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					                          New Mexico
               Child and Adult Care Food Program


                       SNACK
       MENU RECORD BOOK
              for Children 1 - 12 Years Old




                   New Mexico Children, Youth and Families Department
                           Child and Adult Care Food Program
                                   P.O. Drawer 5160
                           Santa Fe, New Mexico 87502-5160



 Child and Adult Care Food Program Sponsor:


 Beginning Date:                         Kitchen Name or Location:


               Revised April 2004

NEW MEXICO CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES DEPARTMENT
              FAMILY NUTRITION BUREAU
                                                    TABLE OF CONTENTS

I.         INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
II.        DEFINITIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
III.       GUIDELINES/POLICIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
IV.        USDA/CACFP MEAL PATTERN FOR CHILDREN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
V.         CREDITABLE FOODS:
                 Recommended . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
                 Not Recommended . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
VI.        NON-CREDITABLE & NON-REIMBURSABLE FOOD LIST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
VII.       DOCUMENTATION FOR COMMERCIALLY-PREPARED FOODS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
                 CN Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
                 Manufacturer's Product Analysis Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
VIII.      KEY POINTS IN FOOD SAFETY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
IX.        INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING THE MENU RECORD BOOK . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
                 Menu Record Book Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
X.         APPENDIX
                 A. Supplemental Program Information:
                                      Feeding Children with Special Needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
                                      Guidelines for Menu Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
                                      Hot Dog s – Why N ot? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
                                      Nutrient Dens ity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
                                      Tips on Introducing New Foods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
                         B. Sample Menus:
                                      Sample Snack Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
                                      Select-A-Snack Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
                                      Vegetarian Snack Ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
                         C. Handouts:
                                      Breakfast Cereals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
                                      Cheese F or Every Taste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
                                      Crackers, Anyone? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
                                      Fabulous Fiber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
                                      Granola, Cereal Bars & Grain/Fruit Bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
                                      Iron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
                                      Juices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
                                      Vitamin A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
                                      Vitamin C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .           61
                          D. Kitchen Helps/Tips/Hints:
                                       Commo n Can and Jar Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
                                       Recipe Co nversion Ch arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65



Th e S tate of New Mexico Children, Youth and Families Department, Child and Adult Care Food Program d o e s n o t d is c rimin a t e o n t he ba s is o f a ge, c o lo r
race, sex, national o rigin or disability. Any perso n who b elieves they h ave bee n discriminated against in an y USDA -related activity should con tact: U S D A ,
Office of Civil Righ ts, Room 326-W , Whitte n Buildin g, 1400 Indepe nden ce Ave nue, SW , Wash ington , D.C. 202 50-941 0 or call (20 2) 7 20-5964 (voice and TD D).
                                          INTRODUCTION
The Menu Record Book (MRB) has been developed for your use to record meal and snack menus and
the quantities of foods used daily. The MRB serves as a basic record for auditing purposes.

The Menu Record Book is the ONLY form of documentation required by the State Agency to ensure
sponsoring organizations serve meals which meet the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
meal pattern requirements.

The purpose of the Menu Record Book is to provide you with useful information to:

 a.   plan and record menus and portion sizes which meet the USDA meal pattern requirement,
 b.   plan and record food items which are creditable following Federal and State guidelines,
 c.   record the calculated amounts of food needed for the number of persons planned,
 d.   record the actual number of meals served, and
 e.   maintain a daily, permanent record.


                                                  IMPORTANT!


        The MRB must be filled out accurately and completely on a daily basis. This book must
          be available at any time for review by the Children, Youth and Families Department,
        Summer Food Service Program or any other Federal (USDA) Program Audit Unit staff.
        Meals cannot be reimbursed unless they are recorded in the MRB. Failure to complete
              the MRB correctly may result in financial loss to the sponsoring organization.



                                                  IMPORTANT!

Menus should be planned two or more weeks in advance. In planning menus, consider the likes and
dislikes of the children. Plan menus which children will enjoy, using a variety of foods, textures and
colors. Make meal time a relaxing time which children will look forward to everyday.

At times, menus are revised because of changes in food deliveries, seasonal availability, and
inventory. If the planned menu is changed, take care to correct the menu record book to reflect the
actual foods and amounts served. If more food was used than planned, the changes must also be
recorded in the MRB.

If you serve SNACKS only you may contact the State Agency for a copy of the SNACK menu record
book. If you also serve SUPPER, contact the State Agency for a copy of the menu record book
which includes supper. If you serve INFANTS (from 0 to their first birthday) you must follow the infant
meal pattern and record meals in the INFANT menu record book. If you serve children with
SPECIAL NUTRITION NEEDS, you must follow the dietary prescription from a recognized medical
authority as described in Appendix A. Contact the Family Nutrition Bureau Nutritionists at (505) 841-
4856 for further information, sample menus and/or technical assistance.




   Page 2 of 69            New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
Please read the instructions and other important information on the next few pages carefully. This
Menu Record Book should be used with the USDA Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs
(Program Aid Number 1331) and the New Mexico Simplified Food Buying Guides.

If you have any questions about this Menu Record Book or about the Child and Adult Care Food
Program, please contact:

                              Family Nutrition Bureau
                              3401 Pan American Freeway, NE
                              Albuquerque, NM 87107
                              (505) 841-4856 or 1-800-328-2665 (1-800-EAT-COOL)


                                        -or-


                              Family Nutrition Bureau
                              PO Drawer 5160 / PERA Building
                              Santa Fe, New Mexico 87502-5160
                              (505) 827-9954 or (505) 827-9961




   Page 3 of 69           New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
                                               DEFINITIONS
The Children, Youth and Families Department (CYFD) reimburses sponsors participating in the Child
and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) for meals served. However, there are specific regulations
regarding how the meals are served and what foods are served. The following definitions are used in
the CACFP and it is important that sponsors become familiar with them.

Creditable Foods     These are foods used to meet the requirements for a reimbursable meal.
                     Foods are creditable based on the following: 1) nutrient content; 2) customary
                     function in a meal; 3) USDA regulations; 4) the Food and Drug
                     Administration's (FDA) Standards of Identity; and 5) Federal and State
                     Agency policies.

Menu Record Book The Menu Record Book (MRB) is the official record in which the food served
                 and quantities used to meet the meal requirements for the USDA CACFP Meal
                 Pattern are documented.

Non-Creditable
Foods                These are foods that do not meet one or more of the five criteria described
                     under creditable foods, above. (Also called "Other Foods" or "Extras".) A meal
                     may contain both creditable and non-creditable foods. Non-creditable foods
                     are allowed, for example, to supply calories to meet the energy needs of
                     growing children, or to improve acceptability of the rest of the meal. However,
                     non-creditable foods may not be used to meet the meal pattern requirements.

Reimbursable
Meals                Those meals that are served and meet the following requirements:
                           1) USDA meal pattern requirements;
                           2) federal regulations; and,
                           3) state agency policies.

Non-Reimbursable
Meals            Those meals that do not meet the criteria for reimbursement.

Recommended
Foods                These are creditable foods which are naturally low in fat, sugar and salt. They
                     are generally less processed than other foods in the same component.

Not Recommended
Foods           These are creditable foods which are generally higher in fat, sugar and salt
                than other recommended foods in the same component.

Non-Reimbursable
Foods            These are foods which are non-creditable (i.e., do not meet the meal pattern
                 guidelines) and non-reimbursable as part of total food costs. Most of these
                 foods are very low in nutritional value and high in cost.

Family Style         This is a style of meal service in which both adults and children participate in
                     setting the table, serving the food, eating together and cleaning up after the
                     meal. All required components of the meal are placed on the table at the start
                     of the meal. The minimum required amount of each meal component must be
                     available for each child and adult. Children are encouraged to take a portion
                     from each meal component.

  Page 4 of 69           New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
Component        One of four food categories of the USDA Meal Pattern Requirements,
                 including:
                         1) Milk
                         2) Meat/Meat Alternates
                         3) Grains/Breads
                         4) Fruits/Vegetables

Disallowance     A meal or meals which are not approved for reimbursement by the State
                 Agency because:

                        1) Meals are not recorded in the menu record book,
                        2) Meals are missing one or more of the required components. All of
                           these meals will be disallowed; and/or,
                        3) Documentation in the menu record book and/or food receipts
                           indicates that not enough food was served and/or purchased to give
                           each participant the required minimum amount. In this case, the State
                           Agency uses the USDA Food Buying Guide to determine how many
                           servings of each component were available. If the number of
                           servings available is less than the number of participants listed on
                           the menu record book, the difference will be the number of meals
                           disallowed.




                                    Note *** Note *** Note ***


                     Disallowance can be the result of
  substandard record keeping, insufficient documentation in the MRB,
   preparation of inadequate amounts of food and/or not meeting the
                              meal pattern guidelines.


                                        Note*** Note *** Note




  Page 5 of 69      New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
                              GUIDELINES / POLICIES

MILK

< Only FLUID MILK meets the milk requirement.

< Flavored milk (such as chocolate or strawberry) can be used to meet the
   requirement.

< Only whole milk can be served to children under 2 years old. Lowfat milk is
  recommended for children over the age of 2 years.


MEAT/MEAT ALTERNATES

Meat and meat alternates include beef, pork, lamb, poultry, fish, cheese, yogurt, dry beans and peas,
eggs, nuts and seeds, and nut and seed butters.

< Many meats and meat alternates are good sources of iron, which should be offered daily.

< Textured vegetable protein product (TVP) is a protein extracted from soy beans. It is used in
  many food products as an extender or substitute for meat, fish or poultry. TVP products must meet
  USDA specifications.

< A serving of meat is the cooked lean meat without the bone.

< A serving of cooked chicken or turkey includes the meat and skin alone or meat without the
  bone.

< Commercially prepared canned or frozen meat stews, pizzas, chicken nuggets, pot pies, ravioli,
  burritos and other entree/meat products are creditable foods only if:
          1. The product contains creditable food items which meet all or part of the USDA meal
             pattern;
          2. The CN label and/or a Product Analysis Sheet are available for review by the State
              Agency. Please refer to Section VII for examples.

< "USDA-donated (special purchase or commodities)" applies only to USDA foods normally not
   available on the market and donated to Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) eligible programs.

< Peanut butter, soynut, or other nut or seed butters may be used as meat/meat alternate
   components.

< Nuts and seeds can meet the entire serving of the meat/meat alternate component at snack, but
   no more than one-half serving of the meat/meat alternate component at lunch and supper.


              Caution:   to prevent choking, nuts and seeds offered to children under
                         the age of five should be ground or finely chopped. Children
                         under the age of two should not be given nuts or seeds.




   Page 6 of 69           New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
MEAT/MEAT ALTERNATES - Continued

< Yogurt may be offered as a meat/meat alternate. Only commercially-prepared nonfat or lowfat
  yogurt may be served (not homemade yogurt). Drinkable yogurt is not creditable. Yogurt products
  that are not intended for drinking such as “Go-gurt” are creditable. Yogurt products such as frozen
  yogurt, yogurt flavored products, yogurt bars, yogurt covered fruit and/or nuts and similar products
  may NOT be served to meet this requirement. Fruit, nuts, seeds, etc, may be added to yogurt in
  required amounts to meet other food component requirements.

< Eggs may be served as part or all of the meat/meat alternate component at lunch, snack and
  supper. They may be served any style: scrambled, fried, deviled or hard-cooked. Eggs served at
  breakfast are considered "EXTRA" and cannot be used to meet the breakfast requirements.

< Eggs are also creditable as the meat/meat alternate component when used to make a main dish.

< Homemade soups, containing meat, fish, poultry or other meat alternates are creditable as an
  additional source of meat/meat alternate. If soups are providing only part of the meat/meat
  alternate, they must provide at least 1/4 ounce of meat/meat alternate per serving. The remainder
  of the meat/meat alternate component must be met with additional meat/meat alternates.

< Pasteurized process cheese and cheese food such as Kraft American singles are creditable, but
  because dried or fluid whey is added during processing, twice as much is needed to meet the
  requirement. For example, one ounce of cheese food is equivalent to ½ ounce meat alternate.

< Cheese spreads, canned cheese sauces, powdered cheese products and cheese food
  products are not creditable. For more information on creditable/non-creditable cheese, please
  refer to the “Cheese for Every Taste” informational sheet in the Appendix.

< Hot dogs, corn dogs, turkey dogs and some highly processed meats and luncheon meats
  are not creditable as meat/meat alternate components because of their high fat and sodium
  content. For a complete list, see the non-creditable foods list in Section V.




  Page 7 of 69           New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
FRUIT/VEGETABLES

Each breakfast, lunch, and supper served must contain fruit and/or vegetables. Snacks may also
have fruit and/or vegetables as components.

< To meet meal requirements, two (2) or more different types of fruit and/or vegetable must be
   served at lunch and supper. For example, orange juice and orange wedges are considered one
   type of fruit. Therefore, an additional fruit and/or vegetable must be served to fulfill the
   requirement.

< Any fresh, frozen, commercially-canned or dried fruit or vegetable may be used to meet the
   fruit/vegetable requirement. For health and better nutrition, a VARIETY of fruits and vegetables
   should be used at each meal.

< Cooked dried peas, beans, or lentils can be used as a meat alternate or vegetable component,
   but cannot be used to meet both components at the same meal.

< Fruit and vegetable juices must be 100% full-strength juices. Juice blends are creditable if they
   are blends of 100% juice. Juice drinks, “cocktails” and "beverages" are not 100% juice and
   are not creditable. Ingredient labels must be read carefully. The only exception to this rule are CN-
   labeled juice drink products.

< Popsicles are not creditable. Frozen fruit juice bars are creditable. They must be 100% juice or
   carry a CN label indicating amount of fruit component met.

< Salsa is creditable under the following criteria:
         1. If at least 1/8 cup is served per child and the product contains all vegetable ingredients.
         2. Products that contain non-vegetable components, like gums, starches or stabilizers may
            be credited only if a manufacturers analysis is available to determine the portion of the
           product that is a vegetable ingredient.
         3. Only the vegetables may be counted towards the volume requirement.

< For lunch or supper, fruit or vegetable juices, cannot meet more than one-half (½) of the fruit
   and/or vegetable component. Full-strength juice meets the entire fruit/vegetable component at
   breakfast or one component at snack.

