1920 by YSidJ6

VIEWS: 290 PAGES: 806

									 KEY TO THE PLAN OF THE SYDNEY UNIVERSITY
                AND GROUNDS.


1. MAIN BUILDING.*                   17. „GARDENER'S LODGE.

2. GREAT HALL.                      18. MESSENGER'S LODGE.
3. FISHER LIBRARY.                  19. CARETAKER      OF

4. MEDICAL SCHOOL.                  SCIENCE
                                          BUILDINGS.
5. BOTANY.
                                    20. ATTENDANT'S LODGE.
6. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY.
                                    21. THE OVAL.
7. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY.
                                    22. TENNIS COURTS.
8. GEOLOGY.
                                    23. HOCKEY GROUND.
9. PHYSICS.
                                    24. ST. PAUL'S COLLEGE.
10. BIOLOGY.
                                    25. Sr. JOHN'S COLLEGE.
11. ENGINEERING.
                                    26. ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE.
12. AGRICULTURE.
                                    27. WOMEN'S COLLEGE.
13. VETERINARY SCIENCE.
                                    28. WESLEY COLLEGE.
14. MACLEAY MUSEUM.
                                    29. TRAINING COLLEGE.
15. THE UNION.
                                    30. ROYAL PRINCE ALFRED
16. MANNING HOUSE.                       HOSPITAL!
                                    31. PRINCIPAL'S RESIDENCE,
                                         ST. ANDREW'S.
                     * Bedell's quarters herein.
        CALENDAR'
                   OF THE



UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY
           FOR THE YEAR


                1920




                  SYDNEY
   ANGUS AND EOBEEÏSON, LTD.
       PUBLISHERS TO THE UNIVERSITY
                    1920
                      TABLE OF CONTENTS.

PREFACE          ..
CALENDAR FOR 1920-1921
                      «
ROYAL CHARTER
THE UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY COLLEGES ACTS, 1900, 1902 AND 19
BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY
FISHER LIBRARY, MUSEUMS, AND UNIVERSITY EXTENSION LECTURES
MATRICULATION EXAMINATION
'TIME TABLES OF LECTURES
REGULATIONS ..             ..        ..           ..
¡LECTURE AND EXAMINATION SUBJECTS FOR 1920-21
LIST OF SCHOLARSHIPS, EXHIBITIONS, PRIZES, ETC.
TABLE OF FEES              ..        ..                            ..    ,..
FOUNDATIONS
UNIVERSITY PRIZES
PRIVATE ANNUAL PRIZES
HONOURS AT DEGREE EXAMINATIONS'

RESULTS OF MATRICULATION AND ANNUAL EXAMINATIONS
■UNIVERSITY OFFICERS
MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY
AFFILIATED COLLEGES ..               ..           ..               ...

RECOGNISED HOSPITALS ..              ..           ....................
LIST OF BENEFACTIONS

LIST OF DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY

REPORT OF THE SENATE AND ACCOUNTS FOR THE YEAR 1919

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL RECORD
UNIVERSITY CLUBS, ETC.
INDEX
                           PREFACE.
THE UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY was incorporated by an Act of the·.
Legislature of New South Wales, which received the Boyal
Assent on the 1st of October, 1850. This Act was amended
by subsequent Acts, enlarging the scope of the University, and
the whole were consolidated in the University and University
Colleges Act, 1900, followed by Amending Acts in 1902 and
1912.                                   v
       By a Eoyal Charter issued N7th February, 1858, the same
rank, style, and precedence are' granted to Graduates of the
University of Sydney as are enjoyed by Graduates of Universities
within the United Kingdom.
      By the University and University Colleges Act of 1900, and
the subsequent Act of 1912, the University of Sydney is declared
to be a body politic and corporate, consisting of a Senate con-
stituted of four Fellows appointed by the Governor, one Fellow
elected by the members of the Legislative Council, one Fellow
elected by the members of the Legislative Assembly, five Fellows-
representative of the teaching staff of the University, ten Fellows
elected by the graduates of the University, and three Fellows
elected by the aforesaid Fellows. The Act-of 1912 provided
that in addition to the ten Fellows elected by the graduates, The
Honorable Sir Normand MacLaurin and His Honor Judge
Backhouse should each during his life be a Fellow of the
Senate. The term of office of a Fellow is fixed by statute at
five years, and at two years in the case of Fellows representative
of the teaching staff. The term of the office of Chancellor is
fixed by by-law at three years ; that of the Vice-Chancellor is
limited by statute to one year. In both cases the retiring officer-
is eligible for re-election. The Senate has power to appoint all
Professors and other officers, and has the entire management and
superintendence over the affairs of the University, with power
to make by-laws governing the discipline, curriculum and other
matters, which by-laws, however, must be submitted or the·
approval of the Governor.




                                                                      i
    -vi.                             PEEFACE.

          Elections of Fellows by the graduates of the University are
    conducted by means of a convocation of electors, consisting of
    the Fellows of the Senate, Professors, Public Teachers and
    Examiners in the Schools of the University, Principals of Incor-
    porated Colleges within the University, Superior Officers
    •declared by By-law to be such, and Masters, Doctors and
    Bachelors in any Faculty over the age of 21 years. Provision is
    made by statute for the transmission of votes by post.
          The Senate is empowered to give such instruction, and to
    grant such degrees and certificates in the nature of degrees' as it
    thinks fit, in all branches of· knowledge except Theology and
    Divinity. Women are admitted to all University privileges
    equally with men.
          The University has a statutory annual endowment of £30,000
    -from the Government of New South Wales, and it also receives
    special Parliamentary appropriations for specific purposes, inclu-
    ding Evening and University Extension Lectures; Departments
    of Agriculture and Veterinary Science, of Botany, Organic
    'Chemistry (Pure and Applied) ; Economics and Commerce ; and
    Mechanical Engineering ; the maintenance of Science Eesearch
    Scholarships ; Tutorial Classes and other purposes, Provision
    has been made by statute for a Chair of Architecture. The
    University also derives income from the Challis Fund for general
    purposes ; from the Peter Nicol Russell Fund for the School of
    Engineering ; the Fisher Fund for the Library, and the Fees
    •of Students.
         There are ten Faculties in the University, viz., Arts, Law,
    Medicine, Science, Engineering, Dentistry, Veterinary Science,
    Agriculture, Economics and Architecture.
          In the Faculty of Arts two Degrees are given—namely
    Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts. The curriculum of study
    "for the Degree of B.A. extends over a period of not less than
    three years, during which students are required to attend lectures
    and pass examinations. The subjects of study are the English,
    Latin, Greek, French and German Languages, Ancient and
    Modern History, Oriental History, Mental Philosophy and Logic,
    Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, Geology and Palaeontology,
    Botany, Zoology, Physiology, &c.




I
                              PREFACE.                                 viL

      Evening Lectures are given, which include all the subjects
necessary for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, with limited
options.
      In the Faculty of Law the Degrees of LL.B. and LL.D. are
given. The curriculum of study for the Degree of LL.B. extends
over four years. The Degree of Bachelor of Law is recognised under
certain conditions by the Board for the admission of Barristers in
New South Wales as a qualification for admission to the Bar.
      Graduates in Arts of this University enjoy certain privileges
granted by Act of Parliament, exempting them from all exami-
nations other than an Examination in Law before admission as
Barristers of the Supreme Court. The Bules of the Supreme
Court also provide for a shortening of the period of Studentship-
at-Law, in the case of Graduates in Arts, from three years to
two, one of which may be concurrent with the final year of
studentship at the University. Graduates who enter into articles
of clerkship with attorneys and solicitors are required to serve
for three years only instead of five.
      The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge extend certain
privileges to students who have completed two years' study in the·
University of Sydney and who desire to compete in the Examina-
tions for Honours. Graduates of the University of Sydney who
comply with certain requirements maybe admitted as "advanced
students " in the University of Cambridge. " Advanced students ""
may, under special conditions, proceed to the Degree of Bachelor
of Arts or Bachelor of Law in that University, or obtain a
certificate testifying to their proficiency in research.
      In the Faculty of Medicine three Degrees are granted, viz.,
 Bachelor of Medicine, Doctor of Medicine, and Master of Surgery.
 The course of study for the Degrees of M.B. and Ch.M. extends
 over a period of five years. Diplomas in Public Health and
 Tropical Medicine are also granted.
       The Degrees in Medicine and Surgery granted by the
 University of Sydney may be registered upon the Colonial List
 of the British Medical Register, under section 13 of The Imperial-
 Medical Act of 1886.
       In the Faculty of Science the Degrees of Bachelor of Science,
 and Doctor of Science are given. The course for the Degree of.'
 B.Sc. extends over a period of at least three years, during
    Tili.                            PREFACE.

    •tue subjects of study are Mathematics, Chemistry (theoretical
    and practical), Physics (theoretical and practical), Mineralogy,
    Oeologyand Palaeontology, Zoology, Botany, etc.
          In the Faculty of Engineering Degrees are given in the
    several branches of Engineering, viz., Civil Engineering,
    Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, and Mining and
    Metallurgy.     The curriculum covers at least four years.
         In the Faculty of Dentistry the curriculum extends over a
    period of four years, leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Dental
    Surgery.
          In the Faculty of Veterinary Science there is granted
    the Degree of Bachelor of Veterinary Science, for which a
    •curriculum of four years is prescribed.
         In the Faculty of Agriculture the curriculum, extend-
    ing over at least four years, leads to the Degree of Bachelor
    •of Science in Agriculture.
          In the Faculty of Economics there are granted the Degrees
    of Bachelor and Master of Economics, the course of study for
    the former of which extends over a period of not less than four
    years, and the Diploma in Economics and Commerce, for which
    a three years' course is prescribed.
         In the Faculty of Architecture there is a four year curricu-
    lum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Architecture.
          Courses of Lectures in connection with the scheme for Uni-
    versity Extension are delivered in Sydney and other places upon
    application. Each course consists of six or ten lectures, and
    'Concludes with an examination. Those persons who have attended
    any course regularly, and passed the concluding examination,
    receive University Certificates to that effect. The subjects of the
    lectures have hitherto been English Literature, Modern History,
    Ancient History, PoliticalEconomy,LogicandMentalPhilosophy,
    •Commercial Law, Science, etc.
          The lectures of the Professors are open to persons not
    members of the University, upon payment of the fee prescribed
    ior each course.




L
                                PREFACE.

      An Act to provide for the establishment of Colleges of
Residence in connection with different religious denominations-
was passed by the Legislature during the Session of 1854.
Ample assistance was offered towards their endowment ; and the
maintenance of the fundamental principles of the University—
the association of students ioithout respect of religious creeds, in the
cultivation of secular knoioledge—is secured consistently with the
most perfect independence of the College authorities within their
own walls. Colleges in connection with the Church of England,
the Roman Catholic, Presbyterian and Wesleyan Methodist
Churches, have been established. A College for "Women has
also been established on a non-sectarian basis. The Colleges
have all been erected on the University grounds.
      The University (Amendment) Act of 1912 makes provision·,
for the allotment of Exhibitions by the Senate to students
desirous of entering the University. Such Exhibitions are
granted on the results of the Leaving Certificate Examinations-
held in pursuance of the Public Instruction Act of 1880 and
Amending Acts, and exempt the holders from payment of
Matriculation, Tuition and Degree Fees. They are tenable in.
any Faculty or Department. The number awarded yearly is
at the rate of one for every five hundred persons in the State of
New South Wales between the ages of seventeen and twenty
years, as shown by the last preceding Census of the Common-
wealth of Australia. The Exhibitions are granted irrespective
of sex, and are held subject to the by-laws of the Senate, which
determines the annual number to be allotted to each Faculty o?
Department.
              <Sgî)îtt2 Entbersüü OLaienïiar
                                   1920.
                               MARCH XXXI.


         M     Senate Meets. MATRICULATION and P. N. RUSSELL
         Tu           [SCHOLARSHIP Examinations begin. FINAL
         W            [DEGREE Examination in Medicine begins.
         Th
         F
         S
         S     Third Sunday in Lent.
              LENT TEKM begins.      University Examinations begin, viz.,
         M      [DKFKEKKD ANNUAL Examinations, HONOUE Examinations
         Tu            in the Faculty of Arts and DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING. ■
         W
         Th
              J      ANNUAL LAW Examinations,
                [Competitive Prize Compositions.
                                                      Latest date for receiving j
                                                                                    |
         F
         s
         s    Fourth Sunday in Lent.
              Examinations for Higher Degrees begin.
       M
       Tu
       W
       Th
       F
       S
       ¡
       S      Fifth Sunday in Lent.
       M      Lectures begin.
       Tu
       W      Faculty of Arts.
       Th
       F      Finance Committee.
       S
28   'S        Palm Sunday.
29   jM        Professorial Board.
30   I Tu
31   !W
     !
     I
              (Sgbittg ëtmbttsitg Calendar
                                   1920.
                                APETL XXX.
    /

    TIi
    E     Good Friday.
    s
    s     Easter Day.
     M    Easter Monday.
     Tu
     W
 8! Th
 9! F
10! s
11! S     First Sunday after Easter.
12 J M    Senate Meets.
13 ! Tu
Hl W
16 Th
16- F
17 I S
18 S      Second Sunday after Easter.
19 1 M    Faculty of Science.
20! Tu
21 i W
22: Th
23 ¡ F
24 ί S
25; S     Third Sunday after Easter.
26, M     Professorial Board.
27 Tu
28 1 W
29 ; Th
30 ! F    Finance Committee.
          ,Spotte? Üttttaratp. (EaUnbar
                             1920.
                          MAY XXXI.

 ■
     S
1
 2        Fourth Sunday after Eaeter.
 3   s
     M    Senate meets.
 4   Tu
 5   W
 6   Th
 7   F
 8   S
 9   S    Rogation Sunday.
10   M
11   Tu
12   W
13   Th   Ascension Day
14   F
15   S
16   S    Sunday after Ascension.
17   M
18   Tu
19   W
20 Th
 21 ¡ F
 22 S
 23 i S   Whit Sunday.
24 ! M.   Professorial Board.
25 ; Tu
26 ! W
27 ! Th
 28 1 F   Finance Committee.
 29 S     LENT TERM ends.
30 S      Trinity Sunday.
31 M
(Sgînug Enibersitgr (Ealenbar
                      1920.
                    JUNE XXX.




 King's Birthday.


 First Sunday after Trinity.
 Public Holiday.




 Second Sunday after Trinity.
 Senate meets.   TRINITY TERM begins.

 Faculty of Arts.


 Third Sunday after Trinity.
 Professorial Board.
 Faculty of Science.
 Prince of Wales Birthday.

 Finance Committee.

 Fourth Sunday after Trinity.
 Public Holiday.
     jgïmtg etniberaxtg (Eaknùar
                      1920.
                  JULY XXXI.


Th
F

S      Fifth Sunday after Trinity.
M      Senate meets.
Tu
W
Th
F
S
s      Sixth Sunday after Trinity.
M
Tu
W
Th
F
S
S      Seventh Sunday after Trinity.
M
Tu
W                                         [nations in August.
Th     Entries close for MEDICAL AND ENGINEERING Exami-
F
S
s      Eighth Sunday after Trinity.
M.     Professorial Board.
Tu
W
Th
F      Finance Committee.
S
         <Sgi)n.e¡) Itmbersxtg (Ealjcnïisr
                               1920.
                          AUGUST XXXI.
 1   S

            Ninth Sunday after Trinity.
 2 M        Public Holiday.
 3 Tu
 4 W
 5Í Th
  6IF
   7; S
  81 S      Tenth Sunday after Trinity.
 9 M        Senate meets.
10 Tu
Π W
12     Th
13 F
14 S
15 S        Eleventh Sunday after Trinity.
16 M        Examinations in MEDICINE and ENGINEEKINO.
17 Tu
18 W
19 Th
20 F
21 S        ΤΚΙΝΙΤΓ TETIM ends.
22 S        Twelfth Sunday after Trinity.
23 M
24 Tu
25 W
26 Th
27 F        Finance Committee.
28 S
29 S        Thirteenth Sunday after Trinity.
30 M
31 Tu
(Sgîmeg Sniberßitp (EaUirbar
                   1920.
             SEPTEMBER XXX.




 Fourteenth Sunday after Trinity.
 Senate meets.




 Fifteenth Sunday after Trinity.
 MICHAELMAS TERM begins.




 Sixteenth Sunday after Trinity.


 Faculty of Arts.

 Finance Committee.

 Seventeenth Sunday after Trinity.
jSpîmeg StntberstíD (Eakiiîiar
                   1920.
              OCTOBER XXXI.




 Eighteenth Sunday after Trinity.
 Public Holiday.
 Paculty of Science.   Professorial Board.



 Nineteenth Sunday after Trinity.
 Senate meets.




 Twentieth Sunday after Trinity.




 Twenty-first Sunday after Trinity.
                               "SCHOLARSHIP Examinations.
                           tions and for MATRICULATION
 Entries close for the ANNUAL UNIVERSITY· Examina-
 Finance Committee.
 Twenty-second Sunday after Trinity.
     pgbneg Stnibtcßüg (Eaknîiar
                   1920.
              NOVEMBER XXX.


M      Senate meets.
Tu
W
Th
F
S
S      Twenty-third Sunday after Trinity.
M      Professorial Board.
Tu
W
Th
F
S
S      Twenty-fourth Sunday after Trinity.
M
Tu
W
Th
F
S     Lectures cease.
S     Twenty-fifth Sunday after Trinity.
M
Tu
W
Th
F     Finance Committee.
S
s     Advent Sunday.
M     ANNUAL Examinations begin.
Tu
     jgïmeg Enibcrsitg (Ealenïmr
                      1920.
                DEGEMBEE XXXI.
W

Th
F
S
     Second Sunday in Advent.
s
M    Senate meets.
Tu
       Γ
W
Th
F
S    MioHAjiLMAS TERM ends.
S    Third Sunday in Advent.
BI
Tu
W
Th
F    Finance Committee.
S
     Fourth Sunday in Advent.
s
M
Tu
W
Th
F
S    Christmas Day.
S    First Sunday after Christmas.
M
Tu
W
Th
F
                                 1921.
                       JANUAEY XXXI.
 1 S


 2        Second Sunday after Christmas.
 3   s
     M
 4   Tu
 5   W
 6   Th   Epiphany.
 7   F
 8   S
 9   S    First Sunday after Epiphany.
10   M
11   Tu
12   W
13   Th
14   F                                     °
Io   R
16   S    Second Sunday after Epiphany.
17   M
18   Tu
19   W
20   Th
21   F
22   S
23   S    Septuagésima Sunday.
24   M
25   Tu
26   W
27   Th
28   F    Finance Committee.
29   S
30   S    Sexagésima Sunday,
31   M
           >gîmeg Mïaùztsity ÔEaUnbar
                            1921.
                     FEBRUARY XXYIII.
 1   Tu


 2   W
     Th
 4 F       Entries close for the Matriculation and University
 5 S                                       [Examinations in March.
 6 S       Quinquagesima Sunday.
 7 M       Senate meets.         Latest date for receiving Theses
 8 Tu                                          [for the M. A. Degree.
 9 W       Ash Wednesday.
10 Th
11 F                                                     [Exhibitions.
12 «       Latest day for receiving applications for Public
13 S       First Sunday in Lent.
14 M
15 Tu
 16 ! W
 17 i Th
 18 ( F                                          [and for Bursaries.
 19 ; S    Applications close for Post-Graduate Scholarships
20 S       S cond Sunday in Lent-
21 M
22 Tu
23 W
 24 ' Th
 25 ! F    Finance Committee.
 26 : s
 27! S     Third Sunday in Lent.
 28 ■ M    MATRICULATION and P. N. RUSSELL SCHOLARSHIP
                  'Examinations. FINAL DEGREE Examination
                  "in Medicine.
              (Sgïmeg (Enibersttp (Ealmbar
                                    1921.
                                 MAHCH XXXI.
    1   Tu

 2      W
 3      TL·
 4      F
 5      S
 6      S     Fourth Sunday in Lent.
 7      M     Senate Meets.     LENT TEKM begins.       University Examina-
 8      Tu        'tions, viz., DEFERRED ANNUAL Examinations,
 9      W         L NNUAX
                  AAW Examinations, HONOUR Examinations in the Facu
10      Th        of Arts and FACULTY OF ENGINEERING.       Latest date for
11      F       [receiving Competitive Prize Compositions.
12      S
13      S     Fifth Sunday in Lent.
14      M     Examinations for Higher Degrees.
15      Tu
16      W
17      Th                                        <3
18      F
19      tí
20      S     Palm Sunday.
21      M     Lectures begin.
22      Tu
23      W     Faculty of Arts.
24      Th
25      F     Good Friday.
26      S
27      S     Easter Day.
28      M     Easter Monday.
29      Tu
30      W     Professorial Board.
31      Th
ι
          (SgîiïttD Erabersüg (EaUnbar
                                 1921.
                            APRIL XXX.
          Γ
 1 F      j
          i
          Finance Committee.
I     S   !
1
0.        First Sunday after Easter.
34   Ms   Senate Meets.
 5   Tu
 6   W
 7   Th
 8   F
 9.  S
10   S    Second Sunday after Easter.
11   M    Faoilty of Science.
12   Tu
13   W
14   Th
15   F
■ 16 S                                   I
17 S      Third Sunday after Easter.
18 M
19 Tu
20 W
21 Th
22 F
23 S
24 S      Fourth Sunday after Easter.
25 M      Professorial Board.
26 Tu                              f
27 W
28 Th
29 F      Finance Committee.
30 S
             ΒΪηεερ <Enttar0ttj) (Mtnbar
                              1921.
                            MAY XXXI.
1    S    Rogation Sunday.


 2   M    Senate meets.
 3   Tu
 4   W
 5   Th   Ascension Day
 6   F
 7   S
 8   S    Sunday after Ascension.
 9   M
10   Tu
11   W
                                        I
12   Tk
13   F
14   S
15   S    Whit Sunday.
16   M                                      -
17   Tu
18   W
19   Th
20   F
21   S
22   S    Trinity Sunday.
23   M    Professorial Board.
24   Tu
25   W
26   Th
27   F    Finance Committee.
28   S    LENT TERM ends.
29        First Sunday after Trinity.
30
31
     s
     Tu
     M
          (Sgîiittg (Smbersiigr (EaUnuar
                                    1921.
                                  JUNE XXX.
1    W


 2   Th                       *
 3   F     King's Birthday.
 4   S
 5         Second Sunday after Trinity.
 6   s
     M     Public Holiday.
 7   Tu
 8   W                                        '
 9   Th
IO   F
11   S
12   S     Third Sunday after Trinity.
13   M     Senate meets.    TRINITY TERM begins.
14   Tu
15   ΛΝ    Faculty of Arts.
16   Th
17   F
18   S
19   S     Fourth Sunday after Trinity.
20   M
21   Tu    Faculty of Science.
22   "W
23   Th    Prince of Wales Birthday.
24   F     Finance Committee.
25   S
26   S     Fifth.Sunday after Trinity.
27   M     Public Holiday.
28   Tu    Professorial Board.
29   W
30   Th
           pímeg Stoitersitp (Ealcîtïmr
                               1921.
                            JULY XXXI.
1    F


 2   S
 3        Sixth Sunday after Trinity.
 4   s    Senate meets.
 5   M
     Tu   „
 6   W
 7   Th
 8   F
 9   S                                                                 •
10
11   s
     M    Seventh Sunday after Trinity.
12   Tu
13   W
14   Th                                                     •
15   F
16   S
17   S    Eighth Sunday after Trinity.
18   M
19   Tu
20   W                                  [nations on August 15th.
21   Th   Entries close for MEDICAL AND ENGINEERING Exami-
22   F
23   S
24   S              : tiday after Trinity.                         '
25   M    Professorial Board.
26   Tu
27   W
28   Th
29   F    Finance Committee.
30   S
31   S          h Sunday after Trinity.
            £Ï)tttg Eratoersitg (Ealenbax
                               1921.
                            AUGUST XXXI.
 1 M      Public Holiday.


 2   Tu
 3   W
 4   Th
 5   F
 6   S
 7   S    Eleventh Sunday after Trinity.
 8   M    Senate meets.
 9   Tu
10   W
11   Th
12   F
13   S
14   &    Twelfth Sunday after Trinity.
15   M    Examinations in MEDICINE and ENGINEERING.
16   Tu
17   W
18   Th
19   F
20   S    TRINITY TERM ends.
21   S    Thirteenth Sunday after Trinity.
22   M
23   Tu
24   W
25   Th
26   F    Finance Committee.
27   S
28        Fourteenth Sunday after Trinity.
29   M
30   Tu
31   W
          ígímeg Umbersttß (EaUnbat
                            1921.
                      SEPTEMBEE XXX.
1 Th


2    F
3    S
4         Fifteenth Sunday after Trinity.
5    s
     M    Senate meets.
6    Tu
7    W
8    Th
9    F
10   S
11   S    Sixteenth Sunday after Trinity.
12   M    MICHAELMAS TERM begins.
13   Tu
14   W    Faculty of Arts.
15   Th
16   F
17   S
18        Seventeenth Sunday after Trinity.
19   s
     M    Faculty of Science.
20   Tu
21   W
22   Th
23   F
24   S
25   S    Eighteenth Sunday after Trinity.
26   M    Professorial Board.                 ^
27   Tu
28   W
29   Th
30   F    Finance Committee.
          Süiiitep itnibersitp (Eaüitöar
                            • 1921.
                        OCTOBER XXXI.


 1   S
2          Nineteenth Sunday after Trinity.
3    s
     M     Public Holiday.
4    Tu
5    W
6    Th
7    F
8    S
9    S     Twentieth Sunday after Trinity.
1    M     Senate meets.
1
0    Tu
1
1    W
1
2    Th
1
3    F
1
4    S
1
5    S     Twenty-first Sunday after Trinity.
1
6    M
1
7    Tu
1
8    W
2
9    Th
2
0    F
2
1    S
2
2    S     Twenty-second Sunday after Trinity.
2
3    M                              [MATRICULATION SCHOLARSHIPS.
2
4    Tu                         [tions and for Examinations for
2
5    W
2
6    Th    Entries close ¿for the ANNUAL UNIVERSITY Examina-
2
7    F     Finance Committee.
2
8    S
3
9    S     Twenty-third Sunday after Trinity.
3
0    M     Professorial Board.
1
           »gîmqj Stntefiüg (ílaknuar
                           1921.
                       NOVBMBEE XXX.
1 Tu


 2   W
 3   Th
 4   F
 5   S
 6   S    Twenty-fourth Sunday after Trinity.
 7   M    Senate meets.
 8   Tu
 9   W
10   Th
11   F                    .;,
12   S
13   S    Twenty-fifth Sunday after Trinity.
14   M
15   Tu
16   W
17   Th
18   F
19   S    Lectures cease.
20   S    Twenty-sixth Sunday after Trinity.
21   M
22   Tu                                         ,
23   W
24   Th
25   F    Finance Committee.
26   S
27   S    First Sunday in Advent.
28   M    ANNUAL Examinations begin.
29   Tu
30   W
          <Sgîmeg Strabersüg (Ealenbat
                                   1921.
                          DECEMBER XXXI.
 1 Th


 2   F
 3   S
 4            Second Sunday in Advent.
 5   s
     M        Senate meets.
 6   Tu
 7   W
 8   Th
 9   F
10   S        MICHAELMAS TERM ends.
11            Third Sunday in Advent.
12
     s
     M
13   Tu
14   W
15   Th
16   F    ■
17   S
18   S        Fourth Sunday in Advent.
19   M
20   Tu
21   W
22   Th
23   F        Finance Committee.
24   S
25   S        Christmas Day.
26   M
27   Tu
28   W
29   Th
30   F ■!
31   s        !
     i
            ROYAL CHARTER
                           OF THE


     UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY.
                  FEBRUARY 27TH, 1858.



19ÍCtOT.tílf by tke Grace of God, of the United Kingdom Recites Act
of Great Britain and Ireland, Queen, Defender of the poration.
Faith, to all to whom these presents shall come Greeting :
WHEREAS under and by virtue of the provisions of an
Act of the Governor and Legislative Council of our
Colony of New South Wales, passed iu the fourteenth
year of our reign, No. 31, intituled "An Act to Incor- -
porate and Endow the University of Sydney," and to
which our Soyal Assent was granted on the 9 th day of
December, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty-one,
a Senate, consisting of Sixteen Fellows, was incorporated
and made a body politic with perpetual succession, undeor
the name of the University of Sydney, with power to
grant, after Examination, the several degrees of Bachelor
of Arts, Master of Arts, Bachelor of Laws, Doctor of
Laws, Bachelor of Medicine, and Doctor of Medicine,
and to examine for Medical Degrees in the four Branches
of Medicine, Surgery, Midwifery, and Pharmacy. AND
whereas our trusty and well-beloved Sir William Thomas
Denison, Knight Commander of our most honourable
Order of the Bath, Lieutenant-Colonel in the; Royal
Engineers, our Captain-General and Governor-in-Chief
2                              ROYAL CHARTER.

8en!ît°n "' 'n niK^ over 0lu sa^ Colony, has transmitted to us the-
humble Petition of the Senate of the said University of
Sydney under their common seal, dated the 9th of Feb-
ruary One Thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty-seven,,
wherein is set forth a statement of the establishment
of the said University, the appointment of learned Pro-
fessors of the Facultjr of Arts, and the provisions adopted
and to be adopted in respect of the faculties of Laws and
Medicine, and the course of Education and discipline for
Soliciting ^1ζ Scholars, Undergraduates, and Graduates of the said
recognition University, and in which it is humbly submitted that-
conferred bv the standard of acquirements which must be attained by
the Univer- Graduates in the University of Sydney is not below that
prescribed by the most learned Universities of the
United Kingdom, and the direction of the studies in the
said University has been committed to Professors who
have highly distinguished themselves in British Univer-
sities, that the rules under which the high standard in the
University has been fixed cannot be altered without the
approval of our representative in the Colony, and that
there is invested in him the power of interference should
the rules laid down be unduly relaxed in practice, and
that, therefore, the Memorialists confident^ hope that
the Graduates of the University of Sydney will not be
inferior in scholastic requirements to the majority of
Graduates of British Universities, and that it is desirable
» to have the degrees of the University of Sydney generally
recognised throughout our dominions ; and it is also
liumbly submitted that although our Eoj'al Assent to the
Act of Legislature of New South Wales hereinbefore
recited fully satisfies the principle of our law that the
power of granting degrees should flow from the Crown,yet
that as that assent was conveyed through an Act which
has effect only in the territory of New South Wales, the
Memorialists believe that the degrees granted Iy the said
University under the authority of the said Act, are not
legally entitled to recognition beyond the limits of New
South Wales ; and the Memorialists are in consequence
most desirous to obtain a grant from us of Letters Patent
requiring all our subjects to recognise the degrees given
under 0 the Act of the Local Legislature in the same
manner as if the said University of Sydney had been an
                    KOYAL CHARTER

University established within the United Kingdom under
a Royal Charter or an Imperial enactment ; and the
Memorialists therefore hereby most humbly pray that
we will be pleased to take the premises into our gracious
■consideration and grant to the University of Sydney
Letters Patent effective of the object therein set forth.
Now KNOW YE that we, taking the premises into consider-
ation, and deeming it to be the duty of our Royal office,
for the advancement of religion and morality and the
promotion of useful knowledge, to hold forth to all classes
■and denominations of our faithful subjects, without any
distinction whatsoever, throughout our dominions
encouragement for purming a regular and liberal course of
education, and considering that many persons do pro-
secute and-complete their studies in the Colony of New
South Wales, on whom it is just to confer such distinc-
tions and rewards as may induce them to persevere in
their laudable pursuits; do, by virtue of our Prerogative
Royal and our especial Grace and certain knowledge
and mere motion, hy these presents of us, our heirs aud
successors, will, grant, and declare that the Degrees of
Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, Bachelor of Laws, recoo-nitioD
Doctor of Laws, Bachelor of Medicine, and Doctor of granted.
Medicine, already granted or conferred or hereafter to be
granted or conferred by the Senate of the said Univers^
of Sydney shall be recognised 'as Academic distinctions
•and rewards of merit, and be entitled to rank, precedence,
and consideration in our United Kingdom and in our
■Colonies and possessions throughout the world as fully
as if the said Degree had been granted by any University
of our said United Kingdom. And- we further will and
■ordain that any variation of the Constitution of the said
University which inay at any time or from time to time
be made by an Act of the said Governor and Legislature
shall not, so long as the same or a like standard of
knowledge is in the opinion of the said Governor preserved
■as a necessary condition for obtaining the aforesaid degrees
therein, in any manner annul, abrogate, circumscribe,
or diminish the privileges conferred on the said
University btv these our Royal Letters Patent, nor the
sanks, rights, privileges, and consideration conferred by
ruch degrees.      And, lastly, we do hereby for us, our
                      ROYAL CHARTER.

heirs, and successors, grant and declare that these our
■Letters Patent or the enrolment or exemplification
thereof shall be in and by all things valid and effectual
in law according to the true intent and meaning of the·
same, and shall be construed and adjudged in the most
favourable and beneficial sense to the best advantage of
the said University, as well in all our courts as else-
where, notwithstanding any non-recital, uncertainty, or
imperfection in these our Letters Patent. IN WITNESS-
whereof we have caused these our Letters to be made-
Patent.
Witness ourself at Westminster, the Twenty-seventh
day of February, in the Twenty-first year of our Reign-
By WABRAHT under the Queen's sign manual.
                                             C. EOMILLY.
             THE UNIVERSITY
                              AND

UNIVERSITY COLLEGES ACT,
          1900.
       (As amended by the Acts of 1902, 1912 and 1916.)




An Act to consolidate the Acts relating to the University
  of Sydney and Colleges within the University of
  Sydney.
              [Assented to 22nd September, 1900.]
WHEHEAS it is expedient for the better advancement of
religion and morality and the promotion of useful
knowledge, to hold forth to all classes and denomina-
tions of Her Majesty's subjects resident in New South
Wales, without any distinction whatsoever, an encourage-
ment for pursuing a regular and liberal course of
education ; and to ascertain by means of examination
the persons who acquire proficiency in literature, science,
and art, and to reward them by academical degrees as
evidence of their respective attainments and by mark?
of honour proportioned thereto ; and to encourage and
assist the establishment of colleges within the University
of Sydney, in which colleges systematic religious in-
struction and domestic supervision, with efficient assist-
ance in preparing for the University lectures and
examinations, shall be provided for students of the
University : Be it therefore enacted by the Queen's
Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and
consent of the Legislative Council and Legislative
Assembly of New South Wales in Parliament assembled,
and by the authority of the same, as follows :—
6                  UNIVERSITY AND UNH7-ERSITr COLLEGES.

                                            PART I.
                                          Preliminary.
                 1. This Act may be cited as the "University and
              University Colleges Act, 1900," and is divided into
              Parts and Divisions, as follows :—
                PART I.—Preliminary.—ss. 1-5.
                PART II.—Incorporation and constitution of the Univer-
                       tity and provisions relating to the Senate.—ss. 6-18.
                PAKT III.—Examinations and degrees.—ss. 19-23.
                PART IV.—Endowment and finance.—ss. 24-29.
                PART V.—Students,            licensed masters,     and
                privileged
                    officers.—ss. 30-32.
                PART VI. — Colleges within the University—
                Division 1.—Interpretation.—s. 33.
                Division 2.—Endowment and subscribed fund—
                       (i.) Conditions of endowment.—ss. 34, 35.
                       (ii.) Endowment for building.—s. 36.
                       (iii.) Endowment for principal.—ss. 37-39.
                       (iv.) Interest on subscribed fund.—s. 40.
Repeal              Division 3.—Government of students.—s. 41.
Schedule.
                  2. (1) The Acts mentioned in the Schedule" to this
Officers
              Act are, to the extent therein expressed, hereby re-
under Acta    pealed.
hereby
repealed.            (2) All persons elected or appointed under the Acts
              hereby repealed, and holding office at the time of the
              passing of this Act, shall continue in office as if this Act
              had been in force at the time they were appointed, and
Regulations
or by-laws    they had been appointed hereunder.
under Acts
hereby               (3) All regulations or by-laws made under the
repealed.     authority of any Act hereby repealed, and being in force
              at the time of the passing of this Act, shall be deemed
              to have been made under the authority of this Act, and
              references in such regulations to the provisions of any
              Act hereby repealed shall be deemed to be references to
Interpre-     the corresponding provisions of this Act.
tation.
                  3. In this Act, unless the context or subject-matter
              otherwise indicates or requires,—
  UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.

  7

" Bachelor " means any person upon whom the degree
     of Bachelor has been conferred by the University.
" Doctor" means any person upon whom the degree
    of Doctor has been conferred by the University.
" Fellow " means a member of the Senate.
                                                                A ct
" Leaving Certificate " means—                                   . „Î?· 52,
         °                                                      of 1912,
  (1) the leaving certificate granted by the Depart- seot- 2·
      ment of Public Instruction on the recommenda-
      tion of the Board of Examiners, in pursuance
      of regulations under the Public Instruction
      . Act of 1880, and the Acts amending it, to a
      student leaving a secondary or high school
      which he has attended ; or
  (2) a leaving certificate granted by the Depart-
       ment of Public Instruction on the recommen-
       dation of the Board of Examiners to a student
       leaving a school—(registered under the Bur-
       saries Endowment Act, 1912, and not under the
       Department of Public Instruction)—who has
       complied with the conditions prescribed for the
       leaving certificate granted in pursuance of
       regulations under the Public Instruction Act
       of 1880 and the Acts amending it.
" Board of Examiners " means a board of not less
    than eight persons appointed by the Governor,
    being four officers of the Department of Public
    Instruction, and not less than four professors or
    other teachers of the University nominated by
    the .Senate.
"Master" means any person upon whom the degree
      of Master has been conferred by the University.
'' Minister " means Minister of Public Instruction.       Act No. 52
                                                                of 1012
" Exhibition " means public exhibition awarded to sect. 2,'
     a student who intends to graduate in the Uni-
     versity.
" Governor " means the Governor in Council.
"University" means the University of Sydney.
8                   UNIVJERSITY AND UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.

Act not to
interfere        4. Nothing in this Act shall be deemed to affect or
with rights
of Her
              interfere with any right, title, or interest of Her
Majesty-      Majesty, Her Heirs and Successors, or in any way to
14 Vic. No.   limit the Koyal Prerogative.
31, a. 24.
Women to         5. The benefits and advantages of the University,
be admitted
to Univer-    and the provisions of this and any other Act relating
sity privi-
leges.        thereto, shall be deemed to extend in all respects to
47 Vic. No.
17, s. 3.
              women equally with men.


                                           PART II.
                Incorporation and constitution of the University and pro-
                                visions relating to the Senate.
The Univer-
sity of
                 6. The University of Sydney is the body politic and
14 Vic. No.   corporate incorporated by that name under the Act
Sl, s. 1.     fourteenth Victoria number thirty-one, and shall, by
              that name, have a perpetual succession and a common
              seal and power to sue and be sued, and to take, pur-
              chase, and hold all real and personal property whatso-
              ever, whether the same is situate in New South Wales
              or elsewhere, and to grant, demise, alien, or otherwise
              dispose of the same, and also to do all other matters
              and things incidental or appertaining to a body politic.
Proviso.         Provided that the University shall not, unless with
Ibid. s. 2.
              the approval of the Governor, alienate, mortgage,
              charge, or demise any of its lands, except by way of
              lease for any term not exceeding thirty-one years from
              the making thereof, by which lease there shall be
              reserved and made payable during the whole of the
              term the best yearly rent that can reasonably be
              obtained without any fine or foregift.
Act No. 52       7. The body politic and corporate of the University
of 1912,      of Sydney shall consist of a Senate, which shall be
sect. 3.
              constituted by—
                    four Fellows appointed by the Governor ;
                    one Fellow elected by the members of the Legis-
                         lative Council ;
                    one Fellow elected by the members of the Legisla-
                         tive Assembly ;
      UNIVERSITY AKD UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.                   9

     five Fellows to be representative of the teaching
           staff of the University as follows:—The
           Chairman of the Professorial Board elected
           by the Board and four Fellows elected one
           by each of four Faculties ;
     ten Fellows elected by graduates of the Uni-
           versity ;
   three Fellows elected by the aforesaid Fellows :—
The first of each such appointment and election
shall be made within three months after the commence-
ment of this Act ; but if for any cause any such election
is not held, or is void, the Governor may appoint to the1
office :
   Provided that The Honorable ¡Sir Henry Normand
MacLaurin and His Honor Judge Backhouse shall each
during his life be a Fellow in addition to the ten
Fellows elected by graduates as aforesaid.
   8. Subject to the above proviso, the members of the
Senate shall, except as hereinafter mentioned, hold
office for five years, or until their successors are
appointed or elected : Provided also that the Chairman
of the Professorial Board and the four other Fellows
elected one by each of four Faculties shall hold office
for a period of two years. "All retiring Fellows shall be
eligible for reappointment or re-election.
   9. Any vacancy occurring by death or resignation of
a Fellow so appointed or elected shall be filled by a
like appointment or election, as the case may be, of a
Fellow, who shall hold office during the residue of the
term of the Fellow whose office he fills.
   9A. Elections of Fellows elected by the graduates
shall be according toby-laws to be made by the Senate,
or, if the Senate fails to make such by-laws before the
expiration of two months from the commencement of
this Act, shall be according to regulations which the
Governor is hereby authorised to make : Provided that
voting at such elections shall be by ballot of the
graduates voting personally or by voting papers trans-
mitted through the post as provided by such by-laws.
The election of the Chairman of the Professorial Board
IO                  UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.

             and the four other Fellows elected one by each of the
             four Faculties shall be according to by-laws to be made
             by the Senate.
                Such by-laws may be made at any time after the
             passing of this Act.
                9B. The appointment and election of the other Fellows
             shall be according to regulations to be made in that
             regard by the Governor.
                9c. Any election of Fellows by the graduates of the
             University shall be by the following persons of the age
             of twenty-one years, namely—
                   (a) Fellows ;
                   (¿>) officials declared by this Act to have the same
                         rights and privileges within the University as
                         Masters and Doctors ;
                   (c) graduates keeping their names in accordance
                         with any by-law in that behalf on the register
                         of the University, who have taken within the
                         University the degree of Master or Doctor ;
                   (rf) Bachelors and all other persons who obtain
                         any certificate which the Senate by by-law
                         declares to be equivalent to the degree of
                         Bachelor.
chancellor. io. (1) The Senate shall elect out of their own body,
31,5.^4. °' by a majority of votes, a Chancellor of the University,
24 vie No. w]j0 shall hold office for such period as the Senate shall
io, 8. O.      ρ     .       ..        .       L


           from time to time appoint.
Vacancies in      (2) Whenever a vacancy occurs in the said office by
cimncenor     death, resignation, or otherwise, the Senate shall, in
           like manner, elect out of their own body, a person to
           fill that office.
vice-Chan-         H1 (i) The Senate shall annually, on a day of which
14 vio. No. due notice has been given, elect out of their own body
ϋ1'4"-6"ν      & Vice-Chancellor of the University, who shall hold
24 Vic. No.    δ«        Λ
13, s. 5.        ornee tor one year.
Vacancies in       (2) Whenever a vacancy occurs in the said office by
Vice^chan- death, resignation, or otherwise before the expiration of
ceiior.      the year of office, the Senate shall, as soon as con-
             veniently may be, hold a meeting of which due notice
     UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.                                       11

has been given, and at such meeting elect out of their
own body some other person to be Vice-Chancellor for
the remainder of the year.
      (3) Any Vice-Chancellor shall be capable of re- Vice-Chan-
election as often as is deemed meet.                          eligible for
                                                                    re-election.
   12. (1) At every meeting of the Senate the Chancellor ^™^
or, in his absence, the Vice-Chancellor shall preside as si, s. io.
chairman, but if the Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor are i3^Jc¿.No'
both absent, the Fellows present shall elect a chairman.
   13. (1) All questions which come before the Senate Questions
shall be decided at any meeting duly convened, at which ^4¾¾,*11
a quorum is present, by a majority of the votes of the 31, β. 9.
Fellows present.
      (2) The chairman at any such· meeting shall have Chairman,
a vote, and in case of an equality of votes a second or
casting vote
      (3) At any such meeting eight Fellows shall form Quorum.
a quorum.
   14. (I) The Senate shall have full power to appoint senate may
and dismiss all professors, tutors, officers, and servants appointa1«1
        T-T      .r                                               dismiss
of the University.                                                officers.
                                                                      14 Vic. No.
     (2) The Senate shall have the entire management 2¡¿| tohav«·
of and superintendence over the affairs, concerns, and entire
property of the University, and in all cases unprovided ™ent. ge"
for by this Act the Senate may act in such manner as
appears to them to be best calculated to promote the
purposes of the University.
   1 4A. The Senate shall provide for the establishment S1T1""?
and maintenance of evening tutorial classes in science, classes.
economics, ancient and modern history and sociology,
and may provide for evening tutorial classes in other Act No. 52,
subjects.                                                        ™<η>.
  Such classes shall be open to students whether they
have or have not matriculated within the University.
  The Senate may issue diplomas in respect of students
who have in such classes studied for at least one year in
any one subject.
 12                   UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.

By-law              15. (1) The Senate may make by-laws and regula-
^;d21M-s      tions relating to—
■M Vic. NJ.              (a) the discipline of the University ; and
(by examinations for and the granting of scholarships,
exhibitions, degrees, certificates or honours ; and
(¢) the conferring of ad eundem degrees ;
Α Ν 52,
 Μ ·)°'          (c ' ) -^e establishing and regulating evening tutorial
sect. 5~(2).                  classes.
                   (d) the mode and time of convening meetings of the
               Senate ; and
               («) all other matters whatsoever regarding the Uni-
               versity ;
               Provided that no such by-law or regulation shall
               be repugnant to any existing law or to the general
               objects and provisions of this Act.
      Approval of           (2) All such by-laws and regulations shall be
           «ovenior.         reduced to writing and submitted for the consideration
                           and approval of the Governor, and when approved shall
                             be countersigned by him, and when so countersigned
                               and sealed with the seal of the University shall be of
                  full force and effect.
           To be laid           00 The Colonial Secretary shall lay every such
            before the        by-law and regulation before the Legislative Council
            Councu'and an<l Legislative Assembly during the session of Parlia-
          Legisiative ment in which it becomes in force or within six weeks
  esem y.        a^er ^6 beginning of the next ensuing session.
Evidence               W ^Y suc'1 by-law or regulation may be proved
                           in any Court by the production of a verified copy under
                                                          the seal of the University.
           University             16, (1) The University shall once at least in every
            their pro-        year, and also whenever the pleasure of the Governor
         to^je1*3          may be signified in that behalf, report their proceedings
                                                    "Governor,      to the Governor.
14Vic. No
31, s. 22. '           (2) A copy of such report shall be laid before the
«port°to be    Legislative Council and Legislative Assembly within six
laid before    weeks after it is made if Parliament is then in session,
               or
Councilor*        > ^ n0^> then within six weeks after θζ beginning of
Legislative    the next ensuing· session.
                                  ζ
Assembly                                                  _^
visitor.          17. The Governor of New South Wales shall be the
ma. Β. ηβ.       visitor of the University, with authority to do all things
               that pertain to visitors as often as he deems meet.
         UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY COLLEGES                                  13

    18. No religious test shall be administered to any Religious
person in order to entitle him to be admitted as a /¾', 2o.
■student of the University, or to hold any office therein,
or to partake of any advantage or privilege thereof.
      Provided that this enactment shall not be deemed
■to prevent the making of regulations for securing the
■due attendance of the students for divine worship at
•such church or chapel as their parents or guardians
may approve.

                            PART III.
                   Examinations and degrees.
    19. (1) The Senate may give such instruction as it Degrees,
•thinks fit,' and may, after examination, confer the several 3* ^'°{3No'
•degrees of Bachelor, Master, and Doctor, and such other «7'vic. No.
•degrees and such certificates in the nature o E degrees 's'
;as it thinks fit in all branches of knowledge, except
theology and divinity.
       Provided that no student in the University shall be
•compelled to attend lectures upon or pass examinations
in any of the following subjects, namely :—Ethics,
!metaphysics, and modern history.
       (2) All persons who obtain any certificate or guali- statue of
ification which the Senate by by-law declares to be of certificate»,
-equivalent rank to the degree of Bachelor shall have Ibid- "■ 2·
the same rights and privileges within the University as
Bachelors.
    20. (1) At the conclusion of every examination of Examiners
■candidates the examiners shall declare the name of „suiS"?
•every candidate whom they deem entitled to any degree, examina-
   ■t   -i                                                         tlOIlS.

¡ana also—                                                         14 vie. No.
    (β) the departments of knowledge in which his pro-      '
          ficiency has been evinced ; and
    (b) his proficiency in relation to that of other candi-
          dates.
       (2) The Chancellor shall give every such candidate certifloates.
:a certificate under the seal of the University and signed
by such Chancellor, in which the particulars so declared
«hall be stated.
14                     UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.

Ad eundem
degrees.            21. (1) When any person has obtained in any Uni-
44 Vie. No.      versity, recognised hj the by-laws of the University in
22, s. 1.
                 force for the time being, any degree corresponding or
                 equivalent to any degree which the Senate is now or may
                 hereafter be empowered to confer after examination, the
                 Senate niay confer such latter degree upon such persons-v
                 without examination.
Rights of              (2) The persons upon whom degrees are conferred,
holdersV
                 under the provisions of the preceding subsection, shall
                 be entitled to the sanie rights and privileges as apper-
                 tain to those who have taken the same degrees in the
                 ordinary course in the University.
Senate may          22. (1) The Senate may authorise any college or
authorise
educational      educational establishment, whether incorporated or not,
establish-       instituted for the promotion of literature, science, or art,
ments to
issue certifi-   to issue to candidates for the degrees of Bachelor of
cates.
4 Vic. No.       Arts, Master of Arts, Bachelor of Laws, and Doctor of
81, s. 11.       Laws certificates to the effect that the candidate for any
                 such degree has completed such course of instruction
                 therefor as the Senate by regulation prescribes.
Upon which              (2) Any person who presents to the Senate any
degrees may      such certificate may be admitted as a candidate for the
be granted.
                 degree to which it has reference.
Report on           23. (1) For the purpose of granting the degrees of
medical          Bachelor of Medicine and Doctor of Medicine, and for
establish-
ments by         the improvement of medical education in all its branches,
Senate.          as well in ^medicine as in surgery, midwifery, and
14 Vic. No
31, s. 12.       pharmacy, the Senate may report to the Governor the
                 medical institutions and schools, whether incorporated
                 or not, in the city of Sj'dney, from which, either singly
                 or jointly with other medical institutions and schools in
                 New South Wales or in foreign parts, it appears to the
                 Senate fit and expedient to admit candidates for medical
                 degrees.
Candidates
                       (2) On approval of such report by the Governor,
from such        the Senate shall admit as a candidate for the degree of
establish-       Bachelor of Medicine or Doctor of Medicine any person
ments may
be admitted      who presents to the Senate a certificate from any such
to degrees.
                 institution or school to the effect that such person has
                 completed the course of instruction therefor which the
                 Senate by regulation prescribes.
     UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.                               15

                         PART IV.
                  Endowment and finance.
   24. (1) By way of permanent endowment for the Permanent _
University the Governor is hereby empowered by war- n¡d. s. s.
Tant, under his hand, to direct to be issued and paid out
of the Consolidated Revenue Fund the sum of thirty
thousand pounds in every year as a fund for building,
and for defraying the several stipends appointed to be Amendedby
paid to the several professors or teachers of literature, of 1312,' '
science, and art, and to such necessary officers and Sec*- β W,
servants as are from time to time appointed by the uf 191e sect.
Senate, and for defraying the expense of such prizes, 2 '>■
scholarships, and exhibitions as are awarded for the
■encouragement of students in the University, and for
providing gradually a library for the same, and for dis-
charging all incidental and necessary charges connected
with the current expenditure thereof.
    Provided that where, on the taking after the year one „'[^ 52,
thousand nine hundred and twelve of any census by the sect, β'(2).
Commonwealth, it appears therefrom that the number
of persons between the ages of seventeen aud twenty
years then in New South Wales has increased since the
taking of the last preceding census, the endowment to
which the University was then entitled shall be increased
at the rate of one pound for every fifteen persons of
such increase.
      Provided also that the Senate may apply any por- Proviso,
tion of the said endowment fund to the establishment and Ibid·s· n-
maintenance of a college in connection with and under
the provisions of the University.
       (2) The said sum shall be paid in four equal To be paid
quarterly instalments, on the first day of January, the InstàlmenÏÏ
first day of April, the first day of July, and the first day
of October, in every year.
    25. The Senate may charge such reasonable fees for J«»'or
the respective degrees conferred as they with the appro- 14 VLC. NO.
bation of the Governor direct. Such fees shall be carried 3L's'13'
to one general fee fund for the payment of the expenses
of the University.                  -
16                   UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.

        Fees to Pro-           26. The Senate may by any by-laws and regulations-
                teaSrsnd provide for payment by the students of the University
     nid. s.           of reasonable fees to the professors or teachers for
                      attendance on" their lectures. Such professors or teachers
                            niay, in addition to their stipends, demand and receive
                                                         su<sh fees from the students.
         Fees for en-           27. The Senate may in like manner provide for pay-
         trance, &c. men(; by S110J1 students of reasonable fees for entrance,
                        degrees, certificates, and other University charges. The
                   Treasurer of the University shall, on behalf of the
                                      University, collect such fees from the students.
      Powers of               28. The securities representing the investments of the
               *erfse¿*teof sum of money bequeathed by the late Solomon Levey,
          Levey's            Esquire, to the Sydney College, with the
                                                                               interest
           1
             J^vIc! No. thereon, shall be held by the Senate upon trust to con-
              18,8.5.;          tinue to hold the same, or to alter them from time to
                                 time in favour of other investments at interest upon
                             such security and in such manner in all respects as the
                               Senate in their absolute discretion think fit, and the
                              clear or net interest or income arising therefrom shall
                         be applied in or towards the endowment of a scholarship
                            in the University under such regulations as the Senate,
                            in their absolute and uncontrolled discretion in respect
                             of making and altering the same, deem to be as nearly
                         as circumstances permit in accordance with the intention
                               of the said Solomon Levey in making the aforesaid
                                                                              bequest.
         Accounts of              29. The Senate shall once in every year transmit a.
                tocóme and ^3^ account 0^ *ue whole income and expenditure of the
              expenditure University to the Colonial Secretary, who shall submit
               beforeïhe tne same * tne Legislative Council and Legislative
                                       °
       Legislative Assembly ; such account shall be audited by
                                                                                    the
          Assembly1! Auditor-General, but nothing in the section shall pre-
           M Vic. No. vent the Senate from.employing a private auditor to·
                  Amended           examine the books of account of the University,
                                                                             by Act No.
rVof1912'                                    PA*TV.
                   Students, licensed masters, and privileged officiaU.
Residence of        30. No student shall be allowed to attend the lectures·
!ω.6", is.   or
                classes of the University unless he dwells—
(a) with his parents or guardian ; or
       UNIVEKSITY AND UNIVEESITY COLLEGES.                              17 '
   (b) with some relative or friend selected by his parents
         or guardian and approved by the Chancellor or
         Vice-Chancellor ; or
   (¢) in some collegiate or other educational establish-
         ment ; or
  . (d) with a tutor or master of a boarding-house licensed
         by the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor as herein-
         after mentioned.
   31. ( 1 ) Every person desirous of being licensed as a Licensing;
tutor or master of a boarding-house in connection with S™swlth
the University shall apply for his license to the Chan- students
cellor or Vice-Chancellor in writing under his hand uvic^No.'
specifying the house or houses belonging to or occupied 31.8-19-
by the applicant and intended by him for the reception
of students, and the number of students who may be .
conveniently lodged and boarded therein.
      (2) Such Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor may require Powers of
of any such applicant testimonials of character and „r ν"οβΓ°Γ
fitness for the office, and thereupon may grant or with- Chancellor,
hold the license for the academical year then current or
 then next ensuing.
      (3) Every such license shall be registered iu the ρ«™·
archives of the "University and shall lapse at the end of registered.
the academical year in which it was registered, but may
be renewed by the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor and
re-registered.
      (4) Every such license shall be revocable at any !¡evocation
time, and the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor may forth- of Ucenee·
with revoke the same in case of any misbehaviour of
such tutor or master of a boarding-house or of the
students under his care which, in the opinion of the
Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor and a majority of the
professors of the University, ought to be punished by
immediate revocation of such license.
          Exhibitions, Lectures, and Matriculation!
   31A. (1) The Senate shall allot to students entering £/%¾1'
the University public exhibitions, which shall take the sect. 8.'
form of exempting the holders from the payment of
matriculation, tuition and degree fees to the University ;
      UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.

such exhibitions shall be tenable as prescribed by
by-laws to be made by the Senate in that behalf;
Provided that the exhibitioner shall be of good conduct
and shall make such progress in his studiesas shall
satisfy the Senate.
       (2) The number of such exhibitions to beso allotted
 each year shall be one for every five hundred of the
 persons within New South Wales who are between the
 ages of seventeen and twenty as shown by last preceding
 oensus of the Commonwealth, or such other ratio as may
 be determined by resolution of both Houses of Parlia-
 ment. That the number of exhibitions tö be awarded
 at the end of the year one thousand nine hundred and
 thirteen shall not exceed one hundred.
       The Senate shall each year determine the number
 of such exhibitions to be allotted during that year to
 students entering each school within the University,
 having due regard to the expressed wish of the
 exhibitioner.
       (3) Such exhibitions shall be allotted in the order
 of merit shown by examinations for leaving certificates
 granted under the provisions of this Act commencing
 in the year one thousand nine hundred and thirteen
 to students to whom leaving certificates are granted
 which certify that they have passed such examination
 in the subjects and at the standards which the Senate
 determines are necessary for matriculation, and a cer-
. tain number of such exhibitions to be determined by
  the Senate may be allotted to students at evening
  tutorial classes :
       Provided that any person who has been a resident
 of New South Wales for three years may compete at
 such examinations and shall be considered equally
 with such students in the allotment of exhibitions, and
 any exhibition may be allotted to such person ac-
 cordingly.
       Provided also that the number of exhibitions to
 be allotted to such persons, in any one year, shall not
 exceed five per centum of the total number of exhibi-
 tions allotted in that year. .
       UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.                                      19

      3IB. The Senate shall allow students of the Teach- New s. 3i?.
ers' College and such teachers in schools under the schMisTmay
Public Instruction Act of 1880 as the Minister may »"end iec-
approve to attend the University lectures without the out payment
payment of any fees :           Provided that such teachers of iees·
have previously passed the entrance examination pre-
scribed by the University by-laws.
      31c. A leaving certificate which certifies that a New s. 3ic.
student has passed the required examination in the c^tificatee.
subjects and at the standards which the Senate deter-
mines are necessary for matriculation or the granting
to any person of an exhibition under the proviso to
sub-section 3 of section 31A, shall entitle the holder to
matriculate at the University.
      31D. Any student entering the University ,by means New ε 3lD
of the leaving certificate or exhibition shall be eligible
for any bursary or scholarship or exhibition at the
disposal of the Senate, subject to the terms of the
foundation thereof.
   32. Each and every of the following officials, that is Member»
η.                                                                     of the
IO say------                                                           Univereity.
                                                                   c
                                                                   l
   (a) every professor and other public teacher and 13) ¿
         examiner in the schools of the University; and
   (¿) every principal of any incorporated college within
         the University ; and
   (¢) every superior officer of the University declared to
         be such by any by-law
shall, during his tenure of office, but no longer, have
the same rights and privileges within the University as
are enjoyed by Masters and Doctors.

          PART VI.
Colleges within the University.
Division 1.—Interpretation.
33. In this part of this Act, unless the context or interpretad
subject-matter otherwise indicates or requires,—                       is vie. No.
  "College" means a college within the University.              ■'"'."
  "Principal" includes the master, warden, rector, or
  any other head of a college.
 20                    UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.

                         Division 2.—Endoioment and subscribed fund.
                                  (i) Conditions of endoioment.
 Endowmen t
 of Colleges.      34. Whenever—
 18 Vio. No.       (a) any collège has been established and incorporated
 »7, Β. 1.
                   by any Act ; and
                   (¿) the founders of or subscribers to such college have
                   complied with the conditions mentioned in the
                   next section,
                such college shall be entitled to the endowments herein-
                after severally mentioned, which said endowments shall
                be paid by the Treasurer under warrants signed by the
                Governor.
Conditions           35. No such college although incerporated shall be
of endow-
ment.           entitled to such endowments unless and until the sum of
Jtid. a. 2.
                ten thousand pounds at the least has been subscribed by
                its founders, and of that sum not less than four thousand
                pounds has been paid and invested in such manner as
                the Governor approves, and the residue has been to his
                ¡satisfaction secured to be paid within three years next
                following; nor unless
                    (a) the whole of the said ten thousand pounds is to be
                          devoted exclusively to the erection of college
                          buildings on land granted for that purpose by
                          Her Majesty to the University in trust for such
                          college, if any is so granted, and if not then upon
                          land otherwise conveyed to and accepted by the
                          University in such trust ; and
                   (¿) it has been agreed by the founders that the entire
                          amount shall be so expended, if the University so
                          requires, within five years next after the first pay-
                          ment on account of either of such endowments.

                                  [ii) Endowment for building.
Endowment          36. Thereshallbepaidoutof theConsolidatedEevenue,
for building.   in aid of the building fund of every college so incorporated,
rbid.s. 3.
                a sum or sums not exceeding in the whole twenty thousand
                nounds, nor more than has been from time to time actually
                expended by the college out of its subscribed funds for
                the purpose of building.
      UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.                                21

                (iii) Endowment for principal.
   37. There shall be paid out of the said Consolidated Endowment
Revenue annually, to such incorporated college in per- pars'sTSry.
petuity, a sum of five hundred pounds for the use of and Ibi,i-s- 4-
as a salary to the principal of such college or in aid of
euch salary.

   38. Every such principal shall be entitled to the annual Conditions
salary hereby provided for on the production of his own endowment
certificate at the time of each payment that he has ¡bi<i- s. 5.
during the period to which it relates performed the
duties of his office.
   Provided that he shall transmit to the Colonia
Secretary once in each year a certificate to the like
effect under the hands of such persons as are for that
purpose appointed by the constitution or rules of the
particular college.

   39. Where any person selected to be the principal of Provision
any such college is out of New South Wales at the time ^¡η"^
of his appointment no such certificate shall be required principal is
until after he has actually entered on his duties, but he south
shall be entitled to the salary, and the college to whichw^No
he has been appointed may receive the same accordingly 37,9. 6.
for his use from the day of his embarkation for New
South Wales.
   Provided that every principal shall actually enter on
his duties within six months after such embarkation
unless the Governor, upon being satisfied that unavoid-
able obstacles have intervened, thinks fit to extend that .
term to nine months.

               (iv) Interest on suhscribed fund.
   40. Until the subscribed fund is required for the ΑΓ^"^ο£
erection of college buildings as aforesaid, the interest Or subscribed
other proceeds accruing from the investment thereof, or e^en'fcd'in
of the portion remaining unexpended from time to time, building,
may be applied to the general purposes of the college as Ib'd's' 7'
the governing body of such college may determine.
22                   UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY COLLEGES.

                             Division 3.— Government of students.
     student» of        41. All students in any such college shall immediately
        be membe°s upon entering therein matriculate in the University, and
          of Univer- s¿all thereafter submit and be subject to the discipline
           attend"          thereof, and shall be required duly and regularly to
            /z^Ts        attend the lectures of the University on those subjects
                        an examination and proficiency in which are required
                       for honours and degrees, with the exception, if thought
                   fit by any such college, of lectures on ethics, metaphysios
                and modern history.

                                               SCHEDULE.
!Reference to Act.            Title or Short Title.            Extentof repeal.


U Vic. No. 31..      An Act to incorporate and endow
16 Vic. No. 28..     the University of Sydney.                 The whole.
17 Vic. No. IS..     An Act to amend an Act intituled
                     an Act to incorporate and endow           The whole.
                     the University of Sydney.                 The whole.
18 Vic. No. 37..     An Act to. enable the University of
                     Sydney to purchase the Sydney
                     College with the land attached            The whole.
22 Vic. No.   8..    thereto.
                     An Act to provide for the establish-
24 Vic. No. 13..     ment and endowment of colleges            The whole.
                     within the University of Sydney.
44 Vic. No. 22..     Ac Act to amend an Act intituled          The whole.
                     an Act to provide for the estab-
47 Vic. No. 17..     lishment     and    endowment of          The whole.
                     colleges within the University
                     of Sydney.                                The whole.
                     An Act to amend the Sydney Uni-
                     versity Incorporation Act.
                     "Ad      eundem     Degrees Act of
                     1881."
                     "University Extension         Act    of
                     1884."     .
Other Acts of Parliament relating
       to the University.

     *Act No. 78, 1916, " University (Amendment) Act
1916," increasing the statutory endowment from
twenty to thirty thousand pounds per annum and
providing a statutory endowment of two thousand
pounds per annum for establishing and maintaining
a chair of Architecture.

      *Act No. 19 1917, ." University Prizes and
Medals Alteration Act 1917," empowering the
University to award the Fairfax Prizes, the John
West Medal, and the Grahame Prize Medal at the
University Examinations for Scholarships at entrance
to the University.

      |ACT No. 2, 1918, "University (Senate) Amend-
ment Act, 1918," providing that the members of the
present Senate of the University of Sydney shall con-
tinue in office until a day to be proclaimed by the
Governor, and for that purpose to amend the Acts
relating to the said University.

     fAcT'No. 43, 1918, "University Amendment
(Exhibitioners' Fees) Act," authorising the Senate of
the University of Sydney to defray from the statu-
tory endowment the fees, at Universities and Educa-
tional Institutions abroad, of certain persons holding
public exhibitions at the University of Sydney ; for
that purpose to amend the Acts relating to such
University ; and for purposes consequent thereon
or incidental thereto.

                  •Printed in Calendar, 1918.
                  t        „       „       1919.



                                              V>
    BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

      All By-laws heretofore passed by the Senate and now in force are hereby
repealed, and in lieu thereof the following By-laws shall be and are hereby declared
te be the By-laws under which the University of Sydney shall henceforth be
governed. Provided always, that nothing herein contained shall be deemed to
revive any By-law previously repealed, or to prejudice any matter already done
vr commenced under any By-laxo hitherto in force.



           CHAPTER I.—THE CHANCELLOR AND VICE-CHANCELLOR.
      1.—The election to the office of Chancellor shall take
place at a duly convened meeting of the Senate to be held
in Lent Term.
     2.—-The Chancellor shall be elected for a period of three
years (except as hereinafter provided), to be computed from
the date of election, but shall be eligible for re-election.
     3. In the event of the office of Chancellor becoming vacant
by death, resignation, or otherwise, before the expiration of
the full term of office herein prescribed, the election of a
successor shall be proceeded with at the next ensuing regular
meeting of the Senate, and the Chancellor so appointed shall
hold office until the Lent Term next after the expiration of
three years from the date of such election.
     4.—The election of Vice-Chancellor shall take place
annually at a duly convened meeting of the Senate, to be
held in Lent Term, except as in cases otherwise provided by
the Act of Incorporation.
     S.—The Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor and *Warden shall
be members e.v-officio of every Faculty, Board, or Committee
appointed by any By-law or otherwise by the Senate ; and
     * References in any by-law to the Warden or to the Registrar shall be taken to be
references to the Warden and Registrar.    See By-laws, Chapter VI.
    26                BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

    at every meeting of any such Faculty, Board, or Committee
    the Chancellor, or, in his absence, the Vice-Chancellor or, in
    the absence of both, the Chairman shall preside, or in his
    absence a member elected for that sitting. The presiding
    officer at such meetings shall have a vote, and in case of an
    equality of votes, a second or casting vote.

                             CHAPTER II.—THE SENATE.
                           MEETINGS AND RULES OF PROCEDURE.


          1.—The Senate shall meet on the first Monday in every
    month, or on the nearest convenient day should such first
    Monday be a public holiday, and may adjourn from time to
    time to conclude any unfinished business.
          2.—At any time in the interval between such meetings it
    shall be competent for the Chancellor, or in his absence the
    A^ice-Chancellor, in any case of emergency, to call a special
    meeting of the Senate, to be held as soon as conveniently
    may be, for the consideration of any business which he may
    wish to submit to them.
I         3.-Upon the written requisition of any three "members
    the Chancellor, or in his absence the Vice-Chancellor, or in
    the absence of both, the Registrar, shall convene a special
    meeting of the Senate, to be held as soon as conveniently
    may be after the expiration of seven days from the receipt
    of such requisition.
          4.—Except in any case of emergency as aforesaid, no
    motion initiating a subject for discussion shall be made but
    in pursuance of notice given at the previous meeting, and
    every such notice shall be entered in a book to be kept by
    the Registrar for that purpose.
          5.—The Registrar shall issue to each member of the
    Senate a summons with a written specification of the various
    matters to be considered at the next meeting of the Senate,
    whether such meeting be an ordinary or special one ; and
    such summons, except in any case of emergency, as afore-
    said, shall be issued at least three days previous to such
    meeting.
                    CHAPTER II.—THE SENATE.                                      ¡¿7

      6.—In the event of a quorum* of the Senate not being
present at any meeting within half an hour after the hour
appointed, the members then present may appoint any con-
venient future day, of which at least three days' notice shall
be given by the Registrar in the usual manner.
      7.—All the proceedings of the Senate shall be entered in
a journal, and at the opening of each meeting the minutes
of the preceding meeting shall be read and confirmed, and
the signature of the Chairman then presiding shall be
attached thereto.
             FELLOWS    RHPRKSKNTATiVB OF    THR   TEACHING   STAFF.         »

     8.—The Chairman of the Professorial Board shall be
elected in the manner provided in Chapter VHI. of the By-laws.
     9.—The four Fellows elected—one by each of
four .
Faculties—shall be elected by the Faculties of Arts, Law,
Medicine and Science respectively.
      10.—The election shall be held at a duly convened
meeting of each Faculty to be held in Term time.
     11.—In the event of the office of Fellow elected by any
Faculty becoming vacant by death, resignation, or otherwiss,
before the expiration of his full term, the election of a
successor shall be proceeded with at a duly convened meeting
of that Faculty to be held as soon as conveniently may be.
                       FELLOWS ELECTED BY THS ORADUATF.S.

      12.—The quinquennial election of Fellows by the gradu-
ates shall be held on the second or third Monday in November
as may be decided by the Senate.
     At least sixty days' notice of the day of election shall be
given by advertisement in two or more of the daily news-
papers published in Sydney and by notice posted at the
University.
      13.—No person shall be eligible for election unless his
name shall have been communicated to the Registrar under
the hands of two quahfied voters not less than twenty-eight
days nor more than forty-two days before the day fixed
for the election.
             * See University and University Colleges Aot, eec. 13, p. 11.
28         -      BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

     14.—On the expiration of the time for receiving nomina-
tions the Registrar shall cause the name of each person so
nominated and the fact of his candidature to be forthwith
advertised in two or more of the daily newspapers published
in Sydney and to be posted at the University.                     °
     15.—In the case of there being only ten nominations the
Registrar shall report the fact to the Chancellor, who shall
then declare the candidates duly elected. If there are more
candidates than vacancies the election shall be by ballot of
the graduates voting personally or by voting papers trans-
mitted through the post.
      16.—The elections shall be conducted in the following
manner :—
        (a) A ballot shall be taken on the day appointed for the
             election at the University or such other place as
             the Senate may determine, of which due notice
             shall be given.
        (b) The ballot shall commence at 10 a.m. and close at
             5 p.m. on the day appointed.
        (c) The voting papers shall contain the names of all
             duly nominated candidates arranged in alpha-
             betical order·. The voter shall mark his voting
             paper by making a cross opposite the name of
             each candidate for whom he votes.
        (d) At. any time after the notification of the day of
             election and not later than the third day before
             the day of' election, a duly qualified voter who
             desires to vote by post may apply in writing
             for a voting paper to the Registrar, and there-
             upon the Registrar shall forward a voting paper
             to such appplicant as soon as possible.
                   Each such voting paper forwarded by the
             Registrar shall be accompanied by a form of
             declaration to be signed by the applicant and to
             state his qualification and that he is of the age of
             twenty-one years, and also by an envelope marked
             " voting paper " and by a second envelope ad-
             dressed to the Registrar.                       c
                                                                          ^




                  (JHAPTER II.—THE SENATE.                           29

                    Having marked his voting paper, the voter
              shall place it without any other matter in the
              envelope marked " voting paper," which he shall
              seal and transmit to the Registrar, together with
              the declaration duly signed, in the envelope pro-
              vided for that purpose.
                    All voting papers so transmitted and received
              at the University not later than 5 p.m. on the day
              of election shall be counted in the ballot.
         (e) The ballot shall be conducted by the Registrar,
              assisted by scrutineers to be appointed by the
              Chancellor. Each candidate shall be entitled to
              nominate one scrutineer.
         (/) At the expiration of the time allotted for the
              ballot the Registrar and scrutineers shall proceed
              to the examination of the voting papers, including
              those transmitted by post and received as afore- .
              said, and the Registrar shall report the result to ·
              the Chancellor, who shall then declare the ten
              candidates who have received the greatest number
              of votes to be duly elected Fellows of the Senate.
         (g) In the event of an-equality of votes, the election
              shall be decided by the casting vote of the Chan-
              cellor.
         (h) The Registrar shall reject as informal any voting
              paper upon which votes are not recorded for the
              exact number of candidates to be elected. In
              any case of doubt as to the formality of a voting
              paper the matter shall be referred to the Chan-
              cellor, whose decision shall be final.
      17.—The Registrar shall prepare a list of all persons
entitled to vote, completed to the last day for receiving
nominations for any election, and a copy of such list shall
be exhibited at the University during the period from that
date to the day of election.
      18.—In the event of the office of a Fellow elected by the
graduates becoming vacant by death or resignation before the
expiration of his full term the Senate at its first meeting after
30               BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

the occurrence of the vacancy shall fix a day of election of
which at least sixty days' notice shall be given by advertise-
ment in two or more of the daily newspapers published in
Sydney, and by notice posted at the University.
     The election shall be conducted in manner similar to that
prescribed for quinquennial elections.
             .   REGULATIONS   MADIÎ   BY   THK   00?KRtfOP.   IN   COUNCIL.

      1.—The quinquennial election of Fellows by the Fellows
shall be held at'a special meeting of the Senate to be convened
for that purpose and to be held as soon as conveniently may
be after the election of Fellows by the graduates.
      2.—In the event of a vacancy occurring by death or
resignation in the office of a Fellow elected by the Fellows
before the expiration of his full term the vacancy shall be
filled at the next ensuing regular meeting of the Senate.
             CHAPTER ΙΠ.—THE SEAL OF THE UiVIVEKSfTr.
     1.—The Seal, of the University shall be placed in the
charge of the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor and Registrar,
and shall not be affixed to any document except by order
of the Senate.                     ,
                           CHAPTER IV.—FINANCE.
      1.—The general supervision of the financial affairs of the
University ,shall, subject to the direction and control of the
Senate, be entrusted to a Finance Committee, consisting of
the Chancellor, the Vice-Chancellor, the Warden, and four
Fellows of the Senate, of which number four shall constitute
a quorum.
      Such four Fellows shall be chosen annually by.the Senate
and shall remain in office until their successors shall have been
appointed. AU casual vacancies shall be notified by the
Registrar at the next meeting of the Senate, and shall be
filled by the Senate as soon thereafter as conveniently may be.
      2.—The Finance Committee shall meet once a month,
and at such other times as the Senate shall have directed, or'
when it shall be summoned by the Registrar under the
direction of the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor.
                    CHAPTER IV.—FINANCE.                             31

     3.—The University Solicitor may be required by the
Committee to attend any of its meetings with reference to
the investments or other matters requiring legal advice or
assistance.
     4..—It shall be the duty of the Finance Committee to
submit to the Senate, towards the end of each Academic year,
an estimate of the expected revenue for the next ensuing year,
together with a statement, of the proposed expenditure as
already authorised by the Senate or apprehended to be neces-
sary, such estimates and expenditure to be arranged ounder
as many heads as shall be convenient. And the Senate shall,
as soon after as may be, consider such estimates and pass
votes for expenditure during such coming year, which votes
shall not be exceeded unless upon special grounds and on
the report of the Finance Committee that sufficient funds
are available for the expenditure.
      5.—The Finance Commitlee shall, as soon as practicable,
after the close of each Academic year, submit to the Senate
a report and a duly audited statement of the accounts and
transactions during the past year.
  1
    6.—The Registrar and Accountant shall present to the
Finance Committee in each month a statement showing, with
such details and particulars as the Committee shall have
required, the full state and condition of the University's
financial affairs at that time, and the Registrar shall then
inform the Committee of all financial matters proper to be
considered at that meeting, and shall produce the Bank
Pass Books of the University made up to the preceding day.
      7.—The Finance Committee shall once in each month
present a report setting forth a pay sheet for the disburse-
ments required for that or the next month, as occasion may
arise, in accordance with the general estimates and votes for
expenditure for the current year, or with any specific order
previously made by the Senate, and also setting forth any
other demands which the Committee shall, after enquiry
and examination, see reason to submit for allowance and
payment in that month.                      °
      8.—The Finance Committee shall also in each month
present to the Senate a report showing the general state and
condition of the University's financial affairs, and setting forth
32   -           BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

all receipts and disbursements since the last preceding report
of like character, and shall therein distinguish all loans and
repayment of loans from other disbursements and receipts,
and the Committee shall, at such meeting and other meetings,
promptly report any default in the payment of interest on any
investment or in the payment of any principal money which
may be due to the University.
      9.—No expenditure of funds of the University, otherwise
than by way of investment on loan upon the authority of the
Finance Committee, with the approval of the Chancellor or
Vice-Chancellor, shall be made unless the same shall have
been authorised by the Senate.
      10.—AU moneys received on behalf of the University
shall be forthwith paid by the Registrar to the credit of the
University at its bank of deposit, on General or Special
Account, as the case may require.
      11.—All disbursements of money belonging to the Uni-
versity, whether the same shall be by way of payment or of
investment, shall be by cheque on the University Bank,
signed by two members of the Senate and countersigned by
the Registrar.
      12.—The investment of moneys shall be confined within
the following classes of securities :—
         (a) Deposit with the Government of the State at in-
         terest, if allowed by the Government for the time
         being.
         (¿>) Purchase of Debentures or Inscribed Stock, or
         Treasury Bills, or other form of security issued by
         the Government of any of the Australian States.
         (c) Debentures or other Loan issues of Municipal or
              other public bodies within this State, having statu-
              tory powers to borrow moneys within limits then
              open, or of any incorporated body or society
              having such authority and within such limits.
         (d) Mortgages of Land and Premises held in fee simple
              to the extent of two-thirds the estimated value,
              with sufficient insurance on destructible improve-
              ments or articles included in such estimates.
          CHAPTER V.—MEETINGS OF CONVOCATION.                 33

       (e) Mortgages of Leasehold Lands and Premises held
            under leases which will not have less than thirty
            years to run at the date of expiration of such
            mortgages, to an extent not exceeding three-fifths
            of like approved estimates, and with like insurance
            on destructible improvements or articles.
       if) Deposits at interest in any Bank of the State.
       (g) Purchase of Freehold or Leasehold Lands, with or
            without improvements, provided that no invest-
            ment under this sub-section shall be made without
            the special authority after special notice of a
            meeting of the Senate.
    OHAPTER V.—MEETINGS OF CONVOCATION OTHEE THAN FOE THE
                      ELECTION OF FELLOWS.
      1.—-The Chancellor or, in his absence, the Vice-Chancellor,
•shall, in pursuance of a resolution of the Senate, or upon the
receipt of a requisition signed by at least twenty members of
Convocation, summon a meeting of Convocation to be holden
at such time and place as he shall direct. And such meeting
shall be held accordingly within twenty-eight days from the
date of the requisition. And notice of such meeting shall be
given by public advertisement not less than fourteen days
before the day appointed for the meeting. Provided that
every such requisition shall specify the subjects which it is
proposed to bring before Convocation. And if, in the opinion
of the summoning officer, the subjects so specified, or any of
them, are such as ought not to be discussed in Convocation,
he shall refer the matter to the Senate, which shall decide
whether the meeting shall be held or not. Provided that no
such meeting shall be held in the month of January.
      2.—At all meetings so summoned the Chancellor, or in
his absence, the Vice-Chancellor, shall preside. In the
absence of the Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor the members
of Convocation present shall elect one of their number to be
president of that meeting.
      3.—The presence at any meeting of twenty-five members
of Convocation shall be necessary to form a quorum. And
if within half an hour from the time of meeting there shall
be no quorum present the meeting shall lapse.
C
34               BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

      4.—At all meetings of Convocation the Registrar or his-
deputy shall act as Secretary and keep the minutes of all pro-
ceedings.
      5.—Every meeting may be adjourned by the President
to such day and hour as may be fixed by resolution.
      6.—All questions submitted to the Convocation shall be
decided by a majority of members present. The President-
shall have a deliberative as well as a casting vote.
      7.—All resolutions of Convocation shall be signed by the
President, and shall be laid by the Registrar before the-
Senate at its next meeting.
     8.—All members of Convocation attending any such
meeting shall appear in the habit of their degree.
                           KB0I6TER 0F;0RAD0ATEB.

      9.—A Register of Graduates of the University shall be-
kept by the Registrar in such manner as the Senate shall
from time to time direct.
      10.—A Register of the Members of Convocation shall be
kept by the Registrar in such maner as the Senate shall from
time to time direct, and such Register shall be conclusive
evidence that any person whose name shall appear thereon
at the time of his claiming a vote at a Convocation is so
entitled to vote.
                           BUPEKIOB OF7ICKB8.

     11.—The Chief Clerk and Accountant, Robert Ambrose
Dallen, and the Auditor, David Fell, are hereby declared to
be Superior Officers of the University, entitled to the right»
and privileges conferred by Section 32 of the University and
University Colleges Act, 1900.
                CHAPTER VI.—WARDEN AND REGISTKAE.
1.—There shall be a Warden and Registrar.         References,
in any by-law to the Warden, or to the Registrar, shall be
taken to be references to the Warden and Registrar.
2.—The duties of the Warden shall be—
        (a) .to attend all meetings of the Senate and its Com-
              mittees, and to advise the Senate on all matters-
              of University administration ;
           CHAPTER VI.—WARDEN AND REGISTRAR.                        35

       ib) to consult with and advise the Professorial Board,
             and all other University Boards, Faculties, Com-
             mittees, Professors and other heads of depart-
             ments, with a view to assisting the Professorial
             Board and other bodies concerned in the co-
             ordination of the work of the Faculties and the
             various departments ;
       {e) to collect and prepare for the Senate and the
             Finance Committee all information, including
             estimates of receipts and expenditure required by
             them in relation to the finances of the University ;
       (d) to exercise a general supervision over the discipline
             of the University ;
       (e) to perform such other duties as may from time to
             time be assigned to him by the Senate.
     The Warden shall—
       (a) have the right of audience at meetings of the
            senate ;
       {b) be ex officio a member of the Professorial Board,
            the Proctorial Board, the several Faculties, Boards
            of Studies, and other Boards or Committees con-
            stituted by the by-laws ;
       (c) in the absence of the Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor
            preside at meetings of the Proctorial Board.
      3.—The Registrar shall keep all necessary records of the
•proceedings of the University, conduct all necessary corre-
spondence, and keep such registers and books of account as
may be required.
      4.—The Registrar shall be responsible for the records of
 the proceedings of the Senate and its Committees, the Pro-
 fessorial Board, Faculties and Boards of Studies.
     '5.—All fees, fines, or other sums received by the Registrar
in his capacity as such shall be paid into the Bank of the
University, in order that the same may be applied, accounted
for, and audited in such manner as the Senate may from
time to time appoint.
36              BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

                    CHAPTER VII,—THE PROFESSORS.
      1.—The title of Professor shall be distinctive of those
Public Teachers of the University upon whom the Senate-
shall have conferred that title, and no person in or belonging to
the University, or any College within it, shall be recognised
as Professor without the express authority of the Senate.
              CHAPTER VIII.—THE PROFESSORIAL BOARD.
      1.—The Professors in the several Faculties, with the
Chancellor, the Vice-Chancellor and the Warden, shall form
a Board to bejcalled The Professorial Board.
      2.—Subject to the By-laws of the University, the Profes-
sorial Board shall manage and superintend the discipline of
all students in the University, and shall have power to deter-
mine all matters concerning the studies and examinations
which affect the students of more than one Faculty.
      3.—For these purposes the Professorial Board shall make
such rules as it may think fit, provided that these rules be
not repugnant to any existing By-law ; and shall have power
to impose any penalties, in accordance with academic usage,
on any student for breach of such rule, or misconduct of any
kind. All members of the Professorial Board and Public
Teachers in the University shall be authorised- to inflict a
fine for breach of discipline, not exceeding two pounds,
provided that every public teacher who inflicts any such fine
shall immediately report the circumstances in writing to the
Professorial Board.
      4.—Any member of the University affected by any
decision of the Board, or any member of the Board, may
appeal therefrom to the Senate, and thereupon the Senate
may review such decision, and either confirm, vary, or annul
the same.
       5.—It shall also be the duty of the Professorial Board
from time to time to consider the By-laws which deal with
the discipline of the University, and the By-laws which deal with
the studies of students of more than one Faculty ; and when
the Board is of opinion that any such By-laws require amend-
ment it shall send up recommendations to the Senate to that
effect.
        CHAPTER VIiI.-THE PROFESSORIAL BOARD.                     37

    6.—A précis of the proceedings of the Board shall be laid
upon the table of the Senate once in each Term, or forthwith
in matters of special importance, and the Senate shall have
power of its own motion to review any decision of the said
Board.
                        CHAIRMANSHIP OF BOARD.

      7.—-The Chairman of the Professorial Board shall be
elected at a duly convened meeting to be held in Term time.
In the event of the office becoming vacant by death, resigna-
tion or otherwise before the expiration of the full term herein
prescribed the election of a successor shall be proceeded with
at a duly constituted meeting of the Board to be held as soon
as conveniently may be, and the chairman so elected shall
hold office for the remainder of such term.

                   COIfVENING AND QUORUM OF BOARDS.

     8.—Every meeting of any Board or Faculty shall be con-
vened by written notice from the Registrar, by direction of
and on a day named by the Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, or
Chairman, and on the requisition of any two members,
addressed to the Registrar, a meeting shall be convened in
like manner. At any meeting of the Professorial Board five
shall form a quorum, and at any other meeting three shall
form a quorum, unless otherwise provided. In case of an
equality of votes, that of the presiding Chairman included,
such Chairman shall have a casting vote.

                           PROCTORIAL BOARD.

     9.—The Warden, the Chairman of the Professorial Board,
and the Deans of four Faculties to be annually selected by
the Professorial Board, shall form a Board to be called the
Proctorial Board.
     10.—The Proctorial Board shall be charged with the
investigation of breaches of discipline and the imposition, of
penalties in accordance with academic usage. The decisions
of the Proctorial Board shall be reported to the Professorial
Board at its next meeting, when any person affected by them,
may appeal to the Professorial Board:
58              BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

                      CHAPTER IX.—THE FACULTIES.
     There shall be ten Faculties in the University, viz :—
                   - (1) Arts.
                     (2) Law.
                     (3) Medicine.
                     (4) Science.
                     (5) Engineering.
                     (6) Dentistry.
                      (7) Veterinary Science.
                     (8) Agriculture.
                     (9) Economics.
                    (10) Architecture.
     2.—Each Faculty shall, under the Senate—
       (1) Have the general direction and supervision of the
            teaching in the subjects pertaining to the Faculty ;
       (2) be responsible, with the assistance of such exami-
            ners as the Senate may on the report of the
            Faculty, from time to time appoint, for the con-
            duct of the annual examinations in those sub-
            jects ; and
       (3) consider and report upon all matters relating to
            the studies, lectures, examinations and degrees of
            the Faculty, or referred to it by the Senate.
                          DEANS OP FAOÜITIES.

      3.—A Dean shall be elected by each Faculty and shall
be the Chairman and executive officer of the Faculty. The
election shall be held at a duly convened meeting to be held
in Term time, and the Dean shall hold office for a period of
two years provided that the Fellow elected by any Faculty
shall be the Dean of that Faculty during his period of office
as such Fellow.
      The Dean of any Faculty may be invited to attend and
may be heard at the Senate during the discussion of business
relating to his Faculty.
      4.—In the event of the office of Dean becoming vacant
by death, resignation, or otherwise before the expiration of
the full term herein prescribed, the election of his successor
               CHAPTER X.—FACULTY OF ARTS.                           39

shall be proceeded with at a duly constituted meeting of the
Faculty to be held as soon as conveniently may be, and the
Dean so elected shall hold office for the remainder of such
term.
                    CHAPTER X.—FACULTY OF AETS.
      1.—The Chancellor, the Vice-Chancellor, the Warden,
the Professors of Classics, Mathematics, Modern Literature,
History and Logic and Mental Philosophy, together with
the Assistant Professors and Lecturers in the same subjects,
and the Professors of Education, Economics and Oriental
Studies shall constitute the Faculty of Arts.
      2.—Except as provided in the By-laws, Chapter XX.,
Sections 2 and 3, candidates for the degree of Bachelor of
Arts shall be required at the commancement of their course
to pass the Matriculation Examination for the Faculty of
Arts prescribed in Chapter XX., Sections 5 and 6.
      3.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts shall be
required to attend the courses of lectures covering a period
of at least three years, and to pass the examinations pre-
scribed in the following By-laws in accordance with the con-
ditions therein laid down.
      4.—The courses of lectures qualifying for graduation shall
be in the subjects of the following groups and sub-groups.
      A subject means a subject of. study in which one or more
courses are given.
      A qualifying course shall consist of at least 90 lectures or
their equivalent, with class or laboratory work, except in cases·
where the Faculty having regard to the nature of the subject,
and the tutorial or other supplementary instruction provided,
shall sanction qualifying courses with lesa than 90 lectures.
      Group I .—Ancient Language and Literature.
         (1) Greek (3 courses).
         (2) Latin (3 courses).
      Group II.—Modem Language and Literature.
        (1) English (3 courses).
        (2) French (3 courses).
        (3) German (3 courses).
40                      BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

       Group III.—Historical, Menial and Social Science.
         (a) 1. Modern History (3 courses).
              2. Oriental History (1 course)..
              3. Military History and Science.
         (¿>) Philosophy and EdiUMtion.
           1. Philosophy (3 courses).
         2. Education (1 course),
         (c) Law.
              1. Roman Law (1 course).
              2. Constitutional Law (1 course).
              3. Jurisprudence, Legal History, and the Elements
                     of Political Science (1 course).
              4. International Law (1 course).
         (d) Economics.
           Economics (3 courses).
Group IV.—Mathematics and Science.
  (a)      Mathematics (3 courses).
  (b) 1. Physics (3 courses).
        2. Chemistry (3 courses).
        3. Geologj· (3 courses).
        4. Botany (3 courses).
        5. Zoology (3 courses).
        6. Physiology (1 course).
      t7. Botany and Zoology as required for the First
              Year in Medicine.
        8. Astronomy.
      5.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts shall
comply with the following conditions :—
         (1) Ten qualifying courses must be taken by candi-
               dates for graduation. Not more than four quali-
               fying courses can be taken in any one year. The
               ten qualifying courses must be taken in not less
               than three years.
         (2) An examination shall be held upon completion of
               each qualifying course, and candidates successful
               in passing shall be held to have so far qualified
               for the degree.
     t No. 7 is intended for students intending to enter the Faculty of Medicine, and will
not qualify any atudent to attend subsequent courses in either Zoology or Botany.
             CHAPTER X,—FACULTY OF ARTS.                           41

       (3) The ten qualifying courses must be selected from at
            least three of the abovementioned groups.
       (4) Three of the ten qualifying courses must be selected
            from language subjects.
       (5) Not more than three courses taken from the Science
            subjects of Group IV. (b) shall count as qualifying
            courses.
       (6) Not more than two courses taken from the Law
            subjects in Group III. (c) shall count as qualifying
            courses. These courses shall not be taken until
            the candidate is of at least six terms' standing
            from matriculation.
       (7) A qualifying course in Military History and Science
            shall not be taken until the candidate is of at
            least three terms' standing from matriculation.
       (8) A qualifying course on Education shall not be
            taken until the candidate is of at least three terms
            standing from matriculation or has taken Philos-
            ophy Course I.
       (9) The qualifying course in Astronomy shall not be
            taken until the candidate is of at least three
            terms' standing from matriculation.
     6.—Every candidate must select certain subjects for a
consecutive course of study. He may choose either of the
two following alternatives—
        (a) Two subjects to be studied each during three con-
        secutive courses, and one other subject to be
        studied during two consecutive courses, or
        (6) one subject to be studied during three consecutive
        courses, and three other subjects to be studied
        during two consecutive courses.
     For the purposes of this By-law the following courses
shall be regarded as continuous, viz. :—
        (a) Philosophy followed by Law or Education or
        Economics,
        (δ) Modern History followed by Law or Military His-
        tory and Science or Economics.
42             BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

          (c) Economics followed by Constitutional Law or Juris-
               prudence, Legal History, and the Elements of
               Political Science.
          (d) Physics followed by Chemistry or Chemistry fol-
               lowed by Physics.
       7.—Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 5, a
 ■candidate who has obtained distinction or High Distinction
 in the examinations of Mathematics II., and who, after attend-
 ing the full Honours courses in Mathematics III. in Pure and
 Applied Mathmatics, obtains Distinction or High Distinction
 at the final examination, may be permitted to count this
 course as equivalent to two of the qualifying courses for bis
 degree.
       8.-^-No candidate without special permission shall be
 allowed to attend a higher qualifying course in any subject
 who has not passed the examination in the lower course of -^
 the same subject.
       9.—Except with the permission of the Professor no can-
 didate shall attend a course in French or German or Mathe-
 matics unless he has already passed the Matriculation Exami-
 nation at the Higher Standard, or an equivalent examination
 in that subject.
       10.—The work of students attending lectures may be
tested by means of written and oral class examinations, class
■exercises, or essays, and the results of such tests shall be
reported to the Senate.
       11.—In determining the results of the Annual Examina-
tions, the Examiners shall take into account the results of
the tests described in Section 10.
       12.—The fee for the degree of Bachelor of Arts shall be
three pounds. No candidate shall be admitted to the exami-
nation unless he have previously paid this fee to the Registrar.
If a candidate fail to pass the examination the fee shall not be
returned to him. For any re-examination for the same
degree he shall pay a fee of two pounds.
       13.—The examination shall be conducted in the first
instance by means of printed papers, and at the termination
of such examination each candidate shall undergo a vivâ voce
examination if the Examiners think fit.
              CHAPTER X.—FACULTY OF ARTS.                        43
                        DEGREE WITS HOSOUKS.

