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Welcome to the Class of 2005

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					International Student Handbook




      Williams College
          2011 – 2012
                                       Published by the Office of the Dean
                                                   July 2011

                             The compilation of this publication was made possible
                                  through the use of the following resources:

                                         Williams College Student Handbook

                                                 Williams College Bulletin

                                           International Student Handbooks
                                           from the following area colleges:
                                                     Smith College
                                                Mount Holyoke College
                                                 Connecticut College
                                                Northeastern University

                                     NAFSA's International Student Handbook

                                       U.S. Department of State's publication

Special thanks to Marissa Thiel, James Mathenge, Zara Curimjee, and Wendy Magoronga

Comments and suggestions regarding the Williams College International Student Handbook
may be directed to: Jessie Garner (413-597-4037) or at Jessie.L.Garner@williams.edu


                               Updated by: Jessie Garner, Assistant to the Dean


Williams College admits men and women of any background to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally
accorded or made available to students at the College. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, creed,
sexual orientation, or national or ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and
loan programs, and athletic and other College-administered programs. The College does not discriminate on the basis of sex in
violation of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1973, or the regulations there under, in the education programs or
activities which it operates, including employment therein. The College does not discriminate on the basis of handicap in
violation of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, or the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or the regulations there
under, in admission or access to its programs and activities.
The Williams community includes talented students with documented disabilities who may require learning, sight, hearing,
manual, speech, or mobility accommodations. Although Williams operates no specially structured academic programs for
individuals with disabilities, the College is committed to providing support services and accommodations in all programs to
students who need them.
Williams endeavors to provide equal access to campus programs and activities for all members of the college community. The
Dean's Office, through the Director of Academic Programs, coordinates the various accommodations required to make students'
educational experiences successful. Inquiries concerning the College's nondiscrimination policies may be referred to the Dean
of the College, Williamstown, MA 01267. Tel.: (413) 597-4171.
IMPORTANT TRAVEL AND ARRIVAL INFORMATION

1. You should arrange your flight through Teresa, at teresa@travelstoreinc.com, to Albany, NY airport on
   August 27, 2011. If you have decided to book your own travel into Albany, NY, please inform us of your
   arrival information (time, carrier, and flight number). There will be representatives from Williams College at
   the airport, and free shuttles to the campus, which is approximately 50 minutes away from the Albany airport.
   We do not provide transportation from any other airport.

2. Sheets and bed linens will be provided through a generous grant from the college, and they will be in your
   dorm rooms upon your arrival. The following items are included:


    Dorm Beddiing Set: Dorm-Room-In-a-Box: Comforter Sheet Set,
    Dorm Bedd ng Set: Dorm-Room-In-a-Box: Comforter Sheet Set,
     Mattress Pad, Piillllow, Towell Set
     Mattress Pad, P ow, Towe Set

                TWIN XL Reversible Comforter

                TWIN XL Sheet Set (Flat, Fitted and 2 pillow cases


                Towel Set (Bath, Hand and Wash)


                TWIN XL Mattress Pad and 1 Standard Pillow
I N T E R N A T I O N A L S T U D E N T S A B O U T W I L LI A M S 7
I N T E R N A T I O N A L S T U D E N T S A B O U T W I L LI A M S 7
            Useful Web Pages ............................................................................................................................................ 8

  JET LAG ................................................................................................................................................................... 8

  CULTURE SHOCK AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT ........................................................................................... 8
            Culture Shock .................................................................................................................................................. 8
            Ten Ways to Aid Cultural Adjustment ............................................................................................................. 9
            Things to do in a New Culture ....................................................................................................................... 10
            Relationships and Social Adjustments ........................................................................................................... 10

  ACADEMICS ......................................................................................................................................................... 12
            Concepts of a Liberal Arts Education ........................................................................................................... 13
            Academic Honesty and the Honor Code ........................................................................................................ 14
            Statement of Academic Honesty .................................................................................................................... 14
            Guidelines....................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
            Course Selection ............................................................................................................................................ 15

  FACULTY .............................................................................................................................................................. 16

  VACATIONS .......................................................................................................................................................... 16
            Storage .......................................................................................................................................................... 16
            Delftree Self Storage & Warehousing ...............................................................................................................
            Adams Heated Self Storage ...............................................................................................................................
            Places to Stay during Major College Holidays ............................................................................................. 16

  STUDENT SERVICES AND RESOURCES ....................................................................................................... 17
            Peer Tutoring ................................................................................................................................................ 17
            Writing Workshop .......................................................................................................................................... 17
            ESL ................................................................................................................................................................ 17
            Career Counseling ........................................................................................................................................ 17

  HEALTH SERVICES ............................................................................................................................................ 18
            Health Insurance ........................................................................................................................................... 18
            Thompson Health Center ............................................................................................................................... 18
            Psychological Counseling Service................................................................................................................. 18
            Exercising and Eating Right .......................................................................................................................... 19
            Peer Health Services ..................................................................................................................................... 19
COPING WITH THE WEATHER ...................................................................................................................... 19
         Type of Clothing Needed - facts .................................................................................................................... 20
         Daylight Savings Time (DST) ........................................................................................................................ 21
         Winter Sports and Activities .......................................................................................................................... 21

COMMUNICATION ............................................................................................................................................. 22
         Mail Service................................................................................................................................................... 22
         Telephone Service .......................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.

CONVERSION REFERENCES ........................................................................................................................... 23
         Clothing ......................................................................................................................................................... 23
         Weights and Measures: Abbreviations and Symbols ..................................................................................... 24
         Weights and Measures: Metric to U.S. Standard Conversion ....................................................................... 24
         Temperature .................................................................................................................................................. 24

TRANSPORTATION ............................................................................................................................................ 25
         Airports ......................................................................................................................................................... 25
         Air Service ...................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
         Bus Service .................................................................................................................................................... 25
         Taxi Service ................................................................................................................................................... 25
         Trains ............................................................................................................................................................ 26
         Travel Agencies ............................................................................................................................................. 26
         Car Rental ..................................................................................................................................................... 26
         Automobile Information ................................................................................................................................ 26
         International Driver's License ....................................................................................................................... 27
         Obtaining a Massachusetts Driver's License ................................................................................................ 27
         Driving while intoxicated .............................................................................................................................. 27

MONEY MANAGEMENT ........................................ Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
         Transferring Funds ........................................ Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
         Opening a Bank Account ............................................................................................................................... 29
         Other Banking Services ................................................................................................................................. 30
         Banks in Williamstown .................................................................................................................................. 30

PASSPORT AND VISA INFORMATION .......................................................................................................... 30
         Passports ....................................................................................................................................................... 31
         F-1 Visa/SEVIS I-20 (Student and Exchange Visitor Information System) ................................................... 31
         I-94 Form ...................................................................................................................................................... 31
         J-1 Visa/DS-2019 .......................................................................................................................................... 32
         Expiration dates ............................................................................................................................................ 32
         The Port of Entry ........................................................................................................................................... 32
         Special Registration ...................................................................................................................................... 32
TRAVEL ................................................................................................................................................................. 33
          Reentry to the U.S. ......................................................................................................................................... 33
          Valid U.S. Visa .............................................................................................................................................. 33
          Valid Form SEVIS I-20 or DS-2019 .............................................................................................................. 33
          Travel to Contiguous Territory (Canada, Mexico, or Adjacent Islands other than Cuba) ............................ 33
          Reentry Without an Endorsed SEVIS I-20 or DS-2019 ............................................................................... 336
          Canadian Citizens and Landed Immigrants .................................................................................................. 33
          Travel Within the United States ..................................................................................................................... 34

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT ................................................................................................................................ 34
          On-Campus Employment: Basic F-1 Regulations ......................................................................................... 34
          Transfer to Another Program and On-Campus Employment ........................................................................ 34
          Optional Practical Training .......................................................................................................................... 34
          Change of Address......................................................................................................................................... 36
          Summer Employment ..................................................................................................................................... 36
          Applying for a Social Security Number ......................................................................................................... 36

THE INTERNATIONAL STUDENT AND THE LAW ..................................................................................... 36

CRIMES and “SCAMS” ....................................................................................................................................... 37
          Ways to Avoid Being a Victim of Crime ........................................................................................................ 37
          What To Do If You Are Accused of a Crime .................................................................................................. 38
          Smoking ......................................................................................................................................................... 38
          Alcohol and Other Drugs .............................................................................................................................. 38
          Williamstown Open Container Law .............................................................................................................. 38

HOLIDAYS AND TRADITIONS ......................................................................................................................... 39
          Holidays Celebrated in America ................................................................................................................... 39

RELIGIOUS GROUPS AND CHURCHES ............. Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.

COMMON TERMS AND IDIOMS ..................................................................................................................... 40
IINTERNATIIONAL STUDENTS ABOUT WIILLIIAMS
 INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS ABOUT WILLIAMS
  NTERNAT ONAL STUDENTS ABOUT W LL AMS

"Williams is one of the greatest academic Institutions in the United States. Do not worry if the courses and classes
initially overwhelm you. You will get the hang of it, and you will receive a great education. Teaching at Williams is very
much dependent on the professors, so ask your JA's, IC members and other upperclassmen about the professors
and the classes you are interested in. If you enjoy the professor, you will also enjoy the class more.‖ (Ashok Pillai ,
Sweden)

" I think that Williams is a great school with an exceptional undergraduate program. Most of the classes are small
and the professors know you by your first name. The professors are also very approachable for questions or even
just a quick chat. It is academically competitive out here, which keeps me on my feet all the time and challenges me
to work to my full potential." (Parth Doshi , India)

“ Williamstown is not a town, nor is it a village; it is a street, a college, and a Wal-Mart. The mall is an extension of
this, but it is too far away to be considered a part of this place.‖
(Marcos Sahm, Brazil)

"Williams gives you all the opportunities and freedom to create and explore. All it asks in return is hard work and
devotion." (Kamen Kozarev , Bulgaria)

―Williams is the most exciting place to experience life: study hard, find friends for life, and discover new horizons.
When I first came here, I was fascinated by the beautiful campus and welcoming people.‖
(Iskra Valtcheva , Bulgaria)

"If you'd never heard of Williams before you started applying, don't worry, neither had I. My mom convinced me to
apply through the Common Application, and when I got in I started researching it and found out what a good school it
is. When I visited it, I fell in love with the place, and decided to come here. As a sophomore, I'm absolutely certain I
made the right choice." (Andres Carrizo , Florida)

―When you apply to Williams, you think it is worth a try. When you get accepted and decide to enroll, you hope you
are making the right decision. When you finally get here, you realize this is where you belong.‖
‖I had a wonderful time during First Days. Everything was new for me: all the people, the beauty of the campus, and
the US culture on a broad basis. I entered a community that is as diverse as it is united.‖
(Vlad Andonov , Bulgaria)

―Moving so far away from home was quite a challenge, but coming to college in the US is something I have always
wanted to do and, after living in big cities my whole life, Williams seemed like the perfect place for me to start. I
doubted one of my teachers back home (an alumna) when she told me I would only be bored if I wanted to because
there's always something happening and there's so much to get involved in. I took it to the extreme and ended up
getting involved in one too many activities but I'm learning to manage my time and to pick and choose the best things
for me to be doing now. There's definitely a lot to do in this small town and I've had a wonderful first semester.
Classes were incredible and teachers were accessible and extremely nice.‖
(Melanie Beeck , Brazil)

―Williams College is wonderful. But beware: it might have ups and downs. It does for most people. It might take you
some time to learn to enjoy new things and new types of people. Whatever it is, it takes some moments of elation and
some of despair.‖ (Vasko , Bulgaria)

―This is a place where you will make lots of amazing discoveries about life in general, people, your field of study, this
country. This a place where YOU will discover YOURSELF and who you are and what you can be. Communication
with people may be the most precious and most interesting part of your experience at Williams. I counted up to 30
countries whose representatives are here, for you to speak to and be friends with! You come to the USA and you
meet the whole world, the whole variety of cultures! You will definitely pick up several phrases or words from many
languages (if you are not lazy... :) which is so much fun!‖ (Darya Dyachkova – exchange student, )




                                                                       7
Useful Web Pages

       The Williams College Honor System (http://wiki.williams.edu/display/facom/Honor+Code)
       Williams Students Online (http://wso.williams.edu) - information on weather, dining hall menus,
        campus announcements, campus and Williamstown-area phone directories. Also contains student
        webpages, the Online Facebook, and the Housing Plans.
       Information Technology (http://oit.williams.edu/)- help pages and software downloads.
       Multicultural Center (http://mcc.williams.edu/)
       Office of Career Counseling (OCC) (http://www.williams.edu/go/careers/)
       The Dean’s Office (http://dean.williams.edu/)
       Special Academic Programs (http://www.williams.edu/resources/osap/)
       Williams College Library (http://library.williams.edu/) - library hours and information, electronic
        databases, the library catalog.
       College-Wide Message Service (http://www.williams.edu/messages) - campus announcement
        system for current events and important notices.
       The College Council (http://wso.williams.edu/cc) - student government
       WCFM (http://wcfm.williams.edu) - student radio station
       Williams Outing Club (http://wso.williams.edu/orgs/woc)



 J E T LA G
 JE T LA G


 Jet lag is one of the first adjustments you will face once you arrive in the United States, and it means
 adapting to a new time zone. Jet lag is caused by the long airplane flight from your homeland and its
 severity is related to the distance and direction you travel. After a few days (perhaps as long as a week)
 of disorientation and sleepiness, you will function quite normally - eating lunch when it is the middle of the
 night at home, or rising at an hour you went to bed only a few days before.