< An all fluid snack is not reimbursable. Juice and milk cannot be served together as the two
   components at snack.

< A serving of canned fruit may include a portion of the juice or lite syrup in which the fruit was
   packed. A serving of frozen fruit includes the juice present after the fruit is thawed. Fresh fruit
   may be served whole or in pieces, with or without the skin.

< If serving canned fruit packed in heavy syrup, we recommend draining and discarding the syrup
   before measuring the fruit.

< Mixed food items such as fruit cocktail or mixed vegetables do not meet the entire fruit/veg
   component. Another fruit and/or veg must be served to fulfill the requirements because these pre-
   packaged mixtures are considered just one type of fruit/veg. If you make your own mixed fruit/veg,
   and can list the individual weights of the individual veg or fruits, this mixture can count as two or
   more fruit/veg as long as each veg/fruit provides at least 1/8 cup serving per child.




   Page 8 of 69            New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
FRUIT/VEGETABLES - continued

< Large combinations of fruit or vegetable salads, such as a taco salad or a fruit plate with cottage
   cheese, served as an entree, can be counted as two or more servings of fruit/vegetable. They
   meet the full requirement for fruit/vegetables at a meal if they contain at least 1/2 cup (for 3-5 year
   olds) of two or more fruits or vegetables which contribute at least 1/8 cup each toward the fruit/veg
   component.

< When serving gelatin with fruit, a serving must contain at least 1/8 cup of fruit to count toward the
   fruit/vegetable component. Gelatin is a non-creditable food, or “extra”.

< Serve fresh fruit and vegetables that are in season to help keep food costs low.

< Measure vegetables after preparation. For example, measure frozen corn after cooking, not
   before. Drain the liquid before measuring cooked vegetables.

< Meals should contain foods high in Vitamin C and Vitamin A. Lists of fruits and vegetables high
   in Vitamin C and Vitamin A are found in the Appendix.

< Meals should include foods high in fiber. Fiber is found in all fruits and vegetables and whole
   grains. A handout on fiber can be found in the Appendix.

< Fruit flavored syrup, jams and jellies (even 100% fruit spreads) do not count toward the
   fruit/vegetable component.

< Home canned foods are not creditable because of the potential health hazards attributed to home
   canning procedures.

< Home-grown fresh fruits and vegetables are creditable food items.

< Condiments (such as ketchup, mustard, jelly, and cream cheese) and seasonings are not
   creditable food items. However, they serve an important role in the meal because they enhance
   the acceptability of the meal.

< Reconstituted canned, ready-to-serve, and homemade soups must have at least 1/8 cup
   vegetable per serving to count toward the vegetable requirement.

< Posole or hominy are not creditable food items since manufacturers do not enrich and/or fortify
   the corn. These foods can be served as an extra.

< Cobbler is defined as a deep dish fruit pie with a thick top crust. It is not creditable in the CACFP.

< Crisp is defined as a baked fruit dish with a crumb topping, usually placed under a broiler during
   the last few minutes of cooking to “crisp” the topping. If fruit pie filling is used, it is not creditable. If
   fresh, canned or frozen fruit is the first ingredient by weight, a
   fruit crisp will meet part of the fruit/vegetable component in a
   meal or it could meet the entire fruit/vegetable component in a
   snack.




   Page 9 of 69             New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
GRAINS/BREADS

Grains and breads which are creditable are defined as: enriched or whole-grain breads, biscuits,
rolls, muffins, or cooked, enriched or whole-grain macaroni or noodle products.

< Whole-grain, enriched, or fortified breakfast cereals (cooked, dry, or cold) may be offered as a
  breakfast or snack component only.

        NOTE: New cereals appear on store shelves almost daily. Please read labels carefully.
              If you have questions regarding whether a cereal is creditable, please contact the
              Family Nutrition Bureau at (505) 841-4856 or 1-800-EAT-COOL.

< Grains or breads must serve the customary function of bread in a meal. It must be
  served as an accompaniment to, or be a recognizable part of the main dish (not merely an
  ingredient). For example, the 2 corn tortillas in an enchilada are creditable, but bread crumbs in a
  meat loaf or breading on foods such as fish sticks or chicken nuggets are not creditable.

< Cookies, granola bars or graham crackers may be used only at snack, and only when whole-
  grains (such as oats) or enriched or whole grain flour is the first ingredient listed on the label (the
  predominant ingredient by weight). These food items may not be served more than twice a week.
  Please refer to the granola/fruit bar and cookies handouts in the Appendix.

< Rice pudding or bread pudding are creditable only at snack. Only the rice or bread is credited
  toward the meal pattern components.

< Corn or potato chips and similar items are not creditable, and not reimbursable in CACFP.

< If nachos are served, only corn tortilla products made with enriched or whole grain corn, may be
  used to fulfill the Grains/Breads component.

< Fruit or vegetable breads such as banana, carrot, pumpkin, or squash bread may be used as
  bread alternates if the recipe shows that whole grain or enriched flour is the primary ingredient by
  weight. The ingredients in these items may not be used to fulfill the fruit/vegetable component.

< Rice cakes can be used to meet the Grains/Breads component.

< Pie crust meets the Grains/Breads component if it is part of a meat/meat alternate dish, such as a
  homemade beef pot pie. Pie crusts or toppings in dessert items such as cobblers or crisps are not
  creditable because they do not serve the customary function of bread at a meal.

< Because of their high fat and sugar content, doughnuts are not creditable and not reimbursable
  as Grains/Breads component.

< Coffee cake or sweet rolls made with whole-grain or enriched flour or corn meal can be used as a
  component at breakfast or snack only. However, they are not recommended due to their high
  sugar and fat content.

< Hard pretzels are creditable as a bread alternate at snack only.

< Popcorn is not creditable in the Child and Adult Care Food Program.




  Page 10 of 69           New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
Page 11 of 69   New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
                                  USDA/CACFP
                           MEAL PATTERN FOR CHILDREN


SUPPLEMENT (SNACK) MEAL PATTERN
COMPONENTS                                                             AGES 1-2                   AGES 3-5               AGES 6-12

Milk
Milk flu id                                                            1/2 cup                    1/2 cup                1 cup

Vegetables an d Fruits
Vegetables(s) and/or fruit(s) or                                       1/2 cup                    1/2 cup                3/4 cup
Full-strength fruit or vegetable juice or an equivalent                1/2 cup                    1/2 cup                3/4 cup
quantity of any combination of the above

Grains/Breads
Bread or                                                               1/2   slice                1/2   slice            1 slice
Cornb read, bisc uits, rolls, mu ffins, etc. or                        1/2   serving              1/2   serving          1 serving
Cold dry cereal or                                                     1/4   cup or 1/3 oz.       1/3   cup or 1/2 oz.   3/4 cup or 1 oz.
Coo ked cere al or                                                     1/4   cup                  1/4   cup              1/2 cup
Cooked pasta or noodle products or                                     1/4   cup                  1/4   cup              1/2 cup
Cooked cereal grains or an equivalent quantity of                      1/4   cup                  1/4   cup              1/2 cup
any combination or bread and bread alternates

Meat and Meat Alternates
Lean meat or poultry or fish or                                        1/2   oz.                  1/2   oz.              1 oz.
Cheese or                                                              1/2   oz.                  1/2   oz.              1 oz.
Eggs or                                                                1/2   egg                  1/2   egg              1 egg
Cooked dry beans or peas or                                            1/8   cup                  1/8   cup              1/4 cup
Peanut butter or soynut butter or
Other nut or seed butters or                                           1 tbsp.                    1 tbsp.                2 tbsp.
Peanuts o r soynuts or tree nuts or seed s* or                         1/2 oz.                    1/2 oz.                1 oz.
Yogurt, plain or sweetened and flavored or an                          2 oz. or 1/4 cup           2 oz. or 1/4 cup       4 oz. or 1/2 cup
equivalent quantity or any combination or the above
meat and meat alternates

* Serve with caution to children under five.




    Page 12 of 69                    New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers                Revised April 2004
                   CREDITABLE FOODS / RECOMMENDED
MEAT AND MEAT ALTERNATES

BEEF, FRESH, FROZEN, OR                 SEAFOOD, FRESH OR                        CHEESE                            NUTS AND SEEDS
CANNED (USDA-donated or                 FROZEN                                   Natural or process cheese         Almonds
market style)                           Clams or oysters: shucked*               and cheese substitutes such       Brazil nuts
Beef with natural juices: canned        Crab meat*                               as:                               Cashew nuts
Brisket: corned or fresh                Fish fillets                             American, Cheddar, Colby,         Filberts
Ground beef                             Fish portions: frozen                    Monterey Jack, Mozzarella,        (hazelnuts)
Organ meats: heart, kidney, liver,      Fish steaks: frozen, fried,              or Muenster                       Macadamia
tongue, tripe                           battered                                                                   Peanuts
Roasts: chuck, round, rump              Fish sticks: frozen, fried,              Process cheese food,              Pecans
Steaks: flank, round                    breaded,                                 cheese food substitutes,          Pinon (pine nuts)
Stew meat                               Scallops: frozen*                        cottage and ricotta cheese        Pistachios
                                        Shrimp: fresh or frozen                  are creditable, but twice as      Pumpkin seeds
                                                     *High cost items            much is required to meet the      Sesame seeds
                                                                                 component. One ounce of           Soynuts
CHICKEN, FRESH, FROZEN OR               SEAFOOD, CANNED                          cheese food is equal to ½         Squash seeds
CANNED (USDA-donated or                 Clams: minced                            ounce meat alternate.             Sunflower seeds
market style)                           Mackerel                                                                   Walnuts
Chicken: boned, canned                  Salmon: pink
Chicken parts: breasts, breasts         Sardines
  and back, drumsticks, giblets,        Shrimp
  liver, thighs, thighs with backs      Tuna: water pack or oil,
Frying chicken                          chunk, flake, grated, solid
Whole chicken

LAMB, FRESH OR FROZEN                   TURKEY, FRESH, FROZEN                    EGGS                              NUT AND SEED
Chops: shoulder                         OR CANNED (USDA-                         Dried egg mix, USDA               BUTTERS
Roasts: leg, shoulder                   donated or market style)                 donated                           Almond butter
Stew meat                               Ground turkey                            Dried whole eggs                  Cashew butter
                                        Turkey, boned, canned                    Fresh shell eggs                  Peanut butter
                                        Turkey ham                               Frozen whole eggs                 Sesame butter
                                        Turkey parts: breasts,                                                     Sunflower seed
                                           drumsticks, halves, leg                                                 butter
                                           quarters, liver, thighs
                                        Turkey rolls or roasts: frozen
                                        Turkey, whole

OSTRICH                                 DELI MEATS OR
USDA Inspected                          LUNCHEON MEATS
                                        Any deli or luncheon meats
PORK, FRESH, FROZEN, OR                 which are labeled “extra                 BEANS, DRY, CANNED                YOGURT
CANNED (USDA-donated or                 lean”, “fat free”, or “97-99%            Black beans                       Lowfat or nonfat
market style)                           fat free”, including but not             Black-eyed peas
Chops: loin                             limited to:                              Garbanzo                          Yogurt, flavored
Ground pork                             Turkey Breast                            Great Northern                    with fruit, fruit
Liver                                   Roast Beef                               Kidney (red)                      juice, nuts, granola
Pork with natural juices: canned        Roast Chicken                            Lima
Roasts: Boston butt, leg, loin,         Corned Beef Brisket                      Mung                              Yogurt, plain
shoulder                                Ham                                      Navy (pea)
Spare ribs                              Turkey Ham (no added ingredients)        Pinto
Stew meat                                                                        Soybeans

PORK, MILD CURED                        VEAL, FRESH OR FROZEN                    PEAS AND LENTILS, DRY
Ham                                     Cutlets: leg                             Dry peas: split or whole
Shoulder: Boston butt, picnic           Ground veal                              Lentils
                                        Liver
                                        Roasts: chuck or leg
                                        Stew meat




   Page 13 of 69                   New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers                   Revised April 2004
GRAINS/BREADS

BREADS                                     BREAKFAST ITEMS                                    MISCELLANEOUS BREAD ITEMS
Bagels                                     Cereal, cold, hot, cooked                          Meat pie crust
Biscuits                                   French toast                                       Pizza crust made from whole grain or
Boston brown bread                         Grits                                              enriched flour
Bread crumbs, dry                          Pancakes                                           Soft "Dutch Style" pretzel
Bread stuffing                             Waffles                                            Taco or tostada shells, tortilla rounds
Bread sticks
Corn bread
Dumplings
English muffins                            CRACKERS                                           PASTA AND RICE
French or Italian bread                    Cheese-Its                                         (Enriched or whole grain)
Fruit or vegetable breads                  Escort                                             Macaroni
Hamburger or hot dog buns                  Graham crackers                                    Noodles: regular, spinach, egg,
Muffins: fruit, plain, bran                Hi-Ho, Sunshine                                    spaghetti
Pita bread                                 Matzo                                              Rice: all varieties
Pumpernickel bread                         Melba Toast
Raisin bread                               Oyster crackers                                    SNACK ITEMS*
Rolls: brown-n-serve, clover leaf,         Rice cakes                                         Graham crackers
dinner, Kaiser, Parkerhouse,               Ritz                                               Hard pretzels
rectangular, round                         Ry-Krisp (triple cracker)
Rye bread                                  Rye wafers
Sopapillas                                 Saltines: 2" square
Sourdough bread                            Soda crackers
Tortillas: corn, flour                     Townhouse
White bread                                Triscuits
Whole wheat bread                          Uneeda
                                           Waverly wafers
                                           Wheat thins
                                           Zwieback
                                                                                              * Snack only
                                             See Cracker Handout




   Page 14 of 69                 New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers                  Revised April 2004
                CREDITABLE FOODS / RECOMMENDED
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

FRUITS                    VEGETABLES                            The following fruits and      JUICES
Apples                    Asparagus                             vegetables qualify but        All 100%vegetable
Apricots                  Avocados                              may not be accepted by        juices
Bananas                   Broccoli                              children. It is best to       Apple cider
Blackberries              Carrots                               introduce them in a meal      Grape
Blueberries               Cauliflower                           with other familiar           Grapefruit
Boysenberries             Celery                                foods. Encourage their use    Orange
Canned fruit in natural   Chile: red or green                   in Nutrition Education        Pear/apple
juices                    Corn                                  classes, perhaps the day or   Pear/grape
Cantaloupe                Cucumbers                             morning before being          Pear
Cherries                  Jicama                                served.                       Pineapple
Fruit mixed (canned)      Lettuce: iceberg, leaf,                                             Prune
Grapes                    romaine                               Bean sprouts                  Tangerine
Honeydew melon            Mushrooms                             Beet greens or beets          Tomato
Kiwi                      Nopales (cactus pads)                 Brussel sprouts               100% Fruit Juice Bars
Mangos                    Olives: green & black                 Cabbage: red, green,
Nectarines                Onions: all varieties                 Chinese                        See Juice Handout
Oranges                   Peppers: green or red                 Collards
Papaya                    Potatoes                              Cranberries                   SOUPS
Peaches                   Pumpkin                               Currents                      Chicken vegetable
Pears                     Salsa                                 Dates                         Clam chowder
Pineapple                 Spinach                               Eggplant                      Homemade
Plantains                 Squash: all varieties                 Endive (escarole, chicory)    Minestrone
Plums                     Sweet potatoes/yams                   Figs                          Pea or bean
Raisins                   Tomato paste, puree, sauce            Grapefruit                    Tomato rice
Raspberries               Tomatoes                              Kale                          Tomato
Strawberries              Water chestnuts                       Kohlrabi                      Vegetable
Tangerines                                                      Mustard greens                Vegetable beef
Watermelon                BEANS AND PEAS                        Okra
                          Black-eyed peas                       Parsley
                          Black                                 Parsnips
                          Garbanzo                              Prunes (pitted)
                          Great Northern                        Radishes
                          Green beans                           Rhubarb
                          Green peas: split or whole            Rutabaga
                          Kidney (red)                          Salsa
                          Lentils                               Succotash
                          Lima                                  Swiss chard
                          Mung                                  Turnip greens or turnips
                          Navy                                  Watercress
                          Pinto
                          Soybeans
                          Wax




Page 15 of 69             New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers             Revised April 2004
               CREDITABLE FOODS / NOT RECOMMENDED
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

Fruit:                                                      Vegetables:
Canned fruit in syrup                                       Frozen vegetables in sauces


MEAT/MEAT ALTERNATES

Beans, Canned:          Beef Products, Canned,                    Chicken, Canned or             Chicken, Fresh or Frozen:
Beans with              Frozen:                                   Frozen:                        Parts: gizzards, heart, wings
frankfurters*           Barbecue beef                             Chicken a la king              Pre-cooked breaded chicken
Beans with bacon        Beef and gravy with dumplings             Chicken barbecue:
in sauce*               Beef hash or goulash                      minced
Refried beans           Beef taco filling                         Chicken chili, with or
                        Beef with gravy                           without beans                  Pork, Fresh or     Pork, Mild Cured:
*Frankfurters and       Chili con carne, with or without          Chicken hash                   Frozen:            Canadian bacon
bacon are               beans                                     Chicken with
considered              Swiss steak with gravy                    dumplings                      Pork heart
"EXTRA" and do                                                    Chicken with gravy
not count toward        DELI MEATS OR LUNCHEON                    Chicken with noodles
the meat                MEATS: Any deli or luncheon               Creamed chicken
component.              meats which are labeled “lowfat”
                        or “lean”, including but not
                        limited to:
                        Turkey Breast
                        Roast Beef
                        Roast Chicken
                        Corned Beef Brisket
                        Ham
                        Turkey Ham (no added ingredients)

Turkey, Fresh or        Turkey Products, Canned or                                               Veal:              Cheese:
Frozen:                 Frozen:                                                                  Heart              Parmesan or
Turkey: giblets         Creamed turkey                            Turkey salad                                      Romano cheese
Turkey parts:           Turkey a la king                          Turkey with dumplings
backs, gizzards,        Turkey barbecue                           Turkey with gravy
heart, neck,            Turkey chili, with or without             Turkey with noodles
wings                   beans
                        Turkey hash

GRAINS/BREADS

Breakfast Items:                                        Cereals:                                  Snack Items:
Coffee Cake                                             containing 35-49% sugar                   Cookies
Croissants                                              per serving                               Granola bar
Pop Tarts (toaster pastries)
Popovers
Sweet Rolls
Danish
Pastry




     Page 16 of 69                  New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers                    Revised April 2004
 CACFP NON-CREDITABLE & NON-REIMBURSABLE♦ Food List
Listed below are some foods that are NOT creditable in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. If these foods are served, they can
be recorded as "Other" but they are NOT considered part of the USDA meal pattern requirements.

    GRAINS/BREADS
    DESSERT ITEMS                                             SNACK ITEMS*                                           CEREALS That contain 50% or more sugar
    Brownies                                                  Corn or other grain-based                              per serving♦ such as:
    Cakes                                                     specially shaped snack, such as                        Apple Jacks™
    Cupcakes                                                  Fritos™, Bugles™, Cheetos™,                            Cap'n Crunch™
    Dessert pie crust                                         cheese puffs, Sunchips™, etc.                          Cocoa Puffs™
    Doughnuts♦                                                Corn nuts♦                                             Frosted Cheerios™
    Ice cream cones                                           Popcorn                                                Froot Loops™
    Snack cakes♦, pre-packaged such as:                       Potato chips                                           Smacks™
       Ding Dongs™, Twinkies™, and LittleDebbie™              Potato sticks
                                                              Tortilla chips                                          PLEASE NOTE: Product formulations for
                                                                                                                     cereals change without notice – this means
                                                              * This category is non-creditable but
                                                                reimbursable in SFSP only!
                                                                                                                     that you must check the nutrition facts label to
                                                                                                                     make sure the cereal is creditable (i.e., less
                                                                                                                     than 50% sugar).

    MEAT/MEAT ALTERNATES
    CHEESES                    MEATS                                            PROCESSED LUNCH MEATS**                                 YOGURT or YOGURT
    Canned cheese              Bacon                                            Bologna (regular, approx 30% fat)                       PRODUCTS
    sauces                     Beef jerky♦                                      Corned beef (regular, approx 30% fat)                   Frozen yogurt, bulk, hard or soft serve
    Cheese “product”           Chicken dogs♦                                    Minced ham loaf♦                                        Homemade yogurt
    Cheese spreads             Ground sausage                                   Olive loaf♦                                             Yogurt covered fruit and/or nuts
    Cream cheese               Hot dogs ♦                                       Pastrami (regular, approx 30% fat)
    Imitation cheese of any    Link Sausages♦ (i.e.,                            Peppered loaf♦                                          NUTS and SEEDS
    kind                        Bratwurst, Chorizo, Italian, Knock-             Picnic loaf♦                                            Acorns
    Neuchâtel cheeses           wurst, Polish, Smoked, Vienna)                  Salami (regular, approx 30% fat)                        Chestnuts
    Powdered cheese            Pepperoni                                                                                                Coconuts
    Process cheese food                                                         ** Sponsors may contact the State Agency
                               Pork Rinds ♦                                        Nutritionists to review any lowfat/low salt
                                                                                                                                        Nut or seed meal flour
                               Soy Hot Dogs♦                                       luncheon meat that could qualify as creditable.
                               Spam♦                                               A CN label or product analysis must be               VEGETABLE PROTEIN
                                                                                   provided with the request.
                               Turkey dogs ♦                                                                                            PRODUCTS
                               Wild meats ♦                                                                                             Tofu

    FRUIT/VEGETABLES
    FRUITS                              VEGETABLES                              JUICES***                                                    CONDIMENTS
    Banana chips                        Hominy                                  "Ades" such as lemonade♦                                     Cocktail sauce
    Fruit cobbler                       Pickles                                 Fruit "drinks"♦                                              Ketchup
    Fruit flavored frozen bars &        Pimientos                               Juice "beverages"♦                                           Mustard
    popsicles                           Posole                                  Juice "cocktails"♦                                           Pickle relish
    Fruit flavored or plain gelatin     Sauerkraut                              Nectars                                                      Vegetable seasonings
    Fruit jams, preserves, & jellies                                            Powdered drinks♦
    Fruit leather                                                               Sport "drinks" ♦
    Fruit pie filling
                                                                                *** Items containing at least 25% fruit or vegetable
    Fruit roll ups                                                                  juice qualify as non-creditable but reimbursable.
    Fruit syrups

    MILK
    MILK PRODUCTS         Butter               Eggnog                            Popsicles                                           Sour cream
                          Cheese*             Frozen dessert bars                Powdered cocoa mixes                                Tapioca Pudding
                          Custards             Ice cream                         Pudding                                             Whipping cream
                          Creamer ♦           Ice milk                           Sherbet                                             Yogurt*
                                               *Creditable as a meat/meat alternate, not as a substitute for fluid milk.

 OTHER
     Candy ♦                       Coffee ♦                                Gum ♦                                    Soda ♦                               Tea ♦
♦
 NON-REIMBURSABLE = The cost of this item, if purchased, will be deducted from receipts
                    and/or invoices.

            Page 17 of 69                     New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers                                       Revised April 2004
                    DOCUMENTATION FOR COMMERCIALLY
                           PREPARED FOODS
           To serve commercially prepared foods, such as pizza, burritos, or lasagna,
        documentation must be provided to support the fact that the ingredients provide
        the minimum amounts of meal component requirements. There are two ways to
                                  document these products:

                                     -Child Nutrition (CN) label, or
                                    -Manufacturer's Analysis sheet

                    What is the Child Nutrition (CN) Label? The CN label:
             -is a voluntary Federal labeling program for the Child Nutrition Program,
                           -provides a warranty for CN-labeled products,
            -allows manufacturers to claim a product's contribution to the meal pattern
                                           requirements.


                A CN label will always contain the following information:
                -   the CN logo, which is a distinct border,
                -   the meal pattern contribution statement,
                -   a six-digit product identification number,
                -   USDA/FNS authorization,
                -   the month and year of approval.




                                                        NOTE:
         A CN label does not mean the product provides the entire
            serving of the required Child and Adult Care Food
                        Program meal component.
          It is important to check the quantity of food contained per portion before
            assuming the product provides complete meal components. Also, be
            sure to check the list of not creditable/non-reimbursable foods before
             serving the pre-prepared item and/or check with the State Agency to
                         ensure the food items served are creditable.

           Because of state guidelines, some products which do have a CN label
                 are still not creditable on the NM CACFP program. .




Page 18 of 69                New Mexico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Record Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
                           CN (Child Nutrition) LABELS

                                         Some Examples



        CHAR-BROILED BONELESS PORK RIB SHAPED PATTIE

                                                      CN

                     2.25 oz. cooked Mon Rib by Monfort provides 2.0
                     oz. equivalent meat/meat alternate for child Nutrition
                CN   Meal Patten Requirements. (Use of this logo and             CN
                     statement authorized by the Food and Nutrition
                     Service, USDA 06-90).



                                                       CN




         4" x 6" CHEESE/CHEESE SUBSTITUTE PIZZA

                                                    CN

                     This 5.00 oz. Cheese/Cheese Substitute Pizza
                     provides 2.00 oz. equivalent meat alternate, 2
                CN   servings of bread alternate and 1/4 cup vegetable for       CN
                     the Child Nutrition Meal Pattern Requirements. (Use
                     of this logo and statement authorized by the Food
                     and Nutrition Service, USDA 4-92).


                                                      CN




Page 19 of 69         New Mexico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Record Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
        Manufacturer's Product Analysis:
        When CN labels are not available, a manufacturer's product analysis may
        be used. This analysis must be signed by an official of the food
        manufacturer (not the salesperson) and must also document the amount
        of meal component(s) provided by the product.

                          Product Analysis for Pizza - CN Approved
          This product analysis form provides information to enable the
          purchaser to determine to what extent a meat product is purported to
          contribute to the Type A lunch requirements.

                Product Name:          Pizza with Beef Pattie Crumbles
                Product Code:        #63627*VPM
                List Variety (ies) of Meat Used in Product: Ground Beef-domestic
                 Total Weight of Uncooked Product:             5.460 oz
                 Total Weight of Uncooked Meat Topping:              .88 oz.
                   Weight of Raw Meat:              .602 oz.
                   Percent Fat of Raw Meat: not greater than 26%
                   (Weight of Dry VPP):            .089 oz.
                   (Weight of Hydrated VPP):          .258 oz.
                   (Weight of Raw Meat & Hydrated VPP):            .86 oz.
                   Weight of Seasonings, etc.:               .02 oz.
                 Total Weight of Precooked Product:              5.10 oz.
                   Weight of Prebaked Crust:       1.83 oz. = 2 bread servings
                   Weight of Sauce:        .98 oz. = 1/8 cup vegetables
                   Weight of Precooked Meat (with VPP, etc.): .88 oz.
                   Weight of Natural Cheese:              .705 oz.
                   Weight of Substitute Cheese:            .705 oz.

        I certify the above information is true and correct, and the above meat
        product (ready for serving) contains a total of 2.02 ounces (equivalent to
        2.00 ounces) of cooked lean meat/meat alternate when prepared
        according to directions. I further certify the Textured Vegetable Protein
        Product (TVPP) used in this product conforms to USDA-FCS
        requirements of the child nutrition requirements.




        _________________________                                   Product Development Supervisor

                  Signature


        _________________________                                 ___________________________
             Company                                                         Date




Page 20 of 69             New Mexico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Record Book for Centers      Revised April 2004
                      KEY POINTS IN FOOD SAFETY
                  TO AVOID FOOD POISONING AND FOOD-BORNE ILLNESS




1. Properly clean site and service area each day.

2. Wash hands often for 20 seconds and always before serving food.

3. Maintain good personal hygiene.

4. Keep hot foods hot (hold at 140/F or hotter).

5. Serve hot foods within 2 hours after cooking.

6. Keep cold foods cold at 40/F or colder. Coolers must have plenty of ice, ice
   blankets, and/or ice packs.

7. Keep cold foods refrigerated until packaged for transporting or served.

8. Cover all foods.

9. Properly dispose of or store leftovers.

10. Serve leftovers within 72 hours.

11. Keep garbage cans covered and empty them daily.

12. Clean and sanitize items used in preparation, cooking, serving and delivery of
    meals .

13. Whe n transp orting food , ensure that the pro per tem perature is being m aintained .




  Page 21 of 69         New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
                     Child and Adult Care Food Program

 INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING THE MENU RECORD BOOK

      U The following information must be recorded at all times in the CACFP Menu
          Record Book:
                   Date                                     Food Items Used
                   Menu                                     Amounts Prepared
                   Size of Serving                          Actual Number Served

See Example

(1) Meal Pattern
    These are the types of food which must be served for each meal. Any extra foods
    which are served at lunch or supper should be indicated here.

(2) Menu
    Record the food items you plan to serve, making sure they meet the required
    components for that meal. We recommend planning menus at least 2 weeks in
    advance.

(3) Size of Serving
    This column lists the minimum serving size for 3-5 year old and 6-12 year old
   children. Circle the planned serving size in this column. Be sure to serve at least the
   minimum required amount.

(4) Food Items Used
    Give a description of the food items prepared and offered at the meal. Abbreviate, if
    necessary. Use descriptive words as appropriate such as homemade, fresh, canned
    frozen, etc. For example:
           Frozen concentrated orange juice
           Whole wheat bread
           Chicken breasts
           Boneless ham
           Milk, 2%
           Homemade chicken soup
           Fresh oranges




  Page 22 of 69         New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
5) Amounts Used
   This information is extremely important to the State Agency monitoring staff, for it
   determines whether enough food was prepared and offered to the children and/or
   adults.

This information needs to be recorded on a daily basis and as accurately as possible.
Staff eating with the children need to be included when calculating the amount of food to
prepare.

Record the size of the container for canned and bottled products and use "pounds" for
fresh products.
   For example:
         1 #10 can of whole kernel corn
         4 pounds lettuce

(6) Actual Number Served
    The information recorded in this section must specify the actual number of people
   served. For improved accuracy, this section is divided into 2 groups:
            Children: Total number of children served.
            Adults: Total number of adults served.

  Remember, when submitting your monthly claim for reimbursement, include only
  the number of children served. The program does not reimburse meals for adults
  except in adult day care centers.




                            REMEMBER . . .
        Ensure that the amount of food used is at least the minimum
            amount required to serve ALL children and adults.




  Page 23 of 69         New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
                         CACFP

Menu Record Book


                        SNACK

                         PAGES



Page 24 of 69   New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
Page 25 of 69   New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
Snack             New Mexico Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)     Production Record Book                                 Name of Person Completing This Page: _______________________________
1. Week                  2. Menu                    3. Size                                                        Select 2 of these 4 Components:                                      8. Other Items
of: 4/21/04                                         of          4. Meat/Meat Alternate            5. Fruit/Vegetable                  6. Grains/Breads             7. Milk              Served
                                                    Serving
AM       MONDAY          Applesauce                  1/2 c.     Item                              Item                              Item                           Item
Snacks Planned: 30       Graham Crackers             2 ea.                                        Apple-                            Graham
Children Served:
           25                                                                                     sauce                             Crackers
                                                                                                                                                                                            Water
Adults:    3                                                                                                       1-1/2
                                                                                                                 # 10 cns.                               1#
Total:     28
                                                                                         Amount                          Amount                           Amount               Amount

PM       MONDAY          Peanut Butter               2T         Item                              Item                              Item                           Item
Snacks Planned: 30       WW Bread                    1 Sl.        Peanut                                                            Whole
Children Served:
          24
                                                                  Butter                                                            Wheat
Adults: 3                                                                                                                           Bread                                                    Water
                                                                              1-1/2 #'s                                                             1-1/2 #'s
Total:     27
                                                                                         Amount                          Amount                           Amount               Amount
AM       TUESDAY         Yogurt                      2 oz.      Item                              Item                              Item                           Item
Snacks Planned: 30                                               Yogurt,                          Carrots
                         Carrot Sticks               1/4 c.
Children Served:                                                 Vanilla                          Bell
           26            Bell Pepper Strips          1/4 c.
                                                                                                  Peppers                                                                                   Water
Adults:    3                                                                   60 oz. or                        2-1/2 #'s C
                                                                               3-3/4 #'s                       2-1/4 #'s BP
Total:     29
                                                                                         Amount                          Amount                           Amount               Amount
PM       TUESDAY         Peaches                     1/2 c.     Item                              Item                              Item                           Item
Snacks Planned: 30       Bananas                     1/4 c.                                       Peaches,
Children Served:                                                                                                        Wheat
                         Wheat Thins                 10 ea.                                       canned
           24                                                                                                           Thins                                                               Water
Adults:    3                                                                                      Bananas,
                                                                                                            1 #10 c
                                                                                                  fresh
Total:     27                                                                                            + 3#'s Bananas                              1#
                                                                                         Amount                          Amount                           Amount               Amount
AM WEDNESDAY             Applejuice                  1/2 c.     Item                              Item                              Item                           Item
Snacks Planned: 30       Muffins, Cornbread          1/2 ea.                                                                        Miffins,
Children Served:                                                                                  Applejuice
           26                                                                                                                       Cornbread
Adults:    3
                                                                                                                   1 gal.                          1-1/4 #'s
Total:     29
                                                                                         Amount                          Amount                           Amount               Amount
Snack              New Mexico Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)     Production Record Book                                 Name of Person Completing This Page: _______________________________
1. Week                   2. Menu                    3. Size                                                        Select 2 of these 4 Components:                                      8. Other Items
of:____________________                              of          4. Meat/Meat Alternate            5. Fruit/Vegetable                  6. Grains/Breads            7. Milk               Served
                                                     Serving
AM       MONDAY                                                  Item                              Item                              Item                          Item
Snacks Planned:____
Children Served:
        ________
Adults: ________

Total:
                                                                                          Amount                          Amount                          Amount                Amount

PM       MONDAY                                                  Item                              Item                              Item                          Item
Snacks Planned:____
Children Served:
        ________
Adults: ________

Total:
                                                                                          Amount                          Amount                          Amount                Amount
AM       TUESDAY                                                 Item                              Item                              Item                          Item
Snacks Planned:____
Children Served:
        ________
Adults: ________

Total:
                                                                                          Amount                          Amount                          Amount                Amount
PM       TUESDAY                                                 Item                              Item                              Item                          Item
Snacks Planned:____
Children Served:
        ________
Adults: ________

Total:
                                                                                          Amount                          Amount                          Amount                Amount
AM WEDNESDAY                                                     Item                              Item                              Item                          Item
Snacks Planned:____
Children Served:
        ________
Adults: ________

Total:
                                                                                          Amount                          Amount                          Amount                Amount
Snack              New Mexico Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)      Production Record Book                                Name of Person Completing This Page: _______________________________
1. (Continued) Week       2. Menu                    3. Size                                                        Select 2 of these 4 Components:                                     8. Other Items
of:____________________                              of          4. Meat/Meat Alternate            5. Fruit/Vegetable                  6. Grains/Breads            7. Milk              Served
                                                     Serving
PM WEDNESDAY                                                     Item                              Item                              Item                          Item
Snacks Planned:____
Children Served:
        ________
Adults: ________

Total:
                                                                                          Amount                          Amount                          Amount               Amount
AM       THURSDAY                                                Item                              Item                              Item                          Item
Snacks Planned:____
Children Served:
        ________
Adults: ________

Total:
                                                                                          Amount                          Amount                          Amount               Amount
PM       THURSDAY                                                Item                              Item                              Item                          Item
Snacks Planned:____
Children Served:
        ________
Adults: ________

Total:
                                                                                          Amount                          Amount                          Amount               Amount
AM       FRIDAY                                                  Item                              Item                              Item                          Item
Snacks Planned:____
Children Served:
        ________
Adults: ________

Total:
                                                                                          Amount                          Amount                          Amount               Amount
PM       FRIDAY                                                  Item                              Item                              Item                          Item
Snacks Planned:____
Children Served:
        ________
Adults: ________

Total:
                                                                                          Amount                          Amount                          Amount               Amount
                                      Appendix A
A. Information on Selected Topics of Interest:

   Feeding Children With Special Needs

   Guidelines for Menu Planning

   Hot Dogs – Why Not?

   Nutrient Density

   Tips on Introducing New Foods




 Page 26 of 69    New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
Page 27 of 69   New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
  FEEDING CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL DIETARY NEEDS
Many children with chronic medical conditions or disabilities have no special dietary needs, and can
be served the same meals as other children participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program.
Some children may have special dietary needs and the CACFP Sponsor must make every
reasonable effort to accommodate those with special dietary needs.

To provide special meals at the child care facility, the sponsor would need advance notice from the
parent, the Diet Prescription for Meals at Child Care form, which would contain a written diet
instruction that has the following information: a) the child’s disability or chronic medical condition and
why it restricts his/her diet; b) the major life activity affected by the child’s disability; and, c) the food
or foods to be omitted, appropriate food substitutions, and any required changes in the texture of
foods. The diet instruction must be written and signed by a physician or recognized medical
authority. Sponsors who need to make reasonable accommodations for children who require special
meals may call the Bureau Nutritionists at 1-800-328-2665 for technical assistance and guidance in
this area.

Some of the most common special diet orders for children are food allergies, food intolerance and
diabetes.

FOOD ALLERGY is an abnormal response of the body’s immune system to an otherwise harmless
food. Usually, the response is to a protein in the food. Although any food may cause an allergic
reaction, six foods are responsible for most of these reactions in children. These foods are peanuts,
eggs, milk, tree nuts, soy and wheat. Many of the true food allergy symptoms often resemble
reactions to other substances such as penicillin or bee stings. Symptoms might include respiratory or
gastrointestinal problems, asthma, hives, eczema or difficulty breathing.

FOOD INTOLERANCE is an adverse food-induced reaction that does not involve the body’s immune
system. Lactose intolerance is one example of a food intolerance. A person with lactose intolerance
lacks an enzyme that is needed to digest milk sugar. When the person eats milk products, gas,
bloating, and abdominal pain may occur.

DIABETES is a metabolic disorder in which the body is unable to use effectively the carbohydrate in
the diet because the person does not produce enough insulin. Insulin is secreted by the pancreas
and acts like a key to the body’s cells so they can use carbohydrate which has been broken down to
the simplest sugar, glucose. When insulin is not present, glucose stays in the blood because it
cannot get to the cells to be used for energy. Children who are diabetic often must control the
amount and kinds of carbohydrate foods they eat to control their blood sugar.

For more information about feeding children with special dietary needs, for referral assistance, or for
assistance to obtain the required written documentation, please contact: New Mexico Department of
Health, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Children’s Medical Services District Nutritionist: District 1
(Albuquerque), 897-5700 ext. 28; District 2 (Santa Fe), 827-3566 ext. 547; District 3 (Las Cruces)
528-5119, or District 4 (Tucumcari) 461-2656.




   Page 28 of 69            New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
               Diet Prescription For Meals at Child Care
Name of Center/Home Provider:
Name of Child for whom special meals are requested:
Age:              Grade Level:            Classroom:

- Does the child have a disability?
          “No
          “Yes – If yes, describe the major life activities affected by the disability:


          -and- Please complete Part B and have it signed by a certified medical authority.

- If the child is not disabled, does the child have special nutritional or
feeding needs?
      “No
      “Yes – If yes, please complete Part B and have it signed by a certified medical authority.
Part B:

 Diet Prescription (Check all that apply.)

              Diabetic                                              Reduced Calorie                          Food Allergy
              Increased Calorie                                     Modified Texture                         Food Intolerance
              Other (Describe)

 Foods Omitted:                                                 and Substitutions:




 Textures Allowed (Check the allowed texture.)
             Regular          Chopped                                     Ground                Pureed

 Other Information Regarding Diet or Feeding:

                                                                                                       Use the back if necess ary .


 I certify that the above named child needs special day care meals prepared as described
 above because of the child's disability or special needs.

 Physician or Medical Authority’s Signature and Date                    Parent/Guardian Signature and Date



   Page 29 of 69                  New Mex ico CACFP    – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers                  Revised April 2004
                             GUIDELINES FOR MENU PLANNING

 I. Planning Considerations Relating to the Child and Adult Care
    Food Program and the Summer Food Service Program

    Ages

    Nutritional n eeds, inc luding sp ecial diets

    Food preferences

    Religious beliefs

    Socioeconomic situation

    Arrival and departure schedules




II. Planning Considerations Relating to the Food Service Operation

    Preparation systems (conventional vs. convenience)

    Number of children to be served

    Equ ipme nt av ailable

    Em ploy ee sk ills

    Budget

    Availability of foods

    Recipes

    Hours of operation

    The location of the kitchen




III. Other Considerations

    Aesthetic qualities and contrasts (color, texture, flavor, consistency and temperature)

    Delivery system (including temperature maintenance of foods)

    Physical needs of the children



                                                                                 Adapted from: Missouri Department of Health




  Page 30 of 69               New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers              Revised April 2004
The Most Common Errors in Meal Planning
KAll bland or strong flavors

KSame flavors

KSame color

KIncomplete menu record book

KUnattractive color combinations

KToo many mixtures

KSame texture, shape or size

KLack of variety in preparation (all fried foods, creamed foods, or food sauces over
  food)


KToo many high protein or starchy foods (Peas, macaroni and cheese and bread)

KToo many of the same type foods

KUnidentifiable foods

KFoods tak e too long to prep are

KSame temperature foods

KSame pieces of equipment needed

KNot ordering, preparing, or serving required amounts of food.




  Page 31 of 69         New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
HOT DOGS - WHY NOT ?
Policy 92-1:          Hot dogs, processed luncheon meats and doughnuts are
                      not creditable in the Child and Adult Care Food Program
                      and the Summer Food Service Program in New Mexico
                      and will not be reimbursed.


For health reasons. . .

Hot dogs, processed luncheon meats and doughnuts are not creditable because of
their high fat, sugar and additive contents relative to their other nutrients.

