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									                                CTC AmeriCorps*VISTA Project
                              Appended Affiliate Progress Reports
                                       May 10, 2002
                   Covering the period August 15, 2001-February 14, 2002


                                                      Table of Contents

Twin Cities FreeNet (TCFN)/Community Computer Access Network,
    Minneapolis, MN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Boat People SOS, Arlington, VA; Hampton, VA; Washington, DC;
    Philadelphia, PA; Atlanta, GA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Plumas County Health Center/Computers in Our Future, Quincy, CA . . . . . . . . . . .14
Friends of Tyler School, Washington, DC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Garfield Childs Memorial Fund, Richmond, VA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
CTCNet National Office, Cambridge, MA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Lowell (MA) Community Technology Consortium: Lowell Telecom. Corp,
    New Beginnings, PathFinder/Milestone, Transitional Living Center . . . . . . . . .29
Malden (MA) Access Television . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
RTPNet, Research Triangle Park, NC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Durham (CA) Literacy Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
San Diego (CA) Cyber-Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Little Tokyo Service Center, Los Angeles, CA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
DSSA/Chicago (IL) Housing Authority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Fenway CDC, Boston, MA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Black Family and Child Institute, Lansing, MI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Adult Literacy Resource Institute, Boston, MA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
Street Level Youth Media, Chicago, IL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Kids Computer Workshop, Washington, DC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Excellence By Choice/Town Park, Miami, FL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Inquilinos Boricuas En Accíon (IBA), Boston, MA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Grand Rapids (MI) Community Media Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Bruce Wall Ministries/PREP Computer Center, Boston, MA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
KCNet, Lockhaven, PA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Allston-Brighton CDC, Boston, MA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

Hardcopy version only (as noted in the above reports)                 pp. 93-149
   Supplementary material for Plumas County Health Center/Computers in Our
   Future, Quincy, CA; CTCNet National Office, Cambridge, Lowell (MA)
   Community Technology Consortium; Malden (MA) Access Television;
   RTPNet, Research Triangle Park, NC; Durham (CA) Literacy Council; Little
   Tokyo Service Center, Los Angeles, CA; Excellence By Choice/Town Park,
   Miami, FL



                                                                   CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 1
Twin Cities FreeNet/Community Computer Access Network
VISTA Member: Jeff Streier
Since our last reporting period, our VISTA member, Jeff Streier has greatly extended the
outreach capacity of the C-CAN program through his work in the communities we serve. The
work Mr. Streier is doing in association with the C-CAN project is helping local CTCs better
serve their constituents, and helping our organization fulfill our mission as a regional ―digital
divide‖ network.

Communications Support
Resource management and dissemination, and maintaining updated communication tools
(newsletters and website) are key to the success of this regional collaborative. All external
communication materials are developed by Mr. Streier and edited by the project manager,
Catherine Settanni. Resource links on the C-CAN website are researched and categorized, and
updated regularly by Jeff, as are meeting minutes, articles, and resource documents from other
sources, such as the national CTCnet listserve and website.

Hands-On Service
Many of the day-to-day tasks Mr. Streier is responsible for involve communication with, and
direct service to, our 50+ member CTCs (Community Technology Centers). CTCs contact Jeff
directly to inquire about resources and opportunities they need to improve service delivery at
their centers. In addition, Jeff spends 2-3 days per week ―on location‖ at member computer
centers, mentoring individuals, assisting staff with classes, and helping with future program
development.




An example of the success C-CAN is having as a direct result of Mr. Streiers‘ work in the
community is illustrated in the following story:

       One of C-CAN‘s members, the Digital Access project, was asked to provide beginning
       computer classes for several seniors at a local CTC. With limited staff, this organization
       was unable to provide the kind of one-on-one support seniors need to develop confidence


                                                  CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 2
        using computers and the Internet. Working with Digital Access, Jeff Streier developed a
        plan to meet with a group of 2-3 seniors on a weekly basis, at a lab located in their
        neighborhood, to teach basic skills. By the third week, there were 10 seniors coming to
        the lab seeking assistance, and Jeff was able to help all of them use the computers for
        various tasks, including scanning photos and using email to send their photos as files.
        This weekly ―senior drop in‖ project has been very successful in linking seniors to the
        available technology services in their community, and serves as a model for other
        organizations interested in working with this population.

Following our 2001 annual conference, numerous CTC constituents requested our support in
helping recruit, train and refer volunteers to their programs. In response to this request from the
communities we serve, Mr. Streier has been given the task of researching tools and resources for
our 2002 initiative, the C-CAN ―Volunteer HUB‖ project.

The Volunteer HUB project includes development of an interactive database that allows
volunteers to find opportunities at local computer centers, and allows staff at local centers to
identify volunteers. Mr. Streier is currently working with a volunteer on development and
implementation of this database. Dissemination of technology-oriented teaching materials are
also part of this project, and Jeff is collecting these materials and making them available to our
constituents.

In addition to the database project, Mr. Streier contacted the CompuMentor organization and, in
association with this non-profit organization, arranged a volunteer management seminar to be
hosted by C-CAN in the summer of 2002. Plans for the summer include attending community
and neighborhood events and signing up volunteers, passing out information about local CTC
initiatives, and demonstrating the Volunteer HUB database for CTCs interested in using this tool.

Over the past nine months, C-CAN has evolved from a limited project into a dynamic and
valuable community resource. Because of the community organizing work done by Mr. Streier,
attendance at C-CAN meetings has increased by over 50%. Because of the success of this
project, the C-CAN has recently assembled its own Advisory Board. Plans for the coming year
include incorporation as a stand-alone 501c3 Non-Profit organization, with a diverse and active
Board of Directors committed to the sustainability of C-CAN.

Also available: newsletter

Work Plan Summary

Goal I: Promote awareness among the target population of the existence of community computer centers and of how
to find a center nearby.

Obj. 1: Design and distribute a simple form for 30 member centers to use to keep track of the weekly usership of
their centers during the year and beyond; 1st Qtr.

Obj. 2: Establish a comprehensive database of computer centers in the metro area (approximately 50), and make this
information available via a simple telephone call; 1st Qtr.




                                                          CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 3
Obj. 3: Establish an automatic quarterly notification system to encourage centers that are listed in the database to
update their entries; 2nd Qtr.

Obj. 4: Recruit 10 volunteers from the community to help distribute flyers in their neighborhoods; 1st-3rd Qtrs.

Obj. 5: Publicize the existence of centers and of the telephone number through monthly press releases and
advertisements in 6 local newspapers, flyers in 500 public spaces, inserts in utility bills that go to the entire metro
population of 2.5 million, and two billboards in the Empowerment Zone; 1st-2nd Qtrs.

Obj. 6: Collect usership forms each month from participating centers to gauge the increase in usership and conduct a
survey of 250 community leaders to gauge their awareness of centers and their ability to pass that awareness on to
others; 4th Qtr.

Goal II: Promote a comfortable attitude towards technology and computer centers among the target populations.

Obj. 1: Recruit and train volunteers as necessary so that help is available during at least half of the 30 participating
centers' public hours to answer users' questions and fix problems that arise; 2nd Qtr.

Obj. 2: Evaluate each volunteer's performance through feedback forms distributed after each class, and provide
additional instruction as necessary; 1st-4th Qtrs.

Obj. 3: Create multilingual training materials (Spanish, Hmong, Lao, and Somali) covering basic computer and
Internet skills and distribute them to 30 participating centers so that language will not be a barrier to access; 2nd Qtr.

Obj. 4: Conduct an informal, multilingual survey of 250 members of target populations to gauge their comfort with
using the centers; 4th Qtr.

Obj. 5: Encourage the volunteers to educate themselves and to train their successors; 3rd-4th Qtrs.

Goal III: Ensure that the work of the C-CAN will continue after the AmeriCorps*VISTA members leave.

Obj. 1: See that representatives of all organizations having a stake in the success of the C-CAN (including parks,
libraries, schools, and community organizations as well as the 30 participating centers) either attend monthly
Advisory Council meetings or are advised of the minutes of those meetings; 2nd Qtr.

Obj. 2: Document and enforce our expectations of participating centers, including completion of usage forms and
surveys and responsible disposal of used equipment; 3rd Qtr.

Obj. 3: Document all work done by the AmeriCorps*VISTA members so that it can be continued by TCFN staff or
volunteers; 4th Qtr.

Obj. 4: Pass the responsibility for all ongoing tasks such as maintenance of the database and distribution of publicity
materials on to interns or volunteers; 4th Qtr.

The C-CAN 2002 strategic plan relies very heavily on Mr. Streiers‘ work as a community
organizer. The main project C-CAN is working on for 2002 is the creation and implementation
of a local/ regional Volunteer Hub. This Volunteer Hub will provide a mechanism for all area
community technology projects to recruit, train and manage technical volunteers within their
programs. This project, along with organizing quarterly meetings, scheduling and organizing
several nationally sponsored training seminars and helping organize an annual conference, will
occupy most of Jeffs‘ time in coming months.

During the last 2 quarters of service, VISTA member, Jeff Streier accomplished the following:



                                                             CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 4
1. Visited several new and existing community computer centers and interviewed program
   directors and staff about their needs and concerns. Continued outreach to attract more
   members to meetings and the annual conference.
2. Updated the current database of CTC‘s in the Twin Cities and began work on migrating this
   data to a new online database for use as part of the Volunteer Hub.
3. Continued to provide training/mentoring for a group of seniors at one of the C-CAN member
   labs: The Corcoran Neighborhood Organizations‘ Senior Center.
4. Participated in conversations pertaining to the actual needs of the Twin Cities centers.
5. Organized and facilitated 2 quarterly C-CAN meetings. Introduced centers to each other
   through these meetings. Developed handouts and materials about meeting topics.
6. Developed and produced a monthly newsletter for the C-CAN. Facilitated information
   dissemination via a monthly newsletter both in online and hard copy formats.
7. Continued to update and revise the C-CAN website. Added an entire links area and added new
   features, such as information about national initiatives.
8. Continued work on developing a volunteer-match database for use by local C-CAN/ CTC
   affiliates.
9. Worked to bring CompuMentor seminars to the Twin Cities through correspondence with
   CTCnet and CompuMentor program directors.

Mr. Streier currently spends approximately 50% of his time working in the community, helping
out at local computer labs, meeting with lab staff and program directors, and attending meetings
with the C-CAN director and our project partners. The rest of his time is spent developing
outreach and resource materials, working on the databases in development, and managing
relationships with C-CAN member organizations.

During the upcoming quarter, objectives for our member will be to:

1. Continue developing a network of community computer centers. Meet with new program
   director as new programs come online, and work with current CTC/ DOE grant recipients to
   provide support for community technology programs.
2. Continue to develop information sharing system, including a volunteer-match database
   project. Use the website and email to disseminate information from national resources.
3. Continuing teaching beginning computer skills to seniors at a C-CAN member public access
   center.
4. Work with two C-CAN volunteers on development of an online volunteer matching database
   system (in development now).
5. Maintain record keeping and documentation in order to transfer knowledge to future staff or
   volunteers.
6. Coordinate two upcoming training seminars provided by CompuMentor.
7. Work on materials and work plans for several outreach events this summer, including the
   annual C-CAN conference in September.
8. Oversee the new C-CAN working committees and help facilitate action plans developed
   within these committees.
9. Continue to explore new relationships with other Non Profit organizations and technology
   projects operating in the Twin Cities metro area.




                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 5
Boat People SOS: Arlington, VA
VISTA Member: James Nguyen
        For the reporting period of August 15, 2001 through February 15, 2002, James Nguyen
has continued to oversee the Community Technology Center (CTC) at the Lockwood/Elmwood
House for Senior Citizens in Arlington, Virginia. During this period, 10 Vietnamese, 6 Korean,
and 3 English speaking students have enrolled in the computer class instructed by 2 volunteers.
The computer classes are categorized to serve three different target populations, Vietnamese,
Korean, and English speaking students.
        Many of these Senior citizens have never turned on a computer, let alone know how to
use a mouse; therefore, the curriculum developed is very elementary. Course materials cover
identification of major parts of a computer, use of keyboard and mouse, identification and
familiarization with the computer itself, use of Mavis Beacon Typing Tutor, surfing the Internet,
and learning Microsoft Word. The volunteers‘ approach to teaching these students is more hands
on experience and one-on-one tutoring rather than standing before the class and lecturing.
        The computer classes encompass structured and unstructured environments, allowing
students to gain experience while having access to instructor‘s assistance. Approximately 30
minutes to 1 hour is allotted to lab time during which students are able to apply the tools they‘ve
learned previously in the classroom.
        Since the CTC became operational, the computer class has attracted many individuals.
The Senior citizens enrolled in these classes are excited and look forward to attending classes.
However, the only immediate hindrance is that these Senior citizens are impatient because they
only want to learn how to send e-mails and surf the Internet; thus, it‘s difficult for the volunteers
to adhere to the established computer curriculum.
        The CTC has been operational a little less than a year; however, it is evident that the CTC
and its developments have made a difference in the lives of those residing at
Lockwood/Elmwood House for Senior Citizens.

Work Plan Summary

Goal 2a: Provide basic computer skills to target population
Objective 2a: No, an ESL curriculum has not been developed because he was not able to recruit
volunteers to teach the class.
Objective 2b: He maintained the website for ACCESS for a little more than one month.
However, the task was later handled to a BPSOS staff member.
Objective 2c: Yes, he has helped a BPSOS staff on activities in support of Lockwood/Elmwood
House for Senior Citizens.

Goal 3a: Human Services
Objective 3a: He worked on Human Trafficking for approximately one month and then he
assisted another staff member with the Tax Assistance for Vietnamese Immigrants with Low
Income (TAVILI) program.
Objective 3b: Yes, he has conducted surveys taken from TAVILI program to evaluate the needs
of community members.
Objective 3c: Yes, he has been working with a BPSOS staff member in maintaining the
distribution for BPSOS newsletter.


                                                  CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 6
Goal 4a: Vietnamese-language newspaper.
Objective 4a: He has not yet completed this task.
Objective 4b: He has not yet completed this task.


Boat People SOS: Hyattsville, MD
VISTA Member: Quan Hoang
        Quan Hoang has continued to oversee the CTC set up at Asian Town in Hyattsville,
Maryland since May of 2001. During the reporting period August 15, 2001 through February 15,
2002, Quan has made great efforts in recruiting volunteers and students for the computer and
ESL classes. He has recruited 1 ESL and two computer instructors.
        This CTC serves the Vietnamese target population, many whom are recent refugees and
immigrants who have been in the U.S. for less than 7 to 10 years who face an array of barriers,
such as lack of English and technology proficiency. Thus, at the CTC, Quan has developed an
ideal computer curriculum curtailed to the students enrolled in the computer class. The computer
curriculum is very detailed describing the materials covered, the time frame in which it will be
covered, and the process of evaluating the effectiveness and successfulness of the materials
taught to these students. Course materials cover identification of computer concepts,
identification and familiarization of the keyboard and its functions, using windows explorer,
attaining knowledge and know-how of Word Processing, using Excel to create spreadsheets, and
navigating the World Wide Web.
         The ESL instructor relies on text books and research via the internet when gathering
materials for the course and in developing the curriculum. The ESL lessons are aimed at
teaching students who don‘t have a grasp of the English language; therefore, the lessons and the
materials covered are very fundamental. Lessons include learning the alphabet, counting
numbers, learning the tenses, and developing fully structured sentences. Just learning the basics
is adequate, but not sufficient if these individuals are expected to assimilate into mainstream
society. Because of this dilemma, the ESL instructor emphasizes a need for each student to
partner up with another classmate and practice conversational English.

 Name of class         Starting        Completion          # of students         # of students
                                                             enrolled              who have
                                                                                  completed
PC 02             09/07/2001         12/05/2001          15                    11
PC 03             09/06/2001         12/07/2001          14                    03
PC 04             01/24/2002         04/25/2002          16                    n/a


    ESL 02        09/18/2001         11/27/2001          13                    07
    ESL 03        01/04/2002         4/05/2002           12                    n/a

         This center has been and continues to be an attraction to the target population and other
institutions as well. BPSOS CTC in Hyattsville, Maryland was selected by the Corporation for
National Service and AmeriCorps*VISTA as one of the four projects to be in the photo shoot to


                                                  CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 7
capture the impact of AmeriCorps*VISTA members on communities across the country. The
photo shoot highlighted the work of BPSOS AmeriCorps*VISTA members and the organization
itself. The photos include, among other things, VISTAs teaching community members how to
use computers and interacting with students in the ESL classes.

Workplan Summary

Goal 2a: Provide basic computer and set up ESL classes for the target population.
Objective 2a: 14 Vietnamese students have completed the first 3-month computer class.
Objective 2b: A curriculum for the ESL class has been developed.
Objective 2c: 25 students have been enrolled for ESL class.

Goal 3a: Provide basic computer and English skills to the target population.
Objective 3a: 16 additional students are currently enrolled in the computer class.
Objective 3b: 12 additional students are currently enrolled in the ESL class.

Goal 4a: Improve access to services.
Objective 4a: Yes, a referral service with interpretation and translation provided to persons with
limited English proficiency has been set up.
Objective 4b: Yes, he has organized workshops on human services and radio talk shows which
include the following: Individual Development Account (IDA); Tax Assistance for Vietnamese
Immigrants with Low Income (TAVILI); Community Awareness on Domestic Violence
(CADV); Community Awareness Campaign on Occupational Safety (CACOS); Victims of
Torture Assistance Program (VTAP); and Health Awareness Programs for Immigrants Plus
(HAPI+).
Objective 4c: Yes, he is assisting the Association of Former Vietnamese Political Prisoner
(AFVPP) in capacity building.
Objective 4d: No, he has not written monthly articles for BPSOS newsletter.


Boat People SOS: Falls Church, VA
VISTA Member: Kim-Oanh Nguyen
        Kim-Oanh Nguyen identified a location for a new CTC to be set up at Willston Senior
Center in Falls Church, Virginia. In order to get a better understanding of the layout, BPSOS
staff and technician came and examined the interior of the center, and designed a blue print as to
where the computers would be set up. Although there was a verbal agreement between the
manager of the center and Kim-Oanh, at the last minute the manger reneged and did not allow
BPSOS to set up a CTC at that location.

       She has recruited two volunteer instructors who will teach computers and English as a
Second Language at the Fairfax County Skillsource Center. There are two rooms fully equipped
with approximately 20-25 computers per room. Also, there is a room that can be utilized as a
classroom where ESL will be taught. The partnership between BPSOS and Fairfax County
Skillsource Center acts as a one-stop shop where individuals can acquire computer skills,
improve their ESL skills, and retain employment.


                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 8
         Aside from addressing the technology aspect, Kim-Oanh has coordinated and organized
activities for youth at the Moon Festival and Lunar New Year Festival. These holidays
symbolize the heritage, culture, and life of the Vietnamese people.

        She also organized the Halloween party for youths addressing the fear of going outdoors
after 9/11. She knew many parents would feel unsafe with their children going out trick-or-
treating; therefore, she planned a Halloween party in a safe and enjoyable environment where
children and parents could interact with one another.

Workplan Summary

Goal 1a: Establish new CTC.
Objective 1a: She identified a location for a new CTC to be set up; however; at the last minute
plans fell through.
Objective 1b: She has recruited two volunteer instructors.

Goal 2a: After-school activities for youth.
Objective 2a: She has not yet completed this task.
Objective 2b: She has taught cultural activities to youth.
Objective 2c: She organized a Halloween party for youths addressing the fear of going outdoor
after 9/11.
Objective 2d: Yes, she got parents to participate in the Halloween event with their children.

Goal 3a: Community outreach.
Objective 3a: Yes, she has helped BPSOS staff with workshops on domestic violence, health
issues, and mental health issues.
Objective 3b: She has not yet completed this task.
Objective 3c: She has recruited and trained 1 community outreach volunteer.
Objective 3d: She has not yet completed this task.

Goal 4a: Community events.
Objective 4a: Yes, she coordinated activities for youth at Moon Festival and Lunar New Year.
Objective 4b: Yes, she has organized recreational events at selected neighborhoods (Yorkville,
Culmore)
Objective 4c: Yes, she replicated this model to other locations (Hampton; Virginia; Maryland;
DC)


Boat People SOS: Arlington, VA
VISTA Member: Vy Phan
       For the reporting period of August 15, 2001 through February 15, 2002, Vy Phan along
with James Nguyen oversaw the operations of the Community Technology Center (CTC) at the
Lockwood/Elmwood House for Senior Citizens in Arlington, Virginia. A few days shy of
February 15, 2002, he completed his one year of service. However, while he was a VISTA


                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 9
member he taught basic computer classes to adults three times a week. The computer classes
served three different target populations, Vietnamese, Korean, and English speaking students.
        Many of these Senior citizens have never turned on a computer, let alone know how to
use a mouse; therefore, the curriculum developed is very elementary. Course materials cover
identification of major parts of a computer, use of keyboard and mouse, identification and
familiarization with the computer itself, use of Mavis Beacon Typing Tutor, surfing the Internet,
and learning Microsoft Word. The volunteers‘ approach to teaching these students is more hands
on experience and one-on-one tutoring rather than standing before the class and lecturing.
        The computer classes encompass structured and unstructured environments, allowing
students to gain experience while having access to instructor‘s assistance. Approximately 30
minutes to 1 hour is allotted to lab time during which students are able to apply the tools they‘ve
learned previously in the classroom.
        Since the CTC became operational, the computer class has attracted many individuals.
The Senior citizens enrolled in these classes are excited and look forward to attending classes.
However, the only immediate hindrance is that these Senior citizens are impatient because they
only want to learn how to send e-mails and surf the Internet; thus, it‘s difficult for the volunteers
to adhere to the established computer curriculum.
        The CTC has been operational a little less than a year; however, it is evident that the CTC
and its developments have made a difference in the lives of those residing at
Lockwood/Elmwood House for Senior Citizens.

Workplan Summary

Goal 2: Provide basic computer and set up ESL classes for the target population.
Objective 2a: He taught basic computer skills to adults three times a week.
Objective 2b: 7 students have completed the first 3-month computer class.
Objective 2c: No, he was not able to enroll students into the ESL class because he did not set up
an ESL at the center.
Objective 2d: Yes, he continued to translate OSHA materials from English to Vietnamese. He
distributed OSHA materials along with TAVILI materials at information workshops conducted
by BPSOS.
Objective 2e: He did not start a monthly column on CTCs for BPSOS newsletter.

Goal 3: Provide basic computer and English skills to the target population.
Objective 3a: He tried to set up a second CTC at the Evangelist Church in Northern Virginia,
but was not successful in doing so.

Goal 4a: Improve access to services.
Objective 4a: Since the previous report, he has continued to conduct 5 minutes radio talk shows
on a weekly basis.
Objective 4b: No, he did not complete this task.
Objective 4c: No, he did not complete this task.
Objective 4d: Please see above (Goal 2: Objective 2d)




                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 10
Boat People SOS: Hampton, PA
VISTA Member: Huynhanh Tran
Boat People S.O.S. office in the Hampton area opened officially in September of 2001. Soon
after, in November 2001, the CTC was established. Since the establishment of the CTC,
Huynhanh has not been successful in recruiting/training ESL or computer instructors. Three
students are enrolled in the ESL class, and 5 students are enrolled in the computer class.
According to the work plan, it was proposed that she would have already organized workshops
addressing life skills and community needs, but she has been unable to accomplish this task.
However, she has distributed and posted fliers advertising BPSOS services and the computer and
ESL classes offered at the CTC. She has handed out an posted these fliers at churches, temples,
and in Vietnamese grocery stores.

The CTC in Hampton has not been a success. Of the students enrolled in the computer class,
none have completed the first 3-month computer class. Many students have dropped out of the
class because they are unable to attend the class during the regular hours because it conflicts with
their work schedule. There are a number of community members who feel that the CTC is
unnecessary because if they need assistance with computers or English, they can always rely on
their children. However, there are individuals who are in favor and believe that the CTC is
beneficial. According to these individuals, there is a willingness to learn basic computer skills
and English; however, the dilemma that they encounter is in finding transportation to and from
the CTC.

Aside from the technology aspect, Huynhanh has assisted the local community improve access to
services. To better inform the Vietnamese community in Hampton, she has placed fliers in
newsletters that are mailed to community members residing in the Hampton area advertising
services provided by BPSOS and the CTC. She has also organized workshops on human
services. She does outreach for the Health Awareness Program for Immigrants (HAPI+)
program that address and inform individuals about breast and cervical cancer. She has organized
4 workshops, and the attendance is approximately 10 persons per workshop. Two of the work
shops were held in Vietnamese temples, and the other two were in churches.

The CTC has been operational for 5 months, and during this time we have encountered
unexpected obstacles to student enrollment, and VISTA supervision. Dr. Nguyen and Bach
Pham have planned a site visit in order to develop strategies to combat these obstacles.

Workplan Summary

Goal 1a: Set up project.
Objective 1a: A CTC was set up in Hampton in November 2001.
Objective 1b: No ESL or computer instructors have been recruited/trained.
Objective 1c: 3 students enrolled in the ESL class, and 5 students enrolled in the computer class.
Objective 1d: No local Steering Committee has been set up for the implementation of BPSOS
programs.
Objective 1e: She has not organized workshops addressing life skills and community needs.



                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 11
Goal 2a: Provide basic computer and English skills to the target population.
Objective 2a: No students have completed the first 3-month computer class.
Objective 2b: No after-school activities for youths have been set-up at the CTC.

Goal 3a: Citizenship classes.
Objective 3a: The citizenship class started on September 2001.
Objective 3b: 2 students were recruited for the citizenship classes.
Objective 3c: She has helped students apply for naturalization, fee waiver, and disability waiver.

Goal 4a: Helping local community improve access to services.
Objective 4a: Yes, she has surveyed the local human services.
Objective 4b: Yes, she organized workshops on human services.
Objective 4c: Yes, she set up a referral service with interpretation and translation to persons with
limited English proficiency.
Objective 4c: Yes, she has published a local Vietnamese language newsletter covering human
services.
Objective 4d: She has not trained any volunteers to help with outreach activities.


Boat People SOS: Decatur, GA
VISTA Member: Anh Quy Luc
         Anh Quy Luc found unoccupied space available at Trinity Church in Decatur, GA. The
CTC became operational on February 01, 2002. In the church, three rooms are designated solely
for the use of the CTC. The first room is a computer lab equipped with seven computers with
Internet access. The two remaining rooms are utilized as after school classrooms where students
can get tutoring, assistance with homework, and prepare for tests and quizzes. One college
student and a retired teacher volunteer as mentors at the CTC. Between the two, they mentor 7
girls from 1st through 8th grades. For the time being, Quy Anh mentors 10 boys from 1st through
8th grades; however, he is looking for a volunteer to replace him.

        The hours of the after school program at the CTC are from 3:30 P.M. to 6:00 P.M. on
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday. Students get help with their homework and one-on-
one tutoring. Because of the limited number of computers in the lab compared to the number of
students enrolled in the after school program, each student only has half an hour to use the
computer. Volunteers may, from time to time, assign specific internet assignments to students,
that require them to navigate the web in search of research materials. At other times, students
may engage in independent internet usage or web searches.

       According to the outlined AmeriCorps*VISTA Project Goals and Objectives for Quy
Anh, he was to have introduced computer training (computer class) for adults. However, he has
not accomplished this task because he has not been able to recruit volunteers to teach the
computer class, and has not found adults who are interested in enrolling in the class. In order to
evaluate whether it is feasible to conduct an adult computer class, Quy Anh will need to assess
the needs and interests of community members in obtaining CTC services such as adult ESL and



                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 12
computer classes. He survey community members, and based on the findings, he and BPSOS
will decide whether a computer class for adults is practical.

Workplan summary

Goal 1a: Assist in setting up one new CTC in Atlanta.
Objective 1a: A CTC was set up at Trinity Church on February 01, 2002.
Objective 1b: 1 volunteer was recruited from colleges and universities.
Objective 1c: 17 students were recruited to join the program.
Objective 1d: The after school activities include tutoring/homework assistance, and lab time.
Objective 1e: No, computer training has been started for adults.

Goal 2a: After-School Services
Objective 2a: Yes, 17 elementary and middle school students have received tutoring and
homework assistance.
Objective 2b: The after school program are on M-T-Th-F from 3:30 P.M. to 6:00 P.M.
Objective 2c: Yes, basic computer program skills training are provided for students.
Objective 2d: He has not yet completed this task

Goal 3a: Citizenship classes.
Objective 3a: He has not yet completed this task.
Objective 3b: He has not yet completed this task.
Objective 3c: He has not yet completed this task.

Goal 4a: Human services.
Objective 4a: He has not yet completed this task.
Objective 4b: He has not yet completed this task.
Objective 4c: Yes, he has set up interpretation, translation, and referral services.
Objective 4d: He had not ye completed this task.




                                                  CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 13
Plumas County Health Center, Computers In Our Future, Quincy,
CA — VISTA Member: Dan Ambrose
  Overall Goal: To work in computer technology arena to increase individual capacity through
  basic skills, literacy, employment opportunities, to increase business competitiveness through
  video conference, web presence, telehealth/telemedicine efforts and to increase community
  capacity through policy, partnerships, infrastructure improvements while bridging the
  ―digital divide.‖

  Objective 1: To coordinate a mini-grant process for 5-7 organizations to develop
  Community Service, web-base projects, provide technical assistance to grantees, and
  document the project. (20-30 hours per week for 9 months).
     1. Develop an RFP (request for proposal) for those seeking grant funding including a
         process for dissemination, documentation, and tracking.
     2. Arrange for purchase of materials for projects through local vendors.
     3. Provide training and technical assistance ( approximately 2-3 hours per week) for
         each grant recipient group to research their projects.
     4. Document process of each recipient group and prepare a report, both for Power Point
         and in hard copy.
     5. Plan a community celebration at the conclusion of the project period and present a
         report on the projects to the community.
     6. Develop a ‗Tool Kit‖ for the mini-grant process to be used for project replication in
         other communities. (Qtrs. 1-3)

  Summary: This part of the project has been modified to accommodate the needs of the local
  community for VISTA assistance. Rather than issue an RFP and coordinate several mini-
  grant projects the local Power-Up Coordinator asked that Dan coordinate a project that
  Indian Valley residents wanted using the Power-Up computer lab. The project was funded
  by Power-Up and the VISTA worked with children in an already established after school
  program to develop a mural for the Greenville Senior Nutrition Site. Using the computers
  the students researched murals in the Internet and developed a plan. Dan contacted local
  adult artists who will work with the students to paint the mural on a wall at the Greenville
  Senior Nutrition Center. He now has the RFP and the Tool Kit will be ready to begin a mini-
  grant process.

  Dan continues to provide technical assistance to the local Indian Education Center,
  Roundhouse Council which houses one of the two computer labs in Indian Valley. He has
  been teaching classes to both adults and kids in an effort to provide a volunteer base to
  continue computer skills instruction for this small rural community when he is no longer
  working there. This work has also given him contacts with local residents who he will try to
  involve in the completion of Objective 2.

  Additional information about this objective is contained in the progress report submitted on
  October 31, 2001. Copies of additional documentation of VISTA achievements have been
  sent via regular mail.



                                              CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 14
Objective 2: Coordinate a mini-grant in another community in the county, possibly Portola, to
fund another series of community Service, web-based projects. (20-30 hours/week)
       1. Develop and disseminate an or otherwise help select an appropriate community in the
           county for a second project..
f. Undertake activities 1-6 as per objective 1 (Qts. 2-4)
g.
Summary: Using the community connections that he has developed over the past six months
Dan has begun using the mini-grant process that he has developed. An RFP has been issued and
he has been contacting local service groups to interest them in participating. Currently two
groups have completed the RFP and will begin work on their projects. One project will be an
Orienteering project to build a new trail. The second project involves conducting a food drive.

Objective 3: Provide technical assistance to the Healthy Plumas On-line Project (HPOP) which
provides technology access to 4 access clusters (the Senior Nutrition sites, the Public Housing
sites, the disabled adult program, and the Greenville Rancheria). (Twenty hours per week for
twelve months.)
        1. Create and support interactive Website elements.
        2. Improve and enhance the Website survey so that users are more likely to complete
        the survey and more accurate information is obtained.
        3. Make the Website more user friendly so that every resident can obtain accurate and
            understandable Health care information with a minimum of confusion. (Qtrs. 2-4)

Summary: In order to accomplish these goals, Dan has designed and implemented an entirely
new look and feel for the site and developed some branding and logos. This will serve as the
skeleton on which to build new content. Dan has been working to change the site over to a
dynamic format which can be updated after his departure. The new format which he has
implemented in the Community Resource Directory portion of the website was published on
March 12. Meetings have been conducted to determine the best structure for the other sections
of the Website. We are now ready to transfer that system knowledge and format to the rest of the
website to achieve sustainability by July.

Dan continues to integrate into the community working with the Plumas County Arts
Commission activities. He has written several news articles about his work which have been
carried in the local papers. He is proving to be a real asset to our community and our
technology development.

Additional information about the progress for this objective is contained in the progress report
submitted on October 31, 2001. Copies of additional documentation have been sent via regular
mail.

Project Accomplishments:

Dan has spent at least 20 hours per week developing the systems that will support the
maintenance of the Healthy Plumas Website when he is no longer here. He has set up a
procedure to manipulate and improve the website information without disturbing the normal
functioning of the website for the daily visitors. He has developed and tested a database that



                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 15
will provide the framework for the entire website. To do this Dan has worked with the
information in the Plumas County Community Resource Directory (one section of the Website)
to provide a system that will meet all the needs for updating and storing the information. Dan
has trained a clerk to use the new system to make regular information updates. The new system
which went live on March 12 meets the needs of the Healthy Plumas project while remaining
easy for the website visitor to understand and the navigate.

A system has also been developed and implemented on the website so visitors can communicate
with Dan via e-mail. He has been prompt in responding to input from the public and has made
changes to the Community Resource Directory as requested.

Dan has kept the public informed about both the Website development and the community
projects in the Greenville area. In December he participated in a presentation about the Website
and the Community Resource Directory to the County Board of Supervisors. In January he met
with the Indian Valley Collaborative to update them on the progress of his computer-based
projects with the students.

Dan developed and implemented a short survey needed by the local Tobacco Reduction program
and placed it into the Website so that they could gather data electronically.

At regular meetings between Dan and the supervisor the progress of website development is
assessed and new ideas are evaluated. While many of the changes that Dan has implemented are
not apparent to the public, the systems that he has been developing and perfecting will help to
insure the sustainability of this valuable health care resource for Plumas County.

Dan‘s other 20 hours/ week are spent in the neighboring town of Greenville creating sustainable
solutions for rural computing education. With few computer experts in the area and even fewer
computing educators, the digital divide has become pronounced, especially amongst those past
school-age. Dan has created a twelve-week ―Intro to Windows and the Internet‖ class for adults.
The class is available and free to any members of the community. When Dan‘s term ends, the
classes will be taught by trained volunteers (former students). All students are considered
potential volunteers and are trained to assist at public computing centers as a part of the ―Intro to
Windows and the Internet‖ class.

Dan has also created an after-school program for 4-6 grade centering around Internet research
and execution of public projects, with an emphasis on art and social consciousness. The students
have researched and designed a mural to be executed in May with a group of local artists and are
in the process of designing and executing a food drive for the local food bank. The students are
taught the value of inter-disciplinary pursuits.

Stories:

Over the past three months the VISTA supervisor has provided information and training about
the Healthy Plumas Website to over 150 residents. The response to the organization and
usefulness of the website, particularly the Community Resource Directory which Dan has been
working to improve have been overwhelmingly positive. The counter placed on the website



                                                  CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 16
indicates that there have been over 1200 hits in the past three months from about 600 unique
users. Considering that the county population is only 22,000 this represents access by three
percent of the county residents.

Dan has found the most rewards with his 4-6 grade students who eagerly greet him every week
and express a consistent interest and enthusiasm for their projects. They have all increased their
artistic skills and understand concepts such as composition, contrast, titling and shading. The
group enjoys investigating artists on the Internet and are operating at a very high-level of
competency in regards to research. They appreciate the value in following a project through
from brainstorming to finality.

Dan also finds rewarding the enthusiasm of his adult students who are willing to take what they
have learned and funnel it back into the community. He loves receiving email from his students
letting him know they are still using the skills he instilled in them.

Difficulties Encountered:

Dan was hired to work on Website development, however the Public Health Department office
had no available Internet connection for him to use. The problem was resolved when Dan was
able to work from his residence on a computer provided by Computers in Our Future.

Several difficulties were encountered due to the rural environment. Dan arrived without a
vehicle, but public transportation is limited and did not accommodate the hours that he needed to
work in the other community 20 miles away. Through the generosity of the Director of the
Health Agency he was able to get a serviceable vehicle. This presented an economic challenge
because the cost of insurance, vehicle maintenance and fuel now began to eat into his small
living stipend. Money continues to be a challenge due to higher than expected living expenses.

Another difficulty that was encountered and overcome was the challenge of two entirely
different work sites. While in Quincy where he lives he works from his residence on Website
development and meets regularly with the Project Supervisor, but during the day he is usually
online and not accessible by telephone. He also works in a small community about 20 miles
away. Keeping the lines of communication open and the information flowing between the two
very different project objectives has provided a challenge for both the VISTA and the supervisor.
E-mail and AOL instant messaging have been practical ways to improve the situation.

Hardcopies of the following were submitted to supplement this report:
    Indian Valley Record August 1st newspaper article on the Internet Day Camp
    Press Release on Fall '01 free computer access program and sample flyer for winter
      program
    October 17 Feathering Publishing article on the Resource Directory
    Indian Valley Record December 5th newspaper article on the PowerUp program
    Undated article on the computer grants program




                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 17
Friends of Tyler School, Washington, DC
VISTA Member: Nathan Kubiszewski
In November, soon after the arrival of our current Americorps VISTA volunteer, a
reorganization of the Friends of Tyler School Computer Technology Center (FOTS/CTC) began.
Open Labs continued to be offered after-school and evenings in November and December.
During this time the VISTA made preparations for classes, developing curricula and identifying
other resources for teaching. Beginning in mid-January, the FOTS/CTC has been able to sustain
several after-school computer classes and open lab during its four-day week schedule and
weekend workshops. The computer center has become a focal point of the FOTS program, with
attendance increasing weekly. The great success of the program has been due to the procedures
and programs that have been created by the current VISTA.

Plans have been establish to handle equipment donations, volunteer interests, and general
program management. Committees were formed to address the technical needs of the center and
improve the infrastructure of the computer labs.

Computer literacy resources have been organized in binders to use as curriculum during
computer classes. A rich library of assessment tools, lesson plans, books, educational software,
and websites has also been collected and will foster the future development of technology classes
and projects. Three classes have been successfully implemented and teach students basic
computer, Internet, desktop, and web design skills. Students, who are enrolled in the classes, are
provided many opportunities to creatively showcase their computer skills by completing
computer projects. With many more projects in the works, and with volunteers willing, the core
computer classes will begin to reach more students in the near future.

In addition to youth technology classes, parent workshops have been established on a weekly
basis. Saturday Workshops address various technology topics and programs, and allow parents
the opportunity to flexibly learn the skills they need or want to have. Workshops thus far have
included Internet 101, Computer 101, Women in Technology, and Microsoft Word Basics.
Curriculum, handouts, and an outline is developed for each workshop. As a result, the workshop
can be offered again in the future and can be taught by volunteers. Attendance for the workshops
has varied, but there has been a consistent group of parents that have been eager to learn
computer literacy skills.

The VISTA volunteer has been able to locate and utilize multiple websites to collect equipment
donations and potential volunteers. As a result, the program has received enough higher-end
equipment to create a secondary multimedia lab, where students and tutors can explore
educational software and desktop publishing. The donation of computers has also enabled the
program to continue its service to the families by recycling unused equipment to students. The
program prides itself on ensuring that all families have a working computer at home. Because of
recent donations, some families have been able to update their older equipment with a newer
donation. Four volunteers have been successfully recruited to work with the computer center or
tutoring program.




                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 18
To help build the capacity and sustain the program's infrastructure, a Technical Committee and
Web Committee has been created by our VISTA. Although technical needs have been relatively
little, the Technical Committee has proven to be a valuable asset for the VISTA. Volunteers on
the committee have helped troubleshoot networking problems, Internet bugs, and PC
refurbishing glitches. Similar to the Technical Committee, the Web Committee has been formed
to help sustain the center‘s infrastructure. With two web professionals and two students, the web
committee is taking an active role to complete the development of the FOTS website as a
marketable and functional site, while documenting the project and creating easy-to-use templates
for future VISTAs and volunteers to work with.

The availability of the lab to students, parents, and tutors has made the center a valuable tool for
the community. After-school and evenings, the lab is always in use by students who will use the
lab for homework, keyboarding, Internet, and/or computer classes. In the past month, the
computer center has been able to get 4-7 parents actively involved with the program; therefore,
creating a closer bond between program and families. The center has also played a key role in
providing resources to tutors and teachers in the program. A listserv was created to close a
communication gap between the center and the tutors. In addition, educational software and
Tutor Workshops have been implemented to help tutors utilize the technology available. Some
tutors have become consistent users of technology during tutoring.

The active presence of the computer center is a testimony of how Americorps VISTA volunteers
get things done. The FOTS computer technology center is still a young program, but the classes,
committees, resources, and relationships that have been successfully developed by our VISTA
has ensured that the program will continue to grow.

Workplan commentary

 Goal 1: Maintain, organize and upgrade computer center site
 a. Ensure that equipment remains in good working order, utilizing two FOTS volunteers
 b. Develop and maintain inventory of supplies, software, hardware
 c. Develop inventory of computer equipment donated to students and families
 d. Create/supervise a committee of FOTS volunteers and students to maintain our web site.
    (Qtrs. 1-4)

 Summary of Accomplished Objectives

A… Community volunteers have taught the Americorps VISTA Volunteer enough basic
computer maintenance and troubleshooting techniques to sustain the computer lab. A Technical
Committee of five community volunteers was formed to help troubleshoot technical problems
too large or difficult for the VISTA to fix. This committee is contacted by the VISTA when
assistance is needed.

B…C… Microsoft Access has been used to create databases to track software, hardware,
community and technology contacts, and student, tutor, and parent contacts. Each database has
easy-to-use interfaces to update information. In addition to computer-based inventories, tracking
procedures have been put into practice for common program functions. Equipment evaluation



                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 19
sheets are catalogued in a binder for all incoming and outgoing donations. Microsoft Word was
used to create simple tracking sheets for attendance, computer maintenance, and home inventory.

* A Technology Report has also been created to highlight program objectives, committees,
equipment, procedures, and program information.

D… A Web Committee has been created to re-develop the FOTS website, and contains two
volunteer web-professionals. The committee has had two successful meetings and continues to
develop a web map and web plan to document the project. Once planning elements have been
completed, 2-3 students (who have been identified) will assist the VISTA and volunteers in the
actual development. The committee‘s goal is to launch the new website by the completion of the
summer program, 2002. As a result, the website will be up and operational for the 2002-2003
school year. Easy to use templates are being created so that future VISTAS and volunteers can
easily update the web content and sustain the site.


A. Goal 2: Provide opportunities for FOTS students to use the FOTS computer center to
       improve typing and word processing skills and to learn to use the Internet.
 a. Provide 14-20 students with after-school classes/workshops or open computer time
    three or four days a week between 4:30 and 6 p.m. and one to two evenings a
    week between 6:30 and 8:30 p.m. focusing on keyboarding, word processing and
    using the Internet for academic research.
 b. Undertake a basic needs assessment of students participating in these classes and
    other FOTS students who will participate in future classes.
 c. Identify successful teaching tools at other CTCs and modify as needed to meet the
    needs of FOTS students; design new curricula as needed.
 e. Begin to identify resources and possible partnerships with other computer programs that
    work with students ages 5 to 18.
 f. Identify 2-3 students to use as peer teachers in after school computer programs. (1st Qtr)

Summary of Accomplished Objectives

A… The computer center has consistently served 15+ students during Open Lab hours Monday
through Thursday (hours vary). Open Lab procedures for students have been established and are
as follows: 1) Sign-in, 2) Complete homework, 3) Write an article for the FOTS Project
newsletter, 4) Complete an Open Lab project, and 5) Free computer time. Open Lab has fostered
a lot of insightful learning due to the one-on-one attention students receive from the VISTA and
volunteers. In addition to Open Lab, three computer courses have been successfully established.
Internet Quest teaches students fundamental Internet skills, Computer Explorers covers
keyboarding and basic computer literacy, and Web Wizards explores PowerPoint and Web-based
website creation. Curricular resources for the computer classes have been identified and
cataloged in curriculum binders. Additional classes and projects are being developed for the
spring and summer sessions.

C… Student files were created to track an initial general assessment to measure computer skills,
keyboard efficiency, and technology interests. General program assessments occur quarterly. In



                                               CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 20
addition, specific assessment pieces have been created to measure the skill objectives for
computer classes, which are given at the completion of the classes.

D… FOTS curricular resource binders have been created for computer classes and projects.
Useful resources were culled from Byte Back, Senior Net, Triangle Coalition, Digital
Newsroom, and a host of web-based programs. In addition, complete curricular pieces have
been identified from software companies and online-tutorials. As a result, the FOTS curriculum
is a pool of resources that can be manipulated and adapted to student need and class
environment. Future VISTAS can rely on the curriculum binders and documented resources to
create future classes.

E… Relationships have been created with Byte Back, Potomac Technology Empowerment
Center, Digital Sisters, and For Love of Children, all of who deal with youth directly or
indirectly. Other CTCs and technology programs have been identified and will be explored for
future relationships.

F… Procedures for hiring, such as a contract, have been created. Students play various roles on
the night they work, including creating files/documents, classroom and lab management, and
troubleshooting. Initially, three students were hired and participated for one month. Other
students have been hired since then, and two remain in the computer lab as part-time assistants.


A. Goal 3: Implement an after-school computer literacy program
a. Operate a five-day a week (including 1-2 evenings a week) after-school program of
   introductory and advanced computer classes and open workshops to serve 30 -50 students,
   covering a range of skills from keyboarding and word processing to spreadsheets, DTP, and
   web page development.
b. Ensure advanced applications proficiency by 15+ students in word processing and desktop
   publishing.
c. With students and FOTS volunteers, improve FOTS website.
d. Ensure that twenty students learn minor computer and printer repair to help keep their home
   computers in good working order.
e. Expand curriculum as appropriate.
f. Adapt this program to use as summer day camp. (Qtrs. 2-4)

Summary:
A… The computer center has been operating on a five-day week schedule. Basic computer
literacy skills are being addressed in current computer classes and Open Lab. Additional classes
and projects are being developed by the VISTA in cooperation with community volunteers.
Future classes will concentrate on more advanced topics such as desktop publishing,
spreadsheets, and web page design. These classes and projects will be implemented in the spring
and summer sessions.

B… To proficiently learn word processing and desktop publishing programs takes commitment
and time. Therefore, only early signs of proficiency has been noticed, as seen with the students
in the Web Wizards class, which have learned how to effectively create PowerPoint



                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 21
presentations. As only three classes are currently being offered, and their skill level being basic,
advanced skills are being reinforced during Open Lab. For example, a number of students have
now efficiently learned how to do research and use Microsoft Word to write a biography or
report based on their findings. In addition, two students have achieved proficient skills to create
a web-based website during Open Lab.

C… See Goal I, part D.

D… This is a class that is being developed for the 2002-2003 school year.

E…and F… The curriculum will continue to expand and grow as new resources are found and
student skills increase. That is why flexible curricular binders were created as a posed to a rigid
curriculum. Volunteers are being recruited to help teach computer classes and develop projects
for other students in the program

The summer program, Cool Camp, is currently being developed. Software, websites, and
volunteer teachers are being identified. In addition to current computer classes and curriculum,
the computer lab will play an important role in academic classes and project-based lessons.

Goal 4: Train FOTS Teachers, Tutors and Parent To More effectively Use Educational
       Software to Enhance Student Academic Achievement
a. Train twenty to thirty volunteer tutors and students to integrate the use of educational
   software games and Internet web sites into the FOTS tutoring program. Provide
   similar training for eight to twelve parents.
b. Assist FOTS after-school teachers to (1) select from a variety of educational
   computer software and/or WEB sites to use in after-school academic classes at FOTS
   and, (2) help them incorporate computers into their after-school classes. (All qtrs)

A… A second lab has been established and maintained for tutors to use during tutoring and
mentoring. A software database and computer procedures have been created and posted near
computers. An introductory computer workshop was given to six tutors, which covered the
Digital Divide Initiative and computer center procedures. Future workshops will be conducted
once a month, and introduce tutors to our educational software and helpful websites. In addition
to workshops, a listserv was created for FOTS tutors to share information and resources. This
has been a useful communication tool.

In cooperation with Digital Sisters, seven parents attended a workshop on how to effectively use
technology as an educational tool for young girls and teenagers. Shireen Mitchell, Director of
Digital Sisters, presented this workshop.

B… Software and resources have been offered to Ms. Ruffin, an after-school teacher working
  with students on math and reading skills, Mr. Gamble, who is teaching a survival math class,
  and to Ms. Long, who leads the Girls II Women group.


A. Goal 5: Train parents of FOTS students and other adult family members



                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 22
 a. Develop needs assessment instrument and survey 15 - 30 adult family members.
 b. Develop appropriate curriculum from this experience and assessment.
 c. Implement day, evening and/or weekend classes/workshops for 12 - 24 adults
 d. Ensure that twenty parents/guardians learn minor computer and printer repair to help
    keep their home computers in good working order and develop a reporting system to
    ensure that computers in the homes are in working order.
 h. Develop plan for expansion of training to serve other neighborhood teenagers and
    adults in the summer of 2002. (qtrs. 2-4)

 Summary:
 A… Assessment of parents was done over the phone and included getting an idea of technology
 interests and availability. Based on initial conversation and meetings, an initial survey has been
 completed and will be distributed during future workshops.

 B…D… Saturday Parent Workshops have been developed for selected weekends through April.
 Each workshop is built around a particular topic that can be covered during one workshop.
 Topics include Internet 101, Computer 101, Microsoft Production, PC Mechanic, etc. A
 schedule has been created and passed out to parents. Parents have the flexibility to decide which
 workshops they need to attend. The curriculum and resources for the Parent Workshops are
 being cataloged in curriculum binders for future use. There has been a consistent core of four
 parents at each workshop. In the future, adult classes could be offered during the weekday, but
 more volunteers and staff are needed before implementation.

 E… This is currently under development. There is no immediate plan or procedures in
   place for expanding our services beyond current students and families in the program.
   This will be addressed during the 2002-2003 school year.

Goal 6: Develop public and private sector resources that will enable the project to continue
    after the Members leave.
a. Identify at least 10 potential sources of funding from the DC area resources
b . Develop proposals requesting funding to continue training programs.
c. Identify computer programs and web sites to be used in the 2nd year.
d. Identify 2- 4 volunteer teachers for the 2nd year.
e. Identify at lease two potential partners to strengthen and increase capacity. (qtrs. 2-4)
    .
Summary:

 A… and B… Sources have been identified and utilized for receiving equipment donations.
 However, monetary funds have not been received on behalf of the VISTA‘s work.

 C… Numerous computer programs, resources, and websites have been identified and catalogued
 in the computer office for future reference. These resources will play a large part in the FOTS
 summer program, Cool Camp. A FOTS Software Bundle has been created to identify quality
 software programs for tutors to use during tutoring; titles are being added. Curriculum websites
 have been documented and can be utilized to sustain future classes and projects. Educational




                                                  CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 23
websites and resources are consistently being added to lab computers, so students and tutors have
quick access to educational resources.

D… Many of the volunteers working with the FOTS Computer Center have been found through
www.volunteermatch.org. For example, two volunteers were found for the Technical and Web
Committee, and an additional volunteer was recruited as a lab helper. An interested volunteer,
who has a background in community technology centers, is currently negotiating a role in the
FOTS Computer Center.

E… Digital Sisters, a technology program that promotes technology among women and gender
issues, has agreed to help FOTS conduct both parent and youth workshops. This partnership
increases the capacity of FOTS by offering technology training that addresses relevant
differences and opportunities between genders.




                                               CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 24
Garfield Childs Memorial Fund, Richmond, VA
VISTA Member: Tiffany Thomas
Tiffany Thomas worked with the Garfield F. Childs Memorial Fund from September 2001 to December
2001. She helped to fulfill certain duties regarding the project through the following activities:
           Reviewing Curriculum with supervisor and staff and Implementing
           Worked with elementary school age children in basic computer skills and terminology
              such as parts of computer, manipulation of hardware, internet, basic typing skills.
           Worked with adults in basic computer skills such as parts of a computer, manipulation
              of hardware, Internet, basic typing skills, Windows, and word processing training.

Tiffany had a problem with meeting deadlines, lack of accountability, arriving to work on time,
lack of cooperation and she did not work well as a team player, though she attended five staff
meetings. She received in house training on how to implement the curriculums and how to
collect data. Any additional training offered for staff, Tiffany did not receive because of not
reporting to work or as mentioned previously, arriving to work on time.

Workplan summary:

1. Assist with development of lesson plans to improve communication skills through the use of
oral and written exercises. Involve students in group discussions, particicpate in writing and
reading exercises, identifying appropriate software
Summary: Undertook for three months.

2. Assist with the development of a plan to recruit 10 adults/community for classes. Recruit 10+
adults per community for the technology classes through door to door outreach; b. Attend weekly
staff meetings.
Summary: attended five staff sessions.

3. Assist with development of shadowing activities for technology program. Arramge for field
trip program. Not completed




                                               CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 25
CTCNet National Office, Cambridge, MA
VISTA Member: Johanna Pabst
During the past several months, Johanna Pabst has been devoting a majority of her time to work
on a CTC Support project, which has created a system of technical assistance support for
Community Technology Centers in the Boston Metropolitan area.

She has played a principal role in the strategic planning for the project, particularly in regard to
developing an effective process for matching volunteers to centers. She has developed and
implemented recruitment systems that are bringing a steady of stream of volunteers into the pool
available to assist centers. At the same time she has developed an online system for the centers to
record their needs for assistance. She plays a central role in helping centers shape their requests
for volunteers in ways likely to match the interests and skills of volunteers, in subsequently
making a match and then serving as a contact for both volunteer and center.

Johanna assisted in the original design of the CTC Support Project's Web site, and now plays the
major role in updating and maintaining it:
http://www.ctcnet.org/ctcsp/. She also takes the lead in regard to designing and maintaining other
portions of the CTCNet Web site, including for the Leadership Development Institute
(http://www.ctcnet.org/ldi/leadinst.htm) and the 2002 national conference
(http://www.ctcnet.org/conf2002/confhome02.htm).

An upcoming part of the CTC Support Project is the design of an evaluation system and Johanna
will play a central role in that process.

Johanna has continued to serve as the editor of CTCNetwork News, the organization's bimonthly
newsletter, both writing articles herself and soliciting and editing articles from others and then
publishing each edition in print and by email.

In addition to her major project activities, Johanna has been more than willing to volunteer her
skills to accomplish routine chores, such as processing new CTCNet members and maintaining
the database of affiliates.

Ms Pabst work continues to be extraordinary in both scope and quality, demonstrating both her
willingness to take on challenging tasks and to swiftly complete them successfully. She writes
very clearly and quickly learns new computer-related skills. She continues to be an excellent
team member able to move projects forward in ways that reflect a carefully
considered understanding of the perspectives of all stakeholders in the process.


Narrative Summary of Project Accomplishments

Since August 15, 2001, (and since joining us in June, 2001) Johanna has been remarkably
successful in all aspects of her project work. This includes guiding our CTC Support Project
from its initial phase to full implementation. Specifically, Johanna has been instrumental in our
volunteer recruitment component and interacting with CTCs to meet their needs with volunteers.


                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 26
Volunteer Components and Recruitment

The outreach to technical volunteers that began last summer continues today, and is becoming
more focused and fruitful. Our main need for volunteers at this time is in the Volunteer Matching
component of the Project, in which they are matched to participating CTCs based on their
interests and skills. We are currently recruiting volunteers through a number of sources,
including online listing services/sites, user group meetings, and local newspapers, schools, and
volunteer groups. We are continuing to explore other possible sources of technical volunteers, as
well as evaluating our current sources in order to develop a rich base of skills and talent.

We currently have 77 volunteers in our Volunteer Database, which has been collecting names
since last October. With the launch of the CTCSP website and online volunteer sign-up in early
February, we have been able to collect much more detailed information about the potential
volunteers skills, interests, and availability right away, which enables us to arrange matches to
centers much more quickly and effectively. We have met many passionate, skilled people who
are eager to share their abilities with centers in need. Future efforts will be focused on making
the volunteer matching process even more efficient, so that volunteers, who come to us wanting
to start at a center right away, are not lost as we try to arrange the match. At the heart of this is an
effort to motivate quick response from the participating centers.

The volunteers who have been working at centers have received nothing but praise from the
center directors, and we are excited about the many successes in store for the centers involved in
the project. Some volunteers have already begun work on a second project, either at the same or
a different center. The evaluation process outlined above will also provide evidence of the
success of the volunteer matching program and we look forward to compiling this data. We
realize that the volunteers lie at the heart of this success and we are establishing a volunteer
recognition program to ensure that all volunteers receive appropriate credit and thanks for their
service.

CTC Needs and Assistance Requests

During the Needs Assessment phase of the CTCSP, we began to collect Assistance Requests
from the participating centers. Through these forms, we were able to identify the specific needs
of the centers, help them define an appropriate volunteer project, and find the right volunteer to
fill the request. We recently revised the Assistance Request Form in order to make it more user-
friendly and easier for centers to fill out, so that center staff will not hesistate to turn to us when
they have a volunteer need. Instead of answering a series of questions about the request, they
simply write a paragraph describing the need. They are then contacted by a CTCSP staff member
to discuss the project and make any changes necessary. New guidelines have been set up for
Assistance Requests, to ensure that the projects centers envision have a high likelihood of being
filled by a volunteer. We have also made it possible to fill out an Assistance Request online, a
process which has been well-utilized by our centers.

To date, we have received about 25 Assistance Requests, which includes some which have been
closed or re-written if centers needs changed, or which have been closed because they were time-



                                                   CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 27
sensitive and a volunteer was not found. About ten projects are in progress or have been
completed, and twelve projects still require volunteers, though some of those already have
volunteers, but could use more. We are steadily working on filling all the assistance requests, but
we are also learning more about what types of projects are likely to be filled. If it is determined
that a project is unlikely to garner much response, we work with the center to modify the request,
or encourage them to create a different project.

They types of projects requested by the centers vary, but tend to fall under or across certain
categories. Many have to do with tutoring and training CTC members and staff in various
applications, or serving as a center monitor during open hours. Other requests include: web page
design and training, installation of web-filtering software, technical trouble-shooting and
support, and database development. A full list of open opportunities is available on the website.

Current work on this area of the project is focusing on encouraging the centers to stay in close
contact with the CTCSP staff, especially when we have located a volunteer interested in a certain
center. We are also considering expanding the project to accept Assistance Requests from centers
beyond the fourteen pilot centers. Several have expressed interest in receiving volunteers from
the CTCSP, and we would love to involve more centers who would be enthusiastic participants.

The success of this component and the success of the volunteer recruitment component are
intertwined. We see both of them moving in a good direction and are constantly working to
improve both where needed.


How Our AmeriCorps*VISTA Member Gets Things Done in Our Community

Together with the CTCSP team, Johanna has helped recruit over 75 volunteers to serve on CTC
projects around the Boston area, and has successfully placed a number of them in CTCs.

Difficulties encountered

The only difficulty CTCNet faces regarding our Americorps*VISTA member is that we‘ve
would like her to join us in a full-time, permanent position but we face stiff competition with a
fellowship offer for graduate study in sociology from Columbia University. We are crossing our
fingers that we can gently coax Johanna into joining us for another year or so.

Any type of assistance the Project staff or CNS can provide to your organization at this time

CTCNet has been involved in VISTA supervisor meetings, as well as PSOs for new CTC Project
VISTAs, and at this time, we have no unmet needs for CNS or Project staff

Copies of press clippings, flyers, letters or other documentation which relates to the member's
activities and achievements are available in hard copy. Hardcopies of the October, December,
and February issues of The CTCNetwork News were submitted to supplement the report.




                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 28
New Beginnings, Lowell, MA
VISTA Member: Kevin Loechner
Kevin Loechner started with New Beginnings on November 12, 2001. Progress on his work plan
has been made in the following areas:

To begin with, we added a new goal to the work plan based on New Beginnings technical needs
and Kevin‘s talents. The goal is to create a strong network infrastructure that is affordable,
stable and easy to manage for non-tech people.

This goal began in the first quarter and will continue through the 3rd quarter. This goal
developed when it became apparent that network problems at New Beginnings were causing
staff and participants to lose access to the resources needed to effectively help them reach their
goals. We work with many participants who are out of work and need to gain valuable
technology skills. Our Internet connection was going down, and we could not access important
training materials. Kevin has spent the past months discussing what the best solution would be,
researching costs and products, purchasing the needed components and building a new server. In
order to provide sustainability and diffuse technical knowledge into the larger community, Kevin
is working in conjunction with two New Beginnings employees so that they can become resident
IT experts and carry on Kevin‘s work when he leaves his VISTA position. The three have
worked together so far building the server, with Kevin illustrating for the others how to install
components such as a processor, memory and drives. Kevin is also creating written
documentation for troubleshooting various technical problems as they arise and the server
building process. When Kevin first arrived, we were going through the process of re-ghosting
our machines, and Kevin has worked to create a how-to guide so others may complete this
process in the future. Kevin‘s next steps will be to continue working with staff to build the
server and install and configure the software, and set up the new network.

Progress on the other goals in the work plan is as follows:

Goal 1: Develop a website presence and plan for 3 local nonprofits (all 4 qtrs). The first quarter
will be to identify the non-profits and outline a plan for helping them, and setting a schedule to
meet with them. The next 3 quarters will be focused completing a web presence plan for each
(one per quarter)
Summary: The first quarter has been spent preparing materials for non-profit agencies to view
in order to assess what software options are available to create a website, including the relative
costs and pros and cons, update issues and design features. Kevin has had a preliminary meeting
with the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Lowell which is the first agency Kevin will work with in
creating a website. He discussed with them their software options and requested that they create
a paper design template of how they would like their site to look. This way, Kevin is insuring
that content comes from the program itself, and he can then begin work on creating a basic site
and work with the designated Boys and Girls Club employee who is responsible for sustaining
the site in the long term. With an eye towards sustainability, Kevin will be working closely with
each agency to document the process for updating websites. This is important for the 3 non-
profit agencies who will benefit from having a website. Each agency is involved in helping low-
income residents meet their needs in various areas. By allowing them a presence on the web,


                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 29
they are able to disseminate important program information to potential participants and funders.
Kevin is on target to complete the Boys and Girl club site by the end of 6 months, and then work
with 2 additional agencies for the last six months.

Goal 2: Design a plan to recruit, train and orient volunteers into the Consortium who can then
volunteer in any of the member. Over all goal by the end of the year is to have a plan in place to
accomplish and manage this, as well as to recruit 10 – 15 volunteers to start working at the
agencies. (all 4 qtrs).
Summary: This goal has been temporarily superseded for two reasons. The first is the creation
of the new goal that coincided with Kevin‘s arrival and abilities – creating a stable network
infrastructure. The second reason is the Lowell Community Technology Consortium is working
on long-term sustainability issues collectively, and it is more appropriate to lay the basic working
foundation of the group, and then build from there. That being said, Kevin‘s work on Goal 3
will help lay the ground work for a curriculum that can be used by eventual volunteers both at
New Beginnings and other consortium sites.

Goal 3: Contribute to the development of a Computer Training book to teach Microsoft Office
programs to adult learners. (qtrs 1-3)
Summary: Kevin has been working in conjunction with the project leader to create a series of
exercises to teach a competency level of Microsoft Excel. His initial time was spent going over
the current material New Beginnings uses to teach Excel to get an understanding of the material
to be included in the new training and the problems associated with the current method. Kevin
also spent time learning the new Microsoft Word training created at New Beginnings, which is
currently being used as a model for the Excel training. As of this week Kevin has created the
Introduction and the first 6 exercises and instructions for the new Excel training book.

Goal 4: Establish an Informational Interviewing Contact Library (qtrs. 3-4)
Summary: Work on this goal is not slated to begin until the 3rd quarter. It is the plan that by the
third quarter, Kevin‘s work on other projects will help him in the planning aspects of this goal, as
he will have managed the building of a server and website and created documentation for both.
He will also have gained communication skills that will allow him to present the idea to
community members who will take part in the informational interviewing contact library.

As far as difficulties encountered up to this point, many of them relate to orienting an employee
who is new to the area as well as right out of college and new to his first full time job. This is
coupled with the fact that he is technically inclined and working on his communication skills.
Kevin is adjusting to the culture of New Beginnings as an organization and making the
adjustment from college. One thing that may be helpful in terms of supplemental training is
information for VISTAs who are technically proficient and may be working on their
interpersonal skills. It is important for VISTAs to integrate their hard skills with the people and
community aspect in a non-theoretical basis – effectively communicate with the community in
order to affect changes in their communities. Encouraging social networks among VISTAs is
also important if they are relocating. I think having a VISTA start in mid November as Kevin
did make it difficult because New Beginnings is closed the last two weeks of the year, and
attendance is limited in the beginning of December. That being said the network of current
VISTA‘s and their friends in the Lowell area has been helpful in making Kevin feel more at



                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 30
home. We are confident that with some of these major adjustments made, we have started to see
Kevin integrate into the New Beginning culture, and become a more productive member of the
New Beginning team. We are confident that his tangible productivity will grow in the upcoming
quarters. Our only major concern with regards to the goals in our plan is his growth in social
skills communication skills that are so important when dealing with people outside the agency.
We are hoping to see some growth as he works more closely with other staff members, as well as
with outside agencies on their websites.


Lowell Telecommunications Corporation / Lowell Community
Technology Consortium — Vista Member: Dan MacNeil
My second VISTA year started September 14th 2002. My responsibilities include teaching
advanced network administration (MCSE) classes, administering a web server used by non-
profits in Lowell, increasing the services offered on this server, leading a group of volunteers
working on non-profit web sites, helping non-profits and individuals connect with each other to
cooperate on tech stuff, helping out in technical emergencies and researching open source
(LINUX) solutions for their usefulness in Lowell Non-Profits and meeting various administrative
requirements of the VISTA project.

If failure is defined as not meeting goals, then the MCSE (Microsoft Certified System Engineer)
classes have been a failure. In these six months we hoped to teach (3) classes with two sessions
each, and prepare (20) people to pass the certification exams for these classes. I‘ve taught (2)
classes each with one section. Realistically, only (4) people will pass (2) exams. Of those (4)
people only (2) people are working in jobs where they could apply their new skills.

I failed because the MCSE material was much harder than I‘d expected and the pool of qualified
students was much smaller than I expected. Back in 1998, I passed the MCSE exams with
relative ease. I‘d assumed that with my help, other people would do as well. This assumption
proved unwarranted. Of the twenty or so students I started with, a couple had difficulty copying
files to and from floppies.

In the silver lining dept, I have crude curriculum prepared for two classes and could teach them
again if demand warranted. Feedback from people completing the class and from people not
completing the class suggests that participants felt they benefited.

The web server administration goes well. We are hosting 10 web sites for Lowell non-profits.
Uptime is independently measured at 98.6%. We have had no known security failures since
going into production.

Since putting up the web server in August, we‘ve added support for email based forms. The user
fills in the form and the results are emailed to the creator of the form. Four sites have put up
about 12 forms. These forms are pretty popular. One non-profit has eliminated about 20 hand-
written paper forms per week.




                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 31
In the last month, we‘ve added support for online databases using the PostgresSQL server
(Postgres is about as powerful as Oracle but costs nothing) Several groups are actively working
on creating databases. Many organizations could greatly benefit from custom databases but lack
the capacity to create, host or administer these databases. If we continue to build our cadre of
web & database developers our database server will be quite useful.

At the top of the list of new features to add is email. Several non-profits in Lowell struggle
under the burden of administering their own email servers. Several other organizations pay an
ISP for email services. The former save a little cash, the later save a little time. Other
organizations make do with hotmail or yahoo. The later option is workable but not desirable.
The free email services are occasionally slow. It is also a little difficult to establish a corporate
identity for fundraising and publicity from a hotmail account.

The Saturday (and now Thursday) volunteer crews are probably my most successful efforts.
Every Saturday we have between 4-7 people working on non-profit web sites. I‘m optimistic
that this group contains a few people capable of replacing me. (Though I will continue on part
time when my VISTA term ends)

The emergency tech support thing has been fun in a masochistic sort of way. You can really get
close to people if you work with them for 24 or 36 hours straight to get a down server up so the
users can check their email or print their grant proposals. I‘ve only had to do this twice in the
past 6 months. I‘m optimistic that as we bring more central services online I‘ll have to do less of
this in the future.

It is difficult to evaluate my success in connecting people. Right now it is something I do in
passing as the opportunity comes up. In the past 6 months I‘ve probably made 5-6 introductions.
Some of introductions have worked out well. For example we connected with cheap, nice
housing for our out of town VISTAs. Other introductions have gone nowhere.

The open source research is also going well. Our main project right now is getting Samba &
Apache setup so that a non profit with many students can provide free web space to those
students and that the staff had disc space they could access from home.

The administrative stuff for the VISTA project was a real burden my first year as a VISTA.
Now it is not so bad. Originally I was pretty grumpy about spending a day with people saying
―Hi my name is Dan & I‘m from Lowell.‖ when I could be preparing for a class or fixing a
problem. In the past 6 months the Project staff have made great progress in addressing the
concerns of people who don‘t like meetings. For example, half the time we meet in Lowell so
we don‘t have to spend 3-4 hours in travel.

Sample of website hosted and developed through Dan's support:
http://www.ltc.org
http://www.lctc.org
http://www.rrc-online.org
http://www.saintjulie.org
Online Materials for MCSE class: http://www.lctc.org/go/class/mcse/index.shtml



                                                   CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 32
Lowell Telecommunications Corporation / Lowell Community
Technology Consortium — VISTA Member: Kourtney Hamilton
A narrative summary of project accomplishments.
Since my VISTA year started in November, I have learned many new skills and participated in a
variety of projects. I created a resource guide for the Lowell Community Technology
Consortium (LCTC - http://www.lctc.org/go/documents/rg.pdf) that details information about
LCTC‘s 19 centers. I conducted 15+ interviews of LCTC center directors, staff members, and
users for the Department of Education grant evaluator who is evaluating LCTC‘s program.
Lowell Telecommunications Corporation (LTC), the lead organization of the Consortium, will
also use these taped interviews for self-evaluation and promotion. I contribute to the LCTC web
site on a regular basis with news items, a VISTA section, and design elements. I‘m in the process
of creating an LCTC poster (http://kourtney.lctc.org/test/poster4.shtml ) for wide distribution in
Lowell to educate residents about the services offered by LCTC member organizations. I
regularly contribute to LTC services and programs; including lab monitoring, LTC newsletter
articles, and TV show productions for non-profit organizations.

Stories that would best communicate to the public how you have completed things in your
community. (Particularly helpful are stories that include numerical results and sustainable
solutions.)
The Resource Guide I created for the Lowell Community Technology Consortium (LCTC)
details 19 community technology centers in Lowell that offer free or low-cost technology access.
Individuals and organizations in Lowell can use this widely distributed guide to find the
appropriate center that offers the services they are looking for. If updated and expanded
regularly, the LCTC Resource Guide is a powerful tool for bridging the digital divide in Lowell,
MA.

Lowell Telecommunications Corporation (LTC) hosts Lowell‘s public and municipal access
television channels in addition to managing a community technology center. With the help of
LTC, non-profit organizations create television shows that provide important information to the
community about cultural events, educational opportunities, healthcare, and social services.
Without assistance from LTC, many of these non-profit organizations would not be able to
distribute this information in such an effective format. Since my start as a VISTA, I have
learned how to operate the television studio equipment and have worked on many shows.

Report of difficulties encountered.
I had trouble getting my bearings at LTC at first, but now that my skills and knowledge have
increased and I am comfortable with my tasks, things are fine. I have had difficulties getting into
the press/media-contact aspects of my job, although I‘ve had some successes in this department.

Information about any type of assistance the Project staff or CNS can provide to you at this
time.
Advice to CTC VISTA staff: visit more sites where your VISTAs work. It will put you more in
touch with what they‘re doing (in real life, not what all the forms say) and therefore give you
more ideas on how to better support them. It will also give you a better idea of the kinds of
VISTAs you want to hire in the future.


                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 33
In the first reporting period, VISTAS working at the Pathfinder/Milestone and Lowell
Transitional Living Center Labs created public access sites for homeless individuals, GED
students, and people from the surrounding community, creating a diverse mix of people. Out of
these efforts, two volunteers were attracted to help with the lab hours and other programs.
Between the two labs, there are over 80 hours of public access available.

Both VISTAS assist in infrastructure development and staff training and support at their
respective sites, resulting in increased program capacity to carry out basic functions and expand
services. Both VISTAS also offer classes to lab users in topics like Basic Computer Skills and
Creating Web Pages. Both VISTAS also assist in the production of newsletters and other media
for the sites.

With the help of volunteers and other programs, the VISTAS took the recycling center that was
built last year and have started distributing around 10 computers per week to people in the
community.

The VISTAS have been able to work with lab users to identify people with the aptitude and
interest to monitor the lab, creating volunteer lab monitors and freeing up time for other projects.
These in-house volunteers will be able to help keep the access times open. The biggest
accomplishment has been developing over the past two VISTA terms, a large and growing
homeless user base. When first under construction, the labs were slow to attract homeless users
to the labs in the homeless shelters. Over the past two years, and thanks to the efforts of the
VISTAS, the labs are now at full capacity and serving a large and growing number of homeless
adults whose skills are increasing from just using games to creating documents and other
projects.

The most remarkable story was the VISTA at the Lowell Transitional Living Center working
with a resident there with a graphics background to create a digital media gallery and art class.
This resident has since been featured in the Lowell Sun on several occasions and has had his
work published nationally in literature for the VA—he is also a veteran.

There have been difficulties in communication trying to manage projects at two different
locations and in matching personalities to the environment. After a few months in to the project,
the VISTAS switched sites, which has worked well. There are no other problems.

Workplan Commentary:

1. Create a viable computer-recycling program with training program to provide low-income
people with a basic computer system. Work with other agencies to give away at least one
machine per week. Train volunteers to manage the program.
Summary: This program is operational. Through a partnership with Mass Rehab and a
community volunteer, donations continue to come in and machines are refurbished and
distributed. Basic computer skills classes are available to recipients. Homeless shelter residents
have even been able to get training in PC repair through the program. Mass Rehab has been
distributing between 1 and 10 machines per week.



                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 34
2. Expand and support existing computer networks, technology, Internet access, and staff
training to increase program capacity.
Summary: The VISTAS have been instrumental in developing the core technologies at the
centers and more importantly working with program staff to design technology and training that
meets the needs of the program. There is a definite increase in staff and computer literacy at the
sites that will help sustain the technology.

3. Increase public access and recruit volunteers to manage the lab. Provide technical training and
classes to lab users. Help with the creation of content projects—newsletters, web sites, digital
media
Summary: The VISTAS have created filled capacity labs the employ user/volunteers to help
with the access hours. The VISTAs provide basic computer classes, and assist in the publication
of program newsletters. The Lowell Transitional Living Center has a digital media gallery run
by one of its residents.


Pathfinders/Milestone, Lowell, MA
VISTA Members: Terrence Kennedy, David Crist
1. In the first reporting period, VISTAS working at the Pathfinder/Milestone and Lowell
Transitional Living Center Labs created public access sites for homeless individuals, GED
students, and people from the surrounding community, creating a diverse mix of people. Out of
these efforts, two volunteers were attracted to help with the lab hours and other programs.
Between the two labs, there are over 80 hours of public access available.

Both VISTAS assist in infrastructure development and staff training and support at their
respective sites, resulting in increased program capacity to carry out basic functions and expand
services. Both VISTAS also offer classes to lab users in topics like Basic Computer Skills and
Creating Web Pages. Both VISTAS also assist in the production of newsletters and other media
for the sites.