 C U L T U R E S H O C K A N D S O C I A L A D JU S T M E N T
 C U L T U R E S H O C K A N D S O C I A L A D JU S T M E N T

 Cu l t u r e Sh o c k

 Culture shock is a psychological disorientation due to being in a new culture. It is not fatal.
 Broadly speaking, culture shock comes from:
    Living and/or studying (or working) for an extended period of time in a different environment;
    Having values you held absolute brought into question because of cultural differences;
    Being constantly put into situations where you are expected to function with maximum proficiency
       but where the rules have not been adequately explained.

 As can be seen, culture shock does not result from a specific event. Rather, it builds up slowly from a
 series of small events often difficult to identify. Remember that the reactions are emotional and not easily
 subject to rational management.




                                                     8
         The FOUR Stages of Culture Shock are:

            Initial euphoria
            Irritability and hostility, disappointments and internal conflicts
            Gradual adjustment (coming to terms)
            Adaptation to biculturalism

Symptoms of culture shock:
    homesickness
    boredom
    withdrawal (i.e., spending excessive amounts of time reading; avoiding contact with host nationals)
    need for excessive amount of sleep
    compulsive eating and/or drinking
    chauvinistic excesses
    stereotyping of and hostility toward host nationals
    loss of ability to work effectively
    physical ailments (psychosomatic illnesses)

Although uncomfortable, it is a normal part of the adjustment process, and you need not be ashamed of it.


 ―Well first of all, no matter how much contact you have had with American culture, you are bound to suffer from some sort
of culture shock. That might range from never having sipped alcohol to suddenly being confronted by it in dorm rooms, or
to put a reverse spin on it: having boozed your way through high school and suddenly realizing that oops, this is America,
the drinking age is 21.‖ (Abid Shah , Pakistan)


Ten Ways to Aid Cultural Adjustment

        Keep contact with your family and friends from home. Write emails, make phone calls.
        Make friends with people from your home country. Join the International Student Organization on
         campus or attend its activities.
        Participate in sports or other activities that interest you or in which you participated at home.
        Find restaurants that serve food you are accustomed to, or buy ingredients from the local food store
         so as to make dishes you have at home.
        Get to know Americans and try to understand and appreciate their culture while sharing your own. Be
         observant and ask questions!
        Expect to encounter some difficulties – it is natural. You might not do as well in your studies as you
         did at home in your first few months here, since you are dealing with a different academic system and
         many other new situations. Be realistic, make allowances for yourself!
        If you do not like your new surroundings and find a lot to criticize, try to think of one thing each day
         which you like about this new environment.
        Take some time to be alone and read or relax. Try to think positive!
        Learn from others’ experience: friends who have already experienced cultural adjustment and culture
         shock, your International Student Advisor, or a College Counselor. A discussion can help.
        Keep your self-respect and concentrate on the long-term advantages of studying in the U.S. Keep
         your sense of humor. Culture shock will pass.

Students from different cultures experience different levels of culture shock. You may not experience the
physical or emotional changes brought on by culture shock while others around you might. If you experience
culture shock you will probably discover your own methods of making yourself better in addition to these
suggestions. Add your ideas to the list and share them with new students as they arrive, or tell your
International Student Advisor, so that others may benefit from your experience.




                                                               9
      "From time to time, and certainly in the beginning, life can seem overwhelmingly unmanageable. The academic
      workload, commitments to other groups and activities, social life (or trying to have one), even all the information in
      your mailboxes and inboxes: together they can make you feel like you're in the midst of a hurricane! Slowly but
      surely, however, you will learn to handle it all. Life in the States is about surfing the waves, not about going deep
      underwater!" (Abhishek Basnyat, Nepal)

      "It will happen to you. You think you know all the stages, like I did, but without knowing, culture shock will creep on
      you. Be it your adverse reaction to the food, to the locals or the local environment, you will suffer some degree of
      culture shock. So be prepared, have an open mind and be ready." (Federico Sosa , Paraguay)

      "Yes, cultural shock exists and you are going to suffer from it. You might even get depressed and cry every day
      because you feel that you cannot get used to this place. (That's what I did during my first few weeks at Williams.)
      But once you reach out to people, the peer counselors, your JAs, the psychological counselors and even your
      professors, it is going to be a lot easier and better. So don't be afraid to cry and don't be afraid to ask for help.
      Everyone will be more than happy to support you." (Reka Daroczi , Hungary)

       ―Different students deal differently with the shock. My advice: remember, this is another country. The customs are
      different; do not retreat in a shell of your own. The wonder of a place like Williams is the great diversity of people on
      campus. You are bound to find people with similar interests, and really: freshman year is AWESOME. Some people
      revel in cultural differences. Be one of them.‖ (Naila Baloch , Pakistan)

       ―You will probably learn that some people are wonderful as they are, and others just aren't. Don't isolate yourself
      too much, but try to keep your sense of who you are and why you are here. There are many things why you can
      enjoy Williams and add meaning to your life--friends, activities, classes, etc, etc. If you don't limit yourself and forget
      your prejudices, Williams will provide you with a whole new world to explore. Have fun with it!‖ (Radu Mireuta ,
      Romania)


      Things to do in a New Culture

            Observe others and yourself.
            Pay attention to common expressions and slang (some of them are listed on the last pages of this
             handbook).
            Don’t take things too literally. Be assertive and ask questions! It is perfectly all right to ask people
             to repeat what they said when you don’t hear or understand.
            Dare to say ―no‖ to situations or actions you find unacceptable or unpleasant.
            Strive to understand, not imitate the Americans!
            Make choices that benefit you.
            Practice your communication skills, go out and take the initiative!

      Relationships and Social Adjustments

      Male/Female Relationships: Most Americans are still confused by all the social, legal and cultural
      changes in male/female relationships brought on by the women's movement. While great importance is
      placed on equality in American culture, women and men do not have equal standing yet. It is still true
      that American women make less money than their male counterparts and have fewer economic and
      educational opportunities. However, compared to women in most other countries, American women
      enjoy great flexibility of choices and options, rights and privileges.


It is not unusual for women to ask men out for a date or to offer to pay. It is also acceptable for men to pay for
the date or vice versa. Often American couples will go on a date and each pay his or her own way.


―The Williams dating scene is despicable -- changes should be made. Be bold, alert, and creative!‖
(Georgi , Bulgaria)



                                                                 10
Titles: Because Americans are informal and value equality, they use first names more than elsewhere.
Sometimes people of different ages, wealth, and status address each other by first name. If you are not
certain how to address someone, ask them what they like to be called. Americans frequently use Mr. or Ms.
(sounds like Mizz) in addressing a stranger. Mrs. and Miss are not used as frequently, unless you are
speaking to someone who is from the "older generation". Professors will usually indicate if they wish to be
addressed by first name, "Professor", or "Doctor". Certain professionals (Ambassador, President, Senator,
Dean) are addressed by titles and the last name.

Time Consciousness: Americans attach great importance to punctuality. The organization of activities is
based on schedules and deadlines. Consequently, it is considered rude to be late. For a meeting or
appointment, you should arrive exactly on time or a few minutes early. If there is a receptionist present in an
office where the meeting is scheduled to take place, always let the receptionist know you have arrived. Allow
that person to alert the party with whom you are meeting to your presence.

For a dinner party, 10 minutes late is forgivable. For a large cocktail party or social event, you may sometimes
be up to 30 minutes late without offending your host. It's best not to take a chance so you should try to arrive
on time. Should you realize that you will be late for a meeting or engagement, call in advance and let the
people you are meeting know.

Communication style of Americans: It is usually best to avoid stereotyping people, but some
generalizations are possible and not so objectionable, as long as we keep in mind their ―generalizing‖ nature:
    In casual conversation (―small talk‖) Americans prefer to talk about weather, sports, jobs,
        acquaintances or past experiences;
    Topics not usually discussed: politics and religion (seen as controversial);
    Very personal topics: sex, bodily functions and personal inadequacies (likely to be discussed only
        among good friends or with complete strangers people do not expect to see again);
    No one talks for very long at a time; people take turns and avoid arguments (if an argument is
        unavoidable, it is to be restrained);
    ―Ritual‖ conversational exchanges are not very common and are usually reduced to ―What’s up?‖ –
        ―Not much.‖ or ―How’s it going?‖ – ―Good.‖ or ―Hey, how are you?‖ – ―I’m fine. You?‖

Individualism: For Americans, the ideal person is an independent, self-reliant individual. This is why they see
themselves as individuals rather than group members. They dislike being dependent on others or having
others dependent on them. Some foreigners regard this attitude as ―selfishness‖, others as freedom.




Friendships:


Many international students have remarked that Americans seem superficial in forming friendships compared to
people in their home countries. Because the American society is very mobile and transient, Americans are taught to
be self-reliant. This may lead to friendships that are shorter and less intensive than in other cultures.

      Americans are very quick to say hello, look a stranger in the eye, or smile at someone on the street. These
      gestures are simply polite, and shouldn’t be seen as an invitation to form a long-lasting friendship. However,
      one should not infer that Americans are incapable of loving or caring deeply. Most Americans have only a
      few really close friends whom they take a long time to get to know, and whom they value and keep in touch
      with for their entire lives.




                                                         11
       "Almost all of the friends you will make at Williams will be from two major sources: your freshman year entry, and your
       extra-curricular activities. Therefore, do not isolate yourself from your entry, and join extra-curriculars that may interest
       you. The party scene here depends upon your activities and groups. You will also definitely make many friends through
       the IC, but make sure you do not limit yourself only to this great group of people. This college is filled with great
       individuals: students, professors, administrators and staff, so make the best of this opportunity you have been given and
       get to know as many of them as possible" (Ashok Pillai , Sweden)

       "One of the hardest things, at first, is to make friends. This is an ‗activity‘ that requires time and effort. Unlike back home,
       where friendships somehow just struck, here one has to work to create them. The way I see it, participating in some sport
       or club activity can provide a basis for making friends. So extra-curriculars are not really ‘extra‘ here, not a matter of
       choice, but something you have to do if you want a decent social life. There's a wide variety of such activities you can
       choose from. Even the PE classes, that many people complain about, are an opportunity to meet new people and make
       new friends." (Abhishek Basnyat , Nepal)

       "Being open, especially towards Americans, is really important at Williams if you want to feel good. When you come here
       it seems that all Americans are awful, loud and uncaring, but this is not true. A lot of them are wonderful and really
       valuable people." (Reka Daroczi , Hungary)

       ―E-mail is your friend. Use it liberally, because people here somehow think that the phone has become obsolete.‖
       (Marcos Sahm , Brazil)




AC AD EM IC S
AC AD EM IC S

―Professors here have this pesky habit of starting class on time.‖
―When you don't have the time to read, at least skim.
When you don't have the time to skim, at least read the titles on the syllabus so you know what's going on.‖
―Choose classes with liberal attendance policies if you enjoy taking the occasional day off. Likewise, if you like to
sleep in, choose classes that start later in the day. If you can combine both, you are in heaven.‖
(Marcos Sahm , Brazil)

"A new topic, concept, or idea is covered in every class. It is highly unusual of professors to repeat something they
have already dealt with (although they will gladly do it for you in their office hours). Therefore it is of utmost
importance, I think, to pay attention in class and take notes.
My background hadn't prepared me for such a system. I was more used to a system where we - both teachers and
students - didn't mind going over a topic several times until most students were comfortable with it. So if you are from
such a background yourself, then it might seem impossible, in the beginning, to catch up with such a crazy pace. But
eventually you‘ll get it, don‘t worry!‖
(Abhishek Basnyat , Nepal)

"If you want to avoid procrastination, work very far from a computer with an email terminal.‖ (Federico Sosa ,
Paraguay)

 ―Life at Williams is very hectic, especially if you have a job and other extra-curriculars besides academics. It can
therefore be hard, if not almost impossible, to relax. I think it‘s helpful to take some time by yourself, for yourself,
every day. That is, spend some time alone and do nothing – just breathe deeply, meditate, and think about all the
wonderful chances Williams offers.‖ (Diana Carligeanu , Romania)

 ―Academics in Williams are strong. That means, they may look menacing in the first couple of weeks, and it is very
usual to feel lost and inadequate. Many people do--if that happens, just know that you are not the only one. Williams
will throw a lot at you and watch how much you can handle. Sometimes you will think, wow, I just can't do all that
reading I have for religion, and you're probably right. Challenge yourself, but try not to go beyond the limits of your
physical and mental capacities—it will hurt you. As time passes, you will hopefully learn to balance studying with
other things you enjoy, and life will be nice and easy once again.‖ (Vasko , Bulgaria)



                                                                  12
 ―It‘s different from home. It‘s tougher but more interesting and beautiful than I expected. And be sure to check what
exactly Liberal Arts College is compared to some huge major universities.‖ (Edvard Major , Yugoslavia)




Concepts of a Liberal Arts Education

The undergraduate liberal arts college is largely a feature of American education and therefore unfamiliar
to students from other countries. Unlike at a university, at Williams the primary work of the faculty is
teaching (although all of the Williams faculty have active research interests too). And while your studies
will be useful in the future, the curriculum does not include courses and fields that are pre-professional or
that lead to a specific occupation. Much of the higher education in the U.S. is more obviously pre-
professional, the undergraduate liberal arts college representing a small portion of American higher
education. There are only about 100 such colleges in the U.S., but the impact of the model is wide.
Almost all universities strive to incorporate some features of the liberal arts model into their institutions.
The model is beginning to be copied elsewhere in the world as well.

      The idea and the term of ―liberal arts‖ emerged in the European universities of the Middle Ages, where
      the focus of the training was on two arts: language and mathematics. Language arts were the trivium of
      grammar, rhetoric and dialectical argumentation. Mathematics in the form of arithmetic, geometry,
      astronomy and music constituted the quadrivium. With the spread of the influence of Aristotelian
      philosophy the study of sciences, of        ethics, physics and metaphysics was added and the term ―arts
      and sciences‖ arose. The mastery of the liberal arts prepared students for professions either in theology
      or law.

      This model was transformed with the rise of modernity into one that focused on the study of the classical
      languages, especially Latin, through which the older medieval subject matter was still pursued. The main
      requirement for entrance into Williams when it was founded in 1793 was mastery of Latin. In the twentieth
      century the centrality of classical languages has been displaced by the different disciplines into which
      knowledge is divided. At Williams, the disciplines are divided into three divisions: languages and arts,
      social studies, and the natural sciences including mathematics.

      The purpose and character of liberal arts education is continually under discussion and increasingly under
      attack. Many people across the political spectrum maintain that college should teach practical skills that
      will lead automatically to a job. Their opponents argue that what is needed first is the ability to learn to
      learn, which is what a liberal arts education provides. Mastery of job skills can come later and will also
      continually change as economic structures and technologies change.
      The heated debate is a sign of the continuing vitality and importance of the liberal arts for defining higher
      education in the United States. But it might be more useful to move from the political fray and try to
      articulate the goals on which all of us might agree. I would propose four.

      Complexity: You are here to learn complexity, to understand that nothing is simple. Whatever you study
      you will be working to understand complex phenomena and thus the character of complexity itself. Not
      unexpectedly complexity is itself complex. It may take the form of complication - e.g. how does a nerve
      impulse travel down a neutron transforming chemical processes into electrical charges. It may be
      ambiguity - how do the multiple layers of a great novel like Moby Dick make it impossible to give a single
      meaning to that work. It may be irony - our immune system might make us think of ourselves as separate
      bodies, but further reflection lets us understand that the decentered and multilayered character of our
      immune systems both creates and destroys the impression that we have separate and impermeable
      bodies that define who we are. Finally it may be flat out contradiction at the heart of an inquiry such as
      the physicist's recognition that light is both a particle and a wave.

      Connections: You will also be making connections between the different things you study. You will take
      four (or five) courses a term so that you’ll have the materials to do that. There is no way to mandate or
      even guess what those connections might look like, but you should be expecting them from the outset. If
      they aren’t happening something is wrong.

      Communications: Whatever you study you will be learning the skills of communicating what you have
      learned, developing mastery and, I hope, love and passion for the various languages, both natural and
      artificial, in which we conduct our different inquiries. Each field has its own language. Some are
                                                               13
      obviously separate like mathematics or the languages we use in chemistry, computer science and music.
      Other fields use a common language like English, but you will begin to see the very different ways in
      which we use our common language. Because what you will be communicating will be complex and the
      connections you’ll be making are your own, this will be hard work.

      Confidence: Our goal is finally your increasing confidence as you expand your understanding of
      complexity, develop your capacity to make imaginative connections, and gain agility in communicating
      what you have learned and translating between the many languages we use here. If we and you succeed
      here, you will leave here with a discipline and flexibility of mind able to adjust to the future, whose outlines
      we always only barely perceive, and to lead meaningful, moral and fulfilling lives drawing on the content
      and tools you’ve gained here.
      Extract by William Darrow, Associate Professor of Religion, Chair of the Religion & the African & Middle
      Eastern Studies Departments, 1996-97.

Academic Honesty and the Honor Code

You should be familiar with the Williams College Honor Code, as you will be asked to reaffirm your
commitment to the Statement of Academic Honesty by signing an Honor Code Pledge at the beginning of
each academic year. The Honor Code prevails in the writing of papers and laboratory reports, quizzes,
homework assignments, hour tests, and examinations.

Students or faculty members who have discovered a violation or a possible violation of the Honor Code
should report it promptly either to the Dean or to the student chair of the Honor Committee. Then the
Student Honor Committee will convene to hear the case. Depending on the circumstances of the
violation, penalties imposed by the Dean may include such possibilities as a directed grade of E in the
course, disciplinary probation, or temporary/permanent separation from the College.

Statement of Academic Honesty

You are expected to acknowledge the research and ideas of others in your work and to abide by those
regulations governing work stipulated by the instructor. Breaking these regulations, misrepresenting your
own work, or collaborating in the misrepresentation of another's work is a serious violation of this
agreement!
                               Instructors will explain how the Statement of Academic Honesty applies to
                               their courses or laboratories. Final examinations or hour tests can range
                               from closed-book, alternate-seating classroom exercises to open-book,
                               "take-home" examinations or papers. Some instructors encourage
                               cooperation among students, but others do not. If you are unsure how the
                               Honor Code applies in a particular situation, try to find out from your
                               professor, or from a member of the Honor Committee.

In written material, you must avoid the possibility of even unintentional plagiarism by acknowledging the
sources of your work. Careful observance of accepted standards of reference and attribution is required.
The basic rules are summarized below. You are expected to provide clear footnotes or other appropriate
documentation and give credit in the bibliography to ideas, interpretations, and facts from various
sources.

The basic rules of attribution require that:
    A direct quotation (whether a single word or a phrase, sentence, paragraph, or series of
       paragraphs) must always be identified by quotation marks, by indenting and single spacing, or by
       reduced type size of the quoted material, and a note must be used to state the exact source.
    A paraphrase of the work of another must be acknowledged as such by a note stating the source.
    Indebtedness to the specific ideas of others, or the summarizing of several pages, even though
       expressed in different words, must be acknowledged by a note stating the source.
    Every instance of the use of another student's laboratory reports, computer programs, or other
       material must be acknowledged by a note.
    Even the use of a student's own previous work must be acknowledged; thus, a student must
       obtain the prior permission of all instructors concerned before submitting substantially the same
       paper in more than one course.

                                                           14
Course Selection

New students preregister by mail in early summer. Soon after arrival at Williams, they meet their assigned
Academic Advisors to discuss the curriculum and their course selections. All course changes for new
students are made with the approval of the faculty advisors. During the first two years, students are
limited in the number of courses they may take in one department or subject each semester. For full
details on registration and requirements, refer to the Williams College Bulletin.

      Course changes may be made at a designated period at the beginning of each semester. No course
      changes can be made after this period except with the approval of the Committee on Academic Standing,
      after consultation with the Dean's Office. During Winter Study, a second Winter Study Project may be
      added if the instructor approves but the original project may not be dropped. A processing fee of $5 per
      day is assessed for each course change accepted after the announced deadline. A failing grade will be
      assigned to any course dropped after the course change period.

      First-year and first-semester transfer students may be permitted to withdraw from one course (incurring a
      deficiency but no grade penalty) as late as the tenth week of the semester. Upperclassmen also may
      once in subsequent years withdraw from a course under the same conditions. A withdrawal, recorded on
      the transcript as a "W," is granted only with the approval of the instructor and the Dean and only if there is
      complete agreement between the instructor and the Dean that, despite conscientious effort to do the
      work, continuation in the course would be detrimental to the overall educational interest or health of the
      student. The deficiency thereby incurred must be removed in the normal manner. See the Williams
      College Bulletin to learn more about making up deficiencies.

      Students are required to take and complete four courses each semester. In exceptional cases, students
      may, upon petition to the Committee on Academic Standing and with departmental approval at the time of
      registration, elect a pattern of five semester courses in the fall semester and three in the spring or three in
      the fall and five in the spring; a pass-fail course cannot be used as the fifth course in this pattern.

      Except in the case of the unbalanced course program described above, a student may, at the beginning
      of any semester, enroll in a fifth course on a pass-fail basis only; this course must be specified as the
      pass-fail course. By the sixth week, a student must decide whether to continue the course, and if so,
      whether on a pass-fail or regular basis. A form for designating the option chosen will be sent from the
      Registrar's Office. A processing fee of $5 per day is assessed for 5th course grading option designations
      accepted after the announced deadline. A course graded "Pass" may not be used as one of the thirty-two
      semester courses required to complete the degree, to fulfill distribution or major requirements, or to make
      up a deficiency. A pass-fail course converted to a fifth regularly graded course, may be used to fulfill
      distribution or major requirements or to make up a deficiency incurred in a prior term. The grade received
      will be included in the calculation of the student's cumulative grade point average.

      Students must take and pass a Winter Study Project in each of their four years. Winter Study Projects
      are graded Honors, Pass, Perfunctory Pass, Fail. All work for Winter Study Projects must be submitted by
      the last day of the Winter Study Program; work may be accepted after this date only with the permission
      of the instructor and a dean. Students who fail their Winter Study Projects may be placed on Academic
      Probation by the Committee on Academic Standing and will be required to make up the deficiency.
      Students who fail through gross neglect of work will normally be required to resign. A student who
      receives a second Perfunctory Pass grade in Winter Study will be required to pass a fifth course, which
      may be graded on the regular A-E or pass/fail basis, in the following spring or fall semester.

      For more information on grading, extensions, warnings, deficiencies, major requirements, withdrawal from
      the College, etc., please refer to the Williams College Bulletin.


      "Williams offers a wonderful education. Part and parcel of that education is the realization that high school and
      college are totally different. For people coming from the A levels or IB system of education, most important is realizing
      that unlike the A-levels, where you have one final exam, Williams is consistent study and hard work. It is suicidal to
      fall behind on work. Regular work is the key to success at Williams.‖ (Abid Shah , Pakistan)



                                                               15
F A C U LT Y
F A C U LT Y


―The faculty at Williams is the most fruitful source of academic improvement. Never feel intimidated to talk with your
professors! They will help a lot but you will never realize how important they are until you see for yourself. When you
feel overwhelmed and stressed as never before (and this moment will come, I can guarantee) you‘d better go and talk
with your professor – he/she will help you tremendously!‖ (Teodora Ivanova , Bulgaria)

 ―The faculty at Williams is fabulous and very helpful. You won't find that at a large university, so take advantage of it
while you're here. Talk to your professors whenever you feel like it, so that you can expand your academic
experience.‖ (Anna Andonova , Bulgaria)



VAC A TIO N S
VAC A TIO N S

All student residences, including co-ops, are closed during Winter Break. Except for international
students, who are allowed to stay on campus during Winter Break. During Spring Break limited housing is
available in Mission Park, Greylock, and co-ops. At the end of the Spring Semester, students must leave
their rooms by noon of the day following the last day of final examinations. Seniors will leave after
Commencement. A $50.00 fine is imposed for each day a student remains in his or her room beyond
deadlines.

During summer, a student can stay on campus only if he/she is working for a particular department.
There are limited opportunities for summer work for first-year students. Research assistants usually
enjoy free housing. Students working for Buildings and Grounds, Admissions and other offices are
normally required to pay $35 per week. The purchase of a meal plan (ranging from $25 to $100 per
week) is compulsory in either case.

St o r a g e

     Connors Brothers (413.458.8141) and Mullen (413.743.4969) are two independent moving and
     storage companies offering summer storage near campus. Storage on campus over the summer
     is very limited and only allowed to a few international and financial aid students who have
     demonstrated critical need to the Office of Financial Aid.




       Places to Stay during Major College Holidays

       In t e r n a ti o n a l s t u d e n t s a r e a l l o w e d t o s t a y o n c a m p u s o v e r W i n t e r B r e a k b u t h e r e a r e a fe w
       m o r e o p ti o n s :

       You should anticipate major college holidays and plan accordingly. Arrangements can be made through
       family members living in the States, friends and their families, etc., for a place to stay during these
       periods. If arrangements cannot be made this way, then the Housing Office should be able to
       accommodate you.

       Information will be sent to international students about Christmas International House, which is an
       organization that provides an opportunity for international students to gather for fellowship and reunion
       for two weeks during the Christmas holidays.

       See if any of your American friends who live nearby would be willing to bring you home for all of part of
       a school break. This could be a great way to see another aspect of American Life

                                                                               16
     STU D EN T SER VIC ES AN D R E SO U R C E S
     STU D EN T SER VIC ES AN D R E SO U R C E S

      Peer Tutoring

      The peer tutoring program is offered through Office of Academic Resources, located on the second floor
      of Hopkins Hall. The Office of Academic Resources solicits recommendations for qualified tutors from
      department chairs at the beginning of each semester. The department chairs supply the Dean's Office
      with the students’ names and the courses for which they are qualified to tutor. These students are then
      offered a paid position through the Office of Academic Resources to perform tutoring services for
      students in need of academic assistance in a particular course.

      The tutoring program is sponsored by the Office of Academic Resources and there is no cost to the
      student receiving the services.

      Writing Workshop

      In the Writing Workshop, peer tutors help other students to plan, develop, organize, compose, and
      refine their essays. Although tutors do not comment on the content or ideas of an essay, they are
      practiced in sharpening the focus of a thesis and in strengthening organization. In addition, tutors can
      improve sentence structure, vocabulary, spelling, grammar, and punctuation. Writers who need
      intensive practice in grammar and punctuation should call the Office of Academic Resources and inquire
      about special tutorial sessions.

      First-year students will receive information regarding the specifics of the Workshop when they arrive on
      campus to participate in the First Days orientation program. Students may seek assistance whenever
      they need to talk about an assignment, organize an outline, get a fresh reaction to a first draft, or just to
      discuss problems involved in writing an essay. In response to these needs, the Workshop features walk-
      in hours.

      The tutors of The Writing Workshop aim to help the entire undergraduate community. Experience
      proves that they are just as effective with advanced writers as they are in teaching basic skills. In fact,
      tutors themselves regularly use the workshop for help with their own writing.

      ES L

      Unfortunately, no actual English as a Second Language program is available at Williams at this time.
      However, there are ESL tutoring services available through the Writing Workshop.

      The Workshop has tutors available to work with international students or any students whose native
      language is not English. Although this tutoring often includes working on papers, it is certainly not
      limited to that. You and your tutor can structure your meetings however you like. Sometimes students
      like to meet on a regular basis and discuss idiomatic expressions and other aspects of the English
      language and American culture, while others meet only to discuss their writing. If you are interested in
      having an ESL tutor, contact the Dean's Office for more information.

