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					                      The Hub Board
                            25th June 2008

                           Agenda Item 05

                 Getting London ready for transition




           London Borough of Tower Hamlets
                 and The Hub Report




                     Learner Travel

               to facilitate 14-19 Pathways
                 & Boroughwide Campus




Page 1 of 32           25.06.08         Agenda item 04   Travel report
                                   April 2008


Learner Travel Report
To facilitate 14-19 Pathways and borough-wide campus

Summary

Introduction This Report was commissioned by the hub Board on 9 January
2008 to assist the development of partnership transport arrangements for
learners involved in the 14-19 Education & Skills programme.

The report is a follow up to the presentation ‘Post 16 Student Travel Risk
Analysis Project’ delivered at the hub meeting by Steve Sipple (Head of Youth &
Community Services) and Roger Kindell (Project Consultant) on 19 September
2007.

Methodology During the preparation of the report consultations have taken
place with the key stakeholders, inc young people, Head Teachers, Area
Directors, Youth Service Managers, Youth Offending Team, Community
Representatives, Connexions, Anti-Social Behaviour Team, Youth Workers,
Tower Hamlets College, Public Transport Project Manager, School Travel
Adviser, MET Police and Transport for London.
The Project Consultant also attended a national conference on Young People &
Public Transport hosted by the National Youth Agency.

Conclusions Local transport arrangements that support the 14-19 reforms,
particularly the future delivery of diplomas, will be essential as more young
people undertake learning away from their home school or college for part of their
course.

It is apparent that there are some common strands relating to the difficulties
some learners experience when travelling to access their education. While it is
not always easy to separate fact from fiction it is clear that some young people
will be reluctant to travel while they feel insecure - they will have done their own
personal risk assessment and are likely to make any decisions about their future
studies based on safe options. Some concerns, like territorial issues, can be real
and based on personal experiences whilst others may be perceptions based on
rumour and fear of the unknown. Students need to consider future options in the
context of their educational needs and personal security.




                                                                                  2
Partners within the hub can ensure there is adequate preparation, training,
support and monitoring in place to help reduce any difficulties to the minimum.

There is little additional cost involved in implementing the proposals
recommended in this report.
Recommendations
The following proposals offer some practical solutions to the issues raised in this
report:

   1. Preparation by providers
   1.1 Schools/colleges to permit optional uniforms for 16+ students when
   travelling to avoid confrontation
   1.2 School/college hours to allow for early afternoon leaving by Diploma &
   non-local students
   1.3 Schools to coordinate leaving times to reduce the impact of many
   students on the buses at the same time - especially where there are several
   schools in the same locality and students are likely to use the same buses

   2. Learner Preparation
   2.1 Training programmes in Year 9 to be established in conjunction with the
   Youth Service and the Independent Travel Team - to encourage young
   people to be independent travellers
   2.2 Students to receive maps and information leaflets about public transport
   opportunities - to encourage travel outside the local neighbourhood
   2.3 Students to consider alternative ‘green’ travel options, such as walking
   and cycling - involving safety training and secure storage options at school

   3. Partner Agencies
   3.1 Some problematic bus routes to be supervised with a 2 nd operator, Police
   Community Support Officers and/or youth workers
   3.2 More security beyond school/college premises and at bus stops to be
   available as required - involving PCSOs and rapid response youth workers
   3.3 CCTV to be installed at ‘hotspot’ bus stops
   3.4 Young people to be involved in area transport decision meetings through
   local youth councils & TfL
   3.5 Student ‘behaviour contracts’ for travel to be established with TfL -
   involving joint signatures with parents and the loss of travel pass when codes
   of conduct are breached
   3.6 Choice of alternative transport where possible – Oyster cards to permit
   limited Tube & DLR journeys in Zone 2
   3.7 TH Community Transport to be involved where appropriate through
   affiliated voluntary & community organisations
   3.8 Schools and youth workers to develop community cohesion events to help
   break down community barriers and reduce conflicts of a racial nature
   3.9 Students travel concerns to be reviewed & monitored through learner
   feedback / satisfaction systems used by offsite and diploma providers



                                                                                 3
Roger Kindell - Project Consultant

Learner Travel


                                     Contents


                                                      page

1.    Summary & Recommendations                        2

2.    Introduction                                     5

3.    Background                                       7

4.    Opportunities to extend choice                   8

5.    Principal barriers                               9

6.    Success elsewhere                               11

7.    Innovative use of existing funds                 13

8.    Costs                                            14

9.    Learners who face particular barriers           15

10.   14-19 transport strategy                        16

      -Journey Risk assessment                        18
      -Travel Checklist                               19
      -Preparation: Travel Plan to Offsite Learning   21
      -Learner Travel Plan                            24