With the help of volunteers and other programs, the VISTAS took the recycling center that was
built last year and have started distributing around 10 computers per week to people in the
community.

2. The VISTAS have been able to work with lab users to identify people with the aptitude and
interest to monitor the lab, creating volunteer lab monitors and freeing up time for other projects.
These in-house volunteers will be able to help keep the access times open. The biggest
accomplishment has been developing over the past two VISTA terms, a large and growing
homeless user base. When first under construction, the labs were slow to attract homeless users
to the labs in the homeless shelters. Over the past two years, and thanks to the efforts of the
VISTAS, the labs are now at full capacity and serving a large and growing number of homeless
adults whose skills are increasing from just using games to creating documents and other
projects.



                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 35
The most remarkable story was the VISTA at the Lowell Transitional Living Center working
with a resident there with a graphics background to create a digital media gallery and art class.
This resident has since been featured in the Lowell Sun on several occasions and has had his
work published nationally in literature for the VA—he is also a veteran.

3. There have been difficulties in communication trying to manage projects at two different
locations and in matching personalities to the environment. After a few months in to the project,
the VISTAS switched sites, which has worked well. There are no other problems.

Workplan Commentary:

1. Create a viable computer-recycling program with training program to provide low-income
people with a basic computer system. Work with other agencies to give away at least one
machine per week. Train volunteers to manage the program.
Summary: This program is operational. Through a partnership with Mass Rehab and a
community volunteer, donations continue to come in and machines are refurbished and
distributed. Basic computer skills classes are available to recipients. Homeless shelter residents
have even been able to get training in PC repair through the program. Mass Rehab has been
distributing between 1 and 10 machines per week.

2. Expand and support existing computer networks, technology, Internet access, and staff
training to increase program capacity.
Summary: The VISTAS have been instrumental in developing the core technologies at the
centers and more importantly working with program staff to design technology and training that
meets the needs of the program. There is a definite increase in staff and computer literacy at the
sites that will help sustain the technology.

3. Increase public access and recruit volunteers to manage the lab. Provide technical training and
classes to lab users. Help with the creation of content projects—newsletters, web sites, digital
media
Summary: The VISTAS have created filled capacity labs the employ user/volunteers to help
with the access hours. The VISTAs provide basic computer classes, and assist in the publication
of program newsletters. The Lowell Transitional Living Center has a digital media gallery run
by one of its residents.


Recruitment Resources Consulting, Lowell, MA
VISTA Member: Rickie Jackson
See program report hardcopy submission.




                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 36
Malden (MA) Access Television
VISTA Member: Liri Qirici
Liri Qirici joined the MATV staff in April of 2001 as an AmeriCorps/VISTA member. His
presence on our staff presented numerous challenges but much opportunity. As a quadriplegic,
Liri needed the workplace to be adapted to his special needs. This included rearranging office
space to create an office and entry path large enough to accommodate movement of his
wheelchair: Liri now shares an office with MATV‘s Executive Director. Liri needed a computer
outfitted with voice-activated software and a good deal of time was spent figuring out how he
can best interface with the software MATV uses in production. MATV also needed to set up a
system whereby Liri was provided with the ―hands‖ to do production work, such as editing,
studio set-up, lighting, camerawork, etc. Telephone usage and interface needed to be adapted.
And, finally, there were the issues of personal care and comfort.

With considerable technical support and assistance from the Massachusetts Rehabilitation
Commission, combined with the flexibility of our staff and support of his family, MATV was
able to procure the necessary technology and services for Liri to function as independently as
possible in our workplace. We are still in the process of setting up a separate phone line to allow
Liri more efficient use of the phone. We are also still limited by the inaccessibility of our facility
downstairs: Liri is not able to do any production work in our smaller ―Studio B‖, use the
classroom space downstairs, or utilize one of our new digital editing systems.

But, despite these limitations, Liri has flourished as a staff member at Malden Access Television.
In his major role as Community Production Coordinator, he has facilitated the active
involvement of newly trained members in community production work. Liri initiates and
oversees the production of many community programs and involves volunteers in these efforts,
ensuring that they are receiving on-the-job training and development of their skills. He also
encourages and supports them in producing their own programs. Liri provides one-on-one
tutorial help for many of our members and interns and helps to teach group classes as well. His
newest project is the production of a regular program series entitled ―What Is…?‖ which focuses
on disease prevention, disabilities, and other health issues. This program aims to educate
viewers in our community and surrounding communities; invites the participation of local
medical agencies and institutions; and helps to train members in the production of a regular
program series.

In addition to these roles, Liri has been instrumental in obtaining ―imported‖ programming to
play on our channels. These include short Public Service Announcements and full-length
programs of an educational/informational nature. He is in the process of building a database
with contact information for these sources of programs. Finally, Liri is involved with the Cyber
Café @ Malden Square, the local computer and Internet access center of which MATV is a
collaborative partner. He has trained many visitors in the basic use of a computer and the
Internet. He will be doing some more formal training classes and plans to focus particularly on
helping the disabled population.

The following examples illustrate some of the ways in which Liri has had an impact on our
community through his work at MATV. Last fall, Liri worked with the Local Action


                                                  CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 37
Committee, an activist group seeking to keep a percentage of affordable housing in Malden. One
of the members of the group had some video production skills but did not feel skilled enough to
produce a video promoting their cause. Liri worked with this producer, walking her through the
various production steps, and enabled her to create a 15-minute piece that was screened at their
Forum on Affordable Housing. The video provoked an extended discussion at the forum and
influenced the political standpoints of various City Councilors who then saw the issue in a
different light.

Liri organized the videotaping of a public forum, held in the MATV studio, in conjunction with
the Massachusetts Senior Action Council. The forum presented to viewers information about
ordering prescription drugs over the Internet. This is just another example of a threefold
accomplishment, that of involving a local agency in our organization, producing valuable
community programming, and employing the skills of volunteer members to promote
information-sharing in the community. One last example of the numerous ways in which Liri‘s
work has impacted the community is his production of a video version of a booklet published by
the Tri-City Community Action Project regarding lead paint poisoning prevention. Again, using
the skills of volunteer members, Liri was able to produce this program that has had wide play on
our cable access channels.

Liri has proved to be an invaluable asset to our organization. His own way of overcoming
obstacles and his ability to use media effectively despite his physical limitations is an inspiration
to many of our novice users that come here to learn media production. His capacity for making
people feel comfortable and putting their skills to the best use helps MATV to achieve its
mission of ―Building Community Through Media‖.

Liri‘s presence on our staff has underscored the need for making the downstairs portion of our
facility handicapped accessible. However, the financial cost of doing so is beyond the means of
our organization. Any assistance that can be provided for this endavor through
AmeriCorps/VISTA or CNS, be it financial or information-oriented, would be greatly
appreciated.

Workplan Summary

Please Note: Because many of the goals and objectives originally defined when Liri was first
hired have significantly changed (due to reasons noted in the last Summary Report) we have
redefined the objectives below and stated the progress towards each. This revised work plan will
also serve as the work plan for Liri‘s second year as an AmeriCorps/VISTA member at MATV.

Goal 1: Provide Instruction and Tutorial Help at the Cyber Café
Liri will provide four hours of instruction/technical assistance per week at the Cyber Café @
Malden Square, a non-profit community technology center of which MATV is a collaborative
partner. Cyber Café staff will schedule appointments for users to meet with Liri on a one-to-one
basis to learn basic computer and Internet skills. Liri will work particularly with the disabled
population, as well as with other populations that use the Cyber Café. Liri will train a total of
four people per month on this individualized basis. In addition, he will assist where needed with
other users to the Café.



                                                  CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 38
Planned Period of Work: Technical assistance, with less formalized instruction has occurred
throughout Quarter 1-4 in the 1st year. Continue throughout 2nd year with more formalized and
scheduled instruction.
Summary of Accomplished Objectives: Though the Cyber Café is open to everyone in the
community, it serves mainly the following populations: low income, elderly, minority, and other
populations with limited access to computer technology. Liri is a natural at providing computer
training as he must rely on the learner to physically use the equipment – thereby giving them the
greatest amount of hands-on instruction. He is also very patient and understanding of people‘s
limitations. His regular hours at the Cyber Café help to bridge MATV‘s ongoing participation in
this project. In Quarters 3 & 4, Liri has worked with approximately 25 individuals, providing
technical and training assistance.

Goal 2: Instructor for MATV production classes
Provide individualized instruction to approximately 36 MATV members/year (3 per month) in
analog and digital editing; SCALA multimedia software; and studio production. Assist in the
teaching of three studio production classes per year for a total of approximately 24 students (8
per class).
Planned Period of Work: Quarters 3 & 4 of 1st year. Continue throughout 2nd year.
Summary of Accomplished Objectives: Through the work of our AmeriCorps VISTA member
(Liri), MATV is able to regularly provide individual instruction and tutorial help to producers.
Such help is required for producers who cannot attend our regularly scheduled classes or are in
need of immediate and intensive training, as in the case of short-term interns and production
volunteers with a limited period of time to offer their services. Further, the one-on-one sessions
provide a tutorial reinforcement for producers who were not able to grasp all the material taught
in the regular classes. Liri trains producers by having them edit and add graphics to community
productions aired on the channel, providing a twofold service to our organization. In Quarters 3
& 4, Liri trained a total of 15 producers on an individual basis. He will be co-teaching his first
studio production class this spring.

Goal 3: Community Production Coordinator
Coordinate volunteers for ongoing community productions by recruiting MATV members based
on skill level, training needs, and interest. AmeriCorps VISTA member will recruit
approximately 180 crew members (5 per show) for approximately 36 shows (3 per month) in one
calendar year.
Planned Period of Work: Quarters 1-4 in first year and continued through 2nd year.
Summary of Accomplished Objectives: Liri performs a crucial function at MATV in his role
as Community Production Coordinator, that of placing volunteers in crew positions for
community productions so that they can hone their production skills, learn new skills on the job,
and become a part of our mission of ―Building Community Through Media‖. Since Liri‘s
placement at MATV, the number of community productions using volunteer crew has increased
significantly. In Quarters 3 & 4, Liri coordinated 18 community productions and recruited a
total of 90 crew members for those productions.

Goal 4: Producer/Director of Community Show
Produce and direct a monthly television program entitled ―What Is…?‖ that focuses on
disabilities, disease prevention, and other health topics. This program is intended to inform and



                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 39
educate the citizens of Malden and surrounding communities about medical issues. It will
involve and promote local non-profit and medical service organizations. The production will
serve as a training ground for its volunteer crew, allowing them to be involved in every aspect of
production under the supervision/guidance of the skilled AmeriCorps VISTA member. The
AmeriCorps VISTA member is expected to produce at least 12 programs involving 35
organizations and 40 volunteer crew in one calendar year.
Planned Period of Work: Quarter 4 of 1st year. Continue throughout 2nd year
Summary: Liri has produced his first two shows in this series. He has involved representatives
from six heatlh-related organizations and has put together a committed volunteer crew of six
members. Other volunteers are recruited for each show in the series to perform various roles in
the production.

Goal 5: Acquisition of Imported Programming
Research and contact sources for available public service announcements (PSAs) and full-length
programs of an educational/informational nature to air on our channels. Create a database listing
these contacts and information about their programs/PSAs.
Planned Period of Work: Quarters 1 –4 in 1st year and continue throughout 2nd year.
Summary of Accomplished Objectives: Public Service Announcements are aired on our
channels between video programs. The AmeriCorps/VISTA member is helping us to keep an
up-to-date library of public service announcements of varying lengths. Thus we are able to air
current and pertinent PSAs, including messages from federal institutions, health and safety
agencies, and cultural/arts organizations. Full-length programs help us to round out the diversity
of video programs shown on MATV, particularly on our Government and Educational Access
channels. The database resulting from Liri‘s research and contact work will make it easier to
receive updated programs and PSAs in the future. During Quarters 3 & 4, Liri researched
approximately 50 organizations and obtained 10 PSAs and 11 programs for cablecast on our
channels.

Also submitted in hardcopy:
    Program for the Thomas J. Byrne Employees of the Year Awards with profile of Liri
    November 11 Boston Sunday Globe "BostonWorks" feature on Liri, "Technologically
       Enabled" by Diane Lewis.




                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 40
RTPNet, Research Triangle Park, NC
VISTA Member: Martha Moore
Computer classes are held on Tuesday and Thursday evenings, 6 pm - 8 pm. About five people
attend with an average of about three people per class. They are learning basic computer skills,
including Word, Excel, PowerPoint, the Internet, and Web design using GeoCities Page Builder.
Martha is currently advertising the start of new computer classes at Birchwood.

Martha has found that she can increase attendance in evening classes by charging a small
monthly fee, paid in advance. The participants have then made a commitment and are more
likely to attend classes. The fees are used to pay for printer ink and paper.