Career Counseling

Activities of the Career Counseling Office include counseling students and alumni on all options which are
available to them. The staff works with various academic departments and alumni to develop and
implement meaningful programs which will orient students to options in careers and further education.
They also work with a variety of organizations to develop full-time and summer jobs/internships. In
addition, on-campus interviews are scheduled for seniors with graduate and professional schools, and a
range of business, non-profit, government, and education oriented employers. Special workshops
develop skills in resume writing, interviewing techniques and the job-hunting process, and also inform
students about specific career choices. An extensive resource library contains career-related materials
and information on job vacancies, graduate schools, fellowships and scholarships. The Office of Career
Counseling (OCC) is open year-round. Further information is available from OCC.
    Web: http://www.williams.edu/go/careers/
                                                          17
H E A LT H S E R V I C E S
H E A LT H S E R V I C E S

He a l t h I n s u r a n c e

Medical care is an extremely important (and expensive) aspect of your life in the States! The U.S. does
not have a national health plan, and the government is not a major provider of medical care. Arranging
and paying for medical care is your responsibility. The best way to meet this responsibility is to obtain
comprehensive health-insurance coverage to protect you and your family from exorbitant costs.

Williams College offers student health insurance. The plan is available to students through the Health
Services Office located in the Thompson Health Center building on Hoxsey Street. In addition to the
regular health insurance, there is also an option to be covered by an emergency medical evacuation plan
for students with F-1 or J-1 status.

Thompson Health Center

Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m.-9:00 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday 1 - 8 p.m.
when classes are in session. Special clinic hours
http://www.williams.edu/admin/health/services_clinic.php

For Health concerns of an yrgent nature that cannot wait until Health Center hours the next day, call ext
4567 to access the on-call physician line for recommendations.

If you need any sort of medical care, do not hesitate to use the health services facilities on campus.
Thompson Health Center provides care for common illnesses and injuries. Prevention is a primary
concern and students are encouraged to bring even minor health concerns to the Center. No charges are
made for most treatment and medicines provided by the Health Center.

If you believe you have mono (mononucleosis virus, which is quite common), don’t panic! Just go to the
Health Center and ask for a blood test to confirm or disprove your suspicion. Symptoms of mono are:
extreme tiredness (fatigue), swollen lymph glands (in the neck area), sore muscles, inability to
concentrate, need to sleep a lot. You might not have all these symptoms, but fatigue is always present.


        Several special services are provided at the Health Center, such as orthopedic and gynecological
        clinics; however, dental and ophtalmological services are not provided. It is suggested that these
        concerns be addressed while at home or by finding a qualified professional in the area to perform
        these services. Inquire at the Thompson Health Center for a referral or check the Yellow Pages of
        the local telephone directory for available services. There are also some optometrists listed in the
        Student Handbook.

        If you plan to be on campus during breaks and summer vacation, it would also be advisable to inquire
        at the Thompson Health Center for referrals or advice regarding any anticipated needs during these
        periods.

        Psychological Counseling Service

        The Counseling Center, which is located in Thompson Health Center, provides comprehensive
        psychological counseling to all students currently enrolled at Williams. The services include:
        psychiatric evaluations, short-term individual or group therapy, crisis interventions, and medication
        evaluation, treatment, and follow-up. The Counseling Center is staffed by clinicians with a wide
        range of experience especially dealing with those issues that are familiar to the college-age
        population. Clinicians are seen Monday through Friday, by appointment only. The Counseling
        Service maintains strict standards and procedures of privacy and confidentiality. Students should be
                                                          18
aware that the exception to this policy occurs if there is a serious threat to the student's life or welfare,
or to the life or welfare of another student or the community at large. Appointments can be made by
calling x2353. There is no fee for this service.

A Staff therapist of the Psychological Counseling Services is always on call when school is in
session. When the Health Center is open (8:30 am - 9:00 pm weekdays and 1:00 pm - 8:00 pm on
Saturdays and Sundays), the on-call counselor can be reached by calling the Health Center at ext.
2206. After hours, you can access the on-call therapist by dialing Campus Safety at ext. 4444 and
giving a number where the therapist can call you back. You don't need to give your name or any
details of your situation to the dispatcher, just a phone number. The therapist will return that call in a
timely fashion.

Exercising and Eating Right

An important part of staying healthy is eating a nutritious and balanced diet. Finding the right foods in
a new country may be difficult. It may help to find some traditional foods from home, especially when
you first arrive. The International Student Club on campus may be able to give you some
suggestions on where to shop. If you have special dietary requirements, the campus dining services
may be able to accommodate you. Be sure to check with the dining service director about your
requirements if you do not readily find the foods you need.

Don’t forget that exercising regularly is the key to better health, less stress, more energy and
improved academic performance! Staying healthy in a new environment, with all the differences in
climate, food, and language, is a great challenge.

Peer Health Services

Peer Health counselors are trained to discuss a wide range of health-related issues including
sexuality, contraception, pregnancy options, sexually transmitted diseases, alcohol and drug abuse,
peer pressure, stress, and eating disorders. Peer Health can provide the names and phone numbers
of counselors who are available for counseling at all hours in addition to the call-in/walk-in Clinic
hours. Designated female counselors also perform anonymous pregnancy testing and gynecological
exam education in conjunction with the Health Center. All services provided by Peer Health
counselors are confidential.


Other Health Services you may find useful

RASAN (Williams Rape And Sexual Assault Network) Contact: Abbi Davies (unix: acd2), Grace Lapier
(unix: gsl1), or Marissa Thiel (unix: mt2) 2011-2012 co-coordinators

SASS (Sexual Assault Survivor Services) This team of trained professionals is available 24 hours a day
and can be reached through Campus Safety at x4444 or by calling 441-6783 directly.

Q u e e r S t u d e n t U n i o n T h e Q S U i s a c o m m u n i ty o f q u e e r a n d q u e e r - f r i e n d l y p e o p l e w h o w i s h
to p r o v i d e a s u p p o r ti v e a n d f u n e n v i r o n m e n t f o r t h e c o n s i d e r a ti o n a n d e x p l o r a ti o n o f q u e e r
i s s u e s , e s p e c i a l l y d i v e r s i ty w i t h i n t h e q u e e r c o m m u n i t y . L i l i R o d r i g u e z a n d j u s ti n a d k i n s f r o m
th e M C C a r e w o n d e r f u l r e s o u r c e s t o c o n t a c t.




                                                                              19
C O P IN G W ITH T H E W E A TH E R
C O P IN G W ITH T H E W E A TH E R

"Winters can be bad if they're long and dreary, But just based on severity, they're not too big a deal. Just pack some
cool sweaters from home, a couple of cool jackets (cool-looking only, that is), and flaunt your unique stuff here!"
(Abhishek Basnyat , Nepal)

"Weather in the Berkshires is something very interesting. Be prepared for anything, I mean anything.‖ (Federico
Sosa , Paraguay)




Type of Clothing Needed - facts

        January and February are the two coldest months of the year, when temperatures regularly drop
         below zero degrees fahrenheit and wind chill factors can make it feel even colder. (See conversion
         scale, p. 18)
        The amount of snow that falls and remains in the Berkshires varies greatly from year to year.
        The ski resorts and mountains always have plenty of snow for outdoor winter activities.
        The best way to dress during these coldest months: layer your clothing, e.g. thermal underwear,
         turtleneck, sweater and jeans. A winter jacket should be worn over it all to protect against the wind
         and snow, as well as snow pants to avoid getting wet. Gloves and hats are essential, to avoid
         exposure of the skin and the risk of frostbite and a scarf or high collar to protect your neck and filter
         the air you breathe.
        March is generally a very windy month, when temperatures begin to rise and the sun may shine for
         longer periods, but the air is still brisk and exposure is a threat. You should still wear your winter
         jacket, gloves and hat when outdoors. Layering is still a good idea, especially when spending
         extended amounts of time outside.
        April is the beginning of spring and rain. In early April there is still a threat of some snow in the
         forecast, but as the days progress, it turns to mostly rain. Rain gear becomes essential. Umbrellas,
         raincoats, and protective footwear will all come in handy.
        As May arrives, the spring clothing starts to filter into our daily wardrobes. The grass begins to turn
         green, the flowers begin to bloom and by Memorial Day, summer is upon us.
        June, July and August are the months when temperatures range anywhere from the high 70's through
         the 90's and can even reach 100 fahrenheit degrees during July and August. Shorts, t-shirts, bathing
         suits, or any lightweight attire is appropriate.
        In early June and as August turns to September, it might be necessary to have a sweatshirt on hand
         in the evening. When the days are shorter, the temperatures drop considerably when the sun goes
         down.
        In October the temperature may be very cold and then warm up again during the say. Layers will be
         important for you to be comfortable throughout the day.
        November bring the end of fall and the start of winter where snow is likey to fall, so make sure you
         have winter coat, boots and hat ready
        December, winter is in full swing and with that your first big snowstorm.




                                                               20
Daylight Savings Time (DST)

During summertime, most of the United States (with a few exceptions) implements Daylight Savings
Time. At 2:00 a.m. on the first Sunday in April clocks are turned one hour forward. Then, at 2:00 a.m. on
the last Sunday in October, the clocks are turned one hour back. (Keep this in mind—Spring forward; Fall
back—and you will always know which way to go.)

Winter Sports and Activities

      When winter's short days and cold stormy weather keep you confined to the indoors for long
      periods of time, you may develop symptoms of a condition that Northerners call "Cabin Fever."
      Fatigue, depression and boredom are all associated with this condition, but there are ways to avoid
      it.
      The best way to avoid cabin fever is to get outdoors. The lack of sunlight has a lot to do with the
      onset of this condition, so spending time outside will help. Some winter sports you might like to try
      are:




                                                         21
Winter Sports and Activities

     Downhill Skiing: There are several ski resorts in the Northeast, two of which are very close by.
     Discount rates are available to Williams College students and they have equipment rentals as well.

     Cross-Country Skiing: This can be a very inexpensive sport if you have access to the equipment,
     because you can go just about anywhere. Hiking trails, open fields or state parks are perfect places to
     try this sport out.
     Ice Skating: Even though Williams has its own rink, sometimes it's fun to find a lake or pond with a large
     section of smooth ice to skate on and try this sport outside. The best time to do this is during January
     and February and only when temperatures have remained below freezing point for a couple of weeks or
     more.
     Sledding: It's always fun to go sledding with friends. Sleds can be purchased at any department store
     for very little money and there are plenty of hills on campus to slide on.
     Snow-Shoeing: Snow shoes can be purchased at sporting good stores. Snow-shoeing is a great sport
     for people who like to hike. You can get a first hand look at how beautiful the Berkshire Hills are during
     the winter season.

     The Williams Outing Club (WOC) organizes many excursions, which include some of the sports listed
     above. They also offer access to the equipment needed to participate in some of these sports.


    C O M M U N IC ATIO N
    C O M M U N IC ATIO N

     Mail Service

     The United States Postal Service (USPS) is the main provider of mail service in the United States. Other
     services include United Parcel Service (UPS), Federal Express (FedEx), and DHL Worldwide Express
     (DHL). Unlike postal service in many countries, the USPS does not offer long-distance telephone
     service or savings accounts.

     Each student is assigned a Student Union (SU) Box upon admission, and the student will keep that SU
     Box number for all four years, but the building in which the mailbox is located may change each year.
     The mailroom staff distributes incoming mail on a daily basis, Monday through Friday. The staff is also
     responsible for disbursing ―campus mail‖ to SU Boxes.
     All incoming student mail should be addressed to:

     Use your S.U. Box number
     in the Paresky line
     .

           (Your Name)
           S.U. BOX _ _ _ _ Paresky
           Williams College
           Williamstown, MA 01267

     You should not send cash through the mail, but otherwise you can be fairly sure that your letter or
     package will be delivered safely. You can insure your package at the post office.




                                                       22
C O N V ER SIO N R EFER EN C ES
C O NV ER SIO N R EFER EN C ES

Cl o t h i n g

     Women’s Clothing
     Japanese                            7          9         11         13         15          17     19
     American                            8         10         12         14         16          18     20
     British                            30         32         34         36         38          40     42
     Continental                        36         38         40         42         44          46     48

     Men's Suits, Overcoats &
     Sweaters
     Japanese                           36         37         38         39         40           41    42
     American                           14       14.5         15       15.5         16         16.5    17
     British                            14       14.5         15       15.5         16         16.5    17
     Continental                        36         37         38         39         40           41    42

     Women's Shoes
     Japanese                           23       23.5         24       24.5         25         25.5     26
     American                            6        6.5          7        7.5          8          8.5      9
     British                           4.5          5        5.5          6        6.5            7    7.5
     Continental                        36         37         38         38         38           39     40

     Men's Shoes
     Japanese                         24.5                    26                  27.5           28     29
     American                          5.5        6.5        7.5        8.5        9.5         10.5   11.5
     British                             5          6          7          8          9           10     11
     Continental                        39         40         41         42         43           44     45

     Stockings
     USA & British                       8        8½           9         10       10 ½          11
     Continental                         0         1           2          4          5           6
     Many European countries also use the same as USA

     Blouses, Sweaters, Slips
     USA & British                      30         32         34         36         38          40
     Continental                        38         40         42         44         46          48
     Americans often use the sizes Small, Medium, Large, and Extra Large. As a general rule,
     for women: S = size less than 12; M = sizes 12, 14, 16; L = size 18 and up.




                                                        23
Weights and Measures: Abbreviations and Symbols


 Length                           Weight
  cm           centimeter         g                  gram
  ft           foot               kg                 kilogram
  m            meter              mcg                microgram
  mm           millimeter         mg                 milligram
                                  oz                 ounce
                                  lb                 pound


 Capacity                         Temperature
  bu           bushel              C                 Centigrad
                                                     e (Celsius)
 cc            cubic centimeter    F                 Fahrenheit
 c             cup
 gal           gallon
 l             liter               Time
 ml            milliliter          hr                hour
 pt            pint                min               minute
 qt            quart
 pk            peck
 tbsp          tablespoon
 tsp           teaspoon


 Volume                            Mileage
 1 bushel      4 pecks             Kilometers        Miles
 1 peck        8 quarts            1                 0.6 or 5/8
 1 gallon      4 quarts            5                 3.1
 1 quart       2 pints             10                6.2
 1 pint        2 cups              40                25
 1 cup         8 fluid ounces      100               62.5


Weights and Measures: Metric to U.S. Standard Conversion

       Metric            U.S. Standard
 1 gram              0.0353 ounces
 30 grams            1 ounce
 500 grams           1.1 pounds
 1 kilo              2.2 pounds
 2.54 centimeters    1 inch
 1 meter             3.28 feet
 1 meter             1.094 yards
 1 hectare           2.471 acres
 1609.3 meters       1 mile

Temperature

While most of the world uses Centigrade (or Celsius) to measure the weather, in America Fahrenheit
is used. To convert Centigrade to Fahrenheit, you must multiply the Centigrade by 1.8 (or 9/5) and
add 32. To convert Fahrenheit to Centigrade, you subtract 32 from the Fahrenheit and divide by 1.8
(or multiply 5/9).

Here are some temperatures to use as a guide:



                                                24
     Centigrade         Fahrenheit
              -18                0
                0              32        (freezing point of water)


                   10             50
                   20             68
                   30             86
                 36.9           98.6     (body temperature)
                   40            104
                  100            212     (boiling point of water)


TR AN SPO R TA TI O N
TR AN SPO R TA TI O N

 ―Being able to leave the college may be vital to feeling better. Williams is extremely isolated so you better learn
where and when you can just catch the bus and go to Boston for example. Unfortunately, there aren‘t as many buses
as I expected but the few that Williams Inn provides are enough.‖ (Nukte Tuncok ’03, Turkey)

―Williamstown is pretty far out in the ‗wilderness‘, so don't expect a lot of city lights and nightlife. While there are a few
places to go--that is, very few, and limiting--creativity and commitment to other forms of fun will be your best bet of
enjoying the Williams experience. Some excursions to cities like New York or Boston might help too.‖
(Vasko ’03, Bulgaria)



Ai r p o r t s

There are no commercially scheduled flights into or out of the Berkshires, but major airlines serve the
nearest major airport in Albany, NY ―The Albany International Airport‖ (www.albanyairport.com), about
an hour away by car. Other airports:
     Bradley International Airport in Hartford, CT (slightly over 2 hours away by car)
     Logan International Airport in Boston, MA (about 3 hours away by car)
     Laguardia or JFK International Airport in NY (about 3,5 to 4 hours by car)

If you need to find transportation to the Berkshires from one of the major airports, local transportation
services are as follows:


Bu s Se r v i c e

Bonanza Bus Service                                            (800) 556-3815
Peter Pan Bus Service                                          (800) 343-9999
Service from Williams Inn                                      (413) 458-9371
Pittsfield, MA terminal                                        (413) 442-4451
Bennington, VT depot                                           (802) 442-4808

        Taxi Service

        Vet's Taxi/Norm's Airport Limo Service
        800-486-4946 or 413-663-8300/6284
        Jenkins Livery
        413-684-1893, 413-822-6092, or JenkinsLivery189@aol.com
        Paladin Livery
        Keith Hartman
        413-663-3188 or 413-441-0039 (cell)
        Airport Limousine Service                        (518) 869-2258
        Albany, NY


                                                                  25
Drivers for Hire: Please see http://facilities.williams.edu/college-vehicles/drivers-for-hire/

Several independent taxi services, including the one in North Adams, provide transportation from
Williamstown to Albany or Hartford and back. We also have a list of ―Driver’s for Hire‖
(http://facilities.williams.edu/college-vehicles/drivers-for-hire/ ) We cannot recommend one but would be
happy to help you contact them to make travel plans. Their prices and travel information is listed next to
their names.


Tr ai ns

Amtrak                                                    (800) 872-7245
Rensselaer, NY

Travel Agencies

The Travel Store Incorporated                             (413) 458-5786
620 Main Street
Williamstown, MA, 01267

Ca r Re n t a l

Enterprise Rent-A-Car                                     (413) 664-7620
303 State Street, North Adams

Williams Zipcar
(for Zipcard holders only)
www.williams.edu/resources/zipcar

Rental cars are available at all major airports.

Automobile Information

If you are interested in purchasing a vehicle, you may consult the local newspaper's classified section for
new or used cars and dealerships. You may also check the local telephone directory under "Automobile
Dealers." If you consider purchasing a used car, it would be wise to have a mechanic look at it before you
purchase it. You can see what students on campus are selling at www.wso.williams.edu/announce/index/2 .

If you buy a car in MA, it must be registered through the Registry of Motor Vehicles (www.mass.gov/rmv/ ),
located on Curran Memorial Highway in North Adams. At the Registry you can obtain the Driver's License
Manual, published by the state and available free of charge, which will give you full information on the
procedures of the registration process. You will also be required by state law to insure your vehicle. To find
an insurance company, consult the yellow pages of the local telephone directory under "Insurance," and ask
friends for recommendations for reputable insurers.




                                                     26
International Driver's License

These are honored in Massachusetts for about 30 days or longer depending on what country you are
from, and what visa category you are in. In general, most people will need to apply for a regular
Massachusetts license, but call the Registry to find out the details of your specific situation. Be prepared
to answer questions about your immigration status, and status at the College.

Obtaining a Massachusetts Driver's License

A valid driver's license is required in order to drive any vehicle in the United States. If you need to apply
for one, consult the Driver's License Manual which is available at the Registry of Motor Vehicles, located
at the following address:

    REGISTRY OF MOTOR VEHICLES
    North Adams RMV
    33 Main St
    North Adams, MA
    www.mass.gov.rmv/


The first step in the issuance of a driver's license is for you to obtain a Learner's Permit. To do this, you
will be required to take a written exam, a vision and color test and pay a small fee. Once you have
completed this step, you have six months to apply for your driver's license and schedule your road test.
Once you have a Massachusetts license, you can drive anywhere in the U.S. because the driving laws
are quite similar throughout the country. However, if you are planning to stay in another state for an
extended period of time, you should check about transferring your license to that state's and becoming
more familiar with their driving laws. Some states recognize the license granted by another state only for
a limited period of time, such as 30 days.

Driving while intoxicated

In Massachusetts there are strict laws governing alcohol consumption for anyone under 21 years of age.
In addition, driving a vehicle under the influence is against the law. There are strict penalties including,
loss of license and even a jail term if you are involved in a fatal accident. So REMEMBER, if you have
consumed alcohol at a private party or anywhere else, DO NOT OPERATE A VEHICLE. Call a taxi or
ask a friend to drive you home.




                                                          27
      Fellowships

    The Williams Office of Fellowships advises and prepares students to compete for national fellowships and
    awards. From the initial inquiry about opportunities to the nomination and selection stages of a national
    competition, the Fellowships Office works with undergraduates, seniors, and alumns to prepare
    competitive applications for prestigious national awards such as the Marshall Scholarship, Gates-
    Cambridge Scholarship, NSF, Rhodes Scholarship, Truman Scholarship, Watson Fellowship, and the
    Fulbright Scholarship among others.

    Additionally, Williams College has many of its own undergraduate as well as graduate fellowships. These
    opportunities are open only to current Williams students who will apply through the Office of Fellowships.

    Students who are interested in pursuing fellowship opportunities should enroll in the Fellowships site on
    Williams GLOW. http://glow.williams.edu/ To enroll follow these steps:

    1. Log onto Glow;
    2. Click Edit this Page button at the upper right hand corner;
    3. Add My Courses block. and click Enroll in Other Courses;
    4. Click All Courses in the block;
    5. Click Organizations to locate Fellowships;
    6. Click Fellowships to enroll yourself , and select Yes to confirm.

    At this site will be dates and deadlines for current competitions, announcements, resources for applicants,
    and application instructions for campus fellowships and campus nomination procedures.

    Alumni who are interested should contact Lynn Chick, Fellowship Coordinator, for access to the GLOW
    site. mchick@williams.edu

    Alumni who are interested should contact Lynn Chick, Fellowship Coordinator for access to the
    Fellowships Blackboard Site. mchick@williams.edu

    Contact us:

Katerina P. King , Director of Fellowships, 413-597-3017
Lynn Chick, Fellowships Coordinator, 413-597-3044




                                                        28
    MONEY MANAGEMENT
Managing your finances is one of the most important and challenging aspects of a successful and
enjoyable academic experience. Dealing with a new currency and cost of living are the beginning of the
challenge. Before you leave home, pay attention to the exchange rate between your country's currency
and the U.S. dollar. Learn to think in dollars.

      Take a close look at your SEVIS I-20 or DS-2019 and prepare a budget for yourself based on the
      estimated expenses on the form. Use the list below to help you think about all the possible expenses
      you may have.

      •     Tuition                           •        Rent
      •     Health Insurance                  •        Transportation
      •     Clothes                           •        Taxes
      •     Recreation                        •        Fees
      •     Meals (often called "board")      •        Books
      •     Communications                    •        Personal expenses
      •     Family expenses                   •        Travel

      Opening a Bank Account

      Once you arrive on campus, you will want to open a bank account at a local bank. It is sometimes
      possible to set up an account from abroad, and some international financial Institutions allow you to
      write U.S. dollar checks on funds deposited abroad; but most local banks in the United States will want
      you to come in personally to set up your account. When you do so, bring your student identification,
      your passport, and the funds you wish to deposit.

      Banks offer many different financial services. You may wish to compare the services and costs of
      several banks before choosing one at which to open an account. One bank may be more conveniently
      located than others, another may have more automated teller machines (ATMs) around town; a third
      may charge less to maintain a checking account; a fourth may allow you to do your banking from home
      via computer. Banks are competing for your business, so don't be shy about asking questions.

      A checking account will allow you to write checks to make purchases and pay bills. Most retailers and
      service providers will accept a personal check drawn on any U.S. bank (it need not be a local bank) as
      long as you can show appropriate identification (passport, student identification card, or driver's license).

      By using checks, it is easy to keep records of your purchases and payments. At most banks you need
      not keep a substantial sum (or "balance") in the account—just enough to cover your checks and any
      fees the bank charges to maintain the account. Finally, checking accounts have the advantage of
      providing you with immediate access to your funds.

Unlike most checking accounts, savings accounts earn interest on the balance in the account. If you
plan to bring money for the entire academic year or for your entire academic program, you should be sure
that your money earns interest! You can withdraw money from an ordinary savings account, but you
cannot do so by writing a check.

Many banks offer so-called NOW (notice-of-withdrawal) accounts that combine the features of
checking and savings accounts. With a NOW account, you may write a certain number of checks each
month; such accounts can be very handy for students who maintain a relatively high balance and write
relatively few checks.

Many students open a savings account and a checking account at the same bank so that they can
transfer money from the interest-bearing savings account into their checking account as they need it.


                                                          29
Other Banking Services

A safety deposit box, available at most banks, is a good place to store valuable possessions such as
the airline ticket for your flight home, expensive jewelry, foreign currency, and the important documents
you bring with you.

A debit card, also known as a checking card, allows you to withdraw or deposit money to your bank
account using an automatic teller machine (ATM) and to make purchases at stores that accept the card.
Some debit cards carry a credit-card logo (such as Mastercard or Visa), and can be used in place of a
check or credit card. Debit cards are not credit cards, however, and they can be used only to the extent
that you have funds in the account to which they are linked.

Credit cards will allow you to make purchases even when you have no money immediately available.
Banks and other financial Institutions, department stores, and gasoline companies all issue credit cards
that can be used to buy goods. You are billed every month and are required to pay at least a portion of
your balance each month. If you do not pay the entire amount due, interest (or a "finance charge")
accrues on the unpaid balance. The interest rate can be quite high, particularly if you have not yet
established your "credit worthiness."

The cost of credit cards varies greatly. The annual fees and interest rates charged by some financial
Institutions are much higher than others. Many cards offer premiums or awards linked to the amount you
spend using the card. Ask your advisor or fellow students—it really pays to shop around. Once you
establish a "credit history," or if you have significant assets, you should be able to obtain a card with a
lower interest rate and little or no annual fee.

Credit cards are convenient, but unless you are careful you may be shocked when you get your monthly
bill. Keep all your receipts to keep track of what you spend. Debit cards are a better solution for students
who have trouble managing their debt. They are as convenient as credit cards but do not allow you to
spend more than you have.

    Banks in Williamstown

      Banknorth Massachusetts, 57 Spring Street               (800) 747-7000     www.banknorthma.com
      Hoosac Bank, 296 Main Street                            (413) 458-9503     www.hoosacbank.com
      South Adams Savings Bank, 273 Main Street               (413) 458-2141     www.sasavings.com
      Williamstown Savings Bank, 795 Main Street              (413) 458-8191     www.williamstownsavings.com




                                                         30
PAS SPO R T AN D VISA IN FO R M A TIO N
PAS SPO R T AN D VISA IN FO R M A TIO N



Pa s s p o r t s

Before you enter the United States, you will be issued a passport by your government. It is your
responsibility to insure that the passport is valid at least six months beyond the date of your authorized stay
in this country. If necessary, your own embassy or consulate in the U.S. will extend, renew, or issue a new
passport. Please consult with them well in advance to find out what forms you will need.

It is a good idea to keep your passport in a safe place at all times during your stay. Upon your arrival, you
will be asked to bring your passport into the office of the International Student Advisor to have the visa,
informational page and the I-94 Form and visa copied for your file. This is a precautionary measure to
insure that, in the event that your passport is lost or stolen, the required information is readily available.

When traveling within the United States, you will not need to carry your passport but you will, however,
need to carry some form of identification. Your Williams I.D. or your SEVIS I-20 form can serve this
purpose.

F-1 Visa/SEVIS I-20 (Student and Exchange Visitor Information System)

Any non-U.S. citizen attending Williams for a full four-year degree program is issued a SEVIS I-20 Form
(Certificate of Eligibility) by the International Student Advisor which enables him/her to apply for a student
visa at a U.S. Embassy in the home country. The F-1 student visa is then stamped inside the passport.
With this visa, a student may leave and re-enter the United States as many times as is desired, provided
he/she has:

      A valid passport;
      A valid multiple-entry student visa;
      A current SEVIS I-20 Form from Williams, which has been signed and dated by a DSO (Designated
         School Official) within the past 12 months;
      Form I-94 which is surrendered at the border or airport to a Bureau of Citizenship & Immigration
         Services (BCIS) official.

          DON’T FORGET TO GET YOUR I-20 SIGNED!

          The Signature from the DSO in the Dean’s Office cannot be more than a year
          old on your I-20 when traveling. You must get your I20 signed before leaving
          the US if that is the case. For example if the last signature on your I-20 reads
          6/25/2011 you will not have to get the I-20 signed again until June 2012 and
          before you leave the US. If you plan to study away or be away from the US
          for more than a couple of months, be sure to get your I-20 signed before you
          leave! You will have a hard time returning to the US if your signature is not
          up to date.
I - 94 For m

When you enter the United States you will be issued an I-94 Form (Arrival and Departure Record) by the
U.S. Immigration Officer. It is extremely important that you retain the I-94 Form, which typically is valid until
your graduation; it is advisable to staple it into your passport. When you leave the U.S. at any time during
your stay, you must surrender this form at the border or airport to an official of the Bureau of Citizenship
and Immigration Service (BCIS). Upon your return you will be issued a new I-94 provided you have the
documents mentioned above.




                                                    31
J-1 Visa/DS-2019

Students who are on an Exchange Program to Williams will be issued a Form DS-2019 from Williams.
Following are the ways that J-1 visas differ from F-1 visas:
1.. Your visa stamp in your passport will indicate J-1 status at Williams College.
1
2.. Your DS-2019 will be marked with an "x" in a specific category. This category cannot be changed
2
    once it is approved and granted. If your category is "student" you may remain here as long as you
    are enrolled in an academic program. If it is marked "researcher, scholar, or professor" you may
    remain for a total of three years. If the "international visitor" category is marked, your stay is limited to
    one year. These limitations are strictly enforced.
3.. Your DS-2019 should also indicate in the lower left-hand corner, if you are subject to the two year
3
    home residency requirement.
4.. Your DS-2019 will show beginning and ending dates of your authorized stay in the U.S. You need a
4
    new DS-2019 if you stay beyond the ending date of your visa even if you are not leaving the country.
5.. Your DS-2019 as long as it is valid, is your official travel document. You may travel outside the U.S.
5
    and re-enter any time as long as you have a valid "multiple entry" visa. You should have the
    Responsible Officer endorse the DS-2019 if it has not been signed in the past twelve months.
6.. You must at all times have the following papers while you are on a J-1 visa, particularly when you
6
    travel outside the U.S.:
         A valid passport;
         A valid DS-2019;
         A valid visa stamp of J-1 in your passport;
         A valid I-94 form (which you surrender when you leave the country).
         While you are on a J-1 visa at Williams College you can do the following:
         Accept employment on campus;
         Accept employment outside the College with special permission from the International
             Student Advisor;
         Obtain a Social Security number, which you will need if you plan to seek employment;
         Apply for "Academic Training" after graduation or during the summer to gain experience in
             your field of study.

Expiration dates

All students should be aware that passports, visas, and I-94 forms do have expiration dates. Once you
are in the United States, your visa may expire. You will not be subject to any penalty if this should occur,
but if you leave the United States with an expired visa, you must obtain a new one before you can return.
Check with the International Student Advisor if you have any questions about this.

T h e P o r t o f En t r y

Upon your arrival to the United States, your immigration documentation will be checked by a border
official assigned to that port of entry. He/she will check your visa, stamp your SEVIS I-20 or DS-2019,
and return them to you. Should you encounter any difficulties at the port of entry or should you be
detained for any reason, please inform the International Student Advisor as soon as possible upon
arriving on campus.

Special Registration

Special Registration is a system that will let the government keep track of nonimmigrants that come to the U.S. every
year. Some of the approximately 35 million nonimmigrants who enter the U.S. – and some nonimmigrants already in
the U.S. – will be required to register with immigration authorities either at a port of entry or a designated immigration
office in accordance with the special registration procedures. These special procedures also require additional in-
person interviews at an immigration office and notifications to immigration authorities of changes of address,
employment, or school. Nonimmigrants who must follow these special procedures will also have to use specially
designated ports when they leave the country and report in person to an immigration officer at the port on their
departure date. See website at: http://www.ice.gov/pi/specialregistration/




                                                                 32
     T R A V E L:
     T R A V E L:

     Reentry to the U.S.

     Before students leave the United States, they should check with the International Student Advisor (Dean's
     Office) about the documents they will need to reenter the United States. In most BCIStances, the
     documents required are:

          Valid passport;
          Valid U.S. visa;
          Valid SEVIS I-20 or valid DS-2019;
          Current proof of financial support.


     Valid U.S. Visa

     The visa is the stamp in the passport that allows entry into the U.S. By examining a student’s visa, one can
     determine the type of visa issued (F-1, J-1, J-2), its expiration date and the number of entries permitted into
     the U.S. As long as the visa indicates F-1 or J-1 visa type, is multiple-entry and has not expired, the
     student does not need to apply for a new visa before reentering the U.S. with a valid SEVIS I-20 or valid
     DS-2019.

     Valid Form SEVIS I-20 or DS-2019

     If the student is in valid F-1 status and plans to remain at the same school after returning to the
     U.S., he/she can reenter using the SEVIS I-20 ID endorsed on page 3 by the International Student
     Advisor or DSO(Gina Coleman). If the International Student Advisor is not available to sign his/her SEVIS
     I-20 prior to leaving the country, the others authorized to sign it in the Dean’s Office are Jessie Garner,
     Laura McKeon, Karen Ryan, and Cynthia Haley .

     For the student who is in J-1 status, his/her DS-2019 must also be endorsed by the International Student
     Advisor prior to travel. If the International Student Advisor is not available to sign his/her DS-2019 prior to
     leaving the country, the only other persons authorized to sign a DS-2019 are Cynthia Haley, and Laura
     McKeon.

     Travel to Contiguous Territory (Canada, Mexico, or Adjacent Islands other than Cuba)

     When traveling to contiguous territory, international students do not surrender their I-94 to reenter the U.S.
     Reentry with an expired visa is possible as long as the trip has been for fewer than 30 days and the student
     is in valid F-1 status. In general, to reenter the U.S. from contiguous territory, the student must present a
     valid passport with a U.S. visa stamped within (valid or expired), an I-94, and a SEVIS I-20. Please note
     that, depending on citizenship, it may be necessary for you to obtain a tourist visa in order to enter Canada.
     For current information regarding visits to Canada, please refer to the following web site:
     http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/visit/index.asp
     Students from Iraq, Iran, and Libya do not benefit from this visa revalidation provision so they must have a
     valid visa whenever they reenter the U.S.

     Reentry Without an Endorsed SEVIS I-20 or DS-2019

     A student attempting to reenter the U.S. without a properly signed SEVIS I-20 or DS-2019 may be denied
     admission. But, he/she is more likely to be issued form I-515 and admitted for 30 days. Within that time
     period, the student must submit his/her documents to the BCIS district office for an extension of stay to D/S.

Canadian Citizens and Landed Immigrants

Canadians reentering the U.S. do not need a U.S. visa but they do need an endorsed SEVIS I-20 and a
valid I-94.

                                                         33
Travel Within the United States

When traveling within the United States, it is not necessary to carry your passport and visa paperwork
with you. You should however, have some form of identification with you at all times. A driver's license or
a college I.D. can adequately serve this purpose. Be sure to have a government-issued I.D. if you will be
traveling by plane, as your student I.D. will not be adequate for this.

Travel within the United States is usually convenient, but can at first be confusing. We recommend you
use a travel agent for advice and assistance to arrange your first few trips. There are a few travel
agencies suggested in the "Transportation" section of this handbook or you may wish to refer to the
yellow pages of the local telephone directory for more information. When you call the travel agent tell
them you are a student, sometimes there are discounts available to students. We also advise you to plan
in advance for any trips you plan to take. It can be difficult and sometimes impossible to make airline
reservations during holiday times such as Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter. If you want to travel
during the holiday times, reserve seats at least three months in advance.


STU D EN T EM P L O YM E N T
STU D EN T EM P L O YM E N T

On-Campus Employment: Basic F-1 Regulations

Students who are maintaining F-1 status are eligible to work on-campus. Work performed on the school
premises is ―on-campus‖ employment as long as the employment provides direct service to students.
Students are permitted to work a maximum of 20 hours per week while classes are in session and full-
time during holidays or school vacation periods, provided the student intends to enroll full-time during the
academic term following the vacation period. This 20 hour total includes hours spent working on an
assistantship. For example, a one-third time assistantship is equivalent to 13 hours of work; therefore, the
student can work a maximum of 7 additional hours on campus to total 20 hours.


Transfer to Another Program and On-Campus Employment

On-campus employment is not permitted after completion of a course of study (other than through
optional practical training) unless the student has been accepted, received an SEVIS I-20, and is planning
to enroll in a new educational program at the same or different educational institution. The student may
work at the old school or at the location of the new school that issued the new SEVIS I-20 during an
interim summer vacation period. According to the BCIS officials at a recent NAFSA national conference,
the student can work at whichever location has the SEVIS I-20 in effect. That is, if the student plans to
work at the old school, the new SEVIS I-20 transfer should not be processed until the student begins the
program at the new school. If the student plans to work at the new school during the summer, the SEVIS
I-20 transfer process should be completed before the student begins work.

      Optional Practical Training

      Optional Practical Training (OPT) provides an opportunity for F-1 visa holders to gain up to one year of
      experience in their field of study during the following time periods:

         during the student’s annual vacation and at other times when school is not in session, if the student
          is currently enrolled and intends to register for the next semester;
         while school is in session ( if practical training does not exceed 20 hours per week);
         after completion of all course requirements for the degree, excluding the thesis or dissertation;
         after completion of the course of study.

      The student is not required to have a job offer from an employer to apply for OPT. It is recommended,
      however, that the student be fairly certain of having a job before applying for OPT; this will prevent the
      student from any unnecessary loss of the authorized twelve-month period of OPT.

      Part-time OPT, 20 hours per week or less, will be deducted from the available twelve months of OPT at
      one-half the full-time rate, i.e., six months of part time OPT will equal three months deducted from the
      total twelve-month period.
                                                         34
      To apply for Optional Practical Training, a student must pick up the application from the Dean's
      Office, at the same time making an appointment with the International Student Advisor, and then do the
      following not more than 120 days before the beginning of OPT, students must apply for OPT before
      completion of the course of study.

                                     OPTIONAL PRACTICAL TRAINING
                                     (PROCEDURE FOR FILLING OUT FORMS)

Gather the required information and complete all of the forms listed below:
           Complete Form 1-765
           Filing fee of $380.00 in the form of a certified bank check, money order, or personal check made payable to
            the U.S Department of Homeland Security. Indicate (1-765) on the checks memo line to avoid any confusion
            at the processing center. Securely fasten the check to the upper left hand corner of the I-765 form.
           Photocopy of both sides of Form I-94 (white card stapled to your passport)
           Photocopy of all pages of all I-20’s (current, as well as any previously issued I-20’s) and include any
            previous OPT/Employment Authorization documentation that you may have.
           Two photographs in a small envelope marked photos (see specific instructions)
           Photocopy of most recent visa
           Photocopy of any identification pages on your passport (i.e. photograph expiration date and birth date)
           Photocopy of the new SEVIS I-20 with OPT recommendation on Page 3
           FOR DEANS OFFICE USE ONLY- F-1 Student Request for New I-20 with OPT Endorsement. This is an
            internal document and should not be included when mailing your application to the Vermont Service Center,

           Bring the completed forms to the Dean’s Office for review and to process SEVIS I-20. Once these
            forms have been reviewed, signed, and all the needed photocopies have been made,
            Mail (preferably by certified mail, return receipt requested) to the following address:

                Customer Service Telephone: (800) 375-5283

                For U.S. Postal Service (USPA) Deliveries:
                USCIS-Attn: I765
                P.O. Box 660867
                Dallas, TX, 75266

                For Express Main and Courier Deliveries:
                USCIS- Attn: AOS- I-765
                2501 S. State Hwy. 121 Business
                Suite 400
                Lewisville, TX

                http://uscis.gov/graphics/index.htm


Include on the outside of the envelope (I-765) this will indicate exactly what the request is.
It is strongly suggested by the Vermont Service Center that you also include with the application a
statement that makes it clear the address on the I-765 is her/his personal address and not that of an
office on campus. The statement might look something like:
“The address I have supplied on Form I-765 is my personal, on-campus address. I live on-campus and this
address is where I receive all my personal mail. I have no other address in the United States. This is NOT the
address of the international office or any other office on campus. Please send my Employment Authorization
Document Card to this address.”
Processing time can take from 6-9 weeks. You cannot start your employment until your application
has been approved and you are in possession of your Employment Authorization Document (EAD).
For this reason, make sure to allow yourself enough time to obtain the EAD before you plan to begin
your practical training.
                                                            35
The EAD will be returned by mail to the address indicated on Form I-765. The student is not to begin
employment until the EAD is issued.

Change of Address

An F-1 student authorized by the Service to engage in practical training is required to report any change
of
name or address, or disruption of such employment to the DSO for the duration of the authorized training.
A DSO who recommends a student for optional practical training is responsible for updating the student’s
record to reflect these reported changes for the duration of the time that training is authorized.

Note: the Change of Address form should be filed 10 days after you move from campus. It can be found
at: http://uscis.gov/graphics/formsfee/forms/ar-11.htm

Summer Employment

International students can work on campus full time during the summer. If a student with F-1 status is
offered employment off campus for the summer, he/she must apply for practical training through the
International Student Advisor. In doing so, he/she would need to anticipate this employment well in
advance to allow enough time to process the application for practical training and must also realize that
this will be deducted from the 12 months of practical training that each F-1 student is allowed.

If a student has completed his/her studies and leaves the United States before optional practical training
is authorized, it is essential that the student has a valid passport, valid visa, valid SEVIS I-20, Notice of
Action (with receipt number for OPT application) and letter on company letterhead confirming
employment.

Applying for a Social Security Number

If you have any intention to seek employment while attending a program at Williams or plan to do any
practical training during or after your attendance, it will be necessary for you to apply for a Social Security
Number in order to be eligible for compensation for any work performed.

The forms required by the Social Security Administration will be available during the International Student
Orientation and a representative from the local Social Security Office is usually on hand to help with the
application process and answer any questions you might have. It is recommended that you take
advantage of this opportunity during orientation as it simplifies the process. If, for some reason, you are
unable to attend this portion of the orientation, a limited supply of these forms will be available through the
International Student Advisor or they may be obtained at the local Social Security Office on Main Street in
North Adams, where you will need to go to apply. Web: www.ssa.gov.

      As a non-U.S. citizen, you are required to show your birth certificate or passport, and the original
      documents given to you by the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services(BCIS), when applying
      for your Social Security Number. No photocopies of these forms will be accepted. Examples of BCIS
      documents are: your Alien Registration Receipt Card (Form I-151 or I-551) or Form I-94. Because
      these documents should not be mailed, you should apply in person.

      Even though you are subject to the regulations for employment determined by the type of visa you hold
      and may not be authorized to work in this country, you can be issued a Social Security card if you are
      here legally and need it for some other reason. If it is the case that you are not authorized to work, your
      card will be marked to show that you cannot work, and if you do, the Social Security Administration is
      required to notify BCIS.




                                                           36
 THE INTERNATIONAL STUDENT AND THE LAW
 As an international student you are subject to Massachusetts and U.S. Federal laws including those
 pertaining to Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services regulations. You are also protected by
 these same laws. Should you come into conflict with the law, the first person to contact is the
 International Student Advisor (or any other Dean if that person is unavailable). They will let you know
 whom to contact next.

 If arrested or questioned by police, an international student, just like an American citizen, is not required
 to confess or give evidence against him/herself; you may remain silent and refuse to answer any
 questions regarding the accusation against you. It is recommended that you do not volunteer
 information without the presence of legal counsel. The only information that you are required to give is
 personal data such as your name, date of birth, and current address.

 International students often worry that they will be deported should they come into conflict with the law.
 In general, you will not be deported for a single misdemeanor or other minor offense, e.g., petty theft,
 shoplifting, disturbing the peace, drunkenness or traffic violations. If an international student is
 convicted of a serious crime and is sentenced to one or more years of confinement, then deportation is
 a real possibility. Charges related to drug offenses such as possession and sale fall into this category.

 Please note that immigration laws and regulations are constantly changing, especially the ones
 governing student visas. The International Student Advisor will keep you informed of any major
 changes that will affect you. Please remember that immigration laws do not apply equally to all
 nationalities. This is particularly true if you are trying to obtain a visa to go to another country. Please
 check with the International Student Advisor if you have any questions. Do not depend on information
 or advice from friends who are often not familiar with immigration laws or are from countries other than
 yours. Your country also will have different regulations vis a vis the U.S.

 CRIMES and ―SCAMS‖
 CRIMES and ―SCAMS‖

 Sadly, crime is a fact of life in the United States. University and college campuses are not immune from
 crime, but help is available. Williams College has its own campus security department, which is
 available 24 hours to assist you with any incidents or crimes that take place on campus. Students
 should call x4444 to report any suspicious situation. In case of a life-threatening situation, however, you
 should call 9-911. Security officers will assist emergency responders and will provide mutual aid if
 necessary.

 Ways to Avoid Being a Victim of Crime

 The most common crime on U.S. campuses is theft of property left unattended or in unlocked rooms,
 cars, or apartments. More serious crimes – such as drug dealing, assault, and rape – also occur.

Some behaviors, such as sexual harassment and spouse abuse, are crimes in the United States,
even though they may not be crimes in your country! Protect yourself by exercising good sense and
caution:

      Keep your dorm room or apartment locked whenever you are away;
      Do not leave your books, backpack, or purse unattended anywhere;
      Buy a good lock for your bicycle and use it;
      Engrave valuables
      Learn what parts of town you should avoid at night;
      Use caution with strangers who are overly friendly, who offer you gifts, or who ask you to
       accompany them to an unknown place;
      Remember that 911 is an emergency number that you can call at any time from any
       telephone in the United States for help in an emergency. (On campus 9-911);
      Ask a reliable friend or the International Student Advisor if you are in doubt about a person or
       an activity.



                                                     37
Sexual harassment is particularly an American concept and a very hot topic on campus and in the
workplace. Sexual harassment consists of unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or
other physical or verbal behavior of a sexual nature. It is important that you learn the definition of sexual
harassment at Williams and what behaviors you should avoid. You can find this information in a
pamphlet which is distributed annually by the Assistant to the President’s Office. If you feel you are being
sexually harassed it is important that you tell someone, such as a security officer, a faculty member, or
the International Student Advisor.

Spouse abuse, or domestic violence, is a crime in the United States. You may feel that all domestic
matters, especially those that occur within your home, are private matters, but in the United States they
cease to be private once one party uses physical violence. In most states, if a couple is fighting and the
police come to the scene and find evidence of assault, they are required to arrest the attacker and put
him or her in jail. In some cases, both participants may be arrested.

What To Do If You Are Accused of a Crime

If you are accused of committing a crime and have been arrested, remember that you do have certain
rights. You should notify the International Student Advisor as soon as possible. You also have the right
to notify your government about your arrest and detainment. If you choose to do so, the police can inform
the appropriate foreign consulate or embassy immediately. Your consular officers have the right to visit
you and arrange for your legal representation. Many countries (for example, China, Nigeria, and
Singapore) require that the consul be notified when their nationals are confined or detained. In these
cases, you have no choice in the matter of whether the authorities notify your consulate; they must do so.
Depending upon the severity of the crime of which you are accused, you should obtain legal assistance.

      Sm o k i n g

      Smoking is no longer permitted anywhere in college buildings, including student rooms, or – as
      recommended by the American College Health Association – within 25 feet of a College building.

      The reason is straightforward. The Environmental Protection Agency has determined that secondhand
      smoke causes cancer. Smoke can’t be confined to a single room; it inevitably spreads. Student residences
      are used by all students and are the workplace of many staff. Studies show that this step will have an
      added benefit of reducing the risk of fire. It seems clear, then, that for the health and safety of all members
      of our community all College buildings and the areas around them need to be smoke-free.

      The College has devised a system to enable those who choose to smoke to dispose of used cigarettes
      outdoors in an appropriate manner. For those of you who do smoke, the decision whether to continue is, of
      course, yours. The College, however, has several responsibilities: to insure that smoking does not
      endanger others, to help educate members of the community about potential dangers to themselves, and to
      help as best it can those who want to quit.

      Smoking cessation programs will be offered throughout the year and will be available at no cost.


      Alcohol and Other Drugs

      The College prohibits the abuse of alcohol and expects members to abide by federal, state, and local
      regulations concerning the possession and use, purchase, and distribution of alcohol. Williams prohibits the
      unlawful manufacture, sale, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of illegal drugs, or the unauthorized
      use of prescription drugs.
      Federal, state, and local laws make illegal use of alcohol and drugs serious crimes. Convictions can lead to
      imprisonment, fines, and/or required community service. Courts do not lift prison sentences to allow
      convicted persons to attend college or continue their jobs.

      Williamstown Open Container Law

      No person shall drink alcoholic beverages from an open container while on any public way or in a public
      place. No person shall carry an open container of alcoholic beverage while on any public way or in a public
      place. Violation of this Williamstown ordinance may result in a fine between $20 and $200.
                                                          38
HOLIDAYS AND TRADITIONS
Holidays Celebrated in America

All of the following holidays are federal holidays, on which government services such as mail delivery,
schools, banks and libraries are closed or curtailed. An * next to the holiday indicates that Williams
College is officially closed. Some administrative offices may remain open, however, if there is a need to
do so. Memorial Day, Columbus Day and Labor Day are holidays when key offices, such as the Dean's
Office and Registrar's Office, generally remain open.

New Year's Day* – January 1
Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Birthday – January 15. This official holiday began in 1996 to honor the leader
of the civil-rights movement in America during the 1960's.
Memorial Day* – Last Monday in May. This holiday honors all U.S. citizens who have died in wars.
Independence Day* – The Fourth of July. This holiday commemorates the day in 1776 when the
American colonists declared independence from Great Britain.
Labor Day* – First Monday in September. A day of recognition for the American laborer.
Columbus Day* – Second Monday in October. A day recognizing Christopher Columbus, who
"discovered" North America.
Veterans' Day – November 11. A holiday honoring those who have fought in U.S. wars.
Thanksgiving* – Fourth Thursday in November. This important holiday celebrates the arrival of the
Pilgrims to New England in 1620. It is celebrated traditionally with a large meal of turkey, cranberry
sauce, bread stuffing, and pie.
Christmas* – December 25. This holiday is both religious and secular in the U.S. It is meant to
celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ, but it also happens to be a huge commercial event.

In addition to legal holidays, other days are marked by religious observance, or by purely social fun-
making. Some of these are:

Ground Hog Day – February 2. Legend has it that the groundhog, a small burrowing animal that
hibernates during the winter months, emerges on February 2. If he sees his shadow (a sunny day) he will
be frightened and return to his burrow. This is supposed to indicate six more weeks of wintry weather. If
he doesn't see his shadow, then spring is at hand.
Valentine's Day – February 14. On this romantic day, people do something special for their
wife/husband, girlfriend/boyfriend. Flowers, chocolates and cards are popular on this occasion.
Saint Patrick's Day – March 17. A day in which the Irish honor their patron saint. The Irish wear green
on this day and often celebrate with wild parties/parades.
Easter – A Sunday in early April. A Christian festival celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ, Easter
is an occasion on which children receive "Easter baskets" filled with chocolates and candies.
Mother's Day – Second Sunday in May. On this day Americans honor their mothers by sending flowers,
buying small gifts, and taking their mothers out to eat.
Father's Day – Third Sunday in June. Fathers are honored on this day.
Halloween – October 31. A Pagan observance on the evening of All Souls’ Day. A time for dressing up
in outlandish costumes, handing out candies to children ("Trick or Treat"), and acting wild.


     (Refer to the Chapllaiins Offiice Websiite for Churches and Relliigiious
     (Refer to the Chap a ns Off ce Webs te for Churches and Re g ous
     Groups)
     Groups)




                                                         39
C O M M O N TER M S AN D ID IO M S
C O M M O N TER M S AN D ID IO M S


A
(n) An all-night work session. "To pull an all-nighter" means to work all night at something, without sleeping.
Ammo                                             (n) Ammunition.
ASAP                                    (abbreviation) As soon as possible
At one's fingertips                     (adv.) Easily recalled or remembered.

B
Babe                                    (n) An attractive woman. Often derogatory.
Baked                                            (adj.) To be high on marijuana.
Bar                                     (n) A place where alcoholic beverages are served.
Bar-B-Q                                 (n) An outdoor cooking party, like a picnic.
To be on top of something               (v) To keep up with something
To beat around the bush                 (v) To speak indirectly, to avoid addressing an issue.
Big Wigs                                (n) Administrators, people of importance.
To blow someone off                     (v) To intentionally and rudely ignore someone.
To blow someone away                    (v) To amaze or impress. Also, to shoot someone with a gun.
To blow something                       (v) To lose (a favorable chance) as a result of foolishness
The bomb                                (n) To be the best, to be really cool.
To bomb an exam                         (v) To do poorly on an exam.
Bombed                                  (adj.) Very drunk or stoned.
To bond                                 (v) To make friends.
To break the ice                        (v) To begin conversation in an awkward social setting.
To break up                             (v) To stop dating/hooking up with someone
Broke                                   (adj.) Out of money.
Buck                                    (n) A dollar bill.
Bum                                     (n) A homeless person, a person begging for money on the street.
To bum/to be bummed out                 (v) To be depressed or sad.
To get busted                           (v) To be caught by security or police for doing something illicit.
BYOB                                    (abbreviation) Bring your own bottle (of alcohol).
Booze                                   (n) Alcohol, usually liquor as opposed to beer.