      14.—(1) Except in special cases where the Faculty may
determine by resolution that this regulation may be relaxed,
candidates to obtain Honours in any subject at graduation
must (a) have attended three consecutive courses in thai
subject ; (6) have been awarded credit or distinction at the
yearly examinations; arid (c) have attended in such cognate
subjects as the Faculty may by regulation determine.
        (2) No candidate shall have his name published as
having gained Honours until he is qualified for graduation.
Unless with the express permission of the Faculty granted
for special reasons, no candidate shall be awarded Honours
at graduation who is of more than twelve terms' standing
from matriculation, or in the case of evening students of
more than fifteen terms' standing from matriculation.
        (3) There shall be three classes in Honours, and the
names in each class shall be arrangea in alphabetical order.
      15.—The candidate for Honours who shall have most
distinguished himself at the B.A. Examinations in Classics.
Mathematics, Logic and Mental Philosophy, English, Modern
History, or ,French and German jointly, shall, if he possess
sufficient merit, receive a bronze medal.
                          MASTER OP ARTS.

      16.—There shall be a yearly examination for the degree
of M.A. during Lent Term, or at such other times as the
Examiners, with the sanction of the Chancellor or the Vice-
Chancellor, may appoint.
      17.—Every candidate for this degree must have pre-
viously obtained the degree of B.A., and two years must have
elapsed since the time of his examination for such degree.
He will also be required to furnish evidence of having com-
pleted his twenty-first year.
      18.—The fee for the degree of M.A. shall be five pounds.
No candidate shall be aomitted to the examination unless he
have previously paid this fee to the Registrar. H a candidate
fail to pass the examination the fee shall not be returned to
him. For any re-examination for the same degree he shall
pay a fee of two pounds.
44               BY-LAWS OF.THE UNIVERSITY.

      19.—Candidates for the degree of M.A. shall elect to be
examined in one or more of the following branches of know-
ledge :—
         I. Classical Philology and History.
       II. Mathematics and Natural Philosophy.
      III. Logic, Moral, Mental and Political Philosophy.
      IV. Modern Literature and Language.
        V. Modern History.
Provided that candidates for the degree of Master of Arts
who have taker First Class Honours in any subject at gradua-
tion, may be tested by thesis under regulations made by the
Faculty.
   . The candidate most distinguished in each branch at the
examination shall, if he possess sufficient merit, receive a
bronze medal.
      20.—The Senate may, at its discretion, admit to examina-
tion for the degree of Master of Arts any person who shall
have obtained at least two years previously the degree of
Bachelor of Arts, or equivalent first degree in Arts, in any
other University approved by the Senate. Every candidate
for admission under this By-law must make application in
writing to the Registrar and supply satisfactory evidence of
his qualification as aforesaid, and that he is a person of good
fame and character ; and upon the approval of his application
shall pay to the Registrar a fee of two pounds for the entry
of his name in the University books, ID addition to tht pre-
scribed fee for his degree. Every candidate before he is
admitted to this degree shall be required to furnish evidence
of having completed his twenty-first year.
                        I

                            EVENING IEOTtFEES.

      21.—Courses of Evening Lectures, embracing all the
subjects necessary for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, shall
be given at such times and in such order as the Senate may
from time to time direct.
     22.—Any person desirous of attending a course of
Evening Lectures may be allowed to do so upon payment
of such fees as the Senate may from time to time direct.
               CHAPTER X.—FACULTY OF ARTS.                        45

      23.—Students who desre to qualify for graduation by
•attendance upon Evening Lectures shall be required to attend
the courses of instruction and pass the examinations pre-
scribed in this Chapter for candidates for the degree of
Bachelor of Arts.
      24.—In all cases not provided for in the preceding By-
 laws of this chapter, Evening Students shall be subject to
 the same By-laws, Rules and Regulations as other students.

                   DIPLOMA IN     EDUCATION.

      The Diploma in Education may be awarded to candi-
dates who have satisfied the provisions of the following
By-laws :—
     25.—The diploma shall testify that the candidate has
passed through a general professional training in the prin-
ciples, art and practice of education. The courses shall be so
.arranged that they may be. taken in preparation for either
primary or secondary teaching.
      20.—Candidates for the diploma in Education shall
 produce evidence of having graduated in Arts or Science.
     27.—The diploma in Education shall be conferred only
upon those candidates who have completed the course of
"lectures and of practice in teaching hereinafter prescribed in
Section 28.
      28.—Candidates for the diploma in Education shall be
:required to attend the following courses of instruction :—
       . (1) The Mental and Physical Life of School Children.
         (2) The Principles of Education.
         (3) The History of Educational Theory and Practice.
         (4) The Principles of Class Teaching and Management.
      Candidates for the diploma in Education who have in-
cluded Philosophy I. or Education among the qualifying
•courses for the degree in Arts, are required to take an addi-
tional Second or Third Arts Course before qualifying for the
■diploma.
46             BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

      Before presenting himself for the examination for· th&
diploma in Education a candidate shall produce evidence
satisfactory to the Senate that he has pursued a course of
practice in teaching, including—
         (a) Observation of Class Teaching.
         (b) Continuous Practice in the Class-room.
         (c) Observing and giving special lessons, and taking
              part in discussions upon them.
      29.—The work of the diploma course shall be so arranged
that it may be completed in one year in the case of those who
can devote their whole time to the work of the course.
      30.—The fee for the diploma in Education shall be three
pounds. No candidate shall be admitted to the examina-
tion unless he shall have previously paid this fee to the
Registrar. Eor any re-examination for the same diploma
he shall pay a fee of two pounds.
                   CHAPTER XI.—FACULTY OF LAW.
      1.—The Chancellor, the Vice-Chancellor, the Warden, the
Professor or Professors and Lecturers in the subjects of the·
curriculum in Law, together with such Fellows of the Senate
as are members of the Legal Profession, shall constitute the
Faculty of Law.
     2.—Thera shall be two degrees granted in the Faculty of
Law, viz. :—Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) and Doctor of Laws
(LL.D.).
     3.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws
(LL. B.) shall, before admission to the Law School, produce
evidence either (i) of having graduated in Arts, or (ii.) of
having completed seven courses in the Faculty of Arts and
passed the concluding examinations, or (iii.) of having com-
pleted the First Year in the Faculty of Arts in accordance
with the provisions of Chapter XX., Section 7, or (iv.) of
having pased the Entrance Examination prescribed in
Chapter XX., Sections 5 and 6. Candidates who have been
admitted to matriculation under the first proviso in Chapter
XX., Section 2, shall not be entitled to admission to the
Law School unless they have passed in Latin in one of the
examinations mentioned in this By-law.
                        CHAPTER XI—FACULTY OF LAW.                                          47

  4.—Thereafter candidates for the degree of LL.B. shall
  ■attend such courses of instruction as may be prescribed by
  Îhe Faculty in the following subjects, that is to say :—
  I. In the First Year-
  Constitutional Law ;
  Roman Law ; and
    The La\v relating to Contracts (including Mercantile
    Law), Torts, Crimes and Domestic Relations.t
    II. In the Second Year—
            Jurisprudence, Legal History, and the Elements of
                 Political Science ;
            Public International Law ;
           The Law of Property and the Elements of Convey-
           ancing and
           The Rules of Legal Interpretation.
 III. In the Third Year-
           Procedure in Civil and Criminal Cases, both before the
           Supreme Court in its common law jurisdiction,
           and before courts of inferior jurisdiction, together
           with the Law of Evidence and Pleading ;
           Equity and Company Law ; the Law relating to Bank-
           ruptcy, Probate and Divorce ; together with pro-
           cedure in those jurisdictions ; and
           Private International Law.
Provided that candidates who have already graduated in Arts
shall be at liberty to take this course in two years, in which
■case the subjects shall be taken in such order as shall be
approved by the Dean of the Faculty ; whilst candidates who
have not completed two years in Arts shall be required to
-extend this course over a period of not less than four years :
Provided also that the order in which these courses of
instruction are taken may, in the case of any individual
•candidate, be varied with the written consent of the Dean
of the Faculty.
       5.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws shall
also be required to pass two examinations, which shall be
•called respectively " the Intermediate LL.B." and                                          "
the
 ΐ In this and all other professional subjects the law referred to is the law in force in
                                        New South Wales.
48              BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY·.

Final LL.B." Examinations, and which shall be held afc the
commencement of Lent Term in each year, or at such other
times as may be prescribed by the Faculty. Candidates who
have not acquitted themselves satisfactorily in such class or
term examinations, or other exercises (including participation,
in moots and attendance in court) as may be prescribed by
the Faculty, may be refused admission to these examinations.
      6.—At the Intermediate LL.B. Examination candidates-
shall be examined in :-(1) Constitutional Law ; (2) Roman
Law ; (3) Jurisprudence, Legal History, and the Elements of
Political Science ; and (4) Public Liternational Law. Pro-
vided that candidates shall be at liberty to take this examina-
tion in Wo sections, of which Section I. shall include the
subjects numbered herein (1) and (2), and Section II. shall
include the subjects numbered herein (3) aid (4).
      Provided also that if in the opinion of the examiners a-
candidate shows sufficient merit in any of the subjects
numbered herein (1) (2) (3) and (4), he shall be entitled to
a pass in such subjects and shall be exempt from passing,
further examinations therein.
      7.—At the Final LL.B. Examination candidates shall be
examined in :—(1) The Law Relating to Contracts (including
Mercantile Law), Torts, Crimes, and Domestic Relations ; (2}
the Law of Property, and the Elements of Conveyancing ; (3)
th¿ Rules of Legal Interpretation ; (4) Procedure in Civil and
Criminal Cases, both before the Supreme Court in its common
law jurisdiction and before courts of inferior jurisdiction,
together with the Law of Evidence and Pleading ; (5) Equity
and Company Law, the Law Relating to Bankruptcy, Pro-
bate and Divorce, together with procedure in those jurisdic-
tions ; and (6) Private International Law.
      Provided that candidates shall be at liberty to take this
examination in two sections, of which Section I. shall include
the subjects numbered herein (1), (2) and (3), and Section II.
shall include the subjects numbered herein (4), (5) and (6).
      Provided also that if in the opinion of the examiners a
candidate shows sufficient merit in any of the subjects num-
bered herein (1), (2), (3), (4), (5) and (6) he shall be entitled
              CHAPTER XI.—FACULTY OF LAW.                         49

to a pass in such subject, and shall be exempt from passing
any further examination therein. This proviso shall apply
as from the 1st day of January, 1916.
      8.—The names of candidates who pass in the Inter-
mediate LL.B. Examination, or either section thereof, or who
pass the Final LL.B. Examination, or either section thereof,,
shall be published in order of merit. But as regards candi-
dates who have completed the Final LL.B. Examination, a-
separate list shall also be published stating (1) the names of
candidates who have obtained First-class Honours ; (2) the
names of candidates who have obtained Second-class Honours ;
and (3) the names of candidates who have passed ; and in
determining the place of candidates in this list the examiners
may take into consideration the results of both the Inter-
mediate and Final Examinations.
      Provided (1) that a candidate who does not pass the
Intermediate LL.B. Examination within two years of his com-
mencing his course in law shall not be eligible for any prize
or scholarship awarded for proficiency in the subjects of that
examination ; and (2) that a candidate who does not pass the
Final LL.B. Examination within three years of passing the
Intermediate LL.B. Examination, shall not be eligible for
Honours or for any prize, medal, or scholarship awarded for
proficiency in the subjects of that examination.
      9.—Candidates shall be exempt from attending lectures
and passing examinations in any of the prescribed subjects
which may have formed part of their course for the degree of
Bachelor of Arts, or which in the event of any change in the
furriculum may have formed part of their course for the
degree of Bachelor of Laws.
      30.—The degree of LL.D. shall not be conferred until
after the expiration or two years from the granting of the
degree of LL.B.
      11.—Candidates for the Degree of Doctor of Laws shall
be required to pass one examination, which shall be called "the
LL.D. Examination," and which shall be held in Trinity Term
in each year, or at such other time as the Dean of the Faculty
may approve.
 50              BY-LAWS OP THE UNIVERSITY.

        12.—At the LL.D. Examination candidates shall be
 examined in (1) Legal History; (2) Roman Law (including a
 special subject from the Digest to be indicated from time to
 time) ; (3) One of the following special subjects :—(a) Com-
 mon Law, including Mercantile Law, Criminal Law, the Law
 of Evidence and Procedure ; (6) Equity and Company Law,
 the Law relating to Bankruptcy, Probate and Divorce,
 together with procedure in those jurisdictions ; (c) the Law
 of Property, and the Practice of Conveyancing ; or [d) Con-
 stitutional Law ; and (4) International Law (Public and'
 Private).
       13.—The candidates who distinguish themselves! most
highly at the Degree Examinations respectively shall, if of
(Sufficient       merit,      receive      a      bronze      medal.
;
      14.—The fees for the Degrees of Bachelor of Laws and
Doctor of Laws shall be ten pounds respectively.       These
fees shall be paid fco the Registrar before the examination,
. and shall not in any case be returned to the candidate.
      15.—Candidates who fail to pass the examination for
either degree shall be required, upon presenting themselves
for any further examination for the same degree, to pay a
:fee of five pounds.
      16.—Students at Law and Articled Clerks and other
persons may be admitted to such lectures and examinations
iin Law as they inay desire, and in the event of their passing
in the subjects of any course they shall be entitled to receive
certificates to that effect.
                 CHAPTER XII.—FACULTY OF MEDICINE.
      1.—The Chancellor, the Vice-Chancellor, the Warden,
the Professors and Lecturers in the subjects of the Medical
'Curriculum, together with such Fellows of the Senate as are
legally qualified members of the Medical Profession, shall
constitute the Faculty of Medicine.
      2.—Class Examinations shall be held during each course
of instruction in each term, unless such term immediately
precedes the annual examination in the subject of the course.
Students shall nofc absent themselves from these examinations
          CHAPTER       XII.—FACULTT OF MEDICINE.                   51

except upon a medical certificate and at the end of each,
course a report of the result, signed by the responsible teacher,
shall be presented to the Senate by the Dean. The results of'
these examinations may be taken into [account by the
examiners at the annual examinations.
      3.—!here shall be three Degrees granted in the Faculty
of Medicine, viz. : Doctor of Medicine (M.D.), Bachelor of
Medicine (M.B.), and Master of Surgery (Ch.M.).
      4.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Medicine
(M.B.) shall, before admission to the Medical School, produce
evidence either (i.) of having graduated in Arts or in Science ;
or (ii.) of having completed the First Year in the Faculty of
Arts, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter XX.,
Section 7 ; (or iii.) of having passed the Matriculation Exami-
nation for the Faculty of Medicine prescribed in Chapter XX.,
Sections 5 and 6.
      5.—Candidates for the Degrees of Bachelor of Medicine
and Master of Surgery shall attend the following courses of
instruction :—
      I. In the First Year—
         Botany, including laboratory practice.
         Zoology, including laboratory practice.
         Inoiganic and Organic Chemistry—Lent, Trinity and
              Michaelmas Terms.
         Practical Chemistry—Trinity Term.
         Physics—Lent, Trinity and Michaelmas Terms.
         Practical Physics—One Term.
         Introductory Human Anatomy—Michaelmas Term.
      II. In the Second Year—
         Descriptive Anatomy—Lent and Trinity Terms.
         Dissections—Lent, Trinity and Michaelmas Terms.
         Physiology—Trinity and Michaelmas Terms.
         Practical Histology—Lent Term.
         Experimental Physiology—Trinity Term.
         Physiological Chemistry—Michaelmas Term.
     III. In the Third Year-
         Physiology—Lent Term.
         Pharmacology—Lent and Trinity Terms.
         Regional Anatomy—Lent and Trinity Terms.
52              BY-LAWS OF THE        UNIVERSITY.

          Dissections —Lent and Trinity lerms.
      H Surgery—Michaelmas Term.
      L_ Pathology and Bacteriology (including
      Laboratory
      J fi|¡g! Practice)—Michaelmas Term.
      ;; Tutorial Surgery—Michaelmas Term.
      F Materia Medica and Therapeutics—Michaelmas Term.
      IV In the Fourth Year—
      Pathology and Bacteriology, (including Laboratory
                 Practice)—Lent and Trinity Terms.
          Surgery—Lent Term.
          Practical Pharmacy—One Term.
          Clinical Surgery—Lent, Trinity and Michaelmas Term.
          Surgical Anatomy and Operative Surgery—Lent Term.
          Medicine—Michaelmas Term.
          Tutorial Medicine—Michaelmas Term.
          Obstetrics—Michaelmas Term.
          Three of the following elective courses—
          (i.) Diseases of Children.                     \
             {ii.) Diseases of the Skin.                   In the long
            <(iii. ) Diseases of the Ear, Noso & Throat. Y vacation.
            t(iv.) Diseases of the Mind,
            (v.) Diseases of the Eye.
      The courses in each of these five elective subjects shall
consist of fifteen meetings of the class, including at least five
cliniques.
      V. In the Fifth Year-
          Medicine—Lent Term.
          Tutorial Medicine-^-Lent Term.
          Gynaecology—Lent Term (30 lectures).
          Medical Jurisprudence—20 lectures—Trinity Term.
          Public Health—30 lectures—Trinity Term.
          Clinical Medicine—Lent, Trinity and Michaelm as Terms.
       6. For the Degrees of M.B. and Ch.M. the examinations
shall be as follows :—
      (i.) A First Degree Examination at the end of the First
     Year in Physics, Chemistry, Zoology and Botany,
     (ii.) A Seoond Degree Examination at tht end of Trinity
     Term of the Second Year in Anatomy and Physiology.
           CHAPTER XII.—FACQLTY OF MEDICINE.!                    53

   (iii.) A Third Degree Examination at the end of Trinity
         Term of the Third Year in the entire subjects of Anatomy
         and Physiology. No candidate shall be admitted to
         this examination unless he has completed the dissection
         of every part of the body ab least once.
   (iv.) A Iourth Degree Examination at the end of Trinity
         Term of the Fourth Year in Pathology, Surgical
         Anatomy and Operative Surgery, and Materia Medica
         and Therapeutics.
    (v.) A Fifth Degree Examination in Medical Jurisprudence
         and Public Health at the end of Trinity Term of the
         Fifth Year.
   (vi.) A Final Degree Examination at the beginning of Lent
         Term after the completion of the Fifth Year, in Medicine
         (including Clinical and Tutorial Medicine), in Surgery
         (including Clinical and Tutorial Surgery), in Obstetrics
         and in Gynecology. Provided that candidates who have
         not passed the examination in Medical Jurisprudence
         and Public Health as described in sub-section (v.) shall
         be required to take those subjects as a part of their
         Final Examination.
      7. Before admission to the Final Examination, candidates
shall also be required to present the following certificates at
least ten clear days before the date of fche examination :—
     (i.) Of Hospital Practice during Michaelmas Term of the
          Third Year, and during the Fourth and Fifth Years, and
          the long vacation at the completion of the Fifth Year,
          in accordance with a hospital time-table, approved by
          the Faculty.                                .ü
    (ii.) Of having been engaged duringTat least ten attend-
          anees of two hours each in compounding and dispensing
          drugs in a Laboratory or Dispensary, or other place for
          compounding medicines, approved by the Faculty.
   (iii.) Of having acted in a recognised hospital during not less
          than nine months as Dresser in the Surgical Wards, not
          less than twelve months as Clinical Clerk in the Medical
          Wards, and not less than three months in each of the
54             BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

         following capacities, viz. : Clinical Clerk and Dresser in
         the Gynaecological In-patients' Department, Student in
         attendance upon the Surgical Out-patients' Depart-
         ment, Student in attendance upon the Medical Out-
         patients' Department, Student in attendance upon the
         Gj narcological Out-patients' Department.
    (iv.) Of attendance at twenty-five Post-mortem Examina-
    tions and Demonstrations after passing the Second
    Degree Examination,
    (v.) Of attendance on at least twelve cases of child-birth
    after having attended the course of lectures upon
    Obstetrics, and under such supervision as may be
    approved by the Faculty.
    (vi.) Of proficiency in Vaccination, signed by a legally
qualified Medical Practitioner,
(vii.) Of proficiency in the Administration of Anaesthetics
from a recognised hospital.
8. No candidate shall be admitted to the Final Examina-
tion until he shall have produced evidence of having completed
his twenty-first year.     Each candidate shall also furnish a
certificate of good fame and character, signed by two com-
petent persons.
      9.—At each examination candidates shall be required to
give proof of their knowledge by written answers to the ques-
tions set, to be followed by a practical or vivâ voce examination
in all subjects whatsoever.
10.—Students who fail to pass, or neglect to attend their
examinations in any subject or subjects, may be required by
the Faculty, on the report of the Examiners, to attend again
the Courses of Instruction or Hospital Practice in such subject
or subjects before again presenting themselves for examination.
11.—Candidates who have passed all the examinations to
the satisfaction of the Examiners shall be recommended to
the Senate for admission to the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine,
and to the Degree of Master of Surgery if they so elect.
      12.—Honours at graduation shall depend upor the pro-
ficiency shown in the examinations, in accordance with regula-
tions adopted by the Senate from time to time, and the
           CHAJTEK XII.—FACULTY OF MEDICINE.                    55

  cardidate who shall have been most distinguished sh all receive
  a bronze medal, provided that he shall have obtained First
  Class Honours.
       13.—Accredited certificates of attendance on courses of
instruction from other Universities and Schools of Medicine
recognised by the University of Sydney may,.on the report of
the Dean, be accepted by the Senate as proof of the attendance
on courses of instruction pro tanto required by these By-laws.
Provided always that no person shall be recommended to the
Senate for admission to the Degrees of Bachelor of Medicine
or of Master of Surgery by examination unless he shall present
certificates of having attended within the University of Sydney
during each of at least nine Terms, not less than two courses of
instruction in subjects included in the Medical Curriculum of
the University. In all such cases a Degree in Arts or in
Science, or some certificate of general education satisfactory
to the Senate, will be required. Every candidate making
application under this By-law must present a certificate of
.good fame and character, signed by two competent persons.
       14.—Bachelors of Medicine and Masters of Surgery of this
 University shall not possess any right to assume the title of
 Doctor of Medicine.
       Ιδ.—The Degree of Doctor of Medicine shall not be con-
 ferred until after the expiration of two Academic years from
 the granting of the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine.
      16.—Candidates for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine
must produce evidence that, after having obtained the Degree
■of Bachelor of Medicine, they have spent at least two years in
Medical or Surgical practice, or that they have been engaged
in a manner approved by the Faculty for a like period in the
study of any subject or subjects included in the Medical
Curriculum of the University of Sydney.
      17.—Candidates for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine shall
be required to pass an examination conducted by means of set
papers and by vivâ voce interrogations in any one of the
following departments of Medical Science and Practice, viz.,
(i.) MediciDe, (ii.) Medical Jurisprudence and Public Health,
{m.) Surgery, (iv.) Obstetrics and Gynaecology ; ΟΤ in any one
56                BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

of the scientific subjects included in the Medical Curriculum.
They shall further be required to present, and if called upon to
defend, to the satisfaction of the Examiners, a previously
unpublished thesis on some subject included in the Medical
Curriculum of the University. Three printed or typewritten
copies of the thesis on paper eight inches wide and ten inches
deep must be transmitted to the Registrar at least two months
before the date fixed for the examination.
      18.—Bronze medals may be awarded for special excellence
or originality of the theses presented.
      19.—The Degree of Master of Surgeiy shall not be con^-
ferred on any person who has not already been admitted a
Bachelor of Medicine.
      20.—The fees for the Degrees of. Doctor of Medicine,
Bachelor of Medicine and Master of Surgery shall be ten
pounds respectively. The fees shall be paid to the Registrar
before the examination, and shall not in any case be returned
to the candidate. ·
      21.—Candidates who fail to pass the examination for any
degree shall be required upon presenting themselves for any
further examination for the same degree to pay a fee of five
pounds.
      22.—undergraduates in Medicine who have passed the
First, Second and Third Degree Examinations in Medicine,
and have in addition attended an advanced course of and
passed an advanced examination in accordance with the
requirements of the Faculty of Science in one of the following
divisions, viz.—(a) Chemistry,, (δ) Physics, (c) Botany, (d)
Zoology, (e) Geology—may, on the report of the Dean of lhe
Faculty of Science, be admitted by the Senate to the Degree
of Bachelor of Science.
                 DIPLOMA IN PUBLIC HEALTH.
      23.—A Diploma, entitled " Diploma in Public Health of
the University of Sydney," may be awarded to candidates
who have satisfied the provisions of the following By-laws.
The Diploma shall testify to the candidate's proficiency in
all the branches oi study, scientific and practical, which are
necessary for the proper performance of the duties of a Medical
Officer of Health.
            CHAPTER XII.—FACULTY OF MEDICINE.                        57

      24.—An examination in the branches of knowledge which
specially relate.to the functions of a Medical Officer of Health
shall be held from time to time and at such times as the Senate
shall appoint, and shall be called " The Examination for the
Diploma in Public Health.'' The times appointed for holding
the examination shall be published in the Calendar.
      25.—The examination for the Diploma in Public Health
shall be in two parts, viz. :—Part I., relating to the General
Principles of Sanitary Science ; and Part IL, relating to State
Medicine and to the applications of Pathology and Sanitary
Science to Public Health. Schedules of these subjects shall
be prescribed from time to time by regulations made in
accordance with these By-laws.
      26.—Application by a candidate for the Diploma in
Public Health for leave to present himself for examination
shall be made to the Registrar not less than four weeks before
the time appointed for the holding of the examination.
      27.—Before presenting himself for Part I. of the Exami-
nation for the Diploma in Public Health a candidate shall
produce evidence satisfactory to the Senate—
      (i.) That he is a qualified medical practitioner, registered
    by the New South Wales Medical Board ;
    (ii.) That a period of not less than twelve months has
    elapsed since he obtained registrable qualifications
    in Medicine, Surgery and Midwifery ; and
    (iii.) That since obtaining registrable qualifications
    in
    Medicine, Surgery and Midwifery,
         (a) He has during a period of not less than six months
              attended Special' Public Health courses in the
              University of SA'dney of Practical Laboratory
              Instruction in Chemistry, in Physiological Chem-
              istry, and in Bacteriology and Parasitology.
         (b) He has attended elsewhere than in a laboratory a
              course of Practical Instruction, approved by the
              Senate, in those Diseases of Animals which are
              transmissible to man ; and
         (c) He has attended such other courses of instruction
              in Public Health as may from time to time be
              prescribed by regulations made in accordance with
              these By-laws.
58               BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

      28.—Before presenting himself for Part Π. of the Exami-
 nation for the Diploma in Public Health a candidate shall
 produce evidence satisfactory to the Senate that, since
 obtaining registrable qualifications in Medicine, Surgery and
 Midwifery—>
          (a) He has been for a period of six months (of which at
          least three months shall be distinct and separate
          from the period of instruction required in sub-'
          clause (a) of clause (iii.) of section 5, diligently
          engaged in acquiring a practical knowledge of the
          duties, routine and special, of Public Health
          Administration under the supervision of a Medical
          Officer of Health approved by the Senate.
          (6) He has, for a period of not less than three months,
          attended the practice of a " Hospital for Infectious
          Diseases," approved by the Senate, such Hospital
          being one at which opportunities are afforded for
          the study of methods of administration. " Methods
          of Administration '"' shall include the methods of
          dealing with patients at their admission and dis-
          charge, as well as in the wards, and the medical
          superintendence of the hospital generally ; and
          (c) He has attended such other courses of instruction in
          Public Health as may from time to time be pre-
          scribed by regulations made in accordance with
          these By-laws.
      29.—A candidate may present himself for Part I. and for
Part II. of the examination separately, or for Part I. and
Part II. together ; but in no case shall a candidate present
himself for Part II. separately from Part L, unless he shall
already have satisfied the Examiners in Part I.
      30.—The examination for the Diploma in Public Health
shall extend over not less than four days.
      Both Part I. and Part II. of the examination shall be oral
and practical, as well as in writing..
      One day at least during the holding of Part I. shall be
devoted to practical work in a laboratory ; and one day at
least durirg the holding of Part II. shall. be devoted to
           CHAPTER XII.—FACULTY OF MEDICINE.                       59

practical examination in, and reporting on, subjects which
fall within the special outdoor duties of a Medical Officer of
Health.
      31.—The result of the examination for the Diploma in
Public Health shall not, in the case of any candidate, be
published until he has satisfied the examiners in both Part I.
and Part II.
      32.—The fee payable for the Diploma in Public Health
shall be ten pounds. This fee shall include the fees for the
examination, and shall be paid to the Registrar at the date
of application for leave to present himself for examination,
and shall not in any circumstances be returned. A candidate
who has presented himself for Part I. of the examination, and
has failed to satisfy the examiners, shall pay a further fee of
three pounds before presenting himself again for Part I. A
candidate who has presented himself for Part II. of the
examination, and has failed to satisfy the examiners, shall
pay a further fee of three pounds before presenting himself
again for Part II;
      THE AUSTRALIAN     DIPLOMA IN TROriCAL MEBICINE.
     33.—An Australian Diploma in Tropical Medicine of the
University of Sydney may be awarded to candidates who
have satisfied the provisions of the following By-laws.
     34.—An examination for the Diploma in Tropical Medi-
cine shall be held at such times as the Senate may appoint.
     35.—Application by a candidate for the Diploma in
Tropical Medicine for leave to present himself for the exami-
nation shall be made to the Registrar not less than four weeks
before the time appointed for the holding of the examination.
     36.—Before presenting himself for the examination for
the Diploma in Tropical Medicine a candidate shall produce
^evidence satisfactory to the Senate—■
                (i.) That he is a qualified medical practitioner regis-
                     tered in one of the States of the Commonwealth,
               (ii.) That a period of not less than twelve months has
                 elapsed since he obtained registrable qualifications
                                in Medicine, Surgery and Midwifery.
60               BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

              (iii.) That since obtaining registrable qualifications in
                Medicine, Surgery and Midwifery he has attended a
                        three months' course of study and practice in
             Tropical Pathology, Parasitology, Bacteriology,
                  Hygiene and Sanitation, and in Tropical Medicine,
                including Etiology, Symptomatology, Diagnosis,
                Treatment and Prevention of Tropical Diseases ; the
                 course to include lectures, demonstrations, and
                     laboratory work during three months at the Aus-
                     tralian Institute of Tropical Diseases and clinical
                        work during three months in the attached hos-
                                             pital wards at Townsville.
             Before attending the above courses the candidate must
            either (a) have passed Part I. of the examination for the
     Diploma in Public Health of the University of Sydney ; or (b)
         present a certificate to the eflect that he has pursued a pre-
         scribed preliminary course of laboratory instruction at the
       University of Sydney extending over a period of at least one
                                                                  month.
     37.—The examination for the Diploma in Tropical Medi-
cine shall be conducted at the Australian Instituí« of Tropical
Medicine at the end of the course. The examination shall be
both theoretical and practical, and shall include (a) tropical
pathology and parasitology ; (b) tropical and applied bacterio-
logy S (°) tropical hygiene and sanitation ; (d) tropical medi-
cine, including etiology, symptomalogy, diagnosis, treatment
and prevention of tropical diseases.
      38.—The fees payable by candidates for the Diploma of
Tropical Medicine shall be the^following :—
        For the prescribed Preliminary Course—Wo guineas.
        For the course at the Institute—ten guineas.
        For the Diploma—five guineas.            (This fee shall include
        the fees for the examination, and shall be paid to
        the Registrar on the date of application by the
        candidate for leave to present himself for the
        examination, and shall not in any circumstances
        be returned.)
        For any reexamination the candidate shall pay a
        further fee of two guineas.
           CHAPTEK XIII.—FACULTY OF SCIENCE.                        61

                CHAPTER XIII.—FACULTY OP SCIENCE.
       1.—The Chancellor, the Vice-Chancellor, the Warden, the
Professors in the subjects prescribed for the degrees in Science,
together with the Senior Assistant Professor, or Senior
Lecturer and Demonstrator from each department shall con-
stitute the Faculty of Science.
       2.—There shall be two degrees in Science, viz., Bachelor
of Science (B.Sc.) and Doctor of Science (D.Sc).
      3.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science
(B.Sc.) shall, before admission to the curriculum of Sciences
produce evidence either (i.) of having graduated in Arts ; or
(ii.) of having completed the First Year in the Faculty of Arts
in accordance with the provisions of Chapter XX., Section 7 ;
or (iii.) of having passed the Matriculation Examination for
the Faculty of Science, prescribed in Chapter XX., Sections
5 and 6.
4.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science shall,
during the First Year, attend the courses of instruction upon
and pass the examinations in four of the following subjects :—
I. Chemistry L, including laboratory practice.
       II. Physics I.,
      III. Botany I.,           „           „             „
      IV. Geology I.,
        V. Mathematics I.
      VI. Zoology L,
       Candidates who have not passed in Chemistry at the
Higher Standard in the Matriculation Examination shall be
required to take Chemistry I. as part of the work of the first
year.
       Candidates who have not passed in Physics at the Higher
Standard in the Matriculation Examination shall bë required
to take Physics I. as part of the work of the first year.
5.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science shall,
during the Second Year, attend the courses of instruction upon
and pass the examinations in three of the following subjects :—
I. Botany II., including laboratory practice.
II. Zoology II.,
III. Chemistry II.,      ,,               „             ,,
62                   BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

   rV. Geology II., including laboratory practice.
    V. Mathematics II.
    VI. Physics IL,
    VII. Physiology I.,       „
    VIII. Astronomy,             ,,         ,,          „
There shall be a lower and a higher standard in the examina-
tion in Botany, Zoology, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics,
Physics, and Physiology. No candidate shall be held to have
passed the Second Year examination unless he has passed in
the higher standard of the examination in at least two of these
subjects.
       6.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science shall,
 during the Third Year attend the courses of instruction upon,
 and pass the examinations in two of the following subjects,
 both of which must have already been passed at the higher
 standard at the Second Year examination :—
         I. Botany III., including laboratory practice.
        II. Zoology III.,
      III. Chemistry III.,      ,,             ,,         „
   rV. Geology III.,
    V. Mathematics' III.
    VI. Physics III..
    VII. Physiology II.,        „
    VHL^Organic Chemistry, Pure and Applied.
       Provided that before admission to the course in Organic
Chemistry (pure and applied), candidates shall have obtained
a pass at the higher standard in the Organic Chemistry section
of Chemistry II. at the second year examination.
       7.— Notwithstanding the provisions of the foregoing
sections, a matriculated student who has attended the courses
prescribed at this University in a first or second year subject,
and has passed the prescribed examination, shall not be
required to take the course of instruction and examination
again in such subject for a degree in the Faculty of Science.
Provided that every student shall have completed all the
subjects of the first year examination one academic year before
being permitted to attend the second year examination ; and
 •This iubject uiay be taken only in conjunction with Chemistry IH. or Physiology Π.
            CHAPTER XIII.—FACULTY OF SCIENCE.                   63

all the subjects of the second year examination one academic
year before being permitted to attend the final examination.
Except as provided in Section 8, a student must pass in all the
• subjects of his final examination in one and the same year. A
student availing himself of the provisions of this section shall
not be eligible for any prizes or scholarships at the annual
examinations.
       8.—Candidates judged by their Professors to be of special
 ability intending to compete for Honours may be permitted,
 with a view to acquiring greater proficiency, to postpone the
 examination in one of the subjects until the end of the fourth
 year, during which they must devote their whole time to work
 in connection with the subject of the postponed examination
 to the satisfaction of the Faculty.
       9.—No candidate shall have his name published as having
 gained honours until he is qualified for graduation. Unless
 with the express permission of the Faculty, granted for special
 reasons, no candidate shall be awarded honours at graduation
 who is of more than twelve terms standing from entering upon
 the curriculum.
       10.—Honours at graduation in any subject of the Science
 curriculum shall be awarded only to such students as have
 passed through courses I., ,11., and III. of such subject.
       11.—The candidate for Honours who shall have most dis-
 tinguished himself at the Bachelor of Science examination
 shall, if he possess sufficient merit, receive a bronze medal.
       12.—The examination for the degree of Bachelor of
 Science shall take place once a year.
       13.—No candidate shall be admitted to this examination
 unless he produce a certificate from the Dean of the Faculty
 of Science that he is of nine Terms' standing, and that he has
 passed all the examinations required since his admission to the
 University.
       14.—The fee for the degree of Bachelor of Science shall be
 three pounds. No candidate shall be admitted to the ex-
 amination unless he have previously paid this fee to the
 Registrar. If a candidate fail to pass the examination the fee
 shall not be returned to him. For any re-examination for the
 same degree he shall pay a fee of two pounds.
64              BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

        15.—The Annual Examinations shall be conducted in the
 first instance by means of printed papers, practical exercises,
 and reference to specimens when necessary ; and at the
 termination of such examinations each candidate shall under-
 go a vivâ voce examination if the Examiners think fit. At-
 least one written Class Examination shall be held during each
 Term of the first two years; except in the mathematical
 subjects. Students shall not absent themselves from these
 examinations except upon a medical certificate. Students
 who fail to pass the Class Examinations may, at the discretion
 of the Board of Examiners, be refused admission to the
 Annual Examinations.
        16.—The examination for the degree of Doctor of Science
 (D.Sc.) shall take place once a year.
       17.—Except as hereinafter provided, every candidate for
the degree of Doctor of Science must have held the degree
of Bachelor of Science at this University for at least three
years. He shall be required to pass an examination in one of
the following branches of science—Botany, Chemistry,
Geology, Mathematics, Palaeontology, Physics, Physiology,
Zoology. He shall also be required to present, and, if called
upon, to defend a thesis not already presented as a thesis for
any degree, embodying the results of an original investigation
in the branch of science selected. \ Five printed or type-
written copies of this thesis must be in the hands of the
Registrar at least two months before the date fixed for the
examination. The candidate may also present, for the' con-
sideration of the Examiners, any original contribution or
contributions to the branch of science selected which he may
desire to submit in support of his candidature. Provided that
in the case of candidates who have taken Honours at the
examination for the degree of Bachelor of Science, the ex-
aminers may confine their examination to the thesis and any
other original work submitted by the candidate, while
retaining the right, if thought advisable, to impose further
examinations upon the whole branch of science with which the
candidate's work is connected.
       Bachelors of Engineering who have obtained Distinction
in a science subject shall be eligible on the same conditions to
proceed to the degree of Doctor of Science.
           CHAPTER XIII,— FACULTT OF SCIENCE.                       65

      18.—The Senate may at its discretion admit to examina-
tion for the Degree of Doctor of Science any person who shall
have obtained at least three years previously the Degree of
Bachelor of Science or an equivalent first degree in science in
any other University approved by the Senate, provided that,
after obtaining such degree, such person shall have pursued a
course of advanced study and research in the University of
Sydney for a period of not less than two years.
       Every candidate for admission under this By-law must
make application in writing to the Registrar, and supply satis-
factory evidence of his qualification as aforesaid, and that he
is a person of good fame and character. Upon the approval of
his application he shall pay to the Registrar a fee of two pounds
for the entry of his name in the University books in addition
to the prescribed fee for his Degree.
       19.—Any candidate for this degree whose qualifications
 shall be of sufficient merit shall receive a bronze medal.
      20.—The fee for the degree of Doctor of Science shall be
ren pounds. No candidate shall be admitted to the examina-
tion unless he have previously paid this fee to the Registrar.
If a candidate fail to pass the examination the fee shall not be
returned to him, but he shall be admissible to one further
examination for the same degree without the payment of an
additional fee. For ear,h subsequent examination that may
be required he shall pay the sum of five pounds.
                  SCHOOL OF DOMESTIC SCIENCE.
      21.—In the School of Domestic Science there shall be
granted a Degree of Bachelor of Science in Domestic Science
(B.Sc. Dom.).
      22.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in
Domestic Science shall be required at the commencement of
their course to pass the matriculation examination prescribed
for candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science.
      23.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in
Domestic Science shall be required to attend the courses of
lectures covering a period of at least three years, and to pass
the examinations prescribed in the following By-laws, in
accordance with the conditions therein laid down.
D
66             BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

     24.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science im
Domestic Science must have attended and passed the con-
cluding examinations of seven of the courses prescribed in.
Sections 4, 5, and 6 of this chapter for candidates for the
degree of Bachelor of Science. These courses shall include
Physics, Chemistry, Physiology, and Botany, or Zoology. One
subject must be selected for a continuous course of study
extending over three years, provided that for the purpose of
this By-IaAV a course in, Physiology shall be held to be con-
tinuous with a course in Chemistry. They will also be
required to attend and satisfy the examiners in a course of
Public Health. In addition, candidates will be required to
attend the lectures and pass satisfactory examinations in.
Stage I. and Stage II. of the course in Domestic Science at
the Sydney Technical College.
     25.—The fee for the degree of Bachelor of Science in-
Domestic Science shall be three pounds. No candidate shall
be admitted to the examination unless he shall have pre-
viously paid this fee to the Registrar. If a candidate fail to
pass the examination the fee shall not be returned to him.
For any re-examination for the same degree he shall pay a-
fee of two pounds.
     26.—A candidate shall not be admitted to the degree of:
Bachelor of Science in Domestic Science unless he shall,
produce a certificate from the Dean of the Faculty of Science·
that he is of nine terms' standing, and that he has passed all
the examinations and has satisfactorily complied with all the
other conditions required of him since his admission to the
University.
      27.—The candidate who shall have most distinguished,
himself at the Final Examination for the degree of Bachelor
of Science in Domestic Science shall, if he possess sufficient-
merit, receive a bronze medal.
              CHAPTER XIV.—FACULTY OF ENGINEERING.
     1.—The Chancellor, the Vice-Chancellor, the Warden, the
Professors, Assistant Professors, Independent Lecturers, and.
Lecturers and Demonstrators in the professional subjects
prescribed for the degrees in Engineering, and the Prof essora
        CHAPTER XIV.—FACULTY OF ENGINEERING.                     67

of Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics and Geology, together
with such Fellows of the Senate as are graduates in Engineer-
ing, shall constitute the Faculty of Engineering.
      2.—There shall be two degrees in the Faculty of Engi-
 neering, viz., Bachelor of Engineering and Master of Engi-
 neering.
      The degree of Bachelor of Engineering shall be given in
■(I) Civil Engineering, (2) Mining and Metallurgy, or (3)
Mechanical and Electrical Engineering.
     3.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Engineering
shall, before admission to the curriculum in Engineering,
produce evidence either (i.) of having graduated in Arts or in
•Science ; or (ii.) of having completed the first year in the
Faculty of Arts in accordance with the provisions of Chapter
XX., Section 7 ; or (iii.) of having passed the Matriculation
Examination for the Department of Engineering prescribed
in Chapter XX., Sections 5 and 6.
                          CIVIL ENOIJiEERINO.

      4.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Engineering
in Civil Engineering shall, during the First Year, attend the
courses of instruction upon, and pass the examinations in, the
folknving subjects :—
      I. Chemistry I., including laboratory practice.
    II. Physics I., including laboratory practice.
   III. Mathematics I.
   IV. Descriptive Geometry.
     V. Geology L, including laboratory practice.
    VI. Engineering Design and Drawing.
      Students are recommended to attend the course of
"mechanical workshop practice prescribed for First Year
¡Students in the Department of Mechanical and Electrical
Engineering.
     5.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Engineering
in Civil Engineering shall, during the Second Year, attend the
•courses of instruction upon, and pass the examination in, the
following subjects :—
     I. Mathematics II.
                         (
68            BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

    II. Engineering Construction, including laboratory prac-
              tice.
   III. Mechanical Engineering L, including laboratory prac-
              tice.
   IV. Physics IL, including laboratory practice.
     V. Chemistry II., for Engineers.
VI. Engineering Design and Drawing.
6.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Engineering
in Civil Engineering shall, during the Third Year, attend the
courses of instruction upon, and pass the examination in, the
following subjects :—
    I. Materials and Structures I., including laboratory prac-
    tice.
    II. Mechanical Engineering II. A, including laboratory
    practice.
   III. Electrical Engineering I., including laboratory prac-
              tice.
   IV. Surveying I., including field work.
 V. Architecture and Building Construction.
VI. Engineering Drawing and Design.
The annual.examinations of Third Year students shall be-
held at the end of Trinity Term. Before entering upon his.
Fourth Year each student shall be required to present a
certificate showing that he has had six months' practical work
on approved engineering works or in approved offices or work-
shops.
      7.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Engineering
in Civil Engineering shall, during the Fourth Year,. attend,
the courses of instruction upon, and pass the examination in,,
the following subjects :—
    I. Materials and Structures II., including laboratory
    practice.
    II. Civil Engineering A and B, including
    laboratory
    practice.
   III. Surveying II.
   IV. Engineering Design and Drawing.
      Every candidate is required to prepare and submit to the
Board of Examiners an original thesis or set of working
drawings and specifications for machinery or works.
        CHAPTER XIV.—FACULTY OF ENGINEERING.                       69

      8.—Notwithstanding the provisions of the four previous-
sections, a matriculated student who has attended the course
prescribed at this University in a first or second or third year
subject, and has passed the prescribed examination, shall not
be required to take the course of instruction and examination
again in such subject for a degree in engineering, provided
that every student shall have completed all the subjects of
the first year examination one academic year before being
permitted to attend the second year examination ; all the
subjects of the second year examination one academic year
before being permitted to attend the third year examination,
and all the subjects of the third year examination one academia
year before being permitted to attend the final examination.
A student must pass in all the subjects of his final examination
in one and the same year. A student availing himself of the
pro\asions of this section shall not be eligible for any prizes·
or scholarships at the annual examinations.
                        MININO AND METALLURGY.

      9.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Engineering
in Mining and Metallurgy shall, during the First Year, attend
the courses of instruction upon, and pass the examinations in,,
the following subjects :—
      I. Chemistry I., including laboratory practice.
    II. Physics I., including laboratory practice
   III. Mathematics I.
   IV. Descriptive Geometry.
     V. Geology I., including laboratory practice.
   VI. Engineering Design and Drawing.
      Students are recommended to attend the course of
mechanical workshop practice prescribed for First Year
students in the Department of Mechanical and Electrical
Engineering.
       10.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Engineering
in Mining and Metallurgy shall, during the Second Year,
attend the courses of instruction upon, and pass the examina-
tions in, the following subjects :—
      I. Engineering Construction, including laboratory prac-
              tice.
70              BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

     II. Mechanical Engineering L, including laboratory prac-
               tice.
    III. Physics II. (two terms), including laboratory practice.
    IV. Engineering Design and Drawing.
      V. Chemistry II. (for Engineers).
     VI. Geology II., including laboratory practice.
   VII. Chemistry, quantitative.
       11.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Engineer-
ing in Mining and Metallurgy shall, during the Third Year,
attend the courses of instruction upon, and pass the examina-
tions in, the following subjects :—
       I. Mineralogy, including laboratory practice.
     II. Materials and Structures L, including laboratory prac-
     tice.
    III. Mechanical Engineering II. A, including laboratory
               practice.
    IV. Electrical Engineering I,, including laboratory prac-
        tice.
V. Surveying I., including field work.
VI. Building Construction.
VII. Practical Metallurgy and Assaying I.
VIII. Engineering Design and Drawing.
IX. Mining (Michaelmas. Term).
Before commencing the Fourth Year, students are recom-
mended to spend at least two months on an approved mine.
12.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Engineering
in Mining and Metallurgy shall, during the Fourth Year,
attend the courses of instruction upon, and pass the examina-
tions in, the following subjects :—
I. Mining.
II. Metallurgy.
      III. Practical Metallurgy and Assaying II.
      IV. Engineering Design and Drawing.
        V. Surveying III., with field work.
       Every candidate is required to prepare and submit to the
Board of Examiners an original thesis, or set of working draw-
ings and specifications for machinery or works.
       13.—Notwithstanding the provisions of the four previous
sections a matriculated student who has attended the course
        CHAPTER XIV.—FACULTY OF ENGINEERING.                        71

prescribed at this University in a first or second or third year
subject, and has passed the prescribed examination, shall not
be required to take the course of instruction and examination
again in such subject for a degree in engineering, provided that
every student shall have completed all the subjects of the first
year examination one academic year before being permitted to
attend the second year examination ; all the subjects of the
second year examination one academic year before being per-
mitted so attend the third year examination ; and all the sub-
jects of the third year examination one academic year before
being permitted to attend the final examination. A student·
must pass in all the subjects of his final examination in one and
the same year. A student availing himself of the provisions of
this section shall not be eligible for any prizes or scholarships
at the annual examinations.

               MECHANICAL   AND   ELECTRICAL   ENGINEERING.

      14.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Engineering
in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering shall during the First
Year attend the courses of instruction upon, and pass the
examinations in, the following subjects :—
        I. Chemistry I., including laboratory practice.
      II. Physics I., including laboratory practice.
     III. Mathematics I.
     IV. Descriptive Geometry.
       V. Engineering Design and Drawing.
     :VI. Mechanical Workshop Practice.
      15.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Engineering
in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering shall, during the
Second Year attend the courses of instruction upon, and pass
the examinations in, the following subjects :—
        I. Mathematics II.
      II. Engineering Construction.
     III. Mechanical Engineering L, including
     laboratory
                practice.
     IV. Physics IL, including laboratory practice.
       V. Chemistry II. (for engineers).
      VI. Engineering Design and Drawing.
72             BY-LAWS OF THE     UNIVERSITY.

       16.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Engineering
in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering shall, during the
Third Year, attend the courses of instruction upon, and pass
the examinations in, the following subjects :—
          I. Mechanical Engineering IL, including
          laboratory
        practice.
        II. Electrical Engineering L, including laboratory prac-
        tice.
      III. Materials and Structures L, including
      laboratory
                   practice.
      IV. Surveying L, with field work.
  V. Engineering Design and Drawing.
The annual examination of third year students shall be
lie Id at the end of Trinity Term. Before entering upon his
Fourth Year each student shall be required to present a certi-
ficate showing that he has had six months' practical workshop
experience in some approved engineering works.
       17.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Engineering
in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering shall, during the
Fourth Year, attend the courses of instruction upon, and pass
"the examinations in, the following subjects :—
      I. Mechanical Engineering III., including laboratory
      practice.
      II. Electrical Engineering IL, including laboratory
      practice.
      III. Engineering Design and Drawing.
      LV. Civil Engineering.
       Every candidate is required to prepare'and submit to the
 Board of Examiners an original thesis or set of working draw-
 ings and specifications for machinery or works.
       18. Notwithstanding the provisions of the four previous
sections, a matriculated student who has attended the course
prescribed at this University in a first or second or third year
subject, and has passed the prescribed examination, shall not
be required to take the course of instruction and examination
again in such subject for a degree in engineering provided that
every student shall have completed all the subjects of the first
year examination one academic year before being permitted to
       CHAPTER XIV.—FACULTY OF ENGINEERING.                    7»

attend the second year examination ; all the subjects of the
second year examination one academic year before being per-
mitted to attend the third year examination ; and all the sub-
jects of the third year examination one academic year before
being permitted to attend the final examination. A student
must pass in all the subjects of his final examination in one and
the same year. A student availing himself of the provisions of
this section shall not be eligible for any prizes or scholarships
at the annual examinations.
      19.—A candidate shall not be admitted to the Degree of
Bachelor of Engineering unless he shall produce a certificate
from the Dean of the Faculty of Engineering that he is of
twelve terms' standing, that he has passed all the examinations
and has satisfactorily complied with all the other conditions
required of him since his admission to the University.
      20.—The candidate who shall have most distinguished
himself at the Final Examination for the Degree of Bachelor
of Engineering in any department shall, if he possess sufficient
merit, receive a bronze medal.
      21.—The examination for the Degree of Master of
Engineering shall take place once a year. This Degree shall
not be conferred until after the expiration of three academic
years from the granting of the B.E. Degree.
      22'.—Every candidate shall be required to produce to the
 Faculty satisfactory evidence of having pursued the Science
 or the Practice of Engineering during three years after gradu-
 ation as Bachelor of Engineering.
      23.—Every candidate for the Degree of Master of
Engineering shall be required to pass an examination in some
engineering subject, which he must submit for the approval of
the Faculty, and to present a thesis embodying the result of an
original investigation or design, provided that candidates who
have taken honours in the professional subjects of the exami-
nation for the Degree of Bachelor of Engineering may be ex-
amined by thesis only. Candidates shall be required to submit
their subjects of examination and thesis for the approval of
the Faculty at the beginning of Michaelmas term.
      24.—The diplomas for the Degrees of Bachelor and Master
of Engineering shall specify the branch or branches of Engin-
eering for which they are granted.
74              BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

       25.—The fees for the degrees of Bachelor and Master of
 Engineering shall be ten pounds respectively. These fees shall
 be paid to the Registrar before the examination, and shall not
 in any case be returned to the candidate. Candidates who fail
 to pass the examination for either degree shall be required
 upon presenting themselves, for any further examination for
 the same degree, to pay a fee of five pounds.
       26.—Graduates in Engineering in any branch may, upon
passing the Degree Examination in any other branch or
branches and producing satisfactory evidence of practical work
therein, receive a certificate for such additional branch or
branches.
       27.—The fee for such additional examination for the
Degrees of Bachelor and of Master of Engineering shall be ten
pounds.
      28.—The candidate who shall most distinguish himself in
the examination for the Degree of Master of Engineering shall
if of sufficient merit, receive a bronze medal.
      29.—Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 6, 7 and
•8 of this chapter,—
        (1.) Undergraduates who have completed two years of
        the course prescribed for students in the, depart-
        • ment of Civil Engineering, and have passed the
        second year examination, may proceed to the
        degree of Bachelor of Science by attending the
        third year courses of instruction in Mathematics
        and Physics and passing the examinations in
        those subjects.
        (2.) Undergraduates who have completed three years of
        the course prescribed for students in the depart-
        ment of Mining and Metallurgy, and have passed
        the third year examination, may proceed to the
        degree of Bachelor of Science by attending the
        third year courses of instruction in Chemistry and
        Geology and passing the examinations in those,
        subjects.
        iß) Undergraduates who have completed two years of
        the course prescribed for students in the depart-
        ment of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering,
          CHAPTER XV.—FACULTY OF DENTISTRY.                        75

              and have passed the second year examination,
              may proceed to the degree of Bachelor of Science
              by attending the third year courses of instruction
              in Mathematics and Physics and passing the
              examinations in those subjects.
Provided that no student who takes advantage of this section
shall be at liberty during the period to which this section
applies to take up any course except those prescribed by this
section.
               CHAPTER XV.—FACULTY OF DENTISTRY.
      1.—The Chancellor, the Vice-Chancellor, the Warden, the
Professors and Lecturers in the professional subjects of the
dental curriculum, and the Professors of Anatomy, Physi-
ology, Pathology and Pharmacology shall constitute the
Faculty of Dentistry. The Professors of Anatomy, Physi-
ology, Pathology and Pharmacology may at any time appoint
as their deputies at a meeting of the Faculty an Assistant
Professor, a Lecturer, or a Lecturer and Demonstrator from
their respective departments.
      2.—There shall be a degree granted in the Faculty of
Dentistry, viz., Bachelor of Dental Surgery
     3.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Dental
Surgery, before commencing iheir studies, shall pass the
Matriculation Examination for the Faculty of Medicine, or
shall produce satisfactory evidence of having passed an
equivalent examination elsewhere.
      4.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Dental
Surgery shall, during the First Year, attend the following
courses of instruction :—
        1. Physics and Practical Physics.
        2. Chemistry (Introductory) and Metals.
        3. Practical Chemistry, and Metallurgy as applied to
             Dentistry.
        4. Elementary Anatomy, including Special Anatomy
             of the Teeth.
        5. Dissections (two terms).
        6. Mechanical Dentistry.
 76             BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

       5.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Dental
 Surgery shall, during the Second Year, attend the following
 •courses of instruction :—
          1. Physiology (Trinity and Michaelmas, two terms).
          2. Physiology, Practical (Lent and Trinity, two terms).
          3.. Surgical Dentistry.
          4. Mechanical Dentistry.
          5. Dissections (equivalent to two terms).
          6. Practice in Surgical and Mechanical Dentistry at
                the Dental Hospital.
          7. Regional Anatomy.
       6.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Dental
 Surgery shall, during the Third Year, attend the following
 courses of instruction :—
         1. Physiology (one term, Lent).
         2. Surgical Dentistry.
         3. Mechanical Dentistry.
         4. Materia Medica and Therapeutics.
         5. General Pathology.
         6. Surgery.
         7. Practice in Surgical and Mechanical Dentistry at
               the Dental Hospital.
      7.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Dental
Surgery shall, during the Fourth Year, attend the following
■courses of instruction :—
         1. Special Dental Surgery.
         2. Practical Pathology and Bacteriology.
         3. Anaesthetics.
         4. Practice in Surgical and Mechanical Dentistry at
               Dental Hospital.
         5. Special Clinical Courses—
                     (a) Medicine.
                     (6) Surgery.
     8.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Dental
Surgery shall be required to pass the following examina-
tions :—
         At the end of the First Year, an examination in Physics
               and Chemistry.
          CHAPTER XV.—FACULTY OF DENTISTRY.                   77

         At the end of Trinity Term of the Second Year, an
               examination in Anatomy.
         At the end of the Second Year, an examination in
             Surgical and Mechanical Dentistry.
         At the end of Trinity Term of the Third Year, an
               examination in Physiology.
         At the end of the Third Year, an examination in
               Surgical Dentistry, Mechanical Dentistry, Materia
               Medica and Therapeutics.
         At the end of Trinity Term of the Fourth Year, an
               examination in Pathology and Bacteriology.
         At the end of the Fourth Year, an examination in
               Clinical, Surgical and Mechanical Dentistry, Sur-
               gery and Special Dental Surgery.
      9.—The fee for the Degree of Bachelor of Dental Surgery
;shall be ten pounds. This fee shall be paid to the Registrar
before the final examination, and shall not, in any case, be
returned to the candidate. A candidate who fails to pass the
•examination may be allowed to present himself for a further
•examination upon payment of the sum of five pounds.
      10.—At each Degree Examination the candidates shall be
required to give proof of their knowledge by written answers
to the questions set, and also by a practical or vivâ voce
■examination in all the subjects.
       11.—Before admission to the final Degree Examination,
•each candidate shall furnish evidence of having completed his
twenty-first year, and also a certificate of good fame and
■character, to the satisfaction of the Senate.
       12.—Candidates who have passed all the examinations
 to the satisfaction of the Board may be recommended to the
 Senate for the Degree of Bachelor in Dental Surgery.
      13.—Accredited certificates of attendance on courses of
instruction from other Universities or Schools of Medicine
or of Dentistry may, on the report of the Director, be accepted
pro tanto by the Senate as proof of the attendance on courses
of instruction required by these By-laws. Provided always
that no person shall be recommended to the Senate for the
"Degree in Dental             Surgery unless he shall have
attended
78              BY-LAWS OF TKE UNIVERSITY

within the University of Sydney, during each of at least six
terms, not less than two courses of instruction in subjects-
included in the Dental curriculum of the University. In all
such cases some certificate of general education satisfactory
to the Senate will be required. Any student who has served
or is serving an apprenticeship in Mechanical Dentistry with,
a registered dentist may, on the report of the Board of Dental
Studies, be exempted from the whole or a part of the pre-
scribed workshop practice in that subject.
      14.—A Graduate in Medicine of the University may be
admitted to examination for the Degree in Dental Surgery on
presenting satisfactory evidence that after graduation in
Medicine he has devoted at least four terms to the study of
Dentistry and that he has attended the following courses of
instruction prescribed for Students in Dentistry, viz. :—1.
The Special Course of Lectures on the Anatomy of the Teeth.
2. Practical Metallurgy. 3. The Lectures in Surgical and
Mechanical Dentistry. 4. Attendance during one year at a
Dental Hospital, with Practical Instruction in Surgical and.
in Mechanical Dentistry. The examination in such case shall
be confined to the Anatomy of the Teeth, to Practical Metal-
lurgy, and to Surgical and Mechanical Dentistry.
      15.—Any person who has been admitted to the Licence
in Dental Surgery of the University of Sydney may proceed to
the Degree of Bachelor of Dental Surgery, after attending
for one year such special courses and passing such examina-
tions as may be prescribed by the Senate.
          CHAPTER XVI.—FACULTY OF VETEKINAEY SCIENCE.
     1.—The Chancellor,' the Vice-Chancellor, the Warden, the
Professor of Veterinary Science, the Professor of Physiology
and the Lecturers in the professional subjects prescribed for
the degree of Bachelor of Veterinary Science shall constitute
the Faculty of Veterinary Science.
     2.—There shall be a degree granted in the Faculty of
Veterinary Science, viz., Bachelor of Veterinary Science
(B.V.Sc.).
     3.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Veterinary
 Science shall, before admission to the curriculum in Veterinary
 Science, produce evidence either—
   CHAPTER XVI.—FACULTY OF VETERINARY SCIENCE.            79

  I. of having graduated in Arts or in Science ; or
II. of having completed the First Year in the Faculty of
Arts in accordance with the provisions of Chapter
XX., Section 7 ; or
III. of having passed the Matriculation Examination
prescribed in Chapter XX., Section 5, or complied
with the conditions of the second proviso of
Section 2 of the same chapter.
4.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Veterinary
Science shall, during the First Year, attend the courses of
instruction upon, and pass the examinations in, the following
subjects :—
          Botany, including laboratory practice.
          Zoology       ,,          ,,
          Inorganic and Organic Chemistry.
          Practical Chemistry.
          Physics.
          Veterinary Anatomy (Osteology and Arthrology).
       5.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Veterinary
 Science shall, during the Second Year, attend the courses of
 instruction upon, and pass the examinations in the following
 subjects :—
          Physiology (with special course in
          Supplementary
          Veterinary Physiology).
          Practical Physiology, including Histology and Physio-
          logical Chemistry.
          Veterinary Anatomy (Equine, and the comparative
       anatomy of the other domesticated animals).
Practical Veterinary Anatomy with Dissections.
6.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Veterinary
Science shall, during the Third Year, attend the courses of
instruction upon, and pass the examinations in, the following
subjects :—
          Veterinary Pathology and Bacteriology.
          Pharmacology.
          Agricultural Botany.
          Veterinary Hygiene and Dietetics.
          Veterinary       Materia     Medica,     Therapeutics
          and
          Pharmacy.
80              BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

         Stable Management, Manipulation of Domesticated
              Animals, and Principles of Horse-shoeing.
        Clinical Instruction.
              And shall perform such further practical work as may
                 from time to time be required.
           7.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Veterinary
        Science shall, during the Fourth Year, attend the courses of
      instruction upon, and pass the examinations in, the following.
 subjects :—
         Veterinary Medicine.
         Veterinary Surgery.
         Veterinary Obstetrics.
         Veterinary Parasitology.
         Meat Inspection.
         Examination of Horses for Unsoundness.
         Clinical Instruction.
And shall perform such further practical work as may
from time to time be required.
8.—Class examinations shall be held during each course of
instruction in each term, unless such term immediately pre-
cedes the annual examination in the subject of the course.
Students shall not absent themselves from these examinations
except upon a medical certificate, and at the - end of each
course a report of the result, signed by the responsible teacher
shall be presented to the Director. The results of these ex-
aminations may be taken into account at the annual examina-
tions.
      9.—No candidate shall be admitted to the Second Annual
Examination unless he has completed the dissection of the
whole cadaver of the horse at least once, and has attended
twenty demonstrations on the Anatomy of other domesti-
cated animals.
      10.—At each Annual Examination candidates shall be re-
quired to give proof of their knowledge by written answers to
the questions set, and also by practical or viiavoce examination
or by both.
      11.—Before admission to the Examinations of the Fourth
Year, candidates shall be required to produce satisfactory
evidence that they have performed such practical work as may
from time to time be prescribed.
        CHAPTER'XVIL—FACULTV OF AGRICULTURE.                          8Γ

      12.·—No candidate shall be admitted to the Examinations-
 of the Fourth Year until he shall have produced satisfactory
 evidence of having completed his twenty-first year and of
 being a person of good fame and character.
      13.—Candidates who have passed all the examinations tc*
 the satisfaction of the Faculty of Science, and have duly com-
 plied with these by-laws, may be recommended to the Senate
 for admission to the Degree of Bachelor of Veterinary Science.
      14.—The candidate who shall have distinguished himself
 most highly at the Examinations throughout the course for the
 Degree of Bachelor of Veterinary Science shall, if of sufficient
 merit, receive a bronze medal.
      15.—Accredited certificates of attendance on courses of ^i
instruction from Universities or Schools of Medicine or of /
Veterinary Science may, on the report of the Faculty be '
accepted by the Senate as proof of attendances on course of
instruction pro tanto required by these by-laws.       Provided ·-*
always that no person shall be recommended to the Senate for if
the Degree of Bachelor of Veterinary Science unless he shall
have attended for at least three terms and passed examina-
tions in the subjects of the fourth year's course, and have
produced some certificate of general education satisfactory to
the Senate.
      16.—The fee for the Degree of Bachelor of Veterinary
Science shall be three pounds. This fee shall be paid to the
Registrar before the Final Examination and shall not in any
case be returned to the candidate. A candidate who fails to
pass the examination may be allowed to present himself for a
further examination upon payment to the Registrar of a sum
of two pounds for each subsequent examination.
              CHAPTER XVII.—FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE.
     1.—The Chancellor, the Vice-Chancellor, the Warden, the
Professor of Agriculture, the Professors of. Chemistry, Organic
Chemistry, Botany, Zoology, Geology, Veterinary Science, and
the Lecturers and Demonstrators in the professional subjects
prescribed for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
shall constitute the Faculty of Agriculture.
82              BY-LAWS OF THK UNIVERSITY.

           2:—There shall be a degree granted in the Faculty of
  Agriculture, viz., Bachelor of Science in Agriculture.
          3.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in
  Agriculture shall, before admission to the curriculum in
  Agriculture, produce evidence either—
I. of having graduated in Arts or in Science ; or
II. of having completed the First Year in the Faculty of
Arts in accordance with the provisions of Chapter
XX., Section 7 ; or
. IH. of having passed the Matriculation Examination pre-
scribed in Chapter XX., Section 5, or complied with
the conditions of the second proviso of Section 2 of
the same chapter.
4.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in
Agriculture shall, during the First Year, attend the courses of
instruction upon and pass the examinations in the following
„subjects :—
          I. Chemistry I., including laboratory practice.
        Π. Botany I.,
    III. Zoology L,
    IV, Geology I.                 „      .
         y. Physics (part course).
         ¡5.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in
 Agriculture shall, during the Second Year, attend the courses
 .of instruction upon and pass the examinations in the following
 subjects :—■
        I. Chemistry (Organic and Physical) with laboratory
        practice.
        Π. Botany (Systematic and Physiological) with laboratory
        practice.
     III. Agricultural Geology, with laboratory practice.
     IV. Principles of Agriculture L, with laboratory practice.
          V·. Economic Entomology.
           6.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in
 ,Agriculture shall, during the Third Year, attend the courses of
 instruction' upon and pass the examinations in the following
 'subjects' ::—
1
      '! ,r 'Ii' Agricultural Chemistry, including laboratory practice.
         Π. Agricultural Botany                ,,
       CHAPTER XVII.—FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE                  83

   III. Plant Pathology, including laboratory practice.
   IV. Veterinary Hygiene and Dietetics.
     V. Stable Management, Manipulation of Domesticated
            Animals and Principles of Horseshoeing.
VI. Veterinary Pathology,
and shall perform such further practical work as may ■ be-
required.
       7. Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in
Agriculture shall, during the Fourth Year, attend the courses
of instruction upon and pass the examinations in the following
subjects :—
      I. Principles of Agriculture II.
     II. Principles of Fruit Culture and Viticulture,
   III. Economic Science Applied to Agriculture,
   IV. Principles of Forestry, with practical exercises,
      V. Agricultural Engineering, with practical exercises, .
    VI. Veterinary Parasitology.
VII. Agricultural Bacteriology, including laboratory prac-
tice,
and shall perform such further practical work as may be
required.
       8.—Notwithstanding the provisions of the four previous
sections, a matriculated student who has attended the course
prescribed at this University in a first or second or third year
subject, and has passed the prescribed examination, shall not
be required to take the course of instruction and examination
again in such subject for the degree of Bachelor of Science in
Agriculture provided that every student shall have completed
all the subjects of the first year examination one academic year
before being permitted to attend the second year examination ;
all the subjects of the second year examination one academic
year before being permitted to attend the third year examina-
tion ; and all the subjects of the third year examination one
academic year before being permitted to attend the final
examination. A student must pass in all the subjects of his
final examination in one and the same year. À student
availing himself of the provisions of this section shall not be
eligible for any prizes or scholarships at the annual exami-
nations.
 84               BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

       9.—Before admission to the Degree of Bachelor of
 Science in Agriculture each candidate shall be required to
 produce evidence of having spent a period of not less than
 twelve months, which need not be continuous, at an Agricul-
 tural College or approved farm, where he has been engaged
 in practical field operations.
       10.—No candidate shall be admitted to the degree of
 Bachelor of Science in Agriculture unless he shall produce a
 certificate from the Dean of the Faculty that he is of twelve
 terms' standing, and that he has passed all the examinations,
 and has satisfactorily complied with all the other conditions
 required of him since his admission to the University.
       11.—The candidate who shall have most distinguished
 himself at the Annual Examinations throughout the course
 for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture shall, if
 he possess sufficient merit, receive a bronze medal.
       12.—The fee for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in
.Agriculture shall be three pounds. No candidate shall be
-admitted to the examination unless he shall have previously
paid this fee to the Registrar. If a candidate fail to pass the
examination the fee shall not be returned to him. For any
re-examination for the same degree he shall pay a fee of two
^pounds.
      13.—^Notwithstanding the provisions of the preceding
By-laws, candidates who hold the diploma of the Hawkesbury
Agricultural College, or any college of similar standing recog-
nised for the purpose by the Senate, may be permitted, on the
recommendation of the Faculty, to take the Degree of Bachelor
of Science in Agriculture in three years by omitting certain
subjects from the third and fourth years of their course, in
which they have already shown proficiency, and taking the
remaining subjects in one year.
               CHAPTEB XVni.—FACULTY OF ECONOMICS.
 :
   Ir—The Chancellor, the Vice-Chancellor, the Warden, the
Professors of Economics, Law and History, and the Lecturers
in the subjects primarily prescribed for degrees in Economics
shall constitute the Faculty of Economics.
         CHAPTER XVIII.—FACULTY OF ECONOMICS                      85

      2.—There shall be two degrees granted in the Faculty of
Economics, viz., Bachelor of Economics (B.Ec.) and Master
of Economics (M.Ec).
      3.—Except as provided by By-law Chapter XX., Sections
2 and 3, candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Economics
shall be required at the commencement of their course to
pass the Matriculation Examination in accordance with the
provisions of Chapter XX., Sections 5 and 6.
      4.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Economics
shall be required to attend the courses of lectures covering
a period of at least four years, and to pass the examinations
prescribed in the following By-laws in accordance with the
conditions therein laid down.
      5.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Economics
shall, during the first year, attend the courses of instruction
and pass the examinations in the following subjects :—
    I. Economics I.
   II. Two full courses taken from the list prescribed in
Chapter X., Section 4, of the By-laws for Students
in the Faculty of Arts.
Mathematics I. will be compulsory for students desiring
to take the full course in Insurance Mathematics.
      6.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Economics
shall during the second year attend the courses of instruction
upon and pass the examinations in three of the following
subjects :—
      I. Economics II.
    II. (a) Business Principles and Practice.
          (b) Economic Geography.
   III. (a) Statistics (half course).
          (6) Accountancy I. (half course).
          Optional—Accountancy I. (a second.half course).
          Students who take this half course may omit the
          History of Economic Thought in the fourth year.
   IV. Insurance Mathematics I.
      7.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Economics
shall during the third year attend the courses of instruction
upon and pass the examinations in the following subjects :—
86              BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITT.

     I. Economics III., or Insurance Mathematics II.
    II. Economic History.
    III. Commercial and Industrial Law.
 8.·—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Economics
 shall during the fourth year attend the courses of instruction
 upon and pass the examinations in the following subjects :—
 I. Public Administration.
    Or two of the following half courses—
    Principles and Practice of Banking.
    Technology of Commercial Products.
    Ecpnomics of Transport.
    Political Science, Elements of.
    Municipal Administration.
    Philosophy II. (Sociology), if not already taken.
    Philosophy I. (Psychology), if not already taken.
    II. Accountancy IL, including Auditing, or a subject not
    already selected from those prescribed for the
    Faculty of Arts.
    III. History of Economic Thought.
       The examination at the end of the fourth year will include
a test in the translation of French or German Economic
Literature for those who have not taken French I. or
German I.
       Students who wish to become professional accountants
are recommended to take Accountancy IL, including
Auditing.
       9.—The fee for the degree of Bachelor of Economics shall
be three pounds. No candidate shall be admitted to the
examination unless he shall have previously paid this fee to
the;Registrar. If a candidate fail to pass the examination the
fee shall not be returned to him.
       For any re-examination for the same degree he shall pay
a fee of two pounds.
       10.—There shall be a yearly examination for the degree
of Master of Economics during Lent Term.
       11.—Every candidate for this degree must have pre-
viously obtained the degree of Bachelor of Economics, and
two years must have elapsed since the time of examination
         CHAPTER XVIII.—FACULTY OF ECONOMICS.                        87

for such degree.      He will also be required to furnish evidence
of having completed his twenty-first year.
      12.—The fee for the degree of Master of Economics shall
be five pounds.
      No candidate shall be admitted to the examination
unless he shall have previously paid this fee to the Registrar.
If a candidate fails to pass the examination the fee shall not
be returned to him.
      For any re-examination for such degree he shall pay a
fee of two pounds.
      13.—Candidates for the degree of Master of Economics
shall be examined in—(i.) Economics, and (ii.) a special
economic subject to be approved by the Professor of Eco-
nomics.
      They will also be required to present, and, if called upon,
to defend a thesis, not already presented by them as a thesis
for any degree, embodying the results of an original investiga-
tion in some economic subject.
      14.—Students who desire to qualify for graduation by
attendance upon evening lectures shall be required to attend
the courses of instruction, and pass the examinations pre-
scribed in this Chapter, for candidates for the degree of
Bachelor of Economics.
                  DIPLOMA   IN ECONOMICS   AND COMÏIBRCB.


      15.—A diploma in Eocnomics and Commerce shall be
granted to students who comply with the conditions of the
following by-laws.
      16.—Candidates for the diploma in Economics and
Commerce shall be required to attend the courses of instruc-
tion upon and pass the examinations in the following subjects,
viz. :—
        (a) In the First Year—
             (1) Economics I.       ..    ..      .. 90 lectures
             (2) Business Principles and Practice    45        ,,
             (3) Economic Geography ..               45        ,,
88               BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

        (b) In the Second Year—
             (4) Accountancy I. (first half of
                 degree course)        ..       ..          ..   45 lectures
             (5) Commercial and Industrial Law
                 (first half of degree course)              ..   45         „
             (6) English Literature II ...................... 60
        (c) In the Third Year—
             (7) Statistics ..       ..         ..          ..   45 lectures
             (8) Public Administration ..                   ..   90         ,,
                 Or two of the following :
                  (a) Technology of Commercials
                         Products ..            ..          ..1
                  (δ) Municipal Administration .. \ 45 lectures
                  (c) Principles and Practice of(                     each.
                          Banking ..            ..          .. J
                  {d) Economics of Transport              ..
      17.—The fee for the diploma in Economics and Commerce
shall be one pound.
      No candidate shall be admitted to the examination unless
he shall have previously paid this fee to the Registrar. ,} For
any re-examination for the same diploma he shall pay ajee
of two pounds.
               .CHAPTER XIX.—FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE.
      1.—The Chancellor, the Vice-Chancellor, the Warden, the
Professor of Architecture, the Professor of Engineering and
the Lecturers in the professional subjects prescribed for the
degree in Architecture shall constitute the Faculty of
Architecture.
      2.—A degree shall be granted in the Faculty of Architec-
ture, viz., Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.).
      3.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Architecture
shall be required at the commencement of their course to pass
the Matriculation examination prescribed for candidates for
the degree of Bachelor of Science. They are recommended
to take Mathematics at the higher standard and Mechanics.
      4.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Architecture
shall be required to attend the courses of lectures covering a
       CHAPTER XIX.—FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE                    89

period of at least four years, and to pass the examinations
prescribed in the following by-laws in accordance with the
conditions therein laid down.
     5.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Architecture
shall, during the first year, attend the courses of instruction
andjpass the examinations in the following subjects :—
         / » C Elements of Architecture.
              1 Architectural Drawing.
         (b) Descriptive Geometry.
         (c) Drawing.
         (d) Mathematics I.
         (e) Physics I. or Chemistry I., provided that candidates
         who have passed in Physics or Chemistry at the
         higher standard of the matriculation examination
         shall be allowed to substitute for (e) another subject
         from (/).
         (/) One of the following :—Latin, Greek, English,
         French, History, or such other of the subjects pre-
         scribed for. candidates for the degree of Bachelor
         of Arts as may be approved by the Board of Studies
         in Architecture.
      6.—Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Architecture
shall, during the second year, attend the courses of instruction
upon^and pass the examinations in the following subjects :—
          (a) Design.
          (b) Drawing.
          (c) History of Architecture I.
          (d) Construction.
          (e) Materials and Structures.
       7.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Architecture
shall, during the third year, attend the courses of instruction
upon and pass the examinations in the following subjects :—
          (a) Design.
          (6) Drawing.
          (c) History of Architecture II.
          (d) Construction, including Engineering Construction.
          (e) Surveying.
        if) Hygiene.
90              BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

      8.—Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Architecture
shall, during the fourth year, attend the courses of instruction
upon and pass the examinations in the following subjects :—
         (a) Design.
         (b) Drawing.
         (c) Professional Practice.
         (d) History of Sculpture and Painting.
       ' (e) Town Planning.
         (/) Short courses on special subjects.
      9.—The fee for the degree of Bachelor of Architecture
shall be ten pounds. No candidate shall be admitted to the
examination unless he shall have previously paid this fee to
the Registrar. If a candidate fails to pass the examination
the fee shall not be returned to him. For any re-examination
for the same degree he shall pay a fee of five pounds.
      10.—A candidate shall not be admitted to the degree of
Bachelor of Architecture unless he shall produce a certificate
from the Dean of the Faculty that he is of twelve terms'
standing, that he has passed all the examinations, and has
satisfactorily complied with all the other conditions required
of him since his admission to the University.
      11.—The candidate who shall have most distinguished
himself at the Final Examination for the degree of Bachelor
in Architecture shall, if he possess sufficient merit, receive &
bronze medal.
                     CHAPTER XX.—MATRICULATION.
      1.—Candidates for any of the Degrees granted by the
 University shall be required to matriculate before entering,
 upon the prescribed course.
     2.—Candidates before being admitted to matriculation
shall have passed one of the examinations required by the
By-laws for admission to the prescribed courses in the different
Faculties, or shall have been admitted ad eundem statum.
r-Efl· (1) Provided that persons who have attained the age of
twenty-five years may be admitted as matriculated students
in the Faculty of Arts or the Faculty of Economics upon the
production of evidence satisfactory to the Faculty that they
possess educational qualifications sufficient to enable them
               CHAPTER XX.—MATRICULATION.                       91

 to proceed with the courses that they propose to take. In
 all such cases the recommendation of the Faculty must be
 by a three-fourths majority, and must be approved by the
 Senate. Students admitted under this proviso shall be eligible
 for Honours but shall not be eligible for prizes or scholar-
 ships·                                                           JL*
       (2) Provided also that holders of the Diploma of the
 Hawkesbury Agricultural College or any college of similar
 standing who have passed the Intermediate Certificate Exami-
 nation in the matriculation subjects may be admitted as
 matriculated students in the Faculty of Veterinary Science
 or the Faculty of Agriculture.
       3. —Undergraduates of other Universities may, at the
 discretion of the Professorial Board, be admitted ad eundem
 statum in this University without examination. Provided
 always that they shall give sufficient evidence of their
 alleged status and of good conduct.
      Where an undergraduate of any other Australasian
 University desires to transfer to this University he may, at
 the discretion of the Professorial Board, be granted all the
 privileges as to matriculation and admission to courses for
 degrees to which he is entitled in his own University. If he
 desires to enter on a course in this University which is not
 provided in his own University, he may be so admitted pro-
 vided that he has matriculated and passes at either University
 in the subjects prescribed for entrance to the faculty con-
 cerned. In every case the applicant shall give sufficient
 evidence of his alleged status and of good conduct.
      4.—Any person desirous of attending University lectures
 may do só without matriculation upon payment of such fees
 as the Senate may from time to time direct.
      5.—Except as provided in the By-laws, Chapter XX., Sec-
tions 2 and 3, all candidates for Matriculation shall be required
to pass an examination in accordance with the following
general requirements :—
         1. English.
         2. Mathematics.
         3. Latin, Greek, French or German.
92                BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY,

        4. One or more of the following—
           (a) One       or more of the foregoing languages not
                 already taken.
           (b) Mechanics.
           (c) History—Either (i.) English History, or
           (ii.)
                 Modern History.
           (d) One of the following Science subjects
           :—(i.)
                 Botany, (ii.) Chemistry (Inorganic), (iii.) Geol-
                 ogy, (iv.) Physics, (v.) Physiology, and (vi.)
                 Zoology.
       In all subjects, except Mechanics, there shall be a higher
 and a Lower standard. The examination in Mechanics is at
 the Higher standard only.
       A pass at the Lower standard shall be deemed sufficient
except where the Higher standard is specified.
       Candidates must pass at the Higher standard in three
subjects, one of which must be English, Latin, Greek, French
or German. The whole examination must be passed at one
sitting.
       The pass, in accordance with the general requirements,
 will admit to matriculation in any Faculty for which no
 special requirements are prescribed.
       If the pass also complies with the special requirements
prescribed for any Faculty, the candidate will be entitled to
admission to that Faculty.
      If the pass does not comply with the special require-
ments for any Faculty the candidate may complete his
qualification for entrance to that Faculty by passing in the
additional subject or subjects at one additional examination
in accordance with the special requirements therefor.
      6.^Unless the candidate has complied in the general
examination described in the previous section with the special
requirements for any Faculty, he shall, in addition to the
general requirements for matriculation, be required to pass
an examination in accordance with the special requirements
for the Faculty concerned, that is to say—
                      CHAPTER XX.—MATRICULATION.                                             93

       *(α) Faculty of Arts—
               Latin or Greek at the Higher standard.
         (Ö) Faculty of Law—
         Latin at the Higher standard, and another lan-
         guage other than English,
         (e) Faculties of Medicine and Dentistry—                    ..
         Latin and another language other than English,
         one at the Higher standard.
         (d.) Faculties of Science and Architecture—
       Latin, Greek, French or German at the Higher
       standard.
       f(e) Faculty of Engineering—
                    Mathematics at the Higher standard, Mechanics,
                           General Paper in English and Geography. -
            7.—A student who has passed the Matriculation Exami-
     nation for the Faculty of Arts, has attended four of the courses
        prescribed for students in the Faculty of Arts, two of which
       shall be selected from the subjects of Groups L, II., and III.,
    and passed the concluding examinations, shall be qualified for
   admission to the curriculum in the Faculties of Law, Medicine,
 Science and Engineering, subject to the following provisions :—:
           (i.) Candidates for degrees in the Faculties of Law and
                   Medicine shall have passed either in the Matricu-
                      lation examination or in their Arts course in (a)
                           Latin and (b) Greek or French or German ;
             (ii.) Candidates for degrees in Engineering shall have
                               passed in Mathematics and Mechanics.
               8.—The Matriculation Examination shall take place at
    the commencement of Lent Term, but the examiners in special
     cases, with the sanction of the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor,
       are authorised to hold such examinations at such other times
                                         as may be deemed expedient.
     9.—The examination shall be conducted by means of
written or printed papers, but the examiners shall not be
precluded from putting vivâ voce questions.
             * Por matriculante intending to join the French or German classes there will he a
            Dictntion test. Those who fail to satisfy the Examiners are recommended not to
         proceed with these subjects.
         tEngineering students who desire to offer themselves later for associate membership
        of the Institute of Civil Engineers are requested to note that they should select French
   or German under the general requirements for matriculation."
94             BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

      10. The names of all candidates who have passed the
Matriculation Examination shall be arranged and published
in such order as the Board of Examiners shall determine.
      11.—Any person who shall have passed an examination
qualifying for admission to his faculty and shall have paid
a fee of two pounds to the Registrar, may be admitted as a
matriculated student.
                        CHAPTER XXI.—IERMS.
      1.—The Academic year shall contain three Terms, that
is to say:—
      LENT TERM.—Commencing on the tenth Monday in the
year and terminating with the Saturday before the twenty-
second Monday in the year, with a recess at Easter not
exceeding nine days.
      TRINITY TERM.—Commencing on the twenty-fourth
Monday in the year and terminating with the Saturday before
the thirty-fourth Monday in the year.
      MICHAELMAS TERM.—Commencing on the thirty-seventh
Monday in the year and terminating with the Saturday before
the fifty-first Monday in the year.

                       CHAPTER ΦΦΠ.—LECTURES.

      1.—Lectures shall commence on the first day of Term,
except in Lent Term, in which they shall commence on the
third Monday of Term. In Michaelmas Term the lectures
shall cease on the Saturday before the forty-seventh Monday
in the year.
      2.—Lectures of an hour each shall be given by the Pro-
fessors and other teachers at such times and in such order as
the Senate may from time to time direct.
      3.—Before the admission of a student to any course of
lectures he shall pay to the Registrar of the University the
fee appointed by the Senate.
      4.—Full and complete tables of lectures and subjects of
examinations shall be printed annually in the Calendar, and
posted at the University from time to time.
        CHAPTER XXIII.—YEARLY EXAMINATIONS.                       95

     5.—Each Professor and Lecturer shall keep a daily record
or class roll of the lectures delivered by him, showing the
number and names of the students present at each lecture.
These class rolls shall be laid on the table at the end of each
Term.lft.|flfêEte,,
      6.—Any undergraduate not holding a scholarship in the
University, nor being a member of a college established under
the provisions of the Act 18 Victoria, No. 37, may be exempted
from attendance upon any or all of the prescribed lectures,
upon producing evidence which shall satisfy the Faculty to
which he belongs that there are sufficient reasons for such
exemption. Provided that no such exemption shall be
granted for more than one year at any time.
      7.—No such exemption shall be granted until the Exami-
ners shall have specially certified to the Faculty that the
abilities and attainments of the applicant are such as to
enable him, in their opinion, to keep up with the usual course
of study at the University without attendance upon lectures:
Undergraduates admitted ad eundern statum, and who are not
required to pass the Matriculation Examination, shall never-
theless be required to pass a special examination, to be certi-
fied by the Examiners as above, before obtaining exemption
from attendance upon lectures.
                 CHAPTER XXIII.—YEARLY EXAMINATIONS.
     1.—In the Faculties of Arts, Law and Science the yearly
B.A. and B.Sc. Examinations shall be held during the last
week of Michaelmas Term, with the exception of the examina-
tions for Honours and Distinctions, which may be held at the'
beginning of Lent Term.
     2.—No undergraduate not exempted under Section 6,
Chapter XXIL, from attendance upon lectures shall be
admitted to these examinations who, without sufficient cause,
shall have absented himself more than three times during
any one term from any prescribed course of lectures. At
every yearly examination students must pass the prescribed
examinations in the subjects of lectures before they, can'
proceed with their course, except where otherwise provided
in these By-laws.
96              BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

      3.-—Students who fail to pass, or neglect to attend their
annual examinations in any subject or subjects, may be
required by their respective Faculties, upon the report of the
examiners, to attend again the lectures on such subject or
subjects before again presenting themselves for examination.
      4.—Every undergraduate exempted from attendance
upon lectures under Section 6, Chapter XXII., shall, before
being admitted to any yearly examination, pay to the Regis-
trar a fee of two pounds.
      5.—Undergraduates who have passed the yearly exami-
nations may, at the discretion of the Dean, and upon applica-
cation, receive certificates to that effect, signed by the Dean
of the Faculty in which they are pursuing their studies, and
by the Registrar.
      6.—Students who show proficiency in the examinations
at the termination of individual courses shall be classified as
having passed with High Distinction, Distinction, or Credit.
The term Honours shall be reserved to indicate special pro-
ficiency at graduation, and shall not be used in connection
with the examinations at the termination of individual courses.
       7.—At each examination additional papers shall be set
 where necessary for Honours and Distinctions, and a list of
 the subjects prescribed for Honours and Distinctions shall
 be published annually in the Calendar.
       8.—The names of those candidates who obtain Honours
 or Distinctions shall be arranged in order of merit.
       9.—Examiners shall be appointed from time to time by
 the Senate to conduct the examinations provided for under
 these By-laws.
      CHAPTER ΦΦΠΙΑ.—STUDENTS ON ACTIVE MILITARY SERVICE.
     1.—-Subject to the provisions of the University and
University Colleges Act, 1900, and notwithstanding that the
provisions of any By-law may not have been strictly observed,
the Senate may, after report from the Professorial Board
and the Faculty concerned, grant such status or degree as
it may deem proper to any student who has been engaged in
active military or naval service during the present European
war.
            CHAPTER XXV.—PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS.                         97

    2.—This By-law shall not apply to the Faculty of
Medicine.
                       CHAPTER XXIV.—SCHOLARSHIPS.
      1.—Scholarships shall be awarded after examination as
the Senate may from time to time appoint.
      2.—No Scholarship shall be awarded except to such
candidates as exhibit a degree of proficiency which shall be
satisfactory to the Examiners. Scholars shall be required to
proceed with their studies in the respective Faculties in which
their Scholarships are awarded.
      3.—The examination for Scholarships shall be concurrent
with the Matriculation and Yearly Examinations, additional
papers and questions being set when required.
      4.—No student of the University shall be allowed to hold
more than two Scholarships at one time.
                CBAPTKK XXV,—PUBLIC EXHIBITIONS.
                {University Amendment Act, 1912.   Section 3IA1)
      1.—Every applicant for a Public Exhibition must make
application on the prescribed form. The printed form shall
contain an undertaking that the applicant will comply with
the By-laws, Rules and Regulations of the University.
      2.—He must state the Faculty in which he wishes to
graduate, but he should indicate whether, in the event of his
not being awarded an Exhibition in that Faculty he would
desire to be considered a candidate for an Exhibition in any
other Faculties.
     3.—He must have passed the Leaving Certificate Exami-
nation in the subjects, and at the standard prescribed in the
By-laws for matriculation in that Faculty.
     4.—Upon the award of an Exhibition he must forthwith
matriculate in the University, and proceed with his studies in
his selected Faculty with a view to graduation.
     5.—He may continue to hold the Exhibition for the
period necessary for graduation for a first degree in his Faculty
on the conditions that he be of good conduct in matters of
discipline and otherwise ; and that he pass all the prescribed
qualifying examinations.                                         B
98              BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

      6.—Failure to pass any qualifying examination will entail
forfeiture of the Exhibition unless such failure be due to
illness or special circumstances. The decision in all such cases
shall be made by the Senate after receiving the report of the
Professorial Board.
      7.—An Exhibitioner who has completed satisfactorily the
course in the Faculty of Arts or in the Faculty of Science may
continue to hold his Exhibition for a further period of two
years if proceeding immediately to a first degree in any other
Faculty or to a higher degree by means of post-graduate
work approved by his Faculty. Provided that the tenure of
each Exhibition shall not exceed a period of five years.
      8.—An Exhibitioner will be exempt from the payment of
matriculation, tuition and degree fees. He shall, however, be
required to pay all other incidental expenses and fees, in-
cluding the expenses of laboratory material, microscope fees
and the fee for the University Union.
     OHAPTEE XXVI.—ADVANCED STUDENTS IN ABTS AND SCIENCE.
     1.—The Faculties of Arts and Science may admit as
Advanced Students persons of the age of 21 years or upwards,
not graduates of this or of another University who give* such
evidence of general education and special qualification for
advanced study and research as may be approved by the
Faculty with which their proposed course of study and
research is most nearly connected.
     The evidence of general· education shall include a satis-
factory record of a full three years' course of study, either as
a matriculated or unmatriculated student, at a University.
     2.—The Faculty of Science may also admit graduates in
Arts as Advanced Students in Science, provided they give
such evidence of special qualification for advanced study
and research as may be approved by that Faculty.
     3.—An Advanced Student who has been admitted to a
course, of advanced study and research shall pursue that
course under the direction and supervision of one or more of
the Professors of the. University, and under such other con-
ditions as may, on the recommendation of the Professorial
Board, be approved by the Senate.
           CHAPTER XXVI.—ADVANCED STUDENTS.                        99

      4.—Application for admission as Advanced Students
shall, in general, be submitted not later than the first day of
November in the year previous to that in which the applicant
proposes to begin his course. The application shall not be
granted unless it shall appear that the course or courses of
advanced study and research can be conveniently pursued
within the University.
      5.—An Advanced Student may in the sixth or any subse-
quent term after his admission submit to his Faculty a
dissertation containing an account of and embodying the
results of his research or researches. The dissertation shall
be referred to one or more persons appointed by the Faculty
who shall have power to examine the student orally or other-
wise upon the subject thereof, and upon the courses of study
which he has pursued, and shall report thereon to the Faculty.
      The Faculty shall have power to take into consideration,
together with the dissertation, any published memoir or
record of work done by the student which he may desire to
submit to them.
      6.—If the Faculty, after hearing the report of the
referees, be of opinion that the work submitted by the student
is of distinction as an original contribution to learning, or as
a record of original research, they shall draw up a statement
to this effect, indicating therein the subject or subjects of
the student's research, and the degree B. A. or B. Sc. for which
his work shall be a qualification, subject to the regulations
which follow.
      7.—The statement drawn up by the Faculty shall be
embodied by the Registrar in a certificate of research in a
form approved by the Professorial Board.
      Each candidate before receiving a certificate of research
shall deposit in the University Library two printed copies of
bis dissertation in a form approved by the Professorial Board,
but if the dissertation has been accepted for publication in
some scientific journal the Librarian may accept a typewritten
copy to be. replaced by a printed copy or its publication in
that journal.
      8.—A student who has obtained a certificate of research,
and has completed six terms as an Advanced Student, may
be admitted, on payment of the usual degree fee of £3, to the
 100                   BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

degree of B.A. or B.Sc. indicated in his certificate, and there-
after under the usual conditions to other degrees in the
University.
     9.—An Advanced Student shall not be admissible as a
candidate for any University Prize or Scholarship which is
only open to undergraduates.
                 CHAPTER XXVII.—ADMISSION AD EUNDEM GRADUM.
      1.—Admission ad eundem gradum in the University may,
at the discretion of the Senate, be granted without examina-
tion to graduates of the following approved Universities—
that is to say, the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge, London
and Durham, the Victoria University, the University of St.
Andrews, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Dublin, the
Queen's University of Ireland, and the Royal University of
Ireland, lately established in its place ; and the Universities
of Melbourne, New Zealand and Adelaide ; and may also be
granted to graduates of such other Universities as the Senate
may from, time to time determine ; provided always that they
shall give to the Registrar, to be submitted to the Senate,
sufficient evidence of their alleged degrees respectively, and
of their good fame and character. Upon the approval of his
application each candidate shall pay to the Registrar a fee
of two pounds for the entry of his name on the University
books, in addition to the prescribed fee for his degree.*
              CHAPTEK XXVni.—TENURE OP OFFICE OF LECTUEEES.
      1.—All appointments of Public Teachers in the schools of
the University, other than Professors, shall be terminable
by a notice of not less than six calendar months, which may
be given by the Senate at any time, but which, if given by the
Teacher, must expire on the 31st December. This By-law
shall not apply to any case in which the Senate shall direct
that the appointment shall be for a limited period.
      2.—All independent Lecturers or Public Teachers other
than Professors shall, unless specifically appointed for
a
     * By a resolution of the Se/iate of date August 14th, 1911, it was decided that admis-
sion ad eundem gradum under this By-law be granted only when the applicant is of dis-
tinguished merit or eminence, or h*s been appointed to an academic offioe in the
University of Sydney, or one of the Colleges within the University.
          CHAPTER XXX.—UNIVERSITY EXTENSION.                       101'

shorter term, hold office for a period not exceeding seven-
years, which shall terminate on December 31st next preceding
the expiration of seven years from the date of appointment.
During such period the appointment shall be terminable at
six months' notice, as provided in Section 1 of this chapter,
and at the expiration of such period the appointment shall-
terminate ; but the holder shall be eligible for re-appointment.
' This By-law shall not apply to Lecturers and Lecturers-
and Demonstrators appointed as Assistants to Professors.
            CHAPTER XXIX.—SUBSTITUTES FOB. OFFICERS.
     1.—Any act required by the By-laws to be performed by
any officer of the University may, during the absence or other
incapacity of such officer, unless otherwise provided, be per-
formed by a person appointed by the Senate to act in his-
place.
              CHAPTER XXX.—UNIVERSITY EXTENSION.
      1.—There shall be a Board, consisting of not more than,
eighteen members, of whom four at least shall be members
of the Senate, and . four at least shall be members of
the Teaching Staff, and not less than two shall be persons
not being members of the Senate or of the Teaching Staff.
The Board shall be appointed annually by the Senate, at its
monthly meeting in November, and shall be held to be duly
constituted upon the appointment of twelve persons to be
members thereof, and the Senate may fill vacancies and
appoint additional members from time to time if it shall think
fit during the year, but so that the total number of members
of the Board shall not exceed eighteen at any time. Member-
ship of the Board shall continue from the time of appointment
until the next annual appointment of the Board, when all
memberships shall lapse, but all retiring members shall be
eligible for re-election.
      2.—The Board shall at its first meeting after its appoint-
ment in each year elect a Chairman for the year, and may
recommend to the Senate the appointment of a Secretary, the
tenure of whose office and the amount of whose salary (if"
any) shall be determined by the Senate. The Chairman shall
convene meetings of the Board, and three members shall form.
a quorum.
                                                  I

102            BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

      3.—All actions taken by the Board shall be subject to the
By-laws, and to any directions which may be given by the
Senate.
      4.—The Board shall from time to time recommend to the
Senate the names of certain persons to be authorised for
employment as University Extension Lecturers, and the
Senate shall at its discretion authorise the employment, of
such persons to deliver lectures under the direction of the
Board.
      5.—The Board may appoint any person whose employ-
ment as Lecturer has been authorised by the Senate to deliver
such courses of lectures, and to· hold such classes and exami-
nations on such subjects, and at such times and places as the
Board may see fit.
      6.—The Board shall determine the tenure of office of the
Lecturers, the duties to be performed by them, the fees and
charges to be paid for the lectures, classes and examinations,
And the mode and time of payment of the fees and charges.
       7.—The payments to be made to the Lecturers shall be
determined by the Board in accordance with regulations as to
the rate of payment to be laid down by the Senate.
      8.—The Board shall make all other arrangements requisite
for the delivery of lectures and the holding of classes and
•examinations, and may award such certificates as it shall
think fit.
       9.—The fees received, together with any Government
 grant, donations, and such sums as may from time to time
 be assigned for the purpose by the Senate, shall be the fund
 for the payment of lecturers and other expenses.
       10.—The Board shall, in the month of November in each
 year, lay before the Senate a report of its proceedings for
 that year.
                CHAPTER XXXI.—TUTOEIAL CLASSES.
     1.—There shall be a Committee, to be called the " Joint
Committee for Tutorial Classes," to undertake under the
Senate the organisation, supervision and control of tutorial
■classes, and of such study circles as may be deemed
advisable.
             CHAPTER XXXI.—TUTORIAL CLASSES.                    103

        The committee shall consist of (a) the Chancellor, the
  Vice-Chancellor, the Warden, and the Director of Tutorial
  Classes, ex officio ; (b) five members appointed by the Senate
  from among, the Fellows of the Senate or the members of the
  Teaching Staff ; and (c) four members appointed by the
  Senate on the nomination of the Workers' Educational
  Association of New South Wales.
        The Committee shall be constituted annually by the
  Senate at its monthly meeting in May.
       Appointed members shall hold office from the time of
  appointment until the next annual constitution of the Com-
  mittee, but shall be eligible for reappointment. Any casual
  vacancy shall be filled as soon after it has been reported to
  the Senate as may be practicable.
        The Committee shall elect a chairman from among its
  members.
        At any meeting of the Committee six members shall form
  a quorum.
        2.—The Director of Tutorial Classes shall act as secretary
• of the Committee, and convene meetings.
        3.—All action taken by the committee shall be subject
  to the by-laws and to any directions which may be given by
  the Senate.
        4.—The committee shall from time to time recommend
  to the Senate, through the Director of Tutorial Classes, the
  names of certain persons to be authorised for employment as
  Lecturers and Tutors to Tutorial Classes or Study Circles,
  and the Senate shall, at its discretion, authorise the employ-
  ment of such persons to deliver lectures, to act as Tutors,,
  and to assist the committee in any other ways directed by the
  Senate on the recommendation of the committee.
        5.—The Senate, on the recommendation of the committee,
  may appoint any person as Lecturer or Tutor to deliver such
  courses of lectures and to hold such classes or study circles-
  on such subjects and at such times and places as the com-
  mittee may deem fit.
        6.—The Senate, on the report of the Committee, shall
   determine the tenure of office of the Lecturers and Tutore,,
104             BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

"the duties to be performed by them, the fees and salaries to
be paid, and the mode and time of payment of such fees and
salaries.
      7.—The payments to be made to the Lecturers and
Tutors shall be determined by the committee in accordance
with the regulations as to rate of. payment laid down by the
Senate.
      8.—The officer in charge of the Department of Tutorial
Classes shall be appointed by the Senate, which shall deter-
mine the tenure of his office and the amount of his salary.
He shall be entitled " The Director of Tutorial Classes." It
shall be the duty of the Director to exercise a general super-
vision over the organisation and management of tutorial
■classes, and to act as Tutor to a class or classes if the Senate
should so determine. He shall report to the committee at
least three times a year ; organise, or arrange for the organisa-
tion of, new classes ; inspect, or arrange for the inspection of,
■ classes ; and be responsible for all other arrangements of his
department under the direction of the committee.
       9.—The committee shall, in the month of April in each
 year, lay before the Senate a report of its proceedings for
 the preceding twelve months.
      10.—-All fees paid by students of tutorial classes shall be
held to be the property of the University, and shall be
administered as the Senate shall direct on report from the
■committee.
       11.—The committee shall present to the Senate in the
-month of April in each year a statement of accounts for the
.preceding twelve months.
                 CHAPTER ΦΦΦΠ.—ACADEMIC COSTUME.
      1.—The Academic Costume shall be for—
        The Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor—a robe and cap
            similar to those worn by the Chancellor of the
            University of Oxford. In undress, the silk gown
            worn by other members of the Senate, black velvet
            cap and gold tassel.
   CH APTER XXXII—ACADEMIC COSTUME.                      ]Q,5-

A Member of the Senate—the habit of his Degree, or
      a black silk gown of the description worn by
      Graduates holding the Degree of Doctor, with,
      tippet of scarlet cloth, edged with white fur, and
      lined with blue silk, black velvet trencher cap.
Doctor of Laws, Medicine or Science—the gown worn.
      by Graduates holding the Degree of Doctor in the
      Universities of Oxford or Cambridge, black cloth.
     trencher cap.
Doctor of Laws—hood of scarlet cloth, lined with
     blue silk.
Doctor of Medicine—hood of scarlet cloth, lined with
     purple silk.
Doctor of Science—hood of scarlet cloth, lined with
      amber-coloured satin.
Master of Arts—the ordinary Master's gown of Oxford
     or Cambridge, of silk or bombazine with black silk
      hood lined with blue silk, black cloth trencher cap.
Master of Surgery—the ordinary Master's gown of
      Oxford or Cambridge, of silk or bombazine, with
     hood of scarlet cloth lined with French grey, black
     cloth trencher cap.
Master of Engineering—a Master of Arts gown, with
     black silk hood, lined with light maroon-coloured
     silk, black cloth trencher cap.
Bachelor of Laws or Medicine—the black
gown
     worn by civilians in Oxford or Cambridge holding
     Degrees, black-cloth trencher cap.
Bachelor of Laws—hood of black silk, edged with
     blue silk.
Bachelor of Medicine—hood of black silk, edged with
     purple silk.
Bachelor of Arts, Science or Engineering—a
plain
     black stuff gown, black cloth trencher cap.
Bachelor of Arts—hood similar to that worn by the
     B.A. at Cambridge.
Bachelor of Economics—hood of black stuff, edged
     with copper-coloured silk.
Bachelor of Science—hood of black stuff, edged with
     amber-coloured silk.
106             BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

        Bachelor of Engineering—hood of black stuff, edged
             with light maroon-coloured silk.
        Bachelor of Science in Agriculture—hood of black
             stuff, edged with green silk.
        Bachelor of Dental Surgery—hood of black stuff,
             edged with purple and cream-coloured silk.
        Bachelor of Veterinary Science—black gown similar
             to that worn by the Bachelors of Laws and
        Medicine, hood of black silk, edged with amber-
        coloured and purple silk.
        An Officer not being a Graduate—a black silk gown
             of the description ' worn by civilians not holding
             Degrees, black cloth trencher cap.
        Undergraduate—a plain black stuff gown, black cloth
             trencher cap.
        Scholar—plain black stuff gown, with a velvet bar
        and shoulder strap, black cloth trencher cap.
2.—Members of the University shall on all public
occasions, when convened for Academic purposes, appear in
their Academic costume.
      3.—The Undergraduates shall appear in Academic
costume when attending lectures, and on all public occasions
in the University ; and, whenever they meet the Fellows,
Professors, or other Superior Officers of the University, shall
respectfully salute them. Provided that students in any
Faculty shall be permitted, if deemed expedient by the
Faculty, to dispense with Academic dress at such courses of
instruction as the Faculty may determine.
                 THE FISHER LIBRARY.
IN 1885 the sum of £30,000, or thereabouts, was bequeathed
to the University by Thomas Fisher, Esq., " to be applied and
expended by the Senate for the time being of the University
in establishing and mamtaining a Library for the use of the
University, for which purpose they may erect a building, and
may purchase books, and do anything that may be thought
desirable for effectuating the purposes aforesaid."
     The Government of the State having decided in 1901 to
defray the cost of the erection of a new building at the
University, to be called the Fisher Library, the principal money
of the Fisher Fund is, by direction of the Senate, to be kept as
a perpetual endowment fund for keeping up and adding to the
Library.
                          REGULATIONS.
     1. The Library Committee shall consist of the Chancellor,
the Vice-Chancellor, the Warden, the Professors, the Librarian,
and such other members as may from time to time be appointed
by the Senate. At its first meeting in any year a Chairman
shall be elected for the year.
     2. There shall be an Executive Committee, consisting of
the Chairman, two members of the Library Committee elected
annually by that Committee, and the Librarian. The
Executive Committee shall meet at least once a month. The
Chairman of the Library Committee shall be the Chairman of
the Executive Committee.
     3. The Librarian shall have the ordinary management of
the Library, subject to the supervision of the Library Com-
mittee and the Executive Committee.
     4. The Library shall be open for purposes of study and the
issue and return of books from 9 a.m. till 4.30 p.m. on each
week-day, except Saturday, when it shall close at noon. It
shall also be open on each week-day during term, except
Saturday, from 6 p.m. till 9 p.m., and also in vaéation at such
times in the evening as may be decided by the Executive
Committee.
108                     FISHER LIBRABT.

      Provided that the Library shall be closed on Sundays and
public holidays, and for the purpose of allowing the Librarian
.-sufficient time to inspect the books, during the first fortnight
;ih the month of January.
      5. Silence must be observed in the reading-room. Any
reader disturbed by a breach of this regulation should bring it
to the notice of the Librarian. Readers are required to sit at
~the tables and are not permitted to stand about in the reading
room.
      6. No person shall use ink in the reading-room, except
with a fountain pen, without the permission of the Librarian,
:and then only at the tables assigned for the purpose.
      7. No person shall be allowed to use or borrow any book
until it has been entered in the catalogue and stamped.
      8. Except as hereinafter provided, no person shall be
allowed to take books out of the Library but Fellows of the
Senate, Professors and other public teachers in the University,
members of the University administrative staff, Graduates and
Undergraduates.
      9. Scholars engaged in special inquiry or research, and
•other persons who make application and satisfy the Library
Committee or the Executive Committee that they are able to
use the Library with advantage, shall have the privilege,
renewable monthly, of using the Library for purposes of
reading and reference, and under exceptional circumstances
may have the additional privilege of borrowing books.
       10. No person shall be admitted to any of the privileges of
"the Library until he has signed an undertaking to observe and
be bound by the regulations of the Library as authorized by
the Senate.
       11. No person, unless he be a Fellow of the Senate or an
•officer of the University, shall be allowed to borrow aDy book
•from the Library, until he has lodged with the University
Accountant a deposit of one pound sterling (£l)in security for
the due return of books and payment of any fines that may
be incurred. The deposit, subject to deductions aforesaid,
shall be returned when the borrower no loDger wishes to use
ihe Library.
                         PISHEK LIBRAJRY.                         109

       12. A reading or borrowing voucher for each book must
be filled in, legibly and in ink, and deposited with the Librarian.
ÎTo book may, under any circumstances, be taken out of the
Library until a borrowing voucher has been given for it. A
reader who has taken a book after signing a reading voucher
therefor must return the book to the Librarian before leaving
the reading-room. Any infringement of this regulation shall
render the borrower liable to a fine of ten shillings.
       13. Everyone who borrows any book from the Library
¿shall return it whensoever he is required to do so by the
Librarian, and without formal notification must return all
books in his possession on or before the last day of July, under
penalty of two shillings for every volume, payment of such
penalty to become due upon the first day on which the Library
is open after the date specified. Each penalty shall be re-
peated every fortnight till it amounts to twice the value of the
book, or till the book is returned, or another of the same
edition and equal value be placed in its room.
       14. No borrower, unless he be a professor or other public
teacher in the University, shall be allowed to have in his
possession more than three volumes belonging to the Library,
except with permission of the Executive Committee.
       15. Headers or borrowers of books shall be held respon-
sible for any injury, mutilation, or disfigurement by writing or
-other marks, and shall be required to pay the full value of new
 copies of such books, and may also be fined or suspended from
 the privileges of the Library at the discretion of the Library
 Committee or the Executive Committee. Any defect in, or
 injury to, a printed book should be pointed out to the
 Librarian ; and readers and borrowers should report at once
 the loss or injury sustained by any book while in their posses-
 sion.
       16. So long as a fine remains unpaid, and so long as any
person remains in possession oi a book which he is not entitled
to retain, the right of the defaulter to the use of the Library
shall be suspended and remain in abeyance.
       17. No book belonging to the Library shall be issued on
loan by any person but the Librarian or his accredited repré-
senta tive.
110                           MUSEUMS.

      18. Rare books, books difficult of replacement, books-
not sufficiently protected by the binding, unbound parts of
works (except periodicals), works of general reference, MSS.,
and such other books as the Committee may determine, shall
not be lent out of the Library.
      19. Periodicals shall be issued from the Library only to
Public Teachers in the University. Other accredited readers
may consult them in the Library. Within one month of the
completion of any volume unbound parts must be returned
to the Librarian for binding.
      20. It shall be in the power of the Librarian at any time
to withdraw any work from circulation.
      21. Besides the Library staff, none but Fellows of the
Senace, Professors, Lecturers, Assistant - Prof e.«sors and
Assistant-Lecturers shall have the right to enter the book-
stack or the periodical room. No person shall enter the stack
except in the company of an officer of the Library.
      22. The Librarian shall be authorised to exclude tempo-
rarily any person infringing the regulations of the Library.

          NICHOLSON MUSEUM OF ANTIQUITIES.
 Committee of Management—Professor BUTLER, B.A. ; Professor WOOD, M.A.;
                      Professor WOODHOUSE, M.A.
              Honorary Curator—Professor WOODHOUSE, M.A.
                           REGULATIONS.
      1. The Bedell shall have charge of that portion of the
building devoted to the Museum, and during the absence of the
Curator shall be responsible for the due care of the collection.
      2. The Museum shall be open for the admission of visitors
every Saturday from the 1st May to the 31st October, from two
to five p.m. ; and from the 1st November to the 30th April,
from two to six p.m. Visitors may also be admitted at any
other convenient time when accompanied by a Member of the
Senate, or by any Professor or Superior Officer of the Uni-
versity, or by the Curator or the Bedell in charge of the
Museum.
      3. All visitors to the Museum shall be required to give
their names and addresses, which shall be entered in a book to
be kept for that purpose.
                               MUSEUMS.                                 Ill

     4. Children under 15 years of age shall not be admitted
"unless accompanied by older friends.

                       MACLEAY MUSEUM.
 ■Committee of Management—The Challis Professor of Zoology, the Professor
                   of Geology and Physical Geography.
                      Acting Curator—J. SHE WAN.
       In the year 1874 the Hon. Sir W. Macleay, M.L.C., under-
  "took to present to the University of Sydney his collection of
   Natural History, together with an endowment for the stipend
   of a Curator, as soon as a suitable building should have been
  provided for its reception.     The conditions attached to this
■donation were—
        1. That the present Curator should be continued in
             office ;
        2. That the endowment of £6,000 for the salary of a
             Curator should be used for this and no other pur-
             pose ; and
        3. That the Museum should be made easily accessible
                 to students of Natural History and.members of the
                 Linnean Society of New South Wales.
             Under these conditions the Senate gratefully accepted
     Mr. Macleay's gift ; and the ParUament having made liberal
      provision for the buildings required, this collection is now in
 the University.

   MUSEUM OP NORMAL AND MORBID ANATOMY.
    •Committee of Management—The Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, The
         Challis Professor of Anatomy, The Professor of Pathology.
       Honorary Curator—Professor D. A. WELSH, M.A., B.Sc, M.D.
                            REGULATIONS.
     1. The Museum shall be called the Museum of Normal
and Morbid Anatomy, and shall be established for the benefit
■of all the Medical Departments of the University.
     2. The Museum shall be under the control of a Committee
of Management, to be appointed by the Senate at its first
.meeting in Lent Term.
 112          UNIVERSITY EXTENSION LECTURES.

     3. The Committee shall consist of the Dean of the Faculty
of Medicine for the time being, together with two members of
the Medical Teaching Staff to be chosen by the Senate.
     4. The working Curator shall be under the control of the
Committee of Management ; and in the second Thursday of
each Term he shall transmit to the Dean, for the Senate, a
report, to be be written in a separate book kept for that pur-
pose of all the work he has done since the last report.
     5. Requisitions for the expenditure of money in connec-
tion with the Museum shall be submitted by the Committee of
Management to the Finance Committee of the Senate for its
approval.

          UNIVERSITY EXTENSION LECTURES.
                SEE ALSO   BY-LAWS, CHAP. XXX (PAGE   103).
DIRECTIONS     AND REGULATIONS REFERRING TO LECTURE:
                         COURSES.
      1. The Board is prepared to receive and consider appli-
 cations for courses of University Extension Lectures to be
 delivered in Sydney, or in any suburb of Sydney or country
 town.
      Applications may be made either by a public institution
such as a School of Arts, or by a Home Reading Circle, or by a
Committee specially formed for the purpose. They should be
addressed to the Secretary Of the University Extension Board,,
the University, Sydney, who will forward a list of available
Lecturers and subjects, and give any other information that
may be desired. The Board will, as far as possible, consult
the wishes of the applicants in the selection of Lecturer and.
subject, and in fixing the dates of the lectures and the intervals
between them.
      The courses may be longer or shorter, may be miscel-
laneous or continuous, and may be delivered by one lecturer or
more. In country centres, especially those at a distance from
Sydney, courses by a single lecturer will generally involve
smaller travelling expenses. As a rule it will be practicable to
supply such centres only with short courses of three or four
lectures.
              UNIVERSITY EXTENSION LECTURES.                      1η3

        2. Applicants must undertake to become responsible for
 the local management and local expenses of the lectures, and
 for the payment of the charges made by the Board.
        The local management undertaken by the applicants will
  include securing a suitable lecture room, with provision, if pos-
  sible, of desks and tables for the convenience of such of the
  audience as may desire to take notes ; advertising the
  lectures; printing tickets of admission, and arranging for
  their sale ; and providing a room with suitable appliances and
  supervision for the concluding examination, if such be held.
     . The local committee will also be responsible for putting up
  the Lecturer during his stay, either at an hotel or by means of
  private hospitality.
        The charge payable to the Board has been fixed at the
 rate of £3 per lecture ; but if the lectures are delivered in
 country towns it will be reduced to £2 per lecture. The ar-
 rangements for the sale of tickets for the course (including
 the fixing of their price) will be left in the hands of the Local
 Committee, which may use the proceeds to defray all the
 expenses which have been incurred. Itis left to the option of
 the local centre to raise the requisite amount by sale of tickets,
 by subscription, or by a combination of these methods ; but
 the amount payable, or a satisfactory guarantee for its pay-
 ment, must be lodged with the Secretary of the Board before
 the course begins.
        3. Every person who attends the course will be supplied
 with a syllabus containing an analysis of each lecture. The
 Board will pay for the printing of the syllabus, and will issue
 copies to the Local Secretary. Each lecture will be of at
 least an hour's length, and at the close the Lecturer will
 invite and answer questions and explain difficulties.
        4. The Local Secretary should make arrangements to
 obtain accurate statistics of the attendance at each lecture,
 and immediately after the last lecture the Lecturer should
 send these statistics to the Secretary of the Board.
       Systematic courses of ten lectures and upwards may
conclude with an examination, which will be conducted, in.
consultation with the Lecturer, by an Examiner appointed by
the Board, and certificates may be awarded or> the results.
If an examination is held, the local centre must bear the-
expense.
] 14'                   TUTORIAL CLASSES.

                        TUTORIAL CLASSES.
             SEE ALSO    BY-LAWS, CHAP.   XXXI. (PAGE   104.)

                            REGULATIONS.
      1. The Joint Committee for Tutorial Classes is prepared
to receive and consider applications for coursas of Tutorial
Classes, to be held in any suitable centre in New South Wales.
      Applications may be made through the General Secretary
of the Workers' Educational Association of New South Wales,
or through the secretary of any branch of that association,
or they may be addressed to the Director of Tutorial Classes,
the University, Sydney. Information regarding lectures and
subjects available, and all other conditions and arrangements,
will be supplied. The committee will, as far as possible,
consult the wishes of the applicants in the selection of the
subject, and in fixing the dates and other arrangements for
the classes.
      A tutorial class holds 24 weekly meetings during each
session for three successive years. Shorter courses of a more
specialised character may be provided, either in addition to
the full course or for special groups of students. Preparatory
courses and study circles may be arranged to meet the needs
of those students who desire some preparation before under-
taking-longer courses.
      2. Except in such cases as may be specially provided
for by the Joint Committee for Tutorial Classes, each student
must pay a fee to assist in defraying the petty local expenses
incurred by that class. Each class must appoint a secretary
and a librarian. It will be the duty of the secretary to keep
the class register, to collect the fees, to convene members,
and to assist the Director and Tutor in all matters pertaining
to the organisation of the class. It will be the duty of the
librarian to keep a list of the books borrowed and returned
by students and to report on these matters to the Tutor.
      At the end of each session the secretary and the librarian
will submit reports to the Director of Tutorial Classes on the
duties they have undertaken for the class ; a copy of the state-
ment öf account of each class, duly audited, must be forwarded
to the Director by the Secretary within one month after the
olose of each session.
                     TUTORIAL CLASSES.                          115

      3. The subjects in which courses may be chosen are not
specially limited, but will in general comprise such subjects
as are taught in the Faculty of Arts in the University of
Sydney, namely, Philosophy, Literature, History, Economics,
Sociology, PoHtical Science, with such of the pure Sciences
as may be treated in a non-technical manner; such as Biology.
      4. Each student must, as a condition of admission to
a class, give a written undertaking that he will attend as
regularly as his circumstances will permit, and will carry
out such written work and study as may reasonably be
demanded of him by the Tutor.
      5. Each class meeting lasts two hours ; at least half
the period of each class meeting must be devoted to general
class work, such as open discussions, reading aloud, or prac-
tical work under the supervision of the Tutor.
MATRICULATION
EXAMINATION.

       BY-LAWS, CHAPTER XX., SECTIONS 5 AND 6.
      5.—AU candidates for Matriculation shall be required to
pass an examination in accordance with the following general
requirements :—
         1. English.
         2. Mathematics.
         3. Latin, Greek, French or German.
         4. One or more of the following—
             (a) One or more of the foregoing languages not
                   already taken.
             (£>) Mechanics
             (c) History—Either (i.) English History or
             (ii.)
                   Modern History.
             (d) One of the following Science subjects
             :—(i.)
                   Botany, (ii.) Chemistry (Inorganic), (iii.) Geology
                   (iv.) Physics, (v.) Physiology, and (vi.) Zoology.
       In all subjects, except Mechanics, there shall be a Higher
and a Lower standard. The examination in Mechanics is at
the Higher standard only.
       A pass at the Lower standard shall be deemed sufficient
except where the Higher standard is specified.
       Candidates must pass at the Higher standard in three
subjects, one of which must be English,, "Latin, Greek, French,
or German. The whole examination must be passed at one
sitting.
      The pass, in accordance with the general requirements,
 will admit te matriculation in any Faculty for which no
 special requirements are prescribed.
                                     MATRICULATION.                                         117
       If the pass also complies with the special requirements
 prescribed for any Faculty, the candidate will be entitled to
 -admission to that Faculty.
       If the pass does not comply with the special requirements
 for any Faculty, the candidate may complete his qualifica-
 tion for entrance to that Faculty by passing in the additional
 ¿subject or subjects at one additional examination in accord-
 ance with the special requirements therefor.
       6.—Unless the candidate has complied in the general
  examination described in the previous section, with the
  special requirements for any Faculty, he shall, in addition to
  the general requirements for matriculation, be required to
  pass an examination in accordance with the special require-
  ments for the Faculty concerned, that is to say—
       (a) Faculty of Arts—
             Latin or Greek at the Higher standard.
       (b) Faculty of Law—
             Latin at the Higher standard, and another language
                  other than English.
        .(c) Faculties of Medicine and Dentistry—
              Latin and another language other than English, one
                   at the Higher standard.
        {d) Faculties of Science and Architecture—
              Latin, Greek, French or German at the Higher
                   standard.
      *(e) Faculty of Engineering—
            Mathematics at the Higher standard, Mechanics,
            ,       General Paper in English and Geography. -
                         REGULATIONS.
      An examination for matriculation is held in the beginning
 of Lent Term (March) in accordance with Chap. XX., Sec. 8,
 of the by-laws.
     •Engineering students who desire to offer themselves later for associate membership
■of the Institute of Civil Engineers, are required to note that they should select French
<or German under the general requirements for Matriculation.
118                     MATRICULATION.

     No candidate will be admitted to this examination unless
he makes a declaration that, if successful in passing, he intends
to pursue his studies in one of the Faculties.
     DETAILS OF SUBJECTS.
     The details of subjects are as follows :—
     LOWER STANDARD.
     1. English—Questions on the language generally and
        others on the subject set for the year.    For students
        in Engineering, in addition, a general paper, com-
        prising questions in English and Geography.
        The Grammars of Nessfield, of Morris, or others of a.
        similar character, should be consulted.
        Subjects for March, 1921 — (a) For special »study,.
        Shakespeare, Henry V. ; the text quoted in the
        examination paper will be that of the Australasian
        Shakespeare ; (6) For general reading, Scott,
        Kenilworth (any unabridged edition). Subjects
        for composition will be set in reference to (δ).
        Subjects for March, 1922—(a) For special study, Shake-
        speare, Merchant of Venice ; the text quoted in
        the examination paper will be that of the Austral-
        asian Shakespeare ; (b) For general reading, Scott,
        The Betrothed (any unabridged edition). Subjects
        for composition will be set in reference to (b).
     2. Mathematics—The examination will consist of
     two
            papers comprising questions in Arithmetic, Algebra
            and Geometry as described below. The examiners
            may reject a candidate who shows exceptional weak-
            ness in any one of the three sections of these papers.
         (a) Arithmetic.—With respect to the English Tables
              of Weights and Measures, only those parts
              which are in general use will be required.
         (b) Algebra. ·— Up to quadratic equations with two
              unknown quantities, ratio, proportion, surds,
              and simple questions in fractional and negative
              indices. Questions may be set involving the
              use of squared paper in simple equations and
              simple simultaneous equations.
                         MATRICULATION.                                      119

           (c) Geometry.—The course of study for the Inter-
                   mediate Certificate in the subject of Geometry
                  will be a suitable preparation for the questions
       set in Geometry.              Simple numerical questions
                     on the trigonometry of the right-angled triangle
                                        will be included in this paper.
          -3. (a) Latin.—The examination will comprise questions
                   on accidence and syntax, and translation at sight
               from Latin into English and from English into Latin.
      Subject for March, 1921 —Livy XXII. (Dimsdale/
             Cambridge), to end of chapter 50.
      Subject for March, 1922—-Cicero, pro Milone (ïteid,
            Cambridge).
      (Jb) Greek.—An examination similar to that in Latin.
      Subject for March, 1921—Thucydides IV. (Graves, Mac-
            millan, or ed. Mills, Ciar. Press) to end of
            chapter 81.
      Subject for March, 1922—The Athenians in Sicily—
            Selections from Books VI. and VII. of Thucy-
            dides, by W. C. Comp ton (G. Bell & Sons)—from
            p. 49 to end.
      (c) French.—The examination will comprise questions
                   on accidence and syntax, and translation at sight
                    from French into English and from English into
             French.
         Candidates will also be required to write a short letter or
 theme in French on some simple subject of which they may be
■all expected to have some knowledge.
         Candidates are recommended, to read about 300 pages of
             modern French prose. No special books are prescribed, but
             some such as appear in the following list will be found suit-
             able :—De Maistre, Voyage autour de ma chambre ;
             Souvestre, Le Serf ; Desnoyers, Les Mésaventures de
             J.-P. Choppart ; Perrault, Contes de Fées ; Erckmann-
             Chatrian, Le vieux Tailleur ; Töpffer, Le Col d' Anterne ;
             Vigny, La canne de jonc ; George Sand, La petite Fadette ;
             Mérimée, L'Enlèvement de la Redoute.
      (d)German.—An examination similar to that in French.
         Candidates are recommended to read about 250 pages of
             modern German prose.      No special books are prescribed,
             but some such as appear in the following list will be found
1;20                       MATRICULATION.

                 suitable :—Grimm, Fairy Tales ; Hauff, Das Wirthshaus im>
                 Spessart ; Goebel, Rübezahl ; Storm, In St. Jürgen ; Baum-
                 bach, Waldnovellen ; Arnold, Aprilwetter ; Hoffmann,.
                 Heute mir, Morgen dir ; Campe, Robinson der jüngere ;.
                 Seidel, Die Geschichte des jungen Herrn Anton ; Zoschke,.
                 Der Zerbrochene Krug.
       4. English History.—
         Subject for March, 1921 and 1922 — British History,,
             including Australian History, from 1603 to the
             present time.
            BOOKS RECOMMENDED.—Warner and Martin's " Groundwork,
               of British History " ; Jose's Short History of Australia, er
               Scott's Short History of Australia.


                         HIGHER STANDARD.
       1. Higher Latin.—Translation from specified books, with.
           questions on language and subject matter. Trans-
           lation at sight from Latin into English, and from
           English into Latin.
         Subjects for March, 1921 — Livy, XXII (Dimsdale,.
              Cambridge), and Vergil, Géorgie IV. (Page, Mac-
              millan).
         Subjects for March, 1922—Cicero, pro Milone (Reid,
              Cambridge) and Horace, Odes III (Page, Mac-
              millari).
       2. Higher English.—Questions on the structure
       and.
            origin of the language ; on the derivation and the
            meaning of words ; on idioms and usages. Compo-
            sition.    Questions on a set subject.
          Subjects for March, 1921 ■— (a) Shakespeare, Corio-
               lanus (ed. Verity or Warwick Edition) ; (6)-
               Lamb, Selected Essays and Letters (ed. Guth-
               Kelch, Bell & Sons).
         Subjects for March, 1922—(a) Shakespeare, Hamlet
               {Warwick Edition) ; Stevenson : Selections-
               (omitting No. XIV.) (ed. Dunn, Longmans).
                     MATRICULATION.                                 121

3. Higher Mathematics.—The examination will consist of
two papers comprising questions in Algebra, Geo-
metry and Trigonometry as described below.          The
examiners may reject a candidate who shows excep-
tional weakness in any one of the three sections of
the papers.
(a) Algebra, including the three progressions, the
binomial theorem for a positive index, and the
properties and use of logarithms.       The graphical
representation of simple            algebraic functions.
Questions in Arithmetic may also be inserted.
(6) Geometry, including Mensuration.               The regula-
tions for this subject are the same as those for
the Pass Work in Geometry of the Leaving
Certificate Examination,
(c) Plane Trigonometry up to solution of triangles
and properties of triangles.
-4. Higher Greek.—An examination similar to that in
Higher Latin.
Subjects for March, 1921—Thucydides IV. (Graves,
MacmiUan or ed. Mills, Ciar. Press) to end of
chapter 81,        and      Euripides,    Alcestis    (Tate,
Bhckie).
Subjects for March, 1922—The Athenians in Sicily—
Selections from Books VI. and VII. of Thucy-
dides, by W. C. Compton (G. Bell & Sons)—from
p. 49 to end ; Sophocles, Antigone, ed. G. H.
Wells (Bell's illustr. Classics).
-5. Higher French.—
          No special books are prescribed, but candidates are
         recommended to read about 600 pages from
        such books as appear in the list below.              Not
         more than one-third of the number should be
       taken from classical writers.             Translation at
    sight from French          into     English,    and     from
                                            English into French.
                PROSE.—Daudet, Tartarin, Le Petit Chose, Lettres de mon
            moulin ; Coppée, Contée ; Mérimée, Colomba, La Jac-
        querie, etc. ;    Lamartine, Groziella, Jeanne d'Arc, Le
                  Tailleur de Pierres de Saint-Point ; About, Le Roi des
122                               MATRICULATION.

                            montagnes, etc. ; George Sand, La Mare an diable ; Vigny,
                       Cinq-Mars ; Sandeau, Sacs et parchemins ; Erckmann ■
                            Chatrian, Waterloo, Histoire d'un Conscript, etc. ; Thierry,
                               Récits des temps mérovingiens, Lettres sur l'histoire de
                   Prance ;    Scribe, Le verre d'eau ;        Angier-Sandeau, Le
                       Gendre de M. Poirier ; Pailleron, Le monde où l'on s'ennuie
                         Berthon, Specimens of Modem French Prose ; Molière, Le
                       bourgeois gentilhomme, L'Avare.
                      VERSE.·—Poems of Lamartine, Coppée, Musset, Victor Hugo,
                           Sully Prudhomme ; Berthon, Specimens of Modem French
                         Verse ; Du Pontet, Poèmes choisis ; Corneille, Le Cid,
                           Horace, Cinna ; Racine, Andromaque, Iphigénie, Esthei,
                          Athalie ; Molière, Les Femmes Savantes, Les Fâcheux ; La
                      Fontaine, Fables.
               Candidates will be required to write a short letter or
                     theme in French on some subject of which they
                   may be all expected to have some knowledge.
       6. Higher German.—An examination similar to that in
          Higher French.
          No special books are prescribed, but candidates are
          recommended to read about 500 pages from such
          books as appear in the following lists :—
           Schiller, Tragedies ; Goethe, Iphigenie, Ergmont, Hermann and
           Dorothea, Aus Meinem Leben ; Lessing, Minna von Bam-
           helm ;     Heine, Reisebilder ;      Hauff, Das Wirtshaus im
           Spessart ; Kurz, Die Humanisten ; Benedix, Doctor Wespe,
           Wildenbruch, Harold ; Freytag, Soll und Haben ; Frenssen,
           Gravelotte ; Fontane, Vor dem Sturm ; Kleist, Michael
           Kohlhaas ; Scheffel, Der Trompeter von Säkkingen.
      7. Mechanics.—The elements of Statics and Dynamics.
      The course of study for this paper is the same as that for
the corresponding subject in the Leaving Certificate Examina-
tion.
      8. One of the following Science subjects—
      A|—BOTANY. :£
      1. The fundamental physiological unit—the living cell.
The main features of the structure and physiology of the cell
wall, cytoplasm, nucleus, vacuoles, chromatophores—Cell
division ; mitosis.
    t All candidates taking Science subjects must produce- note-books certified to on each
page by their science teacher, and in the last page by their head teacher, or by some
person approved by the Senate, as evidence of having performed a satisfactory course of
praotical work.
    i Lower Standard.—The same range will be covered as at the Higher Standard but
an easier examination will be set.
                       MATRICULATION.                         123
      2. The characteristic morphological and biological fea-
tures of the Algae, Fungi, Bryophyta, Pteridophyta, Gymno-
sperms and Angiosperme, as revealed by a study of the follow-
ing types :—
        Algae—Spirogyra, Vaucheria, Hormosira.
         Fungi—Mucor, Agaricus.
         Bryophyta—Marchantía, Dawsonia.
         Pteridophyta—Pteridium, SdagineUa.
         Gymnosperms—Pinus.
         Angiosperme—Lilium, Leptospermum, Helianthus.
      3. Anatomy of Plant Tissues.—The main structural fea-
tures of the following :—Merismatic tissue ; Parenchyma ;
Collenchyma, Sclerenchyma ; Conducting tissue ; Photosyn-
thetic tissue.
      4. Elementary Plant Anatomy.—Anatomy of a typical
Dicotyledonous stem. The vascular bundles ; the xylem ;
phloem ; cambium ; pith ; medullary rays ; cortex. Material
recommended : the Sun Flower (Helianthus).
      Anatomy of a typical Monocotyledonous stem :—The
vascular bundles, their structure and arrangement as com-
pared with the dicotyledonous stem. Material recommended :
the Indian Corn (Zea Mars).
      Anatomy of a typical Dicotyledonous root, such as :
Phaseolus.
      Anatomy of a typical Monocotyledonous root, such as :
Iris.
      Anatomy of a typical Dicotyledonous leaf, such as : The
Privet.
      Anatomy of a typical Monocotyledonous leaf, such as :
 Maize or Iris.
      Examples of a special modification of the leaf, such as :
 Eucalyptus, Banksia, Hakea, etc.
      5. Elementary Plant Ecology.—General Principles of
Ecology : The plant in relation to its environment ; Plant
societies ; Plant communities ; Plant formations.
 124                                MATRICULATION.

      6. Elementary Plant Physiology.—The main fundamental
facts regarding—
         Photosynthesis                   Conduction
         Nutrition                        Growth
         Respiration                      Irritability
         Absorption
      7. Elementary Systematic Botany.—The characteristic-
features of the following Natural Orders, with particular
reference to the structure of the flowers, fruit and seeds ;
pollination and dissemination :—
         Ranunculaceae           Labiatae             Goodeniaceae
         Cruciferae              Proteaceae           Compositae
         Leguminosae             Epacrideae           Liliaceae
         Roseceae                Myrtaceae            Orchidaceae
         Umbelliferae            Rutaceae             Gramineae
   Scrophulariaceae           Casaarinaceae
Each candidate shall be required to submit note books-
duly attested by their Science teacher showing—
         (1) That the candidate has performed the work speci-
              fied in each sub-section of the syllabus.
         (2) That the record in the notebook represents the
            candidate's own work.
           BOOKS RECOMMENDED.—Bower and Gwynne-Vaughan's "Prac-
           tical Botany for Beginners " ; Scott's " Flowering and'
           Flowerless Plants " (2 vols.) ; Coulter, " Plant Structures ";-.
           Brewster and Le Piastrier, " Botany for Australian
           Students " ; Campbell, " A University Text Book of
           Botany."
        B—INORGANIC CHEMISTRY.!
Candidates should be taken through a course which,
includes the subjects mentioned in the following list :—
Distinction between mixtures and Chemical compounds.
Elements.     Symbols of elements.
     The atmosphere.        Combustion of candle and
     phos-
     phorus in air.
     Conservation of matter.    Isolation of active constituent.
     in air.
      tAU candidates taking Science subjects must produce note books certified to on each-
page by their science teacher, and on the last page by their head teacher, or by some
person approved by the Senate, as evidence of having performed a satisfactory conree of
practical work. The note books should be handed to the Superintendent of Examinations-
at the time fixed for the examination paper, and should bear on the outside the distinguish-
ing nnmber of the candidate. The candidate's name must not appear on the note book _
                   MATRICULATION.                           125

Experiments of Priestly and Lavoisier. Respiration.
  Liquid Air.
Oxygen. Preparation and properties of oxygen. Classi-
  fication of oxides.
Atoms and Molecules. Dalton's atomic theory. Laws
  of definite and multiple combining proportions. Com-
  bining weights and atomic weights. Avogadro's Hypo-
  thesis.     Density of Gases.      Formulae.      Equations.
Water.      Its composition and properties.
Solutions. Saturated and supersaturated solutions.
  Water of constitution.      Water of crystallisation.
Efflorescence..     Deliquescence.
Diffusion of solutions.     Colloids.
Solution of gases in \vater. Henry's Law. Dalton's Law
  of Partial Pressures.
Hardness of Water. Temporary and Permanent Hard-
  ness. Softening of Hard Water. Stalactites of lime-
  stone.
Preparation and properties of hydrogen. Diffusion of
  hydrogen and other gases. Kinetic theory of gases.
  Nascent hydrogen.
Valency.
Hydrogen Peroxide and Ozone.
Carbon. Allotropie forms of carbon and their properties.
  Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide.
Oxidation and reduction.       Elementary blowpipe work.
Methane and Ethylene. Manufacture of coal gas. Pro-
  ducer and Water Gas. Structure of flame. Ventila-
  tion.     Miner's safety lamp.
Nitrogen. Ammonia. Preparation and properties of
  ammonia. Action of sulphuric acid on nitre. Pro-
  perties of nitric acid. Action of nitric acid on tin and
  on copper. Action of heat on potassium nitrate, lead
  nitrate, and ammonium nitrate.
Action of sulphuric acid on salt. Properties of hydro-
  chloric acid. Test for chlorides. Preparation and
  properties of chlorine.     Hypochlorites and chlorates.
Sulphur. Properties. Allotropie modifications. Pre-
  paration and properties of sulphuretted hydrogen.
12 6                   MATRICULATION.

        Sulphides. Carbon disulphide. Preparation and pro-
        perties of sulphur dioxide, sulphurous acid and sul-
        phuric acid. Action of heat on sulphates. Thiosul-
        phates.
     Acids, alkalies and salts. Volumetric determination of
        the amount of acid or alkali in a solution.
     Bromine. Hydrobromic acid. Iodine. Manufacture
        of Iodine. Hydriodic acid. Iodic acid. Relations
        between Chlorides, Bromides and Iodides.
     Hydrofluoric ;./„id. Comparison of the Halogens with
        one another. .
   Periodic arrangement of the elements..
   \ Silicon.     Silica.   Silicates.    Glass.    Silicic acid.
   Silicon
   Fluoride.
     Boron.      Borax.     Boric Acid.
     Phosphorus. Phosphoric acids. Phosphates. Phos-
        phites and Hypophosphites.       Phosphoretted hydrogen.
     The Chemistry of the Metals and their more important
        compounds.
     Acids, bases ard salts. Basicity of acids. Ionic disso-
        ciation in solutions.    Strength of acids and bases.
     Metals. Classification of metals. Actior of acids on
        metals. Metals considered as constituents of simple
        salts and of complex salts.
     Gold. Platinum. Extraction of metal from ores and
        properties of metal.
     Mercury. . Silver. Copper. Lead. Tin. Zinc. Cad-
        mium. Extraction of properties of metals. Also chief
        compounds of metal. Use of silver salts in photo-
        graphy.      Manufacture of red lead and white lead.
      Iron. Manufacture of Cast Iron, Wrought Iron and
         Steel.    Oxides and salts of iron.
     Aluminium. Manufacture. Properties. Aluminium com-
         pounds. The Alums. Clay. Manufacture of bricks,
         earthenware and porcelain.
      Nickel. Cobalt. Chromium. Manganese. Use of
         chromâtes and permanganates as oxidising agents.
     Arsenic, Antimony and Bismuth. Comparison of these
         elements with Phosphorus. Detection of arsenjc and
         antimony.      Arsenites and Arsenates.
                        MATRICULATION.                              127

     Barium. Strontium. Calcium. Lime. Mortar.
     Cement.
       Plaster of Paris.
     Magnesium.
 Potassium and Sodium.            Preparation of the metals.
           Manufacture of sodium carbonate and sodium hydrate.
      Uranium.      Thorium.      Radium.
          For a pass at the Lower Standard candidates will not be
       required to know any of the work belonging to the syllabus
      from the word " Gold " to the word " Radium."
     The Practical Work for a pass at the Lower Standard is
the same as for a pass at the Higher Standard.
                            Practical Work.
      In starting practical work, teachers are recommended to
take their pupils through such a course as that laid down in
Perkin and Lean's Introduction to the Study of Chemistry
or similar text-book.
      Candidates must produce note-books showing that they
have performed experiments of each of the following types :—
       (1) Preparation of gases involving the fitting-up of appa-
ratus, collection of gases oyer water and by displacement of
air, filtration, evaporation, distillation and crystallisation.
       (2) Experiments requiring the use of the balance-and
weights, e.g., the increase in weight of metals on burning ; the
loss of weight in calcium carbonate on treatment with an acid.
       (3) Experiments requiring the use of volumetric measur-
ing instruments, the Burette, Pipette, measuring flasks and
cylinders, e.g., the neutralisation of acids and alkalies. Can-
didates must know how to test the accuracy of these instru-
ments.
      PtTRTHEE QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS.—Preparation and
use of deci-normal solutions of acids and alkalies ; preparation
and use of deci-normal solution of potassium permanganate
and similar volumetric estimations. Estimation by gravi-
metric analysis of one or more of the following :—Copper in
copper sulphate, silver in silver nitrate, chromium in potas-
sium bichromate, calcium in calcium chloride, mercury in
mercuric chloride, and barium in barium chloride.
128                            MATRICULATION.

      QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS.—Analysis (using both dry and
wet reactions) of simple salts containing the following metals
and acids: —Lead, silver, mercury, copper, bismuth, cadmium,
arsenic, antimony, tin, iron, aluminium, chromium, zinc, man-
ganese, cobalt, nickel, barium, strontium, calcium, magnesium,
ammonium, potassium and sodium ; sulphuric, hydrochloric,
nitric, carbonic, phosphoric, sulphurous, boric, hydrobromic
and hydriodic acids. Special stress should be laid on the
reasons for each step in the analytical process.
         TEXT BOOKS RECOMMENDED.—Perkin and Lean, Introduction to
             Chemistry ;   Newth's Inorganic Chemistry (Longmans) ;
             Newth's Chemical Analysis or similar book.
         BOOKS RECOMMENDED TO TEACHERS.—Ostwald's Principles of
             Inorganic Chemistry (Macmillan) ;         Alexander Smith's
             Inorganic Chemistry (BeM & Sons).
      Cf—GEOLOGY. J—Candidates will be expected to show a
knowledge of the same divisions of this subject as those re-
quired for the Junior Examination (now abolished) but at a
higher standard. Stratigraphy and Palaeontology, however,
should be studied in greater detail than for the Junior, and
knowledge of a few characteristic fossils of the different Geo-
logical systems will be required. Candidates will be asked to
name and classify the specimens placed before them of common
rocks, rock-forming minerals and fossils. Candidates should
also be taught elementary field mapping.
     All candidates must submit note-books containing the
results of original observations in the field and laboratory.
     These books should contain matter similar to that required
from Junior candidates, with the addition of :—
     Description of fossils, and of recent organisms of types
which occur as fossils, when such fossil types cannot be
obtained.
     Geological sketch maps, or traverses, and geological sec-
tions, of at least one area studied in the field.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED.—Elementary Physical Geography,
Professor Davis ; Geology for Beginners, W. W. Watts (or
Students' Elements of Geology, by Lyell, Second Edition,
b'y^ Judd, 1896. This is somewhat more comprehensive
than Watts) ; Introduction to the Geology of New South
______________ Wales, by C. A. Süssmilch.
t See note on pages 122 and 124.
χ Lower Standard.—The same range will be covered as at the Higher Standard bat an
easier examination will be set.
                             MATRICULATION.                                       129

            FOR REFERENCE.—Chamberlin ¿¿¡Salisbury, Geology, in 1 vol.
                or Geikie, A Text-book of Geology, 2 vols. These books
                are not essential, as they are too expensive for most students.
                Teachers will obtain much help from them. A fine book, at
                a much more moderate price, is Geikie, J., Structural and
                Field Geology.
      Df—PHYSICS.J—Elementary Mechanics, the Properties
of Matter, Sound, Heat, Light, and the Elements of Elec-
tricity and Magnetism.
         Elementary Mechanics and Properties of Matter.—
         Kinematics, simple harmonic motion, elements of
         statics, including hydrostatics and pneumatics,
         dynamics, including elasticity and hydraulics, fric-
         tion, surface tension.
         Sound.—Waves and wave motion, resonance, produc-
         tion and° propagation of sound, reflection, inter-
         ference, pitch, quality, musical scale and musical
         instruments.
         Heat.—Thermometry, calorimetry, transfer of heat,
         expansion, change of molecular state, nature of
         heat, elements of kinetic theory of gases.
         Light.—Propagation, speed, reflection, refraction, dis-
         persion, interference, diffraction, double refraction
         and polarisation, optical instruments.
         Electricity and Magnetism.—Magnets, the earth's mag-
         netic field, magnetic induction, charge, potential
         capacity, production of currents, elementary mea-
         surements, chemical, heating and magnetic effects
         of currents.
       BOOK RECOMMENDED.—Crew's General Physics {The Macmittan
       Co.). or Watson's Intermediate Physics {Longman's), er
       Spinney's Text-Book of Physics (TAe Macmiticm Co.).
       BOOKS RECOMMENDED TO TEACHERS.—Poynting and Thomson's
       Text Books ;       Barton and Black's Practical Physics ;
       Watson's Text-Book of Practical Physics.
      NOTE.—Each candidate will be required to produce a
laboratory note-book, or note-books, containing his original
records and reductions of practical work. The laboratory
work must include forty-independent quantitative experi-
menta distributed over the sections of the syllabus of the
                           t See note on pages 122 and IM.
t Lower Standard—The same range will be covered as at the Higher Standard, but
an easier examination will be set.                                            F
130                       MATRICULATION.

examination ; twenty of these may be of an elementary nature
such as would be carried out by candidates preparing for the
Intermediate Certificate Examination, but twenty must be
of a more advanced character.
     E—PHYSIOLOGY^—The Elements of Animal Physiology.
          BOOK RECOMMENDED.—Manual of Human Physiology, Leonard
          Hill, M.B. {Edward Arnold).
      F—ZOOLOGY, f
      1.—The general structure and life-history of animals.
      2. The characteristic features of the following phyla and
classes :—Phylum Protozoa (classes Rhizopoda and Infusoria);
Phylum Ccelenterata (classes Hydrozoa and Actinozoa) ;
Phylum Platodes (classes Trematoda and Cestoda) ; Phylum
Echinodermata (classes Asteroides and Echinoides) ; Phylum
Annulata (class Chaetopoda) ; Phylum Arthropoda (classes
Crustacea and Insecta) ; Phylum Mollusca (classes Pelecy-
poda, Gastropoda and Cephalopoda) ; Phylum Chordata
(classes Pisces, Amphibia, Reptilia, Aves, Mammalia).
      3. Candidates will be required to submit note-books
with each page duly attested by their science teacher, and
with a voucher for the whole on the last page by their head
teacher or some person approved by the Senate, showing that
they have studied practically the structure of the following
animals :—Paramœcium or Vorticella ; the Liver Fluke ; the
Fresh-water Crayfish (Astacopsis) or Sea Lobster (Palinurus),
the Snail or the Fresh-water Mussel, the Frog.
          Books RECOMMENDED.—Parker and Haswell's Manual of
              Zoology {Macmillan), with the omission of Section I. (2 and
              4), Section III., Section IV. (2 and 4), Section V. (2 and 4)„
              Section VI., Section VII. (2, 4 and 5), Section VIII.,
              Section IX. (2), Section X. (2, 4 and 5), Section XI. (2),
              . Section XII. (pages 310-326). For practical directions
              teachers are recommended to consult Marshall and Hurst's
              Practical Zoology {Smith, Elder <fc Co.), or Huxley and
              Martin's Elementary Practical Biology {Macmillan), or
              Parker and Parker's Practical Zoology {Macmillan).
      9. Modern History.           —:—-
         Subjects for March, 1921 and 1922—The History of
              Western Europe from the Teutonic Invasions to
              the present time.
                         t Se* note on pages 122 and 124.
                        MATRICULATION.                               131

          BOOKS RECOMMENDED.—Robinson's History of Western Europe
             {Ginn & Co.) ; Robinson's Readings from European His-
             tory, abridged edition (Ginn & Co.), 8/6 ; or any other
             books of similar character and standard-. .             ^-



                        LEAVING CERTIFICATE.
      I. A pass in the Higher and Lower Standards respectively
of the subjects at the Leaving Certificate Examination is
accepted as equivalent to a pass in the higher and lower
standards respectively of these subjects at the Matriculation
Examination.
      With respect to Mathematics, a pass in either Mathe-
matics I. or Mathematics II. at the Leaving Certificate Exami-
nation is accepted as equivalent to a pass in Lower Mathe-
matics at the Matriculation Examination, and a pass in both
Mathematics I, and Mathematics II. as equivalent to a pass
in Higher Mathematics at the Matriculation Examination.
      II. Candidates who fail to qualify for Matriculation at
the Leaving Certificate Examination will be required in
subsequently presenting.themselves for a Matriculation quali-
fication to take all the subjects of that examination in accord-
ance with the regulations.


EXAMINATIONS FOR MATRICULATION SCHOLAR-
SHIPS.
THE Examination for Matriculation Scholarships for candi-
dates intending to enter the University in March takes place
in the previous NOVEMBER.
     The results of certain papers in the Leaving Certificate
Examination will be counted as one part of the University
Scholarship and Prize Examination. In addition, special
papers will be set in the week following the Leaving Certificate
Examination in—
             (a) Classics, including Ancient History
             (δ) Modern Languages
             (C) Mathematics.
132                     MATRICULATION.

      The Scholarship for General Proficiency will be awarded
on the results of the Leaving Certificate Examination to
the candidate who shows the greatest proficiency in not
moz"e than six (6) of the following thirteen (13) subjects,
viz. :—
   (1) European History                     (7) Greek
   (2) Ancient History                      (8) Mathematics I.
   (3) English                              (9) Mathematics II.
   (4) French                              (10) Mechanics
   (5) German                              (11) Physics
   (6) Latin                               (12) Chemistry
(13) One of the following (provided that both Physics
and Chemistry have not already been taken)—
Geology
Botany
Zoology
Physiology.
The Scholarship for Classics will be awarded on the
results of the Honours Papers in the Leaving Certificate
Examination in Latin and Greek and the Special Papers.
The Special Papers will be—
         (a) Greek Unseen Translation
         (b) Latin Unseen Translation
         (c) A General Paper embracing questions on Greek and
                      Roman History, Public and Private Antiquities,
                  the History of the Classical Literatures, Metre, and
                    anything falling under the term Scholarship.
            The Scholarship for Mathematics will be awarded on the
            results of the Higher and Honours Papers of the Leaving
        Certificate Examination in Mathematics I. and Mathematics
      Π., and the Special Paper, which will include problems on the
    more advanced mathematical work of the schools,
                                                                   and
   Mechanics.        But the choice of questions will be large enough
         to allow full marks to be obtained by a candidate who does
     not offer Mechanics as a subject.
      The Scholarship for French and German will be awarded
on the results of the Higher and Honours Papers of the
Leaving         Certificate    Examination      in      Frerjch    and
German,
                      MATRICULATION.                            133^

together with the Special Papers, which will include trans-
lation from and into English of passages requiring an advanced
knowledge of French and German ; translatior from French
into German and from German into French ; free composition.
in French and German ; questions on Language, Literature,
and general topics.
      Candidates for Scholarships are required to fill up the
prescribed form, which may be obtained at the Universityr
and to forward it to the Registrar of the University not later
than October 31st, together with a fee of £1.


            ARTICLED CLERKS' CERTIFICATE.
     The Articled Clerks'Certificate is now issued to candi-
dates who pass at one and the same examination (either the
Matriculation Examination or the Leaving Certificate Ex-
amination) in the subjects which are prescribed for entrance
to the Faculty of Law or the Faculty of Medicine.
     Every person desirous of presenting himself for the Pre-
liminary Examination for Articled Clerks shall give notice
thereof to the Warden and Registrar, and pay to him a fee
of two pounds.
434                           TIME TABLE OF LEOTXTBES.

                                                                                      FACULTY
                                                                                      TIME TABLE
                                                                                  Laboratory practice is
                                                                            LEST TBBM.

RBPBBBNCB
 NUMBER                          SUBJECT.
    TO
STKOPSRB-                                                   Mon.      Tu.       W.       Th.         Pri.
                                                                                11,2-5
    40, 41     Chemistry I.                                 11,2-5                                 11,2-S

        39     ^Physics I.                                  2-5       12,£-5             12,2-5    2-5
        52     Zoology I. (a) ..                             12                                       12
        53     Botany I.                                    9,2-4     2-4         9      2-4           9
   42, 47      '•Geology I.   ..                                                  9      U,12t
                                                                      n,i2t
          1    Latin I.                ..              ..     9                                        9

          3    ttMathemafcics I.                            10         10        10       10         10
          1    ÍGreekI.                                     11                   U                   11
          2    ^English I.                                  12                   12                  12
          2    JFreneh I.                                    1          9                9, 12       10
          2    JtGerman I.                                  11                   ii                  11
          6    History I.                                              3                   3          3
          4    Philosophy I.      ..                                   2          2                   2
          1    Latin II. and III.                           10        10         10       10         10

          1    Greek II. and III.                            9          9         9        9           9
          3    Mathematics II.                               9          9         9        9           9
          2    JEnglish II. and III.        ..              11                   11       11
          2    ^French II. and III.                         12                            12
          2    JtGerman II. and III.                                   ii
                                                                        9         9                   ii
                                                                                                       9
          6    History II. and III.                                     2                  2           2
               Oriental History                                         3         3        3
          4    Philosophy      ILv.         Modern Philo-
                   sophy)                                              12        12                   12
               Philosophy       IIB.        (Advanced
                   Psychology)                                          4         4                    4
           5   Education                                     12        12                 12
   ■40, 41     Chemistry II. ..                   ..                  12,2-6              12,2-5
         39    §§Phyeics II.      ..                        2^5       10,2-5              10,2-5     2^5
    43. 48     Geology II.                                  10, 12           10,' 12                  10
         52    Zoology II.                                            11,2-5 2-5          U          2-5
         20    Physiology I. ..                             2-5                          2-5
         10    tRoman Law                                   4-5                          5-5
          9    tConstitutional Law                                    4-5                             4-6
         11    t Jurisprudence                                                              9      9 Sat.
         12    tlnternational Law                                       9                   9||
          3    Mathematics III.                              12        12        12        12         12
         54    Astronomy                                                         10      "7-30        10
                                  («) Zoology L, Sat. Í     ).30-12
    t Or at    other times to be arranged.     J Honour cl    asses      1 be anged it other times.
T Alternate weeks. ** Also demonstrations and practical workwi times an be arranged in accord-
                                                               at        to
ance with the Syllabus, ft Classes A and B meet also at 10 on Friday. || For alternate weeks.
*** At times to be arranged.     * At the observatory.
                                       FACULTT OF ARTS.                                          135

OF ARTS.
OF LECTUEES.
indicated by black type.
RB FBRBNOB                  TB   Νίτγ       BM.                     MICH     AKI.MA8 TERM.
                                 TB
NUMBER
    TO
STNOPSES.     MOD.     Tues.     Wed.       Thur.   Έτι.     Mon.   Tues.    Wed.    Thur.     Fri.


  40, 41       11                11                 11        11              11
    39         2-5 12-2-               12,2- 2-5              2-5 12,2-              12,2-    2-6·
   .52        9,2-4 5            9,2-4 5     9,2-4                  5                5
    53                                                         9    2-4        9     2-4
  42,,47 .             llÜ2                 U,'Í2                    11              11
                       t                    t
     1           9                9                   9        9               9                 9-
     3         10                10                           10        10    10      10
     1         11          ió    11          i¿               11              11               11\
     2         12                12                  ii
                                                     12       12              12               12-
     2          1          9                  9     10         1        9              9        10
     Ï         11                                   11        11              11               11.
     6                      3    ii
                                 ,      .     3      3                   3             3         3
     4                      2      2                 2                   2                       2
     1          10         10     10         10     10        10        10     ï
                                                                              10      10        10
     1         . 9         9      9          9        9        9        9      9       9           9
     3          9          9      9          9        9        9        9      9       9           9
     2         11                11         11                11.             11      11
     2 .       12      11                   .12      11       12                      12
     2                  9          9                  9                 ii
                                                                         9     9                 ii
                                                                                                  9
     6          .    t
                        2                     2       2                  2             2           2
                        3          o          3      ··                  3     3       3
     4                 12        12                  12                 12                      12
                            4     4                   4                  4     4                 4,
     5           2         12                 "i               2        12             2
  40, 41               12,2-            12,2-                       12,2-             12,2-   . .
    39         2-5 5
                   10,2-                10.2-
                                        5            2-5     2^5    10,2-
                                                                    5                 10,2-
                                                                                          5     2-6·
  43, 48      10, 12 5           10, 12 5            10      10, 12 5     10, 12          5    10'
    52         . , 11,2-         2-5         11     2-5             11,2- 2-5         11       2-5
    20         12 5 12            12         12      12        12 5 12     12         12        12
              2-5                           2-5              2-5                     2-5
    10        4-5                           5-5              4-5                     5-5
     9                 4-6                          4-5             4-5                        4-5
    11                                        9     9 Sat.                            '911    9 Sat..
    12                      9                 9                          9             9 Il
     3          12         12     12         12      12       12        12    12      12        12
    54                            10        *7-S0    10                       10     •7-30      10
                          Science Coursée HE. as in Science Time Table.
  ^Practical Physics I. may be done in any one of the following six classes ;—Monday or Tues-
  day or Thursday or Friday in Lent and Mich a elm* s Terms ; Mondaye and Fridays or Tuesdays=
  and Thursdays in Trinity Term.
      §?Practical Physics Π, may be done as follows :—Every Monday and Friday during two terms ;
. or every Tuesday and Thursday during two terms.
;η 36                            TIME TABLE OF LECTURES.




                                                                                      FACULTY
                                                                                        TIME TABLI
H9    .                   SUBJECT.                                         LBNT TEBU.
O &■ a>
K   w
  Ä
£ » c£
H P >                                                    M.       Tu.       W.        Th.         F.    S.


  9        * FIRST YEAR.                                                        5.5                      9
 10        Constitutional Law                             4.5
 13        Roman Law                                                                              4.5
                                                                   4.5
 13        Contracts, Mercantile Law and                  5.6
              Torts
           Crime and Criminal Procedure**                                                         5.5

 11        SECOND YEAR.                                     9      5.5
                                                                     9            9         9t    9      9
 12        Jurisprudence                                                                    9t    6.5
 14        Public International Law
 16        The Law of Property, Convey-
           ancing
           Instruction in Conveyancing***
           Legal Interpretation***
                                                                                             ■"

 18        THIRD     YEAR.                                         5.5      4.5                   4.5
 15        Private International Law                               4.5      5.5
                                                                            ■
                                                                                                  5.5
 17        Procedure, Pleading & Evidence                4.5
           Including Instruction in Proce-
           dure and Pleading
           Equity and Company Law, Bank-
           ruptcy, Probate and Divorce                   5.5
           Instruction in the Practice
           in
           Equity,      Company      Law,
           Bankruptcy, Probate        and
           Divorce**" ..
      * The first two years of the course are the same as in the Faculty of Arts
      ** Crimes and Criminal Procedure, 25 lectures.
      *** Commencing in the sixth week in Lent Term.
      t Tn alternate weeks.
      NOTH.—This time tahle is subject to revision.
                                     FACULTT OF LAW.                                137




OF          LAW.
OF LECTUEES.
RBFEBENCE                 Tm Νίττ TRBH.                     MlCHABLUAS   ΓΒΒΗ.
NUUBEB


   TO        M.     Tu.         W.     Th.    ?·      M.    Tu.    W.    XIi.     F.
STMOP8KB.


    9        4.4    4.5     -                4.5      4.5   4.5                  4.5
    10                                       9 Sat.                              9 Sat.


    13       5.Ô    5.5         5.5          5.5      5.5   5.5    5.6           5.5


    11                9                 9t   9 Sat.           9          9t      9Sat..
    12                                  9t                               9t

              9                  9     4.5     9       9            9.    5.5      9
    14                                                                    4.5
    16
    18       i'.à    ··         4.5          4.5      «     5.5    4.5            4.6
    15



    17       5.5    4.5         5.6          5.5      5.δ    4.5   5η5            5.5
"IU 8                               TIME TABLE OF LECTURES.

                                                                                    FACULTY OF
                                                                                           TIME TABLE
                                                                                           Laboratory Practice is
  •J o    .
  OHn                                                                            LENT TERÏ
 ΗΒίΦ                                                                                          .
 M (B O                          SUBJECT.
 tíQ^                                                               M.     Tu.       W.         Th.
 Pj ¡3«                                                                                                      e.
                              FIRST YEAR.*


   52         Zoology I. A ..                                        9       9         9            9           9
   52         Zoology I. B                                           9       9         9            9           9
   52         Practical Zoology A ..                               2-4               2-4                  2-4
   52         Practical Zoology B . .                                      10T'l2              10-12      2-4
   53         Botany I. A
   53         Botany LB
   53         Practical Botany A             ..
   53         Practical Botany B             ..
-40,41        Chemistry LA                                                  io       10            ió
■40,41        Chemistry LB                                          ii               12
   40         Practical Chemistry A
   40         Practical Chemistry B
   39         Physics I. A                                          io                                      io
   39         Physics I. B .................................        10 '                                     10
              !Practical Physics                                    2-5    ¿!δ                     2-^5    2-5
    19        Human Anatomy (Introductory)
              and B
                                                               A           —
                            SECOND YEAR.
                                                                           —
    19        Descriptive Anatomy                                    9       9        9             9           9
    20        t Experimental Physiology (A and B).
    20        Physiology
    20        !Physiological Chemistry (A and B)..
    19        Dissections—daily
    20        tPractical Histology (A, B, C and D)                  2-5    ¥«                  ¿-5           2-5
                                                                   Í0-1    10-1                10-1       10-1
                             THIRD YEAR.
    20        Physiology                                            10      10       10            10       10
    19        Regional Anatomy                                      11      11       11            11       Π
    20        tPharmacology (A and B)                                       12                     12
    19        Dissections—-daily during Lent anc
              Trinity Terms
    21        Pathology and Bacteriology
    22        Surgery
    25        t Hospital with Tutorial Surgery

      • First Year Medicine is separated into two divisions—A and B. These classes are as nearly
.as possible of equal size. The division into the two classes is carried out by the Department ot
Zoology at the beginning of Lent Term.
      t Divided into four sections. A, B, 0 and D.
      5 Divided into four classes, each one afternoon a week in Lent and Trinity Terms.
                               FACULTY OF MEDICINE.                                   139.

MEDICINE.
OP LEOTUBES.
indicated by black type.
 o«.                    TRINITY TERM.                        MICHAELMAS TERM.
 m
 H5
 to « O a.
 e;
 ig S HO M
 g                                   I
               M.      TB.    w.         Th.    F.    M.     Tu.     W.
          m
 M                                                                   Th.
       52


     52
     52
     52
     53         9               9               9
     53                12                12    11
     53       ii-i    2-4    li-1
     53       2-4     9-11           9^11
 40,41                 10             10
 40,41         12      11     io                12           io
                                                             12             io
                                                                            12      io·
                                                                                    12*.
    40        2-5            2-5               2-5
    40                •¿-5   10-1    2^5
    39         10                              12                                     12
    39         11                              10     io
                                                      11     2-5            2^5        10
                                                      2-5                             2-5
       19
                                                       9         9     9               9
                                                                       9
     19         9       9      9          9     9

     20       2-5     2-5            2-5       2-5
     20        10      10             10        10      9     9        9              9
     20                       io                      2-5    2-5       9    2-5   2-5
                                                     10-1   10-1           10-1   10-lf
     19
     20

     30

     V9       12       12     12         12    12
     20                12                12
     19
     21                                              9-12.45 9-12.45 9- 2.45      9-12.45..
     22                                              1.45    1.45 1 9-12.45
                                                                     I. 45           1.45
     25                                                                 1.45

                     For Fourth and Fifth Years see next page.
340                            TIME TABLE OF LECTURES.




                                                                              FACULTY OF
                                                                                       TIME TABLE
                                                                             IJBST TEEM.



"5*" ft
   Ä                         SUBJHCT.
 h
β IJ H                                                          M.    Tu.         W.       Th.      F.

                        FOURTH    YEAR.


   33     Materia Medica and Therapeutics                                                           ··
          Tutorial and Practical Pharmacy
    21    Pathology and Bacteriology                        11.30     11.30      11.30     11.30   11.30
   .21    Special Pathology
    22    Surgery                                            1.30     1.30      1.30   1.30     1.30
    23    Surgical Anatomy & Operative Surgery.             2.30      2.30     2.30             2.30
    24    Hospital, with Clinical Surgery, etc. j           +.8.30-   + 8.30- +.'8.30 +.8.30- + 8.30-
                                                            11        11      -       11        11
   26     Medicine                                                            11
   29     Obstetrics              ..                        '
   28     Hospital, with Tutorial Medicine and
          Out Patients
                          FIFTH YEAR.
   2C     Medicine                                          9.30      9.30        9.30     9.30    9.30
   30     Gynaecology (first 6 weeks of term)               8.30      S.30        8.30     8.30    8.30
   31     UMedical Jurisprudence (20 lectures) ..
   32     Public Health (30 lectures)
   34        ' Diseases of the Mind
   35        Diseases of the Eye
          * Diseases of Children
   36     < Diseases of the Ear, Nose, and Throat
   37        Diseases of the Skin ..
57,28     •+Hospital, with Tutorial and Clinical
               Medicine         ..                          1U5       11-5       IUS       11-5    lï-à
                          ÏÏ To commence after the course in Public Health.
      +Continued throughout the long vacation until the Final Degree Examination in March.
                                  FACULTY OF MKDICINE.                                                      141




MEDICINE.
OF LECTUEES.
 Mo   ■                                                                 MlCHAKLUAa TBRH.
 O L, DB
                           TRINITT TERM.
 «Sε
 » MW


 fc »     Ä     M.       Tu.       W.       Th.      F.       M.        Tu.         W.         Th.          F
 a 3 t"
 (Sfcœ

                                                            10.    30   10.30§      10.30$     10.30§     10.30$
        33      12.30    12.30     12.30    12.30   12.30   9.     §    9.30        9.30       9.30        9.30
                                                            8.     30   8.30        8.30       8.30        8.30
        21      11.30    11.30     11.30    11.30   11.30   11     30   11-5        11-5       11-5        11-5
                Í8.30-   Í8.30-    Í8.30-   JS.30- Í8.30-          -5
        »{      11       11        11       .11     11
        26
        29
        28




 31             8.30     8.30      8.30     8 .30 ■8.30       9 -5            >-5        Î-5   I     -5
 32             8.30     8.30      8.30     8 .30 8.30
                                                                                                          <I
                                                                                               9
 27, 28         10-5     10-5      10-5     K )-5 10-5                                                       J
                                                                                                             )-5




              Two hours one day a week for each student.          * In Long" Vacation of 4th Tear.
                                           t And afternoon.
142                                   TIME TABLE OF LECTURES.

                                                                                                               FACULTY
                                                                                                               TIME TABLE
HO    .
                                                                                                     LENT TBRU.

3*£                                SUBJHCT.

5S£
M=M
PS»"»                                                                            M.           TH.       ιν.       Th.       F.

                                FIR*T YEAR.
     19   Elementary Anatomy                                                       9                      9                  9
     19   Anatomy of Teeth
     39   Physics and Practical Physics                                                        Ζ-δ                          10
                                                                                 i¿            12
                                                                                                                  ï-b
     40   Chemistry and Practical Chemistry                      j               12                     10-1      12
                                                                                              10-12                10-12
  40      Practical Metallurgy
  19      Dissections (2 terms)
  38      Mechanical Laboratory                                                  2-5                     2-5               2-5
                              8ECOND YEAR.
  33      Materia Medica
.         Physiology
2020      Practical Histology                                                                 2-5                          2-5
  20      Experimental Physiology
  38      Surgical Dentistry                                                                              5
  38      Mechanical Dentistry                                                    5                                5
  19      Dissections (2 terms)                                                 9-11          9-1       9-Íl      9-1      9-11
  19      Regional Anatomy                                                       11                      11                 11
          Dental Hospital                                                        2-5                     2-5      2-5
                               THIRD YEAR.
     20   Physiology                                                             10            10        10        10       10
     38   Surgical Dentistry                                                    8.30                              8.30
     38   Mechanical Dentistry                                                                          8.30
     21   Practical Pathology and                Bacteriology
          (alternate days)    ..
     22   Surgery
          Dental Hospital                                                        2-5                     2-5      2-5       2-6
                              FOURTH YEAR.
                                                                                              í-h
  22      Surgery                                                                  1.30                 1.30               1.30
          Anœsthetics
          Special Clinical Courses—                                                           1.30
                                                                                                                  1.30
          (o) Medicine
          (¿) Surgery ............................................................
                                                                                              3
          Dental Hospital                                                          l¿-5       10-12     10-4      10-12    10-5
  21      Pathology                                                                 11         11        11       311       11
          Special Dental Clinics                                                                         4
                                                                                               TIME TABLE FOR
 33    Materia Medica                                                             9       !     9 9                9         9
       Practical Materia Medica                                                          10-12                             10-12
(0, 41 Chemistry I.                                                             12           12                   12
10, 41 Practical Chemistrv                                                     10-12! 10-12                       10-12
                                                                                       :
  53   Botany                                                                    9           ..   9                          9
  53   Practical Botanv ..                                                      ..     i     .. 10-12                      10-12
                Students must have completed the courses in Chemistry and Botanv before taking
                                  FACULTY OF DENTISTRY.                                             143

OF DENTISTRY.
OF LECTURES.
H9                        TBISITT TKBM.                               îllCHABLHAS     ΓΒΒΜ.
1
    SSs
hSÄ        M.       Tu.          W.         Th.         F.     M.     Tu.     W.      Th.      F.


     19        9                    9                    9

     18                                                                        12
     39              12                       12                       12              12
     40   !"                      12                           11              11
     40
     40                                                                3-5             3-5
     19   2-5       9-12         2-5        9-12       2-5    9-11    9-11    9-11    9-11    9-11
     38             2-5                     2-5                2-5             25              2-5
     33                                                         9               9               9

     20
     20
           10        10           10          10        10     10
                                                                       ιό      10      10      10

     20             2-5                                 2-5
     38                             5                                           5
     38      5                                 5                5                       5
     19   9-12      9-12         9-12       9-12       9-12
     19
          2-5                    2-5        2-5                2-5     2-5     2-5     2-5    2-6
     20

     38   8.30                             8.30               8 30                    8.30
     38                         S.30                                          8.30
     21                                                        11      11      11      11      11
     22                                                       1.30    1.30    1.30    1.30    1.30
          10-5      10-5         10-5       10-5      10-5     2-5     2-5     2-5     2-5     2-5
                      3                       3                         3               3




          10-5     10-12         10-4      10-12       10-5   10-5    10-12   10-4    10-12   10-5
     21   ,11        11           11         11         .11                       4
                                  4
PHARMACY                  STUDENTS.
    33                 9                       9      10-12     9                       9     I01l2
                   10-12                                      10-12
40, 41     11                     12                    11     nil             nil
«0, 41              10-1                   10-1                       1Ó-1            10-1
  53                                                            9               9      .,
  53                                                                          10-12           9-il
Materia Medica.           || Subject to alteration.
144                          TIME TABLE OF LECTURES.

                                                                                 FACULTY
                                                                                 TIME TABLE
                                                                                  Laboratory practice
REFERENCE                                                       LENT     fERM.

NUMBER TO               SUBJECT.
SYNOPSES.
                                                M.      Tu.      W.       Th.       F.          Sat.

  40, 41      Chemistry I.                      11                11                11

      40      Practical Chemistry             2-5Í      2-5      2-5     2-5       2-5
      52      Zoology I.                       12                                   12
      52      Practical Zoology                                                             9.30-12
       3      Mathematics I. ..                 io       iô       io      io        io
      53      Botany I.                          9                 9                 9
      53      Practical Botany                 2-4      ¿4                2-4
      39      Physics I.                                 12                12
      39      Practical Physics
      42      Geology I.                                 ii               11
      47      "Practical Geology                          9                9        12
                                                                9-12
       53     **Botany II.       ..           9-12     9,        2-5     9,10-1     12
  40, 41      Chemistry II.                            10-12
                                                       12,2-5            2
                                                                         12,2-5
        3     Mathematics II...                  9       9      9     9     9 -
       39     § Physics IE                     2-5     10,2-5       10,2-5 2-5
       52     Zoology II. and III.                     11,2-5 2-5'   11    2-5
  43, 48      Geology II.          ..         ICMl            10-11        10-11
              |                               12              12
      20      Physiology I.                    2-5                  2-5

      54      Astronomy                                          10      f7.30      10

                                                                9-12
       53     ***Botany III.                  2-5      9,        2-5     9         12,2-5
        3     Mathematics III.                 12      10-12
                                                        12       12     12          12
  46, 51      §Geology ΠΙ.        ..          9,11   9-11       9,11 9-11
  40, 41      Chemistry III. ..                      2-5        12,2-5 2-5          12
       39     Physics III.                    11.2-5 2-5               2-5         11,2-5
       20     t Physiology II. ..               10    10          io      io        10
       41     +Organic Chemistry III.                            12                 12
     J Students who are not taking Practical Botany, will meet for Practical Chemistry on
Monday, Tuesday and Thursday in Lent Term. Students taking Practical Botany will meet for
Practical Chemistry on Wednesday and Friday in Lent Term, and on Monday, Wednesday ana
Friday for the first three weeks of Michaelmas Term.
     * Students taking Zoology will attend in Michaelmas Term for Practical Zoology when they
have completed the course in Practical Chemistry.
     t Practical work as arranged.                § Practical work at times to be arranged.
                                        FACULTY OF SCIENCE.                                     145

OF SCIENCE.
OF LECTURES.
is indicated by black type.
 Sc H        &J
                                TRINITY TERM.                       MICHAELMAS TERM.
 ISo£
 SD61S
 KÍ5          u.    M.     Tu.       W.         Th.    F.     M.    Tu.       W.    Th.    '     F.
 S           to                                                           c

40,41               11               11,12ft           11     11              11

        40                                                   2-5              2-5              ¿-5X
        52           9                 9                9
        52         2-4               2-4              2-4
         3          10      iô        10        iô     10            io       ioι   iô         iô
        53                  ■   ■
                                                              io
                                                               9               9
        53                                                    ..    2-4             2-4
        39                  12                  12                   12              12
        39                 2-5                  2-5
        42                  11                   11                  11              11
        47                 9                      9    12
                           9,10-12                     9
        53         10-12             10-12 9,10-1            10-12 9,10-12 10-12        9, 8, 10-12
                                                                                     10-12
40, 41                     12,2-5          12,2-5             12,2-5       12,2-5
     3               9       9         9      9      9     '*   9       9     9     9
    39              2-5    10,2-5          10,2-5 2-5   I 2-5 10,2-5       10,2-5 2-5
    52                     11,2-5     ¿5    11     2-5        11,2-5 2-5     11    2-5
43, 48 ί           1(Ml              10-11        10-11 1(Ml         10-11        10-11
                   12                12                 12           12
        20 ί         10     10         10    10     10    10   10     10     10    10
                    2-5                     2-5           2.5               2-5
        54                             10  H7.30 10     !             10   1J7.30  10
        53                 9,11-1               9,11-1 9,10-1 10-12 9,11-1 10-1     9,11-1 9,10-12

     3              12     12     12             12    12    12     12     12        12      12
46, 51             9, 11  9-11 9, 11            9-11        9,11   9-11 9,11        9-11
40, 41                    12,2-5 2-5            11.2-5             11,2-5 2-5       12,2-5
    39             11,2-5 2-5                    2-6 11,2-6 11,2-5 2-5               2-5   η,'2-5
    20
    41              ιό                io               12     ii                               ..
    H At the Observatory.         tt A portion of this class may meet at 12 on Wednesday-
    ° Students not attending Botany I. may be required to attend Geology I. at 9 on Friday.
    ** Two sections to Class in Practical Botany II.
    *** Two sections to Class in Practical Botanv III.
    5 Practical Phyßics may be done as follows :—Every Monday and Friday during TWO terms or
Tuesday and Thursday during TWO terms.                           '
                                           TIME TABLE OF LECTURES.

                                                                                                   FACULTY OF
                                                                                                                     CIVIL EN
                                                                                                            TIME TABLE
                                                                                                           Laboratory Practice ifl
HO  .
OH«
1
2
                                  SUBJECT.                                                     LENT TBBM.
M    «
«S?
Mgo                                                                          M.       Tu.          W.          Th.         F.
ta S K
 a a i«
«At»
40, 41                        FIRST YEAR.                                   11,2-5   12          11, 2-5      12         11,8-5
39           Chemistry I.                                                   10       10          io           10         10
3            Physics I. ..                                                  9        9,2^5                    2-5        9
55           Mathematics I.                                                 12       11           9           9          Í2
69           Descriptive Geometry                                                                             11
42,47        Engineering Design & Drawing I.                                                     12
             "Geology I.        ..      ..
             Mechauical Workshop       Practice
             (optional)

             SECOND YEAR.                                                            10, 2-5          12       10, 2-5    2-5
39                                                                           3-5
             ««"Physics II ..............................................            "                10     2-5
56           Engineering Construction                           j            12      2-6              11     9            10-1
60           Mechanical Engineering I.                                       10      9                9
             Engineer. Design & Drawing II.                                                           "l                  9
59                                                                           11
             Mathematics II. ..
3                                                                            9                                            2
             Chemistry ..              ;..
40
             Geology II.
43,48


     60      THIRD YEAR.                                                             '   12      10, 12      12,2-5
     57      Mechanical Engineering II. A. ..                               ¿5       10          2-5         10
             Materials and Structures A.                                    10, 12   2-5         9
     61                                                                                                      9
             Electrical Engineering I.                           j          9        9                                   10
     62      •Surveying I.
             Building Construction and Archi-
     63      tecture
     59      Engineer. Design & Drawing III.
                                                                                                                         9, 2-6



     57      FOURTH YEAR.                                                            11,9-11                 11,9-11
     58      Materials and Structures B                                     9-12
                                                                                                  elÍ2       12          9-12
                                                                                     12
     62      Civil Engineering A. and B.
     59      Surveying II.                                                  2^5
                                                                                     2^5                     ¿5          2I5
             Engineer. Design & Drawing IV.

          •Practical Surveying on-Saturday mornings.     Drawings to be eent in by December Ut.
                                     ••See note under Faculty of Arts.
                          FACULTY OF ENGINEERING—(CIUIL.)                                    .147

ENGINEERING
GHNEEMNG.
OF LECTUEES.
indicated by black type
                                                                    MICHAELMAS      ΓΒΕΙΜ
                                                                                    .
REFERENCE
NUMBBB TO
SYNOPSES.      M.         Tu.     W.       Th          F.     M.    Tu.      W.     Th.     F.

  40, 41        11               - 11                 11      11             11

       39      2-5         12               12        2-5     12             12
        3       10         10               10        10      10    10       10     10   10
       65        9                 io
                                  9, 2-5               9                      9     2-5
       69      2-5         9                9                       9, 2-5           9  11-1
  42, 47       12         11       12      11                 2-5   11              11   2-5
                                                      12

                                                      2-5
       39      2-5        10,2-            10,2-      2-6     2-5 10,2-             10,2- 2-3
                          6                5                        5                   5

       56 i     12                 12                  12,          1?               12     10-1
                                                      10-12
       60       10        2-5      10
       59       11        11-1     11      2-5                10    2-4      1 ..
                                                                              0     2^5
        3        9         9        9       9          9       9     9        9      9       9
       40                                                            4       12
   43. 48
       60



       57           10.3-         li-5      10        11-1
       61     10,12 5              10                 10
              2-5
       62                  9                9
       63                 12,2             12,2

       59     9,2-6                9       3-5 9,2-5
       57                                         -

       58     10-1         12     10-1      12                12             12             12
       62       9                  9                   9
       59      2-5        2-5             ¿1Ö 10-5 2-5 10-5                        10-5       2-5
                                      TïOr other nrantical work.
  ♦Practical Physics It. either on Monday and Friday or Tuesday and Thursday during any term.
14S                             TIME TABLE OF LECTURES.

                                                                              FACULTY OF
                                                                                          MINING AND
                                                                                       TIME TABLE
                                                                                   Laboratory Practice is
κo -
υ t. en                                                                      LBNT TER«.
"a"
K W P.                        SUBJECT.
hSX
H » >■                                                       M.       Tu.        W.       Th.     F.
«fc«
                           FIRST   YEAR.

40, 41      Chemistry I.                                     11,2-              11,2-5           11,2-5
 39         Physics I.              ..                       5        12                   12
  3         Mathematics I.                                    10      10         i¿        10     10
 55         Descriptive Geometry                               9                  9        2-5     9
 59         Engineering Design and Drawing I. ..                      9,2-5                 9
42,47       ••Geology I.                                     12        11        12        U      12
            Mechanical Workshop Practice (optional)
                         SECOND     YEAR.

 39     •••Physics II.—A                                     2-5      10,2-5              10,2-5 2-5
 56     Engineering Construction    ..                        12                 12
 60     -,
        Mechanical Engineering I. ...                         10                 10              10-1
 59     Engineering Design and Drawing II...                  11      2-5        11        2-5
44A,49A Mineralogy and Economic Geology I..                    9       9          9         9      9
 40 , Chemistry                                              2-5                                  2-5
  J
                          THIRD    YEAR.

  60        Mechanical Engineering II.—A.                              12                  12
  57        Materials and Structures—A                        2^5      10                  10
  61        Electrical Engineering          ..               10, 12    2-5      10, 12            10
            ^                                                                   2-5
  62        •Surveying I.          ..           ..                      9                   9
            j
  63        Building Construction
44B, 49B    Mineralogy and Economic Geology II.                                            ί-δ
  40        Practical Metallurgy and Assaying
  69        Engineering Design and Drawing III.                9                   9             9, 2-5
  64        Mining
                          FOURTH     YEAR.

  64        Mining                                             9        9          9        9      9
  62        Surveying III.
  65        Metallurgy                                        10                  10              io
  40        Practical Metallurgy and Assaying                11-5     1ÖU                 10-4   11-5
  59        Engineering Design and Drawing IV.                                  lui
          * Practical Surveying oa Saturdu y mornings. Drawings to be sen-t in by December 1st.
            ••See note under Faculty of Arta-       *** Lectures Optional in the Third Term.
           FACULTY OF ENGINEERING-(MiNiNa AND MBTALLUBOY).                                   149

ENGINEERING.
METALLURGY.
OF LECTUEES.
indicated by black type.
                            TK                                                         TEEM.
N OMBBB TO
STNOP8SS.                                                                                          1 .
                M.         Tu.     W.        Th.       F.       M.     Tu.       W.    Th.         F.
  40, 41        11                 11                  11        Il             Il                 ¡

    39         2-5         12 .               12     2-5        12               12
     3          10         10      10         10      10        10         10    10     10         ; io
    55           9                9, 2-5               9                          9    2-5
    59         2-5          9                  9                       9, 2-5            9         . 11-1
  42,47         12         11      12         11      12       2I5         11           11         2I5
                                                      2-5
    39         2-5      10,2-               10,2- 2-5           2-5 10,2-              10.2-
                        5                   5                          6                   5
                12                 12                 1Ü,               12              12                  01
                                                                                                           1_
    56     i
                                                     10-12                                         ;
    60          10         2-5     10                                                              I
    59          11      11-1       11        ¿-                 10     2-4       10    2-5
44A, 49A         9          9       9         9         9        9      9         9     9              9
    40                                       5                          4        12

    60                                        '
    57                     10     2-5         10
    61     {   2-5      \         10                   10
               10, 12
    62     {                9                  9                        H              10-1
                                                                       10-1
    63                  12, 2               12, 2
44B, 49B                11,2-                11               9-il                                 .9-11
    40                  5                                      11-5                                11-5
    59           9                  9        3-5 9, 2-5
    64                                                                     9             9
    64           9          9      9           9        9        9               9                     9

    62                                                          11              11
    65          10                10                  10        10              10                 10
    40         11-5     10-4                10-4     11-5     10-4     2,              2,10- 10-4
    59                            12^1                          ..     ÍÓ-4     12-1       4
                                         ^I Or other practical work.

                                      s
♦♦•Practical Physics II. either on Monday and Friday or Tuesday and Thursday during any term.
150                               TIME TABLE OF LECTURES.

                                                                                     FACULTY OF
                                                                                       MECHANICAL AND
                                                                                       TIME TABLE OF
                                                                                         Laboratory practice i»


                                 SUBJECT.                             Mon.     Tuea.    Wed.    Thur.   Fri.


                                                                      11,2-     12      11,2-    12     11, 2-5
                             FIRST YEAR.                              5                 5
          Chemistry I.
          Physics I...
          Mathematics I. ..                                            10       10       10      10      10
          Descriptive Geometry                                          9      9,2-5      9     2-5       9
          Engineering Design and Drawing I.                                                     9
          ¡I Mechanical Workshop Practice

                                                                      2-5 10,2-                 10,2- 2-6
                           SECOND YEAR.                                        5                    5
           s
          * *PhysioaII ............................................
          Engineering Construction                    ..               12                12
                                                                       10                10             10-1
          j                                                            11       2-5      11     2-5
          Mechanical Engineering I. t ..                                9        9        9      9        9
          Engineering Design and Drawing II.
          Mathematics II.
          Chemistry                                                    11      12,2-     11      12      11
                                                                               5

                             THIRD YEAR.
                                                                                10       2-5     10
          Mechanical Engineering II.—A & B.                           10, 12     9      10,32   2-5      10
                                                                                                ■;9
          Materials and Structures A   ..                             2-5
          Electrical Engineering II.
                                                                        9                9              9, 2-5
          •Surveying I.
          Engineering Design and Drawing III                          9-11      10      12-5    10

                         FOURTH YEAR.                  11               11     2-5 11,9-
          Mechanical Engineering III. ..               2-5 11,2-                11    5
          Electrical Engineering II.                           5                12
          Engineering Design and Drawing IV.                   12
          Civil Engineering
          Econemice of Engineering
      » Practical Surreying on Saturday inoniinge. Drawings to be sent in by December let.
                                   ¡I Saturday mornings additional.
     FACULTY OF ENGINEERING—(MBCHANICAL AND ELECTBIOAL).                                          151

ENGINEERING.
ELECTRICAL.
LECTUEES.
indicated by black type·
                               ΤΒΙΝΙΤΓ TSBM.                          MlCHAELHAS TBBH.
RBPBBSNCB
NUMBER, OF
37ΝΟΡΒΒ8.       Mon.     Tu.       Wed.     Th.      Fri.     Mon.   Tu.       Wed.   Th.       Fri.

 40, 41              Π              11                11       11               11


   39            2-5      12                 12       2-5      12               12
    3            10       10        10       10       10 .     10     10        10       10      10
   55             9                9, 2-5              9                         9       2-5
   59            2-5       9                   9      ¿!δ      ¿!δ   9, 2-6               9     11-1
                 I
                                                                                                2-6

   39           2-5      10,2-5             10,2-5    2-5      2-6   10, 2-5          10, 2-5   2-6


                 12                 12                12,             12                 12     10-1
   56       J                                        10-12
   €0            10       2-5       10
   59            11      11-1       U        2^5               10     2-4       10       2-5
    3             9        9         9        9        9        9      9         9        9       9
   40                      .                                           4        12

   60           11,2-5 12,2-5       11       12



   57                     10                 10      11-1
   61       { 10, 12               ηο,                10
                                   2-5
   62                      9                   9'
   59                θ               9      2-5      9, 2-5

                                                                                      flO
   60           9-11      10       12-5      10                                       \ll-5     10
   61            11                 11      12,2-5   11,9-5   10,    10,        10       ,θ
   59            2-5     11,2-5              11               11-5   11-5      11-5             11-5
   58
   61A                                                          9      9         9

                                    TOr other practical work.
•♦Practical Physics II. either on Monday and Friday or Tuesday and Thursday during two terms.
152                          TIME TABLE OF LECTURES.



                                                                        FACULTY OF
                                                                                TIME TABLE
                                                             Laboratory and other practical work i»
SC     .
Kg.«
                                                                      LENT TEEM   .
g§2
"oS
«bb<
                           SUBJECT.
                                                      Mon.      Toes.    Wed.     Thur.     Fri.
«θ1»
                         FlRBT YEAR
           Botany                                       9                  9                  9
           Chemistry                                             io       10          io
           Zoology                                     12                 12
                                                                 12                   12
           Anatomy I.
           Practical Botany                           2-4        2-                   2-4
           ♦Practical Zoology
           Practical Chemistry .
           Physics
           Dissections         ..
           ".
                       aecoND YEAR
           Stable Management, etc.                                         9                  9
           Physiology                                 iô                  10                 10
           Anatomy II.      ..                                   io       12                 12
           Anatomy III.                                                               10
                                                       12
           Practical Histology    ..
           Experimental Physiology                    2-5
           Physiological Chemistry                                                2-5
           Dissections                                          lt-5      2-5     li-1      2-5
                        THIRD YEAR
           Pharmacology ..                                        9                    9
           Hygiene and Dietetics                                                             ,,
           Materia Medica                                                   9                    9
             Pathology                                 1!        1)                   11
           Bacteriology     ..
           Agricultural Botany .                                          11                 11
           . Pharmacy
           Horse-shoeing ..
                                                                          2^4                2-4
                       FOURTH YEAR
           Surgery                                      9         9         9          9     9
           Obstetrics
           Clinical Instruction                       10-12 10-12        10-12 10-12        10-12
           Medicine                                    12    12           12    12           12
           Parasitology                                                   2 T4
           Meat Inspection
           Operative Surgery                            2 .       2                    2      2
                            * Practical Zoology, Saturdays    9.30 to 12.
                      FACULTY OF VETERINARY SCIENCE.                                          153


VETERINARY SCIENCE.
OF LECTURES.
indicated in black type.
  E4 O

  H*g                      TRINITY TERM.                          MICHÍEUIAS TERM.

             Mon.     Tues.     Wed.       Thur.   Fit    Mon.    Tues.   Wed.      Thur.         Fri.
 tffce!
                                                            9               9

                       ió       10
                                9          10
                                                          2-5     ηό                 ηό            ió
               9                 2-4                 9             12                12       ¿•5
                                           12                     2-4                2-4
                       12       11-1
                                           2-5
             2-4                                   2-4
                       2-5
                                                          10-1            10-1              11-1

              ió       ió        ió         ηό     ió      ió      ió      ió        ió       ió
              12       2-5       12                        12              12         9            12
                                                           9               9                        9
                                                     12             9
                                                                                                  2-5

             2-5      11-1      2-5        11-5    "2-5   2-5      2-5
                                                                  11-1    2-5       11-5
                                                                                              0
                           9      9          9       9                      9
                                                                                                        9


                                                                   11     11                       11
                       11                   11            ii      2-4     2-4                     2-4
                                                          2-4                        11
              11       2-4       il        2-4      11

                                                                                     2-4
               9           9      9          9       9      9       9       9          9            9
             2-4                2-4                2-4

            10-12     10-12     10-12      10-12 10-12    10-12   10-12   10-12 10-12       10-12
             12        12        12         12    12       12      12      12    12            12
                                 2-4

               2           2                 2       2      2       2           2     2             2
154                            TIME TABLE OF LECTURES.




                                                                           FACULTY OF
                                                                                   TIME TABLE
                                                                Time not allotted to Lectures
«O     .
D H 1»                      SUBJECT.                                      LENT TERM.
HSfe
fc g f* '                                                    Mon. Tues.      Wed.      Thur.   Fri.
                                                                             η
■   η-

            FIRST YEAR.                                      9,2-5    2      2^5         .     2^5
            Elements of Architecture                                 3-5
            Architectural Drawing
            Descriptive Geometry
            Drawing
            Graphics          ..                 ...

            SECOND YEAR.                                     9^11    io      9^-Íl     9-12     11
            Design                                           12              2-5       12
            Drawing                                          11      2^5     11        2-5
            History of Architecture I. ..
            Construction     ..        ..       ..
            j
            Materials and Structures

            THIRD YEAR.                                       4      10       £-1      11-1     ii
            Design                                           2-4.    9                 2-5
            Drawing             ..         ..          ...                    2-5      10
            History of Architecture II. ..                                             9
            Construction     ..        ..       ..
            j
            Materials and Structures
            •Surveying
            Hygiene             ..         ..


          * Practical Surveying Saturday Mornings. ,
NOTE.—The Studios'are open from 9-5, Saturday 9.30-12.       Time not allotted to
Lectures will be devoted to work in the Studios and Library.
                              FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE.                               L55




ARCHITECTURE.
OF LECTURES.
will be devoted to Studio Work.
 WO
 g*S                    TRINiTr TERM.                          MICHAELMAS TERM.
 B«S
 HES
             Mon.     Tues.    Wed.   Thur.   Fri.   Mon.    Tues.   Wed.   Thur.   Fri.
 sis
 ¢4¾"!
             9,2-5      2       ¿-5           .¿-β   9,2-5    2      2-5            2-5
                       3-5                                   3-5     9




             9-Il 1    10                      11     9^1                           11
                                                              ió

  •{
              12       ¿5      9-11   9-12                           9-1     9-1
              11               2-5    12                             2-5
                                      2-5
                               ii
               4                               11     ZA
              2-4                                                                    ii

         Î   8.30     10
                        9
                               9-1    li-1
                                      2-5
                                              8.30                   9^-1
                                                                     2-5
                                                                             9-1           •
                      8.30     2-5    10
                               8.30   9
                                      8.30
156                                    TIME TABLE OF LECTURES

                                     EVENING LECTURES.
                        FACULTIES OF ARTS AKD ECONOMICS.
                                                     TIME TABLE.
"     O       rA                                                                                         ce           h«
                                                                               >.         >.




                                                                                                 day.
B K* ?                                                                          a
                                                                               -tí        ci     eo
                                                                                                 C       Ό            et
                                                                                         ■tí
a i                                    SUBJECT.                                a
                                                                               O         S
                                                                                                 ΋
                                                                                                 θ       ε            |tí

gas                                                                                       EJ
                                                                                         E-I
                                                                                                 i*      H

    40             Chemistry I (1922) ................................                    6               6-

    39             Physics I. (1920)                 .......................              6
42,47              Geology I. (1921)                 .......................                              6      6,
      8            Economics I.      ..                                         6                   6

      1            Latin I...                                                   7          7
      3            Mathematics I.                                               5                   5
                                                                                                         "Ι
                                                                                                          δ
      2            English I...........................                                   8         8     8
      2            French I.                                                    8         6      6&8
      8            Accountancy IA.                                                      6&7                  S
      8            Business Principles                                          8                   8
      8            Commercial and Industrial Law                                8        .t
      8            Insurance Mathematics I.                                     7                   y
      8            Insurance Mathematics 11. ..                                 6                   8
      4            Philosophy I. ..                                                        7        5        7
      6            History I. and II.                                                      ó        7        6        6·

      4            Philosophy II. and III.                                                   7      5        7
      5            Education                                                   5                    5        5
      1            Latin II. and III.                                         5,8          8        8        8
      3            Mathematics II.                                             6                    6                 6
      2            English II. and III .....................................                 6      6        9
      2            French II. and III ...................................... 7 & 9           9      7
      3            Mathematics III.                                                          S      5                  5
      8            Economics II. and III.                                                           7                  Γ
      8            Banking                                                     8.  h                8                 ».
      8            Technology of Commercial Products                           8                    6
      8            Economics of Transport
      8            Commercial Geography                                                      6                         5
      8            Statistics            ..        ...                                                  6.30-8
      8            Economic History                                            6             6                         6
      8            Municipal Administration                                    6                    6                  6
      8            Public Administration                                       6                    6                  6




                                                                                       t Practical—Two terme.
          8        History of Economic Thought                                     5        6              5
                                I Section (a)                                      6        6
                   Japanese < Section (b)                                                   6
                   . . . .
                                              c
                   ( Section (c)                ..
                    • Practical—Three termB.
                  REGULATIONS.
 REGULATIONS PASSED BY THE PROFESSORIAL"
BOARD.
IT shall be the duty of the Chairman of the Proctorial Board
to exercise a general supervision over the discipline of the
University.
     Every fine shall be paid to the Registrar within forty-
eight hours from the time of its imposition. If not so paid,
the fine shall be doubled ; and if the double fine be not paid
within one week from the time when the originar fine was
imposed, the Registrar shall report the fact to the Profes-
sorial Board, in order that suitable means may be taken
against the offender for his contumacy.
      The Dean of each Faculty shall call upon every student
in his Faculty who shall have absented himself for more
than ten per cent, of any prescribed course of lectures in
any one term to show sufficient cause for such abeenee.
The Dean shall at his discretion either decide that the cause
shown is sufficient, or submit the matter to the Professorial
Board for decision. Such students as fail to show sufficient
cause for such absence are, under Section 2 of Chapter XIII
of the By-laws, excluded from admission to the Yearly
Examinations.
     No excuse for absence from lectures shall be received
from any undergraduate unless tendered in writing to the
Registrar within one week after he resumes attendance.
Every written excus«.· for absence from lectures in any Faculty
shall be submitted to the Dean of that Faculty, who may
at once decide that such excuse shall be accepted, or in cases
of doubt may call a meeting of the Professorial Board to
adjudicate thereon.
     Matriculated students who have lost their places in their
own proper year, either by non-attendance at the prescribed
course of lectures or by failing to pass the required exami-
nations, are not allowed to compete for honours, scholarships,
or prizes at subsequent Yearly, Professional, or Degree
Examinations unless by express permissi©n of the Profes-
sorial Board.
158                       REGULATIONS.

     No verbal information regarding the result of an exami-
nation shall be given by any Professor, Lecturer, or other
officer of the University. Answers to enquiries of such a
nature shall be put in writing and forwarded to the Registrar,
who shall advise the student accordingly.
     No class or final examination shall be held during lecture
or laboratory hours by any member of the Teaching Staff,
unless permission to hold such examinations has been pre-
viously granted by the Warden and due notice sent to other
members of the Teaching Staff concerned.
     No scientific excursions (Botanical, Zoological, Geological
or the like) shall be arranged to take place during lecture or
laboratory hours, unless approval has been previously granted
by the Warden and due notice sent to members of the
Teaching Staff concerned.

      REGULATIONS FOR RECOGNITION OP                CLASSES        AT
                THE TECHNICAL COLLEGE.
      1. That students of the Technical College who have
passed the Matriculation Examination, and who have attended
at the Technical College the courses of instruction approved
by the Professorial Board in the following subjects as required
for the First Year in the Department of Engineering, viz. :
           Mathematics,
           Physics,
           Chemistry,
Descriptive Geometry,
Engineering Design,
Geology,
be admitted to the First Year Examination in Engineering.
      2. That students of the Technical College who have
passed, the Matriculation Examination and have attended at
the Technical College courses of instruction approved by the
Professorial Board in any of the following subjects, as required
for the First Year in the Faculty of Medicine and the first
courses in the Faculties of Arts and Science, viz. :
           Mathematics,
           Physics,
                        REGULATIONS,                              159

Chemistry,
Botany,
Zoology,
Geology,
be admitted to the First Year Examination in those subjects.
      3. Before approval of the courses of instruction the Pro-
fessorial Board shall receive a report from the Professors in
the several subjects upon the adequacy of the courses of
instruction provided and the sufficiency of the equipment.
      i. Before admission to the University Examination in
any subject each student shall present a certificate from the
Superintendent of the Technical College of satisfactory attend-
ance and progress at the appropriate courses of instruction
and of good conduct.
      5. Provided that no student shall be admitted to the
Degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bach;.lor of Science unless he
is a matriculated student of nine terms' standing, or to the
Degree of Bachelor of Engineering unless he is a matriculated
student of twelve terms' standing.


     REGULATIONS       OF    THE    FACULTY      OF    MEDICINE.
     i. No student in the Faculty of Medicine who has not
been specially exempted shall receive a certificate of attend-
ance upon any course of instruction who shall not have been
present at sixty percent, at least of the meetings of the class.
1. A.—Students proceeding to a Degree in Medicine who have
        attended courses of instruction and passed (before or
        after matriculation) University Examinatons, or their,
        equivalent, in Botany or Chemistry or Physics or
        Zoology, may be exempted from such part of the
        regular course of instruction and examination in these
        subjects as the Faculty shall from time to time approve.
2. A.—First Degree Examination.
     There will be separate examinations in Physics I. ;
        Chemistry I. (Inorganic Chemistry) ; Chemistry 1.
        (Organic Chemistry) ; Botany I. and Zoology I.
160                     REGULATIONS.

     Candidates may be admitted to examination in one or
       more of these subjects after having attended the neces-
       sary course or courses of instruction.
    A candidate who has passed in Physics L, Chemistry I.
       (Inorganic and Organic), Botany I., or Zoology I. will
       not be liable to re-examination in the subject or
       subjects in which he has passed.
     Candidates may not proceed to the courses of instruction
       in the Second Year until they have passed in all the
       subjects of the First Degree Examination.
     There will be an examination in Chemistry I. (Inorganic
        Chemistry), and in Physics IA in August ; the exami-
        nations in the other subjects will be held in December.
     AU Deferred Examinations will be held in March.
  No student shall be entitled to obtain a Distinction or
  Scholarship unless he complete the whole examination
  in December.
  B.—Second Degree Examination in Anatomy and Physiology
  at the end of Trinity Term, Second Year.
     Students who fail in this examination may be allowed to
       present themselves for re-examination in the following
       March.
  C.—Fourth Degree Examination in Pathology, Surgical Ana-
     tomy and Operative Surgery, and Materia Medica and
     Therapeutics at the end of Trinity Term of the Fourth
     Year.
     Students who fail in this examination may be allowed to
     present themselves for re-examination in the following
     March.
  T).—Final Examination.
     Students who fail in the Final Examination at the be-
       ginning of Lent Term after the completion of the Fifth
       Year may be allowed to present themselves for re-
       examination at the end of Trinity Term following.
  E.—Students who have failed to pass any of the prescribed
       examinations shall before again presenting themselves
       for examination attend again the courses of instruction
                          REGULATIONS.                              161

in which they have failed unless they receive exemption
at· the discretion of the Boards of Examiners.        For
such reattendance half fees shall be charged.
S. That the following Boards of Studies be established :—
(a) A Board of Studies in Medicine, to include the Lec-
turers in Medicine and Clinical Medicine, one Hon.
Physician nominated by the Medical Board of each
Hospital, and the Tutor in Medicine.
(6) A Board of Studies in Surgery, to include the Lec-
turers in Surgery and Clinical Surgery, one Hon. Sur-
geon nominated by the Medical Board of each Hos-
pital, and the Tutor in Surgery,
(c) A Board of Studies in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, to
include the Lecturers in Obstetrics and Gynaecology,
one Hon. Gynaecological Surgeon nominated by the
Medical Board of each Hospital, and- the Tutor in
Obstetrics.
These Boards of Studies shall meet once in each term to
discuss all matters relating to instruction in their several sub-
jects and generally to co-ordinate the teaching.       The Tutors in
the several subjects shall act as secretaries of the Boards and
shall be responsible for summoning the meetings of the Boards.
            REGISTRATION    OF   MEDICAL GRADUATES.
      The New South Wales Medical Board meets at 3 p.m. on
the second Wednesday in each month at the Board Room, 7
Richmond Terrace, Domain. Graduates who desire to be
registered should attend personally at that time, and present
their diplomas with a signed photograph.
      Registration in Queensland.—Graduates who wish to be
registered in Queensland should attend personally and present
their diplomas at a meeting of the Medical Board. The
Board meets on the second Thursday in the month at 3.30
p.m. at No. 11 Fitzroy Buildings, Adelaide Street, Brisbane.
     REGULATIONS FOR DIPLOMA IN PUBLIC HEALTH.
     1. Part I. of the Examination having reference to the
GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF SANITARY SCIENCE will comprise the
subjects set forth in the following schedule, viz.
:—The
                                                           o

                                                               ç>
162                               REGULATIONS.

elements of chemistry and physics : methods of chemical
analysis, and in particular the analysis of air and water. The
laws of heat and the elements of pneumatics, hydrostatics, and.
hydraulics, in their application to warming, ventilation, water-
supply and drainage. The geological and other conditions
determining the healthiness of sites for dwellings. Sources,
storage, and purification of water-supply. The elements of
meteorology in relation to health. Principles of. building-
construction in their application to dwellings, hospitals and.
schools. The disposal of sewage and refuse, and the general
principles of sanitary engineering. Disinfectants, their chem-
istry and use. The chemical and microscopical examination
of foods, and the detection of the commoner forms of con-
tamination. The methods of bacteriological investigation
and analysis. The chemistry and bacteriology of air, water,
food and soil. The general pathology of infection and of the
diseases of animals that are transmissible to man.
      2. Part II. of the Examination having reference to STATE
MEDICINE AND THE APPLICATIONS OF PATHOLOGY AND SANI-
TARY SCIENCE TO PUBLIC HEALTH will comprise the subjects
set forth in the following schedule, viz. :—The law and statutes
of New South Wales* relating to public health, and the
by-laws and regulations made thereunder. The model by-
laws of the Board of Health of New South Wales*. Sanita-
tion of dwellings, schools, factories and workshops, and of
villages and towns. Inspection of premises liable to inspec-
tion under statute. Inspection of meat and other articles ofr
food. General epidemiology, with special reference to the
origin, pathology, symptoms, propagation, geographical dis-
tribution and prevention of the epidemic, endemic, and other
infective diseases. The methods applicable to the investiga-
tion of epidemics. Effects on health of overcrowding, vitiated
air, impure water, polluted soils, and bad or insufficient food.
Unwholesome trades and occupations, and the diseases to
which they give rise. Nuisances injurious or dangerous to
health. The effects on health of season and climate. The
principles and methods of vital statistics in relation to public
health.
     »In the case of candidates from the United Kingdom, other States of the Common-
wealth, or New Zealand, a knowledge of the corresponding statutes, by-laws, and
regulations may be substituted, if the candidat« so request at the time "of making
application fur leave to present himself for examination.



      O
                        REGULATIONS.                            163

      3. The foregoing schedules are not to be understood as
limiting the scope of the Examination, which may include
every branch of Sanitary Science, including Tropical Hygiene.
No candidate will be approved by the Examiners who does
not show a distinctly high proficiency in all the branches of
study, scientific and practical, which bear upon the duties
of a Medical Officer of Health.
      Regulations about diseases of animals transmissible to
 man.


          REGULATIONS FOR DIPLOiIA IN EDUCATION.
A..—Lecture and Demonstration Courses—■'
   Course 1.—Outlines of Psychology, with special reference
        to the mental life of children. (Education I. A. and
        I. B. at Teachers' College, or Philosophy I. at the
        University).
   Course 2.—(a) The Principles of Education,
                 (δ) History of Education,
                 (c) Organisation and Administration of Edu-
                 cation.
   Course 3.—Principles of Teaching—
                 (a) General Method.
                 (b) Special Method,
    Course 4.—The Physical Life of School Children.
                     B.—Practice in Teaching.
      1. CONTINUOUS PEACTICE.—In order to gain experience
 in ordinary school work each student will be required tc
 teach for a continuous period or periods in an ordinary school.
 The amount of time will vary according to the previous
 experience of the student, but will not, except in special
 oircumstances, be less than 180 hours. For this work the
 student will be attached to an approved school, the principal
 of which will forward periodical reports on the work of the
 student. The student's work will also be under the super-
 vision and direction of the Professor of Education.
 164                          REGULATIONS.

       2. OBSERVATION, DEMONSTRATION AND CRiTicis»r
 LESSONS.—This course will occupy 180 hours during one
 year, and will embrace the following :—(a) Courses of weekly
 lessons throughout three terms ; (b) a course of demonstration
 lessons and discussions of two hours per week for three terms.


     DEGREE OF MASTER OF ECONOMICS (M.Ec).
 1. Candidates for the Degree of Master of Economics will
 be required to submit themselves to examination on—
           (a) the general history and literature of Economics,
                including Economic History ;
           (b) a portion of theoretical or applied economics (in-
                cluding Industrial Law, Problems of Accountancy
                and Business. Administration, Public Administra-
                tion), or Economic History, selected for intensive
                study and research. The choice of the field for
                such study must be approved by the Professor of
                Economics.
    • 2. Candidates will also be required to carry out an
original research on some economic subject, and to present
the result in a thesis. The choice of subject must be approved
by the Professor of Economics.
       3. Candidates for the Degree of Master of Economics who
are or hav3 been candidates for the Degree of Master of Arts in
the School of Logic, Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy,
■will be required to submit themselves for examination and to
present a thesis on subjects other than those taken for the
DegTee of Master of Arts, and conversely. Such subject»
must be approved by the Professor.



  REGULATIONS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF
  ENGINEERING.
      Honours at Graduation in any of the three branches of
Engineering shall be awarded only to students who have
gained distinction in not less than two of the subjects specified
for the fourth, year in the respective branches.
                        REGULATIONS.                           165-

     REGULATIONS FOR RESEARCH STUDENTS IN THE
              SCIENTIFIC, LABORATORIES.
     1. Research students may be admitted to the University
laboratories from year to year on the recommendation of the·
head of the department in which they propose to work.
     2. A research student in any University laboratory shall,
be under the control of the head of the department as regards
the use of the laboratory apparatus and materials. The
Professor, as director of the laboratory, shall have the right
to make himself acquainted with the character and progress
of the work done ■ by any research student working in his-
laboratory.
     3. Research students may work in the University labora-
tories during laboratory hours in Term time, and at such
other times as may be arranged by the Professor in charge.
     4. Each research student shall pay to the University a
fee oi five guineas per term for the expense of material, etc. :
such fee to be paid to the credit of the maintenance vote of
the department. AU expensive apparatus or material re-
quired for special investigations shall be purchased by the
research student.
        The Professor in charge shall be the sole judge of what
             apparatus and material should be provided by the
             University or purchased by the student.
         The University should be provided with printed copies
             of     all    scientific    papers     published    by
             research.


  REGULATIONS FOR THE USE OF MICROSCOPES.
In the Practical Courses of Biology, Physiology, Path-
ology and Bacteriology students may use the microscopes
provided by the University, for the use of which a charge is
made. But they are strongly recommended to purchase for
themselves microscopes of an approved pattern, and to use
them throughout their course. A microscope suitable for
bacteriological work and for.the proper clinical examination
of the blood, and which must also include an oil immersion
lens, is now an essential part of the equipment of every
166                       REGULATIONS.

medical man. It is, moreover, a great advantage for the
student to use his own microscope during his undergraduate
course, as he thus becomes familiar with its working, and is
in à better position to profit by its use in after years. With
the exercise of a little care the efficiency of a good microscope
will not thejeby be impaired.
      The student is particularly warned against the purchase
of an inferior type of microscope which will not be approved
by the Professors, and it is hardly necessary to point out
that not every microscope made by well-known firms
is of a type that can be approved. Students are, therefore,
advised to consult the Professors before making any purchase.
      For Practical Pathology and Bacteriology a ^-inch oil-
immersion objective is also required, and costs about £6.
      The microscope and its accessories should be selected not
not only with a νίβιν to the immediate requirements of the
student, but also with regard to his future work. Since for
practitioners of Medicine microscopic work consists mainly in
the examination of bacteria and of the blood, students will
find it advantageous to purchase from the beginning a triple
instead of a double nose-piece, and to see that the ordinary
high-power objective is adapted for the counting of blood-cells
in a Thoma-Zeiss chamber.
           DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY.
     oStudeDts may use their own microscopes· in the demon-
strations on Pe tro log y, provided they are of an approved
pattern. Students who wish to obtain a microscope suitable
for both Biology and Geology should purchase a petrological
and not simply a biological stand. Advice will always be
willingly giver to any students desiring to purchase a micro-
scope.
LECTURE SUBJECTS FOR 1920-2F
                         LECTURES.       .
THE following regulations have been passed by the Senate :—
                   NON-MATRICULATED            STUDENTS.
     It shall be open to any non-matriculated student, who-
has attended the full courses of lectures upon any subject,
to compete for Honours or Pass in the regular examinations
upon his subject, and to have his name published and recorded,
in the regular class lists, with a distinguishing mark ; but
he shall be incapable of holding any scholarship or receiving"
any prize of those already established for students proceeding
to a Degree.
      Each such student shall be entitled to receive a certificate
of attendance upon the lectures or laboratory practice in the
subjects which he has selected, and proficiency therein, as-
ascertained by the regular and ordinary examinations within
the University.
      The above regulations do not apply to the lectures and.
examinations in the Faculty of Medicine or in the Faculty
of Dentistry.

     The following regulation has been adopted by the Faculty
of Science :—" There shall be only one standard for Honours
in Scientific subjects, viz., that adopted in the Faculty of
Science."
    N.B.-—The numbers refer to the Time Tables of Lectures on pages 134-15(¾.

        FACULTY OF ARTS.—B.A. DEGREE.
          1.—CLASSICS—LATIN AND GREEK.
    Professor Butler, Professor Woodliouse, Acting-Professor Todd,
                               Mr. A. B. Powe.
Subjects selected for Lectures and Examinations :—
 LATIN—1920.
 First Year, Pass.—Livy XXVII. ; Virgil, ^Eneid, VIL.
 and VIII.
168                     LECTURE SUBJECTS.

      Distillation.—Cicero, de Oratore, I. ; Virgil, iEneid, IX.,
X... XI., XII. Roman History to the tribunate of Ti. Gracchus.
      Second Year, Pass.—Tacitus, Histories, III. ; Pliny,
Selected Letters (Merrill) ; Juvenal (Selections).
      Distinction.—Cicero, Philippics I., IL, III., V., and
VII. ; Terence, Andria ; Catullus (Selections).
      Pass and Distinction.—Roman History from the tribu-
nate of Ti. Gracchus to the battle of Actium.
      Third Year, Pass.—As Second Year, with Terence,
Andria : Catullus (Selections). Roman History from the
battle of Actiuui to the death of Marcus Aurelius.
      Honours.—Tacitus, Histories, TV. and V. ; »Martial
{Selections), Ovid, Metamorphoses (Selections) ; Latin
Literature.
                            LATIN—192 J.
      First Year, Pass.—Cicero, Fourth Verrine ; Virgil,
-ÍSneid I. and II.
      Distinction.—Cicero, InCatilinam L, II., III., IV. ; Sallust,
Catiline; Virgil, ¿Sneid, III., IV., V., VI. Roman History to
the tribunate of Ti. Gracchus.
      Second Year, Pass.—Tacitus, Annals III. ; Martial,
Selections (Vol. L, Bridge and Lake, Oxford) ; Horace, Satires
(Selections).
      Distinction.—Cicero, Select Letters (Watson), Parts IV.
.and V. ; Plautus, Captivi and Trinummus.
      Pass and Distinction.—Roman History from the tribu-
nate of Ti. Gracchus to the battle of Actium.
      Third Year, Pass.—As Second Year Pass, with Plautus,
Captivi and Trinummus ; Roman History from the battle of
Actium to the death of Marcus Aurelius.
Honours.—Tacitus, Annals I. and II. ; Lucretius (Selec-
tions) ; Ovid, Fasti ; Latin Literature.
GREEK—1920.
      First Year, Pass.—Lysias, Select Orations (ed. E. S.
Shuckburgh, Macm.) ; Homer, Iliad—selections from ed. by
Leaf and Bayfield, vol. ii. (Macm.) Unseen Translation.
   , Additional for Distinction.—Greek Prose Composition.
Unseen Translation. Thucydides, Book IV. (ed. T. R. Mills,
Ciar. Press), with history of the period ; Sophokles, Philok-
tetes (ed.°Jebb, large ed. Cambr. Press).
                                     CLASSICS.                                      16$

     "Second Year, Pass.—Sophokles, Œdipus Coloneus (ed
Jebb) ; Euripides,Orestes (ed. N. Wedd, Pitt Press) ; Xeno-
phon, Historia Graeca (ed.°E. C. Marchant, in Oxf. Class Texts)·
- -from III. 3.1 to VT. 4.26, and history of the period. Unseen
Translation.                               0
      Additional for Distinction.—Prose Composition. Unseen
Translation. Demosthenes, De Corona (ed. B. Drake, Macm.}
Plutarch's Lives of the Gracchi (ed. H. A. Holden, Cambr.
Univ. Press).
      Third Year, Pass.—As Second Year Pass.
      Additional for Third Year, Distinction and Honours.—
Unseen Translation. Prose Composition. Theocritus, selec-
tions—(ed. R. J. Cholmeley, G. Bell ώ Sons) ; Herodotus,.
Book VIII. (ed. E. S. Shuckburgh, Pitt Press).
                                   GREEK—1921.
     Creek I.—Herodotus, Book VIII. ; Sophokles, Œdipus
at Colonu.* ; Greek History to the .death of Demosthenes r.
Urseen Translation.
     Additional for Distinction.—Thucydides, Book II. ;
Sophokles, Œdipus Rex. ; Greek Composition.
     Greek II.—Aristotle, Ethics, Books I. and II. ; Euripides,
Orestes ; Aristophanes, Frogs ; Urseen Translation.
     Additional for Distinction.—iEschylus, Agamemnon;
Euripides, Medea ; Greek Composition.
     Greek III.—As Greek IL, Pass, with .¿Eschylus, Agamem-
non, and Euripides. Medea.
     Additional for Honours.—Aristotle, Ethics (the whole)7
Greek Composition ; General Paper.
                                  CLASSICS.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED*—
   Lewie and Short's Latin Dictionary (Clarendon Press).
   Roby's Latin Grammar (Macmillan).
   Gildersleeve and Lodge's Latin Grammar.
   Liddell and Scott's Greek Lexicon.
   Goodwin's or Hadley and Allen's Greek Grammar.
   Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, by Victor Henry, trans-
               lated by R. T. Elliott ; or Giles' Manual of Comparatrre-
               Philology for Classical Students (Macmillan).
   Rutherford's First Greek Grammar.
    •Student* are strongly recommended to order ae early u possible &11 books tliat wül'
be needed in the course of the year.
170                        LECTUBE SUBJECTS.

     Thompson, Syntax of Attic Greek.                                      '
     Goodwin, Greek Moods and Tenses.
     Companion to Latin Studies, Sandys (Cambridge).
.ANCIENT HISTORY—                               J

     Mommsen's History of Rome, translated by Dickson (Bentley).
     Mommsen, The Provinces under the Roman Empire.
     Greenidge's Roman Public Life.
     Greenidge's History of Rome (Methuen).
     T. M. Taylor, Constitutional and Political History of Rome.
     PeLham's Outlines of Roman History.
     Bury's Student's Roman Empire (Murray).
     Strachan-Davidson, Cicero.      Warde Fowler, Julius Caesar.
     Grote's History of Greece.
     Greenidge, A. H. J., Handbook of Greek Constitutional History
                   (Macmillan).
      Bury's History of Greece (Macmillan).
      G. L. Dickinson, The Greek View of Life (Methuen).
     A. Holm's History of Greece, trans, in 4 vols. (Macmillan).
      Friedlaender, Roman Life and Manners, trans, in 3 vols. (Routledge).
      G. Ferrero, Greatness and Decline of Rome, 5 vols. (Heinemann).
      Warde Fowler, Social Life at Rome in the age of Cicero (Macmillan).
      Dill, Roman Society from Nero to Marcus Aurelius (Macmillan).
      Heitland, the Roman Republic, 3 vols.
.ANCIENT ATLAS—
     Atlas Antiquus, Kiepert (Berlin).
      Murray's Small Classical Atlas, ed. Grundy.
Murray's Handy Classical Maps, ed. Grundy (each separate) and distinct
from the maps in the Atlas).
•GREEK AND ROMAN LITERATURE—
     Teuffel's History of Roman Literature, translated by Warre (Bell).
     History of Roman Literature, Cruttwell.
     Roman Poets of the Republic, Sellar.
     Roman Poets of the Augustan Age, SMar.
     Virgil, Sellar.
     Mackail's Latin Literature.
     Id. Lectures on Greek Poetry.
     History of Ancient Greek Literature, Mahaffy.
     Bury, Lectures on the Greek Historians.
     Butler, Post-Augustan Poetry from Seneca to Juvenal.
".PASS STUDENTS :           Editions of Latin Authors.
     Cicero, 2nd Philippic, J. E. B. Mayor (Macmillan), or Peskett (Cam-
                  bridge) ; pro Milone, Meid (Cambridge), or Colson (Mac-
                  millan) ; pro Sestio, Bälden (Macmillan) ; pro Murena,
                  Heitland (Cambridge) ; in Catilinam, Wilkins (Macmillan) ;
                  pro Lege Manilla, Wilkins (Macmillan) ; Select Letters
                  (Text, only), Watson (Oxford) ; pro Archia, Beid (Cam-
                  bridge) ; Philippics L, II., V., King (Oxford) ; de
                  Provinciis Consularibus (Baiter and Kayser), in Verrem,
                  Book IV., HaU (Macmillan).
                                 CLASSICS                                    171

    Horace, Odes, Wickham (Oxford), or Page (Macmillan) ; Satires, Palmer
                 (Macmillan) ; Epistles, Wilkins (Macmillan).
    Juvenal, Duff (Cambridge).
    Livy (text, in 8 parts, sold separately), Madvig ; Book II., Stephenson,
                  (Macmillan) ; Books XXI., XXII. (text and notes), Capes-
                  (Macmillan) ; Book XXI., Través (Bell), or Dimsdale
                  (Cambridge) ; Book XXII., Dimsdale (Cambridge) ; Book.
                  XXVI., Nicholls (Angus & Robertson, Sydney) ; Book
                  IX., Stephenson (Pitt Press), or Woodhouse (Clive) ; Book
                  XXVIL, Campbell (Pitt Press).
    Lucretius, Book L-IIL, Lee (Macmillan).
    Lucretius, Book V., Duff (Cambridge).
    Pliny, Selected Letters, Merrill (Macmillan).
    Sallust, Jugurtha, Summers ; Catiline, Summers (Pitt Press) ; Catilina,.
                  Cook (Macmillan)
    Martial, Select Epigrams, two vols., Bridge and Lake (Oxford).
    Tacitus, Annals, Books I. to IV., Furneaux's abridged edition ; Histories,.
                  Books L, IL, and Books III., IV., V., Godley (Macmillan),.
                  Book L, Davies (Cambridge), Book III. (Stimmers), Cam-
                  bridge.
Virgil, Sidgwick (each book sold separately, Cambridge), or Georgics,.
Page (Macmillan) and ^neid, Page (Macmillan).
FOB STUDENTS READING FOR HONOUBS—
     Cicero, de Finibus (Critical edition, Latin Notes), Madvig ; Letters,
                   (select), Watson (Oxford) ; Letters, Tyrrell (Longmans) ;
                   Philippics, King (Oxford) ; de Oratore, Wilkins (Oxford) ;
                   Brutus (text and German Notes), Jahn or Piderit ; or Kellogg
                   (Ginn & Co.) ; Orator, Sandys (Cambridge).
     Catullus, Ellis (Oxford), or Simpson (Macmillan).
     Horace, Odes, Satires and Epistles, Wickham (Oxford) ; or Satires,.
                   Palmer (Macmillan) ; Epistles, Wilkins (Macmillan).
     Juvenal, Mayor (Macmillan).
     Lucan, Haskins (Bell).
     Lucretius, Munro (Bell).
     Ovid, Fasti, Hallam (Macmillan) ; Metamorphoses (Bell).
     Plautus, Captivi, Lindsay (Methuen) or Hallidie (Macmillan) ; Trinum-
                   rmis, Gray (Cambridge).
     Quintilian, Book X., Peterson (Clarendon Press).
     Tacitus, Annals, L-VL, Furneaux, larger edition (Oxford) ; Histories,.
                   Spooner (Macmillan) ; Germania and Agrícola, Furneaux
                   (Oxford) ; Dialogue de Oratoribus, Gudeman (Ginn & Co.),
                   or Peterson (Oxford).
     Terence, Ashmore (Oxford) ; Phormio, Bond & Walpole (Macmillan) ;
                   Andria, Freeman & Sloman (Oxford).
     Virgil, Conington (Bell).
                           Editions of Greek Authors.
     Aristophanes , Clouds, Birds, Achamians, Frogs, Knights, Peace, Merry-
                (Oxford) ; Knights, ed. Neil, cheap ed. 5/- (Cam. Pitt).
172                           LECTURE SUBJECTS.

       Aristotle. Au Introduction to Aristotle's Ethics, Books I.-IV., with
                    Book X., Ch. 6-9, and Analysis and Notes, by Ed. Moore
                    (Longmans, Green & Co.) ; Ethics of Aristotle, ed. with
                    Introd. and Note¿, by J. Burnet (Methuen) ; The Nico-
                    machean Ethics of Aristotle, trans, by F. H. Peters
                    (Kegan, Paul & Co.).
      Demosthenes, Orations against Philip, Abbott & Matheson (Oxford),
                    (Vol. I. contains Phil. I. and Olynth. I. to III. Vol. Π.
                    contains De Pace, Phil. II., De Chers., and Phil. III.) ;
                    or Sandys, the same (Macmillan).
      .Herodotus, translation by Bawlinson, with abridged notes, ed. Grant,
                    2 vols. (Murray) ; Book VII., ed. Butler (Macmillan) ;
                    Book VI., text and notes, ed. Stracton (Macmillan ; Books
                    V., VIII. and IX., ed. Shuckfoirgh (Pitt Press) ; Books
                    IV.-IX., 5 vols., ed. Macan. (Macm.) ; Book I. ed. J. H.
                    Sleeman (Pitt Press).
       Homer, Iliad, Leaf (Macmillan), 2 vols., 2nd ed., or Leaf <£· Bayfield
                    (Macmillan) ; Odyssey, Merry (Oxford) ; larger edition,
                    Books L-XII., Merry and Riddell ; Books XIII.-XXIV.,
                    ed. Monro. Introduction to Homer, Jebb (Maclehose, Glas-
                    gow) ; Homer and the Iliad, F. M. Stawell (Dent) ; Homer
                    and the Epic, A. Lang (Longmans) ; Rise of the Greek
                    Epic, by G. Murray, 7/6 2nd ed. (Ciar.) ; Companion to
                    the Iliad, Leaf (Macmillan) ; Troy, IF. Leaf (Macm.) ;
                    H. Browne, Handbook of Homeric Study ; Homeric
                    Grammar, Monro (Oxford) ; Odyssey, trans. Butcher and
                    Lang (Macmillan) ; Iliad, trans. Lang, Leaf & Myers
                    (Macm.).
       Euripides, Paley ed. of Euripides in 3 vols. ; Text in G. Murray's
                    ed. (Oxford Classical Texts).
       Sophocles, in single plays, large edition 12/-, Jebb (Rivington).
       Thucydides, Book L, Marchant (Macm.) ; IL, Marchant (Macmillan), or
                    Shilleto (Bell) ; III., Marchant (Macmillan) ; IV. and V.;
                    Graves (Macmillan) ; VL, VIL, Marchant (Macmillan) ;
                    III., IV. and VI., Spratt (Pitt Press) ; VIL, Holden (Pitt
                    Press ; VIIL, Tucker (Macmillan). Translation and
                    Notes), Jowett (Oxford).
       Greek Historical Inscriptions, 2nd edition 12/6, ed. Hicks & Hill (Ciar.).
       Historical Greek Coins, ed. Hill.
       Sources of Greek History, ed. Hill, 2nd edition 10/- (Ciar.).

                     2.—MODERN LITERATURE.
      Professor MacCallum, Assistant-Professors Holme and Nicholson,
                  Mr. C. J. Brennan, Mr. A. J. A. Waldock.
                                  FRENCH—1920.
     Course I., Pass.—Composition : Nicholson & Brennan,
Passages for Translation (Oxford Univ. Press). Phonetics and
                     MODERN LITERATURE,                        173

 Dictation. Lectures dealing with the authors treated. Pre-
 scribed Books : Victor Hugo, Les Feuilles d' Automne (Col-
 lection Nelson), Alphonse Daudet, Lettres de mon Moulin
 {Collection Nelson) ; Balzac, Contes Philosophiques (Collection
 ■Gallin, Dent) ; Molière, Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme (éd.
 Chapi7i, Pitt Press Series).                          °
       Additional for Distinction.—Historical Grammar : Dar-
riiesteter, Historical Grammar (Macmiïlan). Prescribed
Books : Oxford Book of French Verse (Clarendon Press) ;
Anatole France, Le Crime de Sylvestre Bonnard (Calmann-
Lévy).
       Course IL, Pass.—Composition : Nicholson & Brennan,
Passages for Translation (Oxford Univ. Press). Lectures (in
!Trench) on the Literature of the 17th Century. Prescribed
Uooks : Corneille, Le Cid (ed. Petit de Julleville, Hachette) ;
Racine, Iphigénie (éd. Lanson, Hachette) ; Racine, Les
Plaideurs (Camb. Univ. Press) ; Molière, Les Précieuses
ridicules (Macmilhn) ; Molière, Les femmes savantes (Oxford
Univ. Press) ; Buffon, Morceaux choisis (éd. Dupré, Hachette) ;
Sévigné, Lettres choisies (éd. Régnier, Hachette) ; Saint-Simon,
La cour de Louis XIV. (Collection Nelson) ; Lemaître, Cor-
neille et la poétique d'Aristote (Lecène et Oudin) ; Faguet,
XVIIe siècle (Société franc, d'imprimerie et de librairie).
       Additional for Distinction.—Lectures on the Literature of
 the 16th Century. Prescribed Book : Darmesteter et Hatzfeld
 Le XVIe siècle (Delagrave).
       Candidates must satisfy a special test in composition,
       Course III., Pass.—Course II., Pass, along with the works
■of Molière (Oxford Univ. Press). Selections to be announced
later.
     . Additional for Honours.—Course II., Distinction, along
•with Montaigne, Extraits (Delagrave).
       Candidates must satisfy a conversational test.
                         FRENCH—1921.
     Course L, Pass.—Composition : Nicholson & Brennan,
passages for translation (Oxford Univ. Press). Phonetics and
Dictation. Lectures dealing with the authors treated. Pre-
scribed Books : Coppée, Poésies choisies (Clarendon Press) ;
 74                    LECTURE SUBJECTS

Bazin, Les nouveaux Oberlé (Calmann-Lévy) ; Montesquieu,
Lettres persanes (Siepmann, MacmiUan) ; Mérimée, Colomba
(Dent) ; Augier and Sandeau, Le Gendre de M. Poirier
(Heath).
      Additional for Distinction.—Historical Grammar : Darm-
esteter, Historical Grammar (MacmiUan). Prescribed Books :
Oxford Book of French Verse (Clarendon Press) ; Bazin, De
toute son âme (Calmann-Lévy).
      Course II., Pass.—Composition : Nicholson & Brennan,.
Passages for Translation (Oxford Univ. Press). Lectures (in
French) on the Literature of the 18th Century. Prescribed.
Books : Fontenelle, Dialogues des morts (Bibliothèque Na-
tionale) ; Regnard, Le Joueur (Hachette) ; Marivaux, Le Jeu.
de l'amour et.du hasard (Macmillan) ; Montesquieu, Lettres-
persanes (MacmiUan) ; Buffon, Discours sur le style (Hach-
ette) ; Rousseau, Lettre àd'Alembert (ed. Bontaine, Garnier) ;
Diderot, Pages choisies (Colin) ; Voltaire, Contes (Clarendon
Press) ; Beaumarchais, Barbier de Seville (Clarendon Press) ,-
Faguet, XVIIIe siècle (Société fr. d'imprimerie et de librairie).
      Additional for Distinction.—Lectures on the Literature
of the Middle Ages. Prescribed Book : Toynbee, Specimens-
of Old French (Clarendon Press).
      Candidates must satisfy a special test in composition.
      Course III., Pass.—Course IL, Pass, along with Mari-
vaux : Théâtre choisi (éd. Móland, Garnier).
      Additional for Honours.—Course IL, Distinction, along,
with Extraits de Join ville (éd. Clédat, Garnier).
                          GERMAN—1920.
     Course L, Pass.—Composition: Nicholson & Brennan,.
Passages for Translation (Oxford Univ. Press). Phonetics-
and Dictation. Lectures dealing with the authors treated.
Prescribed Books : Storm, Immensee ( Whittaker) ; Schiller,
Wilhelm Tell (ed. Brent, Pitt Press Series) ; Gutzkow, Zopf
und Schwert "(ed. Wolstenholme, Pitt Press Series) ; Benedix,
Das Lügen (Ehlermann, Dresden).
     Additional for Distinction.—Lectures on Historical
Grammar ; Wright, Middle High German Primer (Clarendon
Press).       Prescribed       Books : Sahr, Das Deutsche
Volkslied.
                   MODERN LITERATURE.                           175

¡{Sammlung Göschen, 2 vols.) ; Lessing : Minna von Barnhelm
(ed. Buchheim, Clarendon Press).
     Course IL, Pass.—Composition : Nicholson & Brennan,
Passages for Translation (Clarendon Press). Lectures on the
Literature of the. Romantic and Post-Romantic Periods.
Prescribed Books : Walzel, Deutsche Romantik (Teubner,
Leipzig) ; A. W. & Fr. Schlegel, Das Athenaeum (Das Museum,
Pan-V'erlag, Berlin) ; Brentano, Ausgewählte Werke (Max
Hesse, Leipzig) ; Hoffmann, Klein Zaches (Reclam's Universal
Bibliothek) ; Platen, Die Verhängnissvolle Gabel (Reclam's
Universal Bibliothek).
     Additional for Distinction.—Lectures on the Literature
of the Reformation and Transition Periods : Hans Sachs,
Dramatische Gedichte (ed. Tittmann, Brockhaus, Leipzig) ;
Das Volksbuch vom Doctor Faust ( Viemeyer, Halle) ; Gry-
phius, Dramatische Dichtungen (ed. Tittmann, Brockhaus).
      Course HL, Pass.—Course IL, Pass, along with F. von
Oppeln-Bronikowski und L. Jacobowski, Die blaue Blume,
eine Anthologie romantischer Lyrik (Diederichs, Leipzig).
     Additional for Honours.—Course IL, Distinction, along
with Von Brant bis Rollenhagen and Simplicius Simplicissimus
(both in the Sammlung Göschen, Leipzig, Deutsche Denkmäler
des xvitn & xviitn Jahrhunderts).
                        GERMAN—1921.
     Course L, Pass.—Composition : Nicholson & Brennan,
Passages for Translation (Oxford Univ. Press) ; Phonetics and
Dictation. Lectures dealing with the authors treated. Pre-
scribed Books : Balladen und Romanzen (Golden Treasury
Series) ; Lessing, Minna von Barnhelm (Clarendon Press) ;
Keller, Zwei Novellen (Oxford Univ. Press) ; Schiller, Die
Jungfrau von Orleans (MacmiUan).
     Additional for Distinction.—Lectures on Historical
Grammar ; Wright, Middle High German Primer (Clarendon
Press). Prescribed Books : Die Meisterstücke des deutschen
Volks-und Kirchenliedes (Cowans de Gray, Glasg.) ; Goethe,
Hermann und Dorothea (Cambridge Univ. Press).
     Course IL, Pass.—Composition : Nicholson & Brennan,
Passages for Translation (Oxford Univ. Press). Lectures on
the Literature of the 18th Century, including the work of
176                   LECTURE SUBJECTS.

Goethe up to his death. Prescribed Books : Klopstoek, Ode»
(ed. Windel, Freytag, Leipzig), Herder, Abhandlungen (e¿..
Naumann, Freytag, Leipzig) ; Goethe, Torquato Tasso (Claren-
don Press) ; Schiller, Maria Stuart (Macmillan) ; Lessing,.
Nathan der Weise (Cambridge Univ. Press).
     Additional for Distinction.—Lectures on Old and Middle
German Literature. Prescribed Books : Walther von der·
Vogelweide (Sammlung Göschen, No. 23, Leipzig) ; Hartmann,
von Aue, etc. (Sammlung Göschen, No. 22, Leipzig).
     Course III., Pass.—Course II., Pass, along with Wieland,.
Oberon (Reclam, Leipzig).
     Additional for Honours.—Course II., Distinction, along
with Wright, 0. H. German Primer (Clarendon Press) and
Supplement (Local).
                         ENGLISH—1920-
      Course I., Pass.—Lectures on Notable English Writers.
Prescribed Books : Lang, English Literature ; Chaucer (Globe
Edition) ; Shakespeare,oTwelfth Night ( Warwick Edition) and
The Comedy of Errors, The Merchant of Venice, A Winter's
Tale (the last three in the Globe Edition) ; English Narrative
Poems (Blackie) ; Nielson & Thorndyke, Pacts about Shakes-
peare (extra vol. of the Tudor Shakespeare, Macmillan Co.,
New York).
      Additional for Distinction.—Cook, First Book of Old
English, (Ginn <& Co.) ; Skeat. Specimens of English Litera-
ture, 1394-1579 (Clarendon Press) ; History of English-
Orthography .
      Course II., Pass.—Lectures on the Literature of the
Victorian Period. Lectures on Shakespeare's Comedies..
Prescribed Books : Shakespeare (Globe Edition) ; Carlyle,.
Sartor Resartus ; Tennyson, Maud ; Browning. Men and
Women (ed. Hadow, Oxford) : Ruskin, Queen of the Air ;.
Swinburne, Selections ; Morris, Prose and Poetry, 1856-1870
(Oxford) ; Meredith, Egoist.
      Additional for Distinction.—Andreas (ed. Krapp, Albion
Press, Ginn & Co. ; Caedmon, Exodus & Daniel (Ginn ώ Co.).
      Course III., Pass.—Course II., Pass, along with Brown-
ing, The Ring and The Book.
                                  MATHEMATICS.                                         177
     Additional for Honours.—Course IL, Distinction, along
with Emerson, Middle English Brader (Macmillan Λ Co.).
                          ENGLISH 1921.
Course L, Pass.—Lectures on Notable; English Writers.
Prescribed Books : Lang, English Literature ; Chaucer
(Globe Edition) ; Shakespeare, King Lear (Warwiek Edition)
and Borneo and Juliet, Othello, Macbeth (the last three in
the Globe Edition) ; English Narrative Poems (jBJacifcie) ;
Nelson and Thomdyke, Facts about Shakespeare (extra vol.
of the Tudor Shakespeare, Macmillan Co., New York).
     Additional for Distinction.—Sweet, Anglo-Saxon Primer
 (Clarendon Press) ; Pollard, Miracle Plays (Clarendon Press).
     Course LI., Pass.—Lectures on the Literature of the
Period of the Rise and Decline of Puritanism. Lectures on
Shakespeare's Tragedies. Prescribed Books : Ward's English
Poets, Vol. 2, " Ben Jonson to Dryden" (Macmillan) ; Milton,
Comus, Samson Agonistes (Cam. Univ. Press, or in Milton's
" English Poems," Clarendon Press) and Areopagitica (Claren-
don Press) ; Walton, Life of Herbert (in "Walton's Lives,"
Morley's Universal Library) ; Sir Thos. Browne, Religio
Medici (Everyman s Library) ; Bunyan, Holy War (Cambridge
Univ. Press).
     Additional for Distinction.—Beowulf (ed. Wyatt and
Chambers.
     Course III., Pass.—Course II., Pass, along with Milton,
Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained (Milton's English Poems,
Clarendon Press).
     Additional for Honours.—Course II:, Distinction, along
with Emerson, Middle English Reader (Macmillan).

                             3.-MATHEMATICS.
          Professor Carslaw, Mr. R. J. Lyons, Mr. E. M. WeIIiBh,
                           and Mr. H. H. Thorne.
FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE.
MATHEMATICS L*
^Students taking Mathematics I. must attend one of the
classes specified below.  Class A is for students who are
   * Clase I. in Insuranoe Mathematics je aleo recognise«! as a qualifying oonret in
                                Mathematics for Arte.
178                         LECTURE SUBJECTS.

reading for Honours in Mathematics, but part of the Honours
work is also covered by Class B. Those who pass well in the
examinations of Class B will be held to have obtained "Credit"
in the yearly examination.
                         CLASS A.
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays through-
out the year, at 10 a.m., as follows :—
       LENT TEEM.-—Elementary Differential         and  Integral               Calculus
       (M., W.) ;
       Geometry and Geometrical Conies (Tu., Th.).
       TRINITY TERM.—Analytical Geometry (M., W.) ;
                       Algebra (Tu., Th.).
       MICHAELMAS TERM.—Trigonometry (Tu., Th.) ;
                            Statics and Dynamics (M., W.).
      Honours students, whose time-table allows it, are ex-
pected to attend also on Fridays at the same hour.
      There will ■ be a special tutorial class in Statics and
Dynamics in Lent and Trinity Terms at an hour to be arranged
for those who require additional instruction in this subject.
                        CLASS B.f
This class meets on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays
and Thursdays throughout the year at 10 a.m., and is divided
into two sections.
               The first section is to be attended by those who have
       passed in Mechanics at the matriculation or other equivalent
   examination. The programme for this section is as follows:—
                LENT TERM.—Elementary Analytical Geometry and Elementary
                           Differential and Integral Calculus, 4 hours.
        TRINITY TERM.—Same (continued), 2 hours. Statics and Dynamics,
                     2 hours.
        MICHAELMAS TERM.—Statics and Dynamics, 2 hours. Revision, Pure
        t                          Mathematics, 2 hours.
       The other section is to be attended by those who have
 not qualified in Mechanics at entrance. The programme for
 this section is as follows :—
          LENT TERM.—Elementary Analytical Geometry and Elementary
             Differential and Integral Calculus, 3 hours.
             •       '·          Statics and Dynamics, 1 hour.
      t Arte students who do not propose to take Mathematics II., Class A, in a subsequent
 year may qualify in Mathematics I. by doing satisfactory work In Class B, and passing
 the Examination In Pure Mathematics at the end of the year.
                                  MATHEMATICS.                                        179

         TRINITY TERM.—Same (continued), 2 hours each.
         MICHAELMAS TERM.—Statics and Dynamics, 2 hours. Revision, Pure
         Mathematics, 2 hours.

                  MATHEMATICS IL*
 Students taking Mathematics II. must attend one of the
 courses specified below. Class A is for students who are
 reading for Honours in Mathematics, but part of the Honours
 work is also covered by Class B. Those who pass well in
 the examinations of Class B will be -held to have obtained
 " Credit " in the yearly examination.
                              CLASS A.
       At 9 a.m. throughout the year, as follows :—
        LENT TERM.-—Differential and Integral Calculus (Tu., Th., F.) ;
        Analytical Statics (M., W.).
        TRINITY TERM.—Differential and Integral Calculus (continued)
        (M., W., F.) ■
        Dynamics (Tu., Th.).
        MICHAELMAS TERM.—Spherical        Trigonometry      and     Differential
        Equations (M., W., F.) ;
        Electricity (Tu., Th.).
      Honours students, whose time-table allows it, must also
attend the course in Astronomy (10 a.m. Wednesday and
Friday) in Lent Term, and they are recommended to attend
this course through the year.
      The work in Astronomy of Lent Term will enter into the
March Examination as an alternative to Electricity ; and
students who take Astronomy will be exempted, if they so
desire, from the course in Electricity in Michaelmas Term.
                       CLASS B.f
This class meets at 9 a.m. throughout the year, and is
divided into two sections. . The first is for students of Engi-
neering, the second for Arts and Science students.         The
programme for the two sections is as follows :-—
        LENT TERM.—Differential and Integral· Calculus             (Ji.,   W., F.);
                    Statics and Dynamics (Tu., Th.).
    • Class II. in Insurance Mathematics is also recognised as a qualifying course in
                                 Mathematics for Arts.
    t Arts students who do not propose to take Mathematics in a subsequent year may
qualify in Mathematics II. by doing satisfactory work in Class B, and passing the
Examination in Pure Mathematics at the end of the year.
180                       LECTURE SUBJECTS.

        TRINITY TERM.—Same [continued).
        MICHAELMAS TERM.—Dynamics (Af., W., F.);        Spherical Trigon-
                             ometry and Differential Equations (Tu., Th.).

                  MATHEMATICS III.
Students taking Mathematics III. must attend one of the
courses specified below. Class A is for students who are
reading for Honours in Mathematics, but part of the Honours
work is also covered by Class B. Those who pass well in the
examinations of Class' B will be held to have obtained
" Credit " in the yearly examination.
                             CLASS A.
     At 12 noon throughout the year, as follows :—
       LENT TERM.—Solid Geometry (M., W., F.) ;
        Analysis (Tu., Th.).
        TRINITY TEBM.—Rigid Dynamics (M., W., F.) ;
        Analysis (continued) (Tu., Th.).
        MICHAELMAS TERM.—Hydrostatics and'Elements of Elasticity (M.,
        W., F.).
        Analysis (continued) (Tu., Th.).
     There are also two alternative classes at 11 a.m., meeting
twice a week for three terms ; one in Pure Mathematics, the
other in Applied Mathematics. In 1920 the subject of the
Pure Mathematical Course will be Higher Algebra, and
the subject of the Applied Mathematical Course will be an
Introduction to Mathematical Physics, with special reference
to Electricity and Hydrodynamics. At least one of these
courses must be taken by Honours students.
                        CLASS B.
At 12 noon on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays
throughout the year, as follows :—
LENT TEEM.—Solid Geometry.
      TRINITY TERM.—Differential Equations and Rigid Dynamics.
      MICHAELMAS TERM.—Hydrostatics and Elements of Elasticity.
      BOOKS RECOMMENDED FOR THE USE OP STUDENTS.
      Matriculation.
      Lower Mathematics.—Any of the text-books in common use.
      Higher Mathematics.—This examination will not include             Solid
          Geometry or the work for advanced students in the Learing
          Certificate Examination.
      Geometry.—Any of the text-books in common use.
                                  MATHEMATICS.                                  181
                      o

         Algebra.—Any of the ordinary text-books on Algebra.
         Trigonometry.—Any of the ordinary text-books on Trigonometry.
         Four Figure Tables to be used.
                                     Mathematics I.
    Oass A—
         Richardson and Ramsey's Modern Plane Geometry.
         Heath's Elementary Solid Geometry.
         Hamblin Smith's Geometrical Conic Sections.
         C. Smith's Conic Sections.
         C. Smith's Treatise on Algebra, or Chrystal's Algebra.
         Carslaw's Introduction to the Calculus.
         Carslaw's Trigonometry, Part II.
         Loney's Elements of Statics and Dynamics.
    Class B—
         Carslaw's Introduction to the Calculus.
         Loney's Elements of Statics and Dynamics.
                                     Mathematics II.
    Class A—
          Lamb's Infinitesimal Calculus.
          Todhunter's & Leathem's Spherical Trigonometry.
          Lamb's Statics.                     ,
          Murray's Differential Equations.
α         Loney's Dynamics of a Particle and of Rigid Bodies.
    Barlow and Bryan's Mathematical Astronomy.
    And the following, though not necessary, will be referred to—
    Osgood's Differential and Integral Calculus.
    -    Gibson's Elementary Treatise on the Calculus.
    Lore's Theoretical Mechanics.
    Jeans' Theoretical Mechanics.
    Lamb's Dynamics.
    Forsyth's Differential Equations.
    Starling's Electricity and Magnetism.
    Class B—
          Lamb's Infinitesimal Calculus.
          Loney's Dynamics of a Particle and Rigid Bodies.
                              Mathematics III.
    Class A—In addition to those for the Second Year in Statics and Dynamics—
    Goursat's Cours d' Analyse Mathématique, Tome I.
    Hardy's Course in Pure Mathematics.
    Bell's Coordinate Geometry of Three Dimensions.
    Houstoun's Introduction to Mathematical Physics.
    Routh's Rigid Dynamics, Vol. I.
    Bôcher, Higher Algebra.
    And the following, though not necessary, will bo referred to—
    Frost's Solid Geometry.
    Salmon's Solid Geometry.
    Gray's Treatise on Physics, Part I.
182                        LECTURE SUBJECTa
                                                        O

                                                        Theory of the Con-
     Carslaw's Fourier's Series and the Mathematical
     auction of Heat.
Bromwich's Infinite Series.
Forsyth's Differential Geometry.
Lamb's Hydrodynamics.
Gray & Mathews' Bessel Functions.
Besant and Eamsey's Hydromechanics, Part II.
Pierpont's Functions of a Complex Variable.
Whittaker and Watson's Modern Analysis.
Class B—
     C. Smith's Solid Geometry.
     Lamb's Statics.
     Loney's Dynamics of a Particle and Rigid Bodies.

 4 .—LOGIC AND MENTAL PHILOSOPHY.
Professor Anderson, Dr. H. T. Lovell, Dr. Phillips.
Courses of instruction are given on the following sub-
jects :-—
                              FACULTY     OF ARTS.
LOGIC AND PSYCHOLOGY (90 lectures)—
      (a) LOGIC—Analysis of, the methods of reasoning in.
ordinary life, and in the various departments of knowledge.
Fundamental types of explanation—Class, Law, Cause, End.
The nature and limits of scientific explanation. Classification,
of the Sciences. Relation of Philosophy to Science, with an.
account of the main problems of philosophy.
      (6) PSYCHOLOGY.—The nature of Psychology as a posi-
tive science. The various methods of Psychology and their
limitations. Analysis of psychic processes, with a genetic
treatment of special problems. The relation of Psychology
to normative sciences such as logic and ethics. The value of
Psychology as a means of explanation will be illustrated by
reference to practical problems of Education and Sociology.
An account will be given of some of the results of Experi-
mental Psychology, and of the nature of statistical methods.
A certain amount of psychological apparatus is available for
class demonstration and inductive investigation.
ADVANCED PSYCHOLOGY [Philosophy ILB] (90 lectures).
    (a) Pathological Psychology : The nature of instinct, the
    relation of instinct to (i.) emotion, (ii.) intelligence.
    Inferences relating to mental pathology.        Historical
               LOGIC AND MENTAL PHILOSOPHY.                         183

                   and critical treatment of Freud's method of°Psycho-
              Analysis.      An account of Jung's Association Method.
                            Some phases of the psychology of Insanity.
       '(6) Social Psychology : The principles of social psychology,
           with special treatment of the gregarious instinct,
             suggestion, sympathy, imitation.        The psychology of
                                                                crowds,
          (c) Experimental Psychology : Students will be required to
                  learn in the laboratory methods of testing or investi-
               gating the following : Sensory acuity, attention, apper-
                 ception, memory, association, imagery, fatigue and
                  mental work, illusions, suggestion, relation between
               feelings and their expression, reaction-times.     There
                     will also be some exposition of the application of
                 statistical methods to the quantitative formulation of
                                                   experimental results.
              The lectures in Advanced Psychology are open to those
           ~who have completed Philosophy I. or its equivalent, and
         constitute a qualifying course for the degree of Bachelor of
          Arts.      The course may not be taken simultaneously with
      Philosophy ILA or III., but is to be regarded as an alternative
        course, though continuous with other courses in Philosophy.
                                  ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY (90 lectures)—
      Historical and critical account of the development of
Primitive and Ancient Thought. Oriental Religions and
Theosophies. Greek Philosophy in its Relation to Greek Life
and Culture. Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Stoics, Epicureans,
and Sceptics. Philosophy at Rome. Theosophy and Chris-
tianity. Christian Religion and Christian Theology. Chris-
tianity and the Empire. Philosophy and Theology during the
early middle ages. Scholasticism and Mysticism. Thomas
Aquinas and Dante.
MODERN PHILOSOPHY (90 lectures)—
     Historical and critical account of the main problems and
systems of modern philosophy. The Renaissance, the Refor-
mation and the Counter-Reformation, Bruno, MachiaveUi,
Luther and Calvin. Religion and Theology. Church and
State. The problems of Science and the problems of Meta-
physic. Philosophers and their systems :—Descartes, Spinoza,
184                     LECTURE SUBJECTS.

Leibnitz^; Locke, Berkeley, Hume ; Kant, Fichte, Hegel r
Schopenhauer, Nietzsche ; Spencer, Wundt, James, Eucken,
Bergson. Philosophical thinkers and systems will be dis-
cussed in their historical and logical connection, with special
emphasis on the relation of philosophical thought to the
scientific, social and religious life of the times. All students ■
will be required to make a special study of a selected author.
SOCIAL AND ETHICAL PHILOSOPHY (90 lectures)—
     The social aspect of self-consciousness. Primitive forms
of society.    Origin of the state.     Law and Morality.
     The moral consciousness, its nature and development.
Theories of the moral judgment. The economic theory of
values. Biological and psychological theories. The moral
will and the moral character.
      Liberty and solidarity as conditions of morality. Kant
and Bergson on liberty. Determinism and indeterminism.
Liberty, equality and fraternity. Economic, social and re-
ligious solidarity. Theories of justice from Aristotle to Karl
Marx.
      Theories of the moral end. Naturalism, Hedonism, Utili-
tarianism.     Mill, Spencer, and Kant.
      The moral community. Family, society, and state.
Class consciousness. Rights of person, property and contract.
Powers and functions of the state. Crime and punishment.
Church and State.      Nationalism and Internationalism.
      Of the foregoing courses, the following will be given
during 1920 :—
      Philosophy I.—(Day). Logic and Psychology : Tuesday,
        Wednesday and Friday, at 2 p.m.
      Philosophy I.—(Evening). Logic and Psychology : Tues-
        day and Thursday at 7 p.m., Wednesday at 5 p.m.
      Philosophy IIA..—Social and Ethical Philosophy : Tues-
        day, Wednesday and Friday at 12 noon.
      Philosophy IIB.—Advanced Psychology : Tuesday, Wed-
        nesday and Friday at 4 p.m.
      Philosophy III.—Ancient Philosophy : Tuesday ' and
        Thursday at 7 p.m., Wednesday at 5 p.m.
                 LOGIC AND MENTAL PHILOSOPHY.                               185
                       LIST OF BOOKS RECOMMENDED.
      LOGIC AND PSYCHOLOGY.—Welton : Groundwork of Logic (Univ. Tut. ,
Press) Welton's Logical Basis of Education (MacmiUan) ; James' Textbook
.of Psychology (MacmiUan) ; McDougall's Phj'siological Psychology (Dent-
Temple Primers) ; Meyer's Introduction to Experimental Psychology (Camb.
Univ. Press).
       Additional for, Distinction.—Bosanquet's Essentials of Logic (Mac-
miUan) ; Thomson's Introduction to Science (Home Univ. Library) ; Stout's
Manual of Psychology (Univ. Tutorial Press), Edition 1913 ; McDougall's
Social Ps3'chology (Methuen).
      ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY.—Brett's Government of Man (Bell) ; Lowes
 Dickinson's Greek View of Life ( Methuen) ; Roger's Student's History of
 Philosophy (Macmillan) ; Plato (3 vols.), Aristotle's Ethics, Marcus Aure-
 lius, and Epictetus in Everyman's Library ;                Vols, on Epicureanism,
 Stoicism, and Neoplatonism in Chief Ancient Philosophies (S.P.O.K.).
       Additional for Distinction.—-Eucken's Problems of Human Life (Scrib-
 ner's) ; Royce's World and Individual, 2 vols. (MacmiUan).
      MODERN PHILOSOPHY.—Descartes, Spinoza, Berkeley and Hume in
Everyman's Library ; Watson's Selections from Kant (Maclehose) ; Spinoza,
TÎchte and Hegel (Blackivood's Philosophical Classics) ; Brett's Government
of Man (Bell) ; Royce, Spirit of Modern Philosophy (Houghton, Mifflen).
       Additional for Distinction.—Perry's Present Philosophical Tendencies
 (Longman's) ; Taylor's Elements of Metaphysics (Methuen).
      SOCIAL AND ETHICAL PHILOSOPHY.—Brett's Government of Man (Bell);
Fairbanks' Introduction to Sociology ; Mackenzie's Manual of Ethics (Univ.
Tutorial Press) ; Woodrow Wilson, The State (Isbisler) ; Evatt, Liberalism
in Australia ; Home Univ. Library—; Vols, on Liberalism, Conservatism,
Socialist Movement ; Everyman's Library ; Vols, on Aristotle's Ethics,
Mill's Utilitarianism ; Machiavelli's Prince ; Burke's Reflections.
       Additional for Distinction.—Green's Prolegomena to Ethics (Clarendon
 Press) ; Green's Principles of Political Obligation (Clarendon Press) ;
 Northcott, Australian Social Development (Columbia University Studies).
      ADVANCED PSYOHOLOGY.—James : Principles of. Psychology (Mac-
 miUan) ; Stout : Manual of Psychology (Univ. Tut. Press, edition—-1913) ;
 Brill/;·^ Psychanalysis (W. B. Saunders); Psychotherapeutics—A Sym-
 posium (Richard Badger) ; Watts : Echo Personalities (George Allen and
 Unwin) ; Hart : Psychology of Insanity (Cambridge Literature & Science
 Manuals) ; McDougall : Introduction to Social Psychology (Methuen) ;
 Le Bon : Psycholog37 of the Crowd (Fisher Unwin) ; Myers : Text-book of
 Experimental Psychology (Arnold) ; \ Valentine : Experimental Psychology
 and Education (Üniv. Tut. Press).                                      KfcaïJÉiÎf';
      Honour students will, in addition, be required to under-
take a special course of study in certain topics to be chosen,
within limits, by the students themselves.
      Classes for Honour and Post-graduate study will meet
At hours to be arranged.
186                        LECTURE SUBJECTS.

                               5.—EDUCATION.
Professor Mackie, Dr. P. R. Cole, Mr. T. T. Roberts, Mr. R. G. Cameron)
                              and Dr. G. Phillips.
          Course       I. Theory and History of Education.
          Course II. Experimental Education.
          Course III. Principles of Teaching:
     Courses I. and II. in Education may be taken as Second'.
and Third Year subjects for the Arts Degree.
     Before taking the Courses I. and II., students are strongly
recommended to take either Philosophy I. or the First Year
course in Education at the Teachers' College.
           I.—THEORY AND HISTORY OF EDUCATION.
A.—History of Education.—(Half Course)—45 meetings—
      Alternating courses are provided in the history of educa-
tion. Course (a) includes the history of education in Europe
from the earliest times to the Renaissance. Course (¿>) covers °
the period from the Renaissance to the present time. In.
each course special reference is made to the development of
education in England.
      Course (b) will be followed during 1920.
B.—Theory of Education—(HeIf Course)—45 meetings—
      Definition, scope and method of a theory of education.
Relation to philosophical and social sciences.      Various state-
ments of the aim of education.       The school in relation to other
ethical institutions.    Function of the school in the democratic· ·
state.
       The organisation and administration of school educa-
tion. Conception of an educational system. The parts of
the system, and their relations to each other and to the com-
munity.       Current problems in school organisation.
       The process of education. Analysis of its elements, and
their relation to the end. Limits of education. Education,
and Eugenics. Heredity and environment as conditioning
development. General nature of intellectual, aesthetic and.
volitional training.
                                HISTORY.                                    187

     Theory of the curriculum. Classification of subjects of
instruction. General principles of selection. Relation of
school studies to one another.     Formal discipline.
      Experimental Education, its aims, methods and results-
.Mental tests, laboratory and class-room methods.
      Principles of general method. Intellectual, moral, and
aesthetic training. The form of instruction in relation to the
nature of knowledge, and modes of acquisition.—Lesson types.
■Class management and organisation in relation to the prin-
ciples of social psychology.
                II.—EXPERIMENTAL EDUCATION.
      This Course may be offered as a Full Course qualifying
~ίοτ the Degree in Arts.
      In addition to the reading prescribed, students will be
required to carry out suggested investigations in the class-
room and laboratory.
           III.—PRINCIPLES OF TEACHING
The Course will include lectures on general method and
organisation, and short courses on special method. Students
qualifying for the diploma in Education must take the lectures
on general method, together with at least one special method
•course.·
6.-HISTORY.
Professor G. A. Wood, M.A.     Mr. J. F. Bruce, M.A.
COURSE I., 1920.
Mr. Bruce.
Tuesday, Thursday ard Friday at 3 p.m., and Tuesday,
£ p.m., Wednesday 7 p.m., and Thursday 6 p.m.
Pass.— English History, 449 to 1509.
(a) Preliminary reading.—Warner and Martin's              Groundwork   of
English History, or Tout's Advanced History, Pollard's History of
England (Home University Library), Fletcher's Introductory His-
tory, Vol. I.
(6) Books to be bought.—Green's Short History (Everyman, 3/6) ;
Bell's Source Books, vols. I. to VT. (1/6 per vol.) ; Lipson's
Economic History (10/-) ; Maitland's Constitutional History
(16/6).
188                           LECTURE SUBJECTS.

      (c) Additional Books to be read.—Wakeman's History of the Churcfc
           of England ; Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (tr. Everyman. 1/9) ; Bede's
           Ecclesiastical History (Bohn, 5/-, or Everyman, 1/9) ; Freeman's
           William I. (2/6), or Stenton's William I. ; Green's Henry II. (2/6) ;
           Tout's Edward I. (2/6) ; Bacon's Henry VII. ; Seebohm's Oxford
           Reformers (1/-) ; Keating and Frazer's History of England
           for Schools (3/6).
      Essays will be written ir the course of the year ; and an
examinatior will be held in December.
      Honour students will do the work described above, and
will be expected to give evidence of knowledge and ability
of a higher degree.
      Honour students will also be examined in March, 1921,
on " The History of Europe from 800 to 1250."
      (a) Books to be bought.—Bryce's Holy Roman Empire ; Tout's Empire
           and Papacy ; Robinson's Readings in European History, Vol. I.
           (The Middle Ages) ; Davis's Medieval Europe (Home University) ;
           Archer and Kingsford's " The Crusades."                         a
      (b) Additional Books to be read.—Milman's Latin Christianity (Books
           VII. to X.) ; Davis's Charlemagne ; Morison's St. Bernard ;
           Sabatier's St. Francis ; Gebhart's L'Italie Mystique ; Church's
           St. Anselm ; Henderson's Documents of Medieval History ;
           Historical Atlas (Clarendon Press).
     Honour students will also be required to write an essay
on a subject within this period.
                         COURSE IL, 1920. -
     Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 2 p.m., and Tuesday,
3 p.m., Wednesday 7 p.m., and Thursday, 6 p.m.
     Aspects of British History from 1760 to 1867.
      Books recommended.—Hunt's History of England from 1760 to 1801 ;
          Burke's American Speeches and Letters (Everyman's Library) ;
          Morley's Burke ; Rosebery's Pitt ; Toynbee's Industrial Revolu-
          tion ; o Perris's Industrial History of Modern England ; Lloyd's
          Trade Unionism ; Hammond's Village Labourer ; Hammond's
          Town Labourer ; Carlyle's Past and Present ; Ruskin'e JJnto
          This Last.
     Essays will be written in the course of the year, and an
examination will be held in December.
     Honour%tudents will take papers on the work described
above, and will be expected to show evidence of knowledge
and ability in a higher degree.
                                  HISTORY.                                   189

     Third Year Honour students will write in the course of
the year essays on the following subjects :—
     (1) The Teaching of Adam Smith.
    Books.—Smith's Wealth of Nations, Hurst's Adam Smith.
     (2) Ruskin as a Social Reformer.
    Books.—Buskin's Writings, especially " Unto This Last " : Hobson's
        Ruskin as a Social Reformer.
     Second Year Honour students will write in the course
of the year essays on the following subjects :—     °
     (1) The Decay of the Yeomanry.
    Books.—Johnson's Disappearance of the Small Landowner ; Ham-
        mond's Village Labourer.
     (2) Chartism.
    Book.—Hovell's Chartist Movement.       0

    Honour students will also be examined in March, 1921,
on British Colonial Policy from 1783 to the present time.
    Books. —Egerton's British Colonial Policy," Currey's British Colonial
        Policy, Durham's Report, Curtis's Problem of the Commonwealth,
        Jebb's Colonial Conferences, Jebb's Britannic Problem, Holland's
        Imperium et Libertas, .Seeley's Expansion of England. "
     They will also write an essay on some aspect of this
subject.
                             COURSE II., 1921.
                               Professor Wood.
     Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 2 p.m., and Tuesday,
5 p.m., Wednesday 7 p.m., and Thursday, 6 p.m.
    European History from 1774 to the present time.
    Books recommended.—Fyffe's Modern Europe ; Currey's European
        History since 1870 ; Grant B.obertson's Histor-cal Atlas of Modern
        Europe ; Dickinson's Revolutions and Reactions in Modern
        Prance ; Cesaresco's Making of Modern Italy ; King's Mazzini ;
        Phillips' European History, 1815-1899.
     Essays will be written in the course of the year, and an
examination will be held in December.
     Honours students will take papers on the work described
above, and will be expected to show evidence of knowledge
and ability in a higher degree.
190                       LECTURE SUBJECTS.
     Honours students will also be examined in March, 1922,
on, British History from 1832 to the present time, and will be
required to write an essay on some part of this subject.
      Books recommended.—Morley's Gladstone ; Trevelyan's Bright.

                          7.—ORIENTAL HISTORY.
                             Professor Murdoch.
     This Course may be taken by Arts students in any year,
and may be regarded as consecutive to a course in Modern
History.
     A Course of Lectures, entitled " An Introduction to Far
Eastern History," with special reference to the main formative,
factors in Japanese culture.
      Books to Buy.—Rapson's Ancient India ; Latourette's Development
          of China ; Latourette's Development of Japan.
      Books which it ιυίΙΙ be advantageous to have.—Vincent Smith's Early
       - History of India ; Rhys David's Buddhist India ; Macdonnell's
       History of Sanskrit Literature ; Rhys Davids' Buddhism ;
       Boulger's History of China; Wells Williams' History<of China,
       Douglas' Confucianism and Taouism ; Beals' Buddhism in China ;
       Murdoch's History of Japan, vols. I. and II.

                                 8.-ECONOMICS.
                                  Professor Irvine.
     The courses of Lectures in Economics I... II. and III. may
be taken as alternative courses by students in the Faculty of
Arts for the Degree of B.A.
                           ECONOMICS I.
     A General Survey.
     Books recommended.—*Gide, Principles of Political Economy ; *Clay,
Economics for the General Reader ; Marshall, Principles of Economics ;
*Hobson, The Science of Wealth ; Hobson, Evolution of Modern Capitalism ;
Hobson, The Industrial System ; Ruskin, Unto This Last ; Taussig, Prin-
ciples of Economics ; Macgregor, Evolution of Industry ; Pigou, Wealth
and Welfare ; Hayes, Introduction to Sociologj-.
                         ECONOMICS II.
       A.—Evolution of the Industrial System. Present Organi-
       sation of Production. Recent developments. Large-
       scale Production. Concentration and Combination.
       Corporate Organisation. Co-operation. Economics of
       Management.
                          * These will be used as textbooks.
                         ECONOMIC HISTORY.                                    191

     B.—Unsettled Monetary Problems.        Theory of Credit.
     Fluctuations in the Purchasing Power of Money. The
     Quantity Theory.      Proposed Remedies.
     C.—Crises and Industrial Depressions.      Financial Panics.
     D.—The Function of Speculation.       Stock Exchanges.
     E.—Theory of International Trade.      The Foreign Ex:
change.
F.—Problem of the Transport, Marketing and Distribu-
tion of Goods.     Modern Devices for Improving Effici-
ency and Lessening Cost.      The State and the Control
of Transport and Marketing.         Organisation of Com-
mercial Intelligence.
Books recommended ¡or reading.—Nicholson, Principles of Political
Economy (Vol. II.) ; Withers, The Meaning of Money ; Scott, Money and
Banking ; Clare, The A.B.C. of the Foreign Exchanges ; Fisher, Purchasing
Power of Money ; Jevons, Money ; Ashley, The Tariff Problem ; Fuchs,
The Trade Policy of Great Britain ; Bastable, Theory of International
Trade ; Pigou, Protective and Preferential Import Duties ; Jenks, The
Trust Problem ; Macrosty, The Trust Movement in British Industry ; Ely,
Monopolies and Trusts.

                         ECONOMICS III.
      A.—The Labour Movement.
      B.—Socialism and the Social Movement.
      C.—Co-operation.        Profit-sharing.               Co-partnership.
        Social Insurance.
      D.—Public Finance.
     Books recommended.—Hobson, The Industrial System ; Hóbson, Work
and Wealth ; Carver, Distribution of Wealth ; Smart, Distribution of In-
come ; Wells, New Worlds for Old ; George, Progress and Poverty ; Kirkup,
History of Socialism ; Skelton, Socialism - a Critical Examination ; Plehn,
Public Finance ; Ingram, History of Political Economy ; Mr. and Mrs.
Webb, Industrial Democracy ; Seligman, Essays in Taxation, Incidence of
Taxation ; Carter, Industrial Reconstruction.
     Students for Distinction in Economics II. and III. must
be able to translate passages from French or German writers,
and must show an adequate knowledge of the writings of
Adam Smith, Ricardo, J. S. Mill, Jevons, and Böhm-Bawerk.
                         8A.—ECONOMIC HISTORY.
                              Mr. G. V. Portus.
      A Course of 90 Lectures, divided into three sections.
182                          LECTURE SUBJECTS.

     In the first term the lectures will deal with the general
problem of the Economic Interpretation of History, and will
survey the economic characteristics of primitive and ancient
peoples, ending with the Roman Empire.
     The second term will be devoted to English Economic
History up to about the 17th century, examining the Manorial
System and its displacement ; the development of Town
Economy : Medieval International Trading and Finance ;
the National Economic Theories of the Tudors (wage assess-
ment, price fixing, and poor laws) ; the Mercantile System ;
and the economic basis of the first period of English Im-
perialism.
     The third term's lectures are designed to cover the
Economic History of England from the 18th to the 20th
century ; the Agricultural and Industrial Revolution ; Laissez
Faire and the Factory Acts ; the Growth of Trade Unionism
during the. 19th century; the Economic Background of
European Politics up to the Great War.
      Books.—No one text-book covers the ground of the lectures. Students
ΛνίΙΙ find a general treatment of the subject in Herrick's " History of Com-
merce and Industry " (Macmillan's). Myers' " Dawn of Histoty " (Home
University Library) will be useful for the first term's work, and Ashley's
" Economic Organisation of England " (Longmans) for the second and
third term. Students will be expected Io procure a copy of " Documents
illustrating English Economic History," by Bland, Brown & Tawney.
      Books of reference. — (I) Kropotkin's "Mutual Aid"; Grundy,
'' Thuoydides and the History of his Age," chapters iii.-vii. inc. ; Robert-
son's " Evolution of States, Part II., chapters i. and ii. ; Fairgrieve,
" Geograph}' and World Power."
      (2.) Ashley's "Economic History"; Cunningham's "Growth of
English History and Commerce " ; Innes' " England's Industrial Develop-
ment " ; Warner, " Landmarks in English Industrial History ;" Schmoller,
" Mercantile System."
      (3.) Johnson, " Disappearance of the Small Landowner " ; Hutchins
and Harrison, " History of Factory Legislation " ; Webb, " History of
Trade Unionism " ; Cole, " Self-Government in Industry " ; Hobson,
"                                                                        Imperialism."
*
     Terminal essays are required, and students will be advised
on the scope of the work required for Honours in this subject.

                   8B.—PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION.
      This Course is divided into two sections.
                    MUNICIPAL ADMINISTRATION.                         193
                C


  SECTION A.
Mr. P. R. Watts.
In this section a review is made of political institutions
throughout the Empire and in the principal foreign countries.
Reference should be made to the following books :—Dicey,
" History and Law of the Constitution " ; Ogg, " Govern-
ments of Europe " ; Goodnow, " Politics and Administra-
tion " ; Leacock, " Elements of Political Science."
                             SECTION B.
                            Mr. F. A. Bland.
      In this section the principles:of Public Administration
are considered in their application to specific problems in
this State and the Commonwealth. The history, functions,
and forms of administrative machinery of individual depart-
ments are examined, together with such questions as the
recruiting and control of officers of the Public Service. No
text-books are available for this section, but reference should
be made to Royal Commission Reports upon various depart-
ments.
       Essay work will be required of all students in this section.
8c—MUNICIPAL ADMINISTRATION.
Mr. F. A. Bland.
The course will deal with Municipal Administration from
the socio-political point of view. In addition to outlining
the forms and functions of Local Government, an attempt
will be made to estimate the social and economic effects of
Municipal Administration.
      A review will be made of the chief features of the system
of England, Germany and the United States, and, in greater
detail, of Australia. Such subjects as City Government,
Housing and Town Planning, Municipal Finance, and Muni-
cipal Trading will bè considered.
      The following books are recommended for reading :—
    Bluett, Local Government Handbook, Local Government Act, 1919 ;
    Munro, Principles and Methods of Municipal Administration ;
    Harris, Problems of Local Government; Knoop, Principles of
    Municipal Trading ; Sutheis, Mind Your Own Business ; Howe ,
    The City the Hope of Democracy ; Knibbs, Local Government ;
    Irvine, Housing in New South Wales.                                H
 194                          LECTURE SUBJECTS.

        EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF M.A.
                            (See By-laws, Chap. X., Sec. 17.f)
         (1) Candidates for the Degree of Master of Arts in any-
              subject must have passed the examination in that
              subject in at least two years of their course of study
              for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, or must show
              evidence of having done equivalent work.
           Candidates for Honours in any subject must have
              obtained Honours at graduation in that subject for
              the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, or must show,
              evidence of having done equivalent work.
       . (2) Candidates for the Pass or Honours Degree of M.A..
              who have obtained first-class Honours in any subject·
              at graduation may, with the approval of the pro-
              fessor, be exempted in that subject from examina-
              tion on the courses of study prescribed in the follow-
              ing paragraphs, provided (a) that they present a-
              thesis of sufficient merit ; and (6) that, if required,
              they pass such examination as the professor may
              deem fit on matters connected with the thesis they
              present.
        (3) The examiners shall be at liberty to declare that-
              candidates for Honours, though they may not have
              deserved Honours, have acquitted themselves so as
              to deserve the ordinary Pass degree, and such candi-
              date shall be held to have passed the examination
              for that degree.
        (4) Candidates will be allowed considerable freedom of
              choice in regard to the details of their work, but'in
              every case their proposed course of study and the
              subject of their thesis or essay must be submitted for
              approval to the professor of the department.
        (5) Theses or essays offered for the M.A. Degree must be
              in the hands of the Registrar at least four weeks
              before the day of examination
    t Candidates may be admitted to Examination for the Degree of M.A. one year after
obtaining the Degreee of B.A. The Degree of M.A. cannot be conferred until the time ha»
elapsed which ia required by the By-laws.
                                 MASTER OF ARTS..                                           iyS

   SCHOOL OF. CLASSICAL PHILOLOGY AND ANCIENT HISTORY.
      Candidates may offer themselves for examination in one
or more of the following subjects :—
      1. The History of Greece, to the death of Demosthenes·
         In addition to a general knowledge of the subject, down
         to the death of Demosthenes, special knowledge of one
         of the following periods will be required :—
             (a) Down to 404 B.c., with Herodotus, Thucydides,
                  and Xehophon (Hellenics L, II.), and such in-
                  scriptions (in G. F. Hill's Sources for Greek
                  History, ör Hicks and Hill, Greek Historical In-
                  scriptions) as bear upon the history of the
                  period.              '
             (b) From 431 B.C. to the death of Demosthenes, with
     Thucydides, Xenophon (Hellenics) and Demos-
     thenes (Phil. I., Olynth. L-IIL, De Pace, Phil.
     IL, De Chers., Phil. III. De Corona), together
     with the inscriptions in Hicks and Hill, Greek
     Historical Inscriptions, bearing upon the period.
     *2. The History of Rome, to the death of Marcus Aurelius.
         Special knowledge of Cicero's Letters and Tacitus'
         Annals will be required.
      3. Greek Literature, to the death of Demosthenes. In
         addition to a general knowledge of the whole subject,
         special knowledge of one of the following groups will
         be required :—
(o) Lyric : Fragments as in Smyth's Greek Melic
Poets, or Farnell's Greek Lyric Poetry : Recent
Discoveries,
(b) Rhetorical : Speeches of the Attic Orators.
Candidates are recommended to consult the Professor
with reference to the course of study in this subject.
      4. The Homeric Poems—either the Iliad or the Odyssey.
      5. The Greek Drama. Candidates will be expected to be
         familiar with the history of Greek dramatic art in all its
         branches, both from the literary and from the practical
     • Other bouks may, subject to the approval of the Professor of Latin, be substituted
for those here specified.
196                              LECTURE SUBJECTS.

         or purely theatrical point of view. Haigh's Attic Theatre
         and Haigh's Tragic Drama of the Greeks would form the
         introduction to such study. Candidates would also be
         expected to offer as subjects of more minute literary
         study at least six plays of ¿Eschylus, Sophocles, Euri-
         pides, and Aristophanes (all four authors being repre-
         sented in the candidate's selection). Candidates are
         recommended to consult the Professor with reference
         to the course of study in this subject.
           *6. Roman Literature, to the death of Tacitus.      Special
              knowledge will be required of Virgil and Horace ; and
                candidates will be required to show a general know-
              ■ ledge of, and to translate passages from, other Latin
          authors.
      7. Greek Constitutional History. In addition to a general
        knowledge of the subject, to be gained from such a book
        as Greenidge's Handbook to Greek Const. History, special
        knowledge will be required of Plato, Republic, Books
        VIII.-IX. ; Aristotle, Politics, and Athenaion Politeia ;
        Xenophon, Respubl. Laced, and Respubl. Ath. Refer-
        ence also should be made to Freeman's History of
        Federal Government in Greece and Italy, and to such"
        other books as are recommended.
      8. Comparative Philology, with special application to the
        Greek and Latin languages. Books especially recom-
        mended : King and Cookson's Sounds and Inflections
        in Greek and Latin : Monro's Homeric Grammar :
        Wordsworth's Specimens of Early Latin : Lindsay's
        TAe Latin Language : Giles' Manual of Comparative
        Philology.
     Candidates for Honours are required to offer not less than
two of the above subjects ; but Honours will not be awarded
unless a sufficiently high standard is attained in each of the
subjects selected.
     The Greek and Latin books especially prescribed must be
read in the original language.      Books which have in whole or
     • Other books may, eubject to the approval of the Professor of Latin, be substituted
for those here specified.
                          MASTER OF ARTS.                                197
in part been included in the candidate's course for the B.A.
Degree may be offered only subject to the approval of the
Professor.

   SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND NATURAL PHILOSOPHY.
Candidates will be examined in the following subjects, or
in an equivalent course of study approved by the Professor.
Analytical Geometry of Two and Three Dimensions.
The Application of the Calculus to the Theory of Plane
               Curves.
         Statics and Dynamics, including the simpler parts of
               the Theory of Attraction and Rigid Dynamics.
        The Elementary Mathematical Theory of one of the
               subjects prescribed for the course in Mathematical
               Physics of the Third Year in Arts.
      Candidates for Honours may offer themselves for exami-
nation in any Mathematical subjects distinctly in advance of
those prescribed for the B.A. course. The subjects should be
chosen from both the Departments of Pure and Applied
Mathematics, but in exceptional cases a candidate may
devote his attention to Pure Mathematics only, or to Applied
Mathematics only.

      SCHOOL OF LOGIC, MENTAL, MORAL AND POLITICAL
                         PHILOSOPHY.
     Candidates may offer themselves for examination in on&
or more of the following subjects :—
           1. Logic.              4. Metaphysics.        7. Education.
           2. Psychology.        5. Politics.
           3. Ethics.             6. Sociology.
     In subjects 1-6 all candidates will be required to submit,
themselves to examination—
        (a) On the general history and literature of the subject
              or subjects chosen.
        (b) On a special branch of, or period'in the history of,
              the subject or subjects chosen.
198                   LECTURE SUBJECTS.

      In Education (subject 7) candidates will be required to
submit themselves to examination in two of the following
subjects—
        (a) Principles of Education. (6) History of Educa-
             tional Theory and Practice, (c) The present or-
             ganisation and administration of Education
             throughout the world, (d) The methods of teach-
             ing the various subjects of the primary and secon-
             dary schools, (e) Educational Psychology. (/)
             Mental Pathology and the.treatment of abnormal
             children.
      No books are prescribed, and considerable freedom will be
allowed in the arrangement of the courses of'study, provided
that every course must have the approval of the Professor.
      Candidates will be required to present a thesis on some
subject connected ινηΛ the branch of study selected. The
choice of subject must be approved by the Professor. The
thesis must give evidence of critical and constructive ability
on the part of the author.
      Candidates for Honours in Philosophy are required to
offer two subjects from the list as given above, provided that
for Honours in Education alone they may offer instead four
sub-sections of that subject.
         SCHOOL OF MODERN LITERATURE.
Candidates may offer themselves for examination in one
or more of the following subjects :—
       1. English Philology, English Literature before Chaucer,
             special knowledge of Beowulf, the Chronicle and
             Sir Gawayne and the Grene Knight will be re-
             quired.
       2. English Literature from Chaucer to the present day.
             Special knowledge will be required of three of the
             following authors :—Chaucer, Shakespeare, Burke,
             Tennyson.
       3. German Philology. German Literature before Klop-
             stock. Special knowledge of the Niebelungen
             Lied, .Walter von der Vogelweide, Hans Sachs
             (Dichtungen, Goedeke and Tittman).
                       FACULTY OF LAW.                              199

       4. German Language and Literature from Klopstock
             to the present day. Special knowledge will be
             required of Goethe's Novels and Dramas, of
             Schiller's Plays and Poems, and of Lessing's chief
             Dramas and Prose Works.
       5. French Philology.         French Literature till 1600.
             Special knowledge will be required of the Chanson
             de Roland, of the Romances and Pastorals
             (Romanzen and Pastorellen, ed. Bartsch), and of
             Montaigne.
       6. French Language and Literature from 1600 to.the
             present day. Special knowledge will be required
             ofMolière, of Voltaire's Historical Works, of Sainte-
             Beuve's Port Royal, and Hugo's Dramas.
     Incall these subjects there may be vivâ voce examination
in addition to the examination in writing.
     Candidates will be required to present an essay on some
subject connected with the period, and written in the language
they have selected.
     Candidates for Honours are required to offer not less than
two of the preceding subjects.
                  SCHOOL OF HISTORY.
Candidates are required to undertake the study of some
period or branch of History, approved by the Professor, and
to present an essay dealing with some part of it.
                       FACULTY OF LAW.
      The following Regulations have been passed by the
Senate :—
      1. A class examination shall be held at or after the end of
the first and second terms by each member of the teaching
staff in the subject matter of his lectures for the term, and a
report of the results of each examination shall be forwarded
to the Dean.
      2. Every candidate for the Final Examination, or, if he
takes that examination in sections, for Section II. of that
examination, shall, unless exempted by the Dean, be required
200                        LECTURE SUBJECTS.

to produce a certificate that he has acquitted himself satisfac-
torily in such practical exercises, including notes and attend-
ances in court as may be from time to time prescribed by the
teaching staff.
      3. A candidate who fails to pass in the Pinal Examina-
tion, or, if he takes that examination in sections, in Section
II. of that examination, shall, if the examiners are of opinion
that he has shown sufficient merit, be entitled to a deferred
examination in the subjects in which he has failed, such
deferred examination being held at such times as the Faculty
may prescribe.
      The following regulation has been passed by the Faculty
of Law :—
      In addition to the lectures in the subjects mentioned in
Chapter-XVIL, Section 8, candidates for the Degree of LL.B.
shall attend the courses of practical instruction in (a) Convey-
ancing, (b) Common Law Practice and Pleading, and (c)
Practice in Equity, Company Law, Bankruptcy, Probate and
Divorce.
LECTURE AND EXAMINATION SUBJECTS FOB THE DEGREE OF
                         LL. B.
   Professor Peden, Mr. F. R. Jordan, Mr. J. H. Hammond, Mr. D. S. Edwards,
        Mr. C. G. Davidson, Mr. P. Halse Rogers, Mr. M. L. MacCallum,
                                 Mr. P. R. Watts.
                9.-CONSTITUTIONAL LAW.
This subject will include :—(1) An account of the general
features of the British Constitution, and especially those
which are essential to a proper understanding of the imperial
factors in Australian government ; (2) a more particular
account of the constitution and government of the Common-
wealth ; and (3) an account of the constitution and govern-
ment of the State of New South Wales.
   Students are recommended to read the following text-books and statutes :
—Dicey, " Introduction to the study of the Law of the Constitution" ;
Anson, " The Law and Custom of the Constitution," 3rd ed. (Vol. II., ch.
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10, except S. 4) ; Thomas, "Leading Cases in Con-
stitutional Law " ; Webb, " Imperial Law " (ch. 3) ; Jenks, " History of
the Australian Colonies " ; Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act,
 1900, together with other Acts and Instruments relating to the Government
                           FACULTY OF LAW.                                       201

of the Commonwealth ; The Constitution Statute (18 and 19 Vict. c. 54)
and The Constitution Act, 1902, 1908, 1914 and 1916, together with other
Acts and Instruments relating to the Government of New South' Wales.
Reference should also be made to the following works :—Anson, " Law and
Custom of the Constitution " (Vol. I.) ; Ridge, " Constitutional Law of
England " ; Quick and Garran, " Commentaries on the Commonwealth of
Australia Constitution Act " ; Moore, " The Constitution of the Common-
wealth of Australia " (2nd edn.) ; Keith, " Responsible Government in
the Dominions " ; and to such statutes and cases as may be indicated in
the lectures.
                               10.—ROMAN LAW.
     This subject will include :—(1) The history of the sources
of Roman Law, together with an account of the administrative
and judicial organisation of the Empire under Constantine,
and a sketch of the subsequent history and influence of
Roman Law ; (2) the text of the Institutes of Justinian
(omitting iii. 1 to 12, and iv. 6 to end) ; and (3) the general
principles of Roman Law, so far as these are treated of in the
Institutes of Justinian.
    Students are recommended to read—Hunter, " Introduction to Roman
Law " ; and Moyle, " The Institutes of Justinian " and commentary.
Reference may also be made to Hunter, " Roman Law in the order of a
Code " ; and Sohm, " The Institutes of Roman Law " (translated by J. C.
Ledlie) ; and Leage, " Roman Private Law."
11.—JURISPRUDENCE, LEGAL HISTORY, AND THE ELEMENTS
                        OF POLITICAL SCIENCE.
     This subject will include :—(1) An enquiry into the
nature and relation of certain fundamental legal conceptions,
together with a sketch of their historical development ; (2)
the outlines of English legal history ; and (3) the elements of
political science.
      Students are recommended to read—Holland, " Elements of Jurispru-
dence " ; Austin, " Jurisprudence " (Student's edition), Introduction and
Part L, ch. 1, 5, 6, and 11 ; Maine, " Ancient Law," with Notes by
Pollock ; Carter, " History of English Legal Institutions " ; and Sidgwick,
" Elements of Politics." Reference may also be made to the following
works, and especially to such parts thereof as may be indicated in the
lectures :·—Austin, "Jurisprudence " (Student's edition). Parts II. and III. ;
Pollock, " First Book of Jurisprudence " ; Maine, " Early Institutions,"
" Early Law and Custom," and " Village Communities " ; Jenks, " The
State and the Nation " ; Bryce, " Studies in History and Jurisprudence " ;
Bentham, " Theory of Legislation " (by Dumont) ; Farrer, " The State in
relation to Trade " ; and Jevons, " The State in relation to Labour " ; and
Dicey, " Relation between Law and Public Opinion in England during the
19th Century " (2nd edn.).
202                          LECTURE SUBJECTS.

            12.—PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW.
This subject will include. :—(1) An account of the nature,
history and sources of Public International Law ; and (2) An
account of the rules generally accepted as determining the
conduct of States in their normal relations, in the relation
of war, and in the relation of neutrality:
      Students are recommended to read :—Cobbett, " Leading Cases and
Opinions on International Law (3rd edn.). Reference should also be made
to Hall, " Treatise on International Law," Westlake, " International Law,
vols. i. and ii." ; and Oppenheim, " International Law " ; and to such other
works and such statutes cases and documents as may be indicated in the
lectures.
 13.—THE LAW (in force in New South Wales) RELATING TO CON-
            TRACTS, MERCANTILE LAW, TORTS, CRIMES AND
            DOMESTIC RELATIONS.
      The lectures on this subject will comprise :—An account
of the law in force in New South Wales with respect to (1)
Contracts generally ; (2) Mercantile Law (including Negotiable
Instruments, Partnership, Insurance, Carriage and Mercantile
Agency) ; (3) Torts, and obligations arising from civil wrongs
at common law ; (4) Crimes, including offences punishable
summarily ; and (5) Domestic Relations and Lunacy.
      Text-books and Statutes :—Anson, " Law of Contract " ; Stevens'
" Elements of Mercantile Law " Parts II. and III. (5th or later edition,
omitting part relating to companies) ; Caporn, " Selected Cases on the
Law of Contracts ; Pollock " Law of Torts " ; Kenny, " Outlines of
Criminal Law " ; Kenny, " Selection of Cases illustrative of Criminal
Law " ; Stephen, " Commentaries," Book III. Reference should also be
made to Salmond, " Law of Torts," Hamilton & Addison's Crimes Act, and
to statutes (see appended list) and decisions relating to the above subjects,
and especially to such statutes and decisions as may be indicated in the
lectures.
14.—THE LAW OP PROPERTY AND PRINCIPLES OF CONVEY-
ANCING (as in force in New South VVales).
The lectures on this subject will comprise :—(1) An intro-
ductory course dealing with the general principles of the Law
of Property, as regards the nature, creation, transfer and devo-
lution of estates and interests that may be held in real and
personal property in New South Wales ; and (2) A more
advanced course on the system of Conveyancing in vogue in
New South Wales, with respect both to interests in land
(whether held under a common law title or under the Real
Property Act) and interests in personalty.
                            FACULTY OF LAW                                       203
     The lectures will be supplemented by a course of practical
instruction in Conveyancing.
     Text-books and Statutes :—Williams, " Principles of the Law of Real
Property " ; Williams, " Principles of the Law of Personal Property " ;
Millard, " Law of Real Property in N.S.W." ; Millard, " Law of Personal
Property in N.S.W." ; Elphinstone, " Introduction to Conveyancing " ;
Hogg, " Conveyancing and Property Law in N.S.W." ; together with
the following statutes (with commentaries where indicated)—Conveyancing
Act, 1919 ; Wills, Probate and Administration Act, 1898 ; Administration
(Validating) Act, 1900 ; Administration Amending Act, 1906 ; Registration
of Deeds Act, 1897, 1918 ; Real Property Act, 1900 (Canaway) ; Married
Women's Property Act, 1901 ; Inheritance Act, 1901 ; and Limitation of
Actions Act 3 and 4, Will. IV., c. 27 (adopted by 8 Will. IV. No. 3) ; 5 Vict.
No. 9, sections 39, 40, 41 ; Trust Property Act of 1862, section 36 ; Bills
of Sale Act, 1898 ; Bills of Sale (Amendment) Act, 1903 ; Lien on Crops and
Wool and Stock Mortgages Act, 1898; Trade Marks Act, 1905-1912
(Federal); Patents Act, 1903-1909 (Federal); and Copyright Act, 1912
(Federal). Reference should also be made to Jenks, " Modern Land Law ";
Hogg, " Conveyancing Precedents and Forms " ; Prideaux, " Dissertations
on the Law and Practice of Conveyancing," and to such other statutes (see
appended list) and decisions relating to these subjects as may be indicated
in the lectures.
15.—PROCEDURE IN CIVIL AND CRIMINAL CASES, together with
          the LAAV OF EVIDENCE AND PLEADING.
      The lectures on this subject will comprise :—An account
of (1) the system of procedure in Civil and Criminal Cases at
Common Law before the High Court, Supreme Court, Court of
Criminal Appeal, and courts of inferior jurisdiction ; (2) The
principles of the Law of Evidence ; and (3) the principles of
Pleading.
      The lectures will be supplemented by a course of prac-
tical instruction in Procedure and Pleading.
     Text-books and Statutes :—Smith, "Action at Law." ; Stephen, "Digest
of the Law of Evidence " ; Stephen, " The Principles of Pleading in Civil
Actions " ; the Duchess of Kingston's Case, with notes, from Smith's
" Leading Cases " ; Cockle's Leading Cases on Evidence, together with the
following statutes (with commentaries where indicated) ;—Evidence Act,
1898 ; Common Law Procedure Act, 1899 (Rolin and Innes) ; Attachment
of Wages Limitation Act, 1900; Crimes Act, 1900, Parts XI., XIL,
XIIL, XIV. (chaps. 1 and 4), XV. and XVL (Hamilton and Addison) ;
Poor Prisoners Defence Act, 1907 ; Criminal Appeal Act, 1912 ; Supreme
Court Procedure Act, 1900 ; Supreme Court and Circuit Courts Act, 1900 ;
Supreme Court and Circuit Courts Amendment Act, 1912 * District
Courts Act, 1912 (Foster and Bonthorne) ; Judgment Creditors Remedies
Act, 1901 ; Interstate Debts Recovery Act, 1901 ; Jury Act, 1912, Parts
204                 '       LECTURE SUBJECTS.

VII., IX., X., XL, XIL, and XIII. ; Interpleader Act, 1901 ; Prohibition
and Mandamus Act, 1901 ; Arrest on Mesne Process Act, 1902 ; Justices
Act, 1902 ; Justices Amendment Act, 1909 ; Police OSences (Amendment)
Act, 1908, Part VIII. ; General Legal Procedure Act, 1902 ; Commercial
Causes Act, 1903 ; Legal Proceas Facilitation Act, 1904 ; Small Debts
Recovery Act, 1912 ; State Laws and Records Recognition Act, 1901
(Federal) ; Service and Execution of Process Acts 1901-1918 (Federal) ;
Judiciarj' Act, 1903-15 (Federal) ; High Court Procedure Act, 1903
(Federal) ; High Court Procedure Amendment Act 1903 (Federal) ; Crimea
Act 1914-1915 (Federal) ; and Evidence Act 1905 (Federal). Reference
«hould also be made to such other statutes (see appended list) and decisions
relating to these subjects as may be indicated in the lectures.
        16.—THE RULES OF LEGAL INTERPRETATION.
     The lectures on this subject will comprise an account of
the more important rules relating to Legal Interpretation,
including the provisions of the Interpretation Acts.
      Text-books and Statutes :—Beal, " Cardinal Rules of Legal Interpre-
tation " (2nd edn.); Interpretation Act, 1897 (N.S.W.) ; Acts Interpre-
tation Act, 1901-1918 (Federal) ; and the Interpretation Act, 1889 (Im-
perial). Reference should also be made to Craies, Statute Law ; Norton
on Deeds ; Underhill & Strachan, Interpretation of Wills and Settlements ;
and to such cases as may be indicated in the lectures.
17.—EQUITY AND COMPANY LAW; THE LAW RELATING TO
       BANKRUPTCY, PROBATE AND DIVORCE (as in force in
       New South Wales); TOGETHER WITH PROCEDURE IN
       THOSE JURISDICTIONS.
      The lectures on these subjects will comprise :—(1) An
account of the general principles of Equity and Company Law,
together with Equity and Company Practice ; and (2) A
series of shorter courses on each of the following—(a) the Law
and Practice in Bankruptcy, (6) the Law and Practice in
Probate, and (c) the Law and Practice in Divorce.
      The lectures will be supplemented by a course of prac-
tical instruction in the Practice in Equity, Company Law,
Bankruptcy, Probate and Divorce.
     Text-books and Statutes :—" Principles of Equity " (Snell), together
"with the cases of Russell v. Russell, Bassett v. Nosworthy and Penn v.
Baltimore, with notes, from White and Tudor's Leading Cases in Equity ;
Williams, " Personal Property," Part IL, ch. 4 (Bankruptcy), and ch. 6
{Companies) (a short summary of the local law on these two subjects will
be found in Millard,"Personal Property," 2nd ed. pp. 118-141 and 142-170) ;
Walker and Elgood, " Executors and Administrators " ; Dixon, " Law of
Divorce " (omitting parts relating to practice) ; together with the following
                              FACULTY OF LAW.                                      205
,■statutes (with commentaries where indicated)—Equity Act, 1901 (Rich,
Newham and Harvey) ; Companies Act 1899 ; Companies Act Amendments
Acts, 1900, 190.6 and 1907 (in default of a more recent commentary students
are advised to refer to the notes contained in Rolin and Rich on the corre-
sponding provisions of the Acts of 1874 and 1888 and the No Liability
Mining Companies Act, 1881) ; Bankrupt' Act, 1898 (Salusbury), and
"Supplement, 1914 ; Wills, Probate and Administration Act, 1898, Part II.
(Kemp) ; Practice in Divorce, N.S.W. (Mackenzie) ; Trustee Act, 1898 ;
Trustee Act Amendment Act, 1902 ; and Partnership Act, 1892. Refer-
ence should also be made to such other statutes (see appended list) and
•decisions relating to these subjects as may be indicated in the lectures.
18.—PRIVATE INTERNATIONAL LAW (CONFLICT OF LAWS).
The subject will embrace a study of the principles which
determine questions of jurisdiction, and questions as to the
selection of the appropriate law, in cases coming before the
■courts of this State that involve some "foreign element."
     Students are recommended to read :—Dice}', " Conflict of Laws."
Reference should also be made to Foote, " Private International Law," the
■Servies and Execution of Process Act, 1901-1918 (Federal), and to such
•other statutes as may be indicated in the ■ lectures.
                      APPENDED LIST OF STATUTES.
      Conveyancing Act, 1898 ; Conveyancing and Law of Property
-(Supplemental) Act, 1901 ; Infants' Custody and Settlements Act
J899 ; Children's Protection Act, 1902 ; Landlord and Tenant Act,
1899; Partition Act, 1900; Registration of Deeds Act, 1897-1918;
Wills Probate and Administration Act, 1898 ; Administration (Vali-
dating) Act, 1900 ; Administration Amending Act, 1906 ; Public
Trustee Act, 1913 ; Real Property Act, 1900 ; Real Property
and Conveyancing (Amending) Act, 1901; Apportionment Act, 1905;
Stamp Duties Act, 1898; Probate Duties (Amendment) Act, 1899;
Companies ¡Death Duties) Act, 1901 ; Stamp Duties (Amendment) Acts,
1900, 1904, 1907, 1914 ; Stamp Duties (Deductions) Act, 1904 ; Bills of
Sale Act, 1898 ; Bills of Sale (Amendment Act), 1913 ; Money Lenders and
Infants Loans Act, 1905 ; Liens on Crops and Wool and Stock Mortgages
Act, 1898 ; Limitation of Actions Act, 3 and 4 Will. IV., c. 27 (adopted by
8 Will. IV., No. 3), and 5 Vict., No. 9, s. 39, 40 and 41 (or Acts consolidating
•or superseding the same) ; Married Women's Property Act, 1901 ; Trade
Marks Act, 1905-1912 (Federal); Patents Act, 1903-1909(Federal) ; Patents
Trade Marks and Designs Act, 1910-1915 (Federal) ; Copyright Act, 1879 ;
Copyright Act, 1912 (Federal) ; Inheritance Act, 1901 ; Equity Act, 1901 ;
Trustee Act, 1898 ; Trustee Amendment Act, 1902 ; Trustees' Delegation
of Powers Act, 1915 ; Companies Act, 1899 ; Companies Act Amendment
Acts, 1900, 1906 and 1907 ; Building and Co-operative Societies Act, 1902 ;
Partnership Act, 1892 ; Claims Against the Government and Crown Suits
Acts, 1912 ; Workmen's Compensation Act, 1916 ; Seamen's Compensation
Act, 1911 (Federal); Factors Act, 1899; Compensation to Relatives Act.
206                         LECTURE SUBJECTS.

1897; Bills of Exchange Act, 1909-1912 (Federal) ; Negotiable Instruments
Procedure Act, 1901 ; Fair Rents Act, 1915 ; Common Carriers Act, 1902 ;
Defamation Act, 1912 ; Defamation (Amendment) Act, 1917 ; Life, Fire
and Marine Insurance Act, 1902 ; Life, Fire and Marine Insurance (Amend-
ment) Act, 1917 ; Life Assurance Companies Act, 1905 (Federal) ; Marine
Insurance Act, 1909 (Federal); Innkeepers Liability Act, 1902; Crimes
Act, 1900 ; Crimes Amendment Act, 1905 ; Crimes (Girls' Protection) Act^.
1910 ; Crimes (Girls' Protection) Amendment Act, 1911 ; Crimes Act, 1914-
1915 (Federal) ; Witnesses Examination Act, 1900 ; Supreme Court and
Circuit Courts Act, 1900 ; Supreme Court and Circuit Courts Amendment *
Act, 1912 ; Supreme Court Procedure Act, 1900 ; Judgment Creditors
Remedies Act, 1901 ; Interpretation Act, 1897 ; Acts Interpretation Act,.
1901-1918 (Federal) ; Bankruptcy Act, 1898 ; Matrimonial Causes Act,
1899; Contractors Debts Act, 1897; Coroners Act, 1912; Masters and
Servants Act, 1902 ; Deserted Wives and Children Act, 1901 ; Deserted
Wives and Children Amending Act, 1913 ; Infant Protection Act, 1904 ;.
Neglected Children and Juvenile Offenders Act, 1905 ; Police Offences
Act, 1901, Parts T. and II.; Police Offences (Amendment) Act, 1908^
Criminal Appeal Act, 1912 ; Service and Execution of Process Act, "1901-
1918 (Federal); Marriage Act, 1899; Legitimation Act, 1902; Pawn-
brokers Act, 1902 ; Gaming and Betting Act, 1912 ; Usury, Bills of Lading
and Written Memoranda Act, 1902 ; Sèa Carriage of Goods Act, 1904
(Federal) ; Arbitration Act, 1902 ; Lunacy Act of 1898 ; Secret Com-
missions Act, 19Oo (Federal); Australian Industries Preservation Act, 1906-
1910 (Federal) ; Commerce (Trade Description) Act, 1905 (Federal) -r
Trading With the Enemy Act, 1914 ; Enemy Contracts Annulment Act,.
1915 ; Enemy Contracts Annulment Act, 1915 (Federal).

                            ADMISSION OF BARRISTERS.
      Certain privileges are conceded to Graduates and Third Year Students
of the University in respect to the conditions necessary for admission to the
Bar. As to these, candidates are advised either to refer to the Rules for
the admission of Barristers (see Law Almanac), or to apply for information
to the Secretary of the Barristers' Admission Board, Supreme Court.

                           ADMISSION OF ATTORNEYS.
      The Degree of Bachelor of Laws of the University of Sydney obtained
by an Articled Clerk who has attended the law lectures appointed by the
said University exempts him from passing the Legal History Examination,
the Intermediate Law Examination, and sections 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 of the
Final Examination. But he is required to pass section 6 of the Final
Examination, and to give all notices and pay all fees as required by the
existing Rules in the case of an Articled Clerk proceeding to Final Exami-
nation (see Law Almanac).
      For examinations of persons desirous of entering into Articles, see Rules
of the Supremo Court relating to the admission of Attorneys (Law Almanac).
      The subjects of the Examinations will be found in detail on page 133.
                             FACULTY OF LAW.                                    207
EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF LLD.
The Examination for the Degree of Doctor of Laws will
include the following subjects :—
                        1.-LEGAL HISTORY.
Candidates will be examined both in general and more especially in
English legal history. In addition to the text-books and books of
reference prescribed for corresponding parts of the LL.B, Examination,
candidates are recommended to read or refer to Pollock and Maitland.
" History of English Law " ; Holmes, " Tho Common Law " ; Lee,
'" Historical Jurisprudence " ; and Stephen, " History of the Criminal
.Law of England."
                         II.—ROMAN LAW.
The Examination in this subject will have reference to a special subject
:from the Digest, to be selected from time to time, and to be studied in con^
nection with the corresponding branch of English Law. Until further
notice the special subject will be " The Roman Law of Sale," as set forth
in the following Titles of the Digest: XVIII., 1, 5, 6, and XIX., 1. These
portions of the Digest should be studied in connection with Moyle's treatise,
'" The Contract of Sale in the Civil Law."
        III.—ENGLISH LAW (AS IN FORCE IN NEW SOUTH WAIVES).
•One of the following special subjects :—
     (1.) The Common Law (including Mercantile Law,
          Criminal Law and the Law of Evidence and Pro-
          cedure).
      Candidates, in addition to the books and statutes prescribed for the
•corresponding portion of the LL.B. Examination, are recommended to
make a special study of the leading cases, and especially of those contained
in Smith, " Leading Cases," and Tudor, " Leading Cases on Mercantile Law
And Maritime Law."
              (2.) Equity (including Bankruptcy, Probate, Company
               Law and Procedure).
                 Candidates, in addition to the books and statutes prescribed for the
           •corresponding portions of the LL.B. Examination, are recommended to
           make a special study of the leading cases, and especially those contained
       :in White and Tudor, " Leading Cases in Equity."
 (3.) The Law of Property and Conveyancing.
In addition to the books and statutes prescribed for the corresponding
portion of LL.B. Examination, candidates are recommended to make a
.special study of the leading cases and especially of those contained in
Tudor's "Leading Cases on Real Property and Conveyancing, &c."
Candidates will also be expected to show a competent knowledge of the
jpractice of conveyancing.
208                         LECTURE SUBJECTS.

 (4.) Constitutional Law.
In addition to the books and statutes, &c, prescribed for the corre-
sponding portion of the LL.B. Examination, candidates are recommended
to read or refer to the following works :—Quick and Garran, " Commentaries
on the Commonwealth of Australian Constitution Act " ; Clark, " Austra-
lian Constitutional Law " ; Moore, " The Constitution of the Common-
wealth of Australia " ; Todd, " Parliamentary Government of the British
Colonies " ; Forsyth, " Cases and Opinions in Constitutional Law " ; and
Ilbert, " Legislative Methods and Forms."
           IV.—INTERNATIONAL LAW (PUBLIC AND PRIVATE).
      In addition to the books prescribed for the corresponding portion of
the LL.B. Examination, candidates are recommended to read Westlake,
" Private International Law " ; and Dicey, " Conflict of Laws."
      NOTICE.—Candidates are at liberty, on giving six months' prior notice,
and with the approval of the Dean of the Faculty, to offer other books in
lieu of those recommended. Candidates are also advised that a thorough
knowledge and apt treatment of a fair proportion only of the subjects
touched on in any paper will be regarded as sufficient evidence of pro-
ficiency as regards that particular branch of the Examination.

                FACULTY OF MEDICINE.
    For Chemistry, Botany, Physics and Zoology see under.
Faculty of Science.
      19.—HUMAN- ANATOMY.
      Professor Wilson, Messrs. B. Coen, Burkitt, Hunter, and other
      Demonstrators.
          DESCRIPTIVE ANATOMY.
       A.—For Medical Students of First Year.
     Daily during Michaelmas Term.
     Introduction. Various aspects of anatomical study.
Methods of study. Nomenclature and Terminology. General
characteristics of bodily structure. Preliminary account of
human ontogeny. Establishment of rudiments of various
bodily systems and organs.
     Text Book.-—Either Cunningham's Text-Book of Anatomy, McMurrich's
Development of the Human Body, or Bryce in Vol. I. of Quain's Anatomy,
11th Ed.
                 B.—For Medical Students of Second Tear.
       Daily during Lent and Trinity Terms.
       Lectures and Demonstrations on Systematic Anatomy.
                           HUMAN ANATOMY.                                    209

     The lectures are illustrated by anatomical preparations,
both naked-eye arid microscopical, and by dissections, lantern
slides and diagrams.
      Text-Books.—Text-Book of Anatomy, edited by D. J. Cunningham >
or Morris' Human Anatomy, edited by McMurrich. If a special atlas of
illustrations be desired, the Hand Atlas of Human Anatomy, W. Spalteholz,
translated by L. F. Barker, or Toldt's Atlas, will be found most suitable.
              REGIONAL ANATOMY DEMONSTRATIONS.
                 A.—For Medical Students of Third Year.
      During Lent and Trinity Terms.
      The course includes regional·" demonstrations on the
Cadaver, a series of lectures and demonstrations in Neurology
and on the Anatomy of the Lymphatic System, special
demonstrations on Surface Anatomy on the Cadaver and in
the living subject, and demonstrations on Macroscopic Sec-
tional Anatomy.
              B.-—For other than Medical Students.
A junior course of demonstration in Regional Anatomy
will be held twice weekly during Trinity Term.
ELEMENTARY DESCRIPTIVE ANATOMY.
For other than Medical Students.
Thrice weekly during Lent and Trinity Terms. During
Lent Term : Introduction to Anatomical study and methods.
Nomenclature and Terminology. General characteristics of
bodily structure. The anatomy of bones, joints and muscles.
During Trinity Term : The vascular, respiratory, digestive,
urogenital and nervous systems ; the organs of sense and the
integument, the ductless glands. The lectures will be illus-
trated by demonstration from preparations, lantern slides, etc.
                       SPECIAL COURSES.
     During Trinity Term.
     A.—SPECIAL TOPOGRAPHICAL AND SURFACE ANATOMY
FOR STUDENTS OF MASSAGE.—A course of ten lectures, supple-
mentary to the general course of Elementary Descriptive
Anatomy. Here various facts" and features of importance
from the point of view of training in massage will receive
special consideration.
210                      LECTURE SUBJECTS.

     During Michaelmas Term.
 B.—DENTAL ANATOMY.—A course of ten lectures upon
the Anatomy of the teeth, including their structure and
development, will be given to First Year students in Dentistry.
Text-Book recommended for consultation.—Tomes' Dental Anatomy.
      C.—SPECIAL ARTISTIC ANATOMY.—A course of ten lec-
tures, supplementary to the general course of Elementary
Descriptive Anatomy, and dealing with points of special im-
portance from the point of view of artistic representation,
such as bodily proportion, form, in repose and in movement
(including attitude and expression).
      This course will only be delivered when desired by
students who have already taken either one or both terms of
the.general course of Elementary Descriptive Anatomy.
        PRACTICAL ANATOMY OR DISSECTIONS.
The dissecting rooms are open to members of the Prac-
tical Class only, during all the three terms, from Monday
to Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m. to 12 noon,
under the supervision of the Professor and Demonstrators.
Parts for dissection will be allotted by the Senior Demon-
strator. During each of the terms in which attendance
on Practical Anatomy is obligatory in accordance with the
University By-laws, every student must be actually engaged
in dissection, so far as the allotment of parts renders this at
any time possible.
      Not less than three hours must be devoted daily to actual
work in the dissecting-room, where alone a practical famili-
arity with the macroscopical details of human structure can
be acquired.
      Special tutorial classes are held in connection with the
dissection of the various parts for Second Year students.
      Credit for having dissected a part will be given only
 where diligence and attention to the work, and a fair degree
 of proficiency in actual dissection, have been exhibited. Pro-
 sectors for the Anatomy Classes are selected from among the
 best dissectors.
    Text-Books for Regional and for Practical Anatomy.—Cunningham's
Manual of Practical Anatomy.—Berry's Surface Anatomy.
                              PHYSIOLOGY.                                 211

               ANATOMICAL LABOBATOBY.
The Professor will give all possible assistance to any
advanced student or other competent person who may desire
to pursue some special study or enter upon some original
investigation in Anatomy, provided that, if not a member of
the University, the applicant shall make special arrange-
ments with the Registrar.
             20.—PHYSIOLOGY—JUNIOR AND SENIOR.
     Acting-Professor Priestley, Mr. F. S. Cotton, Mr. H. G. McQuiggin,
                     Dr. Wardlaw, and Demonstrators.
     These classes include a description of the microscopical
anatomy of the tissues and organs of the body, a special
account of the Physics and Chemistry of the body, and of the
functions of all its various parts.
     The course is fully illustrated by experiments, diagrams,
models, &c, &c.
                PRACTICAL PHYSIOLOGY.
Conducted jointly by the Professor and his Assistants.
The work of this class includes :—
       I. PRACTICAL HISTOLOGY.*—Tn which each student
       prepares, examines and preserves for himself
       specimens of the tissues and organs of the body.
       The student is shown all the more important
       processes in histological work and, where practi-
       cable, performs them himself.
       II. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY.—In this division
       each student performs for himself, and obtains
       graphic records of, the simpler experiments deal-
       ing with the physiology of muscle and nerve, the
       circulation and respiration. He also obtains
       practical training in the use of those physio-
       logical instruments employed in clinical work,
       e.g., ophthalmoscope, laryngoscope, perimeter,
       sphygmograph, fee.
       III. PRACTICAL CHEMICAL PHYSIOLOGY.—Each stu-
       dent makes an examination of the principal
       proteins, carbohydrates and fats contained in
              * See Regulation in reference to Miorosoopee, page 165.
212                        LECTURE SUBJECTS.

                  animals and plants. He then examines chemi-
                  cally blood, muscle, milk, bile, saliva, and
                  gastric and pancreatic juices, and performs ex-
                  periments in artificial digestion with' the three
                  latter. After this he proceeds with the quali-
                  tative and quantitative (gravimetric and volu-
                  metric) analysis of normal and abnormal urine.
                  Special attention is drawn to the clinical bear-
                  ing of the work.
SPECIAL COURSES ON PHYSIOLOGY FOR ARTS, "SCIENCE,
DENTAL AND MASSAGE STUDENTS.
These Special Courses of Instruction will be held at times
to be arranged. Demonstrations in ELEMENTARY PHYSIO-
LOGICAL ANATOMY will be included.
     The courses will be illustrated by means of dissections,
models, diagrams, microscopical preparations, &c, &c, &c.
      Text-Books for Physiology.—Halliburton's Handbook of Plvysiology ;
G.N. Stewart's Manual of Physiology ; Halliburton's Essentials of Chemical
Physiology ; Brodie's Essentials of Experimental Physiology ; "Quain's
Anatomy, or Schafer's Essentials of Histology ; Principles of General
Physiology, Bayliss ; Practical Physiological Chemistry, Hawk ; Directions
for a Practical Course in Chemical Ptrysiology, Cramer ; Practical Physio-
logical Chemistry, Cole.
     A Supplementary Course of Lectures on Special Veteri-
nary Physiology will be given in Michaelmas.
     Additional instruction adapted to the requirements of
Students in Veterinary Science will be given during the
Courses of Practical Physiology and of Practical Chemical
Physiology.
    Text-Book for Veterinary Physiology.—Γ Manual of Veterinary
Physiology.   F. Smith.
          THE PHYSIOLOGICAL LABORATORY.
The Physiological Laboratory (including the special
laboratories for Histology, Experimental Physiology, Physio-
logical Chemistry, and the Workshop) is open daily from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. ; Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
     Junior students are admitted at stated times, and receive
instruction from the Demonstrators.      Senior students can use
                                 PATHOLOGY.                             213
the laboraton' at any time during Term, and most vacations,
by arrangement with the Professor, and are encouraged in the
prosecution of original investigations under his direction, and
that of the Demonstrators.
     Anyone, whether or not a member of the University,
wishing to undertake original research in the laboratory, can
do so by application to, and arrangement with, the Professor.

                            21.—PATHOLOGY.
      Professor Welsh, Mr. Barling, Mr. B. T. Edye, Dr. Keith Inglis,
                         and Miss Marjory Little.
              FOE STUDENTS OF MEDICINE.
 I. In Michaelmas Term of the third year three hours
 daily are given to the study, by means of lectures, demon-
 strations and practical laboratory work, of (1) general path-
 ology, (2) hsematology, (3) bacteriology, and (4) the systemic
 pathology of the arteries, heart and lungs.
       (1) Under GENERAL PATHOLOGY is taken morbid pro-
cesses in general, and their causation, including—(a) retro-
grade tissue changes (degeneration, necrosis, atrophy) ; (δ)
progressive tissue reactions and formative processes (inflam-
mation, repair, hypertrophy) ; (c) new-growth (neoplasia) ;
(d) general circulatory derangements (venous hypersemia,
dropsy, embolism, thrombosis). In the practical work a
number.of lesions illustrative of the more important pro-
cesses are selected for study under the microscope and with
the naked eye.
       (2) Under HEMATOLOGY is taken the pathology of the
cells of the blood, and of certain correlated tissues (bone
marrow, lymphoid tissue, etc.). Practical instruction is-given
in methods of preparation and examination of blood films, in
the enumeration of the blood cells, in the estimation of
haemoglobin, and special stress is laid on the recognition and
interpretation of blood conditions in relation to clinical work.
       (3) Under BACTERIOLOGY is included a descriptive study
of the more important bacteria concerned in disease, their
chief morphological and biological characters, their modes of
action and results (infection, intoxication, local and general
214                   LECTURE SUBJECTS

lesions), experimental inoculation, the causation and pre-
vention of bacterial disease. The laboratory work deals with
general bacteriological technique, with special reference to
clinical work, and includes sterilisation, preparation of culture
media, isolation and cultivation, staining and microscopic-
examination, inoculation and identification, etc.
      N.B.—Microscopes for practical work in Haemotology,
Bacteriology, etc., require a suitable condenser and a -¿Vinch
homogeneous immersion objective. A triple dust-proof nose-
piece and a mechanical stage will be found of great con-
venience. (See regulations for the use of University micro-
scopes on page 165.)
       N.B.—A Thoma-Zeiss hsemocytometer, with two pipettes
and a counting chamber of approved pattern (e.g. Breuer),
should be obtained.
       II. In Lent Term of the fourth year IJ hours daily are
given- to the continued study of SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY by
lectures, demonstrations., and practical work in the laboratory
and in the post-mortem room, including a systematic study
of the more important diseases affecting the endocrine organs
and the structures of the circulatory, respiratory, alimentary,
urinary and nervous systems, with special reference to clinical
medicine.
       III. In Trinity Term of the fourth year IJ hours daily are
 devoted to lectures, demonstrations and practical laboratory
 work on—
       (1) PARASITOLOGY, a systematic study of the more im-
 portant protozoa and metazoa that are parasitic in man, with
 special reference to their incidence in Australia.
       (2) The phenomena of IMMUNITY, with special reference
 to their clinical applications, including toxins and anti-toxins,
 agglutinins and precipitins, hœmolysins and cy tolysins, phago-
 cytosis and opsonins, deviation of complement and the Wasser-
 manr reaction, vaccines, vaccination, and the principles of
 vaccine therapy, anaphylaxis, resistance to infection, etc.
       (3) The action of SNAKE VENOM and allied poisons, with
 their antidotes.
                                  PATHOLOGY.                                      215

       (4) General revision and more advanced study of HEMA-
TOLOGY and BACTERIOLOGY.
    IV. TROPICAL DISEASES.—Special         attention is devoted,
both in the lecture and in the practical courses, to the path-
ology of the more important forms of tropical disease under
the above headings. Since 1902 about one-fourth of the
course has been devoted to this aspect of Pathology.
     V. CLINICAL PATHOLOGY AND POST-MORTEM EXAMINA-
TIONS.—Students are urgently recommended to avail them-
selves of every opportunity that may ba given in the patho-
logical laboratories of the Eoyal Prince Alfred and Sydnsy
Hospitals for the study of pathological processes in the living
and in the dead.
     VI. POST-GRADUATE COURSES.—Special post-graduate
courses will, from time to time, be arranged.
     VII. ORIGINAL RESEARCH.—Original research in any
branch of Pathology and Bacteriology is encouraged so far as
the equipment and accommodation in the Laboratory «ill
permit.
      Text-Books.—For Bacteriology, Muir and Ritchie's " Manual " or its
equivalent. For Hsematology, Schleip's " Atlas," or Text-book by Gulfand
and Goodall. For Tropical Disease, Allbutt and Rolleçton's " System of
Medicine," vol. ii., part ii., or Text-book by Manson, or by Gastellani.
For Immunity, Ritchie in Allbutt and Rolleston, vol. ii., part i., or books bj'
Ehrlich, Metchinkoff, Wright, Emery, Allen (practical), or Bosanquet and
Eyre (practical). For General and Special Pathology, MacCallum, Adami,
(vol. i. General, vol. ii. Special), Woodhead (practical), Beattie and Dickson
(vol. i. General, vol. ii. Special), or Osier's " Principles and Practice of
Medicine " (Special).
     The best text-books at present available are Muir & Ritchie (Bacteri-
ology), Gullund & Goodall (Hœmato'ogy), MacCallum (Pathology), and
Casteilani & Chalmers (Tropical Medicine.
             FOR STUDENTS OF DENTISTRY.
Students of Dentistry are required to take the same
course as students of Medicine throughout Michaelmas Term
of the third year : but a special course on the pathology
and bacteriology of the mouth and teeth will take the place
of some of the work prescribed for students of Medicine
during that term.
     Text-Book.—Colyer's " Dental Surgery and Pathology " or its
equivalent.
216                       LECTURE SUBJECTS.

             22.—PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF SURGERY.
                           Dr. F. P. Sandes.
            INTEODUCTION—PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE.
  (a) Inflammation.      (6) Traumatism.    (c) Surgical Dis-
 eases,    (d) Regional Surgery—injuries and diseases peculiar
                      to parts of the body.
                       23.—OPERATIVE SURGERY.
            Dr. F. P. Sandes.     Tutor, Mr. J. L. McKelvey.
      In this class the principal operations are described and
their uses explained, and after ascertainirg that the student
has a thorough knowledge of the aratomy oí the part, he
performs the operatiors on the cadaver under the supervision
of the lecturer and his assistant.
     Text-Books Recommended.—Rose arid Carless' Manual ; Cheyne and
Burghard's Manual ; Waring's Manual of Operative Surgery ; Jacobson and
Rowlands' Operations of Surgery ; Thomson and Miles' Surgery, vols. I.
and II. ; Treves and Hutchinson's Operations ; Fitzwilliams' Operative
Surgery.
                24.—CLINICAL SURGERY.
Mr. Charles MacLaurin. Mr. G. H. Abbott.         Mr. Gordon Craig.
The Lecturers will deal more particularly Λι-ith the clinical
aspect, the diagnosis and treatment of surgical cases which
may from time to time present themselves in the wards.
                25.—TUTORIAL SURGERY.
The Surgical Tutor acts under the instructions of the
Lecturers in Surgery and Clinical Surgery, to whose courses of
instruction that of the Tutor is preparatory in its character.
The times fixed for the course are suitable on the one hand
to the convenience of the students and to the arrangements
of the hospital on the other. At least two meetings of the
class, each of at least one hour's duration, are held in each
week during Term, and, if need be owing to the number of
students in attendance, the class is subdivided so that the
students may have as much individual attention as possible.
A class examination is held at the end of each Term, ana the
results are communicated to the Registrar. The course is
conducted on a definite ana systematic plan as directed from
time to time by the Senate, and is of an entirely practical
                      CLINICAL MEDICINE.                           217

nature. The Tutor seeks to make each student thoroughly
acquainted with all the signs of Surgical Diseases and Ir juries,
with the methods and means of Surgical Diagnosis, and with
the nature, use, and application of surgical instruments and
appliances. The following is a more detailed statement of
the work of the class :—
        1. Case taking. 2. Knots, Bandages, Dressings. 3.
        Antiseptics and Sterilisation. 4. Fomentations,
        Poultices, etc. 5. Sutures and Sponges ; their
        preparation. 6. Splints and the Treatment of
        FracturesA 7. Surgical Emergencies in General.
        8. Restoration of the Apparently Drowned. 9.
        Local Anaesthesia. 10. Preparation of Patients
        for Operation. Treatment immediately after
        Operatior. 11. Artificial Limbs and Mechanical
        Apparatus generally. 12. Instruments. 13. Sur-
        face Anatomy. 14. Outline of Radiography.
        26.—PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE.
        Professor Mills.
       (a) General Symptomatology of Medical Diseases.
       (b) The Symptomatology of Diseases of Special Organs.
       (c) Respiratory Sy stem.
       (d) Circulatory System.
       ■(e) Digestive System.
       (/) Urinary System.
       (g) Nervous System.
       (A) Fever and Hydrotherapy.
       (i) Diet and Dietetics.
       (?) General Principles of Treatment.
             27.—CLINICAL MEDICINE.
    Drs. G. E. Remiie, Sinclair Gillies, C. Bickerton Blackburn.
    A. BEDSIDE INSTRUCTIONS ΓΝ THE WARDS OF THE ROYAL
    PRINCE ALFRED HOSPITAL.—The methodical ex-
    amination of patients, their symptoms and physical
    signs of disease.   Discussion or the diagnosis and
    treatment of each case.
    B. CLINICAL LECTURES on special cases, or on special
    subjects not otherwise dealt with or demonstrated
    . at the bedside.
218                     LECTURE SUBJECTS.

                   28.—TUTORIAL BiEDICINE.
              Messrs. E. W. Fairfax and John I. C. Cosh.
      The Medical Tutor acts as an assistant to the Lecturers on
 Clinical Medicine, to whose courses of irstruction the work of
 the Tutor is preparatory and supplementary. The meetings
 of the class are held at times suitable to the convenience of
 the students or the one hard and to the arrangements of the
 hospital on the other hand. The class meets at least twice
 weekly during Term, and each meeting is of not less than
 one hour's duration. If need be, owing to the number of
 students in attendance, the class is subdivided so that each
 student may have as much individual attention as possible.
 The course is conducted on a definite, and systematic plan, as
 directed from time to time by the Senate, and it is of an
 entirely practical nature. The Tutor seeks to make each
 student thoroughly acquainted with the signs of medical
 diseases, always comparing the abnormal with the normal,
 with the methods and means of medical diagnosis, and with
 the nature, use, and applicatior of such instruments as are
 used in medical diagnosis and treatment. The Tutor also
 exercises a gérerai superintendence over the work of the
 Clinical Clerks in the medical wards, and he gives them such
 assistance as they may require for properly recording the
 medical cases.
       The outlines of the work of the class are somewhat as
follow :—
       Special attention is paid to the proper way of taking the
 history of a medical case. Signs and sy mptoms, the difference,
 their significance.
      METHODS OF EXAMINATION.—Inspection, palpation, per-
cussion, auscultation, (a) the practica of these methods on the
healthy, (δ) the practice of the same methods on patients the
subjects of disease, (c) the signs revealed by these methods in
diseased conditions contrasted with the signs which obtain
in health.
      DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.—Examination of mouth and phar-
ynx ; inspection, palpation and percussion of abdomen in
health and in disease.
                             GYNECOLOGY.                            219

      CIRCULATORY SYSTEM.—The pulse ; its characters ; the
condition of the arteries ; estimation of blood pressure ;
taking of sphygmograms and their interpretation. Venous
pulse ; its significance ; examination of normal hearts ; ex-
amination of diseased hearts ; signs of dilatation and hyper-
trophy ; normal heart sounds ; abnormal heart sounds and
their significance.
      RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.—Examination of normal chests
by inspection, palpation, percussion and auscultation ; types
of breath sounds in healthy persons and in patients subject
of disease ; characters of respiratory accompaniments.
      URINARY SYSTEM.—Palpation of kidneys ; examination
of urine chemically, with special reference to albumen, blood,
bile and sugar ; microscopical examination of urinary
sediment.
      NE\IVOUS SYSTEM.—The mental condition af the patient ;
examination of the cranial nerves, with reference to their
functions ; examination of motor functions with regard to
paralysis, incoordination, abnormal movements ; examination
of sensory functions as to touch, temperature, pain and
muscle sense ; examination of reflex functions ; electric re-
actions of muscles and nerves.
                           29.—OBSTETRICS.
        The Physiology and Pathology of Pregnancy, Labour
     and the Puerperium.
Obstetric Operations.
The New-born Child.
Text-Books.—Johnstone's Text Book of Midwifery ; Eden's Manual of
Midwifery ; Tweedy and Wrench's Practical Obstetrics.
                           30.^GYNECOLOGY.
                          Mr. Fourness Barrington.
        Methods of Diagnosis:
Diseases of the Uterus and Fallopian Tubes.
Pelvic Inflammation.
Diseases of the Ovaries.
Affections of the Vagina and Vulva.
Disorders of Function.
Text-Books.—Barbour and Watson's Gynaecological Diagnosis and
Pathology ; Cameron's Gynaecology.
220                    LECTURE SUBJECTS.

31.—MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE.
Dr. R. H. Todd.
Legal criminal procedure. Medical evidence.. Identifi-
cation in the living and dead. Death in its medico-legal
relations. The examination of the dead body. The signs of
death. Forms of death. Differential diagnosis of states of
insensibility. Wounds in their medico-legal relations. Exami-
nation of blood and other stains. Legal relations of sex
incidents. Signs of pregnancy and delivery. Infanticide.
Lunacy in relation with the law.     Toxicology.
32.—PUBLIC HEALTH.
Mr. W. G. Armstrong.
PUBLIC HEALTH.—Air—Composition,            impurities, venti-
lation, amount required, natural and artificial ventilation,
examination of air. Water—Quantity and supply, quality,
impurities, purification, examination of water supplies. Food.
—Classification of foods, dietaries, preservation of foods, un-
sound food, diseases caused by food. Sanitary engineering—
Dwellings, sanitary defects, disposal of refuse, sewers, sewage
disposal. General Epidemiology with special reference to the-
origin, symptoms, propagation and prevention of the epidemic,,
endemic and other infective diseases liable to occur in Aus-
tralia. Unwholesome trades and occupations and the diseases
to which they give rise. Vital statistics. The law of public
health—Notification, preventive measures, nuisances, insani-
tary habitations, protection of food supplies. Local Govern-
ment ordinances relating to public health.
33.—PHARMACOLOGY, MATERIA MEDICA AND THERAPEUTICS.
        Professor Chapman, Mr. S. H. Stroud, E.I.C., Ph.C.
I. For Medical Students.
      (1) A course of lectures on Pharmacology will be given
twice a week during Lent and Trinity Terms to students in
their third year.
      The lectures deal with the mode of action of drugs on the
animal organism as illustrated by the effects of representative
substances as curare, strychnine, caffeine, morphine, alcohol,,
chloroform, ether, chloral hydrate, cocaine, aconite, acetani-
lide, phenacetin, carbolic acid, salicylic acid, quinine, atropine,,
            PHARMACOLOGY, MATERIA MEDICA, ETC.                          221

physostigmine, pilocarpine, nicotine, adrenalin, ergot, digitalis,
ipecacuanha, apomorphine, tartar emetic, castor oil, aloes,
iron, mercury, arsenic, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, cal-
cium, and magnesium.
      (2) Each student will examine during Lent and Trinity
Terms the chemical characters of the principal groups of
active substances in plants, will perform the tests for the
chief alkaloids and drugs, and will carry out the main0
methods of separation for the common poisons, etc. The
student will then proceed to the examination of the effect of
the principal drugs on secretion, muscle, nerve, heart, respira-
tory apparatus, etc., and the properties of some of the more
important therapeutic agents will be investigated in detail.
    Text-Booh—Dixon, Manual of Pharmacology.
      (3) A course of lectures on Materia Medica and Thera-
peutics will be delivered daily in Michaelmas Term to Students
in their Third Year.
     The subjects considered will include—
         (a) The chief conditions which influence the action of
              drugs.
         (b) The nature, mode of action, uses, chief methods of
              administration of the more important official and
              unofficial drugs, and of their preparations.
         (c) Poisons, their effects, detection, and antidotes. '
     The course will be illustrated by diagrams, macroscopical
and microscopical preparations, and by such other means as
may be available.
      (4) Practical instruction in Pharmacy will be given once
a week during one Term to students in their Fourth Year.
Each student dispenses selected prescriptions which embody
the use of the chief pharmaceutical processes.
    Text-Books.—Hale White, Materia Medica, etc. ; Bruce and Dilling,
Materia Medica, etc. ; Cushny, Pharmacology and Therapeutics.
II. For Dental Students. .
     A course of 20 lectures on the Materia and Therapeutics
of the more important substances employed by dentists and
adapted to the special requirements of the latter will be given
during Michaelmas Term.
222                         LECTURE SUBJECTS.

      Text-Books.—Buckley, Modern Dental Materia Medica, Pharma-
 cology and Therapeutics,-or H. Prinz, Dental Materia Medica and Thera-
 peutics .
  III. For Veterinary Students.
      Students in their Third Year will attend the course.of
Pharmacology provided for Medical Students.         They will also
attend during one Term a course of instruction in Practical
, Pharmacy.
 IV. For Pharmaceutical Students.
       (1) A course of lectures on Materia Medica, treating
 primarily of the substances officinal, and secondarily of the
 more important substances not officinal in the British Phar-
 macopoeia, will be given daily during Lent Term. It will be
 illustrated by diagrams, macroscopical and microscopical
 specimens, and such other means as may prove feasible.
       (2) A course of lectures on Materia Medica and Pharmacy
 will be given twice a week during Trinity and Michaelmas
 Terms. The lectures will deal with the following subjects :—
 History of Pharmacy, weights and measures used in phar-
 macy, the nature of solution, percentage of solutions, specific
 gravity, melting point, boiling point, optical rotation, refrac-
 tive index, acid value, saponification value,· iodine value,
 crystallisation, scaling, precipitation, filtration, the use of
 heat, steam baths, evaporation, extraction apparatus, desic-
 cation of drugs, distillation, trituration, levigation, elutriation,
 the extraction of drugs, maceration, infusion, decoction, per-
 colation, expression, working in bond, sterilisation, organised
 and unorganised ferments, preparations of the British Pharma-
 copoeia, explanation of the preface, appendices, chemical re-
 actions and tests of the British Pharmacopoeia, manufacture
 of official preparations, special Australian conditions of manu-
 facture, non-official remedies, general principles of dispensing,
 powders, mixtures, emulsions, pills, gargles, lotions, liniments,
 suppositories, incompatibles, treatment of difficult prescrip-
 tions, pharmaceutical Latin, the law relating to pharmacy,
 the law relating to foods and drugs, regulations in force in the
 Commonwealth relating to foods and drugs, special regula-
 tions affecting pharmacists and pharmaceutical ethics..
                    PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE.                            223

      (3) Practical instruction in Materia Medica and Phar-
macy will be given twice a week during Lent, Trinity and
Michaelmas Terms. During Lent Term this will involve the
examination of crude vegetable and animal drugs included
in the lectures, and the recognition of official preparations.
Chemical tests will be performed for alkaloids, organic,
synthetic substances and other drugs. Assays will be done
of volumetric, gravimetric and gasometric characters. Deter-
minations of arsenic and lead in drugs and other analyses of
special pharmaceutical interests will be carried out. During
Trinity and Michaelmas Terms the practical work will follow
the lectures and will embrace the preparation by the student
of typical examples drawn from the official dilute acids,
waters, liquors, plasters, extracts, fluid extracts, mixtures,
liniments, oils, oleates, syrups, tinctures, ointments snd
effervescing salts. Standardisations will be made when
necessary. The determinations of density, melting points,
boiling points, and optical rotation will be made. Selected
prescriptions will be dispensed. The student will receive
instruction in the translation of prescriptions, in the reading
of prescriptions, and in the detection of overdoses.
                  MUSEUM OF MATERIA MEDICA.
    Text-Books.—British Pharmacopoeia ; White and Humphrey, Pharnia-
copcedia ; Ince, Latin Grammar ; Hampshire, Volumetric Analysis ;
McEwen, Art of Dispensing ; Hale White, Materia Medica.
    Reference.—Greenish, Materia Medica ; Squire, Companion to the
Pharmacopoeia.
      The Museum of Materia Medica will be opened to students
attending any of the courses of instruction in the department
for the examination of drugs and specimens. Every student
is expected to become familiar with the appearance and char-
acters of the drugs dealt with in the course of instruction.
34.—PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE
Dr. Andrew Davidson.
This course comprises :—
     I. An account of the Nature, Causes, Classification, Social
   and Medico-Legal Relations of Insanity.
   II. An account of the various forms of Mental Disease or
   Disorder ; their clinical history, diagnosis, prognosis
   and treatment.
224                       LECTURE SUBJECTS.

  III. Practical demonstrations, at a Mental Hospital, of the
           various types of Mental Disease or Disorder ; and
           instruction in the method of examining insane per-
           sons, and in filling up certificates of insanity.
                          35.—OPHTHALMOLOGY.
                             Dr. F. Antill Pockley.
      Diseases and Injuries of the Conjunctiva, Cornea, Scler-
otic, Iris and Ciliary Body, and Crystalline Lens. Glaucoma,
Asthenopia. Examination of the Eye. Ophthalmoscopy.
Affections of the Vitreous Humour, of Optic Nerve, Retina,
and Choroid. Affections of Sight unaccompanied by any
definite intraocular signs :—Amblyopia and Amaurosis,
Colour Blindness, &c. Perimetry :—Defects in Visual Field,
Hemianopsia, &c. Affections of the Ocular Muscles : Para-
lysis, Strabismus, &c. Diseases of the Eyelids and Lachrymal
Apparatus.      Operations.
     BOOKS RECOMMENDED.—Text-Books.—Handbook of Diseases of the
Eye, Swanzy and Werner ; Diseases of the Eye, Berry ; Ophthalmic Surgery
and Medicine, Jessop.
     For Reference.—System of Diseases of the Eye, Norrie and Oliver ;
American Encyclopaedia of Ophthalmology.
       36.—DISEASES OF THE EAR, NOSE AND THROAT.
                        Dr. H. J. Marks.
      EAR.—Anatomy and physiology of the sound-conducting
apparatus. Clinical examination of the ear and the estimation
of the hearing power. Diseases and affections of the auricle
and of the external auditory canal. Injuries of the drum
membrane. Acute and chronic catarrh of the middle ear.
Acute and chronic suppurations of the middle ear. Complica-
tions and sequelae of suppurative diseases of the middle ear.
The anatomy and physiology of the sound perceiving appar-
atus. Inflammatory and suppurative lesions of the labyrinth.
Non-suppurative diseases of the labyrinth. Injuries affecting
the internal ear. Deaf-mutism. Intracranial lesions of
otitic origin.    Operations.
       NOSE.—Anatomy and functions. Methods of examina-
nation. Injuries. Foreign bodies. . Acute and chronic rhin-
itis. Epistaxis. Causes and treatment. Diseases and affec-
tions of the nasal septum. Nasal obstruction, its symptoms
and effects, local and general.     Neuroses of the nose. Chronic


      ι
             SURGICAL AND MECHANICAL DENTISTRY.                         225

infective diseases of the nose. Benign and malignant
tumours. General consideration of symptoms and treatment.
The Nasal Accessory Sinuses : Anatomical considerations and
methods of examination. Inflammation of the sinuses. Acute
and chronic suppurations. Benign and malignant tumours.
Operations. Ocular and orbital complications of sinus dis-
ease. Naso-Pharynx : Anatomy. Methods of examination.
Acute and chronic post-nasal catarrh. Adenoids. Benign
and malignant new growths. Pharynx : Anatomy and
methods of examination. Acute and chronic pharyngitis.
Acute tonsillitis. Chronic enlargement of the tonsils.
Chronic infective diseases. Benign and malignant growths
of tonsil and pharynx. Neuroses of pharynx. Throat affec-
tions of specific fevers.    Operations.
   LARYNX, TRACHEA, BRONCHI and (ESOPHAGUS.—Methods of
■examination. Laryngoscopy. Tracheoscopy. Bronchoscopy
(Esophagoscopy. and laryngeal suspension. Radiography.
General therapeutics. Injuries of larynx. Acute and chronic
laryngitis. Chronic infective diseases. Benign and malig-
nant new growths. Neuroses óf larynx. Diseases of the
trachea. Diseases of the (Esophagus. Foreign bodies in the
air-and food passages. Operations. Diseases of the ear, nose
and throat in relation to general medicine.
37.—DISEASES OP THE SKTN.
Mr. E. H. Molesworth.
A short theoretical course of lectures in Dermatology,
embracing all the chief diseases of the skin and their treat-
ment, is delivered to the students once a year, whilst at the
outdoor Dermatological Department clioical teaching is given
throughout the whole year.
               FACULTY OF DENTISTRY.
    (See also under Faculties of Medicine and of Science.)
    38.—SURGICAL AND MECHANICAL DENTISTRY.
    Messrs. R. Fairfax Reading, F. Marshall, P. A. Ash, Donald Smith,
    E. Deck, A. L. Lyell. ■
(α) SPECIAL DISEASES OF THE TEETH.
PART I.
1. Surgical Anatomy of the Teeth, Temporary and Per-
manent.      2. Extraction — Instruments, etc.    3. Accidents
                                                                        J
226                    LECTURE SUBJECTS.

during and after extraction. 4. Extraction under anaes-
thetics. 5. Pyorrhoea Alveolares. 6. Tumours of the Jaws.
7. Reflex Disorders of Dental Origin. 8. Injuries—Fracture
of Alveolus. Dislooatior. Accidental Extraction. Infection,
of Wound. Fractured Teeth. 9. Replantation. Trans-
plantation. Implantation. 10. Fracture of Jaw—Compli-
cations. Splints. 11. Cleft Palate. 12. Deformities—Re-
storative appliances.
                        PAET II.
1. Condition of Teeth and Jaws at Birth. 2. Temporary
Dentition and its Complications. 3. Permanent Dentition.
4. Abnormalities of Teeth. 5. Caries. 6. Diseases of the
Pulp. 7. Abscess. 8. Diseases of the Pericimentum. 9.
General hygiene of the Mouth. 10. Root canals, treatment
and filling.
             (6) CLINICAL DENTAL STJEQEBY.
1. The Teeth—Definition, nomenclature, structure, form,
surfaces, arrangement. 2. Sterilisation—Mouth, hands, in-
struments, &c. 3. Examination of the Teeth—Appliances,
methods, removal of deposits, separating, records, &c. 4.
Stages of Caries—Superficial, moderate, deep. 5. Exclusion
of moisture—Appliances, methods. 6. Preparation of Cavi-
ties—Opening, removing decay, shaping, sterilising. 7.
Classification of Cavities—(a) Simple cavities on. exposed
surfaces, (b) Simple approximal cavities, (c) Compound cavi-
ties. 8. Filling Materials—Gold, tin, amalgam, cement, gutta
percha. 9. Cavity Linings—Indications for, materials. 10.
Filling cavities with gold and with tin. 11. Filling cavities
with plastic materials. 12. Combination fillings. 13. Mat-
rices—Forms, uses, dangers. 14. Inlays, porcelain and gold.
15. Bleaching of discoloured teeth. 16. Care and treatment
of deciduous teeth.
                      ORTHODONTIA.
Etiology.     Classification of cases.      Movements to be
produced.      Materials, appliances and methods.    Simple cases
and methods of correction.      Complicated cases and methods
of correction.
            SURGICAL AND MECHANICAL DENTISTRY.                              227

                 (c) CROWN AND BRIDGE WORK.
      1. History, definition and application. 2. Materials and
instruments required. 3. Selection of cases for crown work.
4. Treatment and preparation of roots for reception of the
various forms of pivot crown. 5. Construction and mounting
of porcelain and facing crowns. 6. Preparation of teeth for
the adjustment of hollow metal crowns. 7. The hollow metal
■crown. 8. Porcelain faced hollow metal crown. 9. Seamless
crowns. 10. Principles involved in the selection of cases
for bridge work. 11. Construction and fitting of the various
forms of fixed bridges. 12. Application to special cases. 13.
Removable bridges. Application and construction. 14.
Material and various methods employed in setting crown and
bridge work. 15. Porcelain as applied to crown and bridge
work. 16. General principles. 17. The various kinds of
porcelain bodies, their composition and fusing points. 18.
Manipulation of the body. 19. The construction of porcelain
•crowns.

                         (d) PROSTHETIC DENTISTRY.
      1. The anatomy of the mouth. 2. Results of losing the
teeth. 3. Examination of the mouth. 4. Retention or ex-
traction of natural teeth. 5. Furnishing the laboratory. 6.
Impressions. 7. Casts for artificial dentures. 8. Moulding-
dies and counter-dies. 9. Taking the bite with " Relation of
the jaws to the temporo-mandibular articulation," and " The
record of the paths of the condyles." 10. Articulators. 11.
Selecting and mounting the teeth. 12. Principles of reten-
tion of artificial dentures. 13. Composition and manufacture
of porcelain teeth. 14. Rubber and vulcanite. 15. Vulcan-
ising and finishing. 16. Swaged metal plates. 17. Cast
metal plates. 18. Combination dentures. 19. Soldering. 20.
Continuous gum dentures.         21. Esthetics of prosthetics.
      Text-Books Recommended.—Essig's and Kirk's American Text-Books >
Tomes ; Turner's Mechanical Dentistry ; Kingsley's Oral Deformities »
Evans' Crovra and Bridgé Work ; Guilford's Orthodontia ; Farrar's Irregu-
larities ; Dental Metallurgy, E. A. Smith (Churchill & Co.) ; Angle's
Malocclusion of the Teeth ; Goalee's Crown and Bridge Work ; Smale and
Colyer, Diseases and Injuries of the Teeth ; Johnson's Methods of Filling
Teeth ; Operative Dentistry (Black).
228                    LECTURE SUBJECTS.

PROSTHETIC REQUIREMENTS,
FIRST YEAR.
1. Drawing from specimen teeth. 2. Cusp modelling. 3.
Section cutting and printing. 4. Composition impression of
upper jaw and pour the cast. 5. One upper and one lower
cast from plaster impressions, and trimmed for vulcanite
dentures. 6. One upper and one lower cast from plaster im-
pressions, and trimmed for metal dentures, marking the plate
outline ' to indicate the location of the hard and soft places,
the frcenum and muscular attachments. 7. Vulcanise two
tubes of rubber at specified temperatures. 8. Vulcanise an
upper plate without teeth. 9. An upper partial vulcanite
plate with two incisor and two back teeth. 10. Break and
repair No. 9. 11. Prepare abite plate, and construct a full
upper vulcanite denture, articulating to lower cast, using
plain teeth, red rubber base, and pink rubber facing. 12.
Make dies and counter dies for No. 6. 13. Construct vulca-
nite dentures for an edentulous mouth. 14. Practical repairs.
                           SECOND    YEAR.
     1. Partial upper vulcanite plate to supply four front teeth
before the natural teeth are extracted. 2. Draw plate outline
on cast and construct a partial upper metal plate, without
teeth. 3. Draw plate outline on a lower cast, the plan for
the plate and clasps, and construct a partial lower soldered
matal plate with two clasps. 4. Prepare bite blocks and
articulate casts, and construct a full upper metal denture with
soldered vacuum chamber and gum section teeth with vul-
canite attachment, articulating with a full lower swaged
metal denture with plain teeth. 5. Partial upper metal plate,
four teeth and two clasps soldered. 6. Practical vulcanite
and metal denture.
                           THIRD YEAR.
                           TECHNICAL.
          1. Forty amalgam and cement fillings (20 to be preceded
    by root treatment).   2. Twenty gold filhngs ; ten inlays (five
   porcelain, five metal).     3. Take plaster impressions of an
      approved case of malocclusion.    4. Run casts, prepare and
          SURGICAL AND MECHANICAL DENTISTRY.                     229'

plane same for lodgment in case.        5. Mitre and solder sections
of wire.     6 Make two D bands.           7. Make four Magill
bands,,
two soldered labially and two soldered lingually.       8. Make
two plain spurred bands for rotating.       9. Make an appliance
for maintaining expansion after correction of'dental arches.
10. Make a retaining appliance, as used in Class II. or III.,
for keeping the normal mesiodistal relationship.       11. Make a-
retaining appliance for use after a tooth has been rotated to
maintain its position.     12. Make an appliance to maintain
the anterior teeth after correction of a case of Class-II.    13.
Make an expansion arch.         14. Make sheath hooks, and attach-
to expansion arch.       15. Prepare and mould an undercut
lower cast with cores.       16. Mould an undercut upper cast
with Hawes Flask.           17. Construct a partial metal plate,,
using four tube teeth.      18. A full upper cast aluminium plate,
with attachments for rubber.       19. A full lower cast fusible
metal plate, with attachments for rubber.               20. Practical
dentures (anatomical articulation).      21. Preparation of roots-
for, and construction on, an articulator of three hollow metal
molar crowns ; two incisor crowns (one banded, one half-
banded, soldered).       22. Two porcelain-faced bicuspid crowns ;;
one all porcelain bicuspid crown, using full-band and porcelain
facing ; three Davis crowns, cast bases ; four telescoping
crowns (two molar, two incisor) with tube and split pin.
      Instruments Required.—Angle band forming pliers, How
pliers, band soldering pliers, SSW taps and dies, pin holder,,
shellac and sandarac, plaster plane, wrenches (straight and..
curved), angles, set of trays.
      Material Required.— Four coils German silver alloy band
metal, 36 gauge ; two feet 18 gauge German silver alloy wire,
for spurs, loops, etc. ; two feet wire, German silver, 16 gauge ;
five pennyweights easy flowing silver solder ; one piece easy
flowing soft solder.
                            FOUETH YEAE.
Thirty gold fillings (fifteen to be approximal cavities in an-
       terior teeth).
Fifty amalgam and cement fillings (twenty-five to succeed root·
        treatment).
230                     LECTURE SUBJECTS.

Two regulation cases ; ten inlays (in the mouth).
Two hollow metal crowns ; three incisor crowns               These
One deep-banded porcelain faced bicuspid crown { to be done .
One all-porcelain banded bicuspid crown                 Í        in
One Davis crown, cast base                              I the mouth
Preparation of cavities for, and construction of, three metal
       inlay attachments for removable bridges.

                         PRACTICAL.
1. Treat one case of malocclusion, case to be started
■ during Lent Term. 2. Make Magill bands and plain spurred
bands, as required in treatment. 3. Make sheath hooks, and
attach to expansion arch as required. 4. Make retaining
appliance for case treated. 5. Take impressions of com-
pleted case, cast and plane same, and lodge in case. 6. Con-
struct a partial continuous gum denture, supplying four an-
terior teeth.     7. Practical dentures (anatomical articulation).
One Gunning splint ; one Kingsley splint ; one Hammond
       splint.
One cleft palate case complete, both soft velum and obturator ·
       to be made.
Examination for certificate of proficiency ir extraction.
Four removable bridges, each with two or more dummies.
       1, to be made in the mouth.
       2, to be the constructed skeleton for an all-porcelain
             bridge.
       3 and 4, to be ordinary cases selected by the lecturer.

                             PHARMACY.
      The course of instruction attended by Pharmacy students
 consists of—
         (a) Chemistry, inorganic and orgaric, with practical
              work, see No. 40.
         (b) Materia Medica, see No. 33.
         (c) Botany, see No. 53.
                                 PHYSICS.                                   231

                  FACULTY            OF      SCIENCE.
                                39.—PHYSICS.
      Professor Pollock, Assistant-Professor Vonwiller, Mr. I. G. Mackay,
             Mr. E. H. Booth, Mr. G. H. Briggs and Demonstrators.
                                 LECTDBES.
                            PHYSICS I.
     Ar introductory course of lectures on the Elementary
Principles of Mechani ;s, Properties of Matter, Sound, Heat,
Light, and Electricity and Magnetism.
    Text-Book.—Spinney, Text-Book of Physics, or Crew, General Physics,
or Watson, Intermediate Physics.
                         PHYSICS Π.
A course of about fifty lectures on the Properties of"
Matter, Heat, and Electricity and Magnetism.
                              PHYSICS ΠΙ-
      Α course of about fifty lectures on Physical Optics,
Acoustics, and Electricity and Magnetism.
      For Honours the examination will include the subjects of"
Physics II.
                       PHYSICAL LABORATORY.
      The Physical Laboratory was designed by Sir Richard
Threlfall, K.B.E., M.A., F.R.S., Hon. Fellow of Caius College,
Cambridge, then Professor of Physics in the University, and
was built under his supervision. The building was com-
menced in 1886, and completed early in 1888. Considerable
additional laboratory ac ommodation was provided in 1901
by an extension of one side of the building.
      The Laboratory was founded for the encouragement of
the study of Physical Science, and its object is to afford
facilities for instruction and research.
PRACTICAL PHYSICS,
FIRST YEAR.
The course consists of quantitative experiments in the
following :—
     Measurement of Length. Estimation of Mass. Determi-
nation of Density. Determination of Atmospheric Pressure..
Pressure       of       Water        Vapour.           Hygrometry.
Thermometry.-
232                        LECTURE SUBJECTS.

"Vibratory Motion. Moments of Inertia. Elasticity of Solids.
Surface Tension. Calo rime try. Determination of Musical
Pitch. Measurement of Velocity of Sound in Air and Solids.
Reflection and Refraction of Light. Elementary Spectro-
.scopy. Polarisation of Light. Saccharimetry. " Measure-
ment of Resistance. Electromotive Force and Current.
Electro-magnetic Induction.
     All students attending the Physical Laboratory are
required to keep a record of their practical work in special
note-books. The marks given for Practical Physics at the
-annual examination depend upon these records as well as upon
the result of any examination which may be held.
     Students presenting themselves for examination in
Physics at the end of any Academic Year during which they
have not attended the Laboratory must also present them-
selves for examination in Practical Physics.
      Text-Book.—Practical Physics, Pollock and Vonwiller.

                               SECOND      YEAB.
      The course consists of quantitative experiments in the
■following :—
     Measurement of Time. Pendulums. Elasticity of
Solids. Viscosity. Surface Tension. Expansion of Solids.
Liquids and Gases. Heat Conductivity. Calorimetry.
..Magnetic Measurements. Determination of Magnetic
Elements. Magnetic Properties of Metals. Accurate Com-
parison of Resistances. Electrolytic Measurement of Current.
.Accurate Comparison of Electromotive Forces. The Poten-
tiometer. Electrical Thermometry. The Ballistic Galvano-
meter. Measurement of Capacity. Determination of Self
and Mutual Induction, etc.
      Text-Book.-—Text-Book of Practical Physics, Watson.

                                THIRD    YEAB.
      Advanced Physical Measurements.
                             BOOKS RECOMMENDED.
                       For First Year Students.
Spinney, Text-Book of Physics, or Crew, General Physics, or Watson,
!Intermediate Physics.    Pollock and Vonwiller, Practical Physics.
                                  CHEMISTRY.                               233·
                                  o
                            For Second Year Students.
      Poynting and Thomson, Properties of Matter. Poynting and Thomson,
Heat. J. J. Thomson, Elements of the Mathematical Theory of Electricity
and Magnetism. Starling, Electricity and Magnetism. Kaye and Laby,-
Chemical and Physical Constants. Watson, Text-Book of Practical
Physics.
                              For Third Year Students.
      Barton, Text-Book of Sound. Wood, Physical Optics, or Houstoun,.
Treatise on Light. J. J. Thomson, Conduction of Electricity through Gases.
Rutherford, Radio-active Substances and their Radiations. Campbell,.
Modern Electrical Theory.
      Third Year Students should consult the Professor of Physics before
buying text-books, as alterations may be made in this list.
      For Second, and Third Year Students—For reference and further study.
      General Physics.·—Maxwell, Matter and Motion. Everett, C.6.S. System,
of Units. Thomson and Tait, Natural Philosophy. J. J. Thomson,
Applications of Dynamics to Physics and Chemistry. Whetham, Theory
of Solution. Jevons, Principles of Science. Ostwald, Physico-Chemical:
Measurements. Lewis, Treatise on Physical Chemistry. Monographs on
Physics, edited by Thomson and Horton.       Threlfall, Laboratory Arts.
      Heat.—Preston, Theory of Heat. Maxwell, Theory of Heat. Ewing,
Steam Engine and other Heat Engines. Clausius, Mechanical Theory of
Heat.      Meyer, Kinetic Theory of Gases. Jeans, Dynamical Theory of Gases.
      Light.—Schuster, Theory of Optics. Preston, Theory of Light. Verdet,
Optique.      Mascart, Optique.     Drude, Optics.
      Sound.—Helmholtz, Sensations of Tone.        Rayleigh, Sound.
      Electricity and Magnetism.—Maxwell, Electricity and Magnetism. J. J.
Thomson, Recent Researches in Electricity and Magnetism, Electricity and
Matter, Corpuscular Theory of Matter, Positive Rays. Jeans, Mathematical
Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. Richardson, Electron Theory of
Matter. Hughes, Photo-electricity. Kaye, X-Rays. Bragg, X-Rays and.
Crystal Structure. Millikan, The Electron.^ Makower and Geiger, Prac-
tical Measurements in Radio-activity. Perrin, Atoms. Ewing, Magnetic
Induction in Iron and other Metals. Whittaker, History of the Theory
of the .Äher.
                              40.—CHEMISTRY.
   Professor Fawsitt, Acting-Professor Schofield, Messrs. F. A. Eastaugh,
             E. Le-G. Brereton, G. J. Burrows, and Demonstrators.
I.—FIRST COUESE IN GENERAL AND INORGANIC
CHEMISTEY.
     A course of about sixty meetings held during Lent and.
Trinity Terms upon General and Inorganic Chemistry. This
course is the first part of the whole course intended for first
year students of Chemistry.
     Text-Book.·—Newth's Inorganic Chemistry (Longmans).
234                          LECTURE SUBJECTS.
                                              o
Other Text-Books required by Students in their first year of Chemistry
are Perkins' Qualitative Analysis, and the book recommended for First
Year Organic Chemistry (at present, Perkin and Kipping's                 Organic
Chemistry).

n.—ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (see 41, Department of Organic
                    Chemistry).     »
      m. ------ ADVANCED   COUKSES IN GENERAL AND PHYSICAL
                                CHEMISTRY.
     A.—A course of about twenty meetings.
     Subjects.—General Properties of Gases, Liquids and
Solids. Solutions : Boiling and Freezing Points of Solutions.
Solubility : Ionisation, Hydrolysis. Electro-Chemistry : Con-
ductivity of Solutions, Electrolysis.
     B.—A course of about twenty meetings.
     Subjects.—Thermo-Chemistry. Fuels. Foundations of
Analytical Chemistry.      Physical Properties of Matter.
    Text-Book for Λ and B.—Walker's Introduction to Physical Chemistry
(Macmillan), or Senter's Outlines of Physical Chemistry (Methuen).
     C.—A course of about twenty meetings for third year
students.
     The subjects of Lectures will vary from year to year ;
they will be selected from special branches of physical,
analytical, or advanced inorganic chemistry.
     D.—A practical course on Physico-chemical Measure-
ments intended for students in their final year.
                 IV.—CHEMISTRY Π.       FOR ENGINEERS.

      A.—A course of about twenty meetings given to Engi-
neers in their- second year.
      Subjects.—Properties of Metals and Alloys, including
Metallography, the Elements of Thermo-chemistry, including
Combustion of Fuels and Pyrometry, Water Supply, Cements,
Oils, Lubrication, Paints, Varnishes, Enamels, Explosives.
                           V.—THEORY OF ASSAYING.
    A.—A course of twenty meetings designed for Fourth
Year Mining students.
                               CHEMISTRY.                                235

                     VI.—PEACTICAL CHEMISTRY.
     THE    CHEMICAL AJSTD       METALLURGICAL LABORATORIES.
     The Main Chemical Building is a plain rectangular struc-
   ture, about 170 feet long by 76 feet wide.    There is also an
   Assay Laboratory, 55 by 44 feet.      There are also open and
               covered yards for out-door operations.
                          PRACTICAL COURSES.
             Α.—COURSE FOR FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.
     Students in their first year are given a laboratory course
in which the reaction of salts are studied, and also the use
of the balance and the burette. The reactions of some
organic substances, such as the alkaloids, are also studied.
     Text-Book,-—Qualitative Analysis, Perkin.
     B.—ADVANCED COURSE FOR PHARMACY STUDENTS.
     Quantitative Analysis.—Testing balance and weights.
Testing calibration of burette, pipette and flask. Preparation
of htmus solution. Preparation and use of standard acid and
alkali solutions. Use of indicators—methyl orange and phe-
nophthalëin. Volumetric determination of iron. Gravi-
metric determination of one or more of the following :—Iron,
antimony, phosphoric acid and silver. Use of the nitrometer,
etc.
     Text-Books.—Newth's Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis.
         C.—ADVANCED COURSES FOR B. SC. DEGREE.
     For the Second Year Examination students work for one
term at Practical Organic Chemistry, one term at Quantitative
Analysis, and one term at Qualitative Analysis.
     Text-Books.-—Clowes & Coleman's Quantitative Analysis ; Fawsitt's
Tables of Quantitative Chemical Analysis.
     For the third (final) examination students work for one
term at Practical Organic. Chemistry, one term at Advanced
Quantitative Analysis, and one term at Physico-chemical
Measurements or Assaying.
     Text-Book.—Finlay's Practical Physical Chemistry (Longmans).
D.—ADVANCED COURSE FOR B.E. DEGREE IN MINING
AND METALLURGY.
A course of general Quantitative Analysis. Examination
of oils, cements, furnace gases.
:236                      LECTUBE SUBJECTS.

   E.—ASSAYING AND PRACTICAL METALLURGICAL COURSE.
       Candidates for the B.E. Degree in Miningjand Metallurgy
.are required to take the following course :—
       Dry Assay of Lead, Silver, Gold, Tin and Mercury Ores.
       Examination of Fuels and Refractory Materials.
       Assay of Silver (wet and dry) and Gold Bullion.
       Determination of Iron, Copper, Zinc, Lead, Manganese,
.Nickel, Chromium, Arsenic, Antimony, Tin, Bismuth, Tung-
sten, Molybdenum, Sulphur and Phosphorus.
       Electrolytic and Colorimetric methods.
       Complete Analysis of Slags, Ores and Fluxes.
       Cyanide and Amalgamation Tests.
       Iron and Steel Analysis.
       Complete Analysis of Alloys.
       Gas Analysis.
       Flotation Tests.
       Me tallography.
       Pyrometry.
       Mill Work.
      BOOKS RECOMMENDED.—Beringer's Text-Book of Assaying. Furman's
"Manual of Practical Assaying. Rhead and Sexton's Assaying and Metal-
lurgical Analysis. Brearley and Ibbotson's Analysis of Steel Work's
Materials. Low's Teclinical Methods of Ore Analysis. Parry's Assay of
Tin and Antimony.      Fulton's Manual of Fire Assaying.
  F.—COURSE OF PRACTICAL METALLURGY FOR DENTISTS.
     A course of sixty hours upon Elementary Practical
Metallurgy is given in Michaelmas Term.
     BOOKS RECOMMENDED.—Dental Metallurgy, E. A. Smith (Churchill).
•Chemistry for Dental Students, by H. Carlton Smith (Wiley and Sons).
     For reference.-—Dental Metallurgy, by Essig (S. S. White). Mixed
 Metals, Hiorns (McM. & Co.).
REGULATIONS FOR THE CHEMICAL AND METALLURGICAL
LABORATORIES.
The Chemical and Metallurgical Laboratories are open
■daily (except Saturdays) during Term time.
      Students will require to provide themselves with the
apparatus which they use for practical chemistry.
     The larger and more expensive pieces of apparatus may
be provided for the use of advanced students by the University
on the condition that all breakages have to be made good.
                       ORGANIC CHEMISTRY.                           237
      Students engaged in special investigations may have to
provide themselves with any materials they may require
which are not included among the ordinary reagents, also
with the common chemicals when they are employed in large
quantities.
      All preparations made from materials belonging to the
Laboratory become the property of the Laboratory.
      No experiment of a dangerous character may be per-
formed without the express sanction of the Professor or
Lecturers.
      EaCh1 student is required to keep full notes of each day's
 work for the use of the Examiners.
      The Laboratory hours are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
      Every student (except First Year students working with
 a class) is required to enter the time of his arrival and
 departure each day in the attendance book.
      Apparatus belonging to students in Chemistry I. should
be removed by the student on or before the last day of Term
in which the practical course is taken. The Chemical De-
partment does not accept responsibility for the safe keeping
•of apparatus which is left in the lockers after the last day
of Term. In the case of students in Chemistry II. and III.,
apparatus shall be removed at the end of the last Term.

         4L.—ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (PUKE AND APPLIED).
      Professor Read, Dr. Harker, Mr. Turner, and a Demonstrator.
                         LECTURE COURSES.
 (I.) An introductory course of twenty lectures, delivered in
      Michaelmas term.
      Purification and analysis of organic compounds. Em-
      pirical, molecular, and structural formulae. Iso-
      merism. Homologous series. The saturated hydro-
      carbons and their substitution products. Alcohols,
      ethers, aldehydes and ketones. Fatty acids and esters.
      Unsaturated hydrocarbons. Amines. Simple coal tar
      derivatives, including benzene, aniline, and phenol.
238                    LECTURE SUBJECTS.

  (IA.) A course of thirty lectures for students of Medicine,
       delivered in Michaelmas Term. This course includes
       the subjects of (I) and, in addition, the following :—
       The fats, carbohydrates, simple nitrogen compounds of
       physiological importance. Molecular configuration of
       the carbon compounds.
  (II.) A course of forty lectures for Second Year students,
       delivered during Lent and Trinity Terms.
       This is a systematic course of Organic Chemistry covering
       the most important groups of compounds and including
       some stereochemistry.
(III.) (a) A course of twenty lectures on Advanced Organic·
         Chemistry, delivered in Lent Term, and dealing prin-
         cipally with the chemistry of the sugars and the
         components of the Australian and other essential oils.
N These lectures form the complete course for Third Year
         students in Chemistry.
    (b) A course of twenty lectures on Applied
    Organic .
       Chemistry, delivered in Trinity Term.
       Visits to chemical works in connection with this course-
       will be arranged during the year.
    (c) A course of twenty lectures, in continuance of (a),.
         delivered in Trinity and Michaelmas Terms, in which,
         such subjects as stereochemistry and the chemistry
         of heterocyclic groups will be discussed.
                      PRACTICAL COURSES.
Second Year.—Methods of manipulation ; preparation and.
     identification of representative organic compounds.
This course consists of twenty meetings of three hours each,
     held on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons during
     Trinity Term. Every opportunity is afforded students.
     of attending at other times during the week in order-
     to complete and extend the work« outlined at the
     meetings.
Third Year.—Advanced qualitative, quantitative, and pre-
     parative work in Organic Chemistry.
                          ORGANIC CHEMISTRY.                                     239

Third Year students in Chemistry attend the Organic Chemical
    Laboratory for a minimum time of nine hours a week
    for one term.
                              0
Third Year students taking OrgaDic Chemistry as a special
     subject must spend a minimum time in the Laboratory
     equivalent to eighteen hours a week for one term and
     nine hours a week during the otheor two terms. Honours
     will only be awarded when both the character and the
     amount of the practical work are deemed satisfactory.
     Candidates for Honours must take both the Pass and
     the Honours Examinations.
Facilities are also offered for post-graduate research work in
     Organic Chemistry.
      BOOKS RECOMMENDED.—First Year : Cohen's Theoretical Organic
Chemistry (Macmillan), or Perkin and Kipping's Organic Chemistry
(Chambers).
      Second Year : Either of the above may be used by students in this year ;
a good alternative is provided by Holleman and Jamieson Walker's Text-
book of Organic Chemistry. In addition, students are advised to read
Thomson's Introduction to Science (Home University Library), and to refer
frequently to Martin's Industrial and Manufacturing Chemistry (Organic).
      Third Year : For Preliminary Reading.—Cohen's Organic Chemistry
for Advanced Students, 3 vols.' (Arnold). Sudborough and James' Practical
Organic Chemistry.
      For Supplementary Reading.-—Stewart's Recent Advances in Organic
Chemistry (1918). Stewart's Stereochemistry (1919). Sidgwick's Organic
Chemistry of Nitrogen. Wood's Chemistry of Dyeing. Porritt's Chemistry
of Rubber.
      For Reference.—Richter's Organic Chemistry, translated by Spielmann.
Martin's Industrial and Manufacturing Chemistry (Organic).
     Third Year Students in Chemistry will only need the books by Cohen
(vol. iii.) and Sudborough and James for preliminary reading, but a certain
amount of supplementary reading is recommended.                      »
     Third Year students in Organic Chemistry, besides taking
every opportunity of consulting original papers, should
acquairt themselves with the system adopted in Beilstein's
Handbuch and in the abstracts of the Journal of the Chemical
Society. They should also make use of Richters Lexikon,
ir order that they may become familiar with systematic
nomenclature.
240                       LECTURE SUBJECTS.

  REGULATIONS FOR THE ORGANIC CHEMICAL LABORATORY.
      The Laboratory completed in 1917 provides accommo-
dation for Third Year and Research students ; it is open daily-
during term from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Saturdays excepted).
      StudeDts are required to eDter the daily times of attend-
ance at the Laboratory in the register provided.
      With certain exceptions, the necessary apparatus may
be borrowed from the Store, on the condition that all break-
ages be made good. Bench keys must be given up before
a receipt for returned apparatus can be issued.
      Students are held responsible for the care of the benches,
reagent bottles, fittings, water-overs, etc., used by them.
Benches must be left in a clean condition at the end of each-
day's work ; gas and water taps must be closed when not.
required. The regulations posted in the Laboratory respect-
ing the use of inflammable liquids, etc., must be strictly-
observed.
     All preparations made from departmental material revert-
to the Department.
     Full notes of the practical work are required for exami-
nation at the end of each term.
          GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY.
 Professor David, Mr. W. S. Dun, Mr. L. A. Cotton. Mr. W. R. Browne,
 W. L. L. Waterhouse and three Demonstrators.
                            Lecture Courses.
       For First Year Students in Arts, Science, Mining Engineering, and
                              Civil Engineering.
                            42.—GEOLOGY I.
     This course of sixty lectures is evenly divided into three-
parts, given respectively in Lent, Trinity and Michaelmas-
Terms.
     Part I. deals with History of Geology, Material Geology,
including Elementary Petrology and Mineralogy, and the first
principles of Geological Collecting and Field Work.
     Part Π. treats chiefly of Dynamical Geology, including
the Composition, Movements and Work of the Atmosphere-
and of the Ocean ; of Evaporation and Rainfall ; of Lakes.,
\
    \               GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY.                                  241

Rivers, Springs and Artesian Wells ; of various Glacial Phe-
nomena ; of the Movements of the Earth's Crust ; and of
Earthquakes and Volcanoes.
     Part III. will refer chiefly to '(a) Structural Geology and
the Evolution of Earth Forms, and (b) to Elementary Strati-
graphical Geology and Palaeontology. Section (6) will be
given in Michaelmas Term.
     The lectures in many cases will be illustrated by means
of an electric lantern and projection-microscope.
     Text-Boohs.-—Geology for Beginners, by Prof. W. W. Watts ; Elements
of Geology, by Norton ; or Scott, Introduction to Geology.
     For Beference and Further Study.—New South Wales, Historical,
Physiographical and Economic, by A. W. Jose, T. Griffith Taylor, W. G.
Woolnough ; Volcanoes, by Professor Judd ; Australia, from a Physio-
graphic and Economic point of view, by T. Griffith Taylor, B.A., B. E.,
B.Sc. ; Physical Geography, by Davis ; Geology, Vol. I., by Chamberlin
and Salisbury ; Structural and Field Geology, by James Geikie ; An Intro-
duction to Geology, by W. B. Scott ; Text-book of Geology, Pirsson and
Schuchert.
                            For Second Year Students.
                            43.—GEOLOGY II.
                  For Arts and ¡Science Students.
This course will consist of sixty lectures, evenly divided
into three parts, given ID LeDt, Trinity and Michaelmas Terms
respectively.
     Part I. will be devoted chiefly to a study of Australasian
Stratigraphical Geology. Part II. will deal chiefly with the
elementary principles of Palaeontology, with special applica-
tion to Australasia and Oceania. Part III. will be devoted
to the Physiographic Evolution of Australasia.
      Text-Books.-—Geology of Commonwealth|: Reprint from Federal Hand-
book, 1914 ; Geology of New South Wales, by C. A. Süssmilch.
      For Beference and Further Study,-—Elements of Geology, by Le Conte
and Fairchild ; Text-Book of Geology, Pirsson and Schuchert ; Reports of
Australasian Scientific Societies and Geological Surveys ; Structural and
Field Geology, James Geikie ; Geology of New Zealand, Professor Marshall ;
Geology of South Australia, W. Howchin ; Australasian Fossils, a Student'B
Manual of Palaeontology, by F. Chapman ; Climate and Weather of Aus-
tralia, Hunt, Quayle and Taylor ; Physiography, Salisbury.
                    For Second Tear Mining Engineering.
  44A.—MINERALOGY AND ECONOMIC GEOLOGY I.
A course of sixty lectures will be given on Descriptive
Mineralogy and Economic Geology.                These will
include
                                                                           /
242                        LECTURE SUBJECTS.

Physical Properties of Minerals, Mode of Origin, Occurrence
and Classification of Mirerais. The following economic pro-
ducts will be considered :—Coal, Rock Oil and Various Hydro-
carbons, their Mode of Occurrence and Distribution ; Phos-
phatic Deposits and other Natural Fertilisers, Bauxites 'and
Alumstone ; Rock Salt, Gypsum, Boracic, Potassic and Sodic
Deposits ; Mica Asbestos, Buildirg Stones, Clays, Limestones,
Portland Cement Stones, Abrasives, Gem Stones, Fluxes.
Exercises will be given in methods of estimating quantities
and values of mineral deposits of economic value.
     Text-Books.—Mineralogy, Crystallography and Blowpipe Analysis, by
Moses and Parsons ; Mineral Resources of New South Wales, by E. F.
Pittman.
               For Third Year Mining Engineering Students.
 44B:—MINERALOGY AND ECONOMIC GEOLOGY TI.
A course of twenty lectures will be given on the Origin of
Ore Deposits, with descriptions of typical Australasian
Mining Fields.
      Text-Book.-—Mineral Deposits, by VV. Lindgren.
      Reference.—Ore Deposits, by Beyschlag, Vogt & Krusch, Vols. I. and
II., English Translation.
                For Second Year Civil Engineering Students.
      44c.—GEOLOGY FOR CIVXL ENGINEERS.
A course of twenty lectures on fuels, water supply and
drainage, road materials and foundations, and the geological
aspects of harbour, canal and railway construction.
Text-Book.—Ries and Watson, Engineering Geology.
                   For /Second Year Agricultural Students.
      45.—GEOLOGY AND ITS BEARING ON AGRICULTURE.
 A course of forty lectures, with practical work, will be
given or? the chemical relations of different rock types ; rock
classification ; processes and effects of rock weathering and
soil formation ; natural fertilisers ; origin, composition and
circulation of underground water. Physiography will also be
studied in its relation to climate and plant distribution.
Text-Book.—Rock3, Rock Weathering and Soils, by Merrill. -
For Reference.—Forest Physiography by Bowman ; Climate and
Weather of Australia, Hunt, Quayle and Taylor ; Meteorology, Milham
Physiography, Salisbury.
\
                             GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY.                                     243
    ι
                        For Third Year Stvdents in Arts, Scieiice, etc.
         '                           46.—GEOLOGY III.
                 •   A.—PRINCIPLES         AND      PROBLEMS         OF    GEOLOGY.
              This course will consist of about fifty lectures, delivered
        during Lent and Trinity and Michaelmas Terms, dealing with
        the principles and problems of Dynamic, Tectonic and Strata-
        graphical Geology, as applied to the general plan of the earth,
        its past history, and the chief forces by which they are deter-
        mined.
              For Reference.—Geology of Queensland, Jack and Etheridge ; Geo-
        graphy of South Australia, Walter Howchin ; Geography of Victoria, by
        Professor Gregory ; Suess, Face of the Earth, Vols. I., II., III., IV., trans-
        lated by H. R. Solías, or Le Face de la Terre, by Emm. de Margene ; Leçons
        de Geographie Physique, De Lapparent ; Elements of Geology, Le Conte,
        new edition by Fairchild ; Geology, Chamberlin and Salisbury, Vols; I.,
        II. and III.; Grundzuge der tektonischen Geologie, Otto Wilckens; Traité
        de Géologie, by Haug ; Earth Features and their meaning, Hobbs ; Charac-
        ters of Existing Glaciers, Hobbs ; Principles of Stratigraphy, Grabau ;
        Nature and Origin of Fiords, Gregory ; Mountains, their Origin, Growth,
        and Decay, Geikie.      Current literature.

                                B—PALAEONTOLOGY.
              This course will consist of sixty lectures, to be delivered
        during the Lent, Trinity and Michaelmas Terms. The prin-
        cipal classes of the Invertebrate, found in the fossil state will
        be considered, the lectures being illustrated with numerous
        specimens and diagrams. Special reference will be made
        throughout to the Palseozoology of Australia, and incidentally
        to its Palseophytology.
             Text-Books.—Text Book of Palaeontology, Zittel, Vol. I. (2nd edit.,
        translation by Eastman) ; Australasian Fossils, a Student's Manual of
        Palaeontology, by F. Chapman.
             For Reference.—Memoirs and Records of the Geological Survey of New
        South Wales and of the Australian Museums ; Fossil Plants, by Seward ;
        North American Index Fossils, by Grabau and Shimer. References to
        other works will be supplied during the course:     Current Literature.

                                       C.—MINERALOGY AND PETROLOGY.
                       The course consists of about sixty lectures divided as
             follows :—About twenty lectures on Crystallography, in which
              will be discussed—Angular distribution of crystal faces, sym-
               metry, the various systems of notation, the relations of zones,
244                        LECTURE SUBJECTS.

methods of projection and crystal drawing, apparatus for
goniometry, details of the systems, theories of crystal struc-
ture, etc.
      Text Book.—Crystalline Structure and Chemical Constitution, Tutton.
      For Be/erence.—Crystallography, Tutton ; X-Rays and Crystal Struc-
ture, by Bragg and Bragg.
      About twenty lectures on Optical, Physical and Chemical
Mineralogy, including preliminary optics, transmission of
light in crystals, refractive indices, double refraction, optic
axes, dispersion, opticf 1 indicatrix, relation between physical
properties and crystalline form, classification of minerals,
synthesis of minerals, etc.
     Text Books.—Petrology of the Igneous Rocks—Hatch ; Petrology of the
Sedimentary Rocks—Hatch & Rastall ; Iddings, Rock Minerals, Wiley and
Sons ; Manual of Pétrographie Methods, by Johannsen ; Dana, E. S., Text
Book of Mineralogy, Wiley & Sons.
     Reference Books.—Traité de Technique Mineralogique et Petrographique,
Duparc & Monnier ; Pétrographie Methods, Weinschenk & Clark ; Optical
Properties of Crystals, Groth Jackson; Optical Indicatrix, !Fletcher;
Physical Optics, Wood ; Light, Preston ; Determination of Rock Forming
Minerals, Johannsen ; The Microscope, Naegeli and Schwendcner, trans-
lated by Crisp and Mayall ; Crystallographie Physique, Soret ; Microscopy,
by Spitta.
      About twenty lectures during Michaelmas Term on
Petrology-Composition, habit, origin and classification of
igneous rocks ; mechanics of igneous intrusion ; synthesis of
rocks ; petrology of sedimentary rocks ; metamorphism ;
relation of rocks to ore deposits.
      Text-Books.—Harker, Natural History of Igneous Rocks, or Iddings,
Igneous Rocks.
      For Reference.-—Hatch, Text-book of Petrology ; Van Hise, A Treatise
on Metamorphism ; Elemente der Gesteineehre, Rosenbusch ; Mikros-
kopische Physiographie der Mineralien und Gesteine, Vols. I. and II.,
Rosenbusch ; Lehrbuch der Pétrographie, Zirkel ; Quantitative Classi-
fication of Igneous Rocks, Cross, Iddings, Pirrson and Washington ; British
Petrography, Teall ; Petrology of the Sedimentary Rocks, Hatch and
Rastall ; Igneous Rocks and their Origin, Daly ; Die Kristallinen Schiefer,
Grubenmann ; Chemical Geology, Elsden ; Rock Minerals, Iddings ; Prob-
lems of Vulcanism, Iddings ; Fundamental Principles of Petrology,
Weinschenk (translated by Johannsen).
     For Honours additional lectures may be delivered, and
special examinations may be set in one or more divisions of
the subject.
                  QEOLOaY AND MINERALOGY.                         245
      Students must read the current Geological and Mineral-
ogical Magazines.
     Students in their Third Year Geology Courses must take
either A and B of 44 or A and C of 44. They are recommended
not to attempt A, B and C during the same year.
                   Practical Courses.
The times set down for practical work refer only to the
hours of demonstrations. In addition, students must spend
a certain amount of time in individual practice and in exa-
mining the collections of rocks, minerals and fossils. For this
purpose.the laboratories are open daily during term.
                   47.—GEOLOGY I.
A minimum of fifty hours' demonstration work in the
Laboratory, devoted chiefly to Petrology, Physical Properties
of Minerals and Rocks, Preparation of Geological Maps and
Sections, and Examination of Fossils.
      LENT TERM.—Petrology : Elementary Crystallography
and Optics. Petrological Microscope, Optical Properties of
■chief rock-forming minerals, Textures and Structures of erup-
tive rocks, Types of eruptive rocks, both in slides and hand
specimens. Each, student prepares sections of rocks for the
microscope.
    Text-Book.—Minerals and the Microscope, by H. G. Smith.
      TRINITY TERM.—Mapping : Attention will be paid chiefly
i» the making and interpretation of contour maps, geological
maps and sections.
      Five demonstrations in Palaeontology will be given to-
wards the end of this term.
      Cost of apparatus, etc. : Microscope fee, £1 ; other
apparatus, about 2s.
     In addition to the work done in demonstration hours,
students will need to carry out individual work under the
supervision of the demonstrators, amounting in all to about
■30 hours.
      FIELD WORK.—Students must produce evidence (in the
•shape of essays) of having spent a minimum of four days (or
246                       LECTURE SUBJECTS.

the equivalent) during the year in geological work in the field.
Excursions will be arranged on Saturdays during term to
places of geological interest near Sydney.
                           48.—GEOLOGY II.
      LENT TERM.—(a) Twenty-five demonstrations on Micro-
scopical Petrology, including study of the sedimentary and
metamorphic rocks ; also five demonstrations on the deter-
mination of hand specimens.
      TRINITY TERM.—(δ) Twenty demonstrations on Blow,-
pipe Analysis and Determinative Mineralogy ; (c) ten lectures
and demonstrations on Elementary Crystallography.
      MICHAELMAS TERM.—-(d) Twenty demonstrations on In-
vertebrate Palaeontology ; (e) ten demonstrations on Geo-
logical Mapping.
      The cost of apparatus is approximately as follows for the
different courses :—(a), a fee of £1 for use of petrological
microscopes, unless students provide their own microscopes
of a suitable pattern ; (b), 15s.
      In addition to the ninety hours occupied in demonstra-
tions, students will be expected to carry out a minimum of
sixty hours' individual work under the supervision of the
demonstrators.
 FIELD WORK.—Students must produce evidence (in the
shape of essays) of having spent a minimum of six days
during the year in geological work in the field. If possible, a
camp or camps will be arranged during one of the vacations
to enable students to carry out this work under supervision.
Text-Books.—(1) Minerals in Rock Sections, by Luquer ; Petrology for
Students, by Harker ; (2) Mineralogy, Crystallography and Blowpipe
Analysis, by Moses and Parsons ; (3) Palaeontology, Woods.

                49A.—ECONOMIC GEOLOGY I.
             Mining Engineering Students' Second Year.
      LENT TERM.—Twenty lectures and demonstrations       on
crystallography, physical properties of minerals, and intro-
ductory blowpipe analysis.
     TRINITY TERM.—Twenty demonstrations on blowpipe
analysis.
                  GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY.                              247
    Text-Books.—Mineralogy,   Crystallography    and    Blowpipe Analysis,
Moses and Parsons.
     MICHAELMAS TERM.—Twenty demonstrations on con-
struction of geological maps and sections, with special refer-
ence to mining work.
     FIELD WORK.—As under Course No. 48. Excursions to
works, etc., will be taken as opportunity offers.
                49B.—ECONOMIC GEOLOGY II.
              Mining Engineering Students' Third Tear.
     TRINITY TEEM.—Forty hours' demonstration     in practical
determinative mineralogy, including advanced blowpipe analy-
sis, and twenty demonstrations on micro-chemical tests, and
microscopic examination of ore deposits and associated
country rocks.
      MICHAELMAS TERM.—Forty hours' individual work in
determination of minerals in hand specimens, etc.
                 50.—AGRICULTURAL GEOLOGY.
                  Agricultural Students' Second Tear.
     LENT TERM.—Twenty lecrures and demonstrations in
determination of minerals by physical and chemical tests,
and in Elementary Crystallography.
     TRINITY TERM.—Twenty demonstrations in microscopi-
cal examination of rocks, with practical reference to soil
formation.
     MICHAELMAS TERM.—Twenty demonstrations in con-
struction and reading of geological maps and sections.
     FIELD WORK.—As under Course 48.
                         51.—GEOLOGY III.
                  For Third Tear Students in Geology.
                   GEOLOGY III.—A.
Twenty demonstrations on the Construction and Inter-
pretation of Geological Maps and Sections will be given
during Lent Term, and outdoor exercises in field mapping
will be given during Michaelmas vacation, and at such other
times as are available.
248                   LECTURE SUBJECTS

                     PALEONTOLOGY ΙΠ.—B.
|j¿^A course of demonstrations in illustration of the lectures
on Palaeontology will be given during the Lent, Trinity, and
Michaelmas Terms.       Time—Four hours per week.
     Students must spend at least nine hours, per week (in-
cluding demonstrations) in practical work in the Geological
Laboratory ; for Honours, at least fourteen hours per week.
     FIELD WORK.—Students must produce evidence of
having spent a minimum of ten days during the year in
geological work in the field. Additional work will be required
for Honours.
               MINERALOGY AND PETROLOGY III.—C.
      Students must spend at least nine hours a week in prac-
tical work in the Geological Laboratory ; for Honours, at
least fourteen hours a week.
      PHYSICAL MINERALOGY.—Optical and physical measure-
ment of crystals ; refractive index ; double refraction ; optic
orientation ; optic axial aDgle ; dispersion.
      PETROLOGY.—A systematic course on Practical Petro-
logy.                                                    .
      CRYSTALLOGRAPHY.—Measurements of models and crys-
tals, with contact goniometer ; measurement of crystals, with
various types of one-circle and two-circle reflecting gonio-
meter ; stereographic and gnomonic projection ; drawing of
crystals ; determination of crystal elements.
      ROCK ANALYSIS.—Each Honours student must make at
least one complete analysis of a rock or mineral during the
year.
      An advanced course of Blowpipe Analysis and individual
work in determination of hand specimens of minerals.
      FIELD WORK.—Students for a pass must produce evidence
of having spent a minimum of ten days during the year in
geological work in the field. Additional work will be required
for Honours.
                                 ZOOLOGY.                                 249
                              52.—ZOOLOGY.*
         Professor Johnston, Mr. Launcelot Harrison, Mr. E. A. Briggs,
                              and Demonstrators.
                         ZOOLOGY I.
A course of fifty lectures, illustrated by specimens and
diagrams, and supplemented by occasional demonstrations.
I. Introduction to Biology. Main divisions of the science.
Π. General structure and physiology of animals. Amoeba, o
The cell : its structure and multiplication.    The ovum and
the sperm.       Maturation and impregnation.     Segmentation.
Histology of animals. The various systems of organs and
their principal functions.     Reproduction, asexual and sexual.
Symmetry.
   ΠΙ. General account of the following phyla with descrip-
tions of representative examples : Protozoa, Porifera, Cœlen-
tera, Piatodes, Nemathelminthes, Echinoderma, Annulata,
Àrthropoda, Mollusca, Chordata.
                        PRACTICAL ZOOLOGY.
      The following animals are studied :—Paramœceum, Vorti-
<ceUa, Obelia, FascioL·, Nereis, Asterina, Helix, Palinurus,
Periplaneta, Trygonoptera, HyIa, Columba, Lepus.
      An elementary course for Medical and Science students
of the First Year.
ZOOLOGY II. AND III.
ZOOLOGY AND COMPARATIVE ANATOMY.
ADVANCED COURSES.
Two advanced courses, one on the Morphology and Em-
bryology of the Invertebrata, with laboratory work ; the other
on the Morphology and Embryology of the Vertebrata, with
laboratory work.f
     BOOKS RECOMMENDED :
                        For First Tear Students.
ZooLOor.—Thompson's " Outlines of Zoology " or Parker and Has-
well's " Manual of Zoology." Reference should also be made to the larger
works recommended below for the use of Second and Third Year students.
For some parts of the Practical Zoology it will be useful to refer to Marshall
and Hurst's " Practical Zoology," T. J. and W. N. Parker's " Practical
Zoology," and Marshall's " Frog." _____________________________________
                 'See Regulation in reference to Microaoopes, page 165.
                   t These two courses are taken in alternate years.
250                        LECTURE SUBJECTS.

                              For Second Year Students.
      ZOOLOGY.—-Parker and Haswell's " Text-book of Zoology " (2nd
edition), Vol. I., or Sedgwick's "Textbook of Zoology," Vol. I. For
reference, Korschelt and Heider's " Text-book of the Embryology of
Invertebrates " ; Bay Lankester's " Treatise on Zoology " ; The Cam-
bridge Natural History ; Wilson's " The Cell in Development and Inheri-
tance " (2nd ed.) ; MacBride's " Embryology of the Invertebrates."
                       For Third Tear Students.
Parker and Haswell's Text-book (2nd edition), Vol. Π. Marshall's
Embryology. Wallace's "Darwinism." Lloyd Morgan's "Animal Life
and Intelligence." Jordan's "Evolution and Animal Life." Kellogg's
"Darwinism To-day." Thompson's "Heredity." Punnett's "Mendel-
ism." Gadow's " Wanderings of Animals." Kellicott, " Outlines of
Chordate Development."

            ZOOLOGICAL LABORATORIES AND MUSEUM.
      The Laboratories, together with the Departmental
Museum, are open to students of Zoology daily from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m., excepting on Saturdays, when they are closed at
1 p.m., and Sundays and Public Holidays, when they are not
opened. The practical teaching is confined to certain stated
times, but students are at liberty to work in the Laboratory
or the „Museum at any time within the limits specified.
The accommodation for research work is at present limited,
but, so far as practicable, every encouragement and assistance.
are given to graduates and others desiring to pursue lines óf
original investigation on Zoological subjects.
                              53.—BOTANY.
Professor Anstruther Lawson, Acting-Professor McLuckie, Mr. Patrick
                  Brough and two Junior Demonstrators.
     I. (a) An Elementary Course in Botany for first year
students in Medicine. The course will consist of about thirty
lectures of one hour each and the same number of laboratory
periods of two hours each. Types will be studied—from the
living plants—illustrating the characters of the main groups
of Algae, Fungi, Bryophyta, Pteridophyta, Gymnosperms and
Angiosperme. Special attention will be given to the Morph-
ology, Physiology and Life-histories of the types selected.
The' course is designed as a qualifying one in Medicine only.
Throughout the work emphasis will be given to those aspects
                            BOTANY.                              251
of plant life which illustrate the main features of Cytology,
Development, Nutrition, Growth, Parasitism, Pathology, Repro-
duction and Heredity.
      I. (6) An Elementary Course in Botany designed to meet
the requirements of Pharmacy students. It consists of about °
fifty lectures and forty laboratory periods of two hours each.
     In Lent Term the general foundations of the course will
be laid, by the study of types illustrating the characters of
the main groups of the Algae, Fungi, Bryophyta, Pteridophyta
and Gymnosperms, from the point of view of their Life-history,
Morphology and Physiology.
      In Michaelmas Term, the main characters of the Angio-
sperms will be studied ; and attention will be given to those
plants which have a special Pharmaceutical interest, and in
which resins, gums, balsams, oils, alkaloids and substances of
nutritive value occur. Lecturettes during the laboratory
period will deal with the original sources of the plants from
which drugs are obtained ; the distribution of the plants
geographically ; the collection, extraction and purification
of the drugs, the form of the drug known to commerce and
its Pharmaceutical importance. The course is designed as
a study in plant life to prepare Pharmacy students for their
course in Materia Medica.
      I. (c) An Elementary Course in Botany designed to meet
the requirements of first year students in Science, Arts, Agri-
culture and Veterinary Science. The course consists of about
fifty lectures of one hour each and fifty laboratory periods of
two hours each. Illustrative examples will be selected
(whenever possible from the living plants) to study the Life-
histories, Morphology and Physiology of the main groups of
Algae, Fungi, Bryophyta, Pteridophyta, Gymnosperms and
Angiosperms. The Earth's Vegetation will be considered in
a general way—its Ecology, Evolution and Geological History.
Throughout the course emphasis will be given to those aspects
of Plant Life which illustrate the main features of Cytology,
Development, Growth, Irritability, Nutrition, Parasitism, Path-
ology, Reproduction and Heredity.
                                                       I


252                   LECTURE SUBJECTS.

      II. This is an advanced course designed to meet the
requirements of second and third year students in Science and
Agriculture. Lectures and laboratory work will be arranged
to give a more thorough ard detailed krow ledge of the Morph-
ology, Physiology, Ecology, Phylogery, Geographical Distri-
bution and Geological History of the main groups of Algae,
Fungi, Bryophyta and Pteridophyta as follows :—
      Lent Term.—During the first part of this term there will
be given fifteen lectures on the Morphology, Ecology and
Phylogeny of the Algae, ard a similar number of two-hour
laboratory periods. During the second half of Lent Term
there will be given fifteen lectures on the Morphology, Ecology,
Parasitism, Pathology and Phylogeny of the Fungi, accom-
panying a similar number of laboratory periods of two hours
each.
      Trinity Term.—During this term a course of about thirty
lectures will deal with the subjects of Growth, Irritability, and
Reproduction of Plants. Concurrently with these lectures,
students, ID an experimental course of about thirty laboratory
periods of two hours each, will investigate the nature and
different phases of these vital phenomena and also study the
relations between such vital phenomena aDd certain external
and purely physical factors. In all experiments living plants,
growing as nearly as possible under normal conditions, will
be used.
      Michaelmas Term.—During the first part of this term ten
lectures accompanied by a similar number of two-hour labora-
tory periods, will be giver on the Morphology, Ecology, ard
Phylogeny of the Bryophyta During the second part of the
term there will be given about twenty lectures accompanied
by twenty laboratory periods, on. the Morphology, Ecology,
Phylogeny, Geographical Distribution and Geological History
of the Pteridophyta.
      (Course H. will be given in alternate years with Course
ΠΙ.)
      III. This is a continuation of Course IL, and is designed
to meet the requirements of second and third year students in
Science and Agriculture.       Lectures arjd laboratory work will
                             BOTANY.                             253

be arranged to give·a more thorough and detailed knowledge
of the Morphology, Physiology, Ecology, Phylogeny, Geogra-
phical Distribution and Geological History· of the Gymnos-
perms and Angiosperms, as follows :—
      Lent Term.—During the first vart of this term there will
be given about twenty lectures on the Morphology, Phylogeny
and Geological History of the Qymnosperms. This will be
accompanied by ten hours' laboratory work per week during
the term. Towards the end of the term a course of about
five lectures will be given dealing with the History of Botany
and its development as a Science.
    . Trinity Term.—In this term about thirty lectures will be
given on the subjects of Respiration and Nutrition of Plants,
and throughout the term students, by means of laboratory
experiments, will study the processes of Respiration, Absorp-
tion, Conduction, Transpiration, etc., as far as it is possible to
do so in the laboratory. Throughout these courses the
student will obtain some insight into the principles of plant
structure, of the relation of structure to function, and of the
influence of environment upon the organism. Living plants
growing as nearly as possible under normal conditions will
be used in experiments.
      Michaelmas Term.—During this term there will be given
about ten lectures on the Morphology, Phylogeny and Geolo-
gical History of the Angiosperms. The special Morphology
and Embryology of the Dicotyledons and Monocotyledons will
be investigated and a comparative study of floral morphology
and the basis of classification into natural orders wall be
studied. This will be accompanied by laboratory work
amounting to a minimum of ten hours per week. Students,
taking this course are also expected to spend at least two
hours a week in the Herbarium identifying species of the
local flora.
      This course will be followed by (1) a series of lectures on
General and Local Floras and their Ecology, and the Geo-
graphical Distribution of plants, accompanied by laboratory
work ; and (2) a short course of lectures on Evolution, Varia-
tion and Heredity in plant life.     .
      N.B.—Course II. will be given during the current session.
254                      LECTURE SUBJECTS.

                       Special Demonstrations. '
      In addition to the regular Laboratory hours special
voluntary classes are held on Saturday mornings from 9 until
12 noon. During that period demonstrations of the preceding
work will be available for those who wish to fill in any gaps
in their practical work, or to confirm their previous observa-
tions during the regular laboratory hours. These demon-
strations are only intended for those who may find it conve-
nient to attend for the sake of this additional information
and assistance they may obtain.

                  Second and Third Year Students.
      It is imperative that every student graduating in Botany
should have a fair knowledge of the local flora by collecting,
handling, and knowing the native plants in their natural
habitats.
      It will therefore be necessary for every student before
sitting for the final examinations to present a Herbarium of
the New South Wales plants. The Herbarium must consist
of the following :—
             Algae         .. ..      ..      ..     ..    45
             species
             Fungi       ..       ... ..      ..     ..    25
             Bryophyta        ..      ....           ..    25
             Pteridophyta      ..     ..        ..   ..    50
             Gymnosperms ..           ..        ..   ..       5
             Angiosperme                      ..     .. 150
      Eaeh student must certify that the collection and identi-
fication of the specimens composing the Herbarium are the
result of his or her.own individual work.
    (Course III. will be given in alternate years with Course II.)
                             BOOKS RECOMMENDED.
     For First Year.—Practical Botany for Beginners (Bower & Gwynne-
Vaughan) ; Flowerless Plants (D. H. Scott) ; Flowering Plants (D. H. Scott) ;
University Text Book of Botany (D. H. Campbell) ; Text Book of Botany
(Strassburger).
     Books Becommeiided for Pharmacy Students.—Materia Medica (Greenish)
Practical Botany for Beginners (Bower & Gwynne- Vaughari) ; Flowerless
Plants, Flowering Plants (Scott) ; Text-Book of Botany (Strassburger).
                                ASTRONOMY.                                   255

                                 COURSE II.
                             (α) MORPHOLOGY.
                                      ALGAE.
     Text-Books.—Freshwater Algae ( West) ; Study of Seaweeds (Murray).
     References.—Phycologia Australica (Harvey); Morphologie und Biologie
Der Algen (Oltmann's) ; Ein Lehrbuch der Pflanzensystematik, Vol. I.
(Lotsy).
                                      FUUGI.
     Text Books.—Diseases of Cultivated Plants and Trees (Massee) ; Com-
parative Morphology & Biology of the Fungi (De Bary) ; Australian
Uredineae (McAlpine).
     References.—Fxmgi and Lichens (Engler & Prantl) : Plant Diseases
(Duggar) ; Timber and its Diseases, etc. (Marshall· Ward) ; Ein Lehrbuch
der Pflanzensystematik, Vol. I. (Lotsy).
                 BRYOPHYTA AND PTERIDOPHYTA.
Text Books.—Mosses and Ferns (Campbell) ; Origin of a Land Flora
(Bower) ; Ein Lehrbuch der Pflanzensystematik, Vol. II. (Lotsy).
Reference.—Bryophyta (Cavers).
                                (δ) PHYSIOLOGY.
      Text Booke.—Plant Physiology (Pierce) ; Experimental Plant Physi-
ology (Darwin & Acton) ; Physiological Anatomy (Haberlandt) ; Plant
Physiology (Jost) ; Physiology of Plants (Pfeffer) ; Researches on Irrita-
bility of Plants (Bose) ; Soil Conditions and Plant Growth (Russell) ; Or-
ganography of Plants, I. & II. (Goebel).
                                   COURSE III.
                (a)                                MORPHOLOGY,
                                  OYMNOSPERMS.
Text Books.—Special Morphology of the Gymnosperms (Coulter and
Chamberlain) ; The Anatomy of Woody Plants (Prof. E. C. .Jeffrey).
References.—Lotsy.
                                  ANOIOSPERMS.
   Text Rooks.—Special Morphology of the Angiosperms (Coulter and
Chamberlain).
                           (b) PHYSIOLOGY.
                          (Same as Course II.)
                 (c) ECOLOGY AND HEREDITY.
   Ecology ( Warming) ; Mendelism (Punnetl).
                              54.—ASTRONOMY.
                             Professor W, E. Cooke.
     NOTE.—The course consists of about sixty lectures ; and,
  in addition, students will be expected to attend at the Observa-
   tory, generally in the evening, for practical work about once
                    a week, throughout the year.
256                        LECTURE SUBJECTS

                             LECTURE SUBJECTS.
      Elementary spherical trigonometry.
      History of astronomy.
      Size, shape and movements of the earth.
      General descriptive astronomy.
      Various systems of spherical co-ordinates, and transforma-
tion from one system to another.
      Theory of astronomical instruments.
    - Determination of time, latitude and azimuth.
      Celestial latitude and longitude, and various problems
connected with the sun's and moon's movements.
      Kepler's laws and planetary motions.
      Elementary Celestial Mechanics.
      Methods of determining size, mass and distance.
      Parallax, aberration, precession, nutation, refraction,
eclipses and occulations.

                             PRACTICAL WORK.
      Angular measurements.
      The use of the nautical almanac.
      Apparent movements of sun, moon, planets and stars.
      Constellation studies.
      Determination of time, latitude and a7imuth with theo-
dolite.
      More accurate work with the transit circle.
      Adjustments of equatorial and determination of celestial
positions therewith.
      Astronomical photography.
      Physical appearance of sun, moon, planets, nebulae, etc.
      Elementary spectroscopy.
 Various kinds of clocks, electric instruments, etc.
Text Books Recommended.—Young's General Astronomy ; Godfray's
Treatise on Astronomy ; Chauvenet's Manual of Spherical and Practical
Astronomy ; Barlow and Bryan's Mathematical Astronomy ; any good
History of Astronomy, such as Bryant's or Forbes' ; Nautical Almanac for
the current year (essential for every student) ; Four-figure Logarithm
Tables (Bottomley's is recommended) ; Seven-figure Logarithm Tables
(Chambers' is recommended).
                     ENGINEERING CONSTRUCTION.                                     257
              FACULTY OF ENGINEERING.
                   CIVIL ENGINEERING.
              Professor Warren, Mr. Miller, and two Demonstrators.
                       55.—DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY.
         The^ course consists of forty lectures on the elements of
    Descriptive Geometry during Lent and Trinity Terms for all
    students in Engineering of the First Year, and a short course
    of lectures in Michaelmas Term on Graphic Statics.
      Students are required to complete, under the Demon-
istrator's supervision, a series of practical exercises and
problems to illustrate the work dealt with in the lectures.
      During Lent and Trinity Terms :—
      Scales. Constructions relating tn straight lines, polygons, circles and
circular arcs, conic sections, cycloidal curves, involutes, spirals, S.H.M., and
Cams.
      Orthographic projection. Representation of points, lines and planes by
their projections and traces. Problems on lines and planes. The deter-
mination of the projections of solids, under given conditions of position.
Principles of isometric projection. The interpénétration of given solids.
Tangent planes. The projection of shadows. Generation and classification
of surfaces.' Development of surfaces. Principles of perspective projection.
Spherical projections. The elements of projective geometery. Graphic
Statics.
    In Michaelmas Term :—
    Further Problems on Graphic Statics.
 Honour students are required to do additional work.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED FOR REFERENCE.—Descriptive Geometry (A. E.
Church) ; Descriptive Geometry. (J. Woolley) ; Practical Plane and Solid
Geometry (Advanced), {Harrison & Baxaiyiall) ; Graphics ,(R. H. Smith) ;
Vectors and Rotors, Henrici & Turner ;. Elements of Projective Geometry,
{Cremona) ; Projective Geometry and its application (Emch).
            56.—ENGINEERING CONSTRUCTION.
The course of instruction and laboratory work in Engi-
neering Construction applies to all Engineering students of
the Second Year, and consists of seventy lectures and eighty
hours' practical work in the laboratory.
                  MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES I.—SECOND YEAR.
    Stress, Strain, Elasticity.—Tensile, stress.    Normal and tan-
       gential stress.      Combination of stresses.       Shearing
                                                              stress.
  Fluid stress.     Tensile and compressive strain.    Limit of pro-
  portional^}' and coefficient of elasticity,     Poisson 's ratio.
                                                                 θ
258                   LECTURE SUBJECTS.

Stress-strain diagrams. Elastic resilience. Yield point. Elon-
gation and reduction of area in ductile materials, such as
structural steels. The behaviour of brittle and ductile mate-
rials when subjected to tension, compression and shearing
stresses.                                                   „.
      Vector Quantities.—Additions and substraction and com-
position and resolution of forces. Force polygon. Funicular
polygon. Reciprocal figures. Simple examples of the deter·^
mination of stresses in braced structures by means of graphical
and analytical methods.
      Testing the Materials used in Engineering Construction.—
Brief description of the methods employed in testing the
more common materials used in engineering construction
such as steel, timber, stone and concrete, with a view to
ascertain and record their characteristic properties.
      Transverse Stress.—The investigations of the equations of
bending moments and shearing stresses in simple beams
loaded in various ways. The moments of inertia of various
cross-sections, and moments of resistance. Horizontal and
vertical shearing stresses in the cross-sections of a beam.
      Torsional Stress.—Coefficient of rigidity, twisting moment
and moment of torsional resistance.       Torsional resilience.
      Design of Beams, Girders, and Simple Structures.—Simple
examples of the design of beams, girders, timber and steel
viaducts, trestles, and minor structures, occurring in ordinary
building construction, railway and hydraulic engineering
works. Standard tests and specifications for cast iron, struc-
tural steel, timber, cement, concrete, stone, and brick. Re-
sults of modern researches on the strength, elasticity and other
properties of the materials used in engineering and building
construction. The safe working stresses in structures. The
impact effect of moving loads.
      Rainfall, evaporation and percolation, and the flow of
water in channels, pipes, culverts and streams. The location
and construction of storage reservoirs, earthwork dams, tanks,
wells, watercourses and conduits. The filtration of water
and the construction of filter beds.
                    MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES.                                 259
      BOOKS RECOMMENDED.—Engineering Construction in Steel and
Timber, Part I., by Prof. Warren. Published by Longmans. Elements of
Hydraulics, by Mansfield Merriman, pub. Wiley & Sons. Vernon Har-
court's Civil Engineering, pub. by Longmans.
     Students are also required to study the current numbers of Engineering
Journal.
                     57.—MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES.
     The course of instruction in Materials and Structures
extends over the Third and Fourth Years, and consists of
lectures, laboratory and drawing office work. Materials and
Structures A applies to all Engineering students in their Third
Year, and consists of forty lectures and a minimum of fifty
hours' laboratory work. The drawing "office work in con-
nection with this course is included under the heading
Enginering Design and Drawing. Materials and Structures B
consists of thirty lectures and a minimum of 100 hours'
practical work, and applies to Civil Engineering Students
only, in their Fourth Year.
     Α.—-The calculation of the stresses in bridge trusses for
fixed and moving wheel loads. Cooper's standard loading.
The design of bridges of timber and steel for railways and
highways. The deflection of beams and trusses, continuous
beams, long and short columns. Joints and connections in
riveted structures, also in eye-bar and pin structures. Rein-
forced concrete structures,. retaining walls, masonry dams,
piers, abutments, wing walls, arches, etc.
     Foundations.—Methods of construction of foundations
for engineering structures.
      B.—Testing of Materials Used in Engineering Construc-
tion*—A more detailed consideration of the methods of testing
materials, and the determination of their characteristic pro-
perties. The various instruments, machines and apparatus
used in tests of materials. Micro-photography as applied to
iron, steel and timber. The iron-carbon alloys in regard to
micro-structure and characteristic properties.
      Bridge Design.—The determination of the stresses in
swing bridges, cantilever bridges, arched and suspension
bridges, and the design of such structures.
     BOOKS RECOMMENDED FOE REFERENCE.—Engineering Construction in
Steel and Timber, by Professor Warren, Part I. Engineering Construction
in Masonry, Concrete, and Foundations, Part II. (Longmans) ; Lanza'e
Applied Mechanics ; The Strains in' Framed Structures, by Dubois ;
260                        LECTURE SUBJECTS.

R. H. Smith's Graphics ; Clarke's Graphic Statics ; Burr's Stresses in
Bridges and Roof Trusses ; Report of the New South Wales Railway
Bridges Inquiry Commission ; Johnson's Theory and Practice of Modern-
Framed Structures ; Baker's Masonry Construction ; Patton's Founda-
tions ; Report of the Advisory Board for the Sydney Harbour Bridge.
                  MATERIALS TESTING LABORATORY.
This laboratory contains the following appliances:—
     1 Universal Wickstead Machine of 100 tons capacity for
     lengths up to 15 feet, with automatic electrical drive
     and control.
     1 Greenwood and Batley Machine of 100,000 pounds
        capacity.
     1 Pohlmeyer Machine, 50 tons capacity.
           These three machines are supplied from an accumu-
     lator with motor-driven pump, and are controlled with
     delicate hydraulic valves.
     1 Amsler Compression Macine of 1,000,000 pounds capa-
     city for lengths to 12 feet, supplied with motor-driven
     oil pump and pendulum load indicator and dials.
     1 Torsion Testing Machine 100,000 inch pound capacity,
     for lengths up to 10 feet.
           The above described machines are all provided with
     autographic recorders ; one is also provided with a
     chronograph for time tests.
     1 Impact testing machine drop hammer, Marten's system,
        fitted with Amsler's autographic recorder.
     2 Charpy pendulum machines, large and small sizes, and
        1 Guillery rotating machine.
     Hardness apparatus, consisting of Brinell's ball and
        Amsler's cone pressure apparatus, also Marten's
        Schlerometer.
     2 Alternating testing machines.
      1 Avery 10,0001b. machine.
      1 Avery 2,0001b. machine.
     Various smaller testing machines for cement, wire, beams,
        a sand-blast apparatus, electric furnace, drying oven,
        Zeiss micro-photographic apparatus, various- extenso-
        meters, including 4 sets of Marten's mirror apparatus,
        dials, sectors, cathetometers and other apparatus for
        measuring strains.
                      CIVIL ENGINEERING.                       261.
              58.—CIVIL ENGINEERING.
The instruction in Civil Engineering A and B consists of
a Course of 70 lectures and the practical work included in the
Course of Instruction on Engineering Design, Specifications
and Drawing extending over the three terms of the Fourth
Year. Mechanical and Electrical Engineering students are
required to attend Civil Engineering A only,which consists of
30 lectures delivered in Lent Term of the Fourth Year.
A.—ROADS AND RAILWAYS.—The principles of railway
and road location, and the design and construction of works-
Permanent way.        Signals.     Points and crossings.      In-
terlocking systems.
      Passenger and Goods Stations.
      Locomotives. Rolling stock. Brakes. Couplings and.
other railway appliances.
      The construction of roads and streets. Paving of carriage
ways.
      B.—HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING.—The water supply of
 towns and the design and construction of the various works
 required in connection therewith. Flow of water in pipes
 and channels. Weirs, &c.
       SANITARY ENGINEERING.—Various systems of sewerage,
 House drainage. Construction of sewage works. Sewage
 disposal.     Destructors and desiccators.
       HARBOUR ENGINEERING.—Description and classification
 of the principal harbours. The design and construction of
 breakwaters and harbour works, docks, &c.
       RIVERS AND CANALS.^-The design and construction of the
 various works in connection with river improvements. Ship
 canals, &c.
       IRRIGATION.—Reservoirs for storing irrigation water.
 Masonry and timber dams with flood discharges and sluices.
 Inundation canals. Perennial canals. Headworks and weirs.
 Scouring effect of falling -water. Water cushions. Irrigation,
 works in Egypt and India. The various important works
 for storing, regulating and distribution of water. Various-
 schemes for irrigation works in Australia.
262                          LECTURE SUBJECTS.

     BOOKS AND PAPERS RECOMMENDED FOB REFERENCE.—!lumber's
Water Supply ; the Manchester Waterworks, by Bateman ; Spon's
Dictionary, Waring's Sewerage and Land Drainage ; Sewage Disposal, by
W. Santo Crimp, Stevenson's Harbours and Docks ; Stevenson's Rivers and
<Uanals ; Vernon Harcourt's Civil Engineering ; Vernon Harcourt's Har-
bours and Docks ; Vernon Harcourt's Rivers and Canals ; Vernon Har-
court's Sanitary Engineering ; Sanitary Engineering, Moore ; the Pro-
ceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers, and also of the American
Society of Civil Engineers ; the various reports of Sir John Coode ; the
various reports on the Sewerage of the principal towns of Australia : Roads
and Streets, by D. K. Clark ; Barry's Railway Appliances ; Gribble's
Preliminary Surveys and Estimates ; Wilcocks' Egyptian Irrigation ;
Buckley's Irrigation Works in India ; Irrigation Engineering, Wilson, p.
Wiley and Sons. Students are expected to read the current numbers of the
various Engineering Journals. Elements of Railroad Engineering, by W.
■G. Raymond.
      ENGINEERING DRAWING AND STRUCTURAL DESIGN.
      The course in this subject consists of lectures and drawing
office practice, having special reference to Structural Engi-
neering.
                               LECTURES.
      SECOND YEAR.—Structural details ; the form and strength
of joints and fastenings used in framing in steel and timber ;
design and construction of beams, columns, roof frames, and
other steel, timber or combination structures, including some
cast and wrought iron details ; design of plate girders ;
graphical analyses of stresses in and the deflection of simple
beams and trusses.
      THIRD YEAR.—Design of rivetted and pin jointed bridges ;
details and economic proportions ; reinforced concrete beams,
slabs, etc. ; graphical solution of problems in continuous
girders ; retaining walls.
      BOOKS OF REFERENCE.—Engineering Construction (W. H. Warren),
Part I., Steel and Timber ; Part II., Masonry, Concrete and Foundations.
Bridge Engineering (Waddell) ; Theory and Practice of Modern Framed
Structures (Johnson, Bryan and Turneaure) ; Steel MUl Buildings (Ketchum) ;
Highway Bridges (Ketchum) ; WaUs, Bins and Elevators ^Ketchum) ;
Structural Engineer's Handbook (Ketchum) ; Design of Simple Roof
Trusses in Wood and Steel (Howe) ; Plate Girder Design (Hudson) ;
Design of Plate Girders (Moore) ; Roofs and.Bridges (Merriman & Jacoby) ;
Reinforced Concrete Construction (Hool) ; Principles of Reinforced Con-
crete Construction (Turneaure and Maurier) ; Concrete, Plain and Rein-
iorced (Taylor & Thomson) ; Concrete Engineers' Handbook (Hool and
Johnston).
              ENGINEERING DRAWING AND DESIGN.                        263
                      DBAWXNG      OFFICE PEACTICE.
      SECOND YEAR.—Lent and Trinity Terms. Computa-
tions and drawing include detail designs and working drawings
of a timber roof truss, of portions of the steel framing for a
mill building or warehouse, and of a plate web girder for
railway, highway or crane bridge to the requirements of
specifications supplied to the students.
      In this year the conditions which are supplied to the
students are varied for the same type of structure, so that
the effects of such variations may be studied.
      THIRD YEAR.—Analysis and design of steel frames for
bridges, buildings and towers ; structures in concrete and
reinforced concrete such as slabs and beams ; retaining walls ;
graphical solutions of problems.
      In this year also, the designing is carried out to meet the
conditions supplied to the students, these conditions being
varied as in second year. Students at this stage are allowed
more latitude with regard to the use of formulae and standard
proportions, although the checking by means of first prin-
ciples is still insisted on.
      FOURTH YEAR.—Design, specifications, etc., of such work
as is indicated in the lecture courses, including structures of
masonry, concrete and reinforced concrete, such as dams,
stand-pipes, conduits, buildings, reservoirs, steel and rein-
forced concrete arches.
      The work of this year is carried out as far as possible
under conditions similar to those existing in commercial
establishments.
                MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.
Professor Barraclough, Mr. G. P. Sutherland, and one Demonstrator.
59.—ENGINEERING DRAWING AND DESIGN OF MACHINERY.
The course in this subject consists of lectures and drawing
office practice as indicated in the following syllabus :—
                                LECTURES.
    FIRST YEAR.—Fundamental principles ; conventional
methods with regard to sections and projections ; reading of
drawings ; nature and uses of materials for machine parts ;
264                        LECTURE SUBJECTS.

 .strength ; stress ; bending moment ; shearing force ; twisting
 moment ; factors of safety for steady, intermittent and alter-
 nating loading ; the use of first principles in the design of
 •details ; bolts ; studs ; connection of parts by pins, keys
 and cotters ; pipes and flanges ; shafts and couplings ; bear-
 ings ; brackets and hangers ; pulleys ; toothed wheels ; belt
 driving ; rivets and riveted joints ; boiler shells ; rectangular,
 circular, I section and reinforced beams.
       SECOND YEAR (Michaelmas Term only).—Design of trans-
 mission machinery, engine and boiler fittings, and introduc-
 tion to steam engine design.
   ^    THIRD YEAR.—Detailed design of steam engine ; con-
 necting rods ; pistons ; piston rods ; cylinders ; valves ;
 •crank shafts ; flywheels ; framings ; valve gears ; governors ;
 pumps and auxiliary fittings ; detailed boiler design ; Board
 of Trade and Lloyd's requirements ; riveting ; staying ;
 mountings ; furnace fittings ; piping. The influence of
 methods of manufacture on design. Estimates and specifi-
 cations.
       FOURTH YEAR.—This class is conducted as a Seminar in
•         conjunction with Mechanical Engineering III.
       Problems affecting the design of machinery and prime
 movers are brought forward and discussed.
 In addition a course of lectures will be given on—
 Heavy machine framings ; gas engine design ; helical
 gearing ; design of machine tools ; thick cylinders ; centri-
 fugal pumps ; valve gears and link motions ; cranes.
     TEXT-BOOKS USED.—Machine Design (Spooner) ; Machine Design,
•         (Grifßn) ; Marine Boiler Management and Construction (Stromeyer) ;
Mechanical Engineers' Pocket Book {Kent).
    ADDITIONAL BOOKS FOR REFERENCE.—Marine Engines and Boilers
{Bauer and Robertson) ; Notes on the Design of a Steam Engine {Depart-
mental) ; High Speed Steam Engine {Graham) ; Mechanical Engineering
■(Lineham) ; Machine Design ( Unwin and Mellanby) ; Internal Combustion
Engines (Guldner) ; Diesel Engine {Supino) ; Steam Turbines (Martin) ;
■Cranes (Böttcher) ; Elecrtic Cranes (Broughton) ; Machine Designer's Hand-
book (Halsey).
               DRAWING OFFICE PRACTICE.
FIRST YEAR.—Lettering and printing ; sketching and
•drawing of machine details from models and pictorial sketches ;
preparation of tracings and blue prints ; checking ; assembly
drawing from the detail drawings, and vice versa.
                 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.                        265

      SECOND YEAR (Michaelmas Term).—The design of simple
transmission machinery. A drawing of a small factory with,
its machines is supplied. The type of prime mover is specified.
The student estimates the power of the prime mover, selects
from catalogues one of appropriate size, places it suitably in.
the factory, designs the whole of the transmission gear, and
estimate^ the cost of the work. The short specification is
arranged so that >the design will include at least one example
of a shaft, a flange coupling, a friction clutch, a plummer
block, a wall bracket, a wall box, a belt drive, a chain drive,,
a bevel wheel drive, and a corner wall bracket.
      THIRD YEAR.—The design of a steam engine and boiler.
      In this year the work done is largely individual in char-
acter. The students are supplied with a short specification,
of requirements to be met, and the design is carried out by
means of preliminary sketches and lay-outs, the details being
worked up gradually from these. As far as possible the
students' individuality and inventiveness are drawn on, and
the application of first principles to the solution of the
problems occurring in the design is insisted on.
      FOURTH YEAB.—Design, specifications, etc., of such work
as is indicated in the lecture courses.
      This work is carried out as far as possible under conditions-
similar to those employed in commercial establishments.
Where possible those students in the First Year showing good
progress are set.to make detailed drawings for the Fourth Year
Students, and also tracings of such details as are required.
               60.—MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.
The instruction in Mechanical Engineering is divided into
three parts, of which I. is taken by all students of the Second
Year, II. by Mechanical and Electrical Engineering students of
the Third Year, and (in part) by Civil Engineering and Mining
students of the Third Year, while III. is taken by Mechanical
and Electrical Engineering students of the Fourth Year.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING I.
      The course consists of 60 lectures and 20 demonstrations
in the Second Year. :—
      (a) Engineering mechanics. The application of the
principles      of    dynamics        to      various     engineering
problems.
  266                      LECTURE SUBJECTS.

  Equilibrium of machine parts. Work. Power. The indi-
  cator card. Friction. Efficiency and mechanical advantage
  of machines. Transmission and absorption dynamometers.
  Moments of inertia. Ply-wheel action. Reciprocating motion.
  Acceleration effects. Hydrostatic problems. Simple hydrau-
  lic machines.
        (δ) Kinematics of machines. The science of mechanism.
  Constrainment of plane motion. Virtual motion in mechan-
  isms. Relative velocities in mechanisms. Diagrams of
  velocity and acceleration. Spur-wheel trains. Screw gears.
  Profiles for wheel-teeth. Epicyclic gearing. Cam trains.
  Straight line motions. Inversion of mechanisms. Analysis of
  important mechanisms. Systems of classification. Applica-
  tions to machine tools.      " The art of invention."
        (c) History of the development of heat motors, and the
  elements of thermo-dynamics. Sources of energy. Fuel.
  Combustion. The operation of steam and gas engines.
  Reversed heat motors.
      BOOKS RECOMMENDED FOB REFERENCE.—Applied Mechanics (Perry) ;
  Mechanics of Engineering (Church) ; Kinematics of Machines (Durley) ;
  Theory of Machines (Machay) ; Mechanism (Dunkerly) ; Mechanics of
  Machinery (Kennedy) ; History of the Steam Engine (Thurston) ; Steam
  Engine (Ewing) ; Tables of the Properties of Steam (Barraclough) ; The
  Steam Engine (Creighton) ; Mechanical Engineering (Lineham).
                      MECHANICAL ENGINEERING II.
          90 lectures and 40 demonstrations during Lent and
    Trinity Terms of the Third Year :—
       (a) Properties of steam. More advanced theory of heat
engines. Conditions affecting economy. The cyclical flow of
heat in the cylinder walls of heat engines. Detailed considera-
tion of heat losses. Standard methods of conducting engine
trials. Valve gears. Boilers. Economisers. Superheaters.
Condensers. Cooling towers. Auxiliaries. Injectors. Re-
frigerating machines and processes. Steam turbines. Modern
• gas engines.         Use of cheap gas.
          (6) Theory of machines. Various machine problems.
    Friction of machines. Lubrication. Dynamics of the steam
    engine. Crank effort diagrams. Fly-wheels. Governors.
    Inertia of reciprocating parts. Balancing of machines.
    " Vibration " troubles.
                    MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.                                 267

     (c) Hydraulic machinery. Reciprocating pumps and
pressure engines. Impulse and reaction turbines. Centri-
fugal pumps.     Elevators.    Compressed air.
     AU students attending this course are required to Write
during the year a Mechanical Engineering essay on subjects to
be selected by them in consultation with the Professor.
     ADDITIONAL BOOKS RECOMMENDED FOR REFERENCE.—The Entropy
Diagram and its Applications (Boulvin) ; Steam Engine (Perry) ; Manual of
the Steam Engine (Thurston) ; Steam Engineering (Pullen) ; Applied Ther-
modynamics (Ennis) ; Steam Engine Problem (Barraclough) ; Experimental
Engineering (Carpenter) ; Balancing of Machines (Dolby) ; Hydraulics
(Bovey) ; Hydraulic Motors (Bodmer) ; Steam Power (Dally) ; Production of
Cold (Ewing) ; The Properties of Saturated and Superheated Ammonia
Vapour (Illinois Engineering Experiment Station Bulletin No. 66) ; Steam
Tables (Gallendar) ; Steam Tables (Marks & Davis) ; Mechanical Engi-
neers' Handbook (L. S. Marks).
                  MECHANICAL ENGINEERING III.
                MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR.
      Fifty sessions, with laboratory work, in the Fourth Year.
This class is conducted as a Consulting Engineering Seminar,
a few only of the sessions being devoted to formal lectures.
Topics for discussion and investigation are assigned to each
member of the class, and these are brought forward for con-
sideration in turn ; a review of the more important engineering
journals is also maintained, and students are encouraged to
keep systematic abstracts of the articles they read. The
following syllabus indicates the nature of the work dealt with :
      Advanced problems in engineering mechanics. The
gyroscope, and its applications. Torsional vibration of shaft-
ing. Torsion power-meters. Special problems in the design
of gas engines and producers, centrifugal pumps, condensers
and steam turbines.      The flow of steam.
      The testing of power plants. Reports on standard
methods. Discussion of general problem of power production.
Finance as a factor in engineering enterprises. Cost of power.
Hydraulic power stations. Power-house design and equip-
ment. Chimneys. Combustion and smoke prevention.
Liquid fuels. Care of engines, boilers and machinery. Boiler
inspection.     Causes of boiler explosions.
     Engineering literature. References to available sources
of information.
:268                      LECTURE SUBJECTS.

    Expert investigations and reports. Methods and
examples.
      ADDITIONAL BOOKS RECOMMENDED- FOR REFERENCE.—The Steam
Turbine (Goudie) ; Steam Turbines (Thomas) ; Development and Transmis-
sion of Power (ϋιιιυίη) ; Steain Power Plants (Meyer) ; Central Electric
Stations ( Wordingham) ; Large Electric Power Stations (Klingenberg) ;
Hydraulics (Lea) ; The Engineering of Power Plants (Fernold <Sc Orrok).
      In connection with the above work, each student in
Mechanical Engineering is required to present a graduation
thesis which must represent a completed piece of original work
•carried out either in the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory
or in the Drawing Office.
              MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY.
      The following syllabus indicates generally the experi-
 mental work which students attending the foregoing courses
 on Mechanical Engineering I., II. and III. are required to
 carry out in the laboratory :—
      I. The use of various forms of slide rules and calcu-
lating instruments. Verniers, micrometer-calipers, gauges
and standards. The planimeter. Working-up indicator
cards. Measurement of friction coefficients. Efficiency and
mechanical advantage of simple machines, such as screw press,
pulley block tackle, differential pulley and worm-wheel crab.
Determination of velocity diagrams in quick return motions.
Energy of fly-wheel. Moments of inertia. Measurements with
rope brake, Prony brake, and fan brake. Transmission dyna-
mometers. Calibration of pyrometers, pressure gauges and
steam engine indicators. The engine indicator. Prehminary
tests of steam engine.      Valve setting.
      II. Complete engine and boiler tests. Gas and oil engine
tests. Investigation of heat losses. Tests of lubricants.
Determination of friction in line shafting, etc. Befrigeration
and ice-making plant. Calorific value of fuels. Flue gas
analysis.      Tests of hydraulic motors and pumps.
      III. In connection with the Mechanical Engineering
Seminar students are required to carry out definite experi-
mental investigations either individually or in groups, and
the results are from time to time brought before the class for
discussion ; also such opportunities as occur will be taken for
•conducting tests of outside power plants.
                  MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.                       269

       Encouragement will be given to any senior students, and
others with the necessary qualifications, who are desirous of
making original investigations in the laboratory.
       OPERATION OF ENGINES AND MACHINERY.—Although it is
not part of the regular work of the University to train students
in the management of Engines, Boilers, and Machinery,
during the four years they spend at the Engineering School,
much valuable experience should be gained in this direction
if all the available opportunities are taken advantage of.
       SHOP WORK.—Students in Mechanical Engineering are
required, in addition to the class instruction in shop work, to
spend one month in workshop practice during the summer
vacation of the First and Second Years, and six months
during the Third Year.
            MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY.
      The power equipment of the Laboratory includes the
!following :—
      2 Babcock & Wilcox 50 h-p. water tube boilers ; one hand
        fired, the other with a chain grate stoker,. A separately
        fired superheater; A locomotive type marine boiler. A
        Weir feed pump. A Cameron feed pump. A Körting
        injector. A Belliss & Morcom compound high speed
        steam engine, direct coupled to a 30 kw. Mavor and
        Coulson dynamo. A compound jet condensing experi-
        mental engine by Euston, Proctor & Co. A 50 k.w,
        Parson's turbo generator. A compound marine engine
        with engine driven air pump. A Willans & Robinson
        surface condensing plant, with augmenter and Edwards
        air pump.
      A 40 h-p. national suction gas engine, direct coupled to
        a 25 kw. J. P. Hall & Co. generator. A 25 h-p. Crossley
        gas engine, driving on town gas an Elwell and Parker
        generator. Experimental two cycle, four cycle, and free
        piston gas engines. A 50 b.h.p. Diesel engine. A
        Daimler paraffin motor. A four cylinder petrol motor
        of a 15 h.p. Albion chassis, presented by the Albion
        Motor Co., Glasgow. Other four petrol engines of
        different types.     A small hot air engine.
270                        LECTURE SUBJECTS.

      A 2-ton Hercules steam driven ammonia refrigerating and 1
ice plant.
Westinghouse air brake and compressor.         Two air com-
pressing plants.
In the Hydraulic Laboratory—A Gardner general service,
duplex steam pump.        A Pulsometer.      A jet pump.    6"~
and 10" motor-driven centrifugal pumps.               An 18""
impulse wheel, with a set of nozzles and three types of"
buckets.
The testing equipment includes Steam and Gas Engine
Indicators, direct, optical and continuous.       Explosion Re-
corders.     Pyrometers for high temperatures.        A Fery Re-
corder.     A Curnon Steam Meter.        A large range of Thermo-
meters.     A Mahler Bomb Calorimeter.         A Junker's Gas and.
Oil Calorimeter.      A Producer Gas Calorimeter.      Gas Analysis
Apparatus.        A Simmance-Abady CO2 Recorder.             A large
Chronograph by Jules Richard.          Horn's Tachograph.      Air,
Draught, and Pressure Gauges.         Measuring Tanks,         Steel-
yards, Gauge notches and orifices, Venturi Meters, Pitot Tubes,
Brake and Transmission Dynamometers.                   A Pratt and
Whitney 36" Measuring Machine.                   A Cambridge
Screw
Measuring Machine.         A set of Johansson Combination Stan-
dard Gauges.
     There are several small rooms available for purposes of
special investigations, and a Junior Laboratory for conducting
demonstrations in applied mechanics. The museum attached,
contains a very complete outfit of models for illustrating the
lectures on Mechanical Engineering.
61.—ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING.
Assistant-Professor Madsen, one Junior Demonstrator.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING I.
Lectures during Lent ßnd Trinity Term only. Examination-
al end of Trinity term.
     During Lent Term the direct-current portion of the work
is dealt with. Subjects dealt with include switch-gear, fuses,
automatic cut-outs, the arrangement of switch and distribu-
tion boards, illumination by arc and incandescent lamps, the
theory and operation of dynamos and motors and controlling
                     ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING.                                    271

devices, methods of production and of distribution of electrical
energy for general purposes, storage batteries and their opera-
tion, the regulations governing the installation and use of
electricity and general applications.
    TEXT-BOOKS.—Electrical Engineering, Simmonds ; Standard Hand-
book for Electrical Engineers, McGraw Publishing Co. Practical Testing of
JDynamos and Motors, F. Smith.     Fire Underwriters' Regulations.
      During Trinity Term alternating-current work is dealt
with. The production and distribution of electrical energy by
single and three-phase systems, the theory of synchronous
motors, induction motors, transformers, rotary converters and
the theory and operation of the ordinary alternating current
apparatus is dealt with.
     TEXT-BOOKS.—Same as in the first term with the addition of—Practical
Alternating Currents, F. Smith, or (in the case of students proceeding to the
fourth year), Experimental Electrical Engineering, Karapeioff.

                 ELJDCTRICAJ., ENGINEERING II.
     Lectures during Lent, Trinity and Michaelmas term.
Examination at end of Michaelmas term.               ^■
     Design of electric generators for direct current. Alternat-
ing current generators, single and polyphase. Static trans-
formers, single and polyphase. Motor generators. Rotary and
motor converters. Induction motors. Single phase motors.
The layout of electric power stations and sub-stations. Long
distance power transmission. Electric tramways. Over-
head and conduit systems. Tramcar motors and controllers.
The lay-out of overhead equipment and feeder systems.
Electric railways. Third rail. Three phase.. Single phase.
Electric welding. Electrolytic and furnace work. The drafting
of specifications.    Preparation of estimates.
       TEXT-BOOKS.—Alternating Currents, Franklin & Williamson. Alterna-
 ting Currents, Russell ; Electro-Dynamics of the Direct-Current Motor,
 Cams Wilson ; Experimental Electrical Engineering, Karapeioff ; Electrical
 Distributing Networks, Hay.
       BOOKS OF REFERENCE.—Dynamo Electric Machinery, Vols. I. and
 II., S. P. Thompson ; High-Speed Dynamo Electric Machinery, Hobart
 and Ellis ; High-Tension Power Transmission Reports, Vols. I. and II.,
 McGraw Publishing Co. Electric Railways, McGraw Publishing Co. Alter-
 nating Current Motors, McAllister. Electrical Journals and the Proceedings
 of the Institutes of English and American Electrical Engineers.
272                   LECTURE SUBJECTS.

      Students will follow a systematic course of numerical
problems and examples illustrating the foregoing lectures, and
instruction will be given in electrical design. All such work,
will be presented at the end of the course as part of the
practical work.
            ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. LABORATORY.
      Students in Electrical Engineering Course II. will attend a-
systematic series of demonstrations in laboratory work. The
investigation of commercial electric measuring instruments,,
meters, incandescent and arc lamps, lightning arresters,,
insulators, etc. Tests of direct current, single, two, and three
phase machines ; single and three phase alternators, and
induction motors. Separation of losses ; characteristic
curves; tempera ture rise at various loads; voltage drops.
Efficiency tests and investigation of the performance of plants-
for the generation and utilisation of electric energy. Testing
of transformers and work with high tension alternating
currents. Synchronising, effects of capacity and self-induction,
etc. Experiments will also be carried out with the
oscillograph.
      Visits will be made from time to time to various electrical'
works of interest in and around Sydney.
      As far as possible, arrangements will be made for Electrical
Engineering students to spend their vacations in central
stations or with firms engaged in electrical work.
      Students in Electrical Engineering Course I. will be given
instruction in general installation work, also in the use of the
various instruments and machines in the Electrical Engineer-
ing Laboratory.
      The Electrical Engineering Laboratory contains the
following equipment :—
      1 pair D.C. interpole compound-wound dynamos, 240-
        volts 60 amp. These machines are arranged with slip-
        rings for providing single, two or three-phase currents.
        Arrangements are also provided for mechanically coup-
        ling the armatures at various angles.
      1 ten K.W. three-phase induction motor with star delta,
         starter, direct coupled to a D.C. generator.
                  ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING.                         273

      1 eight K.W. 240-volt D.C. motor, direct coupled to a
         100-volt generator.
      1 twenty K.W., 415-volt three-phase alternator, self
         excited.
      1 pair tramway motors, 500 volt. '
      1 Siemens' twelve K.W., 240-volt D.C. machine.
      1 ten K.W. three-phase Siemens' alternator with
         exciter.
      4 sets five K.W., 240-volt D.C. motors, direct coupled to
         three-phase alternators.
      A number of D.C. and A.C. machines of from two to five
         K.W. capacity, which are used in pairs—belt driven.
      A number of transformers and auto transformers.
      1 ten K.W. single-phase transformer, 240 to 30,000 volts
         with taps introduced at every 5,000 volts.
      A variety of arc lamps, incandescent lamps and fittings.
      1 Duddell oscillograph.
      Power is supplied to the Laboratory from a 400-amp.
hour, 250-volt Tudor battery. A second battery, 300-amp.
hour, 250 volts, is available for special testing purposes. A
third set of cells is arranged so that it is possible to obtain the
currents up to 2,000 amps, for ammeter and watt meter
testing, etc. The batteries are charged from a steam-driven
Belliss set or a National gas engine set, which may be operated
from town or suction gas. 415-volt three-phase current is
supplied with a fourth wire for 240-volt service to the Labora-
tory from the City Council mains.
      The Standards Laboratory contains :—Standard Potentio-
meter outfit with Clark and Cadmium ceils. Standard low
resistances capable of carrying currents up to 10,000 amps.,
and ratio boxes which enable voltage calibrations to be taken
up to 5,000 volts. Standardisation, with alternating currents,
is performed by a set of Kelvin balances which give a range up
to 600 amps, in current and 5,000 volts. Standard Kelvin
watt meters are also provided. A standard photometer with
flicker head and Pentane standard lamp. A suitable range of
necessary galvanometers, resistances and rheostats is available
for testing purposes.
274                         LECTURE SUBJECTS.                             o

          62.—SURVEYING.
Sir. Γ. D. Craig and Mr. T. F. Furber.
The course consists of lectures and field demons.trations.
Students are also required to make surveys for themselves, and
•to undertake the whole of the necessary computations, to
prepare plans and drawings, etc., and to make and reduce
astronomical observations for time, latitude, meridian, etc.
      The lectures treat of the history and development of the
art of land, engineering, mining, hydrographie, hydraulic, and
geodetic surveying, and astronomical operations in connection
therewith, and discuss important modern methods.
      COURSE I., for all students, treats specially of the aims,
scope and general theory of different classes of land and
engineering surveys ; it embraces the description and practical
manipulation of all kinds of instruments used in survey opera-
tions, together with their adjustments.
      Demonstrations will be frequently made in the field, at
which students will perform actual survey work under the
direction of the Lecturer. Cartography will be treated in its
general and special application to the different classes of
surveys indicated above.
      COURSE II., for Civil Engineering students, treats specially
of Tacheometry, Hypsometry, Astronomical Surveying,
Hydrographie and Geodetic Surveys, and Tunnel and Shaft
Alignment.
      COURSE III., for Mining Engineering students, treats
specially of the general features of surface and underground
surveys as applied to mining, the solution of typical problems
met with in mining operations, the prevention and effects of
subsidence in colliery workings, the survey of deep shafts and
bore holes, and the special forms of cartography most suitable
for the delineation of mine workings of various kinds.
     BOOKS RECOMMENDED FOE REFERENCE.—Johnson's Theory and
Practice of Surveying ; Breed and Hosmer's Surveying ; Park's Theodolite
Surveying and Levelling ; A Treatise on Surveying, by Middleton and
Chadwick ; Wilson's Topographic Surveying ; Ganguillet's and Kutter's
Plow of Water in Rivers and Channels ; Lea's Hydraulics ; Merriman's
Hy !raulics ; Robinson's Marine Surveying ; Wharton and Field's Hydro-
graphic Surveying ; Chauvenet's Spherical and Practical Astronomy
(Advanced) ;     Doolittle's Astronomy ;     Hosmer's Practical Astronomy ;
                             ARCHITECTURE.                                      275

Clarke's Geodesy ; Gore's Elements of Geodesy ; Merriman'e Least
Squares ; Wright's Adjustment of Observations ; Trumbull's Underground
Surveying ; Erough's Mine Surveying ; Lupton's Mine Surveying ; Car-
dew's Pocket Manual of Surveying ; Crandall's Text-Book on Geodesy and
Least Squares.
               GEODESY AND ASTRONOMY.
Historical development of geodetic operations. Theory
of Error and the adjustment of observations by the method of
least squares. Measurement of base lines. Base apparatus.
Comparison of standards of length. Determination of coeffi-
cients of expansion. Thermometry. Measurement of angles.
Determination of instrumental errors. Trigonometrical level-
ling. Computation of triangulation. Figure adjustment.
Adjustment between bases. Astronomical observation of
time, latitude, longitude and azimuth. Reduction of star
places. Theory of the figure of the earth. Conneetion between
astronomically and geodetically determined positions. De-
termination of earth dimensions from meridian arcs and from
a general triangulation.    Deflections of the vertical.
                        63.—ARCHITECTURE.
                Special Course ¡or Engineering Students.
                Professor Wilkinson, Mr. J. F. Hennessy.
       ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN AND HISTORY, illustrated by
  lantern slides, photographs and drawings ; and BUILDING
 CONSTRUCTION, illustrated by diagrams, models, lantern slides,
 drawings, and samples of materials.
     Architectural design and its historical evolution from the
earliest times to the present day, embracing Egyptian, Assyrian,
Grecian, Roman, Early Christian, Romanesque, Byzantine,
Gothic, Renaissance and Modern work.
     BOOKS RECOMMENDED.—Essentials in Architecture, by John Belcher ;
History of Architecture, by A. D. F. Hamlin.
      BUILDING CONSTRUCTION.—Description of the nature and
proper utilisation of building materials, and of the modes of
construction adopted in the various building trades.
     BOOKS RECOMMENDED.—Building Construction, Elementary Course, by
Chas. F. Mitchell ; Building Construction Advanced Course, by Chas. F.
Mitchell ; Building Construction and Superintendence, by F. E. Kidder,
Parts I. and II. ; Specification in Detail, by Masey ; Building Construction,
Rivington (vols. 1, 2, 3).
276                         LECTURE SUBJECTS.

   64.—MTNTNG.
Mr. F. Danvers Power.
1. Prospecting, or the search for minerals. 2. Boring>
and the appliances used in connection therewith. 3. Tools used
in mining, hand and machine. 4. Explosives and their use.
5. Mining operations on the surface : with the assistance of
water, dredging, quarrying or open-cut. 6. Mining operations
underground : shafts, slopes, drives, cross-cuts, rises, winzes,
various methods of ore extraction, timbering, filling. 7.
Hauling. 8. Hoisting. 9. Draining. 10. Ventilating. 11.
Travelling. 12. Illuminating. 13. Accidents. 14. Health
and social conditions of workmen. 15. General lay-out of
mines. 16. Timber. 17. Mine management. 18. Mine
examination : sampling, valuation and reporting. 19. Ore
dressing : general, desiccation, reduction, sizing, classification,
concentration, conveying, special methods, flow-sheets,
weighing, sampling, disposal of products.
      Text-Books.—Ore and Stone Mining (Dr. C. Le Neve Poster) ; A Text
Book of Coal Mining (H. W. Hughes) ; Ore Dressing (R. H. Richards).
The following books may also be consulted :—Well Boring for Water, Brine
and Oil (C. S. Isler) ; A Practical Treatise on Hydraulic Mining in California
(A. J. Bowie) ; Mine Timbering (J. Storms) ; Mine Drainage, Pumps, etc.
(H. Behr) ; The Mechanical Engineering of Collieries (T. C. Futers) ; Ore
Sampling (T. Rickard and others) ; Mine Accounts and Mining Bookkeeping
(J. G. Lawn).

                              65.—METALLURGY.
                                Mr. Basil W. Turner.
     A course of seventy-five lectures will be given during
Lent, Trinity and Michaelmas Terms for Fourth Year students
in the Department of Mining and Metallurgy. Introduction :
Fire-resisting materials ; . coal, coke and gaseous fuels ;
pyrometry ; general metallurgical processes and agents ;
types of furnaces ; fluxes, slags, etc. Detailed descriptions
of the methods of extracting the following metals from their
ores :—Gold, silver, lead, copper, tin, antimony, zinc, nickel,
cobalt, bismuth, mercury, aluminium, and iron. Students
will be expected to make full notes at the lectures, and will be
referred to the literature of the subject immediately under
discussion.




        a
                         VETERINARY SCIENCE.                                 277
    All students are required to attend the excursions to
Metallurgical Works.
    Every student is required to prepare a written description
of metallurgical works visited àt the excursions.
     BOOKS RECOMMENDED.:—Roberts-Austen's Introduction to the Study
•of Metallurgy ; Griiner's Traité de Metallurgie ; Percy's Metallurgy ;
Egleston's Metallurgy in the United States; Schnabel's Handbook of
.Metallurgy, translated by H. Louis, M.A. ; Rose's Gold ; Rickards' Stamp
Milling of Gold Ores ; Scheidel's Cyanide Process ; Hoffmann's Lead ;
Hixon's Lead and Copper Smelting ; Peters' Modern Copper. Smelting ;
Lang's Matte Smelting ; Howe's Iron and Steel ; Lowthian Bell's Chemical
Phenomena of the Blast Furnace ; Rowan and Mill's Fuel ; Sexton's Fuel
and Refractory Materials ; Richard's Aluminium ; Fulton's Coke ; Collins'
Lead ; Collins' Silver ; Julian & Smart's Cyaniding of Gold and Silver
Ores ; Campbell's Manufacture—Properties of Structural Steel ; and
papers by various authors in the Trans. Am. Inst. Min. Engineers, Journal
of the Iron and Steel Institute, Engineering and Mining Journal of New
York, Trans. Inst. Min. and Met., The Mineral Industry, etc.

        FACULTY OF VETERINARY SCIENCE
Professor J. Douglas Stewart, Dr. Sydney Dodd, Mr. S. J. Gilbert»
        M.R.C.V.S., Mr. C. J. M. Walters, B.V.Sc, Mr. J. H. Maiden, F.R.S.
        (together with the Professors teaching subjects within the cur-
        riculum).
      66.—Botany.—See Botany I. (c). page 251.
      67.—Zoology.—See Zoology L, page 249.
      68.—Chemistry.—See General and Inorganic Chemistry
.1., page 233 ; Organic Chemistry 1(a), page 238, and Practical
Course for First Year Students, page 235.
      69.—Physics.—See Physics, page 231.
      70.—Physiology.—See Physiology, pages 211 and 212.
      71.— Veterinary Anatomy.—The course of instruction
extends over two years, and embraces Equine Anatomy and
the Comparative Anatomy of the other domesticated animals,
:including the ox, camel, sheep, pig, dog, cat, and fowl. Not
less than 130 lectures, and 50 hours' practical instruction are
given in the systematic study of the skeleton, individual bones,
articulations, ligaments, vascular systems—blood and lymph,
digestive system and accessory organs, respiratory system,
ductless glands, reproductive organs—male and female,
urinary system, nervous systems—cerebro-spinal and sympa-
278                      LECTURE SUBJECTS.

thetic, organs of special sense, muscles, and of the skin and its
appendages. The horse is taken as the type, and chief
reference is made to the differences existent in the structure,
position, and relation of the organs of the other domesticated
animals. Instruction is also given in Embryology and in
Topographical and Surface Anatomy. During the course each
student must dissect, under the supervision of a demonstrator,
the whole cadaver of the horse at least once, and attend no
fewer than 20 demonstrations on the anatomy of the other
domesticated animals.
      Lectures and demonstrations are illustrated by anato-
mical preparations, dissections, models, lantern slides and
diagrams. The museum of the Department contains articu-
lated skeletons of the domesticated animals, as well as many
valuable anatomical models, while complete sets of disarticu-
lated bones are at all times available to the student.
      Text-Books.—" The Anatomy of the Horse " (McFadyean) ; "Anatomy
of the Domesticated Animals " (Sisson).
      72.— Veterinary Pathology and Bacteriology.—Not less·
than 100 lectures and 60 hours' practical instruction, illus-
trated by lantern slides, diagrams and pathological specimens,
in the general aetiology of diseases of the domesticated animals,
and the systematic study of their morbid processes and con-
ditions ; post-mortem examination ; naked eye appearances,
preparation of sections and microscopic examination of
lesions ; general bacteriological technique, preparation of
culture media ; methods of cultivation, staining and identifi-
cation of pathogenic (and some non-pathogenic) bacteria, and
protozoa, with special references to clinical diagnosis ; pre-
paration of vaccines and anti-toxins ; vaccination and
immunisation, sterilisation, etc.
      Special and post-graduate courses are held by arrange-
ment.
 Post-graduate courses include the practical application of
the phenomena of immunity, the actual preparation and stand-
ardisation of vaccines, etc., and experimental work in connec-
tion with the diseases of animals in general.
Text-Books.—Various, loaned by Library.
                        VETERINARY SCIENCE.                                279
      73.—Pharmacology.—(See page 222).
      74.— Veterinary Agricultural Botany.—Lectures, labora-
tory and field instruction in the classification and morpho-
logical characters of grasses, fodder plants and edible shrubs,
noxious and poisonous plants and weeds, fungi affecting
fodder, etc. The general outlines of economic botany are also
dealt with.
Text-Book.—" Agricultural Botany " (Percivals)!
75.— Veterinary Hygiene and Dietetics.—Not less than 40
lectures and demonstrations on air, water, general sanitation
of stables, cow-sheds, kennels, abattoirs, dairies, sale-yards,
dips, etc. ; disinfecting ; composition and nutritive value of
food-stuffs ; principles of feeding ; . adulteration of fodder ;
diseases due to improper feeding ; the hygiene of
abattoirs, the hygienic production of milk, herd and dairy farm
sanitation, harmful contaminations of milk, adulterations of
milk and their chemical detection, protection of milk during
transit from cow to consumer ; State and municipal sanitary
Jaws.
    Text-Books.—" Veterinary Hygiene " (F. Smith) ; Feeds and Feeding"
(Henry) ; " Principles and Practice of Milk Hygiene " (Kleis).
     76.— Veterinary Materia Medica, Therapeutics and Phar-
macy.—Not less than 40 lectures and 40 hours' practical
instruction in the classification of medicines ; their derivation,
preparation, methods of administration or application, actions
and uses ; incompatibles ; impurities ; poisons—nature,
symptoms, antidotes and tests ; prescription writing and
reading. Students dispense, under supervision, all medicines
used in the hospital and clinique.
    Text-Books.—" Veterinary Medicines " (Finlay Dun).      " Veterinary
Pharmacology and Therapeutics " (Milks).
 77.—Stable Management, Manipulation of Domesticated
Animals and Principles of Horse-Shoeing.—Includes the
management and control of the domesticated animals,
methods of handling and restraint, grooming and dressing ;
the use and adjustment of harness ; animal husbandry ;
breeds, conformation, etc. ; principles of horse-shoeing,
surgical shoeing, correction of vicious gaits, etc.
Text-Books.—Various, loaned by Library.
280                        LECTURE SUBJECTS.

      78.—Veterinary Medicine.—Not less than 100 lectures are-
given on the Theory and Practice of Veterinary Medicine, ini
which the nomenclature, classification, causes, symptoms, pre-
ventive and curative treatment of diseases of domesticated
animals, are systematically taught. Practical instruction is
also given at the Veterinary Hospital in the methodical
examination of patients, the symptoms and physical signs of"
disease, diagnosis and treatment.
     Text-Books.-—" System of Veterinary Medicine " (Hoare and others).
" Pathology and Therapeutics of Diseases of Domestic Animals " (Hutyra-
and Marek).
 79.—Veterinary Surgery.—Not less than 80 lectures on.
the Principles and Practice of Veterinary Surgery, together
with 150 hours' practical instruction in operative, tutorial and.
clinical surgery, veterinary dentistry, and ophthalmology.
Each student performs, under tuition, operations and carries-
out under supervision post-operative treatment of surgical
cases occurring in the Veterinary Hospital and daily clinique:
Text-Books.—" Regional Veterinary Surgery and Operative Technique"
(Dollar). "Principles of Veterinary Surgery" (Merillat). " Ansesthesia
and Narcosis of Animals and Birds " (Hobday).
      80.—Veterinary Obstetrics.—Includes embryology, genera-
tive organs, mating, impregnation, development, gestation,
symptoms and duration of pregnancy, management of preg-
nant animals, diseases of pregnancy, accidents and diseases-
following parturition, care of young animals, diseases of young
animals, etc. Practical instruction is given in the aids to
parturition and obstetrical operations.
Text-Book.—" Fleming's Veterinary Obstetrics " (Craig).
81.— Veterinary Parasitology.—Parasites and parasitism ;:
internal and external parasites ; origin of parasites ; change
of host ; influence of parasite on host ; general account of
Protozoan and Metazoan parasites. A systematic account of
the anatomy, development and relationships of the flatworms
(Trematoda and Cestoda), the round worms (Nematoda and
Acanthocephala), and the Arthropodan parasites (ticks, mites,
flies, etc.). A detailed examination of the chief genera affect-
ing domesticated animals, with demonstrations on their
naked-eye and microscopic structure.
      Text-Book.—" Veterinary Parasitology " (Smythe).
                             AGRICULTURE.                                    281
                                                    é
      82.—Meat Inspection.—Lectures and practical instruction
in the laboratories and at the abattoirs, on the general principles
governing inspection of meat, and on the physical and chemi-
cal properties of the meat of various animals used for food,
the qualities of meat, noxious and injurious meat, the differ-
ential diagnosis of the various diseases which render meat
unwholesome and unfit for food purposes, parasitic diseases
communicable to man and other animals, systems of meat
inspection—home and foreign.
    Text-Books.—" Handbook of Meat Inspection " (Ostertag).         " Meat
Hygiene " (Edelmann's).

             FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE.
     Professor R. D. Watt, Acting Professor G. Wright, Mr. J. H. Maiden,
              Mr. W. W.'Froggatt, Mr. E. K. Wolstenholme, and
                               Mr. R. T. Baker.
     83.—PRINCIPLES OF AGRICULTURE I.—A course of 60.
lectures, illustrated by specimens, diagrams and lantern slides
•on the soil and methods of soil improvement. In the study of
the soil, geological, physical, chemical and biological considera-
tions are involved.
      Origin of soils.—Rock weathering and transportation of
■soils ; sedentary, colluvial and alluvial soils ; formation of
.humus.
      Physical properties of soils.—Specific gravity, specific
ieat, conductivity ; relation of soils to air, temperature, and
moisture ; the movements and conservation of soil moisture ;
" dry farming," the Campbell system of soil culture compared
with Australian methods.
      Chemical properties of soils.—Occurrence in soil of ele-
ments required for plant growth ; availability of. plant food
material ; possible deficiency in available nitrogen, phosphorus
potassium and calcium ; chemical changes effected by cultiva-
tion and manuring ; injurious chemical substances in soil ;
■" alkali," acids, manganese and ferrous salts.
      The living organisms in the soil.—Work of earthworms,
«,nts and termites ; bacteria ; nitrogen-fixation, nitrification
and denitrification ; the meaning of fertility ; recent dis-
•coveries and theories.
282                       LECTURE SUBJECTS.
                           g



     Methods of soil improvement.
     Manuring.—Natural manures, green manuring ; artificial
manures, nitrogenous, phosphatic, potassic, calcareous,
general and miscellaneous.
     Cultivation.—Work of the various types of ploughs,
harrows, cultivators, weeders and rollers.
     Drainage.—The conditions rendering drainage necessary ;
beneficial effects ; open drains and sub-soil drainage.
     Irrigation.—Extent of irrigated land on globe ; methods
adopted in Egypt, India and U.S.A. ; possibilities in Australia
in general, and New South Wales in particular ; Australian
Government and private schemes with river water and artesian
water ; beneficial effects of irrigation ; irrigation methods ;
sidelong flooding ; flooding by checks ; furrow system ;
spraying system ; sub-irrigation.
      Text-Boohs.—The Soil (HaU) ; Fertilisers and Manures (Hall) ; Irriga-
tion and Drainage (King).
      The following books may also be consulted: — Soils (Hilgard) ; The
Physical Properties of Soils ( Warington) ; Physics of Agriculture (King) ¿
Dry Farming (Widtsoe) ; Soil Problems in Wheat Growing (Howell) ;
Agricultural Gazette of New South Wales (articles on soils, manures and
irrigation).
     Practical Soil Physics.—In connection with the lectures
on Principles of Agriculture L, students are required to attend
a practical course of about 40 meetings on Soil Physics.
      84.-^PBmCiPLES or AGBICULTTJRE II.—A course of 60·
lectures illustrated by specimens, photographs, diagrams and
lantern slides on plant and animal husbandry, with special
reference to Australian conditions.                      *,
      History and development of the agricultural and pastoral
industries in Australia ; land laws and systems of land tenure.
      The chief varieties, methods of cultivation, seeding,,
manuring, harvesting, and estimated cost of production of the
principal farm crops of New South Wales.
      The various breeds of draught horses, cattle, sheep, pigs,,
goats, and poultry suitable for different purposes and different-
districts.
                                   AGRICULTURE.                                             283

    Dairy farming ; milk records, manufacture of butter and
cheese, feeding of calves, dairy cows and pigs ; conservation of
fodder, making of silage.
      Excursions will be made to agricultural shows and sale-
yards, meat works, factories and other places of agricultural
interest in the neighbourhood of Sydney.
      85.—ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY.—A course of 40 lectures,
illustrated by specimens and diagrams on the methods of
identification, life history, damage caused by and prevention
and remedies for the chief insect pests of Australia.
      General account of insects ; structure, classification and
-distribution.
      Life history of insect pests of orchard, farm, station and
forest ; method of treatment dependent on life history ;
parasites and natural enemies ; trapping, poisoning, spraying
and fumigating ; Vegetative Diseases Act.
      The collection and preservation of economic specimens.
      Excursions will be made to local orchards.
     Text-Books.—" Australian Insects ". (Froggatt) ; " Insect and Fungus
"Diseases of Fruit Trees " (Department of Agriculture).
     86.—*AGRICÜLTUBAL CHEMISTRY.—A course of 60 lec-
tures, illustrated by specimens, diagrams and experiments on
the chemistry of soils, manures and fertilisers, feeding stuffs,
milk and dairy products, insecticides and fungicides, together
"with the chemical changes taking place during plant and
animal growth.
      History of agricultural chemistry ; work of van Helmont,
-Jethro TuIl, de Saussure, Boussingault, Leibig, Laws and
Gilbert, and other investigators.
      The chemistry of the soil ; meaning and value of chemical
 analysis ; determination of total and available plant food
 material ; mechanical analysis of soil ; movement of water
 and salts in soil ; further study of physical properties.
      * This course of lectures is now called Agricultural Chemistry II., as students now
:take a special course in Chemistry—Agricultural Chemistry I. (including Bio-chemistry)
—in their second year instead of Chemistry Π.
284                       LECTURE SUBJECTS.

      The chemistry of fertilisers and manures ; composition and
methods of analysis ; valuation ; theories regarding beneficial
action ; influence of food, age and use of animal and method of
storing on composition of natural manures.
      The chemistry of feeding stuffs ; determination of moisture.
ash, protein, ether extract, crude fibre and carbohydrates ;
digestibility ; valuation ; albuminoid ratio ·; suitability of
various foods and combinations of foods for different classes of
stock ; manurial value of food consumed.
      The chemistry of milk and dairy products ; composition of
milk ; conditions influencing variation ; preservatives ;.
chemical changes in ripening of cream and in butter making ;:
chemical changes in making and ripening of cheese ; condensed
milk and milk powders.
      Insecticides and fungicides ; methods of analysis ; reason
for use ; food poisons, contact poisons and harmful gases ;
metallic poisons ; salts of arsenic, copper, lead and mercury ;
organic poisons ; formalin, phenol, cresol and nicotine ;
fumigation with carbon di-sulphide, sulphur dioxide and
prussic acid.
      Bio-chemistry.—The elements found in plants ; nature of
chemical combinations in vegetable tissue ; nutrition of embry-
onic plant ; carbon assimilation and respiration ; chlorophyll ;
chemistry of the formation of carbohydrates, fats, proteids,
amides and amino-acids ; glucosides, alkaloids, etc. ; trans-
ference of products of assimilation ; storage of reserve
materials ; nature and work of enzymes ; metabolism in
leaves, seeds and fruits ; nutrition of parasites, sapro-
phytes, symbionts and insectivorous plants. Stress will be
laid throughout on the bio-chemical side of the subject.
     Text-Book.—" Manual of Agricultural Chemistry " {Ingle).
     The following books may also be consulted.—" Dairy Chemistry "
(Richmond) ; and " Feeds and Feeding " (Henry).
      PRACTICAL AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY.—In the practical
course of 60 meetings students are required to perform quanti-
tative analyses of the various substances mentioned above.
      Text-Book.—"Practical Agricultural Chemistry" (Wood).
      For Reference.—" Agricultural Analysis " (Wiley).
                               AGRICULTURE.                                    285
      87.—AGRICULTURAL BOTANY.—A course of 40 lectures,
illustrated by specimens, diagrams and models on—
      The botanical characters of agricultural plants, including
      identification of seeds and common seed impurities ;
      germination.
      Identification of grasses, clovers, and other pasture
      plants of economic value,
      identification of noxious and poisonous weeds ; modes
      of spreading ; means of destruction and control ; legis-
      lation in New South Wales and neighbouring States.
      Principles involved in budding ; grafting, pruning and
other orchard practices.
Improvement of agricultural plants, section and cross-
breeding ; Merdell's Law.
Text-Book.—" Agricultural Botany " (Percival).
PRACTICAL AGRICULTURAL BOTANY.—In             the practical
course of 40 meetings specimens will be examined both macro-
scopically and microscopically.
     88.—PLANT PATHOLOGY.—A course of 30 lectures on the
plant diseases caused by fungi and other cryptogamic parasites.
  General description and classification of fungi.               Life
     history of parasites attacking farm and orchard crops ; means
  • of prevention and eradication ; disease resistance ; legislation.
     In the practical course of about 20 meetings a study of
the various fungi will be made by the students, both with the
naked eye and with the aid of the microscope.
    Text-Book.—" Diseases of Cultivated Plants and Trees " (Massée).
    For Reference.—"Handbook of Australian Fungi" (Cook); "The

     >
Rusts of Australia " (McAlpine) ; " The Smuts of Australia "(McAlpine) ;   '         s
" Potato Diseases in Australia " (McAlpine) ; " Fungus Diseases of Stone
Fruit" (McAlpine).
     89.—PRINCIPLES OF FRUIT CULTURE AND VITICULTURE.—
A short course on the chief fruits suitable to the varying con-
ditions of Australian soils and climate ; the piinciples of Vine
growing for table grapes and wine-making.
     90.—ECONOMIC SCIENCE APPLIED TO AGRICULTURE.—A
course of about 40 lectures on the general Principles of Eco-
nomics with special reference to Agricultural Problems.
286                        LECTURE SUBJECTS.

       91.—PRINCIPLES OF FORESTRY.—An account of the
principal Native and Exotic trees of economic importance
suitable to Australian conditions. Identification of common
trees, timbers, etc., and the suitability of various timbers for
economic purposes ; the conservation and renewal of Forests ;
Nursery Work ; Planting Wind-breaks, Ornamental Trees, etc.
       Chemical Industry in relation to Forestry, manufacture of
wood-pulp, artificial silk, alcohol, acetic acid, formalin, etc.
Wood preserving.        Tanning and tanning materials.
      92.—AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING.—The course will
include the elements of Surveying and Measuring Land, the
Principles involved in Roadmaking, Irrigation, Drainage, etc.,
the Motive Powers of the farm—wind, water, steam, gas, oil,
etc.
       The Practical Work will include the measuring and
laying out of plots for experimental purposes, etc.
       93.—AGRICULTURAL BACTERIOLOGY.—A course of 30
lectures on the Bacteria occurring in water, soil, milk and
its products, etc.
       Morphology and cultural and bio-chemical characters of
the important species.
       The influence of bacteria on the soil and on crops.
Bacteria in relation to butter and cheese manufacture. Yeasts
and the principles of wine making.
       In the Practical course of about 50 meetings students are
required to isolate and study typical organisms, and to perform
the bacteriological examination of water, soil and milk.

              FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE.
Professor Wilkinson, Mr. J. F. Hennessy, Mr. J. D. Moore, AIr. A. Coffey,
                             and Mr. A. W. Gerard.
     For GENERAL SUBJECTS of First Year course refer to
Faculty of Science and Faculty of Arts.
             ELEMENTS OF ARCHITECTURE AND ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING.
                   In this course, consisting of 30 lectures and studio work,
            the orders and other elemental forms are studied and explained
              as exercises in pure form, proportion and composition. Direct
                            ARCHITECTURE.                                287

and isometric projection, graphical discussion, perspective,
sciography and sketching and measuring are also dealt with,
and a broad outline of the historical development of architec-
tural design is included under this heading.
    BOOKS RECOMMENDED.—McGoodwin's Shades and Shadows ; Brown's
Study of the Orders ; Gromort, Choix D'Eléments L'Architecture Classique.
               DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY.
A course of Descriptive Geometry as applied to Archi-
tectural Drawing.
                        DRAWING.
Studio work, including freehand drawing from the cast,
antique and life, water colour, pen and ink, sketching from
nature.
                     ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN.
      Courses of lectures dealing with the principles of planning
and composition, the treatment of materials, and the de-
sign and use of ornament.
      The programmes for design problems will be issued at
frequent intervals, a time limit being set in every case. The
problems will be of two classes—first, those requiring a pre-
liminary indicated solution, developed later with final drawings
and upon which one or more weeks may be spent ; and,
secondly, sketch problems involving a final solution completed
in a single day. The programmes of the first class of problem
will include exercises in research, construction and measured
work.
      Class discussions will be held and criticisms given in
connection with each problem.
      BOOKS RECOMMENDED.—Belcher's Essentials in Architecture ;    Van
Pelt's Discussion on Composition.
                HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE.
Lectures dealing with the historical development of
Architectural Design. During the first year, included under
the heading " Elements of Architecture," a broad general
outline of the History of Architecture is given. In the second
and third years the subject is thoroughly discussed M ith a view
to discovering'the helpful lessons which the work of the past
offers in the solution of modern problems.
288                         LECTURE SUBJECTS.

           ARCHITECTURE I.     (SECOND YEAR).
A course of 40 lectures dealing with Architecture before
the Great Greek Period.     Greek and Roman work, the Early
Christian, Byzantine and Mediaeval styles.
     BOOKS RECOMMENDED.—Hamlin's History of Architecture ; Anderson
and Spire's Architecture of Greece and Rome ; Simpson's History of
Architecture.
                ARCHITECTURE II.     (THIRD YEAR).
     A course of 30 lectures covering the period from Renais-
sance to modern times. Also the Oriental styles and minor
phases not dealt with in Course I.
     BOOKS RECOMMENDED.—Anderson's Italian Renaissance ; Ward's
French Renaissance ; Blomfield's English Renaissance ; Richardson's
Monumental Architecture in Great Britain and Ireland.
                        CONSTRUCTION.
CONSTRUCTION I. AND II.—Description of the nature and
proper utilisation of building materials, and of the modes of
construction adopted in the various building trades.    Also the
preparation of working drawings and specifications.
      BOOKS RECOMMENDED.—Building Construction. Elementary Course, by
Chas. F. Mitchell ; Building Construction Advanced Course, by Chas. F.
Mitchell ; Building Construction and Superintendence, by F. E. Kidder,
Parts I. and II. ; Specification in Detail, by Masej' ; Building Construction,
Rivington (vols. 1, 2, 3) ; Engineering Construction in Steel and Timber, by
Prof. Warren.
              ENGINEERING CONSTRUCTION.—(See 56).

                   SURVEYING.—(See 62, Course I.).
HYGIENE.—(See 32.          First part of course in Public Health).
                                                    PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE.
               A course of^ lectures dealing with the following :—The
               position, duties' and responsibilities of client, architect and
    builder ;   building codes ;        reports ;    contracts and agree-
             ments ; finance ; quantities ; costs and approximate estimates.
                HISTORY OF SCULPTURE AND PAINTING.          (FOURTH YEAR.)
                      A course of lectures on the schools and their character-
            istics ; the world's masterpieces and their authors.     Attention
                            ARCHITECTURE.                                289

will be directed to the decorative value of Sculpture and
Painting and the importance of collaboration between painter,
sculptor and architect.
         TOWN PLANNING. (FOURTH YEAR).
Great importance is attached to the study of the architec-
tural aspect of Town Planning. This is not treated as a
special subject, but as one which should form an essential
part of every architect's training. Historical and modern
examples will be discussed, and the principles which govern
the lay-out and the collective grouping of buildings and the
appropriate furnishing of their surroundings will be studied
and illustrated.
     BOOK RECOMMENDED. — Raymond             Unwin's   Town   Planning   in
Practice ; H. Inigo Triggs' Town Planning.
       SHORT COURSES ON SPECIAL SUBJECTS.
These will be delivered from time to time by experts on
special subjects.
    •LIST OF SCHOLARSHIPS, EXHIBITIONS,
                 PRIZES, &C.
     All students of the University who shall during their
course have received Bursaries, Exhibitions, Scholarships or
Fellowships, or exemptions from Fees, are invited by the
Senate to make returns to the University when their circum-
stances in life shall permit, for the purpose of conferring like
benefits on future students. The names öf all students
making such return will be published in the University
Calendar.
        AAVAEDED         AT THE        MATRICULATION EXAMINATION.
      The SALTING Exhibition—A\varded on the recommendation
               of the Trustees of the Sydney Grammar School to a.
           student proceeding thence to the University.     £50 for
     • three years.        (See page 353.)       The last award was
         made in March, 1918.
The BOWMAN-CAMERON Scholarship—Every third year, for
       General Proficiency. £35 for three years. (See page
       340.)     The last award was made in March, 1920.
The COOPER Scholarship No. II.—Awarded to a student dis-
       tinguished in Classics. £50 for one year. (See page
       335.)
The BARKER Scholarship No. II.—Awarded to a student dis-
       tinguished in Mathematics. £50° for one year. (See-
       page 332.)
The LITHGOW Scholarship No. I.—Awarded to a student dis-
       tinguished in Modern Languages (French and German).
       £50 for one year.     (See page 336.)
The JAMES AITKEN Scholarship—For General Proficiency.
       £50 for one year. This Scholarship is not given in the
       year in which the Bowman-Cameron Scholarship is
       awarded.      (See page 341.)
The FREEMASONS' Scholarship—For sons of Freemasons.
       Every third year. £50 for three years. (See page 340.)
       The last award was made in March, 1920.
  ' Scholars are required to proceed with their studies in the respective Faoulties in
                           which their Scholarships are awarded.
                             PRIZES.                             291

The Dr. JOHN OSBOBNE R.N. Scholarship—Every third year
       for General Proficiency. Tenable in the Faculty of
       Medicine by a student of St. Paul's College.
The HORNEE Exhibition—For proficiency in Mathematics.
       £10 for one year.     (See page 355.)
The QUEEN VICTORIA Scholarship—Awarded under certain
       conditions to the best girl matriculant of the year.
       £20 for three years.     The last award was made in
       March, 1920.      (See page 344.)
The PETER NICOL RUSSELL Scholarships—For Mechanical
       Engineering.     £75 for four years!     (See page 305.)
BURSARIES of the annual value of £50 to £25 each are awarded
       from time to time.     (See page 355.)

        AWARDED AT THE FIRST YEAR      EXAMINATIONS.
The COOPER Scholarship No. III.—For Classics. £50 for one
       year.     (See page 335.)
The GEORGE ALLEN Scholarship—For Mathematics. £50 for
       one year.     (See page 339.)
The LITHGOW Scholarship No. II.—For Philosophy. £50 for
       one year.     (See page 337.)
The LEVEY Scholarship—Awarded in the Faculty of Arts or
       the Faculty of Scienée for Chemistry (theoretical and
       practical) and Physics (theoretical and practical). £50
       for one year.     (See page 330.)
The GARTON Scholarship No. 1.—For French and German.
       £50 for one year.     (See page 343.)
The BELMORE Scholarship—Awarded at the First Year Exami-
      nation in the Faculty of Science to a student proceed-
      ing in the Department of Agriculture. £18 for two
      years.      (See page 345.)
The SMITH Prize—For Physics.        £5.    (See page 365.)
The SLADE Prizes—For Practical Chemistry and Practical
       Physics.     £5 each.    (See page 367.)
The COLLIE Prize—For Botany.        £5.     (See page 368.)
292                          PRIZES.

The STRUTH Exhibition—For General Proficiency. Awarded
      at the First Year Examination in Arts to a student
      entering the Faculty of Medicine. £50 for five years.
      (See page 354.) The last award was made in March,
      1919.
The HENRY WAIT Bursary—For General Proficiency.
      Awarded at the First Year Examination in Arts to
      a student entering the Faculty of Medicine. £50 for
      five years. (See page 360.) The last award was
      made in March, 1916.
      AWARDED    AT THE   SECOND   YEAR EXAMINATIONS.
The COOPER Scholarship No. I.—For Classics.       £50 for one
      year.    (See page 334.)
The BARKER Scholarship No. I.—For Mathematics.         £50 for
      one year.     (See page 331.)
The GARTON Scholarship No. II.—For French and German
      £50 for one year. . (See page 343.)
The NORBERT QUIRK Prize—For Mathematics.              £5.     (See
      page 366.)
The DEAS-THOMSON Physics Scholarship—Awarded in the
      Faculty of Arts or that of Science for Physics.    £100
      for one year.    (See page 333.)
The DEAS-THOMSON Geology Scholarship—Awarded in the
      Faculty of Science for Geology.      £100 for one year.
      (See page 334.)
The CAIRD Scholarship—Awarded in the Faculty of Science
      for Chemistry.     £50 for one year.     (See page 341.)
The THOMAS HENRY COULSON Scholarship—Awarded in the
      Faculty of Arts for English II.     £50 for one year.
      (See page 346.)
         AWARDED    AT EACH    DEGREE   EXAMINATION.
BRONZE MEDALS are awarded to the highest proficients in the
     various Degree Examinations.
           SCHOLARSHIPS TENABLE    BY GRADUATES.
The FRAZER Scholarship—Awarded at the Third Year Exami-
      nation upon the results of Examinations, etc., in
      History.   £130.      (See page 322.)
                                PRIZES.                            293

The WILLIAM and JANE GRAHAME Mechanical Engineering
Scholarship—Awarded at the Fourth Year Examina-
tion in the Department of Engineering for Mechanical
Engineering. £50 for one year. (See page 325.)
» The JAMES KING of Irrawang Scholarship—Awarded to a
graduate of not more than four years' standing. £200
for two years. The last award was made in March,.
1920.      (See page 321.)
    The WOOLLEY Scholarship—Awarded to a graduate in Arts
            of not more than four years' standing. £200 for two
            years.    (See page 323.)
    The COOPER Graduate Scholarship—Awarded to a graduate
            in Arts of not more than four years' standing. £250
            for two years. The last award was made in March,
            1920.     (See page 326.)
    The BARKER GRADUATE Scholarship—Awarded to a Graduate
            in Arts or in Science, including Engineering, of not more
            than four years' standing. £250 for two years. (See
            page 326.)
    The JAMES COUTTS Scholarship—Awarded at the Third Year
            Examination in the Faculty of Arts for distinction in
            the study of the English Language and Literature.
            £50 for one year.     (See page 324.)
    The JOHN COUTTS Scholarship—Awarded for distinction in
            the Science course to a student graduating as Bachelor
            of Science with honours. £50 for one year. (See page
            325.)
    The DEAS-THOMSON Mineralogy Scholarship—Awarded to a
            student graduating in Arts or in Science for Mineralogy.
            £50 for one year.     (See page 320.)
    The Royal Commissioners of the Exhibition of 1851 award
            Scholarships to Graduates in Science of this University,
            upon the nomination of the Senate. £200 for two or
            three years.     (See page 322.)
    The MACLEAY Fellowships—Awarded by the Linnean Society
             of New South Wales to graduates in Science. £400 per
             annum.      (See page 311.)
    The RHODES Scholarship—(See page 347.)
    The SCIENCE RESEARCH Scholarship—(See page 327.)
 294                          PRIZES.

               AWARDED IN THE FACULTY OF LAW.
 The WIGRAM ALLEN Scholarship—Awarded for proficiency in
        the subjects of Section I. of the Intermediate LL.B.
        Examination.       £50 for one year.     (See page 337.)
The GEORGE and MATILDA HARRIS Scholarships—Awarded for                °
        proficiency in the subjects of Section II. of the Inter-
        mediate LL.B. Examination.         £50 for one year.     (See
        page 343.)
The PITT COBBETT Prize—Awarded for proficiency in the
        subject of Constitutional Law.       £5.     (See page 371.)
The MORVEN K. NOLAN Memorial Prize—Awarded for pro-
        ficiency in the subject of Political Science.    £5.
        AWARDED IN THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE.
The STRUTH Exhibition—For proficiency in the subjects of the
        First Year Examination in Arts, to a student entering
        the Faculty of Medicine. £50 for five years. (Seepage
        354.)     The last award was made in March, 1919.
The HENRY WAIT Bursary—For proficiency in the subjects of
       the First Year Examination in Arts to a student enter-
       ing the Faculty of Medicine. £50 for five years. (See
       page 3RO.'',      The last award was made in March, 1916.
The RENWICK Scholarship—For proficiency in the subjects of
     the First Year Examination in Medicine.        £50 for one
     year.     (See page 338.)
The JOHN HARRIS Scholarship—For proficiency in the subjects
       of Anatomy and Physiology in the Third Year Examina-
       tion in Medicine.      £50 for one year.     (See page 342.)
The CAIRD Scholarship—For proficiency in the subjects of the
       Fourth Degree Examination in Medicine £50 for one
       year.
The NORTON MANNING Memorial Prize—For Psychological
       Medicine.      £5.     (See page 370.)
The PARKINSON Memorial Prize—For Pathology. £5. (See.
       page 371.)
The MURRAY RATNSFORD SMITH Prize—For proficiency in
       Materials aud Structures.
The PERCY L. WESTON Prize—For proficiency in Electrical
       Engineering I.
                                       PRIZES.                                       295

                  *PRIZE COMPOSITIONS.
WENTWORTH Medal for Graduates—£10.          Awarded annually
  .    for an English Essay.    The competition for this Medal
  is confined to Bachelors of Arts of not more than three
  years'standing.    (See page 361.)
    Subject for March, 1921—" The Theory and Ait of
      Translation."
WENTWORTH Medal for Undergraduates—£10.           Awarded
   annually for an English Essay. (See page 361.)
   Subject for March, 1921—" The Theory and Art of
   Translation."
UNIVERSITY Prize—£10. Awarded annually for English Verse
      (to be written in rhyme). The competition for this
      Medal is open to all Undergraduates and to Bachelors
      of Arts of not more than three years' standing. The
      composition must be at least one hundred lines in
      length.
    Subject for March, 1921—" Belisarius."
Professor ANDERSON'S Medal—£10. Awarded annually for an
       essay on some Philosophical subject. The competition
       for this Medal is open to all Bachelors of Arts of not
       more than Wo years' standing.
     Subject for March, 1921—*' Greek, German and American
       Ideals of Efficiency."
NICHOLSON Medal—£10. Awarded annually for Latin Verse
      (Hexameters). The competition for this Medal is open
      to all Undergraduates and to Bachelors of Arts of not
      more than two years' standing.   (See page 362.)
    Subject for March, 1921—" Hercules Furens."
The FREDERICK LLOYD Memorial Prize—£8.           Awarded every
second year for a Latin Essay.    Open to competition to
 _____ second and third year students in the Faculty of Arts.
    * The exercises for these Prizes, which must not be in the handwriting of the author·
Roust be eent to the Registrar on or before the first day of Lent Term. They must be
contained in an envelope with a motto, and be accompanied by a iealed letter con-
taining the name and motto of the author.
296                             PRIZES.

       Subject for March, 1921—" Satura istius (Sc. Horatii)
         inter Lucilii est et Juvenalis ; nam et asperitatem
         habet, quam Lucilius, et suavitatem, quam Juvenalis,
         mixtarn in suo carmine."'
      The BEACTCHAMP Prize—£25.           Awarded for an Essay upon
             Osome subject of literary or historical interest.    The
               competition is open to all Undergraduates and Gradu-
              ates of not more than twenty-five terms' standing from
                                   Matriculation.      (See page 369.)
      • Subject for 1921—" The making of Modern Japan."
                                      TABLE OF FEES AND COST OF GRADUATION.
                                                    Matriculation   First             Second       Third               Fourth           Fifth               Degree.      Total.
   Faculty or Department.                           £ s. d.         Year.             Year.        Year.               Year.            Year.           £      s. d.   °£    s. d.
                                                    2 0      0      £     s. d.         £    s. d.   £    s. d.    £      s. d.   £        s. d.        3    0 0       55    8 0
Arte                .....................                           t18 18 0            15 15 0     15 15    0
Education (Diploma Course)                                 —             —               —               —         15 15 0              —                 3 0 0            18 15 0
Economics and Commerce                                 2   0 0      15 15   0           13 15   0    15 15   0     15 15 0              —                 3 0 0         68 0     0
Do., (Diploma Course)                                      —         β    β           β     β   0    β β     0          —               —               1    0 0          19 18 0
                                                                                                                                                                           I 88 13
Law (o) .............................                  2   0 0       0
                                                                         —               —           12 12   0    25      4 0     25      4       0       , 10 0
                                                                                                                                                                                 0
                                                                                                                                                             0           i 75 0
Medicine                                               2   0 0      25   Φ        0    28   7   0 28     7   0 25         4 0     25          4       I 10 0 0 M.B. J 160 1 0
                                                                                                                                  0                             Ch.M. 0(b)
                                                                                                                                                        lio o 0 0
Dentistry                                              2   0 0      25    4       0 25      4   0   25   4   0 25         4 0           —               10 0          138 0
                                                                                                                                                                      0(«) 8 0
Science
Engineering—
                                                      2
                                                      2
                                                           0 0
                                                           0 0
                                                                    22 1 0 22 1
                                                                    28 7      28 7
                                                                                                0 22
                                                                                                0
                                                                                                        1
                                                                                                    18 18
                                                                                                             0
                                                                                                             0 28
                                                                                                                        —7  0      ■—
                                                                                                                                        —                 3 0 0
                                                                                                                                                        10 0 0
                                                                                                                                                                       71
                                                                                                                                                                       115 19    0
Civil ...........................................     2    0 0      0         28 7              0 28    7    0 28         7 0                           10 0 0             125   8
Mining and Metallurgy ,                               2    0 0      28    7   28 7              0   18 18    0 28         7 0                          10    0 0                 0
Mechanical and Electrical                                           0                                                                                                  115 19    0
                                                                    28    7
Agriculture                                           2    0 0      22
                                                                    0     1 0  18 18            0    18 18   0      18 18 0             —              3     0   0      83 15    0
Veterinary Science                                    2    0 0      18 18   0  18 18            0    18 IS   0      18 18 0             —               3    0   0       80 12   0
Architecture ..............................           2    0 0      28 7 0    28 7              0   28 7     0    28    7 0             —              10    0   0     125 8     0

The fee of £1 payable for membership of the University Union must be paid by all matriculated students at the commencement of Lent
    Term. Membership of the Union is optional with unmatriculatcd students. Fees aro payable for the use of tho University
    Microscopes, p. 292.

tThe fees are quoted for four lecture subjects in the first year, three in each second and third years ; additional fees for extra subjecte and
half fees for re-attendance on any courses. If more than one Science subject is taken during the course, £1 Is. per term extra for each
course is payable,
(β) Law subjects may be taken during the Arts course. If Law subjects only are taken for five years, the 60 guineas for lecture fees is divisible
(b) Includes Perpetual Attendance at Hospital, £10J10s. ; Practical Midwifery, £5 5s,
(β) Includes £6 8s. per annum payable to United Dental Hospital.
          298                        TABLE OF FEES.

                                                                          '£.
PHARMACY STUDENTS, per courte—
     CHEMISTRY                                10 10     0    25 3     0
     BOTANY                                    2 2      0
     PRACTICAL BOTANY                          2 2      0
     MATERIA MEDICA AND PRACTICAL              9 9      0
     USE OF MICROSCOPE (BOTANY) ..             1 0      0

DIPLOMA OF PUBLIC HEALTH (2 terms              of   each),    5   0   0
per term—                                                     2   2   0
PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY                                           3   3   0
PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY                                      10   0   0
BACTERIOLOGY AND PARASITOLOGY
DEGREE FEE (D.P.H.) ...



          MASSAGE STUDENTS per course—                                    20    5
           First Year.—                                                   0
                  ELEMENTARY DESCRIPTIVE ANATOMY, AND
                        SPECLAL TOPOGRAPHICAL AND "SURFACE
                        ANATOMY
                  PHYSIOLOGY
                  HISTOLOGY AND EXPERIMENTAL
                        PHYSIOLOGY                     4      4
                  PRACTICAL ANATOMY (including         0
                  material)
            USE OF MICROSCOPE ..                       6     6
            Second Tear.—                              0
                 ANATOMY DEMONSTRATIONS                   2
                                                     2 0 10     0
                 •ANATOMY, SPECIAL COURSE            1      1
                 ANATOMY DISSECTIONS (OPTIONAL)      3 3

                                                                          25 14
                                                                          0
          LECTURE FEES, for individual courses, per term—
                 ACCOUNTANCY                                                    0
                 ANATOMY, DISSECTIONS (including material)                      0
                                OF TEETH                                    1
                                GENERAL AND DESCRIPTIVE                     1
                                ELEMENTARY DESCRIPTIVE                      3
                                REGIONAL AND SURGICAL                       3
                                SPECIAL TOPOGRAPHICAL & SURFACE             3
                                                                            3   0
                                                                            1   0
                                                                                3
                                                                                0




\.
                                  TABLE OF FEES.                                           299

LECTURE FEES FOR INDIVIDUAL COURSES per term—
             continued.                                                          £    S.    d
       ANATOMY, SPECIAL ARTISTIC                                                 1 1        O
             ,,       DEMONSTRATIONS
                                                                                             .
                                                                                 2 2        O
       APPLIED MECHANICS                                                         2 2        O
       ARCHITECTURE AND BUILDING CONSTRUCTION                                    2 2        O
       ASSAYING (see Practical Chemistry)
       ASTRONOMY                                                                 2 2        O
       BACTERIOLOGY ..       '    ..                                             3 3        O
       BOTANY                                                                    2 2        O
       BOTANY, PRACTICAL                                                         2 2        O
       BUILDING CONSTRUCTION (see Architecture)
       BUSINESS PRINCIPLES                                                       2 2        O
       CHEMISTRY                                                                 2    2     Ü
       CHEMISTRY, PRACTICAL*                                                     3    3     O
       CHILDREN, DISEASES OF . .                                                 1    1     O
       CIVIL ENGINEERING                                                         2    2     O
       DENTISTRY, MECHANICAL WORKSHOP                                            2    2     O
             ,,      MECHANICAL ..                                               2    2     O
             ,,      SURGICAL
                                                                                 2    2     O
      DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY AND DRAWING
                                                                                 1    1     O
      EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT, DISEASES OF
                                                                                 1    1     O
      ECONOMICS , ..
                                                                                 2    2     O
      •ENGLISH
                                                                                 2    2     O
      FRENCH
                                                                                 2    2     O
          GrEQLOGY
          GEOLOGY, PRACTICAL                                                     2    2     O
                                                                                 2    2     O
          GERMAN
          GREEK                                                                  2    2     O
          GYNECOLOGY ..                                                          2    2     O
          HISTORY                                                                3    3     O
          JAPANESE                                                               2    2     O
          LATIN                                                                  2    2     O
          LAW                                                                    2    2     O
                                                                                 2    2     O
          LOGIC AND MENTAL PHILOSOPHY
                                                                                 2    2     O

    • For Students who have pagsed through the Introductory course the following is the
Table of Fees ; two half-days being counted as one day—
                   For 6 days in the week, £5 per month, or £12 per term.
                        5      „     „      £4 5s.     „      £10       „
                                            £3 6s. 8d.         £8 £2 10s.
                                            £2                 £6 £1
                                                               £4
                                                               £2
300                        TABLE OF FEES.

LECTURE FEES FOR INDIVIDUAL COURSES per term—
       continued.
       MATERIA MEDICA AND THERAPEUTICS
       ,,            ,,        PRACTICAL . .
       MATHEMATICS
       MECHANICAL DRAWING
       MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
       MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE AND PUBLIC HEALTH
       MEDICINE
       MEDICINE, CLINICAL
       MEDICINE. TUTORIAL      ..             (for course)
       METALLURGY
       METALLURGY, PRACTICAL, FOR DENTISTS
       MILITARY HISTORY
       MILITARY TOPOGRAPHY
       MILITARY ENGINEERING
       MILITARY ADMINISTRATION
       MINERALOGY
       MINERALOGY, PRACTICAL .
       MINING
       OBSTETRICS
       OPHTHALMIC MEDICINE AND SURGERY
       PATHOLOGY
       PATHOLOGY, PRACTICAL
       PHARMACOLOGY ..
       PHARMACY
            ,,      PRACTICAL
       PHILOSOPHY
       PHYSICS
      PHYSICS, PRACTICAL
      PHYSIOLOGY
      PHYSIOLOGY, PRACTICAL
      PSYCHOLOGY, EXPERIMENTAL
      PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE
      PUBLIC HEALTH
      QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS {see Practical Chemistry)
      SKIN, DISEASES OF
      SURGERY
      SURGERY, CLINICAL
      SURGERY, OPERATIVE (including Material)
                          TABLE OF FEES.                         301

LECTURE FEES FOR INDIVIDUAL COURSES per term—
        continued.                                             s. d.
        SURGERY, TUTORIAL                   (for course)   £
        SURVEYING ...                                      1
        ZOOLOGY                                            2
ZOOLOGY, PRACTICAL                                         2
MICROSCOPE FEE—Botany                                      2
Zoology                                                    1      0
Histology                                                  0
Geology                                                    0 10
Pathology,                        with immersion lens      0
For use of Oi                     I immersion lens . .     1 0
Entering name on books, to be paid by those who            0
are admitted ad eundem statum or gradum                    1 0
YEARLY EXAMINATION FEE for students who have               0
been exempted from attendance upon lectures                2 0
Deferred examination                                       0
                                                           1    0
(For fees for deferred Degree Examinations,
                                                           0
see By-laws of Faculties).
P. N. RUSSELL SCHOLARSHIP EXAMINATION                      2     0
PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION FOR ARTICLED CLERKS                0
LATE FEE FOR ENTRIES FOR ALL EXAMINATIONS
                                                           2 0       0
                                                           2 0       0

                                                           2 0       0

                                                           2 0 0
                                                           0 10 0
                        FOUNDATIONS.
                                  ι.
                          CHALLIS FUND.
 IN 1880 the late John Henry Challis, Esq., formerly of Sydney,
 bequeathed residuary real and personal estate to the
 University, " to be applied for the benefit of that Institution
 in such manner as the governing body thereof shall direct."
 The bequest was subject to a tenure until death or re-marriage
 on the part of bis widow, and to the payment of various
 annuities, and also to a period of five years' accumulation
 after such death or re-marriage By the death of Mrs. Challis,
 in September, 1884, the University o became entitled, in
 September, 1889, to the accumulated estate with the excep-
 tion of certain portions which were retained by the Trustees
 as a capital sum to provide for annuities payable under the
 will. The last of these annuities having terminated in 1905
 the whole capital of the Challis Fund, amounting to £276,856
 8s. 8d., was then transferred by the Trustees to the University.
       By a resolution of the Senate passed in 1885 it was deter-
 mined that the Challis Fund should be applied as a permanent
 provision of income for educational uses.
       From the income of the Fund a sum of £7,500 was applied
for the payment of half the cost of the erection of a new
Chemical Laboratory, and a further sum of £1,200 devoted
to the erection of a marble statue of Mr. Challis, which has.
been placed in the Great Hall opposite to that of Mr. W. C.
Wentworth.
      The income arising from the Fund is now devoted to
the maintenance of seven Challis Professorships in the follow-
ing subjects, viz., Anatomy, Zoology, Engineering, History,
Law, Logic and Mental Philosophy, and Modern Literature ;
four Challis Lectureships in Law, Readers in Law, and a
Lectureship in Military Science.
                 CHALLIS   PROFESSORSHIPS.
Anatomy, 1890—James T. Wilson, M.B., Ch.M. (Edin.).
Zoology, 1890-1917— WilliamA. Haswell, M.A.,D.Sc. {Edin.):
       1918—Stephen J. Johnston, B.A., D.Sc.
Engineering, 1890—William H. Warren, M.Inst.C.E.



                                                                    o
                          FOUNDATIONS.                            303

Law, 1890-1909—Pitt Cobbett, M.A., D.C'.L.
1910—John
       Beverley Peden, B.A., LL.B.
Logic and Mental Philosophy, 1890—Francis Anderson, M.A-
       (Glasg.)·
Modern Literature,     1890—Mungo W. MacCallum,
M.A.
       (Glasg.).
History, 1891—G. Arnold Wood, M.A. (Oxon.).
                      CHALLIS LECTUBESHIPS.
 Equity, Probate, Bankruptcy, and Company Law, 1.890-1910
         —Q. E. Rich, M.A. : 1911—F. R. Jordan, B.A, LL.B.
 The Law of Status, Civil Obligations, and Crimes, 1890-1907*
         F. Leverrier, B.A., B.Sc. : 1907—E. M. Mitchell, B.A.,
         LL.B.
,Law of Procedure in Civil and Criminal Cases, Evidence and
         Pleading, 1890-1900—C. A. Coghlan, M.A., LL.D. :
         1901-1911—David Ferguson, B.A. : 1912-1917—H. R.
         Curlewis, B.A., LL.B. : 1918—D.' S. Edwards, M.A.,
         LL.B.
!,aw of Property, 1903-9—J. B. Peden, B.A., LL.B.
 Roman Law and Equity Practice, 1910—G. W. Waddell,
         M.A., LL.D.
Readers—1913—Practice in Equity, Company Law, Probate
        and Divorce—C. G. Davidson, B.A., LL.B. ; Convey-
        ancing, 1913— V. Ie O. Brereton, P. R. Watts, B.A.,
        LL.B. ; Common Law Practice and Pleading—D. S.
        Edwards, B.A., LL.B.
!Director of Military Science, 1906-1916—Colonel Hubert John
        Foster, R.E.
                                  II.
THE PETER NICOL RUSSELL ENDOWMENT FOR
          THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING.
      In 1896 the late Sir Peter Nicol Russell, of London (for-
merly of Sydney), presented Io the University a sum of
£50,000 for the endowment of the Department of Engineering.
In 1904 he gave a second sum of £50,000, making £100,000
in all.
304                      FOUNDATIONS.

     The second gift was made as an extension of the first
endowment, with an additional obligation for the establish-
ment of efficient teaching in Electrical Engineering and for
the foundation of additional Scholarships.
     In making the second endowment, Sir Peter Russell
stipulated that the Government of New South Wales should
undertake to hand to the University, within three years, a sum
of £25,000 to provide an extension of the buildings of the
School of Engineering or to erect new buildings. This the
Government agreed to do, and a new building has been
erected "from the designs prepared by the Government
Architect.
     The Deeds of Gift provide :—
        1. That the Department of Engineering at present
             existing in the University, together with such
             additions as may be made thereto, shall be called
             the Peter Nicol Russell School of Engineering.
        2. That the· University shall, out of the income to be
             derived from the endowments, afford both prac-
             tical and theoretical teaching in the following sub-
             jects, in so far as such subjects relate to the
             School of Engineering—viz., Mechanical Engineer-
             ing, Electrical Engineering, Surveying, Mining,
             Metallurgy, Architecture, and such further instruc-
             tion as the Senate of the University may deem
             necessary to give effect to the intention of Sir
             Peter Russell in connection with the P. N. Russell
             School of Engineering.
        3. That the University shall apply the income of the
             Fund in the maintenance of. the P. N. Russell
             School of Engineering, but shall not charge such
             income with any proportion of the cost of the
             existing buildings, nor with the expense or any
             proportion thereof of service by ordinary attend-
             ants, nor with the expense or any proportion
             thereof of the Professorships of Mathematics,
             Chemistry, Physics, Geology, or the Challis Chair
             of Engineering.
                            FOUNDATIONS.                          305

          4; That Scholarships shall be established for the
               encouragement of higher education in Mechanical
               Engineering, to be called Peter Nicol Russell
               Scholarships.
        Other conditions of the Deeds of Gift relate to the mode
   of investment of the principal sum, and provide that any
   unused surplus of income shall be added to the principal
   sum and invested as if it formed a part of the original
   donation.
        The following offices have been established from the
   Peter Nicol Russell Foundations:—
   Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering'1897-1915—Professor Sir
          S.Henry Egerton Barraclough, B.E. (Sydney), M.M.E.
           (Cornell), M.Inst. C. E.
   Lecturer in ■ Surveying, 1890-1906—George H. Knibbs, L.S.,
          F.R.A.S. ;    1906-1912—J. Haydon Cardew,
          Assoc.
          M.Inst.C.E. ; 1913—A. D. Craig, B.A., B.E., Assoc.
          M. Inst.C.E.
   Lecturer in Geodesy and Astronomy, 1906—T. F. Furber.
   Lecturer in Mining, 1892-1902—E. F. Pittman, A.R.S.M. ;
          1903—F. Dan vers Power, F. G. S.
   Lecturer in Metallurgy, 1899—Basil W. Turner, A.R.S.M.
   Lecturer in Architecture, 1887-1912—John Sulman, F.R.I.B.A
          1912-1918—Jack F. Hennessy.
  Lecturer in Electrical Engineering, 1906-8—Ernest Eilburn
Scott, A.M.Inst.C.E., M.l.E.E.      1909—Assistant Pro-
fessor John P. V. Madsen, B.E., D.Sc.
= Demonstrator in Engineering and Drawing,
1903-1910—
          Alexander J. Gibson, A.M.Inst.C.E.
  Assistant Lecturers and Demonstrators—Civil, 1914—W. A.
          Miller, oB.Sc, B.E., Assoc.M.Inst.C.E. ;      Mechanical,
          1911—G. F. Sutherland, A.R.C.S.
  Mechanical Instructor—Robert Hay.
       PETER NICOL RUSSELL SCHOLARSHIPS FOR
                MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.
    UNDER the gift of Sir PETER NICOL RUSSELL, for the Endow-
     ment of the School of Engineering at the University, three
306 ,                    FOUNDATIONS.

Scholarships are offered annually, for the encouragement of
higher education in Mechanical Engineering, under the
following conditions :—
      1. Every candidate must present evidence that he has
satisfied one of the two following conditions :—■
         (a) THAT HE HAS BEEN ENGAGED UNDER APPROVED CON-
            DITIONS IN THE STUDY OF PRACTICAL MECHANICAL
            ENGIN-
            EERING FOR AT LEAST TWO YEARS, BY APPRENTICESHIP
          OR
          SERVICE IN A MECHANICAL WORKSHOP OR DRAWING
          OFFICE,
          PROVIDED THAT ONE YEAR AT LEAST SHALL HAVE BEEN
          SPENT
          IN A WORKSHOP ;. OR,
        (b) THAT HE HAS SATISFACTORILY COMPLETED THE THREE
          YEAR
          COURSE OF TRADE INSTRUCTION IN MECHANICAL
          ENGINEERING
          OF THE TECHNICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT OF NEW
          SOUTH
          WALES.
     2. The Scholarships will be awarded, after competitive
examination held in the month of March, and the holders will
be styled " Peter Nicol Russell Scholars."
     3. The subjects of Examination, will be the following :—
        (a) English, lower paper (100 marks) ; higher paper (130
        marks).
        (6) A General Paper in English, including Geography
        (100 marks).
        (c) Latin, Greek, French or German, lower paper (150
             marks) ; higher paper (200 marks).
        (d) Mathematics (450 marks).
        (e) ■ Mechanics (150 marks).
        (/) Mechanical Drawing (200 marks).
Optional subjects, of which two may be taken—
                                                  f
        (a) Applied Mechanics (200 marks).
        (6) Plane and Solid Geometrical Drawing and Per-
             spective (200 marks).
        (c) Chemistry (150 marks).
        {d) Physics (150 marks).
        (e) A Language not already taken, lower paper (150
             marks) ; higher paper (200 marks).
                         FOUNDATIONS.                            307

       Unless candidates have previously qualified for matricula-
 tion, they must attain the matriculation pass standard in each
 of the compulsory subjects. They will be allowed to take two,
 but not more than two of the optional subjects, but they will
 not receive credit in these unless they attain a satisfactory
 standard.
       Subject to this provision, the Scholarships will be
 awarded to the candidates who obtain the highest aggregate
 number of marks in this Examination, provided that they
 shall have shown sufficient merit to enable them, in the opinion
 of the Examiners, to profit by the award of a Scholarship.
      3. The scholar will be required to commence attendance
forthwith as a matriculated student upon the University
Classes in the Department of Mechanical and Electrical
Engineering, and he can only continue to hold the Scholarship
so long as he shall be of good conduct, and shall attend regu-
larly the courses prescribed in, the University for candidates
for the Degree of Bachelor of Engineering in the Department
of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, and shall pass the
yearly Examinations with distinction in at least one subject
      5. Each Scholarship will be of the value of £75 per annum,
and will be tenable for not more than four years, under the
conditions mentioned in the preceding paragraph. The
Scholarship will be awarded in the first instance for a period
of one year, and the scholar will be re-appointed from year to
year for the maximum period of four years, prpvided that his.
work be considered satisfactory. The payments will be
quarterly, commencing on the first of April after the student
commences his University course.
      6. The candidates' names, together with the matriculation
fee of £2, and all the required certificates, must be in the hands
of the Registrar on the day set down in the University Calendar
as the last day for receiving entries for the University Ex-
aminations in March.
1900—Vine Hall, Roger            1905—Carleton, G. B.
1901—Morris, L. C.               Ada, W. L.
1902—Bellemey, S. J.                   Ranclaud, A. B. B.
1903—Norman, J. L.               1906—Norman, E. P.
1904—Power, R.                   McKeown, E. W.
     Swain, H. J.                      Lloyd, A. S.
      O




308                            FOUNDATIONS.

1907—Hebblewhite, W. R.                   1913—Elliott, M.
      Wilkins, T.                              Degotardi, J. B.
1908—Taylor, E. P.                             Bill, W. G.
      Dennis, C.                          1914—Sims, A. R.
1909—Smith, R. G.                              Mann, G. H.
1910—Pike, W. E.                               Dunster, R. W.
      Mackinnon, J. Y.                    1915—Saxby, K. K.
    Dowling, B. S.                             Home, L. E. W.
1911—Stafford, F. D. I                         Wilson, W. K.
.    Thome, H. H. / œq'                   1916—Young, S. J.
      Tandy, P. E.                        1918—Cram, P.
1912—Wright, J. L.                        1920—Martin, J. D. R. A.
      Wright, A. H.
      Campbell, E. F.
          THE PETER NICOL RUSSELL MEDAL.
THE PETER NICOL RUSSELL MEDAL (value £20) is open to
competition amongst Graduates in Science or Engineering of
not less than one nor more than four years' standing at the
time of award. It is intended to encourage post graduate
study in Engineering. Candidates are required to prepare and
submit a thesis embodying the result of an original investiga-
tion in some Engineering subject.
      The thesis must be in the hands of the Registrar not later
 than the first day of Lent Term.
1901—Madsen, J. P. V., B.Sc.          1   1905—Weston, P. L., B.E., B.Se.
1903—Boyd, A., B.Sc., B.E.            I   1912—Swain, H. J., B.Sc.
               THE        HUGH      DIXSON       COLLECTION OF
                                                         MINERALS
                       FROM BROKEN HILL.
             In 1909 the sum of £7,050 was given by Hugh Dixson,
      Esq., of " Abergeldie," Summer Hill, to enable the University
     to purchase a collection of Minerals obtained from the Barrier
      District of New South Wales, made by Mr. Edward Aldridge.
                 The gift is an absolute one to the University, but it is
        the wish of the donor that the collection be divided into four
  parts.
          Firstly.—A primary collection to be exhibited in the
               Museum of the Sydney University after having
               been made as complete as possible under the
               supervision of the Professor of Geology, by the
               addition of any specimens that may be obtained
               by exchange.
                         FOUNDATIONS                            809

       Secondly.—A second collection made for exhibition at
           the Technological Museum or the Australian
           Museum, or some other Sydney institution, con-
           ditionally on its being put on view within twelve
           months to the satisfaction of the University
           authorities, and designated as part of the Sydney
           University Hugh Dixson Collection of Minerals
           from Broken Hill.
       Thirdly.—A third collection to be handed to the care
            of the New South Wales Government, and joined
            to any exhibit it may have in London or other
            part of Great Britain, and to be designated as
            above.
       Fourthly.—That specimens be set apart for .exchange,
            analysis, and cabinet purposes, after the three
            above collections have been made.

        HUGH DIXSON GIFT OF RADIUM.
In 1918 30 milligrams of radium, valued at £1,000,
together with certain valuable apparatus, were given to the
University by Hugh Dixson, Esq., of " Abergeldie," Summer
Hill. During the war the radium is to be in the possession of
the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital for purposes of medical
research, but within twelve months of the conclusion of the
war an agreement is to be made between the University and
the Hospital as to whether it would be of greater benefit to
society generally if used by the Hospital for medical science or
for scientific purposes at the University. If it be agreed that
medical science has the greater call it will remain in possession
of the Hospital for a period of five years and then revert to the
University absolutely unless a further agreement be made
that it shall remain with the Hospital for a further period.
                             ΠΙ.
                        LECTURESHIPS.
1—WILLIAM HILTON HOVELL LECTtTRESHIP ON GEOLOGY              AND
                 PHYSICAL GEOGEAPHY.
    In 1877 certain tenements and land situated in the city
of Goulbum were bequeathed by the widow of the late
310                    FOUNDATIONS.

William Hilton Ho veil, Esq., of that district, for the endow-
ment of a Professorship or Lectureship in Geology and
Physical Geography, in honour of her late husband. The
present estimated value of the property is £5200.
   1877.—Archibald lAversidge, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S. (Christ's
             College, Cambridge).
   1882.—William John Stephens, M.A. (Queen's
   College,
   Oxford).
   1891.—T. W. Edgeworth David, B.A. (New College, Ox-
   ford), C.M.G., P.R.S., D.S.O.
2 ---- VERNON   MEMORIAL   LECTURESHIP     ON   TOWN
PLANNING.
      Founded in 1915 by a gift of £810 6s. 6d. from subscribers
to a memorial of the late Colonel Walter Liberty Vernon, who
was Government Architect for twenty-one years, and who
designed the Fisher Library and other buildings at the
University.
      The following proposal made by the subscribers was
approved by the Senate :—" That this meeting of subscribers
to the Vernon Memorial Fund offers the sum of £810 6s. 6d.
to the Senate of the University for the purpose of founding
a course of twenty lectures on "Town Planning," to be
delivered biennially, and to be known as the Vernon Memorial
Lectureship, the Senate having the power to reconsider the
disposal of the income at ten year intervals, provided always
that the object to which it is applied shall be within the
limits of Architecture, Town Planning, or some allied
subject."
   1919—Sulman, John, F.R.I.B.A.

                                  IV.
          CURATORSHIP OF MACLEAY MUSEUM.
     In 1888 the sum of £6000 was given to the Senate by the
Hon. Sir William Macleay, M.L.C, to provide for the services
of a Curator for the collections in Natural History which he
had presented to the University.
   1888-1913—George Masters : 1913—John Shewan (acting).
                             FOUNDATIONS                                    311

                                 V.
                            FELLOWSHIPS. °
          1.—WENTWOETH TRAVELLING FELLOWSHIP.
     In 1862 the sum of £445cwas given by W. C. Wentworth,
Esq., to be invested and allowed to accumulate until it should
reach an amount which, in the opinion of the Senate, would be
sufficient for the foundation of a Travelling Fellowship, to be
awarded upon certain specified conditions. The Fund in
December, 1919, was £4,877 7s.
                     2.—JtACLEAY FELLOWSHIPS.
     Founded in 1904 by a bequest of £35,000 from the Hon.
Sir William Macleay to the Linnean Society of New South
Wales.
     The will provides for the foundation of four Fellowships,
each of the annual value of £400 per annum. They are to be
awarded by the Council of the Linnean Society of New ,South
Wales to graduates in Science of the University of Sydney.
     " The Fellowships are intended to encourage and advance
research in Natural Science, by enabling those who wish to
continue their studies at the University, or elsewhere, after
having completed the regular curriculum and taken a Science
Degree, to. do so."
     The following regulations, which have been framed by the
Council of the Linnean Society of New South Wales, govern the
award of the Fellowship :—
      1. Applications by qualified persons desiring to hold these Fellowships
           must be made in writing at such times as may be prescribed by
           the Council.
      2. Every Candidate for a Fellowship must be a Member of the
           Linnean Society of New South Wales ; and must have taken the
           degree of Bachelor of Science or Doctor of Science in the Univer-
           sity of Sydney.
      3. He must produce—
         (a) Satisfactory evidence of his qualification for undertaking
              original investigation ; and in his application he should
              indicate the course of his previous reading and study, and his
              general purposes with reference to future work.
         (6) A satisfactory testimonial of character and conduct, and he
              should give the names of two persons from whom fuller infor-
              mation may be sought.                '
312                           FOUNDATIONS.

       4. The salary of each Fellow will be at the rate of four hundred
            pounds (£400) per annum, payable in quarterly instalments.
       5. In case of resignation or other withdrawal from the Fellowship,
             payment will be made for the time during which the Fellowship
             may have been actually held.
       6. Candidates for Fellowships 'are invited to apply for appointment in
           any one of the following eleven Branches :—(1) Animal and
           Vegetable Physiology and Pathology ; (2) Anthropology ; (3)
           Botany ; (4) Comparative Anatomy and Embryology ; (5)
           . General Biology ; (6) Geography ; (7) Geology ; (8) Meteorology
           (9) Organic Chemistry as applied to Biology ; (10) Palaeontology;
           (11) Zoology.
       7. Every Fellow on his appointment shall be required to sign a paper
             undertaking to observe the regulations drawn up by the Council,
             in accordance with the terms of Sir William Macleay's will, for
             his guidance during his tenure of the Fellowship.
       8. No Fellow shall be permitted to occupy any salaried position or
             undertake any employment for payment during his Fellowship,
             norshall he, without the special sanction of the Council, take fees
             for teaching any pupil either publicly or privately.
       9. The Fellow shall be required to devote his time to research in the
             branch of Natural Science which he shall have specified in his
             letter of application for the Fellowship.
      10. He shall be required to furnish a report on the progress of his
             investigations quarterly to the Council.
      11. When he shall have completed for publication any paper embody-
             ing the results of his researches, he shall at once submit the same
             to the Council.
      12. He shall not publish, nor permit to be published, any paper em-
             bodying the results of his research otherwise than under the
             authority of the said Council.
      13. He may carry ont his investigations in one of the Laboratories of
             the University of Sydney, or elsewhere, subject to the approval
             of the Council. In the former case, he must undertake to con-
             form to the^Regulations for Research Students drawn up by the
             University.
      14. Every Fellow must reside in New South Wales.
      15. The Society does not undertake to furnish any Fellow with work-
             ing accommodation, material, or apparatus.
      16. Every Fellow shall be allowed an annual vacation, the conditions
             and length of which shall be determined from time to time by the
             Council.
      17. Each Fellowship is tenable for one year only ; but a Fellow will be
             eligible for re-appointment from year to year, provided that the
             Council is satisfied with his work.
      18. A Fellow, if he desire to be re-appointed, shall apply in writing to
             the Council afc^least three months before the termination of his
             year of tenure.
                               FOUNDATIONS.                                  313

       19. Should any dispute arise between a Fellow and the Council of the
              Linnean Society of New South Wales on the subject of his
              Fellowship, his employment, or his tenure of office, the decision of
              the Council shall be final and conclusive, without appeal.
       20. Any holder of a Linnean Macleay Fellowship who shall endeavour
to anticipate his income from the Fellowship, otherwise than by
direct application to the Council, and with its concurrence, or
who shall during his enjoyment of the Fellowship commit any
act of bankruptcy, shall render himself liable to immediate dis-
missal from his appointment as Fellow without any notice
whatever.
NOTE.—Women who are qualified in respect of Regulations Nos. 2 and 3
are eligible as Candidates, and accordingly the foregoing Regulations may
                                          be understood as equally applicable to
1905-7—Jensen, H. I., B.Sc.               Female Candidates or Fellows.
1907-20—Pétrie, J. M., D.Sc., F.I.C. 1914-16—Benson, W. N., D.Sc.
1908-9—Goddard, E. J., B.A., B.Sc. 1916-19—Wardlaw, H. S. H., D.Sc.
1909-10—Cotton, L. A., B.Sc.              1917-20—Tillyard, R. J., M.A.,
1912-13—Walkom, A. B., B.Sc.                          D.Sc.
1912-17^-Hallman, E. F., B.Sc.            1919-20—Irwin-Smith, Vera A., B.Sc.
                                          1920—Collins, Marjorie I., B.Sc.

     3.—WALTER AND ELIZA HALL TBAVELLING MEDICAL
                     FELLOWSHIP.
                                EEOTTLATIONS.
     The name of the proposed Endowment shall be "The
Walter and Eliza Hall Travelling Medical Fellowship."
     The object of the Fellowship is to promote the interests of
medical science and practice in Australia by enabling highly
qualified Graduates in Medicine of the University of Sydney to
obtain special experience abroad, and subsequently to return
and give the advantage of such experience to the Medical
School of the University of Sydney.
     The amount of the Fellowship shall be payable as follows
—£150 upon leaving Australia, £100 after six months, £100
after twelve, eighteen, and twenty-four months respectively,
£150 after thirty months, and £200 after thirty-six months.
The Fellow shall proceed abroad on appointment, and shall
return to Sydney on the completion of twenty-four months.
The tenure of the Fellowship shall be three years. In the
event of the Fellowship becoming vacant before the end of the
tenure, the Senate shall proceed to make a further appoint-
ment as from Lent Term of the next year.
      The Fellowship shall be awarded by the Senate of the
 University of Sydney, acting on the recommendation of the
314                      FOUNDATIONS.

Faculty of Medicine, to a Graduate in Medicine of the Univer-
sity of Sydney of not more than five years' standing from his
qualification by examination.
      There shall be no special examination for this Fellowship,
but consideration will be given to :—
         (a) The work of the applicant during the undergraduate
              course in the medical curriculum.
         (b) The interest and capacity for research shown by the
              applicant.
         (c) The general fitness of the applicant to foster the
              objects of the Fellowship.
      During the first two years' tenure the holder shall follow
such a course of work as shall be approved by the Senate on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine.
      The third year's tenure of the Fellowship shall be spent at
the University of Sydney, doing such work as shall be approved
by the Senate on the advice of the Faculty of Medicine. The
Fellow shall do such teaching as may be required of him, and
directly furthering the objects of the Fellowship. The Fellow
shall be under the control of the Head of the Department in
which he carries on his work.
      No Fellow shall, except with the consent of the Senate
previously obtained, occupy any salaried position, or under-
take any employment for payment during his term of
appointment, and every Fellow shall, subject to such consent,
be required to give his full time to the work he has been ap-
pointed to carry out. Each Fellow shall transmit to the
Senate precise progress reports as to the progress of his work
every six months, and the tenure of the Fellowship shall be
subject to these reports being deemed to be satisfactory to
the Senate.
      An allowance of not more than £200 per annum shall be
paid to the Fellow to defray the cost of such material, appara-
tus, and other expenses incidental to the research as shall be
approved by the Senate, but for all such expenditure vouchers
must be submitted. .All apparatus purchased from out of
these funds shall be the property of the University. In the
case of all work published in the form of papers or reports as a
                                FOUNDATIONS.                       315

result of holding the Fellowship, the Fellow shall distinctly
state that it was carried out while holding a " Walter and Eliza
Hall Travelling Medical Fellowship " of the University of
Sydney.
     Further regulations may be prescribed by the Senate of
the University of Sydney from time to time.

Applications for appointment in Lent Term should be in
the hands of the Registrar by the end of February.
1915—Collins, A. J., M.B., Ch.M. (resigned).
1919—Flynn, M. R., B.A., M.B., Ch.M., B.Sc.
                            C


  4.—WALTER AND          ELIZA HALL ENGINEERING FELLOWSHIP.
                                 BEOULATIONS.
      1. The name of the proposed Endowment shall be the
" Walter and Eliza Hall Engineering Fellowship."
      2. The object of the Fellowship is to promote the interests
of Engineering Science and Practice in Australiacby enabling
distinguished graduates in engineering of the University of
Sydney to obtain special experience abroad and subsequently
to return and give the advantage of such experience to the
Engineering School of the University.
      3. The Fellowship is of the annual value of £300, payable
half-yearly, and is available for a maximum period of three
years, the first two of which shall be spent abroad, and the
third at the University of Sydney.
      4. The Fellowship shall be awarded annually in Lent
Term by the Senate of the University of Sydney, acting on the
nomination of the Heads of Departments in the P. N. Russell
School of Engineering, sitting as a committee, to a graduate in
Engineering of the University of Sydney of not more than four
years' standing, reckoned from his qualification, by examina-
tion, for his first degree in Engineering. Ordinarily it is
expected that the Fallowship will be awarded to a graduate of
either two or of three years' standing.
      5. There will be no special examination for appointment
to these Fellowships, but in making the appointment con-
sideration will be given to—
316                      FOUNDATIONS..

      ■    (o) The work of the applicant during his entire under-
              graduate course ;
         (b) His interest ÍD and proved capacity for engineering
              research, as indicated by his work subsequent to
              graduation ; and
         (c) His general capacity for advancing those interests
              which it is the object of the Fellowship to foster.
      6. During the first two years' tenure of these Fellowships
the holder thereof shall follow out such a course of work as
shall be approved by the Senate, on the recommendation of
the Heads of Departments in the P. N. Russell School of
Engineering, under whom the Fellow has pursued his engineer-
ing studies. This two years' course of work shall be carried
out in such
         (a) Technical Manufacturing Works,
         (6) Engineering Research Laboratories ; or
         (c) In connection with such special engineering enter-
              prises
as may be approved.
      7. The third year's tenure of the Fellowship shall be spent
in the Engineering School of the University of Sydney, de-
livering such special lectures and demonstrations as shall be
approved by the Senate, and doing such other approved work
as shall directly further the objects for which the Fellowship
has been established.
      8. No Fellow shall be permitted to occupy any salaried
position, or undertake any employment for payment during bis
Fellowship, without the special sanction of the Senate of the
University. Each Fellow shall transmit to the Senate of the .
University half-yearly a precise report as to the progress of
his work, and the tenure of the Fellowship shall be subject to
these reports being judged to be satisfactory. At the con-
clusion of the tenure of the Fellowship each Fellow shall
submit a paper or report embodying the results of his investi-
gations or experience.
      9. In the case of all work published in the form of papers
or reports as a result of holding one of these Fellowships, the
                              FOUNDATIONS.                        317

Fellow shall distinctly indicate in his publications that he is
the holder of a " Walter and Eliza Hall Fellowship " of the
University of Sydney.
     10. Any further regulations which may be found neces-
sary may be prescribed by the Senate from time to time.
Applications for appointment in Lent Term should be in
the hands of the Registrar by the end of February.
1914^-Burn, A. P., M.Sc. (Tas.), B.E. (Syd.).
1915—Taylor, E. P., B.E.
1916—Pike, W. E., B.E.
1917—Gibson, W. H. H., B.Sc, B.E.
1918—Vogan, H. J., B.E.

       5.—WALTER AND ELIZA HALL VETERINARY SCIENCE RESEARCH
                            FELLOWSHIP.
                                 REGULATIONS.

      1. The name of the endowment shall be the "Walter and
Eliza Hall Veterinary Science Research Fellowship."
      2. The object of the Fellowship shall be to promote
original investigation of animal diseases communicable to
man or of special interest to stockowners of Australasia.
      3. The Fellowship shall be awarded annually in Lent-
Term by the Senate of the University of Sydney, acting on
the recommendation of the Faculty of Veterinary Science,
to a graduate in Veterinary Science of the University
of Sydney of not more than four years' standing. In the
event of the Fellowship becoming vacant before the 1st of
October in any year the Senate may make a further appoint-
ment for the unexpired portion of the year.
      4. In awarding the Fellowship consideration shall be
given to the work of the applicant during his entire under-
graduate course, his post-graduate career (if any), and his
special aptitude and ability to carry out original research.
      5. The Fellowship shall be of the annual value of £300,
payable quarterly. In the case of resignation or other with-
drawal from the Fellowship, payment of salary will be made
for the time during which the Fellowship may have been
actually held.
318                        FOUNDATIONS.

      6. An allowance not exceeding £200 per annum shall be
made to the Fellow to defray such cost of material, apparatus
and other expenses as may be approved by the Professor of
Veterinary Science. This sum shall be expended under the
University regulations governing Finance.
      7. No Fellow shall, except with the approval of the
Senate,occupyanysalariedposition, or undertake any employ-
ment for payment during his term of appointment, and every
Fellow shall, subject to such approval, be required to give
his full time to the work he has been appointed to carry out.
      8. The Fellow shall be required to furnish a progress
Teport quarterly to the Professor of Veterinary Science, and
ar full report to the Senate at the completion of his term of
appointment. He shall not publish, or permit to be pub-
lished, any paper embodying the results of his investigation,
without the approval of the Professor of Veterinary Science.
In the case of all work published in the form of papers or
reports as a result of holding one of these Fellowships, the
Fellow shall distinctly indicate in his publications that he
is the holder of a " Walter and Eliza Hall Fellowship " of
the University of Sydney.
      9. The Fellow shall carry out his investigations at the
University, or at such other place as may be approved by the
Senate ; and he must undertake to conform to the regulations
for Research Students drawn up by the University.
      10. The Fellowship shall be tenable for one year only,
but a Fellow will be eligible for re-appointment from year
to year.
     ■ 11. The Senate may prescribe from time to time such
further regulations as may be found necessary.
Applications for appointment in Lent Term should be in
the hands of the Registrar by the end of February.
1915—Hindmarsh, W. L., B.V.Sc.
1919—Finlay, G. F., B.V.Sc.
  6.—WALTER     AND    ELIZA HALL AGRICULTURE      RESEARCH
                            FELLOWSHIP.
                            EEGULATIONS.
     1. The name of the endowment shall be the " Walter
and Eliza Hall Agriculture Research Fellowship."
                         FOUNDATIONS.                          319
      2. The object of the Fellowship shall be to promote
original research into agricultural problems of economic
interest to Australasia.
      3. The Fellowship shall be awarded annually in Lent
Term by the Senate of the University of Sydney, acting
on the recommeD dation of the Faculty of Agriculture,
to a graduate in Agricultural Science of the Univer-
sity of Sydney of not more than four years' standing. In
the event of the Fellowship becoming vacant before 1st
October in any year, the Senate may make a further appoint-
ment for the unexpired portion of the year.
      4. In awarding the Fellowship consideration shall be given
to the work of the applicant during his entire undergraduate
course, his post graduate career (if any), and his special
aptitude and ability to carry out original research.
      5. The Fellowship shall be of the annual value of £300,
payable quarterly. In the case of resignation, or other with-
drawal from the Fellowship, payment of salary will be made
for the time during which the Fellowship may have been
actually held.                       ν
      6. An allowance not exceeding £200 per annum shall be
made to the Fellow to defray such cost of material, apparatus
and other expenses as may be approved by the Professor of
Agriculture. This sum shall be expended under the University
regulations governing finance.
      7. No Fellow shall, except, with the approval of the.
Senate, occupy any salaried position or undertake any em-
ployment for payment during his term of appointment, and
every Fellow shall, subject to such approval, be required to
give his full time to the work he has been appointed to carry
out.
      8. The Fellow shall be required to furnish a ,progress
report quarterly to the Professor of Agriculture, and a full
report to the Senate at the completion of his term of appoint-
ment. He shall not publish, or permit to be published, any
paper embodying the results of his investigation, without the
approval of the Professor of Agriculture. ° In the case of all
work published in the form of papers or reports as a result of
320                       FOUNDATIONS.

holding one of these Fellowships, the Fellow shall distinctly
indicate in his publications that he is the holder of a " Walter
and Eliza Hall Fellowship " of the University of Sydney.
      9. The Fellow shall carry out his investigations at the
University of Sydney, or at such other place as may be
approved by the Senate ; and he must undertake to conform
to the regulations for Research Students drawn up by the
University.
      10. The Fellowship shall be tenable for one year, but a
Fellow will be eligible for reappointment from year to year.
      11. The Senate may prescribe from time to time such
further'regulations as may be found necessary.
Applications for appointment in Lent Term should be
in the hands of the Registrar by the end of February.
1915—Stephens, H., B.So.Agr.
1918—Waterhouse, W. L., B.Sc.Agr.
        VI.
SCHOLARSHIPS.
Awarded only when candidates exhibit a degree of pro-
ficiency satisfactory to the Examiners. No Undergraduate
may hold more than two Scholarships at one time.
Scholars are required to proceed with their studies in the
respective Faculties in which their Scholarships are awarded.
           A.—SCHOLARSHIPS TENABLE BY GRADUATES.
      The following regulations have been made by the Senate
in regard to the award of Travelling Scholarships :—
      1. That a normal age limit be imposed as a condition for
holding a Travelling Scholarship, but that in special circum-
stances this limit may, with the consent of the Senate, be
extended.
      2. That the normal age limit be twenty-six years.
      3. That all candidates be required to lodge a medical
certificate along with their applications.
      4. That, except with the consent of the Senate, the
Scholarship shall not be tenable by a married person.
      1—THE    DEAS-THOMSON       MINERALOGY      SCHOLARSHIP.
    Founded in 1911 from accumulations from the Deas-
Thomson Foundation.
                              FOUNDATIONS.                           321 .

     Awarded for proficiency in Mineralogy to a student on
graduating in the Faculty of Arts or Science, who proposes to
continue his studies in Mineralogy in a way satisfactory to
the Faculty of Science.    £50, tenable for one year.
1911—Smith, Catherine D., B.Sc.       1916—Tilley, C. E., B.Sc.
1912—Browne, W. R., B.Se.             1919—Yates, H., B.Sc.
1915—Pain, A. A., B.Sc.               1920—Bingham, Mary M., B.Sc.
  2 --- JAMES KING OF IEEAWANa TRAVELLING SCHOLARSHIP.
     Founded in 1888 by a bequest of £4000 from William
Roberts, Esq., of Penrith, for the foundation of a Scholarship
or Scholarships, in memory of the late James King, of Irra-
wang, near Raymond Terrace. By the terms of the will the
choice of competitors and the decision of their respective
merits are vested in the Senate, acting upon the advice of .
the Professors of Classics, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics,
and Natural History. It has been decided that the sum shall
be devoted to the foundation of a Travelling Scholarship, to
be called the James King of Irrawang Travelling Scholarship,
-and to be awarded on the following conditions :—
      1. The Scholarship shall be awarded to a Graduate of not
more than four years' standing, reckoned from his qualifica-
tion by examination for his first degree.
      2. The holder will be required to prosecute his studies or
researches to the satisfaction of the Senate in some approved
place or places during the tenure of his Scholarship.
      3. The amount of the Scholarship is £200 per annum,
tenable for not more than two years.
     Candidates' applications should be in the hands of the
Registrar at least three weeks before the first day of Lent
Term of the year in which the Scholarship is awarded.
1889—Newton, H., B.A.             I    1908—Parkinson, T. C, M.B.,Ch.M.
1892—Brennan, C. J., B.A.         ¡
1909—Chapman, B.JB., B.A.             1910—Allen, C. K., B.A.
1894—Henderson, G. C., B.A.           1912—Bruce, J. F., B.A.
1896—Smith, G. E., M.D., Ch.M.        1914—Moir, Catherine M., B.A.
1898—Chalmers, S. D., B.A.            1916—Murray, Kathleen M., B.A.
1900—Nicholson, G. G., B.A.           1919—Martin, A. H., M.A.
1902—Sawkins, ». T., B.A.             1920—Campbell, Persia G. C, M.A
1904—Allen, L. H., B.A.
1906—Weatherburn, C. E., B.A.                                        31


                                                      "°\

                                                                             M
322                           FOUNDATIONS.

3 --- SCIENCE SCHOLAESHIPS OF THE ROYAL COMMISSIONERS FOK
                     THE EXHIBITION OF 1851.
     Given by the Royal Commissioners of the Exhibition of
1851, to be awarded to a student of three years' standing for
the prosecution of study and research in some branch of
Science with a view of developing the manufactures and
industries of his country.   £200, tenable for two years.
1892—Barraclough, S. H., B.E.          1909—Swain, H. J., B.Sc
1893—Ledger, W. H., B.E.               1910—Davidson, G. F.. B.E.
1895—Watt, J. Α., Μ.Α., B.Sc.          1911—Benson, W. N., B.Sc
1897—Strickland, Tom P., B.E.          1912—Grey, E. C, B.Sc.
1900—Durack, J. J. E., B.A.            1913—Peirce, S. E., B.Sc.
1901—Harker, George, B.Se.             1914—Harrison, L., B.Sc.
1903—Boyd, A., B.Sc, B.E.              1915—Waterhouse, W. L., B.Sc
1905—Laby, T. H.                              (Agr.)
1907—Taylor, T. Griffith, B.Sc, B.E.   1919—Tüley, C. E., B.Sc.

                        4—FRAZER SCHOLARSHIP.
      Founded in 1890 by a bequest of £2000 from the Hon.
John Erazer, M.L.C.
      Up to March, 1919, it was awarded mainly upon the^
result of the Third Year Examination in History under regu-
lations to be found in the Calendar for 1918.      £70.
     The following regulations have now been adopted :—
      1. The Scholarship shall be awarded to a graduate in
Arts of less than four years' standing at the time of the
award, reckoning from his qualification by examination for
the B.A. degree.
      2. The Scholarship shall be awarded on the recommen-
dation of the Professor of History, and the holder will be
required to prosecute his studies or researches in some ap-
proved place or places during the tenure of his Scholarship.
      3. The amount of the Scholarship is £130, tenable for
one year. The holder will be eligible to compete for a re-
newal within the time limits prescribed in the first regulation.
      4. No scholar shall be permitted, without the sanction
of the Senate, to occupy any salaried position or to under-
take any employment for pay during the tenure of the
Scholarship.
      5. The scholar is required to furnish a written report
on the progress of his investigation half-yearly to the Pro-
fessor of History.


                 /^
                                  FO QNDATIONS                                      323

Î893—Henderson, G. C, B.A.                      1903—Cole, P. R.
Wearne, Amy I., B.A., prox.                          Kemp, R. C. King, prox. ace.
ace.                                            1904—Cramp, K. R.
1894—Finney, J., B.A.                           1905—Paterson, J.
Harriott, Georgina J., B.Α.,                         Rogers, P. H., prox.ace.
prox. ace.                                      1906—Whitney, G. C.
1895—Dennis, J., B.A.                           1908—Chapman, B. B. >        „
        Griffith, J. S., B.A., prox. ace.            Lynch, J.           I **■
Ί896—Doust, Edith L., B.A. \                  1909—Mann, J. E. F.
Yarnold.A. Η.,Β.Α,        I œq·               1910—Biddulph, L. H.
Murray, Florence J., B.A.,                    1911—Bruce, J. F.
                                              ;
prox. ace.                                      1912—Currey, C. H.
1897—Chalmers, S. D., B.A.                           Eldridge, F. B., prox. ace.
1898—Lance, Elizabeth Α.,Β. A. I ¿,             1913—Hall, H. D.
Pilcher, N. G. S., B.A.        /8               1914—Mann, O. A.
1899—Teece, R. C..B.A.                          1915—Fraser, W. T. )
1900—Rutherford, Florence M., B.A                    Wilson, J. T. j8"*·
Scrutton, C. Maude, B.A.,                      1916—Collisson, Marjorie C.
                                 prox. ace.    1917—Jerdan, E. A. S.           ")
1901—MuIs, Elsie A. H.                               Harper, Susan R.       ) œ"-
Jarrett, Marjorie K., prox.                     1918—Campbell, Persia G. C)
ace.                                                 Waldock, A. J. A.            f œq'
1902—Teece, R. W.                                    Barker, S. K., prox. ace.
        Mackness, Constance, prox.              1919—Willard. Myra
           ace.                                 1920—Willard, Myra, B.A.

                            5—WOOLLEY
                            SCHOLAESHtP.
     The late Edwin Dalton, Esq., of Sydney, by his Will in
1875, bequeathed his residuary estate, subject to a life
interest on the part of his widow, and an annuity of £75, to
"the University to found " a Scholarship or Scholarships in
commemoration of the late Dr. Woolley, its first Principal
and Professor," desiring that the Scholarship or Scholarships
so to be founded should " have reference to that branch of
teaching or philosophy which the late Dr. Woolley chiefly
inculcated." By the death of his widow in 1893 the Univer-
sity became entitled to the residuary estate, amounting to
about £8000, subject to the annuity of £75.
      The following are the regulations which have been
adopted by the Senate for the award of the Scholarship :—
      1. The Scholarship shall be awarded to a graduate in
Arts of less than four years' standing at the time of the award,
reckoning from his qualification by examination for the B.A.
Degree.
324                         FOUNDATIONS.

      2. The Scholarship will be awarded by the Senate after
report from the Professors of Greek, Latin, Modern Literature,
Philosophy and History, who shall recommend to the Senate
that candidate who in their opinion shows the greatest
promise of success in further study of any one or more subjects
falling under the heads of Language, Literature, History and
Philosophy ; provided that they consider such candidate to
be of sufficient merit..
      3. The holder will be required to prosecute his studies or
researches to the satisfaction of the Senate ai some approved
place or places during the tenure of his Scholarship.
      4. The amount of the Scholarship is £200 per annum,
tenable for not more than two years.
      5. An award of this Scholarship shall generally be made
in alternate years with an award of the James King of Irra-
wang Travelling Scholarship.
      Candidates' applications should be in the hands of the
Registrar at least three weeks before the first day of Lent
Term of the year in which the Scholarship is awarded.
1899—Dettmann, H. S., B.A.           1911—Muscio, B., B.A.
1901—Todd, F. A., B.A.               1913—Fitz-Herbert, J. A.
1903—Merrington, E. N., M. A.        1915—Hall, H. D., M.A.
1905—Cole, P. R., B.A.               1919—Harper, Susan R., M.A.
1907—Lovell, H. Tasman, B.A.         Rivetfc, Doris M., B.A.
1909—ArchdaU, H. K., M.A.

                      THE   COUTTS SCHOLABSHIPS.

   Pounded in 1905 by a gift of £2700 from Mrs. Janet Coutts,
widow of the late Mr. John Coutts. The deed of gift provides
for the establishment of two Scholarships, to be called respec-
tively the James Coutts Scholarship and the John Coutts-
Scholarship, in memory of the donor's deceased sons, who
were graduates of the University of Sydney.

                 6—THE JAMES COUTTS        SCHOLARSHIP.

     Awarded at the Third Year Examination in the Faculty
of Arts for distinction in the study of the English Language
and Literature.     £50 for one year.
                             FOUNDATIONS.                                 325·

1906—MacCallum, M.L.*                    1916—Godfrey, Marsie G.
     Bellhouse, Constance A              1917—Dudley, L. S. 1 „
1907—Scroder, Aphra F.                        Sheed; F. J. ) œq·
                          seq.           1918—Campbell, Persia G.
     Mackaness, G.
1908—Miles, B. J. V.                          Waldock, A. J. A.
1909—Robinson, F. W.                     1919—Coutts, Doris V.
1910—Allen, C. K.                             Griffin, Pearl E. M.    ) seq.
1911—Bruce, J. F.                             Sneath, Beatrice
1913—Hall, H. D.                         1920—Not awarded.
1915—Evatt, H. V.                    |
               7—THE JOHN COUTTS          SCHOLARSHIP.
    Awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Science for distinction in the Science course to a student-
graduating as Bachelor of Science with Honours, who pro-
poses to continue his studies in a way satisfactory to the
Faculty.    £50 for one year.
1907—Flynn, T. T.                        1915—Pain, A. A.
1908—Cotton, L. A.                       1916—Tiliey, C. E.
1909—Cohen, Fanny                        1917—Beveridge, Loma D.
1910—Burrows, G. J.                      1918—BeIz, M. H.
1911—Smith, Catherine D.                 1919—Stephens, J. G.
1913—Badham, C.                          1920—Sandon, Alice M.
1914—Harrison, L.

8 ----THE   WILLIAM   AND    JANE GRAHAME            MECHANICAL      ENGI-
                       NEERING SCHOLARSHIP.
      Founded in 1905 by a gift of £1000 from Mrs. Jane
Grahame, of " Strathearn," Waverley, widow of the late Hon.
William Grahame. Awarded until 1908 at the Second Year
Examination for proficiency in Mechanical Engineering.
Awarded at the Fourth Year Examination to a student obtain-
ing Honours in the examination, who proposes to continue,
his studies in Mechanical Engineering in a way satisfactory"
to the Faculty. £40 for one year.
                                         1911—Hebblewhite, W. A.
                      seq.                    Norman, E. P., proz. ace.
1906—Burnell, J. G. 1                    1912—Taylor, E. P.
     May, H. W.       j seq.             1914—Mackmnon, J. Y.
1907—Carter, E. M.                       1915—Gibson, W. H. H.
     Davidson, G. F.                     1916—Campbell, E. F. .
1908—Lloyd, A. S.       )                1917—Devitt, C. A. W., B.E.
     Norman, E. P. J œq                  1920—PiIz, A. J:, B.Sc., B.E.
1909—Davidson, G. F.
1910—McKeown, E. W.
                                 •Resigned




                                                                                 ■ii
.326                        FOUNDATIONS.

            9—THE BAEKER GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP.
      Founded in 1907 from accumulations from the Barker
 Scholarship Foundation, and awarded to a graduate under
 the following conditions :—
       1. The Scholarship shall be awarded to a graduate in
Arts or in Science, including Engineering, of less than four
years' standing at the time of the award, reckoning from his
qualification by examination for his first degree.
       2. The Scholarship shall be awarded by the Senate after
réport by the Deans of the Faculties of Arts and Science and
the Professors of Mathematics and Physics, who shall recom-
mend the candidate showing the greatest promise of success
.in further study in Mathematics—Pure and Applied.
       3. The holder will be required to prosecute his studies or
 researches in some approved place or places during the tenure
-of his Scholarship.
      ■ 4. The amount of the Scholarship is £250 per annum
 tenable for not more than two years. Candidates' applica-
 tions should be in the hands of the Registrar at least three
 weeks before the first day of Lent Term of the year in which
 the Scholarship is awarded.
 1907—Wellish, E. M., M.A.          1912—Simonds, E. F..B.A.
 1908—Lyons, R. J., B.A.            1914—Thome, H. H., B.So.
.1909—Luaby, S. J., M.A.            1917— Peiice, F. T., B.Sc.
 1911—Cohen, Fanny, Β.Γ., B.Sc.   | 1920—BeIz, M. H., B.Sc.

            10—THE    COOPER GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP.
     Founded in 1907 from accumulations from the Cooper
Scholarship Foundation, and awarded to a graduate under the
"following conditions :—
      1. The Scholarship shall be awarded to a graduate in
 Arts of less than four years' standing at the time of the award,
 reckoning from his qualification by examination for the B.A.
-degree.
      2. The Scholarship shall be awarded by the Senate after
 report from the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and the Professors
 of Latin and Greek, who shall recommend the candidate
 showing the greatest promise of success in further study of
^classical literature.
                         FOUNDATIONS.                              327"

      3. The holder will be required to prosecute his studies or
researches to the satisfaction of the Senate in some approved
place or places during the tenure of his scholarship.
      4. The amount of the Scholarship is £250 per annum,
tenable for two years.     Candidates' applications should be-
in the hands of the Registrar at least three weeks before
the first day of Lent Term of the year in which the Scholar-
ship is awarded.
1909—Robinson, F. W.               1916—Davis, S. J. G.
1910—Kaeppel, C. H.                1919—Newbery, Grace C.
1912—Byth, G. L.                   1920—Radford, D.
1914^-Childe, V. G.
     11—SCIENCE RESEAECH      SCHOLARSHIP REGULATIONS.
     1. That applications be invited from persons qualified to
undertake scientific research within the University or else-
where as approved by the Professorial Board.       Each appli-
cant shall indicate the subject under which the research falls,,
and shall mention the place or places in which he proposes to- °
undertake the rsesearch.
     2. That the holders of the Scholarship shall be known as-
" Science Research Scholars " of the University of Sydney.
     3. That such Scholarships shall be awarded on the recom-
mendation of the Professorial Board, and that the holders be
required to cany out their research under the direction of the
Head of the Department concerned, together with.such other-
member or members of the teaching staff as the Board may
nominate.
     4. That the amount of each Scholarship be determined,
by the Board after consideration of the individual circum-
stances in each case, but shall not exceed £150.
     5. The Scholarship in the first instance shall be tenable
for one year only.
     6. No scholar shall be permitted, without the consent of"
the Professorial Board, to occupy any salaried posilion or
undertake any employment for pay during the tenure of his
Scholarship, nor shall he take fees for teaching any pupil,
either publicly or privately. He may, however, be permitted,
to assist in the teaching work of the department to an extent-
approved by the Professorial Board.
     7. An additional amount equal to 10 per cent, of a
Scholarship awarded in any department shall be paid to the
maintenance fund of that department.




                                                                          ,'/
328                             FOUNDATIONS.

      8. The scholar shall be required to furnish a written report
■on the progress of his investigations, quarterly, to the head
•of the department in which he is conducting his researches.
      9. He shall submit to the Head a paper or papers em-
 bodying the results of his research at the conclusion of the
 tenure of the Scholarship.
      10. In the case of all work published as a result of holding
 any Science Research Scholarship, the scholar shall distinctly
!indicate in his publications that he is the holder of a Science
Research Scholarship of the University of Sydney.
§£     11. Every scholar on his appointment shall be required
to sign a paper undertaking to observe the regulations drawn
up by the Professorial Board.
.1912—Holloway, Rupert Arthur,                1916-17—Collins, Marjorie L, B.Sc.
          B.Sc, B.E.                          1916—Gibson, W. H. H., B.Sc, B.E.
.1912—Little, Elaine Marjory, B.Sc.           1916-18—Pinkerton, Ethel C, B.Sc.
1912-17—Playfair, George I.                   1916-18—Smith, Vera A., B.Sc.
1912—Powell, Charles R.                       1916—Williams, Margaret M-. B.Sc.
1912—Taylor, Evan Percy, B.E.                 1918—Sherrie, Heather H., BSc.
11912—Taylor, Harold Burfield.B.Sc.           1918-20—Broughton, Eileen M.,
1912-14—Tillyard, R. J.                                   BSc.
1913-14—Wardlaw, H. S. H., B.Sc.              191S-20—Angelinetta, Edith J.,
1914—Aurousseau, M., B.Sc.                                 B.Sc.
        Bourne, C. A., B.E.                   1919—Powell, Dorothy K., B.Sc.
       Johns, G. E.,B.A.,B.Sc.                      Rivett, Doris M., B. A.
 1914-15—Pike, W. E., B.E.                    1920—Bentivoglio, Marie, B.Sc.
 1915—Brown, F. G., B.A., B.Sc.                     Iredale, T., B.Sc.
       Hamilton, Ellice E. P., B.Sc.                Bingham, Mary M., B.Sc.
 1915—Jones, T. G. H., B.Sc.                        Russell, Dorothy M. R., B.Sc
       McMahon, J. T., B.E.                         O'Dwyer, Margaret H., B.Sc
      B.—SCHOLARSHIPS TENABLE
      BY UNDERGRADUATES.
                           UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS.
      Scholarships for general proficiency of the annual value
-of £50 were given by the Senate up to the year 1892 out of the
Endowment Fund of the Uriversity.
         1852.*                        1853.                         1854.
Curtis, W. C.               Barton, G. B.                 Hawthorn, S.
Mitchell, D. S.             Coulson, T. H.                Salting, G.
Oliver, A.                  Donovan, J. J.                Stack, J.
Sealy, R.                   Harnett, J.
Wentworth, Fitz-Wm.         Johnson, J. W.                          1855.*
Willis, R. S.               Kinloch, J.                   Innes, R. R., 1
Windeyer, W. C.             Paterson, J. S.               Jones, G., 2
                            Renwick, A.
    * Up to the year 1854 the names are in alphabetical order ; from that date they are
placed in order of merit. The numbers show the several years.
                                  FOUNDATIONS.                                    329'

          1857.                         1864.                           1872.
                              Mate, F., 2                   Kelly, S., 3
Russell, H. C, 2              Long, G. E., 3                Edmunds, W., 2f) M„
Cowlishaw, W. P., 1           Knox, G., 2                   Hurst, G., 2      ( œq-
Garland, James, 1             Sly, J. D., 2                 Jacobs, J., 1
                              Iceton, E. A., 1              Chisholm, W., 1
          1858.
Stephen, Cecil B., 1                      1865.                         1873.
Lane, George, 1               Iceton, E. A., 2              Oliver, J., 2
                              Purves, W. A., 1 \            Butler, T., 1
          1859.               Woolley, W.        f          Forster, C. E., L
                              q
                               '
Stephen, Cecil B., 2                                                   1874.
Bowman, Edward, 1                        1866.              Chisholm, W., 3
Perry, John, 1                                       seq.
                                                            Forster, C. E., 2
                              Cooper, P. A., 2 \            Barff, H. E., 2J
           1860.              Purves, W. A., 2 )            Allen, G. B., 1
Stephen, Cecil B., 3          Alston, J., 1                 Russell, W., 1
Griffith, S. W., 1 \          Roseby, T., 1                           1875.
Mein, C. S., 1            ;                                 Russell, W., 2
q
 -                                       1867.              Ren wick, G., 2
                               Cooper, P. A., 3             Wilkinson, W. C, 1'
           1861.               Roseby, T., 2                Whitfeld, L., 1
                               Coutts, James, 2
Bowman, E., 3                  Richardson, R., 1                       1876.
Griffiths, S. W., 2   }¿       Coutts, John, 1              Debenham, J. W., 3
Murray, C. E. R., 2 ) S                                     Maclardy, J. D., 2
Mein, C. S., 2                             1868.            Whitfeld, L., 2
Wright, K., 1                  Alston, J., 3                Allen, R. C, 1
Allen, A. M., 1                Sly, R. M., 1                Moore, W. L., 1
                               Dargin, S., 1
                                                                       1877.
           1862.                           1869.            Fletcher, J. A., 2
Griffith, S. W., 3             Morris, R. N., 3             Moore, W. L., 2
Murray, C. E. R.               Rennie, E. H., 2             Owen, H. P., 1
Mein, C. S., 3                 Coghlan, CA., 1
                               Kent, F.D., 1                Cullen, W. P.,1    í     .„
Allen, A. M., 2                                             Wright, S., 1        /œq"
Smith, Robert, 2                          1870.
Mate, Frederick, 1                                                     1878.
                               Sly, R. M., 3                Brennan, F. P.,2      1
Cape, A. J., 1                 Plomley, F. J., 2*           ..
                               Kent, F.J)., 2               Campbell, G. R., 2 ) f
            1863.              Hynes, W. A., 1              Linsley, W. H.,2
Smith, R., 3                   Kelly, S., 1                 King, W. U., I
Mate, F., 2                               1871.
Cape, A. J., 2                                                         1879.
                               Plomley, F. J., 3            Rennie, G. E.
O'Brien, L., 2                 Kelly, S., 2
Knox, G., 1                                                 Flint, C. A.
                               Hynes, W. A., 2              Butler, F. J.
Sly, J. D., 1                  Hurst, G., 1
                               Butler, E. J., 1

    • Bracketed equal with Coghlan, who obtained the Lithgow Scholarellip.
    t Edmunds, Hurst and Butler (Lithgow) were bracketed equal
    X Nathan, E. A., prorim? accessit.
:330                              FOUNDATIONS.

            1880.                        1883.                           1889.
^°1"*' Τ·        X seo         Delohery, C.                   Pratt, F. V.   )
                                                              Peden, J. B. ) œq-
 Woolcook, J. J œq·                      1885.
                               Garran, R. R.                  Roberts, J.W., prox. ace.
Piddington, A. B.                                                        1891.
           1881.                         1886.                Edwards, D. S.
Armstrong, L. F. M.            Thompson, R. A.                           1892.
Le verrier, F.§                          1888.                Hall, B. C.           \ ό·
           1882.               Stephen, E. Milner^            Rowland, N. de H. / 8
"Millard, A. C.||
A University Scholarship, value £50, for Classics, was
.given in the years 1854-5 to a student of the Third Year.
1854—Windeyer, W. C.                  |   1853—Salting, George
                            1—LEVEY SCHOLABSHIP.
        Founded by Solomon Levey, Esq., by a gift of £500 (with
•accumulations), as an endowment for the education of orphan
boys in the Sydney College. In 1853 the fund was transferred
to the University of Sydney as an endowment for a Scholar-
ship. Up to 1878 this Scholarship was awarded for general
proficiency at lhe Matriculation Examination.
       It is now awarded at the First Year Examination for pro-
 ficiency in Chemistry and Physics, both theoretical and prac-
 tical, to a student in the Faculty of Arts or in the Faculty of
 Science. It shall not be awarded more than once to the same
 student. It is tenable for one year, and is of the annual value
 of £50.
 1857—Tom, W.                                    1876— Quaife, W. F.
 •I860—Murray, C. E. R. ·                        1877—Linsley, W. H.
 1862—O'Brien, L.                                1878—Jeffries, H.
 1863—Belisario, Edward.
 1865—Cooper, Pope A.                            1879—Cribb, J. G.*
 Ί866—Coutts, James.                             1880—Rennie, G. E.             ")
 .1867—Farrell, C. P.                                   Sutherland, G. W. j jeq.
 1868—Rennie, E. H.                              1881—Poolman, A. E.
 1870-^Backhouse, Alfred P.                      1882—Leverrier, F.
 1871—Robertson, J.                              1883—Ferguson, David
 1872—Oliver, J.                                 1884—Fletcher, A. W.
 1873—BarS, H. E.                                1885—Angove, W. H.
 1874—Renwick, G.                                1886—Wilson, C. G.
 1875—Maolardy, J. D. S.                         1887—Bradfield, J. J. C.
                                                 1888— Wolstenholme, Η.|
     § Bracketed equal with Thomas E. Jones,
     who obtained the Second Cooper Scholarship.
     II Awarded to the second in order of merit, W. Byram, Millard being the holder oí two
Scholarships ; and subsequently awarded to Cecil King, Byram not having complied with
-Ae conditions necessary for holding a Scholarship.
     U Awarded to P. W. Doak, Stephen being the holder of two other Scholarships.
     • Awarded to the second in order of merit, W. U. King, Cribb being the holder of
two other Scholarships.
     t Awarded to W. T. Dick, Wolstenholme being the holder of two other Scholarships,
                                 FOUNDATIONS.                                         33 t

1889—Vallaok, A. S.                 1907—Norman, E. P.
1890—Pell, J. W.                    1908—Ross, A. C.
1891—Brearley, J. H. D.                   Holloway, R. A                    j œq.
1892—Seale, H. P.                   1909—McKern, J. G.
1893—Wood, J. P.                    1910—Peirce, S. E.
1894—Strickland, T. P.              1911—Gardner, R. A.
                                                                           seq.
1895—Sandes, P. P.                        Pike, W. E.
1896—Woolnough, W. G.               1912—Thome, H. H.
1897—Harker, G.                     1913—Pain, A. A.
                                                                          • seq.
1898—Madsen, John P. V.                   Jones, T. G. H.
1899—Boyd, W. S. )         „        1914—Robson, L. C.
     Heden, E. C. } œq·             1915—Beveridge, Loma D,
                                                                                    aeq.
1900—Whitfeld, H. E., B.A.                Sayce, Edna D.
1901—Close, J. C.                   1916—Brain, V. J. F.                     œq.
1902—Saunders, G. J.                      Norman, P. R.
1903—Weatherburn, C. E.             1917—Stephens, J. G.
1904—Atkinson, J.     1             1918—Hook, R. G.                                         .
     Sharp, L. H.      } œq·        Goddard, N. M. ) œq·
1905—White, C. J.                         Hart, K. R. M., prox. ace.
1906—Davidson, G. F.       )        1919—Cram, P.
     Farran-Ridge, C. > œq"         1920—Lions, F.
                                                BAEKER SCHOLAKSHIPS.
     Pounded in 1853 by a gift of £1000 (with accumulations}·
from Thomas Barker, Esq., for the encouragement of Mathe-
matical Science.
                     2—BAEKEE, SCHOLARSHIP, NO. I.
    Awarded at the Second Year Examination for proficiency
in Mathematics.   £50, tenable for one year.
 1853—Mitchell, David Scott                    1876—Allen, G. B.
 1854—Mitchell, David Scott                          Debenham, J., prox. ace.
 1855—Pàterson, James S.                       ] 877—Maclardy, J. D. S.
 1857—Jones, Rees R.                           1878—Alien, R. C.
 1859—Cowlishaw, W. P.                         1879—Cullen, W. P.
 1860—Stephen, Cecil B.                        1880—Cribb, J. G.f
 1861—Bowman, Edward                           1881—Flint, C. A.
 1862—Griffith, S. W.                          1882—Rolin, Tom
 1864—Mate, Frederick                          1883—Halliday, G. C.
 1865—Knox, George                             1884—Millard, A. C.
 1867—Cooper, Pope A.                          1885—Delohery, C.
 1868—Alston, J.                               1886—Russell, H. A.
 1870—Sly, R. M.                               1887—Garran, R. R.
 1871—Plomley, F. J.                           1888—Newton, H.
 1872—Kelly, S.                                1889—Sellors, R. P.
 1873—Butler, E. J.                            1890—Stephen, E. M.
 1875—Barff, H. E.         )                   1891—[Fell, J. W.]t
 Förster, C. E. j œq-                                  O'Reillv, H. de B.
     t Awarded to J. F. Elpbinstone and J. F. McManamey, seq., Cribb being the holder of
two other Scholarships.
     ; Awarded to H. de B. O'Beilly, Fell being the bolder of two other Scholarships.
332                                 FOUNDATIONS

1892—Davies, W. J. E.                             1908—Campbell, A. L.
1893—Davies, A. B.                                1909—Simonds, E. F.
1894—Burfitt, W. F.                               1910—Smith, Catherine D.
1895—Stewart, D. G.                               1911—Meldrum, H. J.        |
1896—Chalmers, S. D.                                   Peirce, S. E.*           ï œq.
1897—Griffiths, F. G.                                  Robson, A. J.          )
1898—Sawkins, Dansie T.                           1912—Fitz-Herbert, J. A. 1
1899—Stephen, H. M.                                    CoIvUIe, A. B.            j œq'
1900—Mort, H. S.                                  1913—Thome, H. H.
:i901^Vonwiller, O. U.                            1914—Evatt, H. V..      > ^n
1902—Wellish, E. M.                                    Harrison, J. F. ) œq·
;
  1903—Weatherburn, C. E.                         1915—Peirce, F. T.     1 ^n
1904—Tomlinson, G. L. \                                Robson, L. C. > œq-
                            aeq.                  1916—Foott, A. E.
Skillman, Jessie   )
'1905—Lyons, E. J.                                1917—BeIz, M. H.
1906—Watkins, H. L.                               1918—Stuckey, G. A.
!1907—Utz, H. S.                                  1919— O'Learv, A. A.
       Cohen, Fanny, prox. ace.
                                    1920—Roper, E. D.
                      3—BARKER SCHOLARSHIP, NO. II.
     Awarded at the Matriculation Examination for proficiency
in Mathematics.   £50, tenable for one year.
1881—Rolin, Tom
1882—Millard, A. C.                                1899—Tivèy, John P.             ")
1883—Delohery, C.                                          Vonwiller, O. U. j œq
1884—Russell, H. A.J                                       Smith, W., prox. ace.
                                                   1900—Wellish, E. M.             )
                                                                                 ) œq.
1885—Garran, R. R.
         Hunt, H. W. G.§                                   Roe, R. Ct
                                   :eq.
 1886—Thompson, R. A.                              1901—Brearley, E. A.                  œq.
 1887—Dick, W. T.                                          Decthelm, O. A. A.
 1888—Stephen, E. M.                                       Weatherburn, C. E
 1889—¿Fell, J. W.                                 1902—Stephen, J. F.
 1890—Newton, W. T. J.                                     Henderson, R. G.
 1891—Davies, A. B.                                        Mottershead, A.
 1892—Simpson, E. S.                                       Paul, A.
 1893—Stewart, D. G.                                       Tomlinson, G. L.
         Strickland, T. P||          £eq.          1903—Lyons, R. J.
 1894—Chalmers, S. D,                              1904—Demie, S.                )
 1895—Griffiths, F. G.                                     Watkins, H. L. j
 1896—Hawken, R. W.                                1905—Utz, H. S.
         Waterhouse, G. A         prox. ace.       1906—Campbell, A. L.
1897—Boyd, W. S.                                   1907—Browne, W. R.                )aeq.
         Horn, W. R.            ·)                         Blumer, R. C.
         Mort, H. S.          [ prox. ace.                 HoUoway, R. A.            )
         Stephen, H. M. J                          1908—Brown, W. R.
à898—Mort, Harold S.                                       Willis, H. H., prox. ace.
                            * Holder of two
    other Scholarships,
    t Did not comply with the conditions for holding a Scholarship.
    Î Awarded to G. H. Abbott, Russell being the holder of two other Scholarships.
    S Awarded to H. W. G. Hunt, Garran beüuthe holder of two other Scholarships.
    i|j Awarded to D. G. Stewart, T. P. Strickland being the bolder of two other Scholarships
                            FOUNDATIONS.                                      333

.1909—Stafford, P. D.f                    1916—Durie, Ethel B.
Snow, L. L.f                              1917—Goddard, N. M.
Robson, A. J.          ( seq.
                                               Sandon, Alice M.     }œq.
.1910—Fitz-Herbert, J. A.t)                    Bingham, Mary M prox. ace.
Gregg, N. M.f                             1918—Roper, E. D.
Leslie, Mary E.                           1919—Melville, L. G.
.1911—Brown, Janet F. M.                       Welsh, A. M.      )
1912—Harrison, J. F.                           Dienam.W.J. ) V^-ace.
.1913—Robson, L. C.                       1920—Bristow, Zelie ")
1914—Beveridge, Loma D        aeq.
                                               Hawker, G. B.]^'
1915—Barnes, Ida D.                            Benjamin, N. F., prox. ace.
                    DBAS-THOMSON          SCHOLABSHIPS.
     Founded in 1854 by a gift of £1000 (with accumulations)
from the Honourable Sir Edward Deas-Thomson, CB...
K.C.M.G., for the encouragement of the study of Natural
Science. ■
           4—DEAS-THOMSON            SCHOLARSHIP POE PHYSICS.
   Awarded at the Second Year Examination to a student in
the" Faculty of Arts or that of Science for proficiency in
Physics. The scholar is required to attend the courses of
instruction upon Physics during his tenure of the Scholarship.
£100, tenable for one year.
 1854—Willis, Robert Spier                1884—Ramsay, J.
1855—Salting, William S.                  1885—Fletcher, A. W.
.1858—Russell, Henry C.                   1886—Abbott, G. H.
  1859—Quaife, F. H.                              Russell, H.A., prox. ace.
 1860—Stephen, Cecil B.                   1887—McDonnell, R. C. W. ·
 1861—Bowman, Andrew                      1891—Fell, J. W.
 .1882—Murray, C. E. R.                   1892—Brearley, J. H. D.
  1864—Cape, Alfred J.                    1893—Brearley, J. H. D.
  1866—Gilchrist, A.                      1895—Strickland, T. P.
1867—Purves, W. A.                        1898—Durack, Joseph J. E.
.1868—Roseby, T.                          1899—Madsen, J. P. V.
  1869—Morris, R. N.                      1900—Boyd, A.
1870—Rennie, E. H.                        1901—Vonwiller, O. U.
.1871—Kent, F. D. r                       1902—Close, J. C.
  1872—Anderson, H. C. L.                 1903—Taylor, T. G.
1873—Butler, E. J.                        1904—Mason, W. H.
.1874— Chisholm, W.                       1905—Lusby, S. G.
  1875— Butler, T.                        1907—Bateman, J. E.
1876—Allen, G. B.                                 Cotton, L. A.t       seq.
.1877—Maclardy, J. D. S.                  1908— Norman, E. P.
1878—Böhrsmann, C.                        1909—Holloway, R. A.
.1879— Bowman, A. S.                      1911—Peirce, S. E.
  1880—Ralston, A. G.                     1912—Gardner, R. A.
1881—Rennie, G. E.                        1913—Thome, H. H.
.1882—Pooiman, A. E.                      1914—Scarr, J. H. A.
a883—Leverrier, F.                        1915—Robson, L. C.
           t Did not comply with conditions tor holding a Scholarship.
  334                              FOXJNDATIONS.

  1916—Sayce, Edna D.                        | 1919 —Hook, R. G.f
  1917—BeIz, M. H.                           I       Satterthwaite, F. T.
  1918—Stephens, J. G.                       | 1920—Baker, W. G.
         5—THE DEAS-THOMSON                   GEOLOGY SCHOLARSHIP.
       Awarded at the Second Year Examination in the Faculty
 of Science. Candidates must have attended the courses of
 instruction on Geology (together with Biology or Chemistry)
 of the Second Year, and the scholar is required to attend the
 •lectures and laboratory practice of the Third Year in Geology
 and Mineralogy.      £100, tenable for one year.
 1892—Hughes, M. O'G., B.A                  1908—Booth, F. A.
 189»—Watt, J.A., M.A.                      1909—Browne, W. R.
 1899—Ball, C. L.   \                       1910—Debenham, F., B.A.
                                                                                 ■ asq.
      Mort, S. R. Jœq·                           Smith, Catherine D.
 1900—Heden, E.C., B.A.                     1911—Watson, A. D.
                           aeq.
      Newman, J. M.t                        1912—Dunkley, A. N.
 1901—Verge, John, B.A.                     1913—Aurousseau, M.
 1902—Ward, L. K., B.A.t                    1914—Pain, A. A.
      Taylor, T. G.                         1915—Collins, Marjorie I.
 1903—Jensen, H. J.                         1918—Bentivoglio, Marie
 1904—Foxall, H. G.                              Peart, Mary M.               Jœq.
 1905—Atkinson, J.                          1919—Bingham, Mary M.
 1906—Hammond, W. L.                             Osborne, G. D.
 1907—Cotton, L. A.                         1920—Not awarded.
                       COOPER            SCHOLARSHIPS.
      Founded in 1857 by a gift of £1000 (with accumulations)
 from Sir Daniel Cooper, Bart., for the encouragement of
 Classical Literature.
                      6—COOPER SCHOLARSHIP, NO. I.
     Awarded at the Second Year Examination for proficiency
in Classics.  £50, tenable for one year.
 1857—Hawthorn, S.
                                               1875—Butler, T.
 1862—Griffith, S. W.                          1876—Russell, W.
 1864—Mate, Frederick                                  Allen, G. B.     ")
 1865—Knox, George                                     prox.
 1867—Barton, Edmund                                  Debenham, J. J ace.
 1868—Alston, J.                              1877—Wilkinson, W. C.
 1871—Coghlan, C. A.                          1878—Allen, R. C.
         Plomley, F. J., prox. ace.           •1879—Badham, Lewis B. L.
 1872—Hynes, W. A.                                     Owen, H. P., prox. ace.
         ♦Backhouse,       Alfred    P.,      1880—Cribb, J. G.J
              prox. ace.                      1881—Barlee, F. R.
 1874—Oliver, J.                              1882—Piddington, A. B.
t Did not comply with the conditions for      1883—Armstrong, L. F. M.
holding the Scholarship,
• A special University Prize was awarded to Alfred P. Backhouse for proficiency ID η
the Scholarship examinations of the year
     t Awarded to W. U. King. Cribb being the holder of two other Scholarships.
                                    FOUNDATIONS.                                         335

1884—Millard, A. C.                              1902—Barton, W. A.
1885—Russell, Jane F. )                          1904—Henderson, R. G.       ")
                                seq.             Rogers, P. H.                     œq.
Neill, L. E. F.  )
1886—Russell, H. A. J
1887—Garran, R. R.                               (
.1889—Lloyd, F.                                  1905—MaeCallum, M. L.
1890—Stephen, E. M.                              1906—Schleicher, B. M. J.
1891—Parker, W. A.                               1907—Castlehow, S.
1892—Levy, D.                                    1908—Robinson, F. W.
1893—Garnsey, A. H.                              1909—Allen, C. K.
1895—Waddell, G. W.                              1910—Byth, G. L.
1896—Whitfeld, H. E.                             1912—Fitz-Herbert, J. A.
1897—Evans-Jones, D. P.                          1913—Childe, V. G.
1898—Teece, R. C.§                               1915—Newbery, Grace C.
1899—Robson, R. N.                               1916—Dudley, L. S.
"1900—Todd, F. A.                                1918—Radford, D.
                                                 1920—Shipp, G. P.

                    7—COOPER SCHOLARSHIP, NO.                Π.

      Awarded at the Matriculation Examination for proficiency
:in Classics.  £50, tenable for one year.
 1881—Jones, T. E.                              1897—Robson, R. N.
 1882—Millard, A. C.                                  Arnold, A. G. de L. ) proi
 1883—Fletcher, A. W. 1                               Bourne, Eleanor E. ) acc
      NeUl, L. E. F.    J·*"                    1898—Power, Percy H.
1884—Russell, H. A.                                   Woodd, G. N. )
1885—Garran, R. R.                                      Todd, F. A.          1 Ρ">χ- acc-
1886—Thompson, R. A.||                          1899—Browne, C. S.tJ \
                                                                           aeq.
1887—Wolstenholme, H.%                                Teece, R. N-Jj     J
1888—Stephen, E. Milner                         1900—Allen, L. H.
1889—Parker, W. A.                              1901—Harris, S. H.f
1890—Levy, Daniel**                             1902—Henderson, R. G.
1891—Garnsey, A. H.                             1903—Porter, W. E. J.
1892—Hall, E. C.                                      MaeCallum, W. L. prox. acc.
1893—Mitchell, E. M. "I                         1904—Schleicher, B. M. J.
       Waddell, G. W. J      3eq.               1905—Castlehow, Stanley
1894—Whitfeld, H. E.                            1906—Fitz-Herbert, R. A.
1895—Evans-Jones, D. P.                         1907—Browne, W. R.f
                                                                              • ¡eq.
1896—Teece, R. C.ft                                   Macrossan, N. W.f
       McEvoy, B. P.                            1907—Cohen, C. H.

X Awarded to A. G. Saddington, Russell being the holder of two other Scholarships.
§ R. C. Teece being the holder of two Scholarships could not retain the Cooper
^Scholarship No. I, which was not awarded.
     Il Awarded to C. L. W. Hunt, Thompson being the holder of two other Scholarships.
      Á Awarded to F. Lloyd, H. Wolstenholme being the holder of two other Scholarships.
      ** Awarded to A. C. Gill, D. Levy being the holder of two other Scholarships.
     tt Awarded to B. P. McEvoy, R. C. Teece being the holder of two Scholarships.
      ÎÎ C. S. Browne did not comply with the conditions for holding the Scholarship.
     ÎÎ R. N. Teece was the holder of two other Scholarships.
      t Did not comply with conditions for holding Scholarship.
 336                               FOUNDATIONS.

 1908—Duhig, J. V. J.                        1915—Levick, C. B.J
 1909—Donovan, C. O. G.                      1916—Radford, D.
 1910—Pitz-Herbert, J. A.                    1917—Brooks, F. K. E.
 1912—Kay, R. I.                             1918—Shipp, G. P.
 1913—Woodward, E. A.                        1919—Capell, A.
 1914—MacCallum, W. P. ·                   | 1920—Morony, G. T.J
                 8—COOPER               SCHOLARSHIP, NO. ΠΙ.
      Awarded at the First Year Examination for proficiency in
 Classics.  £50, tenable for one year.
 1890—Parker, W. A.                1904—MacCallum, M. L.
 1891—Levy, D.                     1905—Schleicher, B. M. J.
 1892—Garnsey, A. H.                     McKeown, F. M., prox. ace.
 1893—[HaU, E. C]                  1906—Castlehow, S.
      Rowland, N. de H.*           1907—Kaeppel, C. H.
 1894—Mitchell, E. M. I            1908—Allen, C. K.
      Waddell.G. Wjœq-             1909—Byth, G. L.
 1895—Whitfeld, H. E.              1911—Fitz-Herbert, J. A.
 1896—Evans-Jones, D. P.           1912—Childe, V. G.
 1897—Teece, R. C-t                1913—Simpson, C. H. G.
      Walsh, J. J.                 1914—Newberç', Grace
 1898—Robson, R. N.                1915—Dudley, L. S.
 1899—Todd, F. A.                  1916—Payn, Sarah D.
 1901—Barton, W. A.                1917—Radiord, D.
      Allen, L. H., prox. ace.     1919-Shipp, G. P.
                                   1920—Not awarded.
 1903—Henderson, R. G.
      Rogers, P. H.    / 8 8 I - I -
                 9—LITHGOW SCHOLARSHIP, NO. I.
     Founded in 1864 by a bequest of £1000 from „William
Lithgow, Esq. Awarded up to 1878 at the First Year Exami-
nation for general proficiency. From 1879 to 1889 it was
awarded at the First Year Examination for proficiency in
Classics ; and from 1890 up to 1892 at the Matriculation
Examination for proficiency in an ancient and a modern
language. It is now awarded for proficiency in French and
German at the Matriculation Examination. £50, tenable
for one year.
1866—Barton, E.                                  1874—Butler, T.
1867—Alston, J.                                  1875—Allen, G. B.
1868—Morris, R. N.                               1876—Wilkinson, W. C.
1869—Sly, R. M.                                  1877—Allen, R. C.
1870—Coghlan, C. A.                              1878—Cullen, W. P.
1871—Backhouse, Alfred P.                        1879—Cribb, J. G-ÎÎ
1872—Butler, E. J.                               1880—Barlee, F. R.
1873—Chisholm, J.
     J Did not comply with conditions for holding Scholarship.
     * The first place in the Scholarship Examination was gained by E. C. Hall, who did
not comply with the conditions for holding the Scholarship.
     t Awarded to J. J. Walsh, E. C. Teece being the holder of two other Scholarships.
     }} Awarded to W. U. King,Cribb being the holder of two other Scholarships.
                                 FOUNDATIONS.                                       337

 1881—Piddington, A. B.                        1885—Russoll, H. A.§
      Rich, G. E., prox. ace.                  '
 1882—Armstrong, L. F. M.                      1886—Garran, R. R.
 1883—Millard, A. C.                           1887—Thompson, R. A.
 1884—Neill, L. E. F.   1                      1888—Lloyd, F.
      Fletcher, A. W. ) œq-                    1889—Stephen, E. M.

 1890—Levy, Daniel                            1892—Rowland, N. de H.       \
 1891—Meli, C. N.                                  Whitfeld,' Eleanor M. ) œq'
                                                                       Ι·.
                                                                             Γ
1893—Strickland, T. P.          1907—Hooton, J. R.
1894—Ludowici, E.]|             1908—Blumer, S. J.
o    Whitehead, Trixie          1909—Taylor, R. J.f
1895—Pilcher, N. G. S.               Buchanan, A. L.f
1896—Nicholson, G. G.           1910—Moir, Catherine M.
1898—Armstrong, Ina B. H.       1911—Crawford, W. F.
1899—Wilshire, Hector           1912—Symonds, S.
1900—Sproule, Margaret          1913—Dare, L.
1901—Armstrong, Clare A. C.     1915—Martin, EUa L.
     Gale, B. C. L., prox. ace. 1917—Irwin, Dorothy
1902— Stephen, J. F.*                Nowell, Frances M., prox. ice
1903—Vaughan, E. F.f            )919—Clarke, Margaret A.
     Mcintosh, A. M.            1920—Not awarded.
1906—Turner, T. A.f
     Campbell, A. L.
               10—LITHGOW SCHOLARSHIP, NO. II.
     The Scholarship is awarded to a student who has com-
pleted the First Year in the Faculty of Arts for proficiency
in the subjects of the course of Philosophy I. The scholar is
required to attend the course of Philosophy II. during his
tenure of the Scholarship. £50, tenable for one year.
1908—Mann, J. E. F. (2nd Yr.) } ¿.
1915— Doubleday, Vera M.           1916—Rivett, Doris M.
     Blanksby.H.R. (1st Yr.) J     1917—Coutts, Doris V.    )
1909—Muscio, B. (2nd Year)               Purnell, Olive E. ) œq-
1910—Smith, D. M. (1st Year)       1918—Lee, R. S.
1911—Cockett, C. B. (1st Year)     1919—Mclntyre, M. W. D.
1912—Perkins, G.                   1920 -Watt, A. S.
1913—Evatt, H. V.
1914—Wearne, Juanita 1
     Slade, E. D.       ( œq·
                 11—WIGRAM ALLEN SCHOLARSHIP.
     Founded by gifts of £381 in 1867 (with accumulations),
and £500 in 1883, from Sir George Wigram Allen, for the
encouragement of the study of Law. Awarded for general
proficiency in the subjects of Part I. of the Intermediate
LL.B. Examination.      £50, tenable for one year.
    !"Awarded to G. P. Barbour and A. G. Saddington, œq., Russell being the holder of
two other Scholarships.
    * Holder of two other Scholarships.
    t Did not comply with the conditions for holding a Scholarship.
    !! Awarded to Trixie Whitehead, E. Ludowici not having complied with the condition*
necessary for holding the Scholarship.
338                            FOUNDATIONS.

1881—Edmunds, W., LL.B.                     1908—Edwards, H. G. 1
1885—Green, A. V., LL.B.                         Lamond, H. L.     / "'
1887—Green, A. V., LL.D.                    1910—Weston, C. A., B.A.
                                                 )
1890—Lloyd, F., B.A.                             Mason, H. H.                seq.
1892—Flannery, G.E., B.A.
1893—Holme, J. B., B.A.                         }                         seq.
1894—Levy, D., B.A.                      1911—Blanksby, H. R., B.A.
                                               Williams, D.
1895—Bavin, T. R., B.A.                         Nimmo, W. M.
                                         1913- -McTague, M. P.
1896—Hammond, J. H., B.A.                       McCulloch, C. V.
                                         1912—Street, K. W., B.A. . ) prox.
1897—Mitchell, E. M., B.A.                      MacDougall, G. J. , C. I ace.
1898—Dettmann, H. S., B.A.               1914—Henry, H. A.*
1899—Pilcher, N. G. S., B.A.                    Street, L. W.*
1900—Butler. P. J., B.A.             )          Blacket, A. R.
     Rutherford, G. VV., B.A. I          1915—Nield, J. R.', B.A.
1901—Teece, R. C.                        1916—Evatt, H. V., B.A.
1902—Fahey, B. F., B.A.                         Glover, D. W. N.       ] œq.
1903—Ferguson, J. A., B.A.               1917—Jerdan, E. A. S.
1904—Wilson, D., B.A.           1               Flattery,T. P.
     Teece, R. N., B.A.       J 3^"      1918—Benecke, J. S.
1905—Jordan, F. R., B.A. Í                      Sheed, F. J., Β.Γ., prox. ace.
     Real, E. T., B.A.         J œq·     1919—Currey, C. H., M.A.
                                                Tonkin;?. K. J.            aeq.
1906—Spence, J., B.A.        )
     Thompson, E. H.       / œq'         1920—Treatt, V. H.
1907—Markell, H. F., B.A.              I
                     12—BENVVICK SCHOLARSHIP.
     Founded in 1877 by a gift of £1000 from the Hon. Sir
Arthur Renwick, B.A., M.D., for the encouragement of the
study of Natural Sciejnce, including Comparative Anatomy.
Awarded in the Faculty of Medicine for proficiency in the
subjects of the First Year Examination in Medicine. £50,
tenable for one year.
                          seq.
1878—Quaife, W. F. \      1891—Hughes, M. O'G.
Fletcher, J. A. J                Veech, M., prox. ace.
1879—Cullen, W. P.        1892—Deck, G. H. B.
1880—Cribb, J. G.         1893—Dixon, G. P.
1881—Sutherland, G. W.    1894—Hall, E. C.        1 „„
1882—Woolcock, J.                Kater, N. W. J œq'
1883—Le verrier, F.       1895—Sandes, F. P.
                          1896—Burfitt, W. F., B.A.
1885—Bancroft, P.              1897—Macintosh, A. H.
1886—Hester, J. W.                    Graham, Mabel J., prox. ace.
     Henry, A., prox. ace.     1898—Muscio, A.
1887—Wilson, C. G.             1899—Dansey, St. J. W.
1888—Abbott, G. H.             1900—Quaife, C.
1889—Sawkins, F. J.            1901—Harrison, E. S. \
     Dick, R., prox. ace.             Leslie, J. R.    J œq·
1890—Vallack, A. S.            1902—Parkinson, T. C.
     Smith, G. E., prox. ace. 1903—Shellshear, J. L.
                                * Did not comply with the conditions for holding the
          Scholarship.
                             FOUNDATIONS.                                       339

1904—Archdall, M.               1913—Lawrance, G. A.
                          seq..
     Brearley, E. A.            1914—Woodhill, G. G.
                                                            œq.
1905—Sampson, G. A.                  Herlihy, F. C.
1906—Burfifct, Mary B.          1915—Ford, J. W.
     Ewing, T.        jajq.     1916—Paling, J. M. A.
1907—Macintosh, A. M.                Hunter, J. I., prox. ace.
     Edye, B. T.      J seq.    1917—Geanev, M.
1908—Wallace, R. A. R.          1918—Frew, C. A.
1909—Benjamin, A.                    Radclifle, D. G         seq.
1910—May, L.                    1919—Taylor, H. J.
                                                             seq.
                                     Earlam, M. S. S.
                 13—GEORGE ALLEN SCHOLARSHIP.
Founded in 1877 by a bequest of £1000 from the Hon.
George Allen. Awarded at the First Year Examination for
proficiency in Mathematics.   £50, tenable for one year.
" "" " " ''                                1904—Lyons, R. J.
1911—Gregg, N. M.                         1920—Welsh, A. M.
1912—Frecker, E. W.                       1905—Watkins, H. L.
                                          1906—Utz, H. S.
                                          1907—Campbell, A. L.
                                          1908—Holloway, R. A.
                                                                        seq.
                                                Simonds, E. F.
                                          1909—Brown, W. R.
1879—Cribb, J. G.*    prox. ace.          1910—Robson, A. J.
1880—Flint, C. A.                         1911—Fitz-Herbert, J.
1881—Woolcock, J.                         1912—Thome, H. H.J
1882—Halliday, G. C.                            Murray, D. M.
1883—Millard, A. C.                             Stafford, F. D.     seq.
1884—Delohery, C.                               Wallace, C. D.
1885—Russell, H. A.                       1913—Evatt, H. V.
                                                                  ■ œq.
1886—Garran, R. R.                        )
     Hunt, H. W. G.,                            Harrison, J. F. j
1887—Thompson, R. A                       1914—Robson, L. C.
1888—Sellors, R. P.                             Hewitt, E. N.      seq.
1889—Stephen, E. M.                             Peirce, F: T.
1890—Fell, J. W.                          1915—Beveridge, Lorna D.
1891—Levy, D.           asq.                    Nicol, T. B.
1892—Davies, A. B.                        1916-^Barnes, Ida D. \
1893—BurBtt, W. F.                              Price, W. L.      J œq
1894—Stewart, D. G.                       1917—Andersen, P. N. W.              aeq.
1895—Chalmers, S. D.                            Purie, Ethel B.
1896—Griffiths, F. G.                     1918—Bingham, Marv M.
1897—Hawken, R. W.                        1919—Roper, E. '
,                                         1920—Clarke, C. H.      }          • œq.
     Morris, J. F.                              MeMUe, L. G. ) lïq

     j
     Sawkins, D. T.
     [Page, E. C. G.]t '
1898—Boyd, W. S.
1899—Mort, H. S.
1900—Vonwiller, O. U.
1901—Wellish, E. M.
1902—Weatherburn, C. E
1903—Mottershead, A.
             14—BOWMAN-CAMEHON                  SCHOLARSHIP.
    Founded in 1877 by a bequest of £1100 from Andrew
Robertson Cameron, Esq., M.D.     Awarded every third year
   · Awarded to J. F. McManamey, Cribb being the holder of two other Scholarships.
   t E. C. G. Page did not comply with the conditions for holding the Scholarship.
   J Did not comply with the conditions for holding the Scholarship.
340                             FOUNDATIONS.

for general proficiency at the Matriculation Examination.                     £35,
tenable for three years in the Faculty of Arts.
1878—Cribb, J. G.                            1902—Stephen, J. F.*f
1881—Halliday, G. C.                               Henderson, R. G.
1884—Russell, H. A.                          1905—Castlehow, Stanley
1887—Wolstenholme, H.                        1908-Duhig, J. V. J. \
1890—Levy, Danielt                                 Byth, G. L.       J
                                                   œq
1893—Mitchell, E. M.                                  -
1896—Teece, R. C.                            1911—Nield, J. R.
1899—Browne, C. S.§ η                        1914—Dudley, L. S.
     Teece, R. N.      I ^*1'                1917—Lee, R. S.
     Wilshire, H., prox. ace.                1920—Bristow, Zelie*
                     15 --- FREEMASONS' SCHOLAKSHrP.
      Founded in 1880 by a gift of £1000 from the Freemasons
of New South Wales under the Constitution of the Grand
Lodge of England, for the endowment of a Scholarship in
honour of the District Grand Master of the Order, John
Williams, Esq. Awarded for general proficiency at the
Matriculation Examination. Competitors must be the sons
of Freemasons of five years' standing of the United Grand
Lodge of New South Wales. If at any time there shall be no
candidates for matriculation eligible to compete for the
Scholarship, or if any such candidates fail to show sufficient
merit, it will be open to like competition at the First Year
Examination. The Scholarship may be held in any Faculty.
£50, tenable for three years, provided that the scholar shall
so long faithfully pursue his studies in the University, and
shall pass the Annual Examinations with credit. Applications
for permission to complete for the Scholarship will be received
not later than the last day for receiving entries for the
Examination for Matriculation Honours and Scholarships.
1884—Pope, Roland J.                        I 1908—Blumer, S. J.
1887—Wolstenholme, H.                       . 1911—Godfrey, G. H. \
 1890—Davies, W. J. E.                                Grace, W. H.       ) œq·
1893—Strickland, T. P.                         1914—Craig, W. D. K. )
189&—Teece, R. C.                                     Whitfeld, R. A. } œq"
1899—Teece, R. N.                              1917—McGregor, W. M.
1902-^Stephen, J. F.                           1920—Bell, N. J.
1905—Utz. H. S.
              t Holder of two other Scholarships.
• Did not comply with the conditions for holding the Scholarship.
* In 1891 the Scholarship was held by A. C. GiU and W. L. Atkins, aeq., Levy being
the holder of two other Scholarships.
     § C. S. Browne did not comply with the conditions for holding the Scholarship.
                               FOUNDATIONS.                                   341

                         16-^CAIBD      SCHOLARSHIP.
      Founded in 1886, by a gift of £1000 from George S. Caird,
33sq., for the encouragement of the study of Chemistry.
Awarded at the Second Year Examination in the Faculty of
Science, for proficiency in Chemistry. The scholar is required
"to attend the theoretical and practical courses of instruction in
Chemistry during the Third Year of the Faculty of Science. If
"there should be no suitable candidate at the Second Year
Examination, the Scholarship may be awarded at the Third
Year Examination, the holder being required to devote him-
«elf to research work in the Chemical Laboratory during his
first post-graduate year.    £50, tenable for one year.
1891—Fell, J. W.                     1911—Peirce, S. E.
1894—Simpson, E. G.                  1912—Gardner, R. A.
1898—Harker, George                  1913—Aurousseau, M.
1900—Heden, E. C. B. B. A.           1914—Jones, T. G. H.
1903—Jensen, H. I.                        Pain, A. A.       j'œq.
1904—Pétrie, J. M., B.Sc.J          •1915— Orr, Annie M. B
     Gray, G. J., B.E.                    Welch, M. B.        jsaq.
1905—Priestley, H.                  1916—King, J. MoE.
1906—White, C. J.                   1917—Barnes, Ida D.
1907—Farran-Ridge, C.               1918—Iredale, T.
1908—Griffiths, E.                        Stephens, J. G. J seq.
1909—Burrows, G. J. \               1919—Hook, R. G.
                         aeq.       1920—Hook, R. G.
     Grev, E. C.
)
1910—Blumer, R. C.
                      17----AITKEN SCHOLAESHtP.
     Founded in 1878 by a bequest of £1000 from James
Aitken, Esq., of Grafton, for a Bursary or. Scholarship. Up
to 1893 it was applied as a Bursary. It is now awarded as a
Scholarship for general proficiency at the Matriculation
Examination in the years in which the Bowman-Cameron
Scholarship is not awarded. £50, tenable for one year in any
Eaculty. .
1894—Dettmann, H. S.
                                            1907—Blumer, R. C.
1895—Griffiths, F. G.                               Macrossan, N. W., prox. ace.
1897—Horn, W. R.                            1909—Buchanan, A. L.
     Bourne, Eleanor E., prox. ace.         1910—Fitz-Herbert, J. A.
1898—Todd, Frederick A.                     1912—Kay, R. I.
1900—Wellish, E. M.                         Evatt, H. V., prox. ace.
     Roe, R. C., prox. ace.                 1913—Wearne, Juanita
1901—Diethelm, O. A. A.                     1915—Levick, C. B.
1903—Porter, W. E. T.                       1916—Durie, Ethel B.
1904—Sampson, G. A.                         1918—Aston, R. L.         Γ   "
3906—CampbeU, A. L.* \                      ρ, G. P.Shipp, }"*
     Turner, T. A.                          1919—Welsh, A. M.
                ; Special award. Research Scholarship tor 1904, £100.
                         * Holder of two other Scholarships.
342                           FOUNDATIONS.

                  18—JOHN HABBIS         SCHOLABSHEP.
      Pounded in 1887 by a gift of £1000 from John Harris,.
Esq., then Mayor of Sydney. Awarded for proficiency in.
Anatomy and Physiology at the Third Year Examination in.
Medicine.     £50, tenable for one
year.                               1905—Poate, H. R. G.
1889—Wilson, C. G.                        1906—Brearley, E. A.      )
1890—Abbott, G. H., B.A.                       Brookes, G. A.       J œq-
1891—Dick, R.                             1907—GoUedge, K. A.
1892—Smith, G. E.                         1908—Ewing, T. T., B.Sc.
1893—Craig, E. G.                         1909—Edye, B. T.
1894—Deck, G. H. B.                       1910—Wallace, R. A-. R.
1895—Dixon, G. P.                         1911—Burkitt, A. St. G. N. H.
1896—MacPherson, J., U.A., B.Sc.          1912—May, L.          \
1897—Willis, C. S.                             Evans, W.      I œq·
1898—Burfitt, W. F., B.A.                 1913—Ratcliff, S. W. G.
1899—Barling, E. V.                       1914—Frecker, E. W.
     Graham, Mabel J. ■ seq.              1915—Humphries, C. C.
1900—Page, E. C. G.       1                    Lawrance, G. A.
     Wallace, D., B.A. 1 œq'              1916—McKee, J.               . œq.
     Muscio, Α., prox. ace.               1917—Flvnn, M. R., B. A., B.Sc
1901—Mason, T. W.                         1918—Hunter, J. I.
1902—Buchanan, G. A.                      1919—Fraser. M. B.
1903—Quaife, C*                           1920—Radcliffe, D. G. 1
     Quaife.W.T.              >                Ryan, F. P.        J œq-
     O'Reilly, Susannah H. j œq-
1904—Parkinson, T. C.
           19—COUNCIL OF EDUCATION              SCHOLABSHIP.
      Founded in 1889 by a gift of £300 from the Trustees of
the subscribers to a Memorial of the late Council of Education
for the foundations of a Scholarship to be called the Council of
Education Scholarship. Competition for the Scholarship is
confined to the sons of teachers or officers in the Department
of Public Instruction of not less than three years' standing.
Candidates must produce a certificate from the Under-Secretary-
of Public Instruction that they are eligible to compete for
the Scholarship. It is awarded at the Matriculation Exami-
nation for general proficiency, but only when the candidates
show such proficiency as in the opinion of the Examiners will
entitle them to the award of a Scholarship, and is tenable
for three years. The first award will be made upon the results-
of the Scholarship Examination in November, 1920, to a
student entering the University in March, 1921. See Regula-
tions, page 131.     £50, for three years.
                                   * Resigned
                              FOUNDATIONS.                             343

                        GABTON     SCHOLAESHIPS.
     Founded in 1898 by a bequest of £2050 from the late
Thomas Garton, Esq., of Clapham, London, for the establish-
ment of Scholarships for French and Gíerman and for Ancient
History, or other subjects at the discretion of the Senate.
Under the powers granted in the Will, the Senate has deter-
mined to apply the fund to the foundation of two Scholar-
ships for French and German.
                  20—GAETON SCHOLAESHIP, NO.       I.
      Awarded at the First Year Examination in the Faculty
•of Arts, for proficiency in French and German. £50, tenable
ior one year.
1900—Wilshire, H.                     1911—Moir, Catherine M.
1901—Sproule, Margaret                1913—Murray, Kathleen M.
1902—Armstrong, Clare A.°C.                Symonds, S., prox. ace.
1906—Marks, Gladys H.                 1914—Dare, L.
1907—Campbell, A. L.                  1916—Martin, Ella L.         )
                                                                       q
     Calow, P. F., prox. ace.              Moulsdale, Esther A. J       '
1908—Hooton, J. K.                    1917—Holland, E. C.
1909—Bulteau, A. W. J.                1919—Spencer, Elsie M.
1910—Watson, Constance E.             1920—Clarke, Margaret A.
                 21—GAETON SCHOLAESHIP, NO. Π.
     Awarded at the Second Year Examination in the Faculty
of Arts for proficiency in French and German. £50, tenable
"for one year.
1899—Bailey, Margaret A.              1909—Hooton, J. R.
1900—Armstrong, Ina B. H.             1910—Bulteau, A. W. J.
1901—Wilshire, H.                     1911—Watson, Constance E.
1902—Sproule, Margaret                1912—Moir, Catherine M.
1904—Armstrong, Clare A. C.           1914—Murray, Kathleen M.
1905—Mcintosh, A. M.                  1915—Dare, L.
1907—Marks, Gladys H.                 1916—Mander-Jones, Phyllis
1908—Campbell, A. L.     1            1917—Martin, Ella L.
     Shortland, Edith J œq'           1920—Spencer, Elsie M.
       22—GEORGE     AND      MATILDA HAEEIS SCHOLAESHIP.
      Founded in 1900 by a gift of £1700 from Mrs. Matilda
Duff Harris, of Ultimo House, in memory of her late husband,
George Harris, Esq., to be called the George and Matilda
Harris Scholarship, and to be awarded in the Faculty of Law,
for the encouragement of the study of Law, under such rules
and regulations as the Senate of the University may make
344                          FOXJKDATIONS.

from time to time for this purpose. Under this power it has
been determined that the Scholarship shall be awarded by the
Senate in each year upon the results of Part II. of the Inter-
mediate LL.B. Examination.       £50, tenable for one year.
1901—Robson, R. N., B.A.                   1912—Blanksby, H. R., B.A.
1902—Wilson, G. H., B.A.                   1913—Street, K. W., B.A.
1903—Kemp, R.-€. King                      1914_Williams, D., B.A.*
1904—Rowland, N. de H., ,B.A.                    Pétrie, H. W..B.A.*
1905—Rowland, N. de H., ,Β.Γ.                   McTague, N.P.         \
     Teece, R. N., Al.Α.,                       McCulloch, C. V. I œq-
prox                          œq.          1915—Youll, J. J.
1906—Jordan, F. R., B.A.                   1916—Nield, J. R., B.A.
     Real, E. T., B.A.                     1917—Evatt, H. V., B.A.
1907—Thompson, E. H.                       1918—Jerdan, E. A. S., B.A.
1908—Collins, C. M., B.A.                       Flattery, T. P., ~)
)                                                  B.A.             > Proz- acc-
                                                                        œq
     Markell, H. F., B.A. J œq'                    York, W. R.         3 ·
1909—Lawrence, R. L., B.A. \               1919—Leaver, J., B.A.      '
     Edwards, H. G., B.A. f œq·                 Sheed, F. J., B.A.  .        seq.
1910—Eldershaw, P. S., B.A.                1920—Spender, P. C, B.A.
1911—Mason, H. H.
     Utz, H. S., B.A.        \ prox.
     Weston, C. A., B.A. j ucc'
                23—QUEEN VICTOBIA SCHOLARSHIP.
      In 1905 the sum of £540 was presented to the University-
by subscribers to a Memorial of the late Queen Victoria for
the foundation of a Scholarship.
      The fund was formed by contributions from the general
community, largely from the school children.
      The conditions of award are as follow :—
      1. That it be awarded to the best girl matriculant of the
year, and be tenable for three years under the conditions
usually existing for Scholarships.
      2. That the scholar shall satisfy the Chancellor, privately,
that she requires the money, otherwise it shall be handed
over to the Chancellor to be used for a Bursary for girls, the
original winner retaining the title of Queen Victoria Scholar.
      The Scholarship is of the value of £20, and is tenable for
three years.
1905—Maclean, Lillian A. \            I 1911—Barker, Gladys Winifred
                                                q
                         Smith, Clara R.     j    "          |
1908—Connell, Marian A. 1914—Beveridge, Lorna D.
                                         1917—Baker, Mary V.
                                         1920—Bristow, Zelie
                                  * Ineligible.
                           FOUNDATIONS.                                      345

                   24—BELMORE          SCHOLARSHIP.
      Founded in 1870 by a gift of £300 from the Right Honour-
able the Earl of Belmore to provide a medal for Agricultural
Chemistry and Geology. Upon the establishment of a Chair
of Agriculture in 1910, it was decided to award the income
of the Fund as a Scholarship.
      Awarded at the First Year Examination in the Faculty
-of Science for proficiency in Chemistry and Geology. The
scholar is required to continue his studies with a view to
graduating in Agricultural Science. £18 per annum, tenable
for two years.
1911—Stephens, H.                                          Shelton, J. P.
1912—Waterhouse, W. L.                           1917—Andereon, R. H.
1913—Noble, R. J.                                        1919—Cook. S.
1914—Grugeon, S. C.                      I   1920—Jones, Dorothy E. ■)
1916—White, G. B.f                |            Judd, L. H.          J - q-
              25—BUSBY MUSICAL SCHOLARSHIP.
      Founded in 1910 by a bequest of £500 from the late Miss
Trances Mary Busby, to be applied in founding a Musical'
Scholarship at the University of Sydney in such manner and
subject to such conditions as the governing body thereof shall
from time to time direct.
      The Scholarship shall be tenable by a matriculated
student attending the courses for some degree at the Univer-
sity.    £20 for one year.
      The appointment shall be for one year only, but may be
renewed in special cases.
      The scholar will have the privilege of playing on the
University Organ at times to be arranged, and it will be his
duty to report on the condition of the organ from time to
time.
      He will be required to give at least six organ recitals
■during the year, at such time as may be directed by the Warden,
and to play the organ at University functions if desired.
      The scholar will be selected by the Organ Committee in
Lent Term, after such examination or competition as the com-
mittee may decide.
            t Did not comply with conditions of Scholarship.
346                         FOUNUATIONS.

      Applications for the Scholarship shall be made to the
Warden before the 15th. of April of each year. The applica-
tion shall include (a) an account of the candidate's previous
training and experience in organ playing, and (b) a list of
twelve selected pieces for the organ which the candidate pro
fesses 1o be able to play.
1916—Barrv, K. L.                     I 1918—Perrv. Irene F.. B.A.
191fi—Green, J. C.                    I 1919—Pickering, N. S.
1917—Green, J. C.                    | 1920—Barry, K. L.,
          26---- THOMAS HENRY         COULSON SCHOLARSHIP.
     . Founded in 1916 by a gift of £1000 from the Executors of
the Will of the late Miss Mary Jane Coulson, in memory of
her brother.
      Awarded in Course II. to a student of six (6) terms' stand-
ing in the Faculty of Arts for distinction in the study of
English Language and Literature.        £50 for one year.
1917—Campbell, Persia G. \       I 1919—Chadwick. Doris A.
       Waldock, A. J. A.   / œq·   | 1920—McQuillen, Pauline A. M.
1918—Sams, A. S.                 |
    27 ---- G. S. CATRD SCHOLARSHIP.—FACULTY OF MEDICINE.
  Founded in 1918 by a-gift of £1000 from Miss Elizabeth
Richardson Caird for the foundation of a Scholarship in
memory of her father, the late George S. Caird, Esq. Awarded
for proficiency amongst male students in the subjects of the
fourth degree examination in the Faculty of Medicine. £50,,
tenable for one year.-
1918—Hunter, J. I.                I 1920—Fraser, M. B.        ") ^n
                                  ]       Leadley, J. H.WJœq·
           28---- DR.   JOHN OSBORNE, R.N., SCHOLARSHIP.
      Founded in 1919 by a bequest of £1000 from Mrs. Kate
Cunningham Moffatt, for the foundation of a Scholarship or
Bursary for a medical student from St. Paul's College, to be·
known as the Dr. John Osborne R.N. Scholarship or Bursary.
      The following regulations have been made by the
Senate :—
      1. The Scholarship shall be awarded for general profi-
ciency at matriculation, and shall be tenable for a period of
two years in the Faculty of Medicine, so long as the scholar
shall be of good conduct and shall attend regularly the courses
in the University for candidates for the degrees of Bachelor of
Medicine and Master of Surgery, and shall satisfactorily pass
the prescribed examinations.
                                      .FOUNDATIONS.                                            347

      2. Failure to pass any qualifying examination will entail
forfeiture of the Scholarship unless such failure be due to
illness or special circmstances. The decision in all such cases
shall be made by the Senate after receiving a report from the
Faculty of Medicine.
      3. The Scholarship is tenable only by a student of St.
Paul's College.
                                       1920—Ratcliff, L. C.
                    *THE RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS.—£300.
SEGULATIONS APPEOVED BY THE TBTJSTEES FOE THE ELECTION OP SCHOLAES
                      IN NEW SOUTH WALES, 1905.
   Committee of Selection—The Committee of Selection shall consist of:—
      1. His Excellency the Governor of New South Wales (in hia private
             capacity), Chairman.
      2. The Chief Justice of New South Wales.
      3. The University of Sydney, acting on the recommendation of the
             Professorial Board.
!NOTE.—It has been decided (1905) that Clause 3 shall be understood as
           follows :—
 (a) That the University shall be represented by the Chancellor,
 the Vice-Chancellor, and the Chairman of the Professorial
 Board, who, with the Governor and Chief Justice, shall con-
 stitute the Committee of Selection, with equal powers.
 (6) That the Professorial Board shall submit to this Committee
 the names of all the candidates whom they consider reason-
 ably suitable for selection, and that from the names thus
 submitted the selection shall be made.
 Eligibility of Candidates— *
                             1. Candidates shall be British subjects, and unmarried.      They must
                                         have passed their nineteenth birthday, but not have passed
                                    their twenty-fifth birthday, on October 1st of the year in which
  _______          they are elected.                                                _____________
     • The following decrees of the University of Oxford apply to members of the University
of Sydney in connection with Statute Tit. II. Sec. 8, which may be seen in the Registrar's
Office.
       1.—That any member of the University of Sydney who shall have passed the Final
Examination at that University either for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts or for the
Degree of Bachelor of Science, and shall have obtained Honours in one or more subjects
•at each Examination, shall be deemed to have taken Honours as required by the pro-
visions of Statt. Tit. II. Sect. vm. cl. 5.                              (10)    October 22,1903.
       2.—That any member of the University of Sydney who shall either (a) have passed
the Examination at that University for the Degree of Master of Arte, or (b) have passed
"the Final Examination at that University for the Degree of Bachelor of Laws, having
-also graduated in Arts, shall be deemed to have taken Honours as required by the pro-
visions of Statt. Tit. II. Sect. vm. cl. 5.
       S.—That any member of the University of Sydney who shall have passed either the
First or the Second or the Third Examination at that University for the Degree of Bachelor
of Arts, and shall at snch Examination have satisfied the Examiners in Greek, shall be
deemed to have shown a sufBcient knowledge of Greek as reqnired by the provisions of
Statt. Tit. II. Sect. vni.                                             (11)     Ottcba 22,1903.
348                              FOUNDATIONS.

        2. Candidates shall be undergraduates or graduates of the University
              of Sydney.
        3. Candidates shall have resided in New South AVales for an aggre-
              gate period of four years during the five years immediately
              preceding the date of election.
        4. Only candidates who have passed an equivalent to the Oxford:
Besponsions Examination, or those who are exempted from
Responsions by the Colonial Universities Statute, are eligible
for election.
In any doubtful cases of eligibility the decision of the Committee of
Selection shall be final.
Method of Selection—
        1. In accordance with the wish of Mr. Rhodes, the Trustees desire
     that " in the selection of a student to a Scholarship regard shall
     be had to (i.) his literary and scholastic attainments ; (ii.) his
     fondness for and success in manly outdoor sports, such as cricket,
     football, and the like ; (iii.) his qualities of manhood, truth,
     courage, devotion to duty, sympathy for and protection of the
     weak, kindliness, unselfishness, fellowship ; and (iv.) his exhi-
     bition, during school-days, of moral force of character, and of
     instincts to lead and take an interest in his school-mates."
     Mr. Rhodes suggested that (ii.) and (iii.) should be decided in.
     any school or college by the votes of fellow-students, and (iv.)
     by the Head of the school or college.
     Where circumstances render it impracticable to carry out the letter of
     these suggestions, the Trustees hope that every effort will be
     made to give effect to their spirit, but desire it to be under-
     stood that the final decision must rest with the Committee of
     Selection.
        2. To aid the Committee in making a choice, each candidate is
              required to furnish to the Chairman of the Committee of
              selection :—
             (a) A certificate showing that he ia within the eligible limits
                    of age.
              (6) A certificate from the Professorial Board of the University
                    of Sydney that he is exempt from or has passed the Respon-
                    sions !Examination of the University of Oxford or its
                    equivalent, and that he is considered a suitable candidate
                    for the consideration of the Committee of Selection.
              (c) A full statement of his school and college career, including
                   his educational qualifications, his record in athletics, and
                   such testimonials from his masters at school and his
                   professors at college in reference to the qualities indicated
                   by Mr. Rhodes as seem best adapted to guide the judgment
                   of the Committee of Selection.
        3. Should it seem advisable, the Committee of Selection is free to-
              apply to the candidates, or any selected number of them, such
              further intellectual or other tests as it may consider necessary
              for purposes of comparison. No candidate shall be finally
              eelected without a personal interview.
                               FOUNDATIONS.                                       349;

     4. The Chairman of the Committee of Selection will at once notify
        to the Trustees the name of the elected scholar, and will forward
        to Mr. Wylie, the representative of the Trustees at Oxford, all
        , the credentials and testimonials on which the selection was
        made. The elected scholar will then be furnished by the
        Chairman of the Committee of Selection with a memorandum
        prepared by the representative of the Trustees at Oxford of
        the steps necessary to have his name enrolled at one of the
        Colleges at the University.
     5. The Scholarship will be paid in four quarterly instalments, the
          first on beginning residence at Oxford, and thereafter terminally
          on the certificate of the College that the work and conduct of
          a student have been satisfactory. Without such certificate the;
          Scholarship lapses. A Scholarship which lapses either from the
          failure of a student to secure his College certificate, from resig- ·
          nation, from marriage, or from any other cause, will not be
          filled up till the year in which it would naturally expire. This
          provision is made in order not to interfere with the rota of
          succeeding scholars.
1904—Barton, W. Α., Β.Α.                   1912—Robson, A. J., B.Sc.
1905—Rogers, P. H., B.A.                   1913—Sbuthee, E. A., B.Sc.
1906—MacCallum, M. L., B.A.                1914—Henry, H. A., B.A.
1907—Portus, G. V., B.A.                   1915—Crawford, W. F., B.A.
1908—Waddy, R. G., M.B.                    1916—Robson, L. C, B.Sc.
1909—Bullock, H., M.B.                     1918—Kershaw, R. N.
1910—Hooton, J. R., B.A.                   1919—Wheen, A. W.
1911—Ward, H. K., M.B.
                         VII.
         MILITARY AND CIVIL APPOINTMENTS.
    MILITARY COMMISSIONS FOE UNIVERSITY                 CANDIDATES.
     The University of Sydney is one of the "Approved.
Universities " designated by the Army Council of the United
Kingdom to nominate candidates for Commissions in the
British Army.
     The candidate must reside for three academic years, and
qualify for a degree in any Faculty but the Medical. If he
passes with First-class Honours he will be entitled to one
year's seniority.
     He may obtain a Commission in the Infantry or Cavalry,
in the Army Service Corps, and in the Royal Artillery, by
qualifying in certain branches of mathematics.
     He must pass through the military curriculum during his
University course, and be attached to permanent forces for
six weeks in each of two consecutive years, and must pass a
350                       FOUNDATIONS.

qualifying examination set by the War Office in Military
subjects, in which the Military curriculum will instruct him.
He must pass a Medical examination, of which the chief
features are :—Height, at least 5 feet 2 inches at 18, with 34¿
inches chest ; good eyesight, hearing, and speech. Sound
physical formation.
OPEN COMPETITION EXAMINATIONS FOR THE CIVIL SERVICE OF
     INDIA, CLERKSHIPS (CLASS I.) IN THE HOME CIVTL SERVICE
     AND EASTERN CADETSHEPS.
These are held in London in the month of August each year.
Every candidate is required to show that he had attained the
age of twenty-two, and had not attained the age of twenty-
four on the first day of August of the year in which the
examination is held.
     The full regulations will be found in the N.S.W. Govern-
ment Gazette, a copy of which may be seen in the Registrar's
office.
        COMMISSIONS IN THE ROYAL AUSTRALIAN NAVY.
                    1—ENGINEER COMMISSIONS.
      Regulations passed in regard to the entry of engineering
graduates ; adopted in October, 1911 :—
      1. All candidates nominated by the Universities are
required to have completed a University course of not less
than four years in Mechanical Engineering. Exceptional
cases of graduates in other branches of Engineering will be
considered on their merits.
      2. Not to have less than twelve months' workshop
experience in the aggregate.
      3. To be medically fit, according to the requirements
prescribed for service in the Royal Australian Navy.
      4. Age not to exceed 24 years, except in special circum-
stances.
      5. Number of candidates entered to be 12 the first year
and, approximately, 6 per annum for the next ten years.
      6. Each University to be asked to nominate in the first
year as many as possible ; in subsequent years, 2 each. If
two be not available from any one University, the other
                         FOUNDATIONS.                           351

Universities to be asked to nominate the balance required.
Should other Universities in Australia establish courses in
Mechanical Engineering which are considered suitable by'
the Naval Board for training candidates, such Universities
to be given a proportion of the nominations.
      7. Candidates on entry to be given the rank of Proba-
tionary Engineer Sub-Lieutenant, with the pay and allowances
as laid down for Engineer Sub-Lieutenants on promotion.
Probationary Engineer Sub-Lieutenants only to provide them-
selves with the minimum requirements of Naval Uniform,
and to be granted their uniform allowance for a year in
advance on entry (£18 5s.).
      8. Probationary Engineer Sub-Lieutenants to be con-
firmed in the rank of Engineer Sub-Lieutenant after a year's
training in ships of Naval establishments on passing the
prescribed examinations in the courses of instruction which
they have undergone.
      9. Engineer Sub-Lieutenants to be eligible for promotion
to Engineer Lieutenant on completion of two years' service
in the confirmed rank of Engineer Sub-Lieutenant. This
period may be reduced in the case of officers displaying con-
spicuous ability.
      10. Seniority in rank to date from original entry as
Probationary Engineer Sub-Lieutenant, and service as such
to count as full time.
      11. In view of cost of training, officers who do not com-
plete five years' service from date of entry will forfeit their
deferred pay, unless they leave the service for reasons approved
by the Naval Board. Discharge for misconduct entails for-
feiture of deferred pay in all cases.
      12. It is probable that these officers will have preference
when arriving in the senior rank as regards shore appoint-
ments.

      Information as to the rates of pay and other conditions
may be obtained upon application at the Registrar's office.
      Candidates should make application to the Registrar
after the final examination in Lent Term
352                       FOUNDATIONS.

      Each candidate for nomination to the Royal Australian
Navy must attach to "his application a certificate from the
Engineering Building Committee stating that he has satis-
factorily completed the course in Mechanical and Electrical
Engineering, and that his general conduct has been such as
to justify his nomination.
                       2—NAVAL SUEGEONS.
      Conditions of appointment ; adopted in April, 1912 :—
      1. Candidates must be of pure European descent, and be
of Australian birth^or permanently domiciled in Australia.
      2. They shall be nominated by the Senate or Council of
an Australian University, on the recommendation of the
Faculty of Medicine.
      3. They shall have graduated in Medicine and Surgery
at an Australian University, and have had at least one year's
experience in a General Adult Hospital, recognised by the
University of the State' from which they are nominated.
      4. They must be medically fit, according to the require-
ments prescribed for service in the Royal Australian Navy.
      δ, Their age shall not exceed 28 years, except in special
circumstances, when the age limit may be extended to 30
years.
      6. Appointments shall be made as required by the Naval
Service, and nominations will be allotted among the Austra-
lian Universities in order of seniority.
      The immediate requirements are five, the nominations
for which will be distributed as follow :—
           Sydney University         ..        ..        ..    2
           Melbourne University ..          ..      .. .    2
           Adelaide University      ..      ..      ..       1
      7. In the event of one University not being able to
nominate the required number of suitable candidates, such
appointments will be made from the next senior University.
      8. Subsequent nominations will be allotted in rotation
to the following Universities :—
                     Sydney
                     Melbourne
                     Adelaide.
                           FOUNDATIONS.                          353

      Should other Universities in Australia establish Schools
of Medicine which are considered suitable by the Naval Board
for training candidates such Universities shall be given a
proportion of the nominations.

    Information as to the rates of pay and other conditions
may be obtained upoji application at the Registrar's office

                               VIII.
                           EXHIBITIONS.
                     1—SALTING EXHIBITION.
     Pounded in 1858 by a gift of £500 (with accumulations)
from Severin Kanute Salting, Esq., to be applied for the pro-
motion of sound learning. Awarded on the recommendation
of the Trustees of the Sydney Grammar School to a student
proceeding thence to the University. £50, tenable for three
years in the Faculty of Arts.
1860—Mein, C. S.                    1891—Garnsey, A. H.
1863—Knox, George.                  1894^-Whitfeld, H. E.
1866—Alston, John W.                1897—Stephen, H. M.
1869—Coghlan, Charles A.            1900—Barton, W. A.
1S73—Forster, Charles E.            1903—MacCallum, M. L.
1876—Allen, Reginald C.             1906—Kaeppel, C. H.
1879—Rennie. G. E.                  1909— Pitt, W. M.
1882—King, Cecil J.                 1912—Crawford, W. F
1885—Garran, R. R.                  1915—Cowper, N. L.
1888—Stephen, E. Milner             1918—Elliott, J. R.

                  2—J.     B.   WATT EXHIBITIONS.
      Founded in 1876 by a gift of £1000 from the Honourable
John Brown Watt, and two subsequent gifts of £1000 each in
1888 and 1889. The Exhibitions are bestowed on the bursary
principle, not being tenable in the Professional Schools, and
are awarded to boys or youths who have been for at least
three years in private colleges or schools. They are tenable
for three years, .and entitle the holders to £30 for the first
year, £40 for the' second, and £50 for the third year. The
candidates must have passed with special credit either the
Junior or Senior PubHc Examination. The Exhibition is
intended to enable the holder to obtain a course of higher
                                                                 N
354                       FOUNDATIONS.

education, either at the University or elsewhere, subject to·
the direction of the Senate, but preference will be given to a.
candidate who proposes to enter the University.
                     3—STBUTH      EXHIBITION.
      Founded in 1883 by a gift of £1000 from John Struth,
Esq., for the foundation of an Exhibition to assist students of
intellectual promise, but whose means are not otherwise
sufficient for the purpose, in obtaining a degree in the Faculty
of Medicine. The exhibition is awarded to a student who
has completed the First Year of the Arts course upon the
following conditions :—
      1. The Deans of the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of
Medicine shall receive a satisfactory assurance that the means
of the applicant are insufficient to enable him to proceed
with the Medical course without some such pecuniary assist-
ance.
      2. Applications for permission to compete for the Exhi-
bition, accompanied by the necessary certificates, must be
sent to the Registrar at least fourteen days before the first
day of the Annual Examinations.
      3. The Exhibition shall be .awarded to that candidate, of
those who are allowed to compete, who shall show the greatest·
proficiency in the First Year Examination of the Arts course,
and whose attainments and promise are such as to justify
the award.
      4. The holder, who shall at once proceed with his studies
in the Faculty of Medicine, shall receive the sum of £50 per
annum for five 3'ears ; provided that he shall only continue
to hold it on the condition that he is diligent and of good
conduct, and that he passes creditably all the Examinations
of his course. In the event of illness of the holder causing pro-
longation of his course of medical study, the case will be
subject to the special consideration of the Senate. The
Exhibition is open to students of either sex. The last award
was made in March, 1919.
      5. The holder of this Exhibition is not exempt from the
payment of any fees.
                               FOUNDATIONS.                                355

                         4—HORNER         EXHIBITION.
     Founded in 1889 by a bequest of £200 from Francis
Horner, Esq., M.A. Awarded for proficiency in Mathe-
matics at the Matriculation Examination. It cannot be held
with two other Scholarships in the University. In case of
equality "in order of merit in competition for the Exhibition,
preference shall be given to a student matriculating direct
from the King's School, Parramatta, or in the absence of a
student from that school, to a candidate from Newington
                                 College, Stanmore.            £10,
 1891—Davies, A. B.              tenable for one year.
1892—Simpson, E. S.                     1905—Utz, H. S.*
1893—Stewart, D. G.         \                   Harrison, B. J. M.
     Strickland, T. P.* ( œq'           1906—Campbell, A. L.*
1894—Chalmers, S. D.                    Booth, F. A.                             )
1895—[Griffiths, F. G.]*                Lloyd, A. C.                                 seq.
     Forsyth, W. G.                          * Robinson, F. W. )
1896—Hawken, R. W.                      1907—Holloway, R. A.
     Waterhouse, G. A., prox. ace.      1908—Brown, W. R.
1897—Boyd, W. S.                        Willis, H. H., prox. ace.
     Horn, W. R.                        1909—Stafford, F. D.*
     Mort, H. S.                        Snow, L. L.*      )
     Stephen, H. M.       prox. ace.    Robson, A. J. t      "'
189S—Mort, Harold S.                    1910—Fitz-Herbert, J. A.* j
1899—Tivey, J. P.                       Gregg, N. M.f           ■ [ seq.
     Vonwiller, O. U.                   Leslie, Mary E.                               )
     Smith, W., prox. ace. seq.         1911—Brown, Janet F. M.
1900—[Wellisch, E. M.J                  1912—Harrison, J. F.
                                        1913—Robson, L. C.
                         œq.
     Roe, R. Cf
     Deck, H. L.         1914—Beveridge, Loma D.
     Griffiths, J. N.    prox. ace. 1915—-Barnes, Ida Doris
     Harris, J. S.                  1916—Durie, Ethel B.
1901—Brearley, E. A.     1917—Goddard, N. M.          )
                                               q
     Diethelm, O. A. A. Sandon, Alice M. ) ' '
     Weatherburn, C. E Bingham, Mary M., prox. ace.
1902—Henderson, R. G.* 1918—Roper, E. D.
     Mottershead, A.     1919—Melville, L. G.
     Paul, A.              • œq.
                                 Welsh, A. M.     ") prox. ace.
     Tomlinson, G. S.            Dianam, W. J. )        ccq.'
1903—Lyons, R. J.        1920—Briatow, Zelie        )
                                           3
1904—Dennis, S.        ) Hawker, G. B. ] ^'
     Watkins, H. L.    ) Benjamin, N. F., prox. ace.
                             seq.
                                 IX.
                           BURSARIES.
    The Bursaries at the disposal of the University have all
been created (on the initiation of the late Dr. Badham, when
    * Holder of two other Scholarships.
    t Did not comply with the conditions for holding the Exhibition
356                       FOUNDATIONS.

 Professor of Classics) by private foundations at a cost of
 £1000 each, together with a margin in some cases to ensure
 prescribed annual awards amounting to £50 ; and they are
 helped, on the part of the Senate, by an accompanying ex-
 emption from all lecture fees.
      They were created for the purpose of placing the advan-
 tages of education in this University within the reach of
 students, who, whilst giving sufficient promise of benefit^
 would otherwise be excluded through the want of financial
 means. In order to secure privacy as regards the financial
 circumstances of the candidates and their friends, the nomina-
 tions are directed to be made by the Chancellor alone.
      Some of the founders indicate a preference for students
 from the country, but the majority are silent on this subject.
 Some state that the bursaries are " to enable the recipient to
 reside in one of the affiliated Colleges or in some other place
 approved of by the authorities of the University from which
 he may attend the prescribed courses of lectures " ; but in
 the greater number there is no corresponding expression.
      In some cases the founders contemplated full bursaries of
£50 a year, as for students from the country, though without
prohibiting divisions of the amount ; but more generally
they either expressry allow of a\vards of £25 a year, or other
less sums than £50, or leave the matter open. And of late
years the absence of new foundations has created a necessity
for extending the usefulness of the bursaries by frequent
divisions into halves ; and the Senate has granted the same
exemptions from fees as in the case of full bursaries.
      No bursary is subject to any distinction of creed or of
position, except that in one case a preference is expressed,
but not imposed, for a student belonging to the donor's own
Church, and in another the nomination is confined to sons
of a minister of religion, but without distinction of Churchy
in both of which cases the founder bestowed a second bursary
without any restriction.
      AU the bursaries, except five, which were given by Mr.
Thomas Walker, in July, 1881, were founded before women 0
were admitted to the University, and they were ostensibly
for men only.      But Mr. Walker's. bursaries were for both
                         FOUNDATIONS.                          '357

sexes, and his instructions required that women should
participate. The practice has since been to observe no
distinction of sex.
      The bursaries are tenable in the Faculty of Arts or that
of Science, and not in the professional schools of Law,
Medicine, Engineering, or Dentistry.
      The conditions on which the bursaries are conferred
are :—
      1. That the Chancellor shall have received satisfactory
assurance that the candidate's Οινε means, and those of his
parents, guardians, '' or other friends " (as expressed in some
of the foundations), are insufficient to enable him to bear the
cost of attending the University without the assistance of a
bursary.
      2. That the candidate is qualified by education and
capacity to benefit by the University course, with which vie\v
some of the earlier foundations required that the candidate
should be examined by the Professor of Classics and (in some
cases "or") the Professor of Mathematics and certified by
them, or one of them, to be intellectually fit. But as the
University bursaries are now ordinarily granted after the
Matriculation Examination, or an equivalent at the Public
Examinations, this stipulation has dropped out of use.
     .3. That the bursar, if not already matriculated, shall
matriculate at the commencement of the next Academic year
after his appointment, and shall come into his attendance on
lectures as the Senate may direct ; and that he shall be dili-
gent and of good conduct, and that he shall pass creditably
at the Annual Examinations during his tenure of the bursary.
      4. Subject to the above conditions, the bursary is held
for three years, except when granted to undergraduates who
have already gone through part of the three years' course
and have then become unable to finish their course without
help, in which case the tenure is confined to the residue of the
ordinary three years' course.
              1—MAtTEICE ALEXANDER BXTESAKY.
      In 1874 the sum of £1000 was given by Mrs. Maurice
Alexander for the endowment of a bursary in memory of her
late husband.     The annual value is £40.
358                       FOUNDATIONS.

                2—JOHN    EWAN FBAZEE BTTESAEY.
      In 1856 debentures for £1250, at 4 per cent., were given
by the Honourable John Frazer, M.L.C, for the endowment
of a bursary, of the annual value of £50, to be called after the
name of his deceased son, John Ewan Frazer.
             3—ERNEST MANSON EEAZEE BURSAEY.
      In 1876 debentures for £1250, at 4 per cent., were given
by the Honourable John Frazer, M.L.C., for the endowment
of a bursary, of the annual value of £50, to be called after the
name of his deceased son, Ernest Manson Frazer.
      4—WILLIAM CHARLES WENTWORTH BUESARY, NO. I.
     In 1876 the sum of £1000 was given by Fitz-William
Wentworth, Esq., for the foundation of a bursary, of the
annual value of £50, to be called after the name of his deceased
father, William Charles Wentworth, Esq.
      5—WILLIAM CHARLES WENTWOETH BURSARY, NO. II.
     In 1876 the further sum of £1000 was given by Fitz-
William Wentworth, Esq., for the foundation of a second
bursary, of the annual value of £50, to be called after the name
of his deceased father, William Charles Wentworth, Esq. ; but
the founder directed that this sum should accumulate until it
should reach £1500, that a second bursary should then be
established, and that the surplus should accumulate ,until
the sum of £1500 should again be reached, Mrhen a similar
result is to follow. This foundation reached the sum of
£1500 in 1886, and a second bursarywas established accord-
ingly·
       6 ---- WILLIAM CHARLES   WENTWORTH BUESARY, NO. HI.
      This fund was established in 1886 by the setting apart of
the sum of £500 frorn the lasf-named foundation, to accumu-
late for the* establishment of a third bursary in accordance
with the directions of the founder.
        WILLIAM CHARLES WENTWOETH BUESAEY, NO. IV.
     In 1913 the fund reached the required sum, and in accord-
ance with the directions of the founder mentioned above, a
fourth bursary has been established. At 31st December,
1919, it amounted to £990 15s. 7d.
                            FOUNDATIONS.                           359

                      7—BUEDEKIN BURSARY.
     In 1876 the sum of £1000 was given by Mrs. Burdekin for
the foundation of a bursary, to be called the Burdekin Bursary.
The annual value is £50.
             S—HUNTER-BAILLIE BURSARY, NO.       I.
      Li 1876 a sum of £1000 was given by Mrs. HunterBaillie
for the foundation of a bursary, to be called the Hunter-Baillie
Bursary.     The annual value is £50.
             9—HUNTER BAILLIE BURSARY, NO. II.
        In 1877 a sum of £1000 was given by Mrs. Hunter-Baillie
        for the foundation of a bursary for the sons of ministers of
    religion.    In the deed of gift the Senate is declared to be the
     ^sole judge of who are to be considered ministers of religion.
   The annual value is £50.
                      10—WALKER BURSARIES;
      In 1881 the sum of £5000 was given by Thomas Walker,
Esq., of Yaralla, Concord, for the foundation of bursaries,
The gift was especially connected with the late resolution of
the Senate to grant to women equal participation with men
in all University privileges, and it was desired by the founder
that a portion of the bursaries—up to one-half, as circum-
stances might dictate—should be made applicable to students
of the female sex. Five bursaries, of the value of £50 per
annum, are now awarded.
             JAMES   KING    OF IRRAWANG BURSARY.
     Founded in 1888 by a bequest of land from William
Roberts, Esq., of Penrith, under certain conditions mentioned
in the Will. The amount is accumulating to provide for the
award.     It amounted on December 31st, 1918,. to £306 9s. Id.
               11—JESSIE    E.   DUNCAN BURSARY.
     In 1901 the sum of £1000 was bequeathed to the Univer-
sity by Mrs. Jessie E. Duncan, widow of the late Dr. Duncan,
R.N., for the foundation of a bursary in the Faculty of Arts,
in accordance with such regulations as the Senate may deter-
mine.     £50 per annum.
       12—THE LEVEY     AND ALEXANDER ENDOWMENT.
    In 1879 a sum of £1000 was given by Mrs. Maurice
Alexander for the purpose of establishing an endowment in
360                      FOUNDATIONS.

the University in memory of her late parents, Isaac and
Dinah Levey. It is intended for young men who shall have
gone through the regular University course, and shall have
passed the Statutory Examination for the Degree of Bachelor
of Arts in the University of Sydney, and graduated with
credit to themselves, and who shall then be desirous of
entering a liberal profession, but be without sufficient pecu-
niary means to bear the cost of the necessary preparation
and superior instruction.
      It is directed that no regard whatever shall be had to the
religious creed or denomination of any candidate, provided
that his personal character and repute shall be good, and that
in determining any such award the only considerations shall
be such as have reference to the character and to the abilities °
and learning of the candidate, as proved by University
Examinations, and to his financial position.
      The award is to be made to a graduate who shall have
 recently taken his B.A. Degree ; but the preference shall be
 given to one who had graduated in Honours.
      The professions which are held specially in view are those
 of Medicine and Surgery, and of Law in either branch, and
 those of Architects, Surveyors and Engineers ; but full dis-
 cretion is given to the University Senate to include any other
 secular profession which shall be deemed by them to be of
 a learned or liberal character.
      It is intended that the graduate selected under this endow-
 ment shall enjoy the income for three years either by one
 payment of not exceeding one hundred and fifty pounds (when
 sufficient accumulations are available) for fees or premiums
 on ar'icles of pupilage ; or by half-yearly payments of twenty-Ώ
 five pounds for three years ; or partly in each way, as may
 be deemed by the Senate best for carrying out the objects
 in view.
                   13—HEIsTlY WAIT BURSARY.
     Founded in 1900 by a bequest of £1000 from the late
Henry Wait, Esq., of Redfern, "for the encouragement of
the study of Medicine." The testator provides that the
" Senate or Governing Body of the said University of Sydney
shall be the proper person to appoint and determine the
                        FOUNDATIONS.                              361

conditions and provisions of the said bursary, and to pay to
the successful candidate for the same yearly, the amount to
be fixed by them therefor." The bursary is awarded to a
student who has completed the First Year of the Arts course
upon the following conditions :—
      1. The Deans of the Faculties of Arts and Medicine shall
receive a satisfactory assurance that the means of the appli-
cant are insufficient to enable him to proceed with the Medical
course without some such pecuniary assistance.
      2. Applications for permission to compete for the Exhi-
bition, accompanied by the necessary certificates, must be
sent to the Registrar at least fourteen days before the first
day of the Annual Examinations.
      3. The bursary shall be awarded to that candidate of
those who are allowed to compete who shall show the greatest
proficiency in the First Year Examination of the Arts course,
provided he shall be deemed to have shown sufficient merit.
      4. The holder, who shall at once proceed with his studies
in the Faculty of Medicine, shall receive the sum of £50
per annum for five years ; provided that he shall only con-
tinue to hold the bursary on the condition that he is diligent
and of good conduct, and that he passes creditably all the
examinations of his course. In the event of illness of the
holder causing prolongation of his course of Medical study,
the case will be subject to the special consideration of the
Senate. The bursary is open to students of either sex. The
last award was made in March, 1916.
      5. The holder of this bursary is not exempt from the
payment of any fees
                                  X.
                               PRIZES.
                       1—WBNTWOETH MEDAL.
     Founded in 1854 by a gift of £200 from W. C. Wentworth,
Esq., the interest to be applied for an Annual Prize for the
best English Essay.
     In 1889 the fund had accumulated sufficiently to provide
for two prizes of the value of £10 each, and a prize is now
given for competition amongst undergraduates, and a second
prize for competition amongst Bachelors of Arts of not more
than three years' standing.
362                          FOUNDATIONS.

1854—Windeyer, W. C. 1870—O'Connor, Richard E.
1855—Windeyer, W. C. 1880—Linsley, W. H.
1862—Docker, Ernest B. 1881—Woolcock, J. L.
1866—-Knox, George                               GRADUATES' MBDAL.
1890—Garran, R. R., B. A.             1901—Gough, N. J., B.A.                  ) ¿.
1891—Curnow, W. L., B.A.                   Read, Elizabeth J., B.A. f 8
1893—Smairl, J. H., B.A.              1902—Gough, N. J., B.A.                  ) ¿.
     Pratt, F, V., B.A., prox. ace.        Scrutton,C. Maude, B.A. ) S
1894—Smairl, J. H., B.A.              1904—Green, H. M., B.A.
1895—Pratt, F. V., B.A.               1905—Allen, L. H., B.A.
1896—Griffith, J. S., B.A.            1911—Allen, C. K., B.A.
1897—Cowan, David, B.A.               1912—Allen, C. K., B.A.
     Taylor, EHz. I.,B.A.,proa;, ace. 1917—Black, Margaret M., B.A.
1898—Dettmann, H. S., ~               1919—Sheed, F. J., B.A.
1899—Dettmann, H. S.,                 B.A.
                                      B.A.
                            UNDERGRADUATES' MEDAL.
1890—Curnow, W. L.          1909—Allen, C. K.
1894—MacMaster, D. A.       1910—Allen, C. K.
1895—Griffith, J. S.        1913—Evatt, H. V.
1896—Dettmann, H. S.        1914—Evatt, H. V.
1897—Dowling, F. V.         1915—Lasker, R. S.                      aeq.
                                                                           }
1898—Nicholson, G. G. '     Robinovitz, S. N. )
1899—Gough, N. J.           1916—Black, Margaret M.
1900—Gough, N. J.           1917—Sbeed. F. J.
1905—MacCallum, M. L.         1918—Coutts, Doris V.
1906—MacCallum.M. L.        I 19iy—Coutts, Doris V.
                    ■   2- -NICHOLSON      MEDAL.
     Founded in 1867 by a gift of £200 from Sir Charles
Nicholson, Bart., D.C.L., to provide an annual prize for
Latin Verse. The competition for this medal is open to all
undergraduates and graduates of not more than two years'
                      standing.     Value, £10.
1880—Barlee, F. R.        1904—Allen, L. H.
1881—Barlee, F. R.            1911—Chisholm, A. R.
1882—Armstrong, L. F,      M. 1914—Davis, S. J. G., B.Sc.
1883—Armstrong, L. F.      M. 1915—Davis, S. J. G., B.Sc.
1889—Garran, R. R.        1916—Davis, S. J. G., B.Sc.
     Wolstenholme, H.     1917—Davis, S. J. G., B.A., B.Sc.
1902—Allen, L. H.         1919—Letters, F. J. H., B.A.
                          3 ---- FAIRFAX PRIZES.
     Founded in 1872 by a gift of £500 from John Fairfax,.
Esq. Awarded to the greatest proficients among the female
candidates at the Senior and Junior Public Examinations.
In the case of Seniors the candidates must not be over twenty-
five years of age, and of Juniors seventeen years. Value, £14
and £6 respectively.
                                  FOUNDATIONS,                                     363

     From 1918 awarded by authority of the University Prizes
and Medals Alteration Act 1917 as one prize for general pro-
ficiency to a female candidate at the University Examina-
tions for Scholarships at entrance to the University. The
successful candidate must not be over the age of twenty-five
years on the first day of examination.     Value, £25.
                                     SBHIOB PRIZE.
1871—Bolton, Anne Jane                          1895—Lane-Latham, Ethel J.
1875—Everitt, M. M.                             1896—Bourne, Eleanor E.
1876—Whitfeld, Caroline A.                      1897—Copas, Theodora E. J.
A'Beckett, Caroline A., prox.                   1898—Knox, Marjory
ace.                                            1899—Armitage, Lilian M.
1877—Garran, Helen Sabine                       1900—Bilbrough, Jessie
1878—Burdorff, Bertha M.                        1901—Skillman, Jessie
      Haggard, A., prox. ace.                   1902—Bourne, Florence T.         \
1879—Love, Helen C.                                   Watson, Maria E.           ) seq.
1880—Holt, Eliza Marion                         1903—Jones, Grace E.
1881—Russell, Jane Foss       1                 1904—MacLean, Lillian Alexia
      Carson, M. H.           ( 8^              1905—Shortland, Edith
1883—Bruce, Mary H.                             1906—Ballantine, Mabel A.
                                œq.
\                                               1907—Connell, Marion A.
      Fox, Emily Alice         )                1908—Gasteen, Elsie F.
1884—Manwaring, Jessie R. E.                    Watson, Constance Έ.,°ρτοχ.
188S-HaIl, Catherine J.                         ace.
1887—Hall, Edith Emily                          1909—Anderson, Agnes K.
      Fidler, Isabel M., prox. ace              1910—Bevington, Agnes P.
188S—-Barton, Joanna             ',                    Baird, Henriette E., prox. ace.
      Bowmaker, Ruth              : feq.        1911—Ashbury, Doris              1
      Hayles, EIIa Florence                            Murray, Kathleen M. } œq-
1889—Allanby, Kate                              1912—Wearne, Juanita
      Fidler, Mabel Maude                       1913—Mander Jones, Phyllis
                                    aeq.
      Grimes, Eleanor Mary                      Beveridge,· Lorna D., prox.
      Proctor, Lizzie                           ace.
1890—Howe, Edith J.                             1914—-Barnes, Ida Doris          \,
1891—Whitfeld, Eleanor M.                                                          feq.
1892—Bloomfield, Elsie l'A.                          Martin, EUa Lois
1893—Crouch, Olive                              1915—Durie, Ethel B.
1894—Lance, Elisabeth Ada |
      England, Hannah             )      "'
                                      JUNIOR PRIZE.
1871—Rennie, Amelia C.                          1878—Russell, Emily L. \
1872—Garran, Mary Eppes                              Russell, Jane F.       ) œq
1873—Badham, Julia                              1879—Carson, Marianne H.
1874—A'Becket, C. A.    )                       1880—O'Brien, Marion
     Carney, Kate      ) œq'                    1881—Holt, Sarah Elizabeth
1875—HaU, A. F.                                 1882—Sinclair ,-Agnes Riddell
1876—Shadier, Cornelia                          1883—Smith, Rebecca Mary
1877—Holt, Eliza M.                                  Russell, Priscilla, prox. ace.
364                          -!FOUNDATIONS.

1884—Pidler, Isabel M.                  1897—Sandford, Blanche V.,
1885—Barton, Joanna                     1898—Kellick, Stella M.   prox. ace.
1886—Baker, Margaret C. ', seq.         1899—Skillman, Jessie
     Fidler, Mabel M.                   1900—Watson, Maria E.       . œq.
:                                       1901—Jones, Eveline G.
1887—Cameron, Séptima S. • aeq.              Ramsay, Muriel B.
     Proctor, Lizzie                    1902—Maclean, Lillian A.
1888—Sabine, Mary Sabine                1903—Norris, Mabel A. C.
    Campbell, Annie Charlotte ) s       1904—Ballantine, Mabel A.
1889—Whitfeld, Eleanor Madeline         1905—Stephen, Gladys V.
     Broad, Amy W., prox. ace.          1906—Gasteen, Elsie F.
1890—Hansard, Edith H.                       Barkell, Philippa K.
1891—Ferguson, Margaret Eliz. 1 ¿,           Watson, Constance E.       seq.
     Parker, Annie H.             / 8        Connell, Marion A.         prox.
1892—Dey, Charlotte J.                  1907—Fredericksen, Selina B. ace.
1893—Read, Elizabeth Jane               M,
1894—Lane-Latham, Ethel Jane            1908—Bevington, Agnes P.
1895—Copas, Theodora E. J. 1            1909—Middleton, Yvonne A. O. I
     Middleton, Florence G. J œq'            McCulloch, Minnie            J
1896—Bowmaker, Jessie           j '     1910—Aldridge. Isabel
     Bruce, Grace Mitchell f œq·        1911—Whyte, Katherine M.
     Mills, Elsie A. H. ) prox.         1912—Antman, Dorothy Hilda
     Stewart, Jessie I. J ace.          1913—Stobo, Jean S.
1897—Armitage, Lilian M.      1         1914—Wakfer, Beryl.
     Harkness, Blanche J. J 39I"        1915—Stobo, JoyceS.
       1918-
               -Bates, Lena M.      |       1919—Clarke, Margaret A.
                             1920—Bristow, Zelie
                          4—JOHN WEST MEDAL.
     Founded in 1874 by a gift of £200 from the subscribers of
a memorial of the Reverend John West, Editor of the Sydney
Morning Herald. Awarded to the greatest proficient in the
Senior Public Examination.     Value, £10.
    From 1918 awarded by authority of the University Prizes
and Medals Alteration Act 1917 to the greatest proficient at the
University Examinations for Scholarships at entrance to the
University.    Value, £10.
1875—Allen, Reginald C.                 1886—Wolstenholme, Harry
1876—Dunn, Thomas                       1887—Stephen, Edward Milner
1877—Murray, J. H. P.                   1888—Mant, Reginald Arthur
1879—Love, W. W. R.                     1889—Levy, Daniel
                         - aeq.         1890—Dennis, George Ernest
|
     Nisbet, W. B.                      1891—Dixon, Graham P.
1880—Leverrier, Frank                        Hall, Edwin C.               I ¿.
1881—Power, George Washington                Rowland, Norman de H.          1
1882—Hay, James Alexander                    Simpson, Edward S.           '
1883—Russell, H. Ambrose                     Roberts, Francis J., prox. ace.
1885—Ashworth, Louis N.
     Thompson, Rbt. A., prox. ace.
                              FOUNDATIONS.                                          365

1892—Mitchell, E. M.            ")          1904—Castlehow, Stanley
Strickland, T. P. j œ(l·                    1905—Robinson, F. W.
1893—Whitfeld, Hubert Edwin                        Campbell, A. L. \
1894—Griffiths, Frederick Guy                      Walker, A. S.          } prox.
       Kerr,Richard Alex.,prox.acc.                Walker, E. B.
                                                   acc                  )
1895—Teece, Richard C.                      1906—Blumer, R. C.
1896—Bourne, Eleanor E.                            Macrossan, N. W. ") prox.
       Horn, W. R.          j                      Cohen, C. H.              )
       Robson, R. N. j prox. acc.                  acc.
                                            1907—Duhig, J. V. J. ")
      Stephen, H. M. )                      Byth, G. L.       ; œ1·
1897—Todd, F. A.                            1908—Buchanan, A. L.
.1898—Browne, C. S. )                       1909—Fitz-Herbert, J. A.
Teece, R. N.     j 3^                       1910—Nield, J. R.
      Macrossan, H. D. "1 prox.            . 1911—Kay, R. I.
      Morton, H. G. S. j acc.                      Evatt, H. V., prox. acc.
1899—Wellisch. E. M. ")                     1912—Robson, L. C.
Roe, R. C..           ) 8^-                 1913—Dudley, L. S.
1900—Weatherburn, C. E.                     1914—Levick, C. B.
1901—Stephen, J. F.           \             1915—Durie, Ethel B.
Henderson,R. G. j œq·
Thelander, C. A., prox. acc.                1918—Aston, R. L. ")
1902—Porter, W. E. T.                       Shipp, G. P. jÄq·
1903—Sampson, G. Y.                         1919—Welsh, A. M.
                                   1920—Bristow, Zelie
                                    5—SMITH PRIZE.
     Founded in 1854, maintained until the year 1885 by
annual gifts, and subsequently by a bequest of £100 from the
Honourable Professor Smith, M.D., CM.G. Awarded to the
best undergraduate of the First Year in Experimental Physics.
Value, £5.
                        seq.
1854—Paterson, J. S.    i01864—Gilchrist, A.                              seq
.0   Willis, R. S.           Knox, G.
1855—Ren wick, A.       1865—Gilchrist, A.
1856—Hawthorn, S.                                                         seq.
1857—Garland, J.                        Stephen,—
     Halley, J. J.       jseq     1866—Thompson, J.                     jasq.
1858—Garland, J.                        Cooper, D. J.
     Stephen, C. B.      Jseq     1867—Alston, J.                       jseq,
1859—Stephen, C. B.                     Morris, R. N.
I860—Bowman, E.         1868—Kemp, R. E.                                j seq
     Griffith, S. AV.           McCarthy, F.
1861—Griffith, S. W.    1869—Rennie, E. H.                              J seq
     Meillon, J.                      Coghlan, C. A.
     Mein, C. S.           seq 1870—Backhouse, Alf. P. -,
1862—Allen, A. M.       Sloman, J.                                                        I
     Smith, R.             seq Kent, F. D.
1863—Cape, A. J.                Coghlan, C. A.                                                1
     Long, G. E.        1871—Backhouse, Alf. P. \
     Manning, C. J.     Butler, E. J.                                        asq.         J
                        Kellv, S.
366                         FOUNDATIONS.

1872—Hurst, G.                      1896—Beaver, W. R. >
     Robertson, J.                        Harker, G.        j **
1873—Oliver, J.                     1897—Ward, L. K.
1874—Debenham, J. . œq.             1898—Jordan, G. E. G.
     Thallon, J. B.                 1899—Fraser-Hill, Charlotte E.
1876—Maher, C. H.                   1900—Close, J. C.
1877—Böhrsmann, C                   1901—Weatherburn, C. E.
     Mathison, W.                   1902—Mason, W. A.
1878—Cullen, W. P.                  1903—Lusby, S. G.
1879—Cribb, J. G.                   1904—Sampson, G. A. η
1880—Fuller, R. M.                        Watkins, H. L.      J 88I-
1881—Fairfax, G. E. œq.             1905—Cotton, L. A. t
     Rolin, Tom        ;
                                          Sewell, L. G.     I œq'
1882—Armstrong, L. F. M.            1906—Norman, E. P.
1883—Bowman, Archer                 1907—Ross, A. Clunies |
1884—Berne, Dagmar                        HoUoway, R. A. J "8I-
1885—McDonnell, R. C. W.            1908—-Benjamin, A.
1886—Bradfield, J. J. C. )          1909—Snow, L. L.
     Thompson, R. A.      J aeq.    1911—Stafford, F. D.
1887—Wolstenholme, H.               1912—Anderson, R. C.          )
1888—Smith, G. E.                         Powell, C. W. R. J œq.
1889—Fell, J. Vf.                         Scan·, J. H. A.          )
1890—Brearley, J. H. D.             1913—Robson, L. C.
1891—Deck, G. H. B.                 1915—Sims, A. R.
     Doak, W. J., proz. ace.        1916—Magill, D. W.
1892—Doak, W. J.                    1917—Stephens, J. G.
1893—Strickland, T. P.              1918—Goddard, N. M.              ι
     Quaife, A. F.                        Tarrant, Dorothy P. J          seq.
     Stewart, D. G. J prox.'a       1919—Lewis, B. H.       )_
1895—BurHtt, W. F.                        Kinsella, V. .T.j œq'
                                     1920—Mackerras, A. P.
                      6—NORBERT QUIRK PRIZE.
     Founded in 1886 by a gift of £144 from the subscriberscto
a memorial of the Rev. John Norbert Quirk, LL.D., late
Principal of Lyndhurst College. Awarded for proficiency in
Mathematics at the Second Year Examination.       Value, £5.
1888—Newton, H.                     1900—Mort, H. S.
1889—Sellors, R. P.                 1901—Vonwiller, O. U.
1890—Stephen, E. M.                 1902—Wellisch, E. M. '
1891—O'ReUIy, H. de B.              1903—Weatherburn, C. E.
1892—Davies, W. J. E.               1904—Tomlinson, G. L. 1
1893—Davies, A. B.                       Skillman, Jessie   f œq"
1894—Burfitt, VV. F.                1905—Lyons, R. J.
1895—Stewart, D. G.                 1906—Watkins, H. L.
1896—Chalmers, S. D.                1907—Utz, H. S.
1897—Griffiths, F. G.                    Cohen, Fanny, prox. ace.
1898— Sawkins, D. T.                1908—Campbell, A. L.
1899—Stephen, H. M.                 1909—Simonds, E. F.
                            FOUNDATIONS.                                           367

                                                                     s
                                         1915—Pcirce, F. T.          e
                                         |                           q
                                         Robson, L. C. j             .
1911—Meldrum, H. J                       1916—Foott, A. E.
     Peirce, S. E.        } seq.         1917—BeIz, M. H.
     Robson, A. J.                       1918—Stuckev, G. A.
1912—Fitz-Herbert, J. A. 1 esq.          1919—O'Learv. A. A.
     ColviUe, H. B.         I            1920—Roper, E. D.
1913—Thome, H. H.
1914—Evatt, H. V.         1
     Harrison, J. F.    )     "'
                            7—SLADE       PKIZES.
      Founded in 1886 by a gift of £250 from G. P. Slade, Esq.,
"for the encouragement of Science. Two prizes are awarded
ior proficiency in Practical Chemistry and Practical Physics
respectively.     Value, £5 each.
                                                 PBACTICAL CHEMISTRY.
1888—Fell, J. W.                      1903—Priestley, H.
1889—Barraclough, S. H.               1904—Carter, H. G. )
1890—Gill, A. C.                           May, H. W.        / œq"
1891—Weigall, A. R.                   1905—Farran-Ridge, C.
1892—Dixon, J. T.                     1906—Griffiths, E.
     Simpson, E. S. (Class Exam.)     1907—Grey, C. E.
1893—Woore, J. M. S.                  1908—Foxall, J. S.   .
     Strickland,T.P.(Class Exam.)     1909—Peirce, S. E.
1894—Sandes, F. P.                    1910—Johns, G. E.
     Warren, E. W. (Class Exam.)      1911—Aurousseau, M.
1895—Reid, N.                              Grace, W. H.                  ceq.
1896—Jack, R. L.                      1912—Jones, T. G. H.
1897—Winton, L. J.                    1913—Welch, M. B.
1898—Heden, E. C. B.                  1914—Bee, J.
     Newman, J. M. jœq.               1915—Kirchner, W. J.
1899—Whitfeld, H. E. B.A.             η 1916—Stephens. J. G.
1900—Giblin, N. E.                    I 1917—Mason, T. R.
1901—Saunders, G. J.                  j 1918—Jane, R. T. W.
1902—Foxall, H. G.                    1 1919—Not awarded.
                                      PBACTICAL PHYSICS.
1890—Roberts, J. VV.              1902—Shellshear, J. L.
1891—Brearley, J. H. D.           1903—Atkinson, J. )
1892—Doak, W. J.                       Jones, S. W. J œq"
1893—Arnott, R. F.        \       1904—Hammond, W. L.
                            q                                               seq.
      Jackson, C. F. f       '          White, C. J.
1894—Sandes, F. P.                1905—Cotton, L. A.                     seq.
1895— Woolnough, W. G.                 Davidson, G. F.
1897—Madsen, J. P. V.             1906—Watkins, H. L.                    seq.
1898—Weston, P. L. 1                   Bateman, J. E.
      Wilson, R. C. ■seq.
                        I         1907—Ranclaud, A. B. B.
1899—Lethbridge, H. O.                1908—Norman, E. P.
      Whitfeld, H. E., B.A.      jœq· 1912—Peirce, S. E.
1900-Gray, G. J.    \             1916—Norman. P. R.
      Stoddart, R. ) œq"          1918—Stuckey, G. A.
1901—Brown, G. F. Campbell        1919—Andersen. P. N. W.
                                  1920—Not awarded.
  ©




368                         FOUNDATIONS.

                        8—GRAHAME PRIZE          MEDAL.
     Founded in 1891 by a bequest of £100 from William
Grahame, Esq., of Waverley. Awarded to such candidate as
shall display the greatest general proficiency at the Senior
Public Examination.       Value, £3 10s.
     From 1918 awarded by authority of the University Prizes
and Medals Alteration Act 1917 to the greatest proficient at
the University Examinations for Scholarships at entrance to
the University.     £4.
1891—Dixon, Graham P.                     1902—Porter, W. E. T.
     Hall, Edwin C.                       1903—Sampson, G. A.
     Rowland, Norman de H                 1904—Castlehow, Stanley
     Simpson, Edward S.                   1905—Robinson, F. W.
     Roberts, Francis J., prox. acc.           Campbell, A. L.
1892—Mitchell, E. M.     \                     )                     >¡eq.
                        œq
     Strickland, T. P. j '                      Walker, A. S.
1893—Whitfeld, Hubert E.                       Walker, E. B.          J
1894—Griffiths, Frederick Guy             1906—Blumer, R. C.               pro
     Kerr, Richard A., prox. acc.              Macrossan, N. W.            x.
1895—Teece, R. Clive                           Cohen, C. H.         '      acc.
1896—Bourne, Eleanor E.                   1907—Duhig, J. V. J. . œq.
     Horn, W. R.         )                     Byth, G. L.
     Robson, R. N.       \ prox. acc.     1908—Buchanan, A. L.
     Stephen, H. M.      )                1909—Fitz-Herbert, J. A.
1897—Todd, F. A.                          1910—Nield, J. R.
1898—Browne, C. S. \                      1911—Kay, R. I.
                        œq
     Teece, R. N.      ) -                      Evatt, H. V., prox. acc.
     Macrossan, H. D. 1                   1912—Robson, L. C.
     Morton, H. G. S. } >*«*■ '    acc
                                          1913—Dudley, L. S.
1899—Roe, E. C.            Í              1914—Levick, C. B.
                             œq
     Wellisch, E. M.       } ·            1915—Durie, Ethel B.
                             191S—Aston, R. L.
                             Shipp, G. P.                          • seq.
                             1919—Welsh, A. M.
                             1920—Bristow Zelie
                             9—COLLIE PRIZE.
     Founded in 1892 by a bequest of £100 from the Rev.
Robert Collie, F.L.S., of Newtown. Awarded to a student
of any Faculty at the First Year Examination in Botany.
Value, £5.                                                                        ^8>j
1900—Weatherburn, C. E.                    1902—Maclnnes, A., B.A.
1901—Stephen, J. F.       1                1903—Dawes, Madeleine M.
     Henderson, R. G. ]     "'             1904—Ferguson, E. W.
     Thelander, C. A., prox. acc.          1905—Hamilton-Browne, Eliz.
1893—Hall, E. C.                           1906—Cohen, Fanny
1895— Bur6tt, W. F., Β.Γ.                  1907—Parkinson,- Kathleen A.
1896—Graham, Mabel J.                      1908—Buchanan, Agnes E.
1897—Bourne, Eleanor E.                    Willis, H. H.
1898—Higgins, T. E. C.
1899— Buchanan, G. A.
1900—Quaife, W. T.
1901—McCulloch, H. T. C.
                               FOUNDATIONS.                                        369

1909—Wylie, C. J.                          1915—Hunter, J. I.
1910—Badhatn, C.                           1916—Geanev, M.
1911—Symonds, H.                           1917—Frew, C. A.
1912—Sutton, N. G.                         1918—Taylor, H. J.
1913—Woodward, E. A.                       1919—Murray, P. D. F.
1914—Murphy, O. E. J.
                          10—BEAUCHAMP PRIZE.
     Founded in 1901 by a gift of £625 from his. Excellency
the Right Hon. William Lygon, Earl Beauchamp, K.C.M.G.,
Governor of New South Wales. It is awarded for the best
Essay on some literary or historical subject, and is of the
value of £25. The subject shall be determined either upon
the recommendation of the donor or of the Professors of
Classics, Modern Literature, History, Philosophy and Law.
The competition is open to all undergraduates and graduates
of not more than twenty-five terms' standing from Matricu-
lation.
1902—Teece, R. Clive, M.A.       1912—Allen, C. K., B.A. )
1904—Green, H. M., B.A.                Bruce, J. F., B.A. ) *'■
1905—Maxwell, W., B.A.           1915—Evatt, H. V., B.A.
190&—Green, H. M..B.A.           1917—Currey, C. H., M.A.
1907—Green, H. M., B.A., LL.B.   1918—Jerdan, E. A. S., B.A.
1908—Maxwell, W., B.A.           1920—Not awarded.
1911—Allen, C. K., B.A.
                      11—KAMBALA PEIZE.*
     Founded in 1904 by a gift of £250 from the members of
the Kambala Girls' Union. The prize is awarded at matricu-
lation to a pupil of a private school for girls in New South
Wales for general proficiency, to assist in defraying the cost of
the purchase of books and other expenses incidental to
attendance at the University.
     The prize (£10) is to be awarded annually to a matricu-
lated student who, through pecuniary circumstances, is, in
the opinion of the Chancellor, deemed such as to render her
a suitable recipient of such a prize.
      Should the principal be increased in the future to a
sufficient amount, the prize may be converted into a scholar-
ship to be awarded under similar conditions.
      The term " private school " has been defined by the
donors as including those schools the pupils of whirh are not
entitled to compete for State University Bursaries.
   *Namee of prize winners, not necessarily implying the receipt of the prize money.
370                        FOUNDATIONS.

1905—Cohen, Fanny                      1913—Newbery, Grace E.
1906—Lane, Laura E.                    1916—Macindoe, Mary K.
1908—Prescott, Kathleen.M.             1918—Wait, Muriel E.
1912—Smith, Vera Melmar                1919—Corin, Kathleen R.
                       1920—Hirst, Elizabeth A.
            12 ---- FEEDEEICK LLOYD   MEMORIAL PRIZE.
     Founded in 1906 by a gift of £110 from the subscribers to
a memorial of the late Frederick Lloyd, B.A., Assistant
Lecturer in Classics for twelve years in the University of
Sydney. It is awarded every second year for a Latin Essay
on a specified subject, and is open to competition to second
                      and third year students in the Faculty of
1907—Castlehow, S.    Arts.     £8.
1909—Porter, W. E. T. 1913—Fitz-Herbert, J. A.
1811—Chisholm, A. R. 1915—Davie, S. J. G., B.Sc.
                                    1917—Letters, F. J. H.
        13 ----- NATHAN PRIZE   FOR AUSTRALIAN HISTORY.
     A prize of £25 for Australian History, given by Venour
Nathan, Esq., will be awarded under the following conditions :
     It will be awarded for the best essay on some part of
Australian History. The essay must be based upon a critical
examinaron of the original sources of information. Students
who wish to compete for this prize are recommended to
consult the Professor of History, who will advise them in
respect to the choice of a subject.
     The competition is open to graduates of not more than
                              twenty-five terms' standing from
 1916—Harris, H. L., M.A.     matriculation.
1918—Bromley, Myrtle S., M.A. 1919—Rose, L. N.
                                              Thomas, Leila M.,   J œq.
                                                B.A.              )
                          1920--Willard, Myra
                 NATHAN PRIZE FOR GRADUATES.
     A special prize of £100, given by Venour Nathan, Esq.,
was awarded in March, 1915, for the best essay on the under-
mentioned subject, and opeD to competition to all graduates
of the University of Sydney.
   Subject : " British Colonial Policy from 1783 to the present
                time.0
                       1915-Currey, C. H., M.A.
         14 ---- THE NORTON MANNING MEMORIAL PRIZE.
     Founded in 1907 by the gift of £125 from the subscribers
of the Dr. -F. Norton Manning Memorial Fund. Awarded, as
an annual prize of books, in Psychological Medicine. Value, £5.
                           FOtTNDATIONS.                                           371

               15. ---- THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE