because of the possibility of ice dams and freeze-thaw
damage.

3.02 A. Interpretation of codes or wind speeds into design pressures should not be left to the roof
contractors or to independent engineers hired by them. Project engineers or architects should develop wind
and/or snow pressures for the roof covering at the same time the basic structure is designed. With the more
complex variations of pressure in different areas called for by current codes, it may be easier to show
pressure zones on the roof plan rather than in a table.

3.02 C. In snow areas, roof panels must be secured against sliding from the structure due to the weight of
retained snow. If snow guards are involved, the project engineer should indicate the weight of snow to be
retained on the roof for design of the strength of the attachment of the individual snow guards to the panels
as well as the anchorage of each panel to the structure.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                             O-1

                                              ZIP-RIB CURVING

GENERAL INFORMATION

A full understanding of what to expect when handling and installing curved panels is critical to the success of a
project. Therefore, this section should be reviewed by both field and office personnel.

Aluminum ZIP-RIB panels can be curved to a standard radius as tight as 20'-0". Tighter radii are possible,
however, subject to inquiry. Both factory and field curving options are available.  When feasible, it is
recommended that all panels be factory curved.

Only Merchant & Evans personnel will be permitted to operate the curving machine.

The curving machine will be shipped in an enclosed 8'-0" x 10'-0" x 10'-0" container. The machine must remain
in the container during the entire curving operation. All panels will be curved on the ground.

Approximate weight of curving machine and container is 6,500 lbs.

The machine curves the panels at a speed of 60 ft per minute.

Depending on the material type, strippable film may be applied prior to curving and must be removed upon
exposure to direct sunlight. Verify with M&E prior to shipment.

FACTORY CURVED PANELS

Panels can be shipped pre-curved to the site by Merchant and Evans with usual limitations. Maximum panel
length depends on radius. Contact M&E for feasibility review. Lengths and rises exceeding a standard truck
load can be reviewed on a job to job basis. All panels curved at the factory will be bundled and transported to
the site as an arch type bundle made from 2X lumber OR packaged on their side. Size of bundle will depend on
radius, panel length, panel weight, etc. Contact Merchant & Evans prior to shipment to discuss exactly how
panels will arrive. Accessible site storage is required as would be for straight lengths. See drawing showing a
typical bundle of curved panels.

JOB SITE CURVED PANELS

Panels will be shipped in straight lengths and curved on-sight. Panels may also be job site roll formed and
curved on site if necessary (See Job Site Roll Forming Section for more information). Adequate site space
must be provided during the entire curving operation. This will depend on panel length and radius and must
be reviewed with Merchant & Evans prior to shipment. Once curved, panels are typically nested together
and hoisted to the roof with slings and a spreader bar. Size of nested panels will depend on radius, panel
length, panel weight, etc. Curving operation will depend on existing job site constraints. Contact Merchant &
Evans prior to shipment to discuss curving operation procedures specific to your project.

Panel Seam Sealant

Factory Curved Panels-
Until further notice, factory curved panels will be shipped from M&E WITHOUT seam sealant. If the project
requires, seam sealant must be provided and applied in the field by the installer. This is normally done
during the installation process. Gun grade butyl seam sealant or butyl sealant tapes must be used. Contact
M&E for pricing and/or suppliers. Refer to M&E shop drawings and/or standard details for additional
information.

Jobsite Curved Panels-
If the project requires, the installer must apply seam sealant during the curving operation. M&E will provide
the necessary equipment and materials for the installer to apply the seam sealant.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                                        O-2


                                            CURVING RESPONSIBILITIES

MERCHANT & EVANS, INC. WILL:

Factory Curved
1. Insure that the curved panels will arrive at the job site on time. Freight to transport curved panels is
   additional.

2. Provide curved panels bundled on a 2X wood arched bundle. Shipment will be on a flat bed trailer.

Job Site Curved
1. Insure that the curving machine arrives at the job site on time with freight paid. Freight to transport straight
   panels is additional.

2. Maintain production schedule and product quality.

3. Provide (1) mechanic to operate curving machine.

4. Provide equipment and materials for the contractors to field apply seam sealant during the curving operation.

CONTRACTOR ERECTOR MUST:

1. If job site curved, provide written confirmation of the union's approval to allow job site curving at the
   proposed site at least 60 days prior to curving. Contact the general contractor for the project to determine
   what union would be involved.

2. Arrange for a 7,000 lb. capacity fork lift and operator. The lift must be suitable to the terrain at the job site,
   i.e.: sand, rocky, uneven. Charges for the lift will be paid by the contractor-erector.

3. Make available weather tight storage for the non-curved and curved panels on the sight.

4. Provide a complete bill of materials prior to start of production. Curving production cannot be restricted
   once it has started. The entire job must be run at one time. Normally, the job will be curved faster than it
   can be installed. Objective is to run 12 hrs/day 7 days/wk.

5. Provide laborers to handle panels entering and exiting curving machine. Figure one man per 20' length plus
   one.

6. Provide one (1) laborer to apply seam sealant during the curving operation in the field. This laborer is in
   addition to laborers needed to handle the panels. See Item 5 above.

7. Provide the proper work area for the curving equipment.
    (a) There must be a solid foundation for the curving machine as it weighs with container approximately 6,500 lbs.
    (b) There must be adequate storage space to accommodate the finished panels for the entire job.

    Any costs incurred to accomplish (a) and (b) above will be paid by the contractor. Any moves of the curving
    equipment after the one original set-up will be done by equipment furnished by the contractor and cost $500
    per move.

8. Verify that all components and materials are shipped and/or produced on site.
Merchant & Evans, Inc.
ZIP-RIB®                                                                                              O-3

                                JOB SITE CURVING - SPACE REQUIREMENTS

Curving space requirements include areas for 1) panel entry and exit of the curving machine, 2) panel storage
area prior to entry of the curving machine (straight panels), 3) panel storage area upon exit of the curving
machine (curved panels), and 4) an 18'-0" x 8'-0" area for the curving machine. Note: the curving machine
should be located on a clean hard surface such as blacktop. See diagram.

Storage area size is determined by pieces required. It should have a surface suitable for moving light loads.

MAJOR ADVANTAGES - JOB SITE CURVING

1.      No transit damage or transit delays.

2.      Lengths beyond allowable transportation limits are possible.

3.      Savings in material handling at the job site are possible. Plans can be made to hoist all the panels at
        one time rather than separately for each truckload as it arrives. See Section B for hoisting methods.

4.      On large projects, there is the possibility of a significant reduction in freight costs.


MAJOR DISADVANTAGES - JOB SITE CURVING

1.      Timing is critical to get the curving machine at the job site at the proper time.

2.      Weather may be a determining factor. Heavy winds, rain or snow make job site curving difficult or, in
        some cases, impractical. Extended exterior exposure of the metal or panels can lead to water stains.

3.      In some areas, unions will not permit production at the job site with non-union personnel. Get this point
        cleared well in advance, in writing, prior to shipment of the curving machine and equipment.

4.      When the curving machine arrives at the job site, the entire job must be run continuously and placed in
        storage.

5.      A large storage area is required to accommodate the finished panels. The storage area must be dry
        and graded to prevent ponding water. Bare metal must be covered to prevent water stain.

COSTS

There are many variables on each job that it is impossible to provide a rule of thumb on costs. They must be
figured on a job-by-job basis. Contact your Zip-Rib representative at the earliest possible time with
information on job location, size, and timing requirements so that an accurate cost study can be made.

				
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