registrationbooklet09 10 by hDQYuWq7

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									                                      TABLE OF CONTENTS
GENERAL INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS AND PARENTS:
     General Information                                                  2
     Telephone Numbers, Visitors, Report Cards, Bell Schedule             2
     Personal Responsibility of Students                                  2-3
     Academic Letter, National Honor Society                              3

SCHOOL CITIZENSHIP & ATTENDANCE POLICIES:
     Attendance Policy, Vacation Policy, Homework Request,                3-4
     Health Information, Home Instruction Policy                          4-5

POLICY CONCERNING STUDENT CONDUCT & SCHOOL OPERATIONS:
      Electronic Devices, Safe School Policy                              5
      Drugs Alcohol & Tobacco, Electronic Devices                         5
      Sexual Harassment, Hazing Policy, Gambling                          5
      Conduct at Sporting Events                                          5
      Dress Code, School Dances Eligibility Requirements                  6
      Lockers, Parking, Special Education, Work Experience Home Release   7

REGISTRATION & SCHOOL FEES:
      Fee Schedule                                                        7-9
      Fee Waiver                                                          9

REGISTRATION INFORMATION:
      Importance of Choosing Classes                                      9
      College & University Considerations                                 9
      Graduation Requirements                                             10
      Sophomore, Junior, Senior Required Courses                          10-11
      SLCC Concurrent Enrollment Requirements                             13
      Concurrent Enrollment Courses                                       13-14
      Registration Instructions                                           14

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:
     Visual Art, Elective Art or CTE Credit                               15-16
     Dance, Theatre, Music                                                16-19
     Business                                                             19-20
     Drivers Education                                                    20-21
     English, Debate,                                                     21-22
     English as a Second Language (ESL)                                   22
     Family & Consumer Science (FACS)                                     23-25
     World Languages                                                      25-26
     Trades and Technical Education                                       26-28
     Mathematics                                                          28-29
     Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC)                        29
     Physical / Health Education                                          29-31
     Science                                                              31-32
     Social Studies                                                       32-34
     Special Education                                                    34
     Other Class Offerings                                                34
     Released Time (No Credit)                                            34
     Career & Technical Education (CTE) & Tech Prep Programs              35
     Granite Technical Institute (GTI)                                    36-46
     Schedule Worksheet                                                   46
                               TAYLORSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL
                                       2009 - 2010
                                              GENERAL INFORMATION FOR
                                                STUDENTS AND PARENTS
          This booklet has been produced to provide students and parents with data concerning courses available at Taylorsville
High School. It contains information students will find of value as they attend Taylorsville High School. Please take time to read
it and save for future reference.

Principal:                 Mr. Jerry Haslam
Assistant Principals:      Mrs. Camilla Dean - 10th Grade
                           Mr. Fred Crawford - 11th Grade
                           Mr. Rod Horton - 12th Grade

Counselors:                Ms. Joyce Jones - A-DAU              Ms. Carolyn Boies - DAV-HUM
                           Ms. Laney Long - HUN-MOn             Mr. Guy Padjen - MOO-SAR
                           Ms. Lorri Aldridge - SAS - Z
Career Center Director:    Mrs. Joyce Fenton

                                EQUAL OPPORTUNITY POLICY STATEMENT
         No student at Taylorsville High School shall, on the basis of sex, handicap, racial or ethnic background, be excluded
from participation, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination in any educational program or activity. Any
violations of this policy should be reported to counselors, assistant principals, or the principal.

                                     TELEPHONE NUMBERS AND WEB SITE
Administration 646-5455                               Attendance Office 646-5458
Counseling Center 646-5456                            Community Education 646-5461
Career Center 646-5460                                Swimming Pool 646-5462
http://www.graniteschools.org/hs/taylorsville/        Seminary 264-4222

                                                           VISITORS
         Granite School District’s policy does not allow student visitors on campus or in the classrooms. Students are not to bring
friends or relatives with them to attend school. Parents, however, are welcome anytime. When parents arrive, please remember to
check in at the Main Office as per District policy. This measure helps to provide a safe and secure school.

                                  REPORT CARDS AND MID-TERM REPORTS
         Report cards and mid-term reports are used to notify parents of a student’s academic standing. Report cards will be given
to students approximately one week following the end of each term to hand carry home, with the exception of the fourth term
report (June), which will be mailed. Mid-term reports will be marked at the mid-point of the term and the report given to the
student. Parents are encouraged to contact the teacher of their student if they have a question regarding either academic or
citizenship grades.

                                             REGULAR BELL SCHEDULE
                                                   Under Review and Approval

              THE PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY OF TAYLORSVILLE HIGH STUDENTS
          As a student at Taylorsville High School, you are expected to be aware of and to accept your individual responsibilities
in the following areas:
          The Teaching - Learning Process: Students deserve the best instruction that Taylorsville High School is capable of
providing. For teacher efforts to be as successful as possible and for students to work and achieve to the best of their ability,
students must cooperate with teachers. Teachers help the activity of learning that goes on in the minds of the students. Learning is
a natural process, but unless students work at gaining knowledge and understanding, "...no genuine learning ever occurs, no
matter what teachers try to do to make it occur (Adler)."
          Respect for the Rights of Others: Every student right has attached to it an obligation. Student rights must be balanced
against the rights of other students. Also, the purpose of school and the requirements of the educational process must be weighed
in deciding student rights and consequences for misbehavior. Our society has laws, and our school has rules that need to be

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observed. Students, who want to take full advantage of their rights and opportunities, while at the same time respecting the rights
of others, have Taylorsville High School’s full support.
         Responsibility for Your Own Actions: A student is held responsible only for the things HE/SHE does or fails to do.
The actions of others are of little importance in determining whether or not a student has accepted his or her responsibility as a
student-citizen of Taylorsville High School. If a student chooses to follow bad examples set by a few others at Taylorsville High
School, that student will be held responsible for their actions only. A student’s first responsibility is to decide how he/she should
conduct themselves while in school. Their second responsibility is to be prepared to accept the consequences for their own
actions.

                                                   ACADEMIC LETTER
         Any student who meets the following criteria is eligible for an academic letter. Grades are official at the time of
application.
Grade Point Average: A weighted GPA of 3.800* or above must be maintained during the first three term of the school years in
which students are applying. *Add .1 for each AP class to the GPA to determine the weighted GPA.
(GPA + .1 for each AP class = weighted GPA.)
Citizenship: No “0"s and no more than two “1"s may be accumulated during the first three terms. Students who receive more than
the maximum number of “0"s or “1"s may remediate these grades by attending Citizenship Makeup. This must be done prior to
application.
Application: In order for a student to be considered for an Academic Letter, he/she must complete an application and turn it in by
the deadline that will be established at the conclusion of the 3rd quarter. Applications and guidelines will be made available to all
students in the front office at the conclusion of the third term of the school year.
Courses: Students applying for an Academic Letter must complete three classes each semester chosen from the areas of
English, Foreign Language, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Concurrent, or Advanced Placement.

                                             NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY
         Junior and Senior students are eligible to be members of the National Honor Society. Applications are available in
September each school year. Students must have a 3.75 GPA to apply and must maintain a 3.75 GPA each term and no zeros in
citizenship. Students must have 3 academic classes each term. Any questions see Emily Parrish.

                                      ATTENDANCE / CITIZENSHIP POLICY
          The responsibility for students’ attendance lies first with the student and then the parent or legal guardian. Therefore, in
order to help parents stay better informed, Taylorsville High School will provide an automated calling system to report when a
student has missed one or more classes. Excessive absences will be monitored by an attendance tracker.
          Regular attendance is a prerequisite for academic success. Accordingly, all students at Taylorsville High School are
expected to be present and ON-TIME in all of their classes every school day. Students and parents/legal guardians are reminded
that absences adversely affect participation grades in their classes. These participation grades may weigh heavily in the
determination of final academic grades.
          Students who are absent from school should have their parent/legal guardian notify the school the day of their absence by
calling the attendance office at 646-5458. If you are unable to call on that day, students must provide a note from parent/legal
guardian WITHIN ONE WEEK of the absence.
          The note must include the following information: student’s name, date(s) of absence, reason for absence, and the
parent/legal guardian’s signature and phone number. Whenever possible, parents/legal guardians are urged to make medical or
dental appointments after school hours.
          Any absence due to pre approved school activity, a written Dr.’s excuse, documentation approved by administration to
excuse an absence, or school suspension, will not count in totals or adversely affect participation grade or citizenship
determination. Pre approved vacation by Assistant Principal may adversely affect participation grade(s), but may not affect
citizenship determination.

Citizenship Determination:
 Behavior - An uncorrected series of negative behaviors or one serious incident may result in a “0" in citizenship.
 0 - 3 Parent/legal guardian Excused Absences = Teacher will determine the Citizenship grade of 0 - 4.
 Fourth Parent/legal guardian Excused Absence = Student will receive a “0".
Four or more days of excused absences within a grading period are considered excessive and will require a doctor's note or other
documentation as requested by school administration to excuse subsequent absences.
 1st Truancy - truancy is defined as a documented un-excused absence. The student will receive a citizenship grade no higher
than a “1".
 2nd Truancy - The student will receive a citizenship grade no higher than a “0".
A 2.0 cumulative citizenship grade (CPA) is required for a student to participate in graduation ceremonies. Students can
remediate citizenship after school in our Citizenship Make-Up Classes. A student makes up one four in citizenship by
attending four hours for a cost of $4.00.
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Remediation of excessive parent/legal guardian excused absence or truancy:
1. A student may attend an “After School Detention” to make-up excessive excused absences and/or truancies in a class. One
ASD will “make-up” one absence in one class for citizenship determination. A student may also attend an “ASD” to correct
behavior problems with teacher permission.
2. A teacher may also offer the option of remediation of their own students as per their disclosure statement

Tardiness - On the fourth tardy from any one class, a student will not receive a grade higher than a “1".
Remediation of Tardiness:
1. A student may attend an “After School Detention” to make-up excessive tardies. One ASD will “make-up” two tardies for
citizenship determination.
2. A teacher may also offer the option of remediation of their own students as per their disclosure statement.
In no way should the negative consequences for a tardy exceed the negative consequences for an absence.

Vacation Policy: Any student who will be out of school for more than three days, due to a trip or vacation, must contact one
of the assistant principals one week prior to departure in order to have their absences excused.

Possible Consequences:
Students who fail to achieve a 2.000 cumulative CPA may be subject to one or more of the following consequences:
1. The loss of a privilege to participate in school activities.
2. The loss of a privilege to use school parking
3. After School Detention
4. Referral to TAYLORSVILLE’s Alternative SHIELD School
5. At the end of the school year, parents will be invited to meet with school administration to determine a positive course of action
before the student is allowed to register for the following school year.
6. Students who fail to meet the citizenship requirement for high school graduation may not earn a Taylorsville High School
Diploma and may not participate in commencement exercises.

Attendance Check-In
          Students who are less than 20 minutes late for a class period should report directly to class. Students who arrive later
than 20 minutes will be considered absent and need to report to the Attendance Office before reporting to class. These students
will also need verification from a parent or guardian (a note or a phone call) excusing the absence.

Attendance Check-Out
        Students who leave school before the end of the day are required to check out through the Attendance Office. This may
be done with parent or guardian permission only (a note or a phone call). Students, who leave school without properly
checking out, will be considered truant.

                                    HOMEWORK REQUEST POLICY
        When requesting missed classroom assignments because of illness, please call the Counseling Center
and allow at least two days to collect missed work from student’s teachers. Or, you may email the teachers
directly. Email for teachers is found at our website. http://www.graniteschools.org

                                          HEALTH INFORMATION POLICY
        As required by policy of the State Board of Health, all enrolled students must have, on site, with the school, a
complete record of their immunizations. These are available from the Board of Health. A second MMR shot is
required before entering the senior year. It is the policy of the school not to dispense medication to students at school.
We advise students who are taking prescriptions that they bring to school only the amount of medication to be taken
during the day enclosed in a proper container. Full bottles or packages of medications should be left at home.

                                            HOME INSTRUCTION POLICY
         When a student has experienced a serious illness, injury, or surgical procedure and is unable to attend school for a long
period of time (more than 2 weeks), the district / school may provide a teacher to instruct the student at home. If this service is
needed, please contact your student's counselor.



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                                        POLICIES FOR STUDENT CONDUCT
        Taylorsville High School strictly adheres to Granite School District policies related to Safe Schools, Drugs, Alcohol and
Tobacco.

                                                 ELECTRONIC DEVICES
         Electronic devices such as cellular phones, musical devices, etc. may not be used during class time. If students use such
devices, they will face administrative confiscation and will require a parent conference to reclaim the device. Students are
strongly encouraged to leave electronic devices at home, as we cannot guarantee their safety. The school will not be held
responsible for the loss or damage of electronic or audio devices brought to school.

                                                 SAFE SCHOOL POLICY
         Any student acts of violence, fighting, physical or sexual assaults or threats, possession of a weapon or facsimile,
criminal behavior, or any type of gang activity or involvement will be dealt with as per the Granite District / Taylorsville Safe
Schools Policy.

                                        DRUGS, ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO
         Possession of tobacco, alcohol, or drugs is illegal. Tobacco violators will be issued citations. Students involved in drug
and/or alcohol situations will be subject to the Granite School District Drug and Alcohol Policy. Violation of both policies (Safe
School or Drug, Alcohol & Tobacco) may include, but is not limited to suspension, probation from activities, and enrollment in a
treatment program, law enforcement referral, and possible alternative placement. By engaging in these and related activities, a
student may relinquish the privilege to attend Taylorsville High School. Complete copies of these Board of Education policies and
the sequential steps involved are available at the school upon request.

                                           GENERAL RULES OF CONDUCT
         Students are expected to treat their fellow students, teachers, other staff members, and visitors to the school with
courtesy and consideration. The use of foul and abusive language, extortion, harassing other students, and fighting will not be
tolerated. Students who choose to engage in these behaviors will be suspended from school and a parent conference required prior
to re-admission.

                               SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY & PROCEDURE
          Any form of sexual harassment by staff or students, including any inappropriate verbal, written, or physical conduct is
strictly prohibited and violators of this policy will subject themselves to investigative and disciplinary procedures. A more
extensive definition of what constitutes harassment is available upon request. Any student who feels they are being subjected to
harassment should report the problem immediately to any teacher, counselor, administrator, or other staff member at the school.
Students should not feel embarrassed, intimidated, or reluctant to file a harassment report.

                                                      HAZING POLICY
         Hazing or initiation activities on the part of Taylorsville High School students or organizations sponsored by Taylorsville
High School are strictly forbidden. Students participating in any activities that might be dangerous or construed as hazing and/or
physical or sexual harassment may result in one or more of the following consequences:
         1. Immediate suspension from school
         2. Removal from the school-sponsored organization/team
         3. Law enforcement referral

                                      GAMBLING AND GAMES OF CHANCE
         Any activity or games involving wagering, use of dice, playing cards, or other devices, as well as "pitching" money are
prohibited while at school or at any school-related functions.

                                    STUDENT CONDUCT AT SPORTS EVENTS
          Student conduct and demeanor at school competitions is clearly outlined by Region and State guidelines. In general,
students are encouraged to enthusiastically support their team while displaying good sportsmanship to opponents. The use of
noisemakers, posting signs or banners with a negative connotation, obscene gestures, verbal remarks and cheers, and/or taunting
others is not permitted. At all games, Taylorsville High students are to sit in the student section designated for Taylorsville
students. They are not to sit in sections designated for the opposing school.
Cheerleaders have been selected as the official group to lead school cheering efforts at these events. Individual groups or students
conducting cheers are discouraged.


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                                                        DRESS CODE
Taylorsville High School students are expected to dress in a clean, neat manner that will not take attention away from the
learning process. Dress is one of the key factors that determines the culture and reputation of a school. While we want our
students to be comfortable, confident, and able to express themselves, there are certain guidelines that all students are
expected to follow:
1. Appearance should not disrupt classroom activity or bring undue attention to the student.
2. Students must wear shoes or sandals at all times.
3. The following clothing is not acceptable: sagging, short shorts or skirts, belly shirts, low-cut shirts, spaghetti straps, or any
other clothing that would make another student, faculty or staff member feel uncomfortable.
4. Standards of propriety and decency dictate that outer clothing should not reveal underclothing.
5. Slogans or advertisements, which by their very nature are controversial or obscene, are not allowed.
6. Clothing which depicts, through words or images, disrespect toward any race, culture, religion or gender will not be allowed.
7. No clothing depicting criminal activity, violence, weapons, drugs, alcohol or tobacco will not be allowed.
8. No gang-related attire. This may include, but is not limited to, the following items as indicated by Utah law enforcement
agencies:
         a. Headwear (bandanas, dew rags, etc.) - The ONLY headwear allowed are baseball caps. Baseball caps must comply
         with the rest of our dress code and MUST BE WORN STRAIGHT FORWARD OR STRAIGHT BACK.
         b. No Sunglasses
         c. Monikers - no nicknames or gang names on clothing will be allowed
         d. No Chains
* The Taylorsville High School Administration reserves the right to make the final determination if an item of clothing is
inappropriate for the school.

                                                     SCHOOL DANCES
          Taylorsville High School sponsors two types of dances. They are: (1) Date-Type Dances (Prom, Homecoming, etc.) are
open to non-student dates, but participants remain subject to all school conduct regulations (one of the students must be currently
enrolled at Taylorsville High School and provide valid student ID prior to entry). (2) Stomps are non date events and are held for
currently enrolled daytime Taylorsville High School students only. Student ID will be required prior to entry and non-Taylorsville
High School students will not be admitted. The administration reserves the right to refuse admission to anyone prior to dances, as
well as at the door. All dances will start at 7:00 p.m. and will end at 10:00 p.m. (exception - dances held after football games will
end at 11:00 p.m.). To ensure a positive and safe atmosphere for all students, good conduct is required. Those found in violation
of this policy will be removed from the dance. If large numbers of students are out of compliance, the THS administration has the
right to cancel a dance at any time. Students must refrain from any dancing that could be described as risqué or vulgar. Failure to
comply will result in being removed from the dance. Dress should be in accordance with the occasion, and the THS Dress Code
will be enforced. Students who enter the dance will be required to wear a wristband, students who leave the dance may only re-
enter if they are wearing their wristband.

                                           ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS
        Students planning on seeking office or participating in any Utah High School Activities Association- endorsed event
should be aware of the listed requirements concerning standards of eligibility. This standard must be met during the term
immediately proceeding each term of competition and throughout the respective terms of office. Eligibility is checked at each
term end when grades are posted.

ORGANIZATION / ACTIVITY
REQUIREMENTS:                                ACADEMIC                    CITIZENSHIP
Athletics, Forensics, Drama, Music           2.0                         No more than one F
Cheerleader                                  3.0                         3.0
Class Officer                                3.0                         2.75
Dance Company                                2.0                         No 0’s or 1’s
Drill Team                                   3.0                         2.5 and no more than one F
National Honor Society                       3.75                        No 0s allowed
SBO                                          3.0                         2.75

Physical Examination
No student shall be eligible to compete in any athletic contest unless such student has proof of a physician’s examination stating
that he or she is physically able to perform in interscholastic contests.




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                                      LOCKERS & PARKING REGULATIONS
LOCKERS
         Hall lockers are provided for storage of coats and books. The locker is only as safe as the student assigned that locker
makes it. Use of a locker by more than one student is unacceptable. To permit other students access to that locker compromises
the security of that locker. The lockers are the property of the school. School authorities have the right and obligation to check
lockers for the safety, welfare, and protection of students on school property at any time. Every student is responsible for the
locker he/she is assigned as well as the contents of the locker at all times. STUDENTS ARE STRONGLY ADVISED NOT TO
PLACE MONEY OR OTHER VALUABLES IN THEIR LOCKER. THE SCHOOL DOES NOT ACCEPT
RESPONSIBILITY FOR STOLEN OR LOST MONEY, CLOTHING, VALUABLES, OR OTHER ARTICLES.

PARKING
          Student parking on campus is by permit only. All cars parked on campus must display a Granite District parking sticker
in the rear window. Permits are required and may be obtained in the main office for a cost of $10.00 Student parking is available
in the parking lot east of the school only. Vehicles parked improperly out of student areas or without a valid sticker will be
ticketed, towed, and impounded. Despite school efforts to maintain secure parking for students, the school is not liable for any
loss or damage incurred in the parking lot.

                                                  SPECIAL EDUCATION
          Whenever possible, special education students are registered in areas of study within the full range of classes available to
the general student body. Special education classes are offered in academic and career/transitional areas. Special education
students registered for the Jones Center (job readiness training) will have a four-period assignment at the center. This schedule
includes bus transportation time. Special education students and teachers are guided and limited by the Individual Education Plan
(IEP), which is developed by the teacher, student, parent, and administrator. Class scheduling is accomplished with the assistance
of the student’s assigned counselor. Special education students will be programmed to meet all graduation requirements,
including citizenship. Any exceptions must be noted on the IEP.

                                                   WORK EXPERIENCE
        Work Experience will only be available to students who have an S.E.O.P. which includes a CTE class and work
experience. Work experience open to JUNIORS & SENIORS only and the final decision to place a student on work release will
be made by the student and counselor.

                                                      HOME RELEASE
          It is Taylorsville’s recommendation that students should carry a full eight-period schedule since the increasing demand in
the job market requires students to be better prepared. We encourage our students to expand their marketable skills by taking
classes related to their career area. If a student has a need for home release, please contact the student’s counselor for options.

                              2009-2010 SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL FEE SCHEDULE
          In-person or mail-in option registration will take place in July and August. Every student will have material sent to them
in July informing them of dates to registrar. When students come to register on the respective dates, they will need to have enough
money to pay for the following fees in cash or check made payable to: TAYLORSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL.

1. BASIC FEE                                                                       ………$75.00
Books / Instructional Materials Replacement/Activities* ($30 materials, $10 media/technology, $20 activities, $10.00 refundable
at end of year.)* Student activity fees are used to fund activity programs such as: school newspaper, literary magazine, dramas,
musicals, concerts, awards, dances, UHSAA sponsored events, and school graduation expenses.

2. COURSE FEES (The following fees are per semester unless otherwise noted)
Arts                                                                                        $35.00
Computer Labs                                                                               $5.00
Dance                                                                                       $10.00
Drama                                                                                       $10.00*
Driver Education                                                                            $100.00
Fitness for Life                                                                            $10.00
Industrial / Home Economics/Vocational                                                      $40.00
Lab Materials                                                                               $15.00
Music (Individual maximum per year: $30.00)                                                 $15.00
Physical Education (Individual maximum per year: $20.00)                                    $10.00
Workbooks                                                                                   $20.00
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3. EXTRACURRICULAR PARTICIPATION FEES (The following fees are per sport (Individual Maximum: $100.00
Basketball, Football, Golf (each)                                                                         $50.00*
Baseball, Debate, Soccer, Softball, Swimming, Track, Volleyball, Wrestling (each)                         $40.00*
Cheerleaders, Cross Country, Drill Team, Pep Club, Tennis (each)                                          $35.00*
         (See section 5 for additional Performing Groups and Uniform Fees.)
Football Helmet Safety/Reconditioning (Not part of individual maximum)                                    $35.00
Personal articles of athletic clothing per sport                                                          $160.00
Summer Athletic Clinic                                                                                    $50.00
Transportation per activity (individual max/year $20.00)                                                  $10.00

4. PERFORMING GROUPS, UNIFORM AND CAMP FEES
Cheerleader                                                                                             $300.00*
Dance Club                                                                                              $150.00*
Debate (per year)                                                                                       $90.00
Drill Team                                                                                              $600.00*
Jazz Band                                                                                               $75.00*
Marching Bands                                                                                          $50.00*
Orchestra, Band, Madrigals, Show Choir, Concert Choir (Boys)                                            $175.00*
Orchestra, Band, Madrigals, Show Choir, Concert Choir (Girls)                                           $125.00*
Pep Band                                                                                                $50.00*
Pep Club / Flag Team                                                                                    $200.00*
Song Leaders                                                                                            $300.00*
Student Body Officers                                                                                   $125.00
Camp Fees for Performing Groups                                                                         $250.00
Granite Youth Symphony – Tuition*                                                                       $60.00
Granite Youth Symphony – Uniform                                                                        $175.00
Granite Youth Symphony – Travel                                                                as per board approval

5. STUDENT TRAVEL
Travel cost may not be more than $700.00* per student per trip. All requests for overnight travel must be approved by the
principal and the Assistant Superintendent.
* $300.00 out of pocket, $400.00 donations, fundraisers, & contributions.
                                                                                          $700.00
6. ADMISSIONS
Banquets                                                                                                  $15.00
Dances & Proms                                                                                            $20.00
Plays, Musicals & Concerts                                                                                $10.00
Stomps with an activity card (Without an activity card: $7.00)                                            $5.00

UHSAA ADMISSIONS
         (Activities sponsored by the Utah High School Activities Association (UHSAA) may not exceed limits established by the Association.)


7. CLUB DUES
School Clubs                                                                                              $10.00
Vocational Clubs                                                                                          $15.00

8. OTHERS
Cap and Gown                                                                                              $21.00
Class Change (non-essential)                                                                              $5.00
Credit Recovery (charge per .25 units of credit)                                                          $45.00
Equipment Rental (per year/per class)                                                                     $35.00
Musical Instrument Rental (for first instrument)                                                          $60.00
        Additional Instruments (per each instrument after first)                                          $15.00
Remediation / Make-up / Test Review Class (not for credit)                                                $30.00
Shop Cards (op. projects which become student property)                                                   cost of item

9. OPTIONAL PURCHASES (The following are not fees and are not subject to fee waiver.)
                                                                                                                                               8
HSCPT (High School Course Proficiency Test)                                                  $85.00
Parking Permits for School Campus                                                            $10.00
Transcripts (First transcript is free, all others are subject to charge)                     $1.00
Yearbook (includes sales tax)                                                                $40.00 (if paid 1st semester)
                                                                                             $45.00 (if paid 2nd semester)

*Unrestricted Indirect Cost Rate (Add 13% to participation fee, only, for charter, private, & home School students)

                                                      ADDITIONAL COSTS
         Parents and students should be aware that certain classes and programs may be made available to students that require
additional costs that are not a part of the established fee schedule. Some examples of these courses/programs are: Enrichment
programs, advanced placement tests, select CTE programs, PSAT (National Merit Testing), SAT, ACT; testing and concurrent
enrollment programs that award college credit. Students should obtain information as to those costs when considering their
participation. These costs and prices are determined by the sponsoring agency and not by Granite School District or Taylorsville
High School.

                                                     FEE WAIVER POLICY
          Taylorsville High School has established policies for fee payments based upon individual needs and situations of
students. Arrangements for fee waivers can be made at the time of registration, if students meet established criteria for fee waiver.
Eligible students should contact the administration for answers to any questions regarding fee arrangements. More complete
information regarding fees and fee waivers will be included in the registration packets student receives in July. A fee waiver does
not cover the cost of a yearbook or materials used in courses beyond that which is required to earn a grade.

                             IMPORTANCE OF CAREFULLY CHOOSING CLASSES
          Students are registering for the full year. On the basis of student requests, teachers will be assigned for the coming year.
Therefore, changes in schedule for next fall quarter are strongly discouraged. Students are expected to become familiar now with
the various subject offerings and to secure enough advice and counsel before registering, so that changes in your schedule will not
be necessary. Students should secure this help from teachers, counselors, parents, and from the information provided in this
publication.
          Taylorsville High School is a Comprehensive Guidance School. Students have the opportunity to work individually with
their counselor each year. Students also participate in a variety of career programs including workshops, guest speakers, career
fairs, military career day, and college programs. All of these activities are designed to help students create informed Student
Educational Occupational Plans (SEOP). Careful consideration of the SEOP is recommended as students complete their course
registration information.

EIGHT PERIODS REQUIRED
Students must register for all eight periods for both semesters. It is required that all students take at least three academic classes
each year from courses in English, Foreign Language, Math, Science, Social Studies and any concurrent or advanced
placement class.

                                COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY CONSIDERATIONS
          Students who are planning to enroll in a major university directly from high school will take three years of Math and
Science. The three years of math should consist of Algebra 1, Geometry and Intermediate Algebra. The three years of Science
should consist of biology, chemistry, and/or physics, and one other science class. Some universities may require two years of a
foreign language.
          Athletes need to consider additional NCAA Clearinghouse requirements if they are planning to go on to college. If you
have any questions or if you have a need for more information, contact your counselor.
          NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse (the clearinghouse) is an organization that works with the NCAA to determine
a student’s eligibility for athletics participation in his or her first year of college enrollments. Students who want to participate in
college sports during their first year of enrollment in college must register with the clearinghouse. Located in Iowa City, Iowa, the
clearinghouse staff follows NCAA bylaws and regulations in analyzing and processing a student’s high school academic records,
ACT or SAT scores, and key information about amateurism participation, to determine the student’s initial eligibility.
          NCAA Division I (2008 and Later) – If you enroll in a Division I college in 2008 or later and want to participate in
athletics during the first year, you must: Graduate from high school; Complete these 16 core courses: 4 years of English, 3 years
of mathematics (Algebra 1 or higher), 2 years of natural or physical science, 1 extra year of English, math or natural or physical
science, 2 years of social science, 4 years of extra core courses (from any category above, or foreign language, nondoctrinal
religion or philosophy); Earn a minimum required grade-point average in your courses; and Earn a combined SAT or ACT sum
score that matches your course grade-point average and test score sliding scale on page 9 (for example, a 2.400 core-course grade-
point average needs a 860 SAT). NCAA approved courses are listed in the course offerings.
                                                                                                                                      9
                                          GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
1. Students must have satisfactory citizenship and adhere to the rules and policies of the school. A student must maintain a 2.0
citizenship point average or better.
2. Successful completion of 27 units of academic credit in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 is required.
3. A student must complete three classes each semester chosen from the subject matter areas listed below: English-language arts,
foreign language, mathematics, science, and or social studies. The breakdown follows:
                           Language Arts                                 4 Units
                           Social Studies                                3.5 Units
                           Mathematics                                   3 Units (2011 graduates)
                           Science                                       3 Units (2011 graduates)
                           Arts                                          1.5 Units
                           Physical & Health Education                   2 Units
                           Career & Technical Education (CTE)            1 Unit
                           Computer Technology                           .5 Unit
                           Financial Literacy                            .5 Unit
                           Elective Units                                8 Units
                           ____________________________________
                           TOTAL                                         27 Units

SOPHOMORES
Minimum Required Courses:
Students registering to be sophomores next year must take a full year of World Civilizations and English, one semester of
Fitness for Life, Computer Technology (unless Fitness for Life or Computer Tech. was taken 9 th grade year), Health, and
one other academic subject for the full year.

10th Grade Social Studies:
The 10th grade social studies requirement can be completed by registering for:
    (1) World Civilizations
    (2) A.P. World History

10th Grade English:
The sophomore English requirement can be filled by registering for one of these two options:
   (1) English Honors 10
   (2) English Core 10
Students who earned passing grades in 9th grade Algebra, Geometry, Fitness for Life, Computer Tech, Word Processing,
Biology, or foreign language cannot repeat the same courses for high school credits.

JUNIORS
Minimum Required Courses:
Students registering to be juniors next year must take a full year of United States History II, English, and one full year of
another academic subject. One semester of Physical Education is also recommended.

11th Grade Social Studies:
The United States History II requirement can be completed by registering for one of these two options:
(1) United States History II
(2) United States History A.P.

11th Grade English:
The 11th grade English requirement can be filled by registering for one of these three options:
(1) English Honors 11
(2) English Core 11
(3) A.P. English Language


SENIORS
Minimum Required Courses:

                                                                                                                                10
Students registering to be seniors next year must take one class of English each semester, one semester of Government and
Citizenship, one semester of Financial Literacy, and at least one other academic subject each semester. In addition, seniors
must complete all graduation requirements not yet filled.

12th Grade English:
The senior English requirement can be completed by registering for a senior English class each semester. Please see booklet.




                                                                                                                               11
                 Attention Taylorsville High School Students!
                                                         February 2009

                                All students taking Salt Lake Community College
                           Concurrent Enrollment classes for the 2009-2010 school year
                                  must comply with the following instructions.

First-Time Concurrent Enrollment Students
Before you will be allowed to check a concurrent enrollment class on your Taylorsville High School registration card, you must
first be admitted to Salt Lake Community College. To do this you need to complete the following steps:

1.       Complete all parts of the attached application for admission in blue or black ink. You must include your social
         security number, full and complete name, and your signature.

2.       Bring the application form and a $35 payment (check made payable to Taylorsville High School) to the Book Store
         before or after school and during lunches. You will leave your registration form at the Book Store and receive a receipt
         for payment.

3.       Your registration card will then be stamped by an official in the Book Store or in the Career Center before you can turn it
         in to your counselor.

Continuing Concurrent Enrollment Students
If you have already taken a concurrent enrollment class you do not need to pay or be admitted again, but you must still have
your registration card stamped at the Bookstore before you turn in your card to the Counseling Center.




                                       Taylorsville High School
                                    Concurrent Enrollment & A.P. Courses
                                                           2009-2010

Concurrent enrollment classes are college level classes offered to juniors and seniors for both high school and college credit.
These classes are taught at Taylorsville High School by Taylorsville faculty members who have been approved as adjunct faculty
at SLCC. This credit is transferable to all state-sponsored Utah colleges and universities. These classes are college level courses
and students who enroll in concurrent enrollment classes should be prepared for the rigors of college work. The student will pay
a one-time college registration fee of $35 for SLCC classes. There is no charge for tuition; however, the students will need to
purchase their own textbooks. (These classes are cross-listed as CC under departmental listings.) For more information, see
Mr. Horton.


                       Important Notice for Concurrent Enrollment Students
 Registration in any college concurrent enrollment course requires that the student pay the
 college admission fee and provide signed parental permission to participate in college level
 course work. In addition, some classes require placement scores from the ACT or CPT
 assessments. It is the sole responsibility of the student to pay the fee, provide signed permission,
 and provide the appropriate test scores prior to the beginning of each semester. Students who
 fail to provide the above information will be placed in a similar non-concurrent enrollment
 class.


Taylorsville High School                              Salt Lake Community Course
General Studies
Intermediate Algebra/College Algebra (CC)             MTH 1010 (4) MTH 1050 (4)
                                                                                                                                 12
English 7-8 CC                                       ENG 1010 (3)
Computer Technology CC                               CIS 1020 Computer Essentials (3)

Art
Drawing CC                                           ART 1020 Intro to Drawing (3)
Oil Painting CC                                      ART 1540 Beginning Oil (3)
Water Color CC                                       ART 1530 Beginning Watercolor (3)
Ceramics CC                                          ART 1600 Beginning Pottery (3)
Interpersonal Communication CC                       COM 1010 Elem of Effect Comm. (3)
Principles of Public Speaking CC                     COM 1020 Principals of Public Speaking (3)

CTE Programs
Adult Roles & Financial Literacy CC                  FHS 2400 Marriage & Family (3)
Advanced Interior Design CC                          IDT 1010 Introduction to Interior Design
Occupational Machine Tech/CNC CC                     MAT 1500 Manual Machining (3)
                                                     MAT 1510 (Lab) (1)
Occupational Welding Tech. CC                        WLD 1005 Related Welding (3)
Occupational Millwork & Cabinetmaking CC             BCCM 1200 Personal Projects (7)
JROTC CC                                             MLS 1010 (2), MLS 1020 (2)

Hospitality and Tourism - SLCC Concurrent Enrollment
Marketing 1900 CC                             MKTG 1900 Special Projects (2)
Business Management 1600 CC                   MGT 1600 Management Essentials (3)
Marketing 2000 CC Internship                  MKTG 2000 Marketing/Coop Ed (3)
Marketing 1010 CC                             MKTG 1010 Customer Service (2)
Marketing 1030 CC                             MKTG 1030 Introduction to Marketing (3)

Total                     13

Weber State University Concurrent Enrollment
Advanced Interior Design                                               IDT 1053 (3) (1010)

UVSC
Sports Medicine                                                                 PE 2500 (3)

Granite Technical Institute (GTI)
Additional Concurrent Enrollment classes may be available from the GTI.


                               Advanced (A.P.) Placement Courses
Advanced placement (A.P.) classes are college level classes that expect students to be prepared for an extensive and rigorous
study of the curricular area. Students in these most of these courses can expect 1-2 hours of homework every night. The purpose
of these courses is to prepare students for the Advanced Placement exam in May. The successful passage of the class and the test
allows students the opportunity to receive college credit.

A.P. Art History
A.P. Biology
A.P. Calculus
A.P. Chemistry
A.P. English Language
A.P. English Literature
A.P. Government and Politics
A.P. Music Theory and Harmony
A.P. Physics B
A.P. Psychology
A.P. Studio Art 2D
A.P. World History




                                                                                                                              13
                  2009-2010 TAYLORSVILLE COURSE CATALOG
                              GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS AND IMPORTANT NOTES

1. USE PENCIL ONLY when completing the registration card. Please make sure that all writing is clear
and readable. Register for eight periods for both semesters. Be sure to mark your choices carefully and
obtain the teacher approval signature, if needed.

2. Complete the upper section of the registration card and fill in all the information requested.

3. Some classes require teacher or counselor approval. The course descriptions identify which classes
require signatures and or prerequisite classes.

4. Be sure that your name and student # are filled in, and that your parent/guardian signs the registration
card. Our purpose is that this registration is final for both semesters, since class changes are difficult after
the schedule has been completed. If changes become necessary, they can only be made by counselors
and, in some cases, administration. No class changes will be made after the first week of the term.

5. Many classes offered at Taylorsville are year-long courses taught first and second semesters. If you
register for such a year-long program, you may have the class during different periods each semester and/or
with different teachers.

6. Extensive outside preparation is required in Advanced Placement courses. Your class selection and
extracurricular programs should be planned accordingly. Students will be required to remain in AP Classes
for at least the first term.

7. To prepare adequately for the American College Test (ACT), the following courses are recommended in
addition to the required English and Social Studies classes:
       * Elementary Algebra, Geometry 1-2, Pre-Calculus
       * Biology 1-2 and Chemistry 1-2 H and /or Physics 1-2 H.

8. To register for Drivers Education - Students who will be 16 on or before February 23, 2010 should
register for Driver Education first semester. Those students who will be 16 on or before July 18, 2010
should register for second semester. Students who will be 16 on or before October 30, 2009 may register
for summer driving, but there are NO fee waivers for summer school. A student needs to acquire a learned
permit from the DLD before the first day of class or you will be removed from class. Fee charge: $100.00.

9. No more than two units of credit can be earned as a teacher's assistant in grades 10-12.

10. Fill in your alternative classes on the registration card. (Two full year classes and two semester
classes.) You may not receive your first elective choice, please carefully consider your alternate classes, as
you may be in the alternate class.

11. Fill in the elective class you would liked dropped in the event you are chosen for a tryout position
(cheer, madrigals, drill team, dance company, etc.) at Taylorsville.




                                                                                                               14
                       TAYLORSVILLE HIGH CLASS DESCRIPTIONS
FINE ARTS
Fine Arts are made up of the following four separate cores: Visual Art, Dance, Music and Theatre. Fine Arts credit may be earned
from the State Core Classes. All other classes that are offered by the four Fine Arts departments and may be taken for elective
credit or other credit as stipulated.

VISUAL ART
The following fulfills Fine Art graduation requirements:
Art Foundations 2
010120                                              10,11,12                                          Semester
This class expands on the design concepts taught in Foundations 1. Students will experiment with a variety of media such as pencil, ink, paint,
chalk, paper and clay to create landscapes, portraits, animals, prints, abstracts, and more. Aesthetics, creativity, divergent thinking, and art
criticism are covered as well. Prerequisite: Art Foundations 1. Fee: $20.00.

Drawing 1: Beginning Drawing
011110                                                      10,11,12                                 Semester
No Drawing background necessary. This beginning class focuses on drawing skills, introductory vocabulary, and the production of introductory
drawing projects. Drawings are completed using mostly pencil, with other mediums, such as ink, charcoal and chalk used as well. Concepts
emphasized include design principles and the elements of art, including line, shape, value, texture and color. Concepts will be applied to
drawing both imaginative and realistic pieces. Fee: $20.00

Drawing 2: Secondary Drawing
011120                                                      10,11,12                                 Semester
This class builds on the skills and vocabulary learned in Drawing 1. Students will use pencil, charcoal, pastel, chalk and ink to demonstrate their
understanding of design concepts. Students will explore creativity and personal expression through the production of both imaginative and
realistic pieces. Students will spend time working on long term projects. Prerequisite: Drawing 1 or Art Foundations Fee: $20.00

Drawing 3: Advanced Drawing
011201                                                      10,11,12                                 Semester
This course builds on the concepts and skills learned in Drawing 1 & 2. Students will be encouraged to think independently as artists as they
produce personal, advanced artwork. Students will be challenged with new drawing ideas, while working toward increasing representational
skills using media such as pencil, charcoal, pastels, chalk, ink and colored pencil. Prerequisites: Drawing 1 or Art Foundations & Drawing 2
 Fee: $20.00

Drawing 4: Studio Drawing
011202                                                      11,12                                    Semester
Building on the skills, concepts and vocabulary learned in Drawing 1, 2 & 3, Drawing 4 will be an advanced studio drawing course. Students
will be required to complete a set of goals to be individually met throughout the semester. This course is a studio course. Students will produce
individual, challenging pieces and will focus on the goal of starting a personal student portfolio. Prerequisites: Drawing 1 or Art Foundations,
Drawing 2 & 3. Fee: $20.00

Drawing CC: Art 1020
011140                                                      11,12                                    Semester
Concurrent enrollment credit available through SLCC. Focusing on drawing concepts intended to advanced students drawing skills,
Drawing CC is a college level drawing course. Students will complete various practice assignments, written assignments and long term projects
while following the text Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. Prior drawing experience is encouraged. Fee: $15.00

2D Studio AP Art
014400                                                      11,12                                    Year
Students enrolled in Advanced Placement Studio Art will focus on personal, challenging, long term projects with the goal of submitting an AP
Portfolio at the end of the course. A studio class, students will make personal choices about the work they create, with individualized support
and direction dedicated toward helping them personally grow as artists. Prerequisite: Signature required. Fee: $35.00

Painting 1-2
011300                                                      11,12                                    Year
011450 CC (Art 1530) 011460 (1540)
Concurrent enrollment credit available through SLCC. Use CC # if you want CC credit. Students will learn techniques for painting in
watercolor and oil painting. Students will learn to render a wide range of subjects. Students will also learn of artists who exemplify these
mediums. This class is requisite to all other painting classes. Prerequisite: Art Foundations. Fee Charge: $35.00.

Painting 3-4

                                                                                                                                                15
011400                                                         11,12                                     Year
011460 Oil Paint CC  (Art 1540)                                                                          1st Semester
011450 Watercolor CC (Art 1530)                                                                          2nd Semester
Concurrent enrollment credit available through SLCC. Use CC # if you want CC credit. Students use skills gained in beginning painting to
experiment with various painting media, techniques and styles. Students work on projects that best meet individual needs. Prerequisite: Painting
1-2. Fee Charge: $30.00.

Ceramics 1
013310                                                         10,11,12                                  Semester
Students learn pottery-making through use of the potter’s wheel, building projects by hand and sculpting animals and people. Students learn the
terminology and skills necessary to fire and glaze their work. Prerequisite: Art Foundations. Fee Charge: $20.00

Ceramics 2
013320                                                         11,12                                     Semester
Additional practice for students desiring to improve their pottery- making skills. Students create a variety of projects using the potter’s wheel,
building by hand and sculpting. Emphasis is placed on improving craftsmanship, glazing skill and developing creativity. Prerequisite: Ceramics
I. Fee Charge: $20.00.

Ceramics 3
013410                                                         11,12                                     Semester
Provides opportunities for students to learn additional techniques in producing hand-built and wheel-thrown pottery forms. Prerequisite:
Ceramics 1. Approval: Ms. Anderson. Fee Charge. $20.00.

Ceramics CC
013330 CC (Art 1600) – elective credit                         11,12                                     Semester
Concurrent enrollment credit available through SLCC. This course follows the SLCC Art 1600 Ceramics syllabus. SLCC requires that
students take at least Ceramics 1 before taking this class. This class in an advanced class that helps students improve hand-building and wheel-
throwing skill learned in Ceramics 1 & 2 classes. The focus is on art production, art criticism, and creativity. Students will glaze and fire
finished work. Prerequisite: Ceramics 1 Fee Charge: $20.00

Printmaking
013250                                                         10,11,12                                  Semester
Students are introduced to printmaking as an art form. Techniques can include silk screen, etching, block print, monotype, and wood cut.
Projects may include cards, t-shirts, posters, fine art prints and more. Design concepts, art criticism, aesthetics, and art history are also
emphasized. Prerequisite: Art Foundations I or Drawing I. Fee Charge: $20.00.

AP Art History
014500                                                         10,11,12                                  Year
The AP Art History class covers the same curriculum as that introductory college class in Art History and prepares students to take the AP Art
History exam. Students will gain understanding and knowledge of architecture, sculpture, painting and other diverse historical art forms as well
as their place in history. No prior experience in art or art history is required. Students who have done well in history, literature or studio arts will
enjoy this class. Approval: Mr. Krueger.

Commercial Art 1
012010                                                         10,11,12                                  Semester
An introduction to the field of Commercial Arts focusing on the production of art as commercial products. Students look at the numerous ways
that art is presented to consumers and work to create these products. Students also learn various designing and production ideas and processes,
including layout, lettering, calligraphy, advertising, package design, computer graphics, t-shirt printing and more. Personalized work, higher
level thinking skills, critical thinking and art criticism are emphasized as well. Fee: $20.00

Commercial Art 2
012020                                                         10,11,12                                  Semester
Students focus on techniques and tools used to create commercial products and seek to develop a better understanding of how to present an idea
or product to consumers. A variety of mediums are utilized, including pencil, ink, paint, computer design, silk screen and more to create logo’s
brochures, cartoons, t-shirts, books, etc. Students are encouraged to create personalized work, to utilize higher level thinking and critical
thinking skills and to apply art criticism to artwork while learning to work independently. Prerequisite: Commercial Art 1 Approval: Current art
teacher. Mrs. Phelps Fee: $20.00.

Elective Credit or Career & Technical Education (CTE) Credit
Photography may be used to fulfill CTE requirement or elective credit:
Commercial Photography 1
096711                                           11,12                                                   Semester

                                                                                                                                                     16
Students will study traditional and digital camera operation, basic theory, materials and process, exposure and processing techniques, enlarging
and printing techniques and print finishing along with computer skills with Adobe Photoshop to enhance digital images. This course equips
students with the technical, intellectual, conceptual, and creative skill of making a photograph. Fee Charge: $25.00, Camera Use Fee $10.00.

Commercial Photography 2
096721                                                       11,12                                     Semester
The course objective is for students to broaden the basis for, and to gain the ability to produce fine photographs at a higher level of competence
within the tradition of the photographic art form. Students will continue to study traditional and digital camera operations and theory, materials
and process, exposure and processing techniques, enlarging and printing techniques and print finishing along with advanced computer skills
using Adobe Photoshop to enhance and alter digital images. This course equips students with the technical, intellectual, conceptual and creative
skill of making a photograph. Prerequisite: Commercial Photo 1. Fee Charge: $25.00 and Camera Use Fee: $10.00.

Multimedia Design
091211                                                       10,11,12                                  Year
Multimedia Design is an introduction to the first-year multimedia course where students will create interactive computer applications to be
delivered on the internet, CD-ROM or other delivery mediums using the elements of text, graphics, animation, sound, video and digital imaging.
Some of the software programs the students will learn are: Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, Macromedia Flash, and others. This course is also a
prerequisite to the advanced Multimedia class. Fee Charge: $20.00/semester

Multimedia Production
091221                                                       10,11,12                                  Year
Multimedia is the process of planning, instructional design, and development. Multimedia Production is a continuation to the first-year
multimedia course. Students will continue to create interactive computer applications to be delivered on the internet, CD-ROM or other delivery
mediums using the elements of text, graphics, animation, sound, video and digital imaging. With the use of software programs such as
Photoshop and Illustrator, Macromedia Flash, and others, students will produce an ongoing series of production projects. These skills can
prepare students for entry-level positions and other occupational/educational goals. Fee Charge: $20.00/semester. Prerequisite: Multimedia
Design.


DANCE
The following may fulfill Fine Art or Physical Education requirements:
Dance 1
062410                                             10,11,12                                            Semester
Dance 1
010010                                             10,11,12                                            Year
An introduction to modern dance and basic dance techniques. Fee charge: $10.00.

Dance 2
010020                                                       10,11,12                                  Year
Dance 3
010030                                                       11,12                                     Year
These classes focus on dance technique and choreography. As the student progresses in the program, work becomes more advanced and covers a
wider variety of dance forms. More experienced dancers may sign up for the higher level dance classes. Prerequisite: Dance 1. Fee charge:
$10.00.

This course is elective credit only:
Dance Company 7-8
010090                                                       11,12                                     Year
Must Audition in Spring of the previous year, information available in main office by April 1. Fee charge: $150.00 (additional fees for optional
activities).


THEATRE
The following fulfills Fine Art graduation requirements:
Theatre I
019950                                                       10,11,12                                  Year
           The course introduces students to the fundamentals of theatre arts, the role of an actor in interpreting dramatic literature, performance
theory and techniques, and as an overview of the technical elements of stage production. Group interaction and ensemble work will be
emphasized. Course work will focus on audition preparation, scene and character development, theatre crafts, dramatic structure, elements of
directing, and establishing a base knowledge of dramatic literature and theatre history. Students are expected to be involved in theater festivals,
workshops, and Taylorsville Theatre Department productions.

Theatre II
019960                                                       11,12                                     Year

                                                                                                                                                  17
           The course continues to build student skill and knowledge of theatre arts, the role of an actor in interpreting dramatic literature,
performance theory and techniques, and continued exploration of the technical elements of stage production. Group interaction and ensemble
work will be emphasized. Course work will focus on audition preparation, scene and character development, theatre crafts, dramatic structure,
elements of directing, and expanding knowledge of dramatic literature and theatre history. Students are expected to be involved in theater
festivals, workshops, and Taylorsville Theatre Department productions. This class requires instructor approval. Approval: Mr Schmid

Theatre III/ Spotlight Players
019970                                                       12                                        Year
          The course is designed for advanced training in theatre arts, the role of an actor in interpreting dramatic literature, performance theory
and techniques, and the technical elements of stage production. Students will participate in a senior thesis production. Group interaction and
ensemble work will be emphasized. Course work will focus on audition preparation, scene and character development, advanced theatre crafts,
dramatic structure, elements of directing, demonstrating a working knowledge of dramatic literature and current theatre movements. Students
are expected to be involved in theater festivals, workshops, and Taylorsville Theatre Department productions. This class requires an audition
and instructor approval. Approval: Mr Schmid

Stage Production
019901 (Semester) 019900 (Year)                              10,11,12                                  Semester, Year
          Students design stage sets, build props, construct, cover, and paint frames and learn to arrange a stage to produce a visually
appropriate setting for a play or musical. This is a portfolio driven class intended for students seeking further educational training and ultimate
employment in the performing arts industry. Coursework will focus on Theatre Department productions with students acting as project
managers while documenting their research, process and final products. Students will periodically present portfolios and participate in
interviews. This class requires instructor approval. Approval: Mr Schmid

MUSIC
The following fulfills Fine Art graduation requirements:
Concert Band
016600                                              10,11,12                                           Year
Brass, Woodwind and Percussion instruments. Band members participate in four concerts and Region Festival each year. The band also plays
for home football games. Members may participate in the orchestra for the school musical in the fall. No audition. Scheduled for 3A period.
Materials Fee: $10/semester.

Concert Orchestra
017000                                                       10,11,12                                  Year
String instruments only. Orchestra members participate in four concerts and Region festival each year. Members may participate in the orchestra
for the school musical in the fall. No audition necessary. Scheduled for 1B period. Materials Fee: $10.00/semester.

Tenor-Bass Chorus
018100                                                       10,11,12                                  Year
Opportunity for development of vocal skills through the performance of music arranged for changing tenor and bass voices. Experience with the
close harmonies. Special attention is given to music reading. This class is recommended for sophomores but not restricted to them. Selected
students may enter 2nd semester. Scheduled for 1B period. Materials Fee: $15.00

Soprano-Alto Chorus
018200                                                       10,11,12                                  Year
Opportunity for development of vocal skills through the study and performance of music for soprano-alto voices. Special attention is given to
music reading. This class is recommended for sophomores but not restricted to them. Selected students may enter 2nd semester. Scheduled for
3B period. Prerequisite: Must have at least a 2.0 GPA or permission from Mrs. Tarrant if GPA is lower. Materials Fee: $15.00.

Junior Choir
018300                                                       11                                        Year
Designed for eleventh grade students who desire to continue in vocal music. Course will be much more concentrated than that of the previous
classes, with greater emphasis on correct vocal production, increased ability in music reading. Approval: Ms. Tarrant. Scheduled for 2A period.
Materials Fee: $15.00

Concert Choir
018500                                                       12                                        Year
Most advanced choir at the high school level. Members are expected to meet higher vocal and musical standards than those of any other group
and must be aware of the commitment to attend all rehearsals and programs. Approval: Ms. Tarrant. Scheduled for 2B period. Materials Fee:
$15.00, Uniform: $175.00.

Graces (Women’s Ensemble)
018420                                                       11,12                                     Year

                                                                                                                                                  18
A select women’s ensemble made up of 25 members. Many opportunities for performances are available, and students must be aware of the
commitment to attend all rehearsals and programs scheduled by the director. Approval: Ms. Tarrant. Scheduled for 1A period. Materials Fee:
$10.00. Uniform: varies.

Madrigals
018600                                                       12                                       Year
A small group of selected senior students. Many opportunities for performances are available, and students must be aware of the commitment to
attend all rehearsals and programs scheduled by the director. Approval: Ms. Tarrant. Scheduled for 3A period. Fee Charge: $45.00 All-State
choir and Uniform $75.00 to 100.00.

Jazz Ensemble (1)
016700                                                       10,11,12                                 Year
The advanced jazz band. Instruments limited to saxophones, trumpets, trombones, piano, bass, guitar, drum set. Membership by audition
ONLY! Members participate in four concerts and Region festival each year. The jazz ensembles are considered honorary members of the
Concert band, and are required to participate in the concert band’s performances. The jazz ensembles also play for the region home basketball
games Approval: Mr. Jensen. Scheduled for 3B period. Materials Fee: $10.00/semester

Guitar 1
016401                                                       10,11,12                                 Semester
This class emphasizes the development of music reading skills, the understanding of basic music theory, the development of guitar skills, and
the playing of simple guitar chords. The course provides sufficient instruction and practice for the students to accompany simple songs with
chord accompaniment and to play simple guitar solos. The class is open to any tenth, eleventh, or twelfth grade student who wishes to learn to
play the guitar and who has an acoustic guitar. No electric guitars are used in the class. Material Fees: Required book $18.00 w CD

Guitar 2
016402                                                       10,11,12                                 Semester
This course will be an extension of Guitar 1 taught 2nd Semester. Approval: Mr. Jensen. The course will include note reading and tablature.
Scheduled for 4th period. Materials Fee: $10.00/semester.

Theory and Harmony 1-2/3-4
019100                                                       10,11,12                                 Year
Introduces students to scales, intervals, chords, ear training, dictation and sight-singing. Practice is given in three and four-part harmony, using
only the primary chords at first. Approval: Mr. Jensen. Scheduled for 1A period. A placement exam will be given before entry is allowed in this
class.

A.P. Theory and Harmony
019400                                                       11,12                                    Year
Advanced placement music class. Students are expected to take the Advanced placement exam at their own expense. Approval: Mr. Jensen.
Scheduled for 1A period. A placement exam will be given before entry is allowed in this class .


BUSINESS
Even though students cannot register for Business Work Experience in the spring, any student thinking of taking Work
Experience next year, needs to register for a Business class NOW! Reserve your place by registering before the spaces are
filled.
Accounting 1 1st Semester
022510                                               10,11,12                         Semester
Accounting 2 2nd Semester
022520                                               10,11,12                         Semester
How businesses keep records, handle cash, prepare payrolls and financial statements, and reconcile bank statements and checkbooks. Good
business and personal skills class. Students may take Accounting 1 for .5 math credit and Accounting 2 for an additional .5 credits to fulfill a 3rd
year Mathematics credit. Workbook & Lab Charge: $25.00.

Business Law
024100                                                       10,11,12                                 Semester
Course includes an understanding of the court system at the local, state, and national level as well as legal terms, criminal and contract law,
rights and responsibilities as citizens, torts, employment and agency relationships, and different types of business organizations. As a
culminating project students will participate in one or more mock trials. Field trip to court and/or prison.

Computer Technology I
024200                                                       10,11,12                                 Semester
024400 CC


                                                                                                                                                  19
Concurrent enrollment credit available through SLCC. Use CC # if you want CC credit. Introduction to Word Processing - Spreadsheets -
Internet - Power Point. Recommended for college preparation: -- it is a required class by all state colleges. Prerequisite: Keyboarding ability.
Lab & Workbook charge: $10.00 and $20.00 CC (college software fee).

Computer Technology II
024301                                                      10,11,12                                 Semester
This course applies advanced concepts and principles using Word, Excel, Access, and Power Point. Students will integrate applications learned.
This course builds on skills from Computer Technology I. Learn ways to enhance your work in this project-oriented class. Fee charge: $5.00

Business Communications
024000                                                      10,11,12                                 Semester
Business communications impacts all aspects of our lives. This introductory course will teach students to communicate in a clear, courteous,
concise, and correct manner on both personal and professional levels. Competency will be developed in oral, written, social, technological,
employment, and organizational communication. Listening skills will be incorporated throughout the semester. When taken as a senior, this
course counts as a semester of senior English.

Business Web Page Design
024600                                                      10,11,12                                 Semester
This course provides students with a major emphasis on the principles and design of a website as well as advanced internet skills and techniques.
HTML, Web publishing and graphics editing software will be used to design, create, format, and edit web pages. Fee Charge: $5.00.

Financial Literacy
065500                                                      11,12                                    Semester
This course is designed to teach students about choices and challenges of today’s financial markets. It will give students a better understanding
of personal finance that will help them to move into adulthood making more informed monetary decisions, realizing a greater potential for
personal wealth, and fostering a stronger state and national economy. It will include information about becoming a wise and knowledgeable
consumer, saver, investor, user of credit, money manager, citizen and member of a global workforce and society.

Word Processing Basics
023201                                                      10,11,12                                 Semester
This is a beginning course for those who do not have keyboarding skills. This course introduces basic word processing skills. These invaluable
skills include editing and proofreading documents, performing standard file management procedures. Fee Charge: $5.00.

Marketing
025400                                                      10,11,12                                 Semester
Explore marketing with this activity-oriented introduction to business, free enterprise, economics, finance, distribution, promotion, buying, and
selling. Fee Charge: $10.00.

Marketing 1030 CC
025700                                                      11,12                                    Semester
Concurrent enrollment credit available through SLCC . Explore the exciting world of Marketing in this 3 credit SLCC Concurrent
Enrollment Course. Students receive a basic understanding of marketing principles and consumer-to-business relationships that influence
consumer behavior.

Retailing / School Store
025201                                                      10,11,12                                 Semester
Operate Taylorsville’s school store, “Warrior World.” This class is activity-oriented! Learn about the exciting world of retailing and gain
valuable work experience. Have fun learning to run a real business: operate a cash register, handle money, and give customer service. Receive
training in buying, storing, pricing, advertising, display, selling, financing, and other activities necessary for successful retail business
operations. Fee Charge: $10.00.

Advertising/Promotion
025100                                                      10,11,12                                 Semester
Prepare for the exciting world of advertising, promotion, and display. Learn to use communication tools to promote products and services using
newspapers, radio, television, and other media. Create and produce advertising and displays.


DRIVER EDUCATION
Driver Education
064101 1st Semester                                         10,11,12
064202 2nd Semester
Students who will be 16 on or before February 23, 2010 should register for Driver Education first semester. Those students who will be 16 on
or before July 18, 2010 should register for second semester. Students who will be 16 on or before October 30, 2009 may register for summer
driving, but there are NO fee waivers for summer school. A student needs to acquire a learner permit from the DLD before the first day of class
                                                                                                                                               20
or you will be checked out. Ninth grade students must pass their English and Geography credits before they are allowed to enroll in Drivers
Education. A student must have a counselor’s signature on their registration card in order to enroll in class. Fee charge: $100.00.


ENGLISH / LANGUAGE ARTS
Sophomore English
English 10 Core
041100                                                        10                                        Year                           NCAA
This course focuses on developing language arts competency. Students will strengthen their comprehension skills using literary, functional, and
informational texts as outlined in the state core curriculum. Students will improve in critical and creative thinking and will improve skills in
reading, writing, and inquiry, and will strengthen their creative and expository writing skills.

English 10 Honors
041110                                                        10                                        Year                           NCAA
Sophomore Honors is a first level college preparatory language arts course with an emphasis on higher level essay composition, classic and
contemporary literature, standardized test preparation, and creative writing. Approval: Present English Teacher.

Junior English
English 11 Core
041140                                                        11                                        Year                           NCAA
This course focuses on developing language arts competency and strengthening skills in effective communication using literary, functional, and
informational texts as outlined in the state core curriculum. Students will improve in critical and creative thinking and will improve skills in
reading, writing, and inquiry.

English 11 Honors
041150                                                        11                                        Year                           NCAA
Honors American Literature is a literature-based course with emphasis on college-prep level analysis, ACT preparation, and essay composition.
It is intended for motivated students who can read extensively. The course traces the history of American literature, from the oral tradition of
Native Americans and the nonfiction forms of the Puritans, through the major writers of the 20th century. Approval: Present English teacher.

A.P. English Language
048115                                                        11                                        Year                           NCAA
This course is an advanced language and composition course for motivated students. Students will become skilled readers of prose written in a
variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. The subject matter will focus on various topics related to rhetoric and effective
communication. Students will compose for a variety of purposes and will study rhetorical analysis related to the specific purposes of any
particular piece of prose. Students who complete the course and pass the A.P. exam may earn college/university credit. Approval: Present
English teacher.

Senior English
Students register for senior English classes on a semester basis. All students are required to be registered for an English class
both semesters and may elect to take additional English courses.

English 12 Core
041171                                                        12                                        Semester                       NCAA
This core class will fulfill the standard English credit requirement. The course will focus on writing. Students will study the writing process
and will review grammar, punctuation, and usage.

English 12 World Literature
044100                                                        12                                        Semester                       NCAA
This core class will fulfill the standard English credit requirement. The course will focus on literature, particularly multi-ethnic literature,
British literature, and other world literature texts.

English 12 Effective Writing (Honors)
041400                                                        12                                        Semester                       NCAA
This course offers opportunities for students who have plans to pursue education beyond high school to practice various skills of the writing
process as well as teaching the rhetorical strategies necessary for strong communication skills. Subjects to be studied will be grammar and
usage for effective communication and modes of discourse such as description, narration, persuasion, and exposition.

English 12 Humanities (Honors)
043000                                                        12                                        Semester                       NCAA
Humanities is a study of the arts which make us human, namely Religion, Philosophy, Music, Dance, Visual Art, Architecture, Literature and
Film. This class helps students develop their language skills through the study of the arts. Students will read the writings of great philosophers,
musicians and artists and learn to connect them to each other.
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English 12 CC (English 1010) – (Honors)
041180                                                        12                                       Semester                        NCAA
Concurrent Enrollment credit available through SLCC. English 1010 focus on developing critical literacy skills in reading, writing, and
thinking. Students will study a variety of rhetorical strategies in preparation for college-level writing. Students will be required to show proof
of a 20 in reading on their ACT or 81% on the SLCC CPT in order to register for English 1010. Approval: Current English teacher. Pre-
requisite: Qualifying ACT or CPT score. Fees: SLCC Registration fee is $35.00. Students must buy their own textbook.

A.P. English Literature – (Honors)
048100                                                        12                                       Year                            NCAA
AP is a writing and literature class on the college level. It is for accelerated and motivated students and emphasizes the various stages of the
writing process, literary analysis, critical thinking skills, and an appreciation of sophisticated literary works. Students will prepare for the AP
exam to be given in May. Students who pass the AP exam may earn college/university credit. Approval: Current English teacher.

In the senior year, the following can be used to fulfill English 7-8 requirements. In the junior year, these courses can be taken
for elective credit, but cannot be repeated the senior year.

Creative Writing
041300                                                        11, 12                                   Semester
The goal of this course is to explore creative writing, including poems, short stories, prose, and drama. We will explore the creative writing
process and read contemporary creative writing. Students will be expected to prepare and refine creative writing for publication.

Principles of Public Speaking CC
046250                                                        11, 12                                   Semester
Concurrent enrollment credit available through SLCC. This class will emphasize the dual role of speech as both a speaking and listening
skill. Practice is provided through individual speeches with emphasis on organization and delivery. Fees: SLCC Registration fee is $35.00.
Students must purchase textbooks.

Interpersonal Communication CC
046050                                                        11, 12                                   Semester
Concurrent enrollment credit available through SLCC. This class will focus on methods used in two-way communication with emphasis on
situations occurring in workplace environments. This course examines human relations and communication including listening, verbal and
nonverbal messages, conflict management, negotiation, and diversity in organizational and interpersonal settings. Topics include group problem
solving, interviewing, writing analysis, presentations, and memos. Fees: SLCC Registration fee is $35.00. Students must purchase textbooks.

Debate 3-4
046400                                                        11,12                                    Year
Debate 5-6
046500                                                        11,12                                    Year
These courses focus on preparation for competition in both speech and debate. Debate 1-2 is required before you can enroll in either of these
courses. Students will work on critical thinking, research, organizational, and persuasive skills. Tournament participation will be required. Lab
Fee: $40

The following can be used only for elective credit:

UBSCT Reading/Writing Tutorial
042610                                                        12                                       1st Semester
This course is for any senior who has not yet passed the reading or writing portions of the UBSCT test. Class time will be spent reviewing skills
found on the test.

ACT Preparation Course
066305                                                        11, 12                                   1st and 2nd Semester
This course is for any 11th and 12th grade students who wish to prepare for the ACT exam. Students will take one third of English and writing
instruction, one third Math, and one third of the class will be dedicated to Science instruction. The focus of the subject areas will be on preparing
students for the specific ACT requirements and on practice tests and test-taking skills. Fee: ACT Preparation Book (TBA).

Yearbook (Publications 5-6)
047650                                                        10, 11,12                                Year
The goal of this deadline-oriented production course is to plan and create the Talisman yearbook. This real life workshop provides an
opportunity for staff members to write copy, layout pages, create graphics, conduct research, photograph candid and posed situations, deal with
a variety of computer software, and run all other phases of yearbook production. Students are selected on the basis of superior citizenship,
attendance, and competence. Approval: Mr. Clawson.

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Journalism 1
047500                                                        10, 11                                   Year
The goals of this course are 1) to learn and apply journalism fundamentals and 2) to learn and apply design, layout, and publication techniques.
Students will apply the principles they learn by publishing the Legends literary magazine, a compilation of the best student creative writing, art,
and music at Taylorsville. Fundraising and promotion is an important part of this class. Students should be prepared to write regularly, make
deadlines, and be self-motivated and curious. Students who want to be on the staff of The Warrior Ledger during 11th and 12th grade years
should take this class to prepare. Approval: Mr. Wessman.

Journalism 2-6
047600                                                        11, 12                                   Year
The goal of this course is to use professional journalistic practices to publish Taylorsville’s student newspaper, The Warrior Ledger. Students
will be required to meet deadlines, accept a position on the staff, raise funds for publication, produce artwork and photography, and employ
design techniques. To be eligible, a student must obtain approval from the newspaper adviser through an application process. Students should be
self-motivated and disciplined, since meeting deadlines is a significant part of the overall grade. Approval: Mr. Wessman.

Debate 1-2
046300                                                        10,11,12                                 Year                            NCAA
This is a beginning class for those interested in the fundamentals of speech and debate. This class will focus on debate and individual speaking
events. Students will learn critical thinking, research, organizational, and persuasive skills. Those enrolled in this class will have the opportunity
to be involved in debate competition. Lab Fee: Maximum $50

ENGLISH as a SECOND LANGUAGE
ESL/Directed Studies – Oral Language (065070)                            10,11,12                                 Year
See your current ESL teacher for enrollment. Designed for students learning English as a second language. Class focus is on strengthening
English reading, writing, speaking and listening. Class also gives students an opportunity to receive tutoring for assignments given in other
classes. Registration is available to any student who demonstrates a need for tutoring and ESL assistance see Borrowman/Ward/Farr.

Advanced ESL – Oral and Written Language (042302)                        10,11,12                                 Year
Designed for advanced ESL students who are currently placed or are ready to be placed in a mainstream Language Arts class. The curriculum
includes level appropriate reading of fiction and non-fiction, both orally and silently, with an emphasis on developing comprehension strategies
and vocabulary. Curriculum will also include writing instruction for both the academic and work place setting along with ample opportunity to
practice both speaking and listening skills through group and individual presentations. Testing will be required for admission see
Borrowman/Ward/Farr.

Intermediate ESL – Oral and Written Language(042301) 10,11,12                                                     Year
Designed for students who are at the Emergent to Intermediate levels of English usage and comprehension. The class teaches skills in reading,
writing, speaking and listening in the English Language. Class focuses: parts of speech, reading fluency, reading comprehension, writing
fluency and strengthening oral language. Testing will be required for admission see Borrowman/Ward/Farr.

Beginning ESL – Oral and Written Language (042300)                       10,11,12                                 Year
Designed for students at the beginning level of English usage and comprehension who need basic language acquisition skills. The curriculum
begins with basic speaking and listening skill development with an emphasis on learning initial communication skills. Once basic skills in
speaking and listening have been mastered, students begin to read and write with a focus on basic comprehension, correct spelling, and accurate
usage and placement of words. Testing will be required for admission see Borrowman/Ward/Farr.

FACS - FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES (HOME ECONOMICS)
Even though students do not register for Work Experience until fall, students need to be registered for a cooperative class
along with Work Experience. The cooperative class in the FACS area, is Food Service, so register NOW! Reserve your place
by registering before the spaces are filled.

Fashion Institute of Design
080920                                                        11,12                                    Year
The world of fashion is exciting and fast paced. Things are always changing. New fabrics and methods of presentation are everywhere. Fashion
Institute is a class for students who are interested in the fashion industry as a career choice. Technical and artistic elements of fashion will be
explored as well as the industry’s methods of construction, flat pattern design, draping, and surface embellishments. The class will focus on the
latest trends in the fashion industry with emphasis on computer designing. The curriculum for this class is taken from the New York High
School of Fashion Industry and Technology. The culmination of the class is a fashion show, to show off your designs and line of clothing. Prizes
are awarded for the best designs. In the spring of 2010, a field trip to America’s fashion capital (New York) is being planned. Join us for a close
up look at the trends, fads, and classics of the fashion world. Course fee: $30.00.

Designer Sewing/Clothing II
082100                                                        11,12                                    Year
                                                                                                                                                   23
This class is for students who have already taken a sewing class and want a fun “hands on” experience. This course will help students improve
their sewing skills while learning new techniques. Included in this course are pattern and fabric selection, alterations and recycling, children’s
clothing, quilting, home decoration, machine embroidery, and much more. All projects are individually selected; therefore, you can work at your
own speed, skill level, and interest. Course Fee: $15.00.

Sport Sewing I
080710                                                       10,11,12                                 Semester
Have fun while you learn a life skill and save money. This class covers basic sewing skills while completing a variety of projects. This course
emphasizes the construction of sports and outdoor clothing. Possible projects are: boxers, sweats, hoodies, and bags for any occasion, and
simple outdoor wear. Clothing care, maintenance, and textile information are covered. Projects can be individually selected. Join us and have
fun with no pressure. Course Fee: $7.00

Clothing I
080800                                                       10,11,12                                 Semester
This is a beginning sewing class developed to help students learn basic sewing skills. A few of the basic projects are: bags of all types, pants,
simple jackets, and accessories. Join this class and have fun and make usable items. Course Fee: $7.00

Food & Nutrition I
(081100)                                                     10,11,12                                 1st semester
Food & Nutrition II
(081300)                                                     10,11,12                                2nd semester
Sign up for Food and Nutrition I & II for a complete year foods course or select one as a semester class. Topics include nutrition, food
preparation, and meal management. This is a basic course that covers a broad range of fun and creative cookery. Basic Fee: $20.00 per semester.

ProStart I (Culinary Arts/Foodservice)
082635                                                      11,12                                    Year
Discover the ins and outs of professional cooking and restaurant management through this course from the National Restaurant Association.
Learn more about the industry with a hands-on approach through field trips, catering, and even our own student run restaurant. It is estimated
that from 2007 to 2017 the number of jobs in the restaurant and foodservice industry is projected to increase by 2 million – approximately
47,000 of which will be management positions. Upon completion of this course, requirements for both years one and two (taught on alternate
years) a student can become a certified restaurant manager. Participation in the ProStart curriculum offers opportunities to complete in culinary
competitions and earn scholarships to culinary schools. Basic Fee: $35 for the entire year.

Child Development
081401                                                       10,11,12                                 Semester
It’s everything you always wanted to know about children and more. Child development is designed for males and females to learn and
understand about children from conception through childhood. There are guest speakers, movies, discussions and “hand-on” learning
experiences. You will have the opportunity to take “Baby Think It Over” home and practice being the parent of a newborn. This class is great
preparation for your future family life.

Child Care I
082300                                                       11,12                                    Year
Be a teacher in high school! You will actually be a teacher in the preschool that runs from November to May here at Taylorsville High School.
First term you will learn about how to teach children, then the next 3 terms you will teach, plan for the teaching days and observe the children.
This is a preschool lab class full of fun “hands-on” learning experiences. Males and females are encouraged to enroll. Prerequisite: To like
children! (T-Shirt: $10.00). Approval: Mrs. Rockwell

Child Care II
082322                                                       12                                       Year
Once you have had the experience of Child Care and want to continue being part of the Preschool don’t forget to check out Child Care II. Child
Care II will give you the opportunity to mentor students that are taking Child Care I. Use the skills that you developed in Child Care and learn
more about the management of a child care facility with more hands on experience. Prerequisite: Child Care I (T-shirt: $10.00) Approval: Mrs.
Rockwell.

Adult Roles and Financial Literacy
081610 & 081620                                              11,12                                    Year
Get a jump start on understanding the responsibilities of Adult Life. Take Adult Roles and Financial Literacy. You will never say, “When will I
ever use this information?” Course topics include: self-management, career & income, consumerism, dating, marriage, families, financial
literacy, and Parenting. This course fulfills the .5 general financial literacy graduation requirement (if student passes four terms with passing
grade) and the other .5 will earn CTE credit. Basic Fee: $5.00

Adult Roles and Financial Literacy CC
081510 & 081630                                  11,12                             Year
Concurrent enrollment credit available through SLCC. Enrollment in this course allows the following credits:
                                                                                                                                                    24
        1. 3 hours of college credit for Family and Human Studies 2400. This is an interdisciplinary class that covers all the
        subjects listed under the Adult Roles and Financial Literacy description (above).
        2. .5 credits for the required general financial literacy class.
        3. .5 credit for CTE or elective credit.
Basic Fee: $ 35 application fee for SLCC (No fee if you have enrolled in a SLCC class previously OR if you are taking more
concurrent classes – you only have to pay the $35 once. Fee: $30 ($25 book rental for college text plus $5.00 course fee)

Housing & Interior Design
081800                                                      10,11,12                                Semester
This fun and creative class will help each student understand how to design their own living environment. Topics include: Elements and
principle of design, color schemes, floor plans and elevations, backgrounds of homes, furniture selection and construction, and accessories. This
class is a prerequisite for Advanced Interior Design. Basic fee: $25.00 for supplies (Unless student provides their own).

Advanced Interior Design CC
082410                                                       11, 12                                   Year
Concurrent Enrollment available through Weber State University. This course is designed for students highly interested in Interior Design.
Students will learn architecture, furniture design and history, perspective drawing, presentation methods, creative sample boards and the class
will design a tree for the Festival of Trees. In addition, students will completely design and decorate the THS CTE Home.
Prerequisite: Housing & Interior Design. Approval: Mrs. Katsilas. Basic fee: $30.00 for supplies (Unless student provides their own).


WORLD LANGUAGE
Students who took two years of a foreign language in Junior High School must register for level 2 in High School. Students who
took three years in junior high must register for level 3.

French 1
031100                                                       10,11,12                                 Year                           NCAA
This course utilizes the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Emphasis will be placed on listening and speaking skills.

French 2
031200                                                       10,11,12                                 Year                           NCAA
Continues the development of the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Narratives and dialogues are used to teach structure and
vocabulary. Prerequisite: French 1.

French 3
031300                                                       10,11,12                                 Year                           NCAA
Stresses comprehension, oral practice, culture and history as they relate to the reading program. Higher proficiency levels are sought in
grammar, vocabulary and idiomatic expression. Prerequisite: French 2.

French 4
031400                                                       11,12                                    Year                           NCAA
Similar to French 3, but it is on a more advanced level. Prerequisite: French 3.

French 5
031500                                                       11,12                                    Year                           NCAA
Similar to French 4 but on a more advanced level. Prerequisite: French 4.

German 1
032100                                                       10,11,12                                 Year                           NCAA
First-year German emphasizes the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing, and an introduction to German Culture.
Purchase of German-English dictionary recommended.

German 2
032200                                                       10,11,12                                 Year                           NCAA
Continues the development of speaking, writing, listening, and reading skills, and the study of German culture. Prerequisite: German 1.
Approval: Mrs. Gorley. Purchase of German-English dictionary is required.

German 3
032300                                                       12                                       Year                           NCAA
The reading program may include a class reader, short stories, and fairy tales, as well as advanced cultural units. Prerequisite: German 2.
Approval: Mrs. Gorley. Purchase of German-English dictionary is required.

Spanish 1
                                                                                                                                                25
034100                                                       10,11,12                                 Year                          NCAA
The four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing are emphasized in this class. Equivalent to the completion of the first and
second year Spanish in Junior High School. Fee Charge: workbook $15.00. Purchase of a Spanish-English dictionary is required.

Spanish 2
034200                                                       10,11,12                                 Year                          NCAA
Continues the development of the listening and speaking skills and emphasizes reading and writing. Daily situations and selected narratives
teach structure, grammar and vocabulary. Prerequisite: Spanish 1. Fee Charge: workbook $15.00. Purchase of a Spanish-English dictionary is
required.

Spanish 3
034300                                                       10,11,12                                 Year                          NCAA
Higher proficiency levels are sought in grammar, vocabulary and idiomatic expressions than in previous classes. Prerequisite: Spanish 2.
Approval: Current Spanish teacher. Fee Charge: workbook $15.00.

Spanish 4
034400                                                       11,12                                    Year                          NCAA
This course offers students literary excerpts, novels, plays and current events in newspapers and magazines. Culture is interwoven throughout.
Prerequisite: Spanish 3. Approval: Current Spanish teacher. Fee Charge: workbook $15.00. This class may be taught at another school.

Spanish for Native Speakers (Espanol para Hispanohablantes)
034660                                          10,11,12                                              Year
This class will be conducted entirely in Spanish. Students registering for this class must be capable of conducting themselves completely in the
Spanish language as they work on class work, cultural projects, class presentations, etc. Students will have the opportunity to explore the
Spanish language through writing, and through reading the works of classical Spanish and Latin American writers within the rich literary
heritage available to Spanish speakers. Regular attendance will be essential for success. Required: Quality Spanish dictionary. Approval:
Current Spanish teacher.

Chinese 1
033750                                                       10, 11, 12                               Year                          NCAA
This is a beginning course in Chinese. Listening and speaking skills will be emphasized but students will also be introduced to written Chinese
characters. Students will be taught by a native Chinese speaker through an interactive Ed net broadcast and will also receive face-to-face
instruction from an on-site Chinese teacher. Chinese culture will be studied throughout the course.

Chinese 2
033800                                                       10, 11,12                                Year                          NCAA
This second-year course is a continuation of the study of Chinese grammar, conversation and culture. Conversation topics include family,
weather, food, clothing, sports and health. More written Chinese characters will be introduced. Students will be taught by a native Chinese
speaker through and interactive Ed net broadcast and will also receive face-to-face instruction from an on-site Chinese teacher. Prerequisite:
Chinese 1.


TRADES AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION
Auto Mechanics 1-2
088100                                                       11,12                                    Year
A beginning course designed to teach the student skills in the use of automotive hand tools and to familiarize students with the proper procedure
of automobile care on engines, standard transmissions, differentials, brakes, suspension, and steering.

Occupational Auto Technician and Electronics (1 or 2 pds.)
092111 (1pd.) 092112 (2pd.)                      11,12                                                Year
This course is designed for students who plan to enter the automotive service field. Most of the time will be spent in actual repair and
maintenance of vehicles and in technical theory. Students need to understand electronics. Students should have their own projects. Approval:
Mr. Stratton.

Auto Owners Maintenance
088000                                                       10,11,12                                 Semester
This course is designed to familiarize students with the automobile and to make them more aware of the obligations that accompany owning and
driving a car. Students learn the basic mechanical units of a car and general maintenance which can be performed by the average owner.

Media Production (Television Broadcast Tech)
045700                                                       11,12                                    Year
This course offers students hands on experience in broadcast journalism and production. The course will focus on video production techniques
including videography, lighting, sound, editing, and on writing for broadcast news. Students will write and produce a live news broadcast,


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individual news reports, public service announcements, commercials, documentaries, and short films. Approval: Ron Beckstrom. Fee Charge:
$25.00.

Welding 1-2
084300                                                       10,11,12                                 Year
This is a basic class in which principles of arc welding, wire feed (MIG) welding, oxy-acetylene welding, gas welding, cutting and brazing are
taught. Many different arc and acetylene tools will be used. Correct use of equipment and technical information will be taught. This is a fun
class in which many assignments and personal projects are created. Many of the students are working in the welding field. Fee Charge: $10.00

Machine Shop 1-2
084100                                                       10,11,12                                 Year
This is a basic class where students make projects with lathes, milling machines, drill presses, and grinders. Students also learn to use lay-out
tools, precision measuring tools, micrometers, vernier calipers and dial indicators along with many other basic tools. The machine shop program
will lead to many excellent job opportunities for those who choose to pursue it for a life's goal. Self innovative projects are encouraged. This
class is designed to be a fun learning experience. Course Fee: $10.00

Metalwork 1
084210                                                       10,11,12                                 Semester
Metalwork 1-2
084200                                                       10,11,12                                 Year
This is a beginning metals for students who are interested in learning basic skills in the metals area. Through several metal projects, students
will learn metalworking skills such as oxy-acetylene welding and burning along with arc welding. Students will also learn about sheet metal
work, foundry and basic machine shop exposure. This will be a fun class exploring the metal trades’ area.

Occupational Welding Tech. (1 or 2 pds.)
094301 (1pd.) 094102 (2pd.)                                  11,12                                    Year
094312 CC (WLD 1005)
Concurrent enrollment credit available through SLCC. Use CC # if you want CC credit. The year includes study of arc-welding, oxy-
acetylene welding and burning, heliarc welding, wire-feed welding, inter shield welding, as well as plasma arc-burning machines. Practical
experience on projects, class assignments, and technical information can help to ensure a better paying job. After taking this course a job in the
metals area should be of no problem to you. Prerequisite: Welding 1-2. Approval: Mr. Parker. Fee charge $10.00.

Occupational Machine Tech/CNC (2 pds.)
094102                                                       11,12                                    Year
094120 CC (MAT 1500-10)
Concurrent enrollment credit available through SLCC. Use CC # if you want CC credit. This is an advanced course in which entry-level job
skills, use of milling machines, lathes, saws, grinders, drill presses, and basic precision-measuring instruments that are used within the machinist
trade are taught. We also learn about C.N.C. (Computerized Numerical Control) programming. We have a C.N.C. mill and lathe where high tech
machining principles can be utilized by our students. This class is designed for you to use the shop facility for personal projects. SLCC credit for
MACH 1500 is available as well as high school credit. There is a very high job placement rate among students completing this class. Approval:
Mr. Parker. Prerequisite: Machine Shop 1-2. Fee charge: $10.00

Woodworking 1
083110                                                       10, 11, 12                               Semester
This beginning wwoodworking course is designed to help students who have had little or no woodworking experience. There is no prerequisite
class. Students who take this course will learn basic woodworking concepts and skills such as measuring, planning, proper and safe use of tools
and equipment. Each student will have the opportunity to select and then build either a night stand or a blanket chest. These are both heirloom
quality projects. This experience will help students learn valuable employable skills. The experiences in class will also help student learn
valuable employable skill. The experiences in class will also help students improve their understanding of may concepts of English,
mathematics, and engineering. Fee Minimum: $20.00

Woodworking 2
083120                                             10, 11, 12                                         Semester
Woodworking 2 class is the second in a series of woodworking courses. Woodworking 1 should be taken before enrolling in Woodworking 2;
however, this requirement may be waived on a case-by-case basis for those students with other woodworking classes or experience. In this class
students will be able to select and then build a pre-planned project such as a chest, and end table, a small entertainment center, a hope chest, or a
chest of drawers. This experience will help students increase their knowledge and skill in project planning, tool and machine operation, project
assembly, and project finishing. Students will learn more about employment opportunities in woodworking. These experiences will also help
students improve their understanding of many concepts in English, mathematics, and engineering. Fee minimum: $20.00

Cabinetmaking/Furniture Design 3/4
083200                                             11, 12                                             Year
The Cabinetmaking/Furniture Design 3/4 class is next in the series of woodworking classes available at Taylorsville High School and lasts the
whole school year. Cabinetmaking/Woodworking 2 is a prerequisite class; however, this requirement may be waived on a case-by-case basis for
                                                                                                                                                   27
those students with other woodworking classes or experience. Having learned to safely use power tools to build a project from plans in prior
classes, students will now research and develop drawings and procedures necessary for a personal project of their own design which they will
then construct. Fee: $25.00. Other material fees will be assessed dependent upon student’s choice of project.

Occupational Millwork & Cabinetmaking (1 or 2 periods available)
093201 (1 Period)
093202 (2 Period) 093301 CC          11,12                                                          Year
Concurrent enrollment credit available through SLCC. Use CC # if you want CC credit. This is an intermediate/advanced woodworking
course (2nd Year) designed to help students increase their woodworking knowledge and skill through the exploration and practice of advanced
ideas, processes and experiences. This increased knowledge and skill will help students gain the necessary skills and understanding required to
build advanced furniture projects and/or attain employment in the cabinetmaking industry. Students will receive instruction in woodworking
materials, joinery, project design, tool and machine operation, project assembly, kitchen cabinet design and construction and wood finishing. A
majority of this instruction and exposure will be presented through practical application. Students will begin the year by designing and building
a furniture piece which will include a door, drawer, face frame, six different woodworking joints and cabinet hardware. In January, students will
help design and build a set of kitchen cabinets for a model home. Students will then finish the school year by selecting and building personal
projects. Prerequisite: Woods 1-2. Fee: $25.00. Other material fees will be assessed dependent upon student’s choice of project.


MATHEMATICS
Algebra 1
052099                                                      10                                      (Two Period Block)             NCAA
This course is an important gatekeeper course for high school students. This course is designed for students who have failed one or more terms
of Algebra in the junior high or who have never taken an Algebra class. Continuation in second semester Algebra I or Geometry (Two Period
Block) will be based on success in first semester Algebra I. Approval: Current math teacher.

Geometry 1-2
053208                                                      10,11                                   (Two Period Block)             NCAA
Geometry is required for everyone planning to study mathematics beyond elementary algebra because it introduces formal logic and
mathematical reasoning. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 1. Approval: Current Math Teacher.

Intermediate Algebra (Sophomore Honors)
052200                                                      10                                      Year                           NCAA
This is an intense, fast-paced course that extends but does not review elementary algebraic concepts involving the study of quadratic relations
and their graphs. Systems of equations are solved, logarithmic functions are studied briefly, real number exponents and complex numbers are
investigated, and proficiency with the algebra of polynomials and rational functions is developed. Trigonometry, probability statistics, and
discrete mathematics topics are essential topics for discussion and application. Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry 1-2. Approval: Current
Math teacher. Required: TI Graphing Calculator (83,84, or 86).

Intermediate Algebra
052400                                                      10,11,12                                Year                           NCAA
Topics covered in Algebra I and Geometry are reviewed and expanded. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I and Geometry 1-2.
Approval: Current Math teacher. Required: TI Graphing Calculator (83,84, or 86).

Pre-Calculus
052500                                                      11,12                                   Year                           NCAA
Includes work with induction, progressions, the binomial theorem, probability, and the theory of equations. Trig. is taught the second semester.
Prerequisite: Geometry and Intermediate Algebra. Approval: Current Math teacher. Required: TI Graphing Calculator (83,84, or 86).

Intermediate Algebra CC (Math 1010)
052710                                                      12                                      1st Semester                   NCAA
College Algebra CC (Math 1050)
052750                                                      12                                      2nd Semester                   NCAA
Concurrent enrollment credit available through SLCC. Prerequisite: Students must have a 3.0 GPA, and above average test scores. Must
pass Intermediate Algebra with a 2.0 GPA or higher to continue into 2nd Semester. SLCC requires an ACT Test score of 18 or higher or CPT
(college placement test) score of 54 in Elementary Algebra. Required: TI Graphing Calculator (83,84, or 86). Approval: Current Math Teacher.

Pre Calc/Trig (Junior Honors)
052800                                                      11                                      Year                           NCAA
This course gives closure to the algebraic and trigonometric topics begun in Geometry and expanded upon in intermediate Algebra. A student
successfully completing this course will be prepared to succeed in AP Calculus. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry and
Intermediate Algebra. Approval: Current Math teacher. Required: TI Graphing Calculator (83, 84, or 86).

A.P. Calculus & Independent Study                                                                                             NCAA AP only
054500 & 054620                                             12                                      Two Period Block
                                                                                                                                                  28
Advanced placement course for mathematics. It includes materials regularly covered in college differential and integral calculus classes. Upon
passing the advanced placement examination, which students are expected to take their own expense, students may receive up to 12 quarter
hours of college credit. Students must have a 3.0 GPA, and above average test scores. Approval: Current math teacher. Required: TI Graphing
Calculator (83,84, or 86).

UBSCT Math Tutorial Course
051310 (Elective Credit)                                     12                                       1st Semester
This course is for any senior who has not yet passed the mathematics portion of the UBSCT test. Class time will be spent reviewing skills found
on the test.

ACT Preparation Course
066305 (Elective Credit)                                     11, 12                                   1st & 2nd Semester
                         th       th
This course is for any 11 and 12 grade student who wish to prepare for the ACT exam. Students will take one third of English and writing
instruction, one third Math, and one third of the class will be dedicated to Science instruction. The focus of the subject areas will be on preparing
students for the specific ACT requirements and on practice tests and test-taking skills. Fee: ACT Preparation Book (TBA).

Math for Life (Quantitative Analysis)
054361                                                       11,12                                    Semester                       NCAA
This course is for students that are looking for a hands-on approach to mathematics rather than the complex concepts presented in intermediate
algebra. Math for Life will give an in-depth understanding of mathematical concepts of beginning algebra and geometry to gain an appreciation
of mathematics. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry. Approval: Current Math teacher. Required: TI-graphing calculator (83,84, or
86).

―Double or Nothing‖ (Introductory Statistics and Probability)
054371                                            11,12                                               Semester                       NCAA
Statistics and Probability is an introductory project- and activity- based course where students critically analyze information about their world.
Students will pursue questions based on their own experiences and gather data from media, their own experiments, and common objects.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry. Approval: Current Math teacher. Required: TI-graphing calculator (83,84, or 86).

JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICER TRAINING CORPS (JROTC)
JROTC-Level I
063000                                                       10,11,12                                 Year
Students participate in skills training called Leadership Education and Training 1 (LET-1). This course is designed for students who are
interested in enriching their high school experience with a military program that teaches skills intended to make them successful in life. It is
open to both male and female students. There is no military obligation associated with JROTC. Leadership is trained by having students in
leadership positions. Team work is trained by having students solve problems and work together in groups. Students learn to teach others,
improve their communications skills and develop self-discipline, confidence, and pride in a job well done. Students are issued an Army uniform
(at no cost to them) and will be required to wear it once a week. Students are required to keep their hair at a reasonable length, can not have
beards, and are not allowed to wear earrings while in uniform (except females). Subjects include: Leadership, Citizenship, First Aid, Map
Reading, Physical Training, and Marksmanship. Extracurricular activities include Drill Team, Color Guard, Rifle Team, Orienteering Team,
Raider Team, Service Learning Team, and Pentathlon Team. Course is open to all high schools in the Granite School District but students must
have their own transportation.

JROTC Level II
063050                                                       11,12                                    Year
This is the second level of JROTC. Expands on the materials taught in level-1 with more demanding requirements. Students in LET-2 serve in
leadership positions and get practical experience in leadership by leading drill, planning and conducting cadet activities, and supervising other
cadets in JROTC extracurricular activities. Course is open to all high schools in the Granite School District but students must have their own
transportation. Prerequisite: instructor approval and completion of LET-1.

JROTC Level III
063060 & 063070 CC                               12                              Year
Concurrent enrollment credit available through SLCC. Use CC # if you want CC credit.
This is the third level of JROTC: Leadership, Education, and Training 3 (LET-3). Most advanced and final level of JROTC. Students in LET-3
serve in the most advanced leadership positions and apply leadership skills they have learned in the previous two years. Students who
successfully complete LET-3 can, if they choose a military career, enter the military at the rank of E-3 instead of E-1. Course is open to all
Granite School District High Schools, but students must have their own transportation. Prerequisite: Instructor approval and completion of LET-
1 and LET-2. NOTE: LET 3 is only taught during 1B period.

JROTC - Leadership Lab
9th Period                                                   10,11,12                                 Quarter
Leadership Lab is conducted after normal school hours. Lab begins at 2:30 PM and ends at 4:OO PM Monday through Friday. Leadership Lab
focuses on practical application of the leadership skills taught in the classroom. All students who choose to participate on our teams must enroll.
Enrollment will not be done until after the beginning of each semester by the INSTRUCTOR and REQUIRES INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.
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PHYSICAL / HEALTH EDUCATION
Health Education
064500                                                        10                                        Semester
Required class for graduation. Health Education is the sum of experiences that explore attitudes, values, beliefs, and behavior choices in the
areas of self-awareness, fitness, nutrition, human sexuality, and substance abuse.

Fitness for Life
061301                                                        10                                        Semester
Required class for tenth-grade students. A semester course to help each student become involved in and adopt a personal lifestyle of regular
physical fitness and knowledge, training, and use of the new fitness center. Core requirement. Fee charge: $10.00.

Lifetime Sports
061501                                                        11,12                                     Semester
A physical education class organized for student participation in individual and carryover sports. Prerequisite: Fitness for Life.

Sports Activities (P.E. level 1)
061550                                                        11,12                                     Semester
Students in this course compete in several team sports activities such as football, soccer, volleyball, softball. The class will emphasize
competitive basketball. This course is very competitive. Prerequisite: Fitness for Life.

Swim 1
062200                                                        10,11,12                                  Semester
Beginning swim class organized to teach stroke development.

Swim Team
062390 (Elective Credit)                                      10,11,12                                  Year
Swim Team Class is designed for those students wanting to swim competitively for Taylorsville High School. Practices begin in September and
continue through January. The competitive season runs from early October to early February. All levels of swimmers are welcome on this
team. Some additional early morning and afterschool practices will be required.

Aerobics I
062380                                                        10,11,12                                  Semester
This class involves all types of Aerobic Fitness: water, step, yoga, jazzercise, circuit, etc. Fee charge: $10.00.

Social Dance 1
010095 (Elective Credit)                                      10,11,12                                  Semester
Students acquire physical, rhythmic and creative skills through dance activity. This course offers instruction in traditional and contemporary
dance activities that students may use in life. Students will learn a variety of dances that can be done in a social atmosphere. They include
ballroom dances such as waltz, foxtrot, swing, and Latin dances. Dances from various cultures are also included. Students will dance in line
formation and with partners. Social Dance 1 is the beginning level.

Social Dance 2
010098 (Elective Credit)                                      10,11,12                                  Semester
Students acquire physical, rhythmic and creative skills through dance activity. This course offers instruction in traditional and contemporary
dance activities that students may use in life. Students will learn a variety of dances that can be done in a social atmosphere. They include
ballroom dances such as American Swing, Tango, Samba and Viennese waltz. Dances from various cultures are included. Social Dance 2 is the
intermediate level.

Social Dance 3
010099 (Elective Credit)                                      11,12                                     Semester
Students acquire physical, rhythmic and creative skills through dance activity. This course offers instruction in traditional and contemporary
dance activities that students may use in life. Students will learn a variety of dances that can be done in a social atmosphere. They include a mix
of ballroom and Latin dances on the advanced level. Students should expect to primarily dance with partners and perform for various audiences.
Prerequisite: Social Dance 1 and 2.

Weight Training 1 / Strength Conditioning
062010                                                        10,11,12                                  Semester
This class has an emphasis on muscular development and body toning as well as cardiovascular fitness through the use of free weight
equipment. Prerequisite: Fitness for Life. Fee charge: $10.00.

Weight Training 2 / Strength Conditioning

                                                                                                                                                 30
062020                                                       10,11,12                                 Semester
This class has an emphasis on muscular development and body toning as well as cardiovascular fitness through the use of free weight
equipment. Prerequisite: Fitness for Life. Fee charge: $10.00.

Weight Training 3-4 (Varsity Athletics)
062030 1st Semester                                          11,12
062040 2nd Semester                                          10,11,12
This is an athletics weight training class specifically designed for those athletes involved in interschool athletic competition. Must have a Coach
Henderson’s signature to enroll. Fee charge: $5.00.

Athletics Girls
061702 1st Semester                                          11,12
061703 2nd Semester                                          10,11,12
Girls who participate in Volleyball, Basketball and Soccer should sign up for 1st Semester. Girls who participate in Softball, Track and
Basketball should sign up for 2nd Semester 8th period athletics. Approval: Head Coach. There is a participation fee charged for competitive
team sports.

Athletics Boys
061700 1st Semester                                          11,12
061701 2nd Semester                                          10,11,12
Boys who participate in Football, Basketball, and Wrestling should sign up for both 1st and 2nd semester 4th period athletics. Those who sign
up for Baseball, Track , Golf and Soccer should sign up for 2nd Semester Athletics 4th period. Approval: Head Coach. There is a participation
fee charged for competitive team sports.

Exercise Science & Sports Medicine (Athletic Training)
098551                                           11,12                                                Year
098560 CC
Concurrent enrollment credit available through UVU. Use CC # if you want CC credit. This full-year course is designed to teach students
components of exercise science including detailed anatomy, exercise physiology, injury prevention, injury evaluation, management, and
rehabilitation. Health Science careers will be discussed and clinical experiences provided. Also meets CTE requirements for graduation. Fee
Charge: $35.00 for UVU Registration and $15.00 lab fee. Approval: Mr. Rasmussen.


SCIENCE
Life Sciences:
Biology 1-2
056199                                                       10,11,12                                 (Two Period Block)            NCAA
In this course the concepts common to all biological areas are covered through the topics of cells, heredity, diversity, evolution and ecology.
This class will employ a conceptual approach and meets the science requirements for high school graduation. Lab Fee: $10.00

Medical Anatomy & Physiology
098411                                                       11,12                                    Year
This course provides students with an in-depth study of health care careers including actual clinical experience in a variety of areas. Instruction
includes intermediate anatomy & physiology, medical terminology, diseases and disorders, medical ethics and first aid. The class is designed to
prepare students for a variety of health technology programs. Lab Fee: $10.00

Human Biology Honors
056310                                                       10,11,12                                 Year                          NCAA
This course is for motivated students interested in human anatomy and physiology. Emphasis is on anatomy, physiology, genetics, basic
chemistry, cell biology, human systems, and interaction with the environment. Computer technology will be used in the coursework and
students may be required to complete research projects individually or in groups. Lab Fee: $10.00

A.P. Biology
056400                                                       10,11,12                                 Year                          NCAA
This class is equivalent to a University Freshman Biology course. Intensive study and involvement in the class is required. 3.2 GPA or better is
strongly encouraged. This course includes twelve two-hour labs plus other in-class labs and hands –on activities. Course emphasizes in-depth
knowledge of biochemistry, cell function, genetics, evolution, life-systems organization, micro- and macro organisms, system homeostasis,
ecology, and behavior. Students who complete the course and pass the A.P. exam may earn college/university credit. Students are expected to
take the A.P. Exam at their own expense. Two hours school labs are required each term. Approval: Ms. Jessica Bennett. Prerequisite: Biology 1-
2 and Chemistry or Chemistry can be taken concurrently. Lab Fee: $25.00

Wildlife Biology
057000                                                       11,12                                    Year                          NCAA

                                                                                                                                                  31
057001                                                       11,12                                    Semester                       NCAA
This course is designed to discuss the interaction between man, wildlife and the environment. The students will examine the effect of man's
presence on wildlife and the environment. Wilderness survival skills are also stressed. Students may enroll for first semester and/or second
semester if they choose. Lab Fee: $10.00

Zoology
056801                                                       10,11,12                                 Semester                       NCAA
The study of the animal kingdom initiated in Biology 1-2 is continued in this course with the concepts of classification, evolution, anatomy,
physiology, adaptation and behavior. Prerequisite: Biology. Lab Fee: $10.00


Physical Sciences:
Chemistry Honors
058300                                                       10,11,12                                 Year                           NCAA
Must have a strong background in Algebra. A basic college prep chemistry course. Principles, concepts and quantitative thinking are
emphasized. Approval: Ms. Natalie Paxton. Lab Fee: $10.00

A.P. Chemistry
058400                                                       11,12                                    Year                           NCAA
Students must have completed Chemistry 1-2 and have either completed or be currently enrolled in Pre Calculus. Equivalent to a freshman
chemistry course at the university level. Students are expected to take the A.P. Exam at their own expense. Approval: Ms. Natalie Paxton. Lab
Fee: $10.00.

Physics 1-2 Honors
058800                                                       10,11,12                                 Year                           NCAA
This is a physics course for students who are advanced in science. Students will receive content that is accelerated; inquiry based and has an
emphasis on quantitative measurement. Individual pursuits will be encouraged and products and projects promoted. This class is a college prep
class. Students who are planning to attend college should take this course. This is a college prep class. Prerequisite: Algebra. Lab Fee: $10.00

Physics with Technology
058683                                                       10,11,12                                 (Two Period Block)             NCAA
This is a conceptual course designed to cover physics using technology. Content includes: measuring, calculating and describing the motion of
an object in terms of position, time velocity, and acceleration; the relationship between force, mass, and acceleration; factors that determine the
strength of gravitational and electrical forces; transfer and conservation of energy; and properties and applications of waves. Lab Fee: $10.00

A.P. Physics B
058900                                                       11,12                                    Year                           NCAA
This is a college level full year course that covers all aspects of physics. The main topics are: mechanics, fluids, thermal, electricity, magnetism,
waves, light, and nuclear physics. This is a highly mathematical course so students should have completed Algebra 2 and had at least a B grade
average. Students should have taken a previous physics course and also received a least a B grade average. Sophomores are not recommended to
take this course, they will not have the prerequisites as mentioned above. Students with high academic ability enrolled in pre-calculus or
calculus may be allowed to take this course without a prior physics background course. Prerequisite: Algebra 2 and Physics. Approval: Mr.
Olsen. Lab Fee: $10.00

Plant/Soil Technology
055601                                                       11,12                                    Semester
Topics discussed in this course will include elementary plant and soil science, basic landscape gardening and greenhouse management. The
emphasis will be on practical application of these topics and the operation of the greenhouse.

SOCIAL STUDIES
World Civilizations 1&2
070999                                                       10                                       (Two Period Block)             NCAA
The required sophomore history program consists of world history and cultures. This is a semester course with daily attendance. The first term
includes a study of ancient civilizations and non-western cultures up to the Italian Renaissance. The second term surveys world history from the
Age of Absolute Monarchs to the present.

A.P. World History
075150                                                       10, 11, 12                               Year                           NCAA
The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of the global processes and contacts, in
interaction with different types of human societies, and prepare the student for the demands of college level work.
Within the class there are six course themes that will be covered:
              The impact of interaction among major societies and regions.
              The relationship of change and continuity across the world history periods.
              The effects of technology, economics, and demography on people and the environment.
                                                                                                                                                 32
               Systems of social structure and gender structure.
               Cultural, intellectual and religious developments and interactions among and within societies
               Changes in functions and structures of states and attitudes toward states and political identities including the emergence of the
                nation-state.
Prerequisites: For this intensive class all students enrolled in AP World History should be outstanding readers, exhibit above average knowledge
concerning historical and political events, and understand there will be one to two hours of homework per class. Each student should take this
class with the expectation of passing the AP World History exam held each May. Upon the successful completion of this exam the student may
receive up to 8 credit hours from the college institution of their choice.

United States History II
073000                                                       11                                       Year                          NCAA
The required junior program includes a historical examination of U.S. history from early explorers through the Civil War and Reconstruction.
The 2nd semester includes a historical examination of American History from the industrial Age to the present times.

A.P. American History
075100                                                       11,12                                    Year                          NCAA
Surveys American History from colonial times to the present and is comparable to a college level American History class. This course requires
college level reading and emphasizes critical thinking and writing skills. Students can expect 1-2 hours of homework each night. Students can
earn up to 8 hours of college credit by passing a national advanced placement test, which they are expected to take at their own expense.
Required: Minimum GPA 3.5. Approval: Mr. McLeran

American Government and Citizenship
073500                                                       12                                       Semester                      NCAA
The goal of this course is to foster informed, responsible citizens. Students will be required to know protections, privileges, and structures that
affect citizens, through studying the organization and function of the United States Constitution, the importance of a limited government, and
guaranteed freedoms and rights of American Citizens. Civil rights, liberties, the relationship between the states, national and local governments,
rights and responsibilities of citizens and their role in civic life will also be examined. This class is a graduation requirement.

A.P. Government and Politics
076600                                                       11,12                                    Year                          NCAA
AP Government & Politics is a fascinating look at the dynamic landscape of U.S. politics. Designed to help the student pass the AP Government
& Politics exam held each May, this class involves interesting discussion and study. Students will learn about how the United States functions
on a local, national, and international scale through the study of general concepts and the analysis of specific case studies. Students may earn
college credit at the end of the year with the successful passing of the A.P. test. Approval: Mr. Curtis

The following can be used only for elective credit:
Law Enforcement
093400 (CTE Credit)                                          11,12                                    Semester
An introductory course for students who wish to pursue a career in law enforcement. This popular course is taught by the school deputy.
Approval: Officer Brady Cottam.

Law and the Courts
075600 (Elective Credit)                                     11,12                                    Semester                      NCAA
This class is an introduction to law and the legal system. Provides students with a background of their rights and laws for those students
interested in the workings of the Criminal and Juvenile Justice Systems. The workings of lawyers, judges, prosecutors, defendants and victims
will be explained. Units also include Family Law and Civil Liberties. Case Studies and Video presentations on various trials will enhance all
topics.

Sociology
076400                                                       11,12                                    Semester                      NCAA
This class will teach students to understand how culture, economy, politics, religion, sports, music, and people affect our society and the
changes that occur. Students will learn to access and apply knowledge through outside lab experience.

Contemporary American Social Problems
076300                                                       11,12                                    Semester                      NCAA
Focuses attention on selected contemporary problems confronting America, problems related to family, community, and man's personal life with
an emphasis on how current social problems affect teenagers and their future. Some of the major topics covered during the course include teen
suicide, sex issues in society, family violence, violence in society, and religious cults.

Psychology 1
077200                                                       10,11,12                                 Semester                      NCAA
Emphasizes the manner in which the individual can apply various psychological theories and concepts to understand one-self, one's motives, and
one's relationships with other people. This class will study how and why we should understand behavior and the causation of behavior.

                                                                                                                                                33
Sports Psychology
077202                                                       11,12                                    Semester
This course focuses on the mental aspect of sports. The class provides students with knowledge and application of goal setting, mental imaging,
affirmation skills, etc. This class is for students that want to learn and apply gained knowledge to their individual sport or sports.

A.P. Psychology
078300                                                       11,12                                    Year                           NCAA
This class will teach the student to become knowledgeable concerning the major psychological theories and concepts, and to help the student
develop a vocabulary pertaining to this subject matter. The student will learn what it would be like to major in college psychology. College
credit can be earned by passing a national advanced placement test which students are expected to take at their own expense. Prerequisite:
Psychology I or 3.0 GPA or better. Approval: Ms. Hanks.

School Success
066750                                                       10,11,12                                 Year
School Success is a full year elective credit class designed to help students stay on track for graduation and get additional help and support. This
class provides a safe place where students learn they are important, their opinions matter, and they are all equal. A unique setting is provided
where interaction among all students takes place through activities and classroom set-up. School Success benefits students who want to learn
how to take responsibility and ownership of their success and future. A strong emphasis on communication, responsibility, and problem solving
is taught. Trust and respect are strong components emphasized in this class.


SPECIAL EDUCATION
Special Education services are provided for senior high students qualified with a disability with the Individuals with Disabilities Act that
adversely affects their educational performance and requires special education and related services. Special education services are determined by
the student’s individualized education program (IEP) and are provided in the least restrictive environment with a focus on access to the general
curriculum and outcomes after graduation. See your current Special Ed. Resource Teacher for enrollment options.


OTHER SPECIAL CLASS OFFERINGS
Cheerleader 063300                                                                11,12                                    Year
Tryouts are under the direction of Ms. Farr.

Dance Company (Dance 7-8) 010090                                                  11,12                                    Year
Tryouts are under the direction Mrs. R. Jones.

Drill Team (Chirons) 063100                                                       11,12                                    Year
Tryouts are under the direction of Ms. Lamb.

Student Government 069600                                                         12                                       Year
Must be elected to office and Approved by Mr. G. Curtis.

Stage Crew 066410                                                                 11,12                                    Year
Students learn all aspects of running the stage lights, curtains, and sound. Approval: Mr. Eberly

Main Office Aide 068400                                                           11, 12                                   Semester
Approval: Debbie Paul

Library Aide 068201 (1st Semester) 068202 (2nd Semester)                          11, 12                                   Semester
Approval: Ms. Taney

Counseling Aide 068301 (1st Semester) 068302 (2nd Semester)                       11, 12                                   Semester
Approval: Ms. Park

RELEASED TIME (No Credit)
L.D.S. Seminary
008001                                                                            10,11,12                                 Year
See Seminary personnel or personal ward bishop to complete registration.

Protestant Seminary
008400                                                                            10,11,12                                 Year
High School Interdenominational Seminary (H.I.S. Club) is a class for students who are interested in learning about the Bible. We also have
action days where we go out into the Taylorsville community to volunteer our help during class hours.


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                                        Granite District School
                                Career and Technical Education (CTE)
                                    and Technical Prep Programs
Classes are taught off campus and are two to four periods in length. Since these programs require travel away from school,
students must be able to provide their own transportation. See Ms. Joyce Fenton in the Career Center (G-101) for further
information. Approval: Joyce Fenton (Career Center Coordinator) for all programs.

ACADEMIES
Academy of Hospitality and Tourism (AOHT) (3B & 4B)
See Joyce Fenton                                       11,12                               Year
Distinguish yourself by enrolling in this exciting two-year program designed for students who are interested in a career in
hospitality and tourism. Students will study domestic and international geography, marketing and sales, advanced computer
applications, communications, and tourism in general. Students will serve a paid internship during the summer between the junior
and senior years. Students will be taking college courses for credit within the high school program. Students are selected in
February of the sophomore year. Courses are taught at Taylorsville High School. Completion of the course will result in a
diploma from the National Academy Foundation (NAF). A total of 13 SLCC concurrent enrollment credits available.

Junior Year, 1st Semester                                        Junior Year, 2nd Semester
        3B Marketing 1900 CC (Loos)                                      3B Computer Technology 2 (Jorgensen)
        4B Domestic Travel (Crowther)                                    4B Business Management 1600 CC (Phillips)

Summer between Junior & Senior Year - Marketing 2000 CC Internship (Loos).

Senior Year, 1st Semester                                        Senior Year, 2nd Semester
        3B Marketing 1030 CC (Phillips)                                  3B Marketing 1010 CC (Loos)
        4B Business Communications (Jorgensen)                           4B International Travel (Crowther)

Academy of Finance (AOF) (1A & 2B at Cottonwood) (1B & 2B at Kearns and Skyline)
See Joyce Fenton                                       11,12                               Year
Distinguish yourself by enrolling in this exciting two-year program designed for students who are interested in a career in
business. Emphasis will be on college level accounting, finance, banking, marketing, and economics classes. A paid internship
with a local business firm takes place between the junior and senior years. Students are selected in February of their sophomore
year. Completion of the courses will result in a diploma from the National Academy Foundation (NAF). Courses taught at
Cottonwood, Kearns, or Skyline High School. Up to 23 SLCC concurrent enrollment credits are available depending on
location.

Trades & Industry
Auto Body Repair 2 Periods (Taught at Granger High School)
See Joyce Fenton                                     11,12                              Year
Designed for the student whose career goal is to become an auto body repairman. Classroom and shop experiences deal with
repairing damaged auto bodies and fenders by straightening metal, smoothing surfaces, painting and replacing body components.

Cosmetology 2 Periods
Cosmetology 4 Periods
See Joyce Fenton                                      11,12                              Year
Students will receive credits when enrolled in a private school of Cosmetology with licensed instructors. Students are responsible
for finding their own school and must pay for their own tuition and expenses.

Student Internships
See Helen Brown                                          11,12                                  Semester
The internship experience provides students with an opportunity to gain exposure to a career area related to their academic work.
The internship will help students identify some of the needed skills, knowledge and preparation desired for employment in the
career of their interest. Students will be assigned to visit a work site on a regular basis throughout the semester. This is an unpaid
experience. See Ms. Brown to sign-up.



                                                                                                                                    35
Welcome to the… GRANITE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE
The Department of Career and Technical Education in Granite School District has a well-earned reputation for providing high-
quality programs that are targeted at high-demand industries. To further this focus, The Granite Technical Institute offers
courses in Health Science & Technology, Engineering, Information Technology, Culinary Arts, Aviation, Agriculture,
Cosmetology/Barbering, and Home Building/Construction.

The mission of the Granite Technical Institute is to support students in finding personal purpose, potential and a pathway to their
future. This is accomplished by helping students achieve in their program and to move seamlessly to further training and
employment. Efforts are being made to directly align critical academic subjects with career and technical education courses, thus
promoting real-world application to academic theory in such areas as mathematics, science and English. In addition, articulation
and collaboration with Salt Lake Community College and other post-secondary institutions is being enhanced in order to make the
transition to further education easier for students. Clear pathways of training have been designed to support student growth from
the 9th through the 12th grades. Courses being offered during the 2009-20010 school year are included in the pages that follow.

*Busing will be provided for students twice daily from the student’s home high school to the GTI. All courses listed in this
catalog will be taught at the Granite Technical Institute (2500 South State Street) unless otherwise specified. This
schedule is designed to accommodate the two-period block enrollments. Students interested in registering for these
courses should see the Career Center Coordinator at their high school. Questions regarding the Granite Technical
Institute can be directed to James Taylor at 646-4350.


    Table of Contents
        How to Register ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Agriculture Science --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Biotechnology --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Construction Trades--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Cosmetology/Barbering ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Culinary Arts ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Engineering ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Health Science --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Information Technology --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Professional Pilot (Aviation) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                                           HOW TO REGISTER
In order to register for any of the classes offered through the Granite Technical Institute, students must first pick up an application
in the Career Center of their high school. Once the application is complete and signed by both the student and their guardian, it
should be returned to the Career Center for review and approval by the Career Center Coordinator. The Career Center
Coordinator will then help the student determine whether or not additional information is required and will help facilitate the
scheduling process.

                                                                                                                                    36
                                         9th GRADE STUDENT PROCEDURE
Ninth grade students who wish to access designated courses must work out their class schedules individually with their guidance
counselor. They must also arrange their own transportation to and from the nearest high school, where they will catch the bus to
the G.T.I. The bell schedules and the bus schedule for the G.T.I. are available at http://gti.graniteschools.org

Once a ninth grade student has determined the course(s) he/she is interested in taking, the guidance counselor will e-mail the
student’s name, student number, the course(s) requested, and periods requested to kgroos@graniteschools.org Kathy will then
enroll the student on “Discovery” and notify the counselor regarding the student’s acceptance.

AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
Agriculture is the nation’s largest employer, with more than 21 million people working in some phase of industry from
growing food and fiber to selling it in the supermarkets. The mission of Agricultural Science and Technology Education is to
prepare students for employment and/or continuing education opportunities in agriculture. This is accomplished through
technical instruction in the classroom, experiential education in the laboratory, the Supervised Agricultural Experience
Program, and through leadership and personal development in FFA (Future Farmers of America-student organization).

AGRICULTURE PRODUCTION (Animal Science)
Semester (2 period block) 9 - 12 grade or
Full Year (2 period block)
Periods: 1A-2A, 3A-4A or 3B-4B
Taught at Wheeler Historic Farm
This course is for students interested in learning the proper care and treatment of horses, cows, and other farm animals.
Instruction will cover the fundamentals of animal science as well as the basic functions of farm machinery and how it relates to
crops being raised on the farm. Student skills will be developed by practicing teamwork, safety, citizenship and other working
activities. Students will develop the skills necessary to complete the state skills test in Animal Science. This course may also be
taken to fulfill a third Science credit requirement.

FLORICULTURE AND GREENHOUSE MANAGEMENT
Semester (2 period block) 9 - 12 grade
Periods: 1A-2A or 3B-4B both first and second semester
Taught at Wheeler Farm
This is an intensive course in greenhouse operation and management that prepares students to produce commercial plant species
in a controlled environment and to manage commercial and experimental greenhouse operations. Studies will also include basic
plant biological systems, soil science, plant propagation, and floral design. This course may also be taken to fulfill a third
Science credit requirement.

NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT I
Semester (2 period block) 9 - 12 grade
Periods: 3A-4A or 1B-2B both first and second semester
Taught at Wheeler Farm
This course includes instruction on the importance of production, management, and conservation of our natural resources,
ecology, and fish and wildlife. Field and laboratory experience will be emphasized. This course may also be taken to fulfill a
third Science credit requirement.

VETERINARY ASSISTANT (Large Animal)
Semester (2 period block) 9 - 12 grade
Periods: 1B-2B both first and second semester
Taught at Wheeler Farm
This course is designed to encourage students to pursue a career in large animal veterinary practice. The program will focus on
the following areas of study: safety and sanitation in veterinary science, veterinary terminology, anatomy and physiology, clinical
examinations, hospital procedures, parasitology, laboratory techniques, animal nutrition, principles of disease, animals in society,
career exploration, and animal management. Students enrolled in the program will also have leadership opportunities through the
FFA, a component that will be integrated into the vet assistant course.
This course provides entry-level skills for those students who want to enter an occupation right out of high school and also
provides the background necessary for students interested in pursuing a professional degree. Laboratory activities provide
students with the hands-on experience and skills needed to participate in the exciting field of veterinary medicine. This course
may also be taken to fulfill a third Science credit requirement.



                                                                                                                                 37
BIOTECHNOLOGY
INTRODUCTION TO BIOMANUFACTURING (BMAN 1110)
Semester (2 period block) 9 – 12 grades                Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1A-2A or 3A-4A both first and second semester
Prerequisite: The following classes may be helpful, but are not required: Biology 1-2, Algebra I, Exploring Technology,
Gateway to Technology, Manufacturing, or Chemistry.
This course offers an introduction to the manufacture of biotech products including medical devices, drugs, cosmetics, diet
supplements, and biofuels. Students will extract oil from plants or design and make a cosmetic, lotion, etc. Projects include
designing and producing the container, making what goes inside, designing the label and marketing the product. Students will
learn how to ensure the safety of medical, drug and natural products. Students will visit local biomanufacturing companies and
explore possible career paths. This course will also study the history and present state of biomanufacturing, learn the science,
engineering and marketing skills necessary in biomanufacturing, and the legal, social, and ethical issues surrounding this industry.
Students will have the unique opportunity of working in the same cutting edge lab and using the same equipment as college
students and professionals. This course offers S.L.C.C. Concurrent Enrollment credit (BMAN 1110, 3 Credits) for qualified
11th and 12th grade students. This course may also be taken to fulfill a third Science credit requirement.

BASIC BIOMANUFACTURING SKILLS (BMAN 1120)
Semester (2 period block) 9 – 12 grades              Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1B-2B both first and second semester
Prerequisite: Intro to Biomanufacturing (BMAN 1110) (may be taken concurrently with Introduction to Biomanufacturing)
This is a lab-based course that will help students learn the biochemistry, microbiology and technical skills to conduct
biomanufacturing processes. Students will learn biochemistry through practical applications like making aspirin or test strips
used in medical labs. Students will perform experiments to verify the quality of the starting ingredients and finished products,
and use computer programs to graph and compute statistics. An emphasis will be placed on learning proper documentation of
experiments in a lab notebook and on company forms in order to learn about FDA requirements in biomanufacturing. Students
will have the unique opportunity of working in the same cutting edge lab and using the same equipment as college students and
professionals. This course offers S.L.C.C. Concurrent Enrollment credit (BMAN 1120, 3 Credits) for qualified 11th and
12th grade students. This course may also be taken to fulfill a third Science credit requirement.

BIOTECHNOLOGY 1010
Semester (2 period block) 11 – 12 grades              Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1A-2A, 3A-4A, 1B-2B or 3B-4B both first and second semester
Biotechnology 1010 is an introductory level course which leads to many exciting careers in science, medicine and forensics. In
biotechnology, our knowledge of biological organisms is applied to solving problems that occur in the real world. Topics covered
include: microbiology, genetics, bioinformatics, proteomics, genomics, forensics, agriculture, stem cell research, and genetically
modified organisms. Students gain extensive lab skills as each of the course’s topics are investigated in a hands-on way. This
course must be taken for S.L.C.C. Concurrent Enrollment credit (BTEC1010, 3 Credits). This course may also be taken
to fulfill a third Science credit requirement.

BIOTECHNOLOGY 1020
Semester (2 period block) 11 – 12 grades
Periods: Individually Determined
Prerequisite: Biotech 1010
Students will participate in an internship with a local biotech company as part of a Contract Research Organization (CRO). The
internships available include research, information technology, and business management. All students will work with highly
experienced professionals. This is a year-long course that will meet for two periods every other day. However, in rare
cases and with special approval, the internship can be accomplished after school and/or during the summer. Interested students
will work directly with Mr. Tuttle at the G.T.I. to arrange internships and to determine class periods. This course must be
taken for S.L.C.C. Concurrent Enrollment credit (BTEC1020, 2 Credits). This course may also be taken to fulfill a third
Science credit requirement.

CONSTRUCTION TRADES
Full Year (2 period block) 10 -12 grade
Periods: 1A-2A, 3A-4A, 1B-2B, or 3B-4B

         Residential Carpentry (1A-2A), (3A-4A), (1B-2B), (3B-4B)
         Commercial Carpentry (1A-2A), (3A-4A), (1B-2B), (3B-4B)
         Electrical (1A-2A), (3A-4A), (1B-2B), (3B-4B)
         Plumbing (1A-2A), (3A-4A), (1B-2B), (3B-4B)
         Concrete (1A-2A), (3A-4A), (1B-2B), (3B-4B)

                                                                                                                                 38
This is a comprehensive construction experience where students, with the supervision of licensed contractors help construct an
entire house while participating in all phases of home construction or participate in a variety of commercial construction
remodels. Students may specialize in residential carpentry, commercial carpentry, electrical trades, concrete finishing or
plumbing at the building site. This is a great experience for those interested in construction/building related careers, or who want
building experience. Apprenticeship programs are available. This course offers S.L.C.C. Concurrent Enrollment credit for
qualified 11th and 12th grade students:

                                             Home Building BCCM1010, 5 Credits
                                                           BCCM1040, 3.5 Credits
                                                           BCCM1060, 1 Credit
                                                           BCCM1140, 3.5 Credits
                                             Electrical    ELI1110, 5 Credits
                                             Plumbing      PLI1110, 3 Credits

COSMETOLOGY / BARBERING
COSMETOLOGY/BARBERING
Full Year (4 period block) 11-12 grade
Periods: Undetermined
This course covers the instruction and practical knowledge required for the Utah Cosmetology license. Students are required to
perform 2,000 hours of classroom and laboratory experience and all instruction will prepare students to take the written Utah
Cosmetology Board. Students must have a social security number to obtain a cosmetology license. Students may also arrange for
cosmetology at a private cosmetology school of their choice. The private school must be accredited to receive high school credit.


CULINARY ARTS
 It's no secret that the restaurant and food service industry is growing. In fact, it is estimated that from 2006 to 2016 the
number of jobs in the restaurant and food service industry is projected to increase by 1.9 million, of which approximately
47,000 will be management positions! The National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation is working hard and
getting results in helping to meet this need through initiatives such as its ProStart program which encourages high school
students to consider careers in the restaurant and food service industry.

PROSTART I
Semester (2 period block) 11 – 12 grade                 Lab Fee Required
Periods: (1A-2A, 3A-4A, 1B-2B first semester) (1A-2A second semester)
Prerequisites: Foods I and Foods II. 2.0 G.P.A. and 2.0 C.P.A. are required to enroll in this program.
This course focuses on preparing students for careers in the restaurant industry. Students will learn skills dealing with customer
relations, food preparation, menu planning, cost controls, marketing, management, and communication. Students will also be
required to develop a professional portfolio related to food services. A nationally accepted certification is available upon
completion of ProStart I and II. Students must have a social security number to qualify for the Pro Start Certificate. This course
offers S.L.C.C. Concurrent Enrollment credit (CHEF 1110, 3 Credits or CHEF 1120, 3 Credits) for qualified 11th and 12th
grade students.

PROSTART II
Semester (2 period block) 11 – 12 grade                Lab Fee Required
Periods: 3A-4A or 1B-2B second semester
Prerequisites: Foods I and Foods II. 2.0 G.P.A. and 2.0 C.P.A. are required to enroll in this program.
This is an advanced course in restaurant management. Students will gain further skills in the areas of customer relations, food
preparation, menu planning, cost controls, marketing, management, and communication. Students will also continue development
of their professional portfolio. A 400 hour internship is required for the successful completion of this course. Students must
have good social skills, good attendance, and the ability to get themselves to their internship experiences. A nationally accepted
certification is available upon completion of ProStart I and II. Scholarships are available for students who pass the National
Restaurant Association exam. Student must have a social security number to qualify for the Pro Start Certificate. This course
offers S.L.C.C. Concurrent Enrollment credit (CHEF 2520, 3 Credits) for qualified 11th and 12th grade students.




                                                                                                                                  39
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
The engineering technology program is a hands-on, project-based approach to learning that better prepares students for
entrance into college engineering and/or engineering technology programs. Coursework uses real-world problem solving that
answers the students’ age-old question, “Why do I need to know this?” There are five courses in the Engineering Technology
Sequence. Course content is designed to help all students explore how engineers and engineering technicians integrate math,
science, and communications skills into their profession. Engineering Technology students will engage in the research,
design, and construction of models/prototypes in a variety of areas including: electrical, fluid, structural, and mechanical
systems.

DRAFTING 1-2
Semester (2 period block) 9 - 12 grade                  Lab Fee Required
Periods: (1B-2B or 3B-4B first semester) (1B-2B second semester)
This course is an exploratory class concerned with the communication of ideas through drawings, sketches and technical
illustrations. Students develop skills through the use of modern drafting equipment and computer aided drafting (CAD) software.

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING
Semester (2 period block) 9 - 12 grade                Lab Fee Required
Periods: (1B-2B, or 3B-4B first semester) (1B-2B second semester)
This course allows students to explore various technology systems and manufacturing processes in order to better understand the
world of engineering and engineering technology. Students learn how engineers and technicians use math, science and
technology in an engineering problem solving process to benefit people and advance our society. This course also includes
concerns about social and political consequences of technological change. This course may also be taken to fulfill a third
Science credit requirement.

INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN
Semester (2 period block) 9 - 12 grade                Lab Fee Required
Periods: (3A-4A first semester) (1A-2A or 3B-4B second semester)
Prerequisite: Principles of Engineering
This course teaches students the design process through the use of computer modeling software. Students will learn problem-
solving skills using a design development process. Models of product solutions are created, analyzed and communicated using
solid modeling computer design software. This course may also be taken to fulfill a third Science credit requirement.

COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING
Semester (2 period block) 10 - 12 grade                Lab Fee Required
Periods: (1A-2A first semester) (3A-4A second semester)
Prerequisite: Principles of Engineering and Introduction to Engineering Design
This course will teach students the concepts of robotics and automated manufacturing by creating three-dimensional designs with
modeling software and producing models of their designs. This course builds on computer solid modeling skills developed in
Introduction to Engineering Design. Students use CNC equipment to produce actual models of their three-dimensional designs.
Fundamental concepts of robotics used in automated manufacturing, and design analysis are included. This course may also be
taken to fulfill a third Science credit requirement.

ENGINEERING DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT
Semester (2 period block) 11 - 12 grade                 Lab Fee Required
Periods: (1A-2A second semester)
Prerequisite: Principles of Engineering, Introduction to Engineering Design, Computer Integrated Manufacturing
This research course requires students to formulate solutions to open-ended engineering questions. With a community mentor
and skills gained in their previous courses, students create a project with written reports on their applications, defend the reports,
and submit them to a panel of outside reviewers at the end of the school year. This course may also be taken to fulfill a third
Science credit requirement.

ELECTRONICS, DC
Semester (1 period block) 10 – 12 grade               Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1A first semester
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Math 1050 or Pre-Calculus for students who wish to take this course for concurrent enrollment
credit.
This course covers basic electronics theory for DC fundamentals, circuit analysis and troubleshooting. Students learn the use of
electronics test equipment such as digital meters, power supplies, and bread-boarding. This course offers S.L.C.C. Concurrent
Enrollment credit (ELET 1011, 3 Credits) for qualified 11th and 12th grade students. This course may also be taken to
fulfill a third Science credit requirement.

                                                                                                                                    40
ELECTRONICS, AC
Semester (1 period block) 10 – 12 grade               Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1A second semester
Prerequisite: Electronics, DC
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Math 1060 or Pre-Calculus for students who wish to take this course for concurrent enrollment
credit.
This course covers basic electronics theory and AC fundamentals, circuit analysis and troubleshooting. Students learn the use of
electronics test equipment such as meters, oscilloscopes, and function generators. This course offers S.L.C.C. Concurrent
Enrollment credit (ELET 1012, 3 Credits) for qualified 11 th and 12th grade students. This course may also be taken to
fulfill a third Science credit requirement.

DIGITAL ELECTRONICS
Full Year (1 period block) 10 - 12 grade               Lab Fee Required
Periods: 2A
Prerequisite: Principles of Engineering and Introduction to Engineering Design are recommended prior to enrolling in this
course.
Students will use computer simulations to learn about the logic of electronics as they design, test, and actually construct circuits
and devices. This is a course in applied logic that encompasses the application of electronic circuits and devices. This course
may also be taken to fulfill a third Science credit requirement.

PHYSICS WITH TECHNOLOGY
Semester (2 period block) 9 – 12 grades                 Lab Fee Required
Periods: 3B-4B both first and second semester
Prerequisite: Algebra 1
Students taking this course will learn physics by doing experiments and labs and by applying physics concepts. Students will
study the concepts of force, work, rate, momentum, power and resistance through the energy systems of mechanics, heat, fluids
and electromagnetism. Motion, optics and nuclear physics will also be investigated. Physics with Technology is an introductory
course that presents opportunities for students to use their creativity, imagination and invention. This course meets the Utah State
Core requirements for Physics. This course leads to advanced material/product engineering, design and production courses
offered through Technology and Engineering Education, as well as AP Physics. This course may also be taken to fulfill a
Physical Science credit requirement.

HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY
CERTIFIED NURSE ASSISTING
Semester (2 period block) 11-12 grade                    Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1A-2A, 3A-4A, 1B-2B, or 3B-4B both first and second semester
Note: It is suggested that students take Medical Terminology prior to taking this course.
Prerequisite: 2.0 G.P.A. and 2.0 C.P.A. are required to enroll in this program.
This program prepares students to perform routine nursing-related services to patients in hospitals or long-term care facilities
under the training and supervision of a registered nurse or licensed practical nurse. Students learn basic nursing skills such as
taking and recording vital signs and recognizing abnormal changes in body functioning. Basic areas of study include: basic
nursing skills, personal care skills, mental health and social service needs, care of cognitively impaired residents, basic restorative
services and resident rights. A 60 hour clinical experience is required in a nursing facility to complete course requirements.
Clinicals are from 3:00 – 8:00 p.m. one day per week and a total of two Saturdays from 7:00 a.m. – 3:00p.m. Students must
supply their own uniforms, watches with sweep second hands, white shoes, pens, and small notebooks. Some College and
University nursing programs require a CNA for admission to their program. An additional .25 credit will be earned by
completing clinical hours. Students must have good social skills, good attendance, and the ability to get themselves to their
clinical experiences. Students must provide a social security number in order to take the state C.N.A. exam.

DENTAL ASSISTING I
Semester (2 period block) 11 – 12 grades                 Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1A-2A, 3A-4A, 1B-2B, or 3B-4B first semester
Prerequisite: 2.0 G.P.A. and 2.0 C.P.A. are required to enroll in this program.
Dental Assisting I introduces students to the field of dental assisting. Students will learn basic patient care skills in preparation to
assist a dentist or dental hygienist in functions of a dental practice. Skills include: infection control procedures, instrument
sterilization, patient preparation, examination, preventive care, dental radiographic techniques, diagnostic study models, bleaching
trays, introduction to dental materials and restorative procedures.

DENTAL ASSISTING II
Semester (2 period block) 11 – 12 grades                Lab Fee Required

                                                                                                                                     41
Periods: 1A-2A, 3A-4A, 1B-2B, or 3B-4B second semester
Prerequisite: B- average in Dental Assisting I
Dental Assisting II offers the student the opportunity to practice skills, learn restorative, cosmetic and surgical procedures.
Students will spend class periods participating in patient care at the Family Dental Plan Granite Clinic located at the GTI. New
expanded functions include crown and bridge, endodontics, surgical procedures, front office skills including Dentrix.
Qualified students will have the opportunity to participate in a 90 hour externship, at a dental office of their choice.

INTRO TO HEALTH SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Semester (1 period block) 9 – 12 grades
Periods: 2B or 4A both first and second semester
This semester course is designed to create an awareness of career possibilities in health care and inform students of the
educational options available for health science and health technology programs. Instruction includes beginning anatomy and
physiology, medical terminology, medical ethics, diseases and disorders. This course is typically taken in conjunction with
EMS.

EMS (Emergency Medical Services)
Semester (1 period block) 9 – 12 grade                  Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1B or 3A both first and second semester
This semester course provides students with advanced emergency medical information and skills. The course introduces students
to a variety of career options in emergency medicine along with preparing students to take nationally recognized tests and
certification in First Aid, CPR and Emergency Response. Students will learn basic skills prior to enrolling in EMT, nursing
assisting, medical assisting and dental assisting courses. This course offers W.S.U. Concurrent Enrollment credit (HLTH
2300) for qualified 11th and 12th grade students. This course is typically taken in conjunction with Intro to Health Science
and Technology.

EMT (Emergency Medical Technician)
Full year (2 period block) 12 grade                   Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1A-2A or 3B-4B
Prerequisite: 2.0 G.P.A. and 2.0 C.P.A. are required to enroll in this program.
This program prepares students to perform initial medical assessment, treatment, and comprehensive care in medical crises, under
the general supervision of a coordinating physician. Instruction includes all aspects of basic health care, disease disorder, injury
diagnosis, emergency treatment procedures for various injuries and disease outbreaks. Students learn theory and then participate
in extensive skill practice sessions with EMTs. Successful students take the Bureau of Emergency
Medical Services exam to become a Certified EMT. Students must have a social security number to qualify to take the EMT state
exam. This course offers Weber State University Concurrent Enrollment credit (PAR 1000, PAR 1001) for qualified
students. Students must provide a social security number in order to take the state Emergency Medical Technician exam.

MEDICAL ASSISTING
Full year (2 period block) 12th grade                   Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1A-2A, 1B-2B, or 3B-4B
Prerequisite: Medical Terminology or concurrent with Medical Terminology first semester. 2.0 G.P.A. and 2.0 C.P.A. are
required to enroll in this program.
This program prepares students to assist physicians by performing functions related to both business administration and clinical
duties in a medical office. The business aspect of instruction covers insurance, bookkeeping, medical terminology, and general
office management. Clinical study includes providing physician assistance during patient examinations, treatment, administration
and monitoring. Students learn to keep patient and related health record information and to perform clinical, administrative and
laboratory duties. A 160 hour externship is required for completion of this course. Students must have good social skills, good
attendance, and the ability to get themselves to their clinical experiences. Students must obtain the series of three immunizations
for hepatitis. This course serves as an introduction to a variety of health related fields.

MEDICAL ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY
Full Year (2 period block) 10 – 12 grades               Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1B-2B or 3B-4B
Prerequisite: 2.0 G.P.A. and 2.0 C.P.A. are required to enroll in this program.
This course provides students with an in-depth study of the human body and includes medical terminology, diseases and
disorders, medical ethics and first aid. The class is designed to prepare students for a variety of health careers and to prepare them
to succeed in a variety of health technology programs. Actual clinical experiences and service learning experiences help students
decide if they should pursue a health occupation. This course may also be taken to fulfill a third Science credit requirement.

MEDICAL ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY FOR CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
Full Year (2 period block) 11 – 12 grades Lab Fee Required
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Periods: 1A-2A or 3A-4A
Prerequisite: Students must pass the S.L.C.C. placement test (CPT) with a score of 58 in reading, have an A.C.T. reading
score of 16 or higher, or have a score of 420 or higher on the S.A.T. in order to qualify for enrollment in this course. Students
must be admitted to S.L.C.C. as a concurrent enrollment student in order to take the CPT. The college placement test (CPT)
must be completed by August 1, 2009. A 2.0 G.P.A. and 2.0 C.P.A. are required to enroll in this program.
This course provides students with an in-depth study of the human body and includes medical terminology, diseases and
disorders, medical ethics and first aid. The class is designed to prepare students for a variety of health careers and to prepare them
to succeed in a variety of health technology programs. Actual clinical experiences and service learning experiences help
students decide if they should pursue a health occupation. This course must be taken for S.L.C.C. Concurrent Enrollment
credit (BIOL1110, 3 Credits). This course may also be taken to fulfill a third Science credit requirement.

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY
Semester (2 period block) 9 – 12 grades                Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1A-2A, 3A-4A, 1B-2B, or 3B-4B both first and second semester
Prerequisite: 2.0 G.P.A. and 2.0 C.P.A. are required to enroll in this program. Students must be able to read at or near grade
level.
This class consists of lecture and video presentations. Students learn the meanings and pronunciations of prefixes, roots, and
suffixes that combine to form over 11,000 medical terms. This is essential knowledge for any health career. This course offers
S.L.C.C. Concurrent Enrollment credit (MA1100, 2 Credits) for qualified 11th and 12th grade students. Medical
Terminology is a prerequisite for Medical Assisting and Pharmacy Technician and recommended for Certified Nurse
Assisting.

PHARMACY TECHNICIAN
Full Year (2 period block) 12th grade                   Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1A-2A or 3A-4A
Prerequisite: Medical Terminology or concurrent with Medical Terminology. 2.0 G.P.A. and 2.0 C.P.A. are required to enroll
in this program.
This program prepares students to support pharmacists by providing assistance during patient consultation, counter dispensing
operations, and prescription preparation. Students will also be trained to keep patient and related health record information and to
perform a wide range of practice-related duties for both retail and hospital-based pharmacies. Students must have good social
skills, good attendance, and the ability to get themselves to their externship experiences. Students must have a social security
number to take the licensure exam. Students must maintain a ―B‖ average and complete a 180 hour externship in addition
to course work for successful licensure with the state of Utah. Students must provide a social security number in order to
take the national exam and become licensed in the state of Utah.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Information technology programs include the study, design, development, implementation, support and/or management of
computer hardware, software applications, multimedia, computer-based information systems, and integration services.
Information technology coursework is divided into four specialty strands. These include:

         Information Support & Services
         Interactive Media
         Network Systems
         Programming &Software Development

Students may choose to take a sequence of courses in one specialization strand or they may take courses across each strand to
gain a broader understanding of the information technology industry.

VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING .NET
Semester (2 period block) 9 - 12 grade
Period: 1A-2A first semester or 3A-4A second semester
This semester course is an introduction to computer programming using Visual Basic .NET. Students will learn problem-solving
and object-oriented programming as they design, code, and test their own programs. Students will learn VB.NET syntax,
graphical user interfaces (GUI), and simple control and data structures. Students will produce a simple graphical game as their
final project. This class is a good introduction to Computer Programming I.

C# COMPUTER PROGRAMMING
Semester (2 period block) 10 - 12 grade
Periods: 3A-4A first semester or 1A-2A second semester
This course introduces students to fundamental programming skills needed for game creation and other similar applications.
Students will learn problem solving as they design, code, and test their own programs. This course provides students with the
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knowledge and skills needed to develop applications by learning C# syntax, I/O, decision and repetition control structures.
Students will become familiar with object-oriented programming as they design and code classes that may be used in games. As
students advance toward more complex data structures, they will use their creativity to make a final game-like project.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING I
Semester (2 period block) 11 – 12 grade
Period: 3B-4B first semester or 1B-2B second semester
Prerequisites: prior programming experience, Visual Basic Programming, Intro to Information Technology, or C # Computer
Programming
This yearlong course introduces students to computer fundamentals. Students will learn problem solving as they design, code, and
test their own programs. Students will learn JAVA syntax, I/O, decision and repetition control structures. Students will then move
on to object-oriented programming and more complex data structures. They will learn how to use arrays, classes, recursive
processes, and text files. This course may also be taken to fulfill a third Math credit requirement. This course is typically
taken in conjunction with Oracle I.

WEB DEVELOPMENT
Semester (2 period block) 10-12 grade
Periods: 1B-2B first semester or 3B-4B second semester
Prerequisite: Computer Technology
Web Development is a course designed to guide students in a project-based environment in the development of up-to-date
concepts and skills that are used in the development of today’s websites. Students will learn the basic fundamentals of how the
Internet works. They will learn and use the basic building blocks of the World Wide Web: XHTML coding, Cascading Style
Sheets (CSS), and JavaScript. They learn and follow the steps to create a website by planning, designing, developing, deploying,
and maintaining of the website projects. Students will learn and use different scripting technologies to create more dynamic and
interactive websites. They will learn what it takes for a career in Web Development as they complete projects and create their
own Web portfolio.

INTRO TO 3D ANIMATION
Semester Class (2 period block) 10-12 grade             Lab Fee Required
Periods: (1A-2A, 3A-4A, or 1B-2B first semester) (1A-2A or 3A-4A second semester)
This semester course offers an entry level study of the basic principles of 3D and 2D animation. Subject matter includes: 2D
animation, timing, secondary motion, stretch & squash, basic 3D modeling, texturing, lighting, UV mapping, rigging and
animating a model. This course has an emphasis on artistic principles for those students interested in the 3D Industry. Students
will learn basic principles such as layout and design, color theory, and basic drawing skills including: head drawings, gesture
drawings, figure drawing and character drawing. In addition, animation planning, storyboard development, and the production
process will be a large part of the course.

ADVANCED 3D ANIMATION
Semester Class (2 period block) 10-12 grade             Lab Fee Required
Periods: (3B-4B first semester) (1B-2B or 3B-4B second semester)
Prerequisite: Intro to 3D Animation
This semester course offers an advanced level study of the principles of 3D and 2D animation. This course is designed to prepare
students for entry into an internship or a college course giving them the skills to succeed in industry. Subject matters they will
cover include: advanced polygonal modeling, nurbs modeling, advanced techniques for both game and movie industries,
advanced lighting and texture, dynamics, environmental construction, advanced character rigging and animation. This course
expounds on the instructional principles taught during the Intro to Animation class, but gives more time for student projects and
critique. Students will continue to apply the art principles learned during the intro class, and the principles will be critiqued and
applied in their final projects. These students will have the opportunity of working with our feeder schools, Utah Valley
University and Salt Lake Community College. They will have opportunities to interface and work with college professors helping
to make the transition into college and their desired field of study seamless.

ADVANCED MULTIMEDIA (Senior Projects Class)
Semester Class (2 period block) 12 grade                 Lab Fee Required
          or
Full Year (2 period block)
Periods: Students wishing to take this course must make individual arrangements with the instructor)
Prerequisite: Advanced 3D Animation
This semester course offers seniors an opportunity to create and complete a portfolio necessary for internships, college programs
and the job application process. Students will have the opportunity to work with real world situations, producing products both
for the school district and local business, helping to give substance to their portfolios. Students will be critiqued every two weeks

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to measure their progress, quality of work, and to receive direction as to the overall layout, design and professionalism of the end
product. This
class is designed after a senior level college studio class better preparing students for what they will encounter once in college. In
addition, part of this class will be designed around completing all necessary paperwork for entrance into college or an internship
program.

COMPUTER MAINTENANCE (A+) CERTIFICATION
Semester (2 period block) 10 – 12 grade                Lab Fee Required
Periods: (3A-4A, 3B-4B first semester) (3A-4A second semester)
In this course, students practice troubleshooting, maintenance, and upgrade of PC’s. Course content covers setup, memory
management, data back-up, and hardware/software diagnostic procedures. The course is designed to prepare students for the
Comp TIA A+ certification exam. A+ certification is a testing program that certifies the competency of entry-level (9 month’s
experience) service technicians in the computer industry. Earning A+ certification means that the individual possesses the
knowledge, skills, and customer relation skills essential for a successful entry-level computer service technician, as defined by
experts from companies across the industry.

LINUX FUNDAMENTALS
Semester (2 period block) 10 – 12 grade             Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1B-2B first semester
This semester course introduces students to the SLES9 Linux operating system. Students will learn initial concepts, installation,
administration, system management, X-window system, TCP/IP, SAMBA for both workstations and servers. This course also
prepares the student for the CompTIA Linux+ certification exam.

MICROSOFT CERTIFIED SYSTEMS ENGINEER (MCSE)-Vista/Server 2008
Semester (2 period block) 11 – 12 grade                Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1B-2B second semester
This course focuses on installing and configuring the Windows Vista operating system, configuring networking and security, and
applications and devices. This course satisfies one of the core MCSE/MCSA requirements. This course prepares students for the
Microsoft 70-620 and the 70-646 certification exams.

NETWORKING TECHNOLOGIES (NETWORK +)
Semester (2 period block) 11 – 12 grade                Lab Fee Required
Periods: 3B-4B second semester
This course focuses on basic networking terms and concepts, the OSI model, transmission media, and protocols used by various
vendors in LAN and WAN network implementation. This course is designed to prepare students for the CompTIA Network+
certification exam and is equivalent to 6 months of full time experience working with Peer-to-Peer and Server Client networks.


PROFESSIONAL PILOT PROGRAM—AVIATION
In cooperation with Salt Lake Community College, high school students may enroll in the Aviation courses listed below and
receive concurrent enrollment credit from SLCC. Students will typically enroll for two courses each semester; for
instance, (1A-2A, 1B-2B) or (3A-4A, 3B-4B). Exceptions to this format must be arranged through the G.T.I.
Administration.

AVIATION HISTORY
Semester (2 period block) 11 – 12 grade                Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1A-2A or 3A-4A second semester
The history of aviation from the earliest times through the modern jet age will be covered. Students will discover significant
aviation developments and how they came about. This course must be taken for S.L.C.C. Concurrent Enrollment credit
(PILT 1050, 2 credits).

AVIATION WEATHER
Semester (2 period block) 11 – 12 grade                 Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1B-2B or 3B-4B second semester
This course will introduce students to the effects of weather on aviation. Specific emphasis will be placed on weather information
available to a pilot, and the hazards of weather to aviation operations. This course must be taken for S.L.C.C. Concurrent
Enrollment credit (PILT 1020, 2 credits).

PRIVATE PILOT GROUND SCHOOL
Semester (2 period block) 12 grade                     Lab Fee Required

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Periods: 1A-2A or 3A-4A first semester
A study of aviation fundamentals, principals of flight, aircraft and engine operations, weather, navigation, and radio
communications as required by FAA regulations will be covered by this course. Students will be prepared to begin flight training.
This course must be taken for S.L.C.C. Concurrent Enrollment credit (PILT 1100, 5 credits).
AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS
Semester (2 period block) 12 grade                      Lab Fee Required
Periods: 1B-2B or 3B-4B first semester
This is an introductory course to provide pilots with the understanding of aircraft systems, components, and basic operations
general to all aircraft. Included will be information about power plants, fuel, and electrical systems. This course must be taken
for S.L.C.C. Concurrent Enrollment credit (PILT 1420, 3 credits).

AVIATION ORIENTATION
Second Semester 12 grade                               Lab Fee Required
This course is scheduled after school at SLCC’s airport facility.
Students will be introduced to many aspects of the aviation industry, job opportunities, flight program, procedures, and how to
finance flight training. Students will be given the opportunity to meet with industry personnel. This course must be taken for
S.L.C.C. Concurrent Enrollment credit (PILT 1040, 1 credit).

SOLO PILOT CERTIFICATION LAB
Second Semester 12 grade                              Lab Fee Required
This course is scheduled after school at SLCC’s airport facility.
Prerequisite: Students must pass both PILT 1310 and PILT 1100 prior to flying in PILT 1140.
Students will begin flight training* with FAA certified flight instructor. Training will include all skills necessary to fly solo.
*Note: Flight hours for this course and supplies will incur an additional cost. Payment can be made weekly for flight
hours. Students fly once per week for just over an hour. This course is scheduled after school.




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                                    REGISTRATION WORKSHEET 2009-2010

REGISTRATION STEPS:
    1.       Carefully review all the course descriptions and prerequisites in the THS School Registration Booklet.
             Students must select a total of 8 units of credit to complete the registration form. Refer to the Registration
             Booklet for information on graduation requirements. These must include no less than 3 courses from the
             core curriculum courses (English, Social Studies, Math, Science, and Foreign Language).
    2.       Write in the course name and number on the chart, and obtain the appropriate teacher’s signature. List 2
             alternate full year classes and 2 alternate semester classes in the space provided.
    3.       If you are college-bound, select classes needed for college preparation and admissions:
              At least 3 years of math beginning with Elementary Algebra.
              Al least 3 years of science: Biology, Physics, or Chemistry and one other class.
              Athletes need to consider additional N.C.A.A. requirements.
              2 consecutive years of the same foreign language taken during 7th-12th grade. (Recommend Required)
    4.       Consider the following requirements when choosing your other classes:
              Classes needed to complete graduation requirements.
              Classes that connect with student’s talents, interests, or abilities.
              Classes that will train you in skills you can use to get a job.
                Classes that prepare you for education and training beyond high school.

These numbers do not represent periods of enrollment. Class periods are randomly selected by computer.
                                               SEMESTER 1
             Course Number                    Teacher Signature                            Course Name
         1
         2
         3
         4
         5
         6
         7
         8

                                               SEMESTER 2
             Course Number                    Teacher Signature                            Course Name
         1
         2
         3
         4
         5
         6
         7
         8

LIST ALTERNATE CLASSES:
     Full Year Classes 1.                                      #                  2.                      #
     Semester Classes  1.                                      #                  2.                      #



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