11.   Appendices                                       25




                                                             4
     ‘…prospective students considering further education courses at
     London schools and colleges expect generally lengthier, more
     complex and less satisfactory journeys than those to their
     compulsory education…although students’ perceptions of further
     education travel does not appear to dissuade students from
     continuing with further education, it does influence many students’
     choices and may narrow the range of further education institutions
     considered.’ [‘16-19+ Student Transport in London’ Report by MVA Research
     Ltd -commissioned by Association of London Government]



2. Introduction

2.1 Issues around students’ travel are not new. Whether by sheer volume or
behaviour the presence of young people on public transport can impact on the
rest of the travelling public.

The introduction of free or subsidised travel schemes in London has given large
numbers of young people the opportunity to travel widely across Tower Hamlets
and other boroughs. They can move easily, visit other places, experience
communities away from their own neighbourhoods and learn how to travel
independently - without depending on cars.

As parental choice is exercised and young people are empowered to make their
own decisions many students already travel some distance to attend preferred
secondary schools or colleges which may involve a reliance on public transport.

2.2 The current initiative by the hub in Tower Hamlets, in the context of the 14-19
education and skills programme, provides increased learning opportunities for
students to access schools, colleges and learning providers across the borough
and therefore increases the need for students to travel for Diploma and KS4
Pathways away from their home school.

2.3 This Report was commissioned by the hub Board on 9 January 2008 to assist
the development of partnership transport arrangements for learners on the basis
of nine principles:

    Make sure learners travel safely
    Consult with young people themselves
    Make effective use of existing travel support and develop cost effective
     transport solutions
    Ensure timetable arrangements support travel
    Keep travel time for learners to a minimum


                                                                                 5
    Meet individual access and mobility need
    Provide appropriate supervision
    Develop young people as independent travellers
    Build on what works
2.4 The specific brief of the consultant is to:

a) Evaluate the opportunities to extend 14-19 choice offered by current borough-
wide transport arrangements and associated learner support funds
b) Identify the principal barriers to and risks from learner travel and propose
practical steps to dismantle barriers and minimise risk
c) Report success elsewhere in developing arrangements to support shared
delivery that do not rely on learner travel and transferability to TH
d) Make recommendations for the innovative use of existing funds to most
effectively optimise choice, achievement and progression for 14-19 learners
e) Make projections about the scale and type of learner travel arising from new
14-19 pathways through to 2012
f) Cost the options for learner travel and make recommendations
g) Ensure proposals fully address the needs of those learners who face particular
barriers and are not yet independent travellers
h) Propose a 14-19 transport strategy and associated protocols and partnership
agreements for TH

2.5 The report is a follow up to the presentation ‘Post 16 Student Travel Risk
Analysis Project’ delivered at the hub meeting by Steve Sipple (Head of Youth &
Community Services) and Roger Kindell (Project Consultant) on 19 September
2007

2.6 During the preparation of the report consultations have taken place with the
key stakeholders, inc 50 young people, Head Teachers, Area Directors, Youth
Service Managers, Youth Offending Team, Community Representatives,
Connexions, Anti-Social Behaviour Team, Youth Workers, Tower Hamlets
College, Public Transport Project Manager, School Travel Adviser, MET Police
and Transport for London

2.7 The Project Consultant attended a national conference on ‘Accessing
Positive Activities: Innovative solutions for young people’s bus travel’ organised
by The National Youth Agency (NYA) on 7 Feb 08




                                                                                6
3. Background

3.1 The borough is well serviced by buses and bus routes. Buses are important
for intra-borough movement whereas the Tube, DLR and rail networks tend to
bring people into and out of the area. All residential areas in the borough are
within 400m of a bus route. Bus routes as a collective network serve the borough
well with approximately 38 services through or within the borough being provided.
Most of the bus services are accessible to mobility impaired people and all but 3
routes are high frequency.

3.2 Transport for London (TfL) provides free travel on buses for young people in
full-time education or unwaged training; and 16 and 17 year olds are able to
apply for half-fare reductions on adult rate fares. The Oyster card will also allow
16 & 17 year olds to travel at half the adult fare on the Tube and DLR.

3.3 The hub is building on school and college specialisms to extend learner
choice and offer new learning opportunities at 14-19 including work-related
diplomas. As no single institution can offer the full range of specialist teachers
and facilities the partnership pools the resources of schools, colleges, local
universities and support agencies to develop local learning pathways. Students
have a choice of courses across the borough relevant to their needs.