The Family Nutrition Bureau’s philosophy is to improve our children’s health through
nutritious foods. Some of these foods have up to 80% of their calories from fat.
They are also high in sodium and nitrates (hot dogs) and sugar (doughnuts).

These low nutrient foods displace high quality foods from the diet.


For safety reasons. . .

Young children have choked on hot dogs. Hot dogs are one of the leading causes
of choking in children.


For child development reasons. . .

The Family Nutrition Bureau programs, promote healthy food choices. The more
“advertising” we do for healthy foods, the more children will become aware of and
enjoy healthy foods.


For economic reasons. . .

The Family Nutrition Bureau wants programs to get the best value for the
reimbursement money they receive. Sponsors should buy the highest quality foods
available for their children, so children get the most nutrients from the meals they eat
at their center or program.

Our programs serve at most 2 meals a day, which is only a part of a child’s daily
nutrition needs. We want families to know their children are receiving the most
nutritious meals through our federally-funded program.




  Page 32 of 69           New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
                                              NUTRIENT DENSITY
Part of the sec ret of e ating well without overeating is choosing foods that are nutrient dense. These are foods
that have lots of nutrients for the number of calories per serving. Here are two examples:

 1.     A bo wl of w aterm elon a nd a 1 2 oun ce s oda pop b oth p rovid e 150 calor ies, b ut the wate rme lon ha s Vita min
        C, Fiber, and other vitamins and minerals, as well as natural sugars. The soda has only simple sugars, or
        "empty" calories. The watermelon is more nutrient dense than the soda pop.

 2.     An 8 ounce glass of skim milk and 1 and 1/2 ounces of cheddar cheese both supply about 300 mg.
        calcium. However, the skim milk contains 85 calories and the cheddar cheese contains 170 calories. The
        skim milk is mor e nut rient d ens e tha n the ched dar c hee se, a nd m ay be a bet ter ch oice for so meo ne w ho is
        watching their calorie and fat intake.


        Choose the food which is more nutrient dense:

                 Fruit roll ups or Fruit Salad                                   Sausage or Pork Chop
                 Skim Milk or Ice Cream                                          Onion Rings or Apple Wedges
                 Creamed Corn or Corn on the Cob                                 Baked Potato or Potato Chips
                 Bag el or S wee t Roll                                          Ground Round or regular Ground Beef
                                              (Answers at the end of this section)




NUTRIENT DENSITY AND CHILDREN

 When feeding children, it is important to serve nutrient dense foods for many reasons:


 *      Children have s mall stom achs, a nd can easily fill up on h igh calorie, low nutrient-de nse foo ds.


  *     Children are growing everyday and need a steady supply of nutritious foods for optimal brain, organ,
        musc le and sk eletal deve lopmen t.


  *     Children need energy from nutritious foods to think, to play and to process the information they are
        receiving about the world aro und them .


  *     The food choic es y ou m ake for ch ildren will lay the fo und ation for ea ting p atter ns th ey w ill prob ably
        have fo r the rest o f their lives.

  Sou nds over whe lming whe n it is pu t that w ay, d oes n't it? Y es, fe eding childr en is a big re spo nsib ility, bu t it is
  also very rewarding. There are no "good" foods or "bad" foods. All foods can be enjoyed, as we remember
  two key points: m oderation and va riety. The fo llowing ch arts are m eant to as sist you p lan your m eals with
  "nutrient density" in mind. Foods are categorized as high - good -or lower nutrient density. When serving
  foods, choose more often from the high nutrient dense foods, and less often from the lower nutrient dense
  foods. O n each page the re is a key telling you w hich nutrie nts are fou nd in eac h com ponen t.




      Page 33 of 69                New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers            Revised April 2004
                 Nutrient Density of Fruits & Vegetables
High Nutrient D ensity                         Good N utrient Density                   Lower N utrient Density

All fresh fruits and vegetables                                                         French fries
Fruits canned in juice                         Fruits canned in light syrup             Fruits canned in heavy syrup
Frozen fruit/juice bars                                                                 Olives
100% fruit juices                                                                       Onion Rings
Vegetable juices, fresh                        Vegetable juices, canned                 Hash Browns
Vegetables, canned (low-sodium)                Vegetables, canned                       Vegetables frozen with butter,
Plain frozen vegetables                                                                 cheese or other
Soups, homemade                                Soups, canned
       Key Nutrients: Vitamin A (beta carotene), Vitamin C, Fiber




             Nutrient Density of Meat & Meat Alternates
        High Nutrient D ensity                       Good N utrient Density                  Lower N utrient Density

Almonds, beechnuts, Brazil nuts,               Peanuts, pistachios, cashews,
filberts, peca ns wa lnuts                     maca damia n uts
Beans, dried, cooked                           Beans, canned
Well-trimmed, lean cuts of beef, pork,         Eggs
veal, and lamb                                 Peanut butter
Chicken and Turkey without skin,
including ground turkey
Fish and Shellfish (other than fried)
Hamburger (made from lean cuts such                                                     Hamburger or regular ground beef
as beef round)
Peas (split, chick, black-eyed)
Pumpkin and sunflower seeds                                                             Refried beans mad e with lard
Refried beans mad e without lard
Tuna packed in water                           Tun a pac ked in oil
       Key Nutrients: Iron, Zinc, Protein



             Nutrient Density of Milk and Milk Products
          High Nutrient Density                       Good Nutrient Density             Lower Nutrient Density
   Buttermilk made from skim or low-fat             Wh ole m ilk                        Che ese mad e with who le
   milk                                                                                 milk
   Low-fat cheeses such as ricotta and
   moz zare lla
   Low-fat cottage cheese
   Non fat m ilk
          Key Nutrients: Calcium, Protein, Vitamin D




 Page 34 of 69             New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers            Revised April 2004
Nutrient Dens ity of Breads, Cereals, & O ther Grain Prod ucts


         High Nutrient Density                  Good Nutrient Density                      Lower Nutrient Density
   Bagels                               Biscuits                                         Ready-to-eat sugared cereals
   Bread sticks                         Quick breads                                     Coffee Cake
   Whole grain or enriched breads       Graham crackers                                  Cookies
   Cooked cereals                       Oyster crackers                                  Cheese crackers
   Ready-to-eat unsugared cereals       Granola                                          Snack crackers
   English muffins                      Pancakes                                         Croissants
   Grits, boiled                        Soft Pretzels                                    Granola bars
   Macaroni                             Saltines                                         Fried grits
   Noodles                              Waffles                                          Meat pie crust
   Pita Bread                                                                            Pop tarts
   Rice (white and brown)                                                                Popovers
   Spaghetti                                                                             Sweet rolls
   Tortillas (flour or corn)
            Key Nutrients: B Vitamins, Fiber, Iron

                            Nutrient Density of Sweets, Fats and Other Foods
                                      (Not Creditable in CACFP/SFSP)

                   Low Nutrient Density                                             Low Nutrient Density
    Cream cheese                                                   Bacon
    Diet margarine                                                 Bologna
    Doughnuts                                                      Butter
    Ice Cream                                                      Candy
    Margarine                                                      Chocolate
    Mayonnaise                                                     Corn chips
    Oil                                                            Deep fried foods
    Pickles                                                        Frankfurters
    Salad dressings made with oil                                  Fruit-flavored drinks
    Sour Cream                                                     Ham hocks
    Vegetable oils                                                 Honey
                                                                   Jelly, jam, marmalade
                                                                   Lard
                                                                   Potato chips
                                                                   Rich sauces
                                                                   Salad dressing made with sour cream or
                                                                   cheese
                                                                   Salami
                                                                   Salt pork
    Soft drinks - Diet                                             Sausage
                                                                   Soft drinks
                                                                   Sugar
            Nutrients: Fat, Salt, Sugar

Correct answers from the quiz:

                                      Fruit salad, skim milk, corn on the cob, bagel, pork chop, apple
                                      wedges, baked potato and ground round.




   Page 35 of 69            New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers               Revised April 2004
Tips on Introducing New Foods To Children
   Try only one new food at time.

   Serve a food children will eat along with the new food.

   Try to serve new food s when children are happy and peaceful. If they are cranky or not feeling well they are
   more likely to refuse the food.

   Keep trying. It may take 10 introductions before some children will accept a new food so don’t become
   discouraged if they won’t try it right away.

   Get the children involved in the planning and preparing of different foods. They are more likely to accept a new
   food if they h ave he lped prep are it.

   Lead b y exam ple. If the prov iders are excited a bout trying a new fo od, the ch ildren are m ore likely to a ccept it.

   Introduce new foods on a regular basis; try having a weekly/biweekly “New Food Day”.

   Encourage the children to help prepare food. They are more likely to try new foods they helped to prepare.

   Introduce new foods as part of a game (i.e., a counting game).

   Have families co ntribute the ir favorite rec ipes. This is great w ay to introd uce eth nic foods , too. The p arents
   may even get inv olve d in the prep aratio n of th e foo ds an d exp lain th e hist ory o f the fo od, w hen it is cus tom arily
   used, etc.

   Have a “theme day” when all activities are related to a theme and introduce new foods related to that theme.

   Rotate m eal serv ice: try self-s erve, ba g lunch, fa mily style a nd buffet.




                                                                                       Adapted from: Missouri Department of Health




 Page 36 of 69                New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers                Revised April 2004
Page 37 of 69   New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
                                        Appendix B


B. Sample Menus:

    Sample Snack Menu

    Select-A-Snack Menu

    Vegetarian Snack Ideas




  Page 38 of 69   New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
Page 39 of 69   New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
                 SAMPLE SNACK MENU

MONDAY          milk                                   apple juice              milk*
                blueberry muffin                       raisin bread             french toast
                                                       w/peanut butter*         warm maple applesauce
                                                       cantaloupe*                 (for dipping – mix 1
                                                                                   tbsp maple syrup into 1
                                                                                  svg applesauce and
                                                                                  heat to just w arm.)

TUESDAY         flour tortilla with                    milk                     rice pudding (only the
                cheese*                                cold cereal              rice is creditable)
                mixed fruit                            banana*                  pineapple/orange juice




WEDNESDAY       milk*                                  snacktime pizza:         milk
                whole wheat bread with                 English muffin, with 1   pumpkin bread
                peanut butter*                         Tbsp tomato sauce*
                melon chunks                           and grated cheese*)
                                                       100% tangerine juice


THURSDAY        milk*                                  cinnamon-oatmeal         strawberry yogurt
                pancake                                granola bar              peaches*
                strawberries                           apple juice              toasted croissant




FRIDAY          milk                                   biscuit                  flour tortilla w/
                chocolate chip bagel ½                 Scrambled egg            refried beans
                with peanut butter*                    blueberries*             and cheese*




* Extra or optional component in this snack.




Page 40 of 69     New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers        Revised April 2004
                                   SNACK                            M E N U



                  Select-A-Snack Ideas
Meat & Meat Alternates              Fruits& Vegetables,                     continued   Grains & Bread, continued
Cheese such as American,            Carrot Raisin Salad                                 Animal Crackers
Cheddar, Co-Jack, Colby,            Cole Slaw                                           Graham Crackers
Monterey Jack, Muenster,            Bell Pepper Avocado                                 Grain Fruit Bars
Mozzarella, Provolone,              Carrot Curls                                        Pasta
and Swiss                           Celery Sticks                                       Pretzels
Chicken Salad                       Lettuce Green Chile                                 Whole Grain Crackers
Cottage Cheese                      Green Bean Salad
Deli Meat such as Turkey,           Garden Salad
Roast Beef, and Ham                 Potato Salad
                                                                                        Combination Items
                                                                                        (These items meet more than one
Deviled Eggs                        Spinach Salad                                       component.)
Egg Salad                                                                               Cheese Pizza
Hard Boiled Egg                     Milk                                                Meat Sandwich
Peanut Butter                       2% Milk                                             Cheese Sandwich
Seeds and Nuts                      Chocolate Milk                                      Peanut Butter Sandwich
Tuna Salad                          Whole Milk                                          Quesidilla
Yogurt                                                                                  Vegetable Soup (homemade)
                                    Water (always an “extra”, never                     with cheese
                                     fulfills a the requirements to                     Hamburger
Fruits & Vegetables                 be considered a component)                          Crackers and Cheese
Apples                                                                                  Apples and Peanut Butter “Dip”
Applesauce                          Grains & Breads                                     Rice Cake and Peanut Butter
Banana                              Bagel                                               “Sandwich”
Cherries                            Corn Bread                                          Carrot Raisin Salad with
Grapes                              Crackers                                            Crackers
Kiwi Fruit                          Croissant                                           Trail Mix (homemade
Mandarin Oranges                    Dinner Roll
Melons (Cantaloupe, Honey-          Fry Bread
dew, Musk Melon, etc.)              Garlic Bread
Nectarines                          Hamburger Bun
Orange                              Hoagie
Peaches                             Pita Pockets
Pears                               Rice Cakes
Plums                               Rye Bread
Strawberries                        Tortilla
Tomatoes                            Whole Grain Bread
Watermelon


   Please select two different components to serve a complete snack. Remember
                     that an “all fluid” snack is n ot creditable !

          URefer to the meal pattern requirements for minimum serving sizes.

  Page 41 of 69         New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers             Revised April 2004
                 VEGETARIAN                                  SNACK IDEAS
 MONDAY               Peanut Butter & Banana Sandwich:                           split pea soup*
                         peanut butter*                                          plums
                         banana*                                                 corn bread
                         whole wheat bun
                         lightlysprinkle w/cinnamon sugar*
                      milk


 TUESDAY              Garden Lentil Toss:                                        Bagel Pizza:
                         lentils                                                   bagel half, toasted
                         mix w/ 1 svg. diced fresh veggies                         tomato pizza sauce*
                         such as: cauliflower, broccoli,                           mozzarella cheese
                         cucumber & carrots                                        green pepper rings*
                         rice*                                                   peaches*
                      Toss all together with 1 tbsp. Italian-
                      type dressing


 WEDNESDAY            ATS Sandwich:                                              Breakfast for Snack:
                        cottage cheese*                                            scrambled egg
                        avocado*, tomato* and shredded                             cantaloupe cubes
                        cabbage*                                                   oven-baked potato*
                         whole wheat bread                                         whole wheat toast*
                      1 oz. pkg. sunflower seeds                                   milk*
                      cranberry juice (100%)*


 THURSDAY             Guacamole Tostada:                                         Pasta Salad:
                      cheddar cheese, shredded                                   cheddar cheese*
                      avocado (mashed into guacamole)*                           celery, green peppers and carrots
                      lettuce & tomato*                                            (combined total should be 1
                      corn tortilla                                              serving)
                      milk*                                                      pasta

                                                                                 Toss all together with 1 tbsp.
                                                                                 Italian-type dressing
 FRIDAY                Mini Chef’s Salad:                                        Toasted Cheese Strips:
                       hard boiled egg, sliced                                   swiss cheese
                       1 serving mixed dark greens with                          rye bread
                       carrots*, green peas* and tomatoes*                       whole wheat bread*
                       cheddar cheese sticks*                                         Make a grilled cheese sandwich
                                                                                      with rye on one side and whole
                       Serve with 1 tbsp. salad dressing of                           wheat on the other. T o serve , cut
                                                                                     into 1-inch strips
                       choice
                                                                                 sliced tomatoes*
                                                                                 chocolate milk*

* Extra or optional component in this snack.

 Page 42 of 69      New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers                  Revised April 2004
Page 43 of 69   New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
                                          Appendix C


C. Handouts:

   Breakfast Cereals

   Cheese for Every Taste

   Crackers Anyone?

   Fabulous Fiber

   Granola, Cereal Bars & Grain/Fruit Bars

   Iron

   Juices

   Vitamin A

   Vitamin C




 Page 44 of 69      New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
Page 45 of 69   New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
  Breakfast Cereals
                                                                     ˜˜˜
Above 35% sugar is not recommended!

To figure the percent sugar:
                                                                                                                 Exa mp le:
1. Locate the Nutrition Facts Label on the
 package. Find th e “Total Carbo hydra te”                                                                 This product contains
 section and note the number of grams                                                                            3 grams of sugar.
 listed for Total Carbohydrate. Look for
 “Sugars” and note the number of grams
 liste d o n th e la bel.                                                                              The Total Carbohydrate is
                                                                                                                        13grams.
2. Divide the num ber of grams o f Sugar by
   the total number of grams of
   Car boh yd rat e.
                                                                                                        Divide 3 by 13 to equal 0.23
3. Multiply the result by 100 to get the
   percentage.                                                                                      Multiply 0.23 by 100 to get 23%.


                                                                              U This product is 23% sugar!

 Page 46 of 69   New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers    Revised April 2004
            A Partial listing of “Best Bets” for Breakfast . . .
üüüBest Choices:                                     üüGood Choices:                                         üOccasional Choices:
General Mills                                        General Mills                                              General Mills
       Cheerios(original)*+                                     Berry Berry Kix*                                    Cinnamon Toast Crunch*
       Multigrain Cheerios*                                     Multi Bran Chex                                     Team Cheerios
       Corn Chex                                                Total Raisin Bran*+                                 Frosted Wheaties
       Country Corn Flakes                                      Wheaties, Raisin Bran*+                             Golden Grahams
       Kix                                                      Nature Valley 100% Natural                          Honey Nut Cheerios
       Whole Grain Total*+                                                         Granola+                         Total Raisin Bran+
       Wheat Chex+                                              Oatmeal Crisp                                Kellogg’s
       Wheaties*+                                    Kellogg’s                                                      Coco Pops*
       Chex, Multi-Bran+                                        Mini Wheats, Raisin Square                          Corn Pops*
       Total*+                                                  Frosted, Bite-Size+                                 Crunchy Nut Corn Flakes
Kelllogg’s                                                      Corn Flakes*                                        Raisin Bran*+
       Puffed Wheat                                             Crispix                                      Quaker
       Bran Flakes*+                                            Rice Krispies Treats                                Frosted Oats
       M ini Wheats*                                            Frosted Flakes*                              Post
       Just Right W/Fruit & Nuts+                               Total Corn Flakes                                   Waffle Crisp
       Nutri-Grain, Golden Wheat                                Nutri-Grain                                         Alpha-Bits
       Frosted Mini Wheats+                                     Complete+
Quaker                                               Quaker
       Shredded Wheat                                           Toasted Oatmeal Squares+
       Oatmeal Squares                                          Sun Country Granola+
       Puffed Wheat                                             Life*                                               OREMEMBER!
       Crunchy Corn                                  Post
       Toasted Oatmeal Squares                                  Honey Nut Shredded Wheat+                           Above 50% sugar
Post                                                            Fruit & Fibre+                                      is NOT creditable!
       Raisin Bran, Whole Grain                                 Grape Nut Flakes
       Wheat+                                                   Honey Bunches of Oats
       100% Bran+                                               Toasties
       Bran Flakes+


                                     * = Available in Bowlpacks                      + = Good Source of Fiber


   Page 47 of 69        New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers      Revised April 2004
Cheese For Every Taste

A Guide to Creditable/Not Creditable Cheeses in SFSP

Cheese definitions:

Natural cheese - a concentrated dairy product produced directly from milk. There are
over 2,000 natural cheeses. One way to classify them is by their moisture content: hard
grating, hard, semisoft and soft.

       Hard grating cheeses: Romano and Parmesan

       Hard: cheddar, Edam, Gouda, Swiss

       Semisoft: blue, brick, Monterey, Muenster, mozzarella

       Soft: Brie, Camembert, cottage,* cream,** feta, Neuchâtel,**

Pasteurized process cheese - a blend of several natural cheeses pasteurized to prevent
further curing. May contain up to 43% water.

Pasteurized process cheese food - pasteurized process cheese to which dried or fluid
whey, cream or milk may be added. You need to use twice as much cheese food per
serving in the CACFP/SFSP to meet the requirement for a meat/meat alternate. (Kraft
American Singles)

Pasteurized process cheese spread - Cheese food to which gums or sweeteners are
added. Not creditable in the CACFP/SFSP. (Cheese Whiz, Velveeta)

Pasteurized process cheese product - Contains pasteurized process cheese food and up
to 57.5% water. Not creditable in the CACFP/SFSP. (Borden’s Lite Line)

Canned cheese sauce - a commercial product made with a blend of cheese and cheese
products, as well as other ingredients. No standard of identity has been established for
it. Not creditable in the CACFP/SFSP.

Homemade cheese sauce - This sauce may be used to meet all or part of the meat/meat
alternate requirement for CACFP/SFSP, if the cheese used to prepare the product is a
creditable natural cheese, pasteurized process cheese or pasteurized process cheese
food.

Powdered Cheese Food - this product is reconstituted with water and/or milk to make
cheese sauce. Not creditable in the CACFP/SFSP.

*twice as much needed                **not creditable in CACFP/SFSP


Cheese can be a good source of protein and calcium, but also high in fat.
   Page 48 of 69        New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
This table lists many cheeses you may know and a few you might want to try.


        Name of Cheese       Creditable     Serving       Calories        Fat       % Calories   Protein   Calcium     Sodium
                                             Size                      (grams)       from Fat    (grams)


 Blue                        yes                 1 oz          100           8.2          74%        6.1    150 mg    396 mg

 Brick                       yes                 1 oz          105           8.4          72%        6.6    191 mg    159 mg

 Brie                        yes                 1 oz            95          7.9          75%        5.9     52 mg    178 mg

 Cheddar                     yes                 1 oz          114           9.4          74%        7.1    204 mg    176 mg

 Colby                       yes                 1 oz          112           9.1          73%        6.7    194 mg    171 mg

 Cottage Cheese,             yes*                2 oz            59          2.6          40%        7.1     34 mg    229 mg
 creamed

 Cream Cheese                no                  1 oz            99          9.9          90%        2.1     23 mg      84 mg

 Edam                        yes                 1 oz          101           7.9          70%        7.1    207 mg    274 mg

 Feta                        yes                 1 oz            75          6.0          72%        4.0    140 mg    316 mg

 Fontina                     yes                 1 oz          110           7.3          60%        8.8    156 mg             not
                                                                                                                            avail.

 Gjetost                     yes                 1 oz          132           8.4          57%        2.7    113 mg    170 mg

 Gouda                       yes                 1 oz          101           7.8          70%        7.1    198 mg    232 mg

 Monterey                    yes                 1 oz          106           8.6          73%        6.9    212 mg    152 mg

 Moz zarella, w hole m ilk   yes                 1 oz            80          6.1          69%        5.5    147 mg    106 mg

 Moz zarella, p art skim     yes                 1 oz            72          4.5          52%        6.9    183 mg    132 mg

 Muenster                    yes                 1 oz          104           8.5          74%        6.6    203 mg    178 mg

 Neuchâtel                   no                  1 oz            74          6.6          80%        2.8     21 mg    113 mg

 Parme san, hard             yes                 1 oz          111           7.3          59%       10.1    336 mg    454 mg

 Provolone                   yes                 1 oz          100           7.6          76%        7.3    214 mg    248 mg

 Ricott a, part sk im        yes*                2 oz            86          4.9          51%        7.1    337 mg    155 mg

 Romano                      yes                 1 oz          110           7.6          62%        9.0    302 mg    340 mg

 Swiss                       yes                 1 oz          107           7.8          70%        8.1    272 mg      74 mg

 Processed American          yes                 1 oz          106           8.9          76%        6.3    174 mg    406 mg
 Cheese

 American Cheese             yes*                1 oz            93          7.0          68%        5.6    163 mg 337 mg
 Food

 American Cheese             no                  1 oz            82          6.0          66%        4.7    159 mg      381mg
 Spread


* Twice as much needed per serving




   Page 49 of 69             New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers                Revised April 2004
CRACKERS, ANYONE?
Crackers are an acceptable bread alternate in the Summer Food Service Program. The
serving size for crackers is 20 grams or .7 ounces for 6-12 year old children. Crackers
are usually high in fat, salt or sugar and should only be served occasionally. A variety
of breads and bread alternates are recommended to give children the opportunity to try
new foods and experience different textures and tastes. When serving crackers, make
sure that you read the Nutrition Facts label. Most labels list the serving size as one
ounce, which is more than the minimum required for 6-12 year old children. You can
use the serving size listed on the box so that you meet or exceed the serving size for
the children in your care, or follow the serving sizes listed below. These are the
minimum number of crackers you must provide the children to meet the USDA/SFSP
requirement. To be creditable, crackers must use whole grain or enriched flour as the
first ingredient. Here is a partial listing of crackers that are creditable in the New
Mexico Summer Food Service Program. Notice that some crackers are lower in fat,
sodium or sugar, or higher in fiber. Read labels to get the best in value and variety!




                                                 CREDITABLE
                                        Serving Size                           %
 Brand Name                          ( equals about 20                      Calories          Comments
                                          grams)                            from Fat
 Cheese Tid-Bits                    22 each                                     54%
 Cheese Nips - original             20 each                                     40%
 Cheese Nips-reduced fat            20 each                                     27%
 Chicken in a Biskit                10 each                                     50%    2 g sugar/14 crackers
 Club crackers - original           6 each                                      36%
 Club crackers-reduced              6 each                                      36%
 sodium
 Club crackers-reduced fat          6 each                                      29%    2 g sugar/4 crackers
 Harvest Crisps - Five Grain        8 each                                      23%    no sugar
 Harvest Crisps - Garden            10 each                                     23%    4g sugar, 1g fiber/13
 Vegetable                                                                             crackers
 Nabisco Cheese Nips Air            21 each                                     23%    <1 g sugar/32 crackers
 Crisps
 Pepperidge Farm Goldfish-          36 each                                     43%
 original
 Pepperidge Farm Goldfish-          36 each                                     36%
 cheddar

   Page 50 of 69       New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers           Revised April 2004
                                                   CREDITABLE
                                          Serving Size                           %
Brand Name                             ( equals about 20                      Calories            Comments
                                            grams)                            from Fat
Ritz                                  6 each                                     44%       1 g sugar/5 crackers
Ry-Krisp                              3 each                                          0%   contains only whole
                                                                                           grain flour
Saltine crackers                      8 each                                  19- 25%      no fiber, 0 - 2 g sugar/5
                                                                                           crackers
SnackWells Classic Golden             9 each                                      17%      2 g sugar/6 crackers
Crackers
SnackWells Wheat Crackers 6 each                                                      0    2 g sugar, 1 g fiber/5
                                                                                           crackers
Townhouse                             6 each                                      50%
Triscuits - original                  5 each                                      32%      4 g fiber/7 crackers
Triscuits- reduced fat                5 each                                      19%      4 g fiber/7 crackers
Twigs                                 10 each                                     40%      1 gm sugar <1g.
                                                                                           fiber/15 crackers
Vegetable Thins                       9 each                                      50%      2 g sugar, 1 g fiber/14
                                                                                           crackers
Waverly                               6 each                                      43%
Wheat Thins - original                11 each                                     36%      2 g fiber/16 crackers
Wheat Thins - Air Crisps              16 each                                     31%      3 g sugar/24 crackers
Wheatables - Garden                   16 each                                     43%      2 g sugar/26 crackers
Vegetable
Wheatsworth                           6 each                                      38%      1 g fiber/5 crackers
Zesta Soup Crackers                   60 each                                     36%      No sugar




  Page 51 of 69          New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers             Revised April 2004
                            FABULOUS FIBER
                                                  What is it?
Fiber is found in plant foods -- whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and legumes. Fiber is the part
   of the plant that cannot be digested by the body. We often hear about two types of fiber:
                                     insoluble and soluble.
   Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water. Sometimes referred to as “roughage”, it aids in
digestion by binding with water in the intestines to help prevent constipation. Insoluble fiber is
                                found in bran and whole grains.
  Soluble fiber, on the other hand, dissolves in water. Instead of giving a coarse and hearty
texture to food, it dissolves to become gummy or viscous. In the body, it helps to regulate the
 use of sugars and binds with fatty substances so that they will be discarded. Soluble fiber is
            found in oat bran, fruits, vegetables, and legumes, such as pinto beans.
From childhood on, following an eating pattern that is low in fat and high in fiber helps reduce
the risk of some types of cancer, heart disease, and some chronic diseases. As children grow
                        and develop, they need more fiber in their diet.