Martha has been encouraging young people to develop their skills. She meets weekly with the
John Avery Boys and Girls Club director to coordinate activities and computer instruction in the
after-school program. Some of the children in the after-school program help teach other children
whose computer skills are not as proficient. Martha seeks out programs, such as Duke's summer
science camp and the Young Entrepreneur's Program, and encourages the Birchwood youth to
participate.

To track usage and capture information from sign-in sheets, Martha is setting up a database.

Martha has attempted to recruit members of the community to volunteer at the Center, but adults
want to be paid. She is currently working to obtain assistance from North Carolina Central
University students through their community service program.

Martha is currently working with a team of volunteers from Triangle United Way's Teaming for
Technology program to upgrade the computers and network in the Birchwood Learning Center.

To help promote use of the Learning Center, Martha has published two issues of the newsletter,
"The Birchwood Tymes" She has a third newsletter and a brochure ready to publish.

In addition to her normal activities, Martha coordinated, prepared, and served Thanksgiving
dinner for the community children, and she provided materials and taught children how to make
Christmas gift sets.

Martha works under the guidance of the Birchwood Learning Center's Acting Executive
Director, Lisa Richmond, and with the advice and consultation of the President of the Home
Owners Association, Ann Atwater.

In addition to these direct activites, Martha works with other Americorps*VISTA workers
(especially Gena Harrington) and she participates in the e-groups.

Commentary on Workplan

Goal 1: The goal of the Birchwood Learning Center project is to promote community
participation in the Center by developing, implementing, and publicizing computer education


                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 41
programs for the community that bring members of the community into the Center to learn and
to help each other learn.
Objective 1: Expand outreach and identify potential new programs and services.
1a. Create and publish a brochure for Birchwood Learning Center. (qtr 1)
        A brochure is ready to print.

1b. Create and publish at least four issues (quarterly) of a newsletter for the Birchwood Heights
community. (qtrs 1-4)
       One issue has been prepared during this reporting period and is ready to print.

1c. Provide door-to-door distribution of the brochure and newsletters to at least 150 families,
encouraging people to come to the center, and collect information about programs and services
of potential interest and value to them. (qtrs 1-4)
       One issue has been prepared during this reporting period; it has not been distributed yet..

1d. Advertise learning opportunities in at least two venues per quarter (for example, on bulletin
boards in schools, churches, and laudromats). (qtrs 2-4)
       Martha advertised the start of new classes and has been recruiting participation in the
Young Entrepreneur's Program.

1e. Conduct at least two information sessions per quarter for local groups, such as churches,
schools, and the Boys and Girls Club, and gather information on programs needed. (qtrs 2-4).
         Martha meets weekly with the John Avery Boys and Girls Club director to coordinate
activities and computer instruction in the after-school program, and she meets with the President
of the Home Owners' Association, Ann Atwater.

1f. Identify two specific programs and activities for the Center to be developed by RTPnet
volunteers. (qtrs. 2-4)
       Martha is working with Triangle United Way volunteers and RTPnet volunteers to
upgrade the computers and network at Birchwood Learning Center.


Objective 2: Provide expanded learning opportunities through direct assistance and volunteer
recruitment.
2a. Assist the Center Manager in providing learning opportunities at the Center through at least
two two-hour sessions to five individuals per week, that cover teaching basic computer skills,
providing assistance with typing resumes and letters and homework assignments, using
educational software and the Internet. (qtrs 1-4)
         Computer classes are held on Tuesday and Thursday evenings, 6 pm - 8 pm. About five
people attend with an average of about three people per class. They are learning basic computer
skills, including Word, Excel, PowerPoint, the Internet, and Web design using GeoCities Page
Builder. Martha is currently advertising the start of new computer classes at Birchwood.

2.b. Recruit at least one member of the community to work at the Center as a volunteer (qtr 3).
       Martha has attempted to recruit members of the community to volunteer at the Center,
but adults want to be paid. She is currently working to obtain assistance from North Carolina



                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 42
Central University students through their community service program. Some of the children in
the after-school program help teach other children whose computer skills are not as proficient.

Objective 3: Evaluate the effectiveness of the publicity, programs and services.
3a. Tabulate data from the sign-in sheets; design a user evaluation survey and administer. (qtr 4)
       Usage of the Center by adults has increased from one or two to about five. To track usage
and capture information from sign-in sheets, Martha is setting up a database.

Objective 4: Identify resources for sustaining the Center.
4a. Identify at least one fundraising opportunity within the community that would contribute
toward paying for the Internet connection, printer cartridges, paper, and other supplies (about
$200 per month). (qtrs. 3, 4)
        Martha has found that she can increase attendance in evening classes by charging a small
monthly fee, paid in advance. The participants have then made a commitment and are more
likely to attend classes. The fees are used to pay for printer ink and paper.

4b. Survey at least nine organizations (RTPnet, Birchwood Heights Home Owners Association,
John Avery Boys and Girls Club, The Shodor Education Foundation, Durham County Literacy
Council, Durham Mennonite Church, Neal Middle School, North Carolina Central University, and
Duke University) for personnel and material support for on-going program and organizational
sustainability. (qtrs 3, 4).
        The main focus has been working with the John Avery Boys and Girls Club and the Young
Entrepreneur's Program.


RTPNet, Research Triangle Park, NC
VISTA Member: Eugena Harrington
Gena provides technical support for a large number of community technology centers (see list
below) in Orange, Durham, and Wake counties, and she's helping some schools in the area. She
performs preventative maintenance (such as updating anti-virus software and hard drive
cleanup), installs and trouble-shoots networks and Internet connectivity, and trouble-shoots
problems with printers and scanners. And she performs custom re-installations on CPUs.

Gena created inventories for several centers, defined some standards, and wrote guides. These
will help RTPnet provide long-term technical support for the centers.

Gena redesigned the technical support Web site (at www.rtpnet.org/tech), adding new content,
including her Guide to Accepting Donations, which recommends minimum hardware and
software requirements for donations to community technology centers, and How to prepare a cpu
prior to loading a Windows-based operating system: Step-by-step guide.

Gena provided some training to community members who have an aptitude and interest in
learning to support the center they use. One teenager in Chapel Hill is starting the Web site for
his community (South Estes) and assisted in teaching classes in both at South Estes and Trinity



                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 43
Court, and a member of the Hargraves Recreation Center staff, Robbin Justice-Jones, now
provides frontline support for the Hargraves Center.

Gena has recruited and trained volunteers with technical skills to adopt one or more centers and
provide frontline technical support for them. In particular, Afiya Carter provides support for the
West End Teen Center in Durham, and Bala Nair has provided volunteer support for the Riley
Hill Community Technology Center in Wendell and the West End Teen Center. And a team
from Triangle United Way's Teaming for Technology now provides support for Birchwood
Learning Center in Durham.

She has also provided training and support for other Americorps*VISTAs, including Kimmora
Mckinnnie (Riley Hill Community Technology Center), Martha Moore (Birchwood Learning
Center), and Luke Reinke (Lakewood YMCA).

In addition to these direct activities, Gena has worked in recycling areas. She has worked with
Triangle United Way's project, Teaming for Technology, to refurbish computers donated for use
in technology centers, and she has accepted other hardware donations from individuals, as well
as Teaming for Technology, placing the equipment in sites which have immediate needs. She has
fixed up older machines and placed them in the homes of individuals who have shown particular
interest and competency with computers, such as a teenager in the Northside community of
Chapel Hill who helped maintain the computers in the Hargraves Center.

Gena has also helped schools and centers, such as the CC Spaulding Magnet Elementary School,
with technology planning.

Gena works under the guidance of Jerry Winegarden, Senior Analyst, Duke University
OIT/Technical Support. Jerry has helped Gena improve her trouble shooting skills and develop
Linux expertise.

In support of the CTC VISTA project, Gena moderated the Yahoo e-group.

Sites for which Gena has provided technical support include the following:

Durham County
   Birchwood Learning Center, Durham
   CC Spaulding Magnet School, Durham
   Community Outreach Partnership Center (COPC), Durham
   Crest Street Community Technology Center, Durham
   Durham County Literacy Council, Durham
   Golden Belt Center, Durham
   JJ Henderson Towers, Durham
   Kings Park Life Center, Durham
   Lakewood YMCA, Durham
   McDougald Terrace, Durham
   Rogers-Herr Middle School, Durham
   Southwest Elementary School, Durham



                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 44
   TROSA, Durham
   West End Teen Center, Durham
   West End Community Center, Durham

Orange County
   Airport Gardens, Chapel Hill
   Central Elementary School, Hillsborough
   Eastwood Family Resource Center, Chapel Hill
   Hargraves Technology Center, Chapel Hill
   Pine Knolls Community Center, Chapel Hill
   South Estes Family Resource Center, Chapel Hill
   Trinity Court, Chapel Hill

Wake County
    NC Hungernet, Raleigh
    Riley Hill Community Technology Center, Wendell
Springmoor Life Center, Raleigh

Commentary on Workplan

Goal 1: The goal of the RTPnet/TACT technical support project is to provide technical support
to Triangle Area community technology centers, both immediate assistance and technical support
materials, to insure their steady and smooth technical operation.
Objective 1: Develop routine maintenance procedures.
1a. Develop a site inventory form (hardware, software, operating system, network, peripherals,
phone jacks, and electrical outlets) and inventory the five target community technology centers.
(qtrs 1, 2)
         Inventories been created for the sites that are most frequently visited and technical
presence is considered primary, including South Estes, Trinity Court, and Hargraves, in Chapel
Hill, and Birchwood Learning Center and West End Teen Center, in Durham.

1b. Define routine maintenance, installation, and troubleshooting procedures for each site, and
develop a routine maintenance, installation, and troubleshooting check list. (qtrs 1, 2)
       The majority of the primary centers are currently on preventative maintenance schedule.
Preventative maintenance not only addresses immediate technical issues (hard drive cleanup,
virus updates, printer connectivity, Internet connectivity), but also evaluates the level of routine
maintenance each center receives. Visit descriptions are logged in mileage reports and technical
notebook. Troubleshooting, routine maintenance and installation documents have been created
and published on the RTPnet Technical Home Page (www.rtpnet.org/tech).(refer to 1c.)

1c. Develop a maintenance, installation, and troubleshooting manual for each site to record the
standard configuration for each machine and the associated maintenance, installation, and
troubleshooting activities. (qtrs 1-4).
       The URL http://www.rtpnet.org/tech is the primary reference for the members of
RTPnet.Troubleshooting, routine maintenance and installation documents have been created and
published on RTPnet's Technical Home Page (www.rtpnet.org/tech).



                                                  CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 45
The equipment, software, and network environment varies from one site to another.

1d. Develop lists of recommended hardware, software, networking facilities, and configurations
for technology centers. (qtrs 1, 2)
        Guide to Accepting Donations (http://www.rtpnet.org/tech/guidetoaccept1.html)
recommends minimum hardware and software requirements to CTCs. For low cost and
maintenance network configurations, Jerry Winegarden's homepage has been linked to the
RTPnet Technical page. The "Resources" link on RTPnet Technical page references information
on networking facilities and configurations, troubleshooting, and assistive technology.

Objective 2: Assist center staff and volunteers in meeting their systems' technical needs in a
self-sustaining way.
2a. Work with the volunteers and staff in the five target centers to install, maintain, and
troubleshoot their computer systems, record the activities, and use materials developed for doing
so through on-going visits and at least one formal session per quarter; provide technical support
services to other centers on a time-available basis, if the need arises. (qtrs 1-4)
        Primary centers, such as South Estes, Hargraves, West End Teen Center, and Trinity
Court, received adequate technical support. Technical duties included network installation,
network configuration, pc troubleshooting, network support, PC custom installations, and
Internet connectivity and printer troubleshooting. For example, network installations were
performed at Pine Knolls, South Estes, and Trinity Court and network re-configuration was
performed at Hargraves. Hardware, as well as technical labor, have also been provided via the
relationship with Teaming for Technology of United Way. And Teaming for Technology has
received technical expertise and resources from RTPnet, particularly for computers donated by
Quintiles. Centers such as Pine Knolls, Henderson Towers, Kings' Park CTC, East Wake
Community Centers and some Durham Public Schools continue to receive alternate technical
support. Basically, the level of technical service is the same but the visits are not as frequent.

2b. Interview at least two people to provide technical support for the target centers and add their
recommendations for hardware, software, networking, and configurations to the manual. (qtrs 1, 2)
       Community members are informally trained to provide technical support to CTCs, such
as South Estes and West End Teen. Technical volunteers have been recruited to provide
technical support to some sites, such as Birchwood.

2c. Study (live or via the Web) the operations of at least two technology support centers, such as
EasyWeb, Inc. (local) and Tech Soup (www.techsoup.org), taking notes on recommendations,
and add recommendations to the procedures manual.
        The RTPnet Technical Home Page (www.rtpnet.org/tech) is considered a conduit