3.4 By 2009 -10 it is estimated that up to 15% of the KS4 cohort may be on a
programme that requires travel.

3.5 At an initial Travel Barriers Meeting on 11 May 2006 it was noted that
consultations with TH Youth Partnership had highlighted ‘some pupils would be
unwilling to travel through certain areas’ due to territorial issues. This reluctance
for many young people to travel beyond their neighbourhood is a highly
significant issue and provides much of the impetus for the current review. In
reality young people who are not able or not willing to travel are likely to be
deprived of opportunities for extended learning and for developing their
independence.




                                                                                   7
4. Opportunities to extend choice

4.1 As noted - TfL provides free travel on buses for young people in full-time
education or unwaged training up to and including the academic year in which
they become 18. Full-time education is defined as 12 hours of guided learning
per week for a minimum of ten weeks. 16 and 17 year olds are able to apply for
half-fare reductions on adult rate fares, travelcards and season tickets. The
Oyster Card allows 16-17 year olds to travel at half the adult fare on the Tube
and DLR. Buses are well used for school and social travel - an arrangement that
many young people from outside London have yet to achieve.

From 7 January 2008 11-18 year olds who qualify for free travel will use a Zip
card. This ensures that young people will have to ‘touch in’ when travelling and
show their photocards on request. The new procedures will help to clarify the free
travel privilege and catch those who abuse the scheme

4.2 There are three main types of financial support available to 14-19 learners in
Tower Hamlets:

      Education Maintenance Allowance (EMA) for 16+
      Learner Support Funds for 16+
      Transport support from the LBTH Children’s Services Directorate

4.3 Through the Post 16 School Access Fund students who do not qualify for an
EMA can be supported if they have exceptional needs, including exceptional
transport needs for students with disabilities and/or learning difficulties.

4.4 Travel support from the Local Authority of a £300 grant (£100 paid every
term) or a travel pass will be considered for students who live more than a mile
and a half from their school or college.

4.5 Tower Hamlets College provides financial support to students with travel
costs primarily through the Learner Support Funds, taking into account such
factors as household income, distance and any funding students may have
received from other sources. The College concentrates assistance from its
Learner Support Funds on disadvantaged students and those on low income.

4.6 Care to Learn provides financial support for parents under 20 years old who
want to continue learning – and this includes help with travel costs.

4.7 The Tower Hamlets Mobility Support Team administers transport support for
people of all ages. This includes taxicards and blind/disabled person’s freedom
passes when the student cannot use public transport.

4.8 Tower Hamlets Community Transport provides minibuses for organisations
who are members of the Community Transport and for people with mobility



                                                                                8
problems. THCT is a charity based in Limehouse set up primarily to provide
transport to voluntary and community groups and offers a fleet of minibuses from
11 to16 seaters, all equipped with seat belts. Individual providers can join the
scheme for £250 and the current booking charges include fuel and insurance. It
is possible that this facility could also be used by students wishing to travel
across the borough if they are members of affiliated youth and/or community
organisations.

4.9 Some schools have their own minibuses which could be used in addition to
public transport to move students between home schools and off site learning
providers. This would help to ensure that students arrive and return on time
during their offsite journeys.

4.10 There is little opportunity to extend choice for 14-19 students using the
current bus services as the free travel passes actively encourage their use
already. A case could be made however to extend this subsidy for additional
limited travel on the Tube and DLR in Zone 2 as many students feel safer using
these forms of transport.


5. Principal barriers

5.1 Fortunately for most young people in Tower Hamlets the typical barriers to
using buses, like cost, availability and reliability, do not apply - due to free or
subsidised travel passes and frequent services. However there is much evidence
to show that some young people have genuine reservations about travel and are
very concerned about their personal safety and the bus environment.

5.2 Interviews with young people provide many clues about their concerns when
travelling. The most regularly stated problems relate to their insecurities about
waiting for buses outside their own neighbourhoods and the anti-social behaviour
of other young people on the buses.

5.3 Some young people say they experience no problems at all and it is
encouraging to note that not all students have problems when travelling. The
interviewer was left with the distinct impression that the people who have fewer
problems and feel less vulnerable are either older, bigger, travel in groups or
have more determination to reach a venue of their choice, such as a sports
centre, or to attend advanced / specialist training.

5.4 For those who are more reluctant to travel the main concerns relate to leaving
their own territory or being on somebody else’s territory. There was much
anecdotal evidence of violence, thefts and bullying - but it is difficult to ascertain
how much of this is myth and how much is fact. Some young people also find it
difficult to travel in other neighbourhoods if their community background or
personal reputation makes them a target. Clearly there are problems in some



                                                                                    9
locations and there are some unruly individuals who create conflict – and it is
also true that some young people tell a good story when they have an audience!