                                     How Much is Enough?
                                For Kids over 1 year: Just Add Five!!
                        Child’s Age + 5 = # of grams of fiber required daily

                                   For Adults: 25-35 grams daily


                                       Fiber Boosting Tips
  1. Pack high fiber snacks such as fresh or dried fruit, raw vegetables, and nuts.
  2. Enjoy oatmeal or a fiber packed breakfast cereal with fresh or dried fruit.
  3. Choose breads, cereals, and pastas that are whole grains. Remember that brown bread
      is not necessarily whole grain – check the label for the words “whole grain”!
  4. Got 5-A-Day? Eat at least five servings of fruits and veggies daily. Remember, raw
      veggies and fruit have more fiber than cooked.
  5. Choose whole fruits over juices. Juicing removes the skin and pulp, where most of the
      fiber is found.
  6. Kids should eat at least 6 servings of grains, cereals, pasta, and rice daily. Remember to
      choose whole grains whenever possible.


  Page 52 of 69           New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
                                                     Fiber Content of Foods
                                                   Food                                    Amount*                      Grams of Fiber
                               Grains
                               Mini-Wheats Cereal                                              1 cup                                  6
                               Oatmeal                                                         1 cup                                  4
                               Barley, cooked                                                1/2 cup                                  3
                               Bran Muffin                                                   1 small                                  2
                               Whole Wheat Bread                                              1 slice                                 2


                               Vegetables
                               Green Peas, cooked                                             1/2cup                                  4
                               Sweet Potato                                                   1/2cup                                  3
                               Broccoli                                                       1/2cup                                  2
                               Carrots                                                        1/2cup                                  2


                               Fruits
                               Strawberries                                                  1 cup                                    4
                               Apple, unpeeled                                            1 medium                                    3
                               Orange                                                       1 small                                   2
                               Asian Pear                                                1/2 medium                                   2
                               Blueberries                                                  1/2 cup                                   2


                               Legumes
                               Pinto Beans                                                   1/2 cup                                  7
                               Baked Beans                                                   1/2 cup                                  6
                               Garbanzo Beans                                                1/2 cup                                  5
                               Lentils                                                       1/2 cup                                  4


                               Nuts and Seeds
                               Peanuts                                                          1 oz                                  3
                               Sunflower Seeds                                                  1 oz                                  3
*The amount listed may or may not be the correct serving size to meet CACFP?SFSP meal pattern requirements . . . please refer to meal pattern requirements for actual serving sizes!




      Page 53 of 69                               New Mex ico CACFP        – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers                                      Revised April 2004
                Granola, Cereal Bars and Grain/Fruit Bars

New products, especially snack foods, are coming out on the market constantly.
Recently, USDA changed their regulations to allow more flexibility in crediting granola
and grain/fruit bars.

È       Granola and grain/fruit bars are generally not recommended and only creditable
        at snack. They cannot be served as a bread alternate at breakfast or lunch.

È       Granola bars should not be served more than twice a week because they are
        generally high in sugar and fat.

È       The granola bar or the grain/fruit bar must have 14.75 grams of enriched or
        whole grain flour in a full serving. It is no longer required for the product to have
        whole grain or enriched flour as the first ingredient by weight. However, the
        serving sizes are much larger than some of the other bread alternates.

È       Providers are responsible for providing at least the minimum serving size for the
        age group they are serving.

È       Some grain/fruit and granola bars, especially the low fat kind, are not creditable
        because they contain 50% or more sugar.

È       Granola and grain/fruit bars are generally expensive and may cost even more
        per serving than the reimbursement offered by USDA.




How to determine if a grain fruit bar qualifies for reimbursement:

Ø       Read the Nutrition Facts label.

Ù       Locate the number of grams of sugar per serving on the label listed under “Total
        Carbohydrates” as “Sugars”.

Ú    Divide the number of grams of sugar by the total number of grams of
 carbohydrate.

Û       Multiply the result by 100 to get the percentage.

Ü       If the bar is less than 50% sugar, it is creditable.




    Page 54 of 69         New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
Some Creditable/Not Creditable products are:
Creditable - Group D Plain Grain Bars                                          Creditable - Group E Grain/Fruit Bars
(1.8 oz/50 gm. = 1 svg. ; 0.9 oz/25 gm. = ½                                    (2.2 oz/63 gm. = 1 svg. ; 1.1 oz/31 gm. = ½
svg.)                                                                          svg.)

        Type of Granola Bar              Serving           6-12 yr                    Type of Grain/Fruit Bar           Serving      6-12 yr
                                       Size for 3-5          olds                                                     Size for 3-     olds
                                         yr. olds                                                                      5 yr. olds

 General Mills Nature Valley                                                     Quaker O ats
 2 bars = 47 grams                                                               1 bar = 28 grams

 Oats & honey, Cinnamon,                 1¼ bar            2 bars                Raspberry, Blueberry-apple,            1¼ bar       2¼ bar
 Peanu t butter                                                                  choco late chip, straw berry

 Qua ker Oa ts Che wy G ranola                                                   Kellog ’s
 Bar                                                                             1 bar = 37 grams
 1 bar = 28 grams                                                                Blueberry, Mixed berry,                  1 bar      1¾ bar
 Oatmeal Cookie                          1¼ bar            2 bars                Apple, Cherry & Peach

 Nabisco
 1 bar = 28 grams

 Nutte r butter , Oreo g ranola          1¼ bar            2 bars
 bars

 Sunb elt
 1 bar = 28 grams

 Golden Almond, Oats &                   1¼ bar            2 bars
 Honey

 Health Valley                            ¾ bar            1¼ bar
 1 bar = 42 grams




   NOT Creditable Bars:
       g   Betty Crocker Sweet Rewards - Cho colate C hip Sn ack B ar, Fruit V ariety, D ouble Fudg e Brow nie
       g   General Mills - Golden Graham Treats (Chocolate Chunk, Honey Graham)
       g   Health Valley - Breakfast bakes
       g   Carnation - Breakfas t bars
       g   Kellogg’s - Crunch Berries Ba rs
       g   Nabisco -        Chips Ahoy granola bars, Snackwells, Hearty Fruit N’ Grain Cereal Bars, Fudge Dipped
                             granola bars, Hearty Fruit N’ Grain Cereal Bars, Fat Free Cereal Bars (Blueberry,
                             Raspberry & Strawberry-banana)
       g   Sunbelt -        Oatmeal raisin, Fudge Dipped Chocolate Chip, Chocolate Chip, Fudge Dipped
                            Macaroon, Apple-Cinnamon, Fruit booster (Raspberry, Blueberry Strawberry)
 * The food items illustrated are u sed solely as exam ples and do n ot represent pr oduct endo rsements.

            Page 55 of 69             New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers                Revised April 2004
                                                           IRON
Children need good food sources of iron every day. Iron is a mineral that helps the body
to carry oxyg en from one p art of th e bod y to an other. It a lso help s the b ody to form b lood c ells. Iron is
found in many foods, but in small amounts. It may be hard for some children to get enough iron each
day from the foods they eat, if they do not eat iron rich foods. The iron in food is absorbed better by the
body when it is eaten with Vitamin C rich food. The iron rich foods that you serve will help prevent iron
deficiency anemia in the children that you are feeding.



Sources of Iron

                BEST SOURCES                        GOOD SOURCES                            FAIR SOURCES
            Apricots-dried                        Almonds                                  Asparagus
            Beans-dried                           Beet Greens                              Bread-enriched
            Beef                                  Chard                                    Brocc oli
            Cashews                               Eggs                                     Brusse l Sprouts
            Cereal-iron fortified                 Peanu ts                                 Collards
            Currants                              Peas -Split                              Dandelion Greens
            Kidney                                Peas-green                               Kale
            Lentils                               Pork                                     Mustard Greens
            Liver                                 Prunes                                   Sweet Potatoes
            Peaches-dried                         Raisins                                  Tomato Juice
            Spinach                               Tuna                                     Turnip Greens
            Turkey                                Walnu ts

Iron Tips

     C   Iron from animal sources is more easily absorbed than iron from plant sources.

     C   Serving a wide variety of foods each day, including meat and meat alternates, vegetables, and
         whole grains, helps assure adequate iron intake each day.

     C   Servin g a vitam in-C rich food w ith me als incre ases th e bod y’s abs orptio n of iron from th e mea l.

     C   Serving m eat, fish or po ultry at a m eal make s iron from other foo ds at the s ame m eal more
         available to the body.

     C   Coo king fo ods in cast iron cook ware a dds iro n to th e diet.




   Page 56 of 69              New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers               Revised April 2004
Page 57 of 69   New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
Nutrition Spotlight on: Juices

        Juice is a great source of fluid, especially during the hot summer
        months. It is much better than caffeine containing soft drinks, for
        example, which can actually contribute to dehydration, since caffeine is
        a diuretic. However, water should be the primary source of fluids for
        everyone. Encourage children and adults to drink plenty of water, and
        serve juice as one alternative to other fruits or vegetables. It helps to
        think of fruit juice as another form of a fruit. The Food Guide Pyramid
        suggests that we eat 2 - 4 servings of fruit and 3 - 5 servings of
        vegetables a day.

        Fruit juices are nutritious because they contain vitamins and minerals,
        like Vitamin C and potassium, as well as carbohydrates. Vitamin C keeps
        gums, skin, tissue and bones healthy. Potassium is a mineral important
        for maintaining normal bodily functions. The carbohydrates are mainly
        the simple sugars fructose and glucose. However, juices, unlike fruits
        and vegetables, are not a good source of fiber.

        Some juices are now being fortified with Vitamin C, Vitamin A, Vitamin E
        and/or calcium. Juices cannot be served in place of milk, even if they
        have been fortified with calcium.

        Serve juice in moderation. Too much, especially before mealtime, will fill
        your child up and they may not want to eat or drink their milk.

        When serving juice, it is best to choose juices which are naturally high in
        Vitamin C, like orange juice, or have been fortified with Vitamin C. The
        iron in foods is absorbed better when it is served with juice containing
        Vitamin C. Many juices contain 100% of the daily value for Vitamin C
        (60mg).

        Fruit and vegetable juices are creditable in the Child and Adult Care Food
        Program and the Summer Food Service Program, if they are 100% juice.
        There are so many juices and juice-type drinks on the market today, that
        providers may be confused about what to serve. Providers should be
        cautioned to look for 100% juice on the label. Fruit drinks, cocktails, and
        beverages are not creditable, even if they are fortified with Vitamin C.
        Many labels also list the recommended daily value for Vitamin C on their
        labels. The daily value may also be 100%, but should not be confused
        with labels that say 100% juice.



On the opposite side of this handout you will find a partial listing of creditable fruit and
vegetable juices on the market today, as well as not creditable fruit juice drink
products.

  Page 58 of 69        New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
           A Shopper’s Guide to Juice and Juice Drinks
           Creditable (must be 100% Juice)1                                               Not Creditable (includes drinks, cocktails and juice
                                                                                                                           beverages)

Frozen Concentrates                                                                     Frozen Concentrates

Chiquita 100% Juice:                                                                    Awake Frozen Concentrate Orange Beverage
Calypso Breeze Tropical Paradise                        Wild Berry Splash
                                                                                        Bright and Early Breakfast Beverage
Dole 100% Juice:            Pineapple Orange
                            Pineapple-Orange Strawberry                                 Chiquita: Kiwi Strawberry Fruit Juice Cocktail
Tropical Fruit                                                                                    Pineapple Guava Mango Fruit Juice Cocktail

Seneca               Apple Juice                                                        Five Alive

Tree Top             Apple Juice                                                        Furr’s Grape Juice Beverage

Welch’s 100% Juice:                                                                     Lemonade               Limeade
Grape Grape Cranberry                       White Grape
White Grape Peach                           White Grape Raspberry                       Seneca: Cranberry Juice Cocktail
                                                                                                Peach Cranberry Juice Cocktail
Fresh Juices (in the dairy case)
                                                                                        Welches Cranberry Juice Cocktail
Dole 100% Juice:
Cranberry Orange                    Pineapple Orange Strawberry                         Fresh Juice Drinks (in the dairy case)

Tropicana 100% Juice:                                                                   Minute Maid Fruit Punch
Orange Juice with calcium and extra Vitamin C
Orange Juice with Vitamin A, C, and E                                                   Sunny Delight
Tangerine Orange        Tropical Orange
                                                                                        Tropicana Fruit Punch
Canned/Bottled Juices
                                                                                        Canned/Bottled Juice Drinks
Juicy Juice (Canned and Non-Frozen Concentrates)
Berry Cherry Grape Punch                                                                Capri Sun

Kirtland Cranberry Raspberry Juice                                                      Fruit Stand Drinks

Minute Maid 100% Juice                                                                  Hansen’s Natural Fruit Juice Smoothies

Motts In A Minute Unfrozen Concentrate:                                                 Hi-C
100% Apple Juice
                                                                                        Kerns Nectars (includes banana pineapple, guava, apricot)
Northland 100% Juices:
Cranberry Apple   Cranberry Grape                                                       Motts In A Minute Unfrozen Concentrate:
Cranberry Peach   Cranberry Strawberry                                                  Apple Cranberry    Berry     Fruit Punch

Tomato Juice                                                                            Ocean Spray            Cranberry Grape Juice Drink
                                                                                                               Cranberry Juice Cocktail
V8 Vegetable Juice
                                                                                        V8 Splash
Welches Juice Makers 100% Juice Pourable
Concentrate: Apple Juice   Cherry Sensation                                             Welches Juice Makers Pourable Concentrate Cocktails:
              Fruit Punch  Grape                                                        Wild Berry        Cranberry Apple
                                                                                        Cranberry Grape   Tropical Orange Passion




           1
               SFSP and CACFP Center Sponsors may also use CN Label juice products which do not contain 100% juice, as part of fruit/vegetable
               requirement, if serving sizes are followed to assure that the component requirements are met.

  Page 59 of 69                           New Mex ico CACFP      – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers                                  Revised April 2004
                                                    VITAMIN A
Vitamin A is important for vision, health of the cornea in the eye, health of the skin, mucous
membranes, bones and teeth.

Vitamin A is a fat soluble vitamin, which is found in animal products like eggs, whole milk, liver
and fish oils. Vitamin A, in the form of beta carotene or carotenoid, is found in some fruits and
vegetables.

When planning menus, it is important to include fruits and vegetables which are good sources
of Vitamin A at least two times a week.

Most Vitamin A rich fruits and vegetables are colored deep orange, yellow and dark green.
They add color, taste and variety to menus. Here are some examples of fruits and vegetables
that are good sources of Vitamin A.*



                     Fruits                                                          Vegetables
                    Apricots                                                       Beet greens
                   Cantaloupe                                                       Bok Choy
                     Mango                                                           Broccoli
                   Nectarines                                                         Carrots
                     Plums                                                            Chard
                                                                               Chinese Cabbage
                                                                                     Collards
                                                                               Dandelion greens
                                                                                       Kale
                                                                                Mustard Greens
                                                                                      Parsley
                                                                          Peppers, red - chile and sweet
                                                                                    Pumpkin
                                                                                     Spinach
                                                                                Squash, winter
                                                                                Sweet potatoes
                                                                                 Tomato sauce
                                                                                 Turnip Greens
                                                                                Vegetable juice


* > 100RE per 1/2 cup serving




   Page 60 of 69            New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers            Revised April 2004
                                                   VITAMIN C
Vitamin C is a very important vitamin that the body uses to make collagen. Collagen is the
single most important protein of connective tissue, used for bone and teeth formation. When
a person is injured, collagen protein glues the separated tissue together, forming scars. Cells
are held together largely by collagen. Vitamin C also functions as an antioxidant, so it protects
other substances in the body, and it helps the body absorb iron from food.

When planning menus, it is important to include a good source of Vitamin C each day, because
Vitamin C is a water soluble vitamin which the body cannot store.

Vitamin C is found in citrus fruits, like oranges, grapefruit and tangerines, but also in many
other sweet tasting fruits and mild flavored vegetables. Here are some examples of fruits and
vegetables that are good sources of Vitamin C.*



                     Fruits                                                         Vegetables
                 Cantaloupe                                                            Asparagus
              Grapefruit sections                                                       Brocco li
                                                                                    Brussels Sprou ts
                  Grapefruit
                                                                                        Cabbage
                  Honeydew
                                                                                       Cauliflower
                      Kiwi                                                               Chicory
               Mandarin orange                                                          Collards
                   Mangoes                                                                Kale
                 Orange juice                                                           Kohlrabi
                   Oranges                                                          Mustard greens
                    Papaya                                                          Peas, edible pod
            Pineapple/orange juice                                                   Peppers, chile
                     Plums                                                           Peppers, sweet
                                                                                       Snow Peas
                 Strawberries
                                                                                      Tomato juice
                                                                                     Turnip greens



* > 18mg per 1/2 cup serving




  Page 61 of 69            New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers                   Revised April 2004
                                        Appendix D

D. Kitchen Helps/Tips/Hints:


      Common Can and Jar Sizes


      Recipe Conversion Charts




 Page 62 of 69    New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
Page 63 of 69   New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
                                       COMMON CAN AND JAR SIZES

                Can Size                                     Average net weight of                       Average Volume
            (Industry Term)*                                fluid measure per can**                          per can             Principal Products

                                                       8 oz.                                          1 cup
                                                                                                                               Ready-to-serve soups, fruits,
                                                                                                                               vegetables

  8 oz. can
                                                       10-1/2 oz. to                                  1-1/4 cups
                                                       12 oz.                                                                  Condensed soups, some
                                                                                                                               fruits, vegetables, meat, fish

  No. 1 can
                                                       14 oz. to                                      1-3/4 cups
                                                       16 oz. (1 lb.)                                                          Some fruits and meat
                                                                                                                               products

  No. 300 can


                                                       16 oz. (1 lb) to                               2 cups
                                                       17 oz.                                                                  Small cans: fruits and
                                                       (1 lb. 1 oz.)                                                           vegetables, some meat and
                                                                                                                               poultry products, ready-to-
  No. 303 can                                                                                                                  serve soups


                                                       20 oz.                                         2-1/2 cups
                                                       (1 lb. 4 oz.) or                                                        Juices, ready-to-serve soups,
                                                       18 fl. oz.                                                              some fruits
                                                       (1 pt. 2 fl. oz.)

  No. 2 can

                                                       26 oz.                                         3-1/2 cups
                                                       (1 lb. 10 oz) to                                                        Family size: fruits, some
                                                       30 oz.                                                                  vegetables
                                                       (1 lb. 14 oz.)


  No. 2-1/2 can
                                                       51 oz.                                         5-3/4 cups
                                                       (3 lb. 3 oz.) or                                                        Condensed soups, some
                                                       46 fl. oz.                                                              vegetables, meat and poultry
                                                       (1 qt. 14 fl. oz.)                                                      products, fruit and vegetable
                                                                                                                               juices

  No. 3 cylinder
                                                       6 lb. (96 oz.) to                              12 cups to
                                                       7 lb. 5 oz.                                    13-2/3 cups              Institutional size: fruits,
                                                       (117 oz.)                                                               vegetables, some other foods




  No. 10 can

*Can s izes are in dustry ter ms and do not ne cessarily a ppear o n the labe l.

**The net weight on can or jar labels differs according to the density of the contents.
Source : Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs, by Dorothy W. Davis and others. Washington, DC: US Department of Agriculture, 1984.




     Page 64 of 69                             New Mex ico CACFP        – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers                Revised April 2004
                           RECIPE CONVERSION CHARTS
             FRACTIONAL EQUIVALENTS (F.E.) * FOR USE IN CONVERTING RECIPES

    The following chart is designed to help you change fractional parts of pounds, gallons,
    cups, etc., to accurate weights or measures. To use this chart, take the number in the
      F.E. column and look under the heading of Tablespoon, Cup, Pint, Quart, Gallon or
    Pound to convert to an accurate unit of measure or weight. For example, reading from
      left to right, the table shows that 7/8 of one pound is 14 ounces , 1/3 of a gallon is 1
                       quart plus 1 1/3 cups; 1/16 of a cup is 1 tablespoon; etc.



F. E. *        TABLESPOON              CUP                    PINT                  QUART      GALLON                POUND

1              3 tsp            16 Tbsp                 2 cups                 2 pints      4 quarts              16 ounces


7/8            2-1/2 tsp        1 cup less              1-3/4 cups             3-1/2 cups   3 quarts plus         14 ounces
                                2 Tbsp                                                      1 pint
3/4            2-1/4 tsp        12 Tbsp                 1-1/2 cups             3 cups       3 quarts              12 ounces


2/3            2 tsp            10 Tbsp                 1-1/3 cups             2-2/3 cups   2 quarts plus         10-2/3
                                plus                                                        2 2/3 cups            ounces
                                2 tsp
5/8            2 tsp (scant)    10 Tbsp                 1-1/4 cups             2-1/2 cups   2 quarts plus         10 ounces
                                                                                            1 pint
1/2            1-1/2 tsp        8 Tbsp                  1 cup                  2 cups       2 quarts              8 ounces


3/8            1-1/8 tsp        6 Tbsp                  3/4 cup                1-1/2 cups   1 quart plus          6 ounces
                                                                                            1 pint
1/3            1 tsp            5 Tbsp plus             2/3 cup                1-1/3 cups   1 quart plus          5-1/3
                                1 tsp                                                       1 1/3 cups            ounces
1/4            3/4 tsp          4 Tbsp                  1/2 cup                1 cup        1 quart               4 ounces


1/8            1/2 tsp          2 Tbsp                  1/4 cup                1/2 cup      1 pint                2 ounces
               (scant)
1/16           1/4 tsp          1 Tbsp                  2 Tbsp                 4 Tbsp       1 cup                 1 ounce
               (scant)




       Page 65 of 69           New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers            Revised April 2004
WEIGHT AND VOLUME OF COMMONLY SERVED FOODS
                FOOD                                 WEIGHT                     MEASURE (Approximate)

  Baking powder                               1 oz                            2 Tbsp
  Baking soda                                 1 oz                            2-1/3 Tbsp
  Bread, loaf                                 1 lb                            16 slices
     sandwich                                 2 lbs                           32 slices
     crumbs, dry                              1 lb                            1 qt
  Butter, lard, margarine                     1 lb                            2 cups
  Flour, all purpose                          1 lb                            4 cups
     white, bread, sifted                     1 lb                            4 cups
     cake, sifted                             1 lb                            4-3/4 cups
  Honey                                       1 lb                            1-1/3 cups
  Lemon juice                                 1 lb                            2 cups (8-10 lemons)
  Lettuce, average head                       9 oz                            1
  Macaroni, dry                               1 lb                            4 cups
     1 lb cooked                              3 lbs                           2-1/4 qts
  Oats, rolled, A.P. (quick)                  1 lb                            6 cups
  Oil, vegetable                              1 lb                            2 to 2-1/8 cups
  Onions, A.P.                                1 lb                            4 to 5 medium
     chopped                                  1 lb                            2 to 3 cups
  Pepper, ground                              1 oz                            4 Tbsp
  Potatoes, white A.P.                        1 lb                            3 medium
  Rice, dry                                   1 lb                            2 cups
     1 lb cooked                              4 to 4-1/2 lbs                  2 qts
  Salad dressing, mayonnaise                  1 lb                            2 cups
  Shortening, hydrogenated                    1 lb                            2-1/4 cups
  Spaghetti, dry                              1 lb                            5 cups
     1 lb cooked                              4 lbs                           2-1/2 qts
  Sugar, brown, solid pack                    1 lb                            2 cups
     granulated                               1 lb                            2 cups
     powdered, XXXX, sifted                   1 lb                            3 cups
  Vanilla extract                             1 oz                            2 Tbsp
  Vinegar                                     1 lb                            2 cups
  Walnuts, E.P.                               1 lb                            4 cups



Page 66 of 69          New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers               Revised April 2004
                        COMMON ABBREVIATIONS
                                               FOUND IN RECIPES

                t or tsp =teaspoon(s)                               wt = weight
                T or Tbsp = tablespoon(s)                           ea = each
                C = cup(s)                                          pc(s) = piece(s)
                pt = pint(s)                                        sl = slice(s)
                qt = quart(s)                                       # = number (i.e. #10 can)
                gal = gallon(s)                                     pkd = packed
                                                                    AP = as purchased
                                                                    MBG = Meat Buyers
                                                                    Guide
                oz = ounce(s)                                       EP = edible portion
                fl oz = fluid ounce(s)                              °F = degrees Fahrenheit


                                       MEASURE EQUIVALENTS
                       3t = 1 T                                       16 oz = 1 lb
                       4t = 1-1/3 T                                   1 lb 4 oz = 1-1/4 lb
                       4 -1/2 t = 1-1/2 T                             1 lb 8 oz = 1-1/2 lb
                       4T = 1/4 C                                     1 lb 12 oz = 1-3/4 lb
                       16 T = 1 C
                       2 C = 1 pt                                     8 fl oz = 1 C
                       4 C = 1 qt                                     16 fl oz = 1 pt
                       2 pt = 1 qt                                    32 fl oz = 1 qt
                       4 qt = 1 gal                                   128 fl oz = 1 gal


                                SCOOP and DISHER EQUIVALENTS
        Scoop or disher             Level Measure                      Scoop or disher         Level Measure
           number                                                         number
                6                            2/3 cup                              24          2-2/3 Tablespoons
                8                            1/2 cup                              30          2-1/5 Tablespoons
                10                           3/8 cup                              40          1-3/5 Tablespoons
                12                           1/3 cup                              50           3-4/5 teaspoons
                16                           1/4 cup                              60            1 Tablespoon
                20                       3-1/5
                                     Tablespoons


Page 67 of 69            New Mex ico CACFP    – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers            Revised April 2004
                   AMOUNT TO PREPARE WHEN SERVING
                         1/8 CUP AND 3/8 CUP

How to use these charts: If you are going to be serving 1/8 cup of fruit or vegetable or
                         3/8 cup of fruit or vegetable, use these charts to see the
                         equivalent 1/4 cup servings. Then, look in your Simplified
                         Food Buying Guide to find out how many purchase units (for
                         example, pounds or #10 cans) you will need of each.



            PLANNING CHART FOR                                                     PLANNING CHART FOR
   1/8 CUP FRUIT OR VEGETABLE SERVINGS                                    3/8 CUP FRUIT OR VEGETABLE SERVINGS

  NUMBER OF 1/8 CUP   EQUIVALENT NUMBER *                               NUMBER OF 3/8 CUP   EQUIVALENT NUMBER
   SERVINGS NEEDED     OF 1/4 CUP SERVINGS                               SERVINGS NEEDED    OF 1/4 CUP SERVINGS

          25                      15                                                 25                40
          50                      25                                                 50                75
          75                      40                                                 75               115
          100                     50                                                 100              150
          150                     75                                                 150              225
          200                    100                                                 200              300
          250                    125                                                 250              375
          300                    150                                                 300              450
          350                    175                                                 350              525
          400                    200                                                 400              600
          450                    225                                                 450              675
          500                    250                                                 500              750




 For numbers which are not on this 1/8 cup                             For numbers which are not on this 3/8 cup
 chart, divide the number of meals to be                               chart, multiply 1.5 by the number of meals
 prepared by 2, and look that number up in                             being prepared and look that number up in
 the New Mexico Simplified Food Buying                                 the New Mexico Simplified Food Buying
 Guide. For example, if you need to                                    Guide. For example, if you need to
 prepare 160 (1/8 cup) servings, divide 160                            prepare 160 (3/8 cup) servings, multiply
 by 2, which = 80. Look up 80 (1/4 cup)                                160 by 1.5, which = 240. Look up 240 (1/4
 servings to determine how much to                                     cup) servings to determine how much to
 prepare for 160 (1/8 cup) servings.                                   prepare for 160 (3/8 cup) servings.


   * all numbers rounded up to nearest 5 servings.


   Page 68 of 69        New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers          Revised April 2004
Page 69 of 69   New Mex ico CACFP   – SNA CK Menu Re cord Book for Centers   Revised April 2004
Family Nutrition Bureau, Family Service Division, P. O.Drawer 5160, Santa Fe, NM 87502, (505) 827-9961

				
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