C
Calling card                             (n) Prepaid phone-card
Cash                                     (n) Paper currency, as opposed to checks or money orders.
To cash                                  (v) To redeem cash from a check or money order.
To catch up                              (v) To do everything that was supposed to be done earlier
Change                                   (n) Coins (penny: 1 cent, Nickel: 5 cents, dime: 10 cents, quarter:
25 cents, half-dollar: 50 cents).
To chat                                  (v) To talk.
Chauvinism                               (n) A prejudiced belief in the superiority of one's own group.
Check, cheque                            (n) A signed piece of paper redeemable for cash at a bank. Used by
individuals to pay for many items and services in lieu of cash.
To be caught red-handed                  (v) To be observed in the act of doing something illicit or illegal.
To check out                             (v) To sign out a book from the library; to pay for purchases in a
store; to try to find out about something.
Chic                                     (adj) In good style, stylish
To chill out                             (v) To relax, to calm down.
To click                                 (v) To have something suddenly make sense, to suddenly get along
Clique                                   (n) A tight-knit social group, usually a close group of friends who tend
                                         to resist outsiders.
Common room                              (n) The room that everyone who lives in the suite can use
                                                    40
Cool                                 (exclamation) OK, good.
Cop                                  (n) Police officer. A slang (and somewhat derogatory) term. Do not
                                     use this term when speaking to a police officer!
Crack                                (n) Cocaine product, a dangerous and highly illegal drug.
To cram                              (v) To study hard the night before an exam.
Crap                                 (n) Garbage, nonsense, excrement.
Crappy                               (adj) Of very low quality
Crunchtime                           (n) The end of semester when there is a lot of schoolwork
Crush                                (n) A strong but short-lived feeling of love for someone
To cut                               (v) To skip a class, to not go to a class.

D
To date                              (v) To see someone in a social, personal, romantic fashion.
Date                                 (n) A person one sees in a social, personal, romantic fashion.
Diesel                               (n) Petrol, fuel for trucks and certain automobiles.
Diesel                               (adj.) Extremely strong, tough, powerful.
Dope                                 (n) Illegal drugs, such as marijuana or hashish. Also, an idiot.
Dork                                 (n) A stupid person, a silly person.
Down in the dumps                    (adj.) Feeling depressed.
Down to earth                        (adj.) Practical, straight-forward, "a normal person."
Drag                                 (n) An act of breathing in cigarette smoke (verb: to have a drag
To drop a course                     (v) To withdraw officially from a course.
Dude                                 (n) A buddy, friend.
Dude!                                (exclamation) An exclamation used to expressed wonder, shock, or
                                     amazement.
Dumb                                 (adj.) Stupid.
To dump                              (v) To end a dating relationship; the action (performed by only one
                                     person in a couple) of abruptly ending a going-steady relationship.

F
Fad                                  (n) A stylish, and often fleeting, trend.
Feather in your cap                  (n) A praiseworthy accomplishment.
To feel it in your bones             (v) To feel or sense what is going to happen.
Fiend                                (n) A person addicted to something (e.g. dope fiend)
Final(s)                             (n) The last exam(s) of a semester.
Flip-flop                            (n) A type of open shoe, which is usually made of rubber and is held on
                                     by the toes and loose at the back
To flip out                          (v) To lose one's mind
To flirt                             (v) To engage in subtle behaviors designed to attract the interest and/or
                                     affections of someone to whom one is attracted.
Flirt                                (n) Someone who often behaves in a way which is considered
                                     flirtatious, which attracts the attention of the opposite sex.
To flunk                             (v) To fail a course, to receive unsatisfactory grades (marks).
To freak out                         (v) To become greatly excited or anxious

G
Gas                                  (n) Gasoline (fuel) for an automobile.
Gay                                  (adj.) Homosexual
To get cold feet                     (v) To back out of a deal because of nervousness or uncertainty. Most
                                     often applied to dating relationships.
To get/be involved with someone      (v) To start dating/date someone
To give the cold shoulder            (v) To rudely and intentionally ignore someone.
To go fly a kite               (v) To go away. Usually a command from one person to another.
To go jump in a lake           (v) To go away. Usually a command from one person to another.
To go to pot                   (v) To deteriorate.
To go downhill                 (v) To deteriorate.
To go out                      (v) To go to parties
To go out with someone         (v) To be in a romantic relationship with someone, to date

                                                       41
To go steady                           (v) To officially (i.e. to make known to the general public) and
                                       repeatedly date or see someone romantically.
To goof-off                            (v) To do silly or purposeless things.
Goof-off                               (n) A person who sometimes does silly or purposeless things.
Gonzo                                  (adj.) Crazy, extremely daring.
Grade                                  (n) Mark, an indication of performance in a class as determined
                                       by the professor.
Grass                                  (n) Marijuana.
Guy                                    (n) A man.
Guys                                   (n) A group of men, or, often, a group of people (in this case,
                                       gender-neutral).
Gym                                    (n) Gymnasium or physical education building.

H
Half-baked                          (adj.) An idea or plan not well thought-out.
To hang in there                    (v) To persevere, to not give up.
To hang on                          (v) To wait (e.g. Hang on for a minute.)
To hang out                         (v) To chill, to relax, to spend one's time in a non-productive
                                    fashion.
Hangover                            (n) Sickness/general malaise felt the day after heavy drinking.
Hassle                              (n) Something troublesome, a nuisance.
To hassle                           (v) To deliberately be troublesome to someone.
To have a bone to pick with someone (v) To have cause to argue or disagree.
To have a crush on someone          (v) To be infatuated with someone
Hick                                (n) A person from a rural area (derogatory), often perceived to be
                                    uneducated.
Hickey                              (n) A mark left on the skin from kissing.
High                                (adj.) Intoxicated by a drug.
Hip                                 (adj.) Trendy, fashionable.
To hit on someone                   (v) To try to pick up or hook up with someone
To hit the books                    (v) To study.
To hit the road                     (v) To leave.
To hold on                          (v) To wait (e.g. Hold on for a second. I'll get a pen.)
To hold one's horses                (v) To be calm or patient.
To hook up                          (v) To form a romantic or sexual relationship with someone,
                                    usually fleeting with merely sexual intent and formed at a party.
Howdy                               (exclamation) Hello. Originally a contraction of "How do you do."
                                    Carries a connotation of lack of culture or sophistication, as it is a
                                    term perceived to be used by uneducated lower-class and
                                    working-class people.
Hung Over                           (adj.) Having a hangover.

I
I.D.                                   (n) Identification or identification card

J
Jello shots                            (n) Jello prepared with alcohol instead of water.
Jerk                                   (n) A mean or nasty person.
Jock                                   (n) An athlete, someone whose social persona is built around the
                                       sport they play.
Junk mail                              (n) Unsolicited mail which aims to sell you something.

K
Keg                                    (n) A large aluminum drum used for storing large quantities of
                                       beer.
To kick ass                            (v) To be very good at something
To know the ropes                      (v) To be familiar with the details of something.
L
                                       (abbreviation) Laboratory.
                                                   42
Late night               (n) The last party on campus
Lemon                    (n) A bad buy or purchase. (Cross-reference with Citroen
                         automobiles.)
To let one's hair down   (v) To relax, to behave informally, to party, usually contrasted to a
                         staunch, official or professional attitude.
To let the cat
     out of the bag      (v) To reveal a secret, thus ruining a surprise.
Lift                     (n) A ride, transportation.
Like                     (interjection) A nonsensical use of the word "like," used as a fill-in word,
                         such as "Uh" or "Um". A common feature of the speech of many young
                         people.

M
To make a move           (v) To talk to the person you want to date
To make ends meet        (v) To make one's expenses meet (not exceed) one's income.
To make up               (v) To apologize after a fight; to do an assignment after it was due.
To make out              (v) To kiss, engage in foreplay
Mall                     (n) A cluster of stores in one large building.
Memo                     (n) A brief note. Abbreviation of "memorandum."
Midterm                  (n) An exam given in the middle of a semester.
Moose                    (n) A large mammal, considerably larger than a deer or elk but similar
                         in body shape, with large antlers, which inhabits local forests.

N
Neat                     (adj.) Cool, interesting. Conveys positive approval of something.
Nerd, geek, square       (n) Someone who studies a lot, someone who is excessively academic.

O
OK                       (exclamation) All right, a term of approval.
On a shoestring          (adv.) Supported by very little money.
On the ball              (adj.) To be with-it, to be focused and productive.
Once in a blue moon      (adj.) Seldom, infrequently. A blue moon is defined as the second full
                         moon in a given month (hence, a rare occurrence).
Out of it                (adj.) To have one's mind far-away or preoccupied, to feel sick or
                         generally unwell.
Over my dead body        (exclamation) Not if I can stop it!
To overdraw              (v) To withdraw more money than one has in one's account.
                         Accompanied by a heavy fee.

P
Paranoid                 (adj, n) Someone who does not trust people
Party animal             (n) Someone who goes out a lot
Party pooper             (n) Dull and unfriendly person who does not enjoy being with other
                         people, spoils their fun, etc.
To pass out              (v) To faint, lose consciousness, usually because of consuming too
                         much alcohol
Payslip                  (n) The piece of paper you use for punching in and out
Plastered                (adj.) Very drunk.
Peeping Tom              (n) A person who covertly observes others in private activities.
Peoplesoft               (n) Registration software at Williams
Phony                    (adj.) Fake.
To pick someone up       (v) To establish a romantic or sexual relationship with someone new,
                         usually a fleeting relationship formed at a party.
Pick-up game             (n) An informal game of basketball or soccer.
Piece                    (n) Slang term for gun.
The Pill                 (n) Contraceptive birth control pill. (Slang.)
Pine                     (n) Same as Unix
To play second fiddle    (v) To be second in importance.
Possum                   (n) An exceptionally ugly and reclusive local mammal.
                                           43
Pot                     (n) Marijuana.
Prick                   (n) A mean or nasty person. Other (highly obscene) definitions
                        exist.
To procrastinate        (v) To delay repeatedly and without good reason in doing
                        something that must be done (noun: procrastination)
Psyched                 (adj.) Excited about something to come.
Psyched-out             (adj.) Intimidated.
To pull one's leg       (v) To chide or tease someone.
To pull some strings    (v) To use influence to get what you want.
To pull the wool
over someone's eyes     (v) To deceive or mislead someone.
To punch in/out         (v) to check in/out from work
To put one's foot
in one's mouth          (v) To make an embarrassing mistake.

Q
Quad                    (n) A square open place with buildings around
Queer                   (adj.) Homosexual
Quiz                    (n) A short test, usually given without warning.

R
Raccoon                 (n) A mammal approximately the size of a medium-sized dog
                        which likes to forage in trash cans. Sometimes rabid.
To rain cats and dogs   (v) To rain heavily.
Redneck                 (n) A person who lives in a rural area (derogatory), especially the
                        west and the southeast; often perceived to be uneducated.
Retard                  (n) A really stupid person (offensive)
Ride                    (n) Transportation, usually in a car.
To rip off              (v) To charge an excessively high price, to cheat.
To rock                 (v) To be really good; to be successful in something
Row house               (n) Terraced house (Perry, Wood, etc.)
RSVP                    (abbreviation of the French "Repondez s'il-vous-plait") Please
                        reply.
To run around with      (v) To be friends and share activities with someone.

S
Schmuck                 (n) Jerk (see ―prick‖)




                                    44
To scope                (v) To investigate, to covertly observe physically attractive people.
Selfreg                 (n) Software used for registering for courses
To be set               (v) To be ready, prepared, finished, done.
Shaky                   (adj.) Uncertain, undependable
To shoot hoops          (v)To play basketball for fun
To shoplift             (v) To secretly steal from a store. Can lead, if caught, to prosecution.
Shot                    (n) A small glass of liquor.
Show                    (n) A movie in a movie theater, or a play in a theater.
Silly                   (adj.) Stupid, dumb
Sip                     (n) A very small amount of drink (verb: to have a sip)
To skip                 (v) To not go to a class, to cut a class.
Skunk                   (n) A small black and white striped animal which inhabits local forests
                        and tends to wander into town. Possesses a gland in its tail which is
                        capable of expelling an extraordinarily unpleasant and long-lasting
                        smell when the animal feels in danger.
Solid                   (adj.) Okay, certain, dependable, etc.
To space out            (v) To not pay attention, to become preoccupied.
To smoke up             (v) To smoke marijuana
Spaz                    (n) An energetic, hyper person.
To spill the beans      (v) To unintentionally reveal a secret, thus ruining a surprise.
To split                (v) To leave.
Stag                    (n) Slang term for a man; to go stag is to go to a dance or party without
                        a date.
Stale                   (adj.) Old, unpleasant.
Stoned                  (adj.) High on marijuana.
Straight-forward        (adj., adv.) To deal with something in a direct manner, to speak openly.
Straight-up             (adj.) Directly, to speak concisely and truthfully, with the truth a higher
                        concern than the effect it may have on the listener.
Stressed out            (adj.) Tense, under pressure.
Stuff                   (n) Things, material affairs or possessions.
Stuffed shirt           (n) A pompous person.

T
Tank top                (n) A top without sleeves which is made of very light material and worn
                        in very hot weather
That sucks!             (exclamation) That's really bad, unpleasant, unwanted, etc.
Thrilled                (adj.) Excited, enthusiastic
Traditional beverages   (n) Soda, beer
Trashed                 (adj.) Really drunk, stoned, wasted.

U
Unix                    (n) Email software at Williams

W
Wacko                   (n) A strange person
Wacky                   (adj.) Something strange, odd
Weed                    (n) Marijuana.
Weird                   (adj) Bizarre, unusual, odd
Weirdo                  (n) A strange person
Whatever                (exclamation, interjection) Used to express boredom, impatience, a lack
                        of concern, laziness, frustration, and a common slang term used by
                        young people to demonstrate superiority over something by expressing
                        that one doesn't care.
To wing it              (v) To attempt to do something without prior preparation or knowledge.
White board             (n) Board on doors for leaving messages, also used in classrooms
To withdraw             (v) To stop taking a class or to officially leave school for the semester
                        or year. Also, to remove money in the form of cash from a bank
                        account.

                                          45
Women's Lib   (n) The feminist movement, short for Women's Liberation.
To work out   (v) To exercise (noun: workout)

Z
To zone out   (v) To become preoccupied, to lose focus.
Zonked        (adj.) Very tired, sleeping soundly.




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