5.5 A study of crime and anti-social ‘hotspots’ in the borough provides a clearer
picture of where problems are likely to occur. Most of the problem areas are
found around underground stations, such as Whitechapel, Bethnal Green and
Poplar and retail centres; and most are close to school/college locations (see
Appendices 11.1-11.4) Where regular school/college bus routes pass through
these locations there is more reason to take action.

5.6 For many young people the fear of assault and theft is a major issue. The
interviewer heard reports of fights, some with weapons, on buses and in the
streets after school. Buses are perceived by some as ‘unsupervised youth clubs’.
The biggest fear when travelling is mugging when CRAVED (concealable,
removable, available, valuable, enjoyable, disposable) items are targeted. On the
streets some young people say they are scared to wait for buses in perceived
hostile areas. Sadly several of the most outspoken views heard related to lack of
trust or confidence in particular districts on the basis of racial differences.

5.7 Views on the bus environment refer to the perceived dirty condition of some
vehicles and problems with some drivers and other users (including the general
public). In addition, there is a view, especially for young men, that public transport
is not ‘cool’ and the ultimate ambition is to own a car.

5.8 Possible solutions to these issues are various, according to circumstance.
Options include:

   Preparation by providers
   i. Schools/colleges to permit optional uniforms for 16+ students when
   travelling to avoid confrontation
   ii. School/college hours to allow for early afternoon leaving by Diploma & non-
   local students
   iii. Schools to coordinate leaving times to reduce the impact of many students
   on the buses at the same time - especially where there are several schools in
   the same locality and students are likely to use the same buses

   Learner Preparation -
   iv. Training programmes in Year 9 to be established in conjunction with the
   Youth Service and the Independent Travel Team - to encourage young
   people to be independent travellers
   v. Students to receive maps and information leaflets about public transport
   opportunities - to encourage travel outside the local neighbourhood
   vi. Students to consider alternative ‘green’ travel options, such as walking and
   cycling - involving safety training and secure cycle storage options at school




                                                                                   10
   Partner Agencies -
   vii. Some problematic bus routes to be supervised with 2 nd operators, Police
   Community Support Officers and/or youth workers
   viii. More security beyond school/college premises and at problematic bus
   stop locations - involving PCSOs and rapid response youth workers
   ix. CCTV to be installed at ‘hotspot’ bus stops
   x. Young people to be involved in area transport decision meetings through
   local youth councils & TfL
   xi. Student ‘behaviour contracts’ for travel to be established with TfL -
   involving joint signatures with parents and the loss of travel pass when codes
   of conduct are breached
   xii. Choice of alternative transport where possible – Oyster cards to permit
   limited Tube & DLR journeys in Zone 2
   xiii. TH Community Transport to be accessed in appropriate cases through
   affiliated voluntary & community organisations
   xiv. Schools and youth workers to develop community cohesion events to
   help break down community barriers and reduce conflicts of a racial nature
   xv. Students travel concerns to be reviewed & monitored through learner
   feedback / satisfaction systems used by offsite and diploma providers


6. Success elsewhere

‘It is important to recognise that learners in urban areas….face transport
challenges. Public transport systems may be poor or link learning sites only
through multiple changes of transport. In some urban areas, learners may feel
unsafe travelling on certain forms of transport or through some areas.’ [Insights
from Diploma pathfinders QCA doc]

6.1 The lessons learned from the eight Diploma ‘pathfinders’ set up nationally in
2006 offer some guidance when it comes to travel issues. There is evidence to
show that moving students and staff to access learning facilities that deliver
applied and specialist learning is a huge challenge in most areas. Rural
communities have problems with distances travelled – while urban communities
have problems with learners not feeling safe on certain bus routes. The solution
seems to be to develop a transport policy that minimises the movement of young
people between organisations – an arrangement in which the role of electronic
learning and ICT is likely to be important.

6.2 It is noted that if learners are transported around different institutions more
frequently than at present, regular and cyclical monitoring procedures need to be
in place to overcome any concerns.

6.3 While other Authorities are seeking to support the movement of young people
within and across learning communities by establishing student travel
arrangements through the existing transport infrastructure, this is less likely to be



                                                                                  11
an issue in Tower Hamlets where public transport is readily available with
considerable subsidies.

6.4 Some Authorities are attempting to minimise travel by the use of virtual
placement CDs for organisations such as Royal Mail, Toyota, Boots, Rolls Royce
and Primary Care Trusts; by using a series of online lessons such as NatWest’s
Face 2 Face; or by the use of mobile information units which take learning to
young people such as those run by Severn Trent and Waitrose in Derbyshire.

6.5 The Pathfinders’ report concludes that there are a number of issues that will
have to be addressed when developing a transport strategy, including

      overcoming the apprehensions of transport providers and users
       concerning the 14-19 age group
      convincing schools/colleges that there are efficiency gains to be made by
       using the current transport infrastructure more efficiently

6.6 It is noted that outside the Pathfinders programme Brent Council has
implemented an innovative scheme to put youth workers on some buses used by
students on their way home from school. The team recruited five of the borough’s
most highly experienced youth workers to engage with young people on specific
bus routes between 3pm and 5pm. Armed with mobile phones and free bus
passes provided by TfL the youth workers waited at bus stops, sat on buses and
frequented areas known to be problematic where buses from various schools
converged. Initial feedback from the scheme indicates that it has made a
difference and students say they feel safer on buses and at bus stops with the
youth workers present.

6.7 Transport for London are developing a Children and Young People’s Action
Plan in which they seek the views of younger travellers to encourage children
and young people to participate in giving their feedback on transport issues. An
example of their success is having a problematic bus stop moved to a safer
location. This could be a useful facility for students through youth councils to
express their concerns and suggestions about travel arrangements.

6.8 The Dept for Transport highlights some instances in other parts of the country
where codes of conduct which could influence young people’s behaviour when
travelling to and from school have been developed by some schools with the
cooperation of transport providers. This may also be worth pursuing locally.


7. Innovative use of existing funds

7.1 One of the key elements to the success of shared delivery is adequate
preparation. For students planning to attend schools outside their usual




                                                                               12
neighbourhoods there would need to be well prepared travel plans to make the
transition as comfortable as possible.

7.2 Options should be discussed on a personal basis and pastoral heads should
be aware of students’ proposed travel plans. Training could be offered in Year 9
to encourage safe independent travelling for students going to previously
unknown neighbourhoods. The training package could be delivered by the Youth
Service linked to the Tower Hamlets Independent Travel Training Team. The
Travel Training Team currently works with children with special needs and there
is the potential to develop their skills into more mainstream work with additional
trained staff.

7.3 Territorial issues should be addressed directly at school and where possible
through youth support agencies. Activities to promote community cohesion
should be established to help break down some of the barriers that exist within
communities. Training programmes could be offered involving joint cooperative
projects with schools in other areas to encourage a shared approach to learning.

7.4 Each school would need to be prepared to receive students from outside their
normal catchment area with pastoral staff assisting in travel arrangements.
Parents’ evenings could be held to help address any negative perceptions about
schools and neighbourhoods. This may be particularly prevalent for young
Bengali women, for example, if their parents are not willing to let them travel
alone outside the home.

7.5 Schools will need to make use of the attendance and tracking system to help
check the whereabouts of young people when in transit between different
locations.

7.6 With current funding arrangements through the School Travel Adviser and
TfL schools could develop their individual School Travel Plans to include training
programmes around safe cycling and invest in secure cycle storage.

7.7 Where there are regular ‘hotspots’ beyond school and college premises as
students leave in the afternoons experienced youth workers could be employed
to engage with young people on the streets. Equipped with mobile phones and
free bus passes the youth workers could wait at bus stops, travel on the buses
and provide an adult presence where none is available at present. On a rapid
response basis youth workers could work wherever the need was greatest. Youth
workers would be a positive point of reference outside the school; they could
liaise with other services such as PCSOs and operate as outreach workers for
the Youth Service.
7.8 Most of these proposals require little additional funding – but they do rely on
the innovative use of existing funds and the involvement of existing services.




                                                                                13
8. Costs

Additional costs may be incurred through the following proposals:

i. Yr 9 independent travel training programme - with staff from the
   Youth Service & Independent Travel Team

  Youth Worker in Charge Level 2 pts 11-14 pro rata            £19363-22083
  Qualified Youth Worker Level 1 pts 3-6 pro rata              £14409-16080

ii. Training resources – maps & leaflets                       TfL funding

iii School Travel Plans – for alternative ‘green‘ travel       TfL funding

iv. Youth Workers on streets & buses: team

  Youth Worker in Charge Level 2 pts 11-14 pro rata            £19363-22083
  Qualified Youth Worker Level 1 pts 3-6 pro rata              £14409-16080

v. Equipment for rapid response youth workers,
   eg mobile phones & bus passes

vi. CCTV at ‘problem’ bus stops & hotspots                      TfL funding

vii. Extended use of Oyster in Zone 2 for Tube & DLR -
     where appropriate

viii. Community Transport membership fees per organisation            £250
      plus individual charges per journey




9. Learners who face particular barriers and are not yet independent
travellers

9.1 In addition to the students who currently lack the confidence to travel
independently there may be young people who have mobility difficulties and/or
specific learning difficulties.

9.2 Pastoral heads will be able to identify such students and make appropriate
arrangements for assisted travel.



                                                                              14
9.3 Options for travel include -

      The Tower Hamlets Mobility Support Team who administer transport
       support for people of all ages. This includes taxicards and blind/disabled
       person’s freedom passes when students cannot use public transport.

      The Post 16 School Access Fund is for students who do not qualify for an
       EMA and can be supported if they have exceptional needs - including
       exceptional transport needs for students with disabilities and/or learning
       difficulties.

      Tower Hamlets Community Transport provides minibuses for
       organisations who are members of the Community Transport and for
       people with mobility problems. They are a charity based in Limehouse set
       up primarily to provide transport to voluntary and community groups.
       Some of their minibuses have tail-lifts to carry wheelchairs and low steps
       to make them easier to access.

9.4 Tower Hamlets Education Transport Section can be contacted for information
about transport service for students with disabilities and/or learning difficulties.




10. 14-19 Transport strategy

10.1 Local transport arrangements that support the 14-19 reforms, particularly
the future delivery of diplomas, will be essential as more young people undertake
learning away from their ‘home’ school or college for part of the course. Local
solutions will need to take account of the wide variety of different circumstances,
such as how to encourage young people to use the network of public transport
effectively and safely in Tower Hamlets.




                                                                                 15
10.2 There are clearly a number of issues to be taken into account when
planning a transport strategy, some of these may include –

      local circumstance & local solutions
      transport available, such as public transport, minibuses & private hire
      availability & location of courses
      collaborative ownership of the 14-19 initiative with transport coordinators
      planning to minimise movement
      partnership funding for services linking school and colleges
      opinions of students/ parents and the workforce
      accountability for attendance
      joint registration systems
      SEN strategy
      supervisory arrangements to ensure safety, good behaviour and good
       attendance

10.3 A Duty of Care towards their students exists for all home institutions sending
or transporting their students aged 14-16 to placements for diploma activities and
other shared learning pathways, eg Engagement Programmes. It is in the
interests of students, parents and institutions to obtain appropriate information on
travel arrangements, to check the insurance position and to obtain the
appropriate consent from parents for such travel. Journey risk assessments
completed by home schools are an important part of this process (see 10.11).

10.4 Common timetable arrangements have been designed to minimise travel
from the home school to the host provider. When mid-day journeys occur
however home schools will need to undertake the required risk assessments and
ensure adequate insurance arrangements are in place.

10.5 Travel to and from school at the start and end of the school day is the
responsibility of the parent or guardian and relies upon the public liability of the
transport carrier.




10.6 The DfES guidance is emphatic that schools should check that employers
with whom students are placed for work experience have suitable insurance
arrangements in place. Travel to diploma and other offsite learning activities are
regarded as school visits for the purpose of insurance where the journey is
commenced at the home school.

10.7 Any member of staff or voluntary helper using their own vehicles on off-site
journeys should ensure that their own motor insurance applies in these
circumstances.


                                                                                 16
10.8 A strategic approach to planning transport could involve having a Transport
Forum with representation from Headteachers, Colleges, LSC, students and TfL
with a Transport Coordinator working within a Home/School/College Transport
Team.

10.9 From Sept 2007 the local authority has a duty to promote sustainable school
travel and it is important that this reflects the travel needs of students accessing
the 14-19 curriculum. Walking and cycling are actively encouraged where
practical and finances are available to assist schools with their proposed School
Travel Plans.

10.10 Under the Education Act 2002 local authorities must publish an integrated
transport plan and transport policy for 16-19s. Local authorities have a duty to
make transport provision for students aged 16-18 and those aged 19 continuing
in education. This also applies to students with learning difficulties or disabilities
of sixth form age if they are over compulsory school leaving age. They must also
ensure that college students are treated no less favourably than those studying at
school sixth forms.




10.11 Journey Risk Assessment for group travel between home school and
learning provider


Date:                                                    Type of Visit:

Organiser/Leader:                                        Student/Group:

From:                                                    To:

Accompanying Adults:                                     Number of Students:




                                                                                   17
  Method of Transport/Hazard              Risk Arising        Action              Action
                                                            Home School      Learning Provider

  Public Transport




  Transport Provided by the
  Home School




  Transport Provided by the
  Learning Provider




  Walking / Cycling




Students with mobility needs                              Checklist:
or other particular requirements:

Emergency Action:                                         Post Visit Assessment:


Signed:                                                   Date:
10.12 Travel Checklist

This checklist reflects LBTH recommendations for travel.
Further reference may be required to check current procedures & updates.


                                                    Yes     No     Don’t   Action needed
                                                                   know
1. If minibuses are used to transport
students, does the ratio of adult supervisors
to students meet the **guidelines for the age
group and needs of the students?

2. If staff deliver students in private cars, has
the appropriate insurance been obtained
and checked by the person I/C Work
Related Learning?




                                                                                           18
3. Have risk assessments on travel been
carried out?

4. Have appropriate contact numbers been
lodged with:

a The Work Related Learning Base

b The Parent

c The Learning Provider

d The Student

5. Have parents given written permission for
students to travel to the off-site Learning
Provider by the means of transport as
designated by the Learning Base?

6. In the event that students will arrive home
later than on a normal school day have
parents been informed of the time of return?

7. Have all parties been informed of what
the arrangements are to be, in the case of
travel problems to and from a placement, i.e.

a Who is responsible for contacting parents?

b Who is responsible for ensuring that
students get home safely?



8. Have all staff who are likely to be in one
to one contact with students during journeys
been CRB checked?

9. Have arrangements been made to escort
students who are at risk when travelling
alone e.g. pupils with learning needs,
physical disabilities?

10. Have arrangements been made for
students who receive travel assistance to
and from school in normal circumstances to
receive such assistance when travelling to
an alternative placement?

11. Have students been informed not to
accept lifts home from employees of the
Learning Provider (other than by the
designated travel arrangements)?

12. Have students been briefed about:



                                                 19
a Expected behaviour during travel?

b Health and Safety i.e. seatbelts, safe
methods of alighting, not leaving seat until
vehicle has stopped etc?

c What to do in the case of an accident?

Name………………………..

Role………………………….

Date………………………….



**Minibuses should normally have an adult supervisor in addition to the driver.

No. of supervisors for Vocational Visits and Work Experience -
Secondary - 1 adult : 20 group members
Special Needs - 1 adult : 3 group members
Profound Multiple Learning Difficulties / Epileptic - 1 adult : 1 group member

There may be occasions, particularly when using Authority approved transport and/or for journeys
between learning sites, where the above ratio may reasonably be increased as determined and
directed by individual Heads.




10.13 Preparation: Learner Personal Travel Plan to offsite learning


      1. Name of Learner:

      2. Home address:

      3. School address:

      4. Offsite Learning Provider address:

      5. Which School Year are you in?


      Year 7                     Year 8                   Year 9                  Year 10


      Year 11                     Year 12                 Year 13



                                                                                             20
 6. How do you normally travel to and from school?

                                To                         From
 Walk
 Cycle
 Car
 Bus
 Tube
 DLR
 Train
 Taxi
 Moped/
 motorcycle
 Other?..................




 7. Why do you travel in the way that you do? (tick all statements that apply
 to you)

Statement:                                                       Further comment:
I live far away from my school/college
I live very close to my school/college
The roads are not safe
I may get bullied
Concern for personal safety
To keep fit and healthy
It’s better for the environment
To travel with my friends
It’s more convenient
To save money
I enjoy this method of travel the most
My carers/guardians escort me on their way to
 work/elsewhere
Other reason?
 …………………………………………………….




                                                                            21
 8. How would you like to travel to and from school each day? (tick one box)

        Walk

        Cycle

        Car

        Bus

        Tube

        DLR

        Other? ...............................


 9. Do you have a bus pass / Oyster Card issued by a Local Authority?

 Yes                        No


 10. Do you own a bicycle?                           Yes                 No


 11. Would it be practical to cycle to school & offsite learning provider?

                                                     Yes                No


 12. What limits you walking, cycling or using the bus to get to and from
 school? (tick all statements that apply to you)


Statement:                                                 Further comment:
I live far away from my school/college
The roads are not safe
I may get bullied by students at my
 school/college
I may get bullied by students from other
 schools/colleges
The buses are too crowded
The bus driver’s behaviour
I do not live near a bus route
The bus service is too infrequent


                                                                              22
    I have too much to carry
    Bad weather
    Other
     reason?....................................................

      13. How do you plan to travel to the offsite learning provider?.......................
      ……………………………………………………………………………………….

      14. Are there any particular problems you might face on your journey to the
      offsite learning provider?.................................................................................
      ……………………………………………………………………………………….

      15. If so, what would help you overcome these problems?............................
      ……………………………………………………………………………………….

      16. Do you know how to get more information about your travel options?.....
      ……………………………………………………………………………………….




10.14 Learner Personal Travel Plan to offsite learning

PERSONAL TRAVEL PLAN


1. Name of Learner:

2. Home address:

3. School address:

4. Offsite Learning Provider address:

5. Person to contact in emergency:

6. Person to contact if late:


                                                    DAY 1                                 DAY2
1. How I will travel eg



                                                                                                              23
   - Walk
    -Cycle
    -Car
    -Bus
    -Tube
    -DLR
    -Other………………...

2. Times I will travel eg

   -morning


   -afternoon




11. Appendices


11.1 Map of school and college locations

11.2 Map of public transport routes

11.3 Map of crime hotspots involving young people

11.4 Public transport access to schools & colleges

11.5 Contacts

11.6 Bibliography




                                                     24
11.1 Map to show School and College locations

The following schools and colleges in LBTH are involved in 14-19 Pathways and
Boroughwide Campus:


Bishop Challoner RC School
Central Foundation Girls School
George Green’s School
Mulberry School
Raine’s Foundation School
Sir John Cass Foundation School
Tower Hamlets College
Wessex Centre




                                                                            25
11.2 Map to show network of public transport




                                               26
11.3 Map to show ‘hotspots’ of youth violence with victims 10-18


                                                                   27
11.4 Public Transport Access to schools & colleges


                                                     28
College                  Bus                DLR              Underground
Bishops Challoner        D3 15 115          Shadwell         Shadwell
Central Foundation GS    D6 D7 25 277 323   X                Mile End
                         339
George Green’s           D3 D7              Island Gardens   X
Mulberry                 D3 15 100 115      Shadwell         Shadwell
                         339
Raines Foundation        D3 D6 106 254      X                Bethnal Green
                         277 309
Sir John Cass            3 15 39 115 309    Limehouse        X
Wessex Centre            D6 8 25 309        X                Bethnal Green
                                                             Stepney Green
Tower Hamlets College    D6 15 115          Poplar           X




Public Transport Access to Secondary Schools


School                   Bus                DLR              Underground
Bethnal Green Tech       8 388              X                X
Bow Boys                 D8 25 52           Bow Church       Bow Road
Langdon Park             D8 108 115 309     All Saints       X
Morpeth                  D6 8 25 309        X                Bethnal Green
                                                             Stepney Green
Oaklands                 D3 D6 8 106 254    X                Bethnal Green
                         388
St Paul’s Way            D6 D7 277 309      Devons Road      X
                         323
Stepney Green            25 309 339         Limehouse        Stepney Green
Swanlea                  D3 25 106 205      X                Whitechapel
                         254




Public Transport: Access to Schools & Colleges


                                                                           29
Usage of Buses



No of schools/colleges          Bus routes
accessible
7                               D6 309
6                               D3 25
5                               D7 115
4                               8 15 339



      These are likely to be the most frequently used bus routes for students
       accessing their education

      As the routes pass through different catchment areas there is likely to be
       considerable mixing of students from different schools and colleges with
       the general public on these service buses

      Some of these journeys may also be possible by students using DLR &
       Underground transport




11.5 Contacts


                                                                                 30
Tower Hamlets Student Finance Section
Mulberry Place
5 Clove Crescent
E14 2BG

Tower Hamlets Education Transport Section
For info about transport service for students with disabilities and/or learning
difficulties
Tel: 020 7364 4869

Tower Hamlets Council Mobility Support Services
Tel: 020 7364 5843 or 5973

Tower Hamlets Community Transport
www.thct.org.uk for information about their services
Tel: 020 7987 6447

Tower Hamlets College
Poplar High Street
E14 0AP
Tel: 020 7510 7656 for Student Adviser

School Travel Adviser – John Rymell
Tel: 020 7364 6918

Tower Hamlets Public Transport Project Manager – Tony Davis
Tel: 020 7364

Transport Community Safety Manager TfL – Raymond Davis
Tel: 020 7027 8179

MET Police Service – Paul Sloan
Responsible for Safer Schools Officers
Tel: 07824 625997

Brent Youth Workers on Buses – Jennifer Shaw
Tel: 020 8937 3750

NYA: Accessing Positive Activities/Young People’s Bus Travel – John Barker
Tel: 0116 242 7417




11.6 Bibliography



                                                                                  31
   16-19+ Student Transport in London – report by MVA Research Ltd,
    commissioned by the Assoc of London Govt

   Accessing Positive Activities: Enabling young people to travel by bus –
    report by National Youth Agency 2008

   Insights from Diploma pathfinders – QCA

   On the buses – London Bulletin Jan/Feb 08

   Independent Travel Training Team – www.PublicFinance.co.uk

   Young people & crime on public transport – report by Dept for Transport

   Various articles on safer school routes – The Job, Metropolitan Police
    Authority

   Safer Transport Teams – The Londoner Jan 08

   Wolverhampton 14-19 Manual – 2005

   School Travel Project – Tower Hamlets Community Safety Service




                                                                              32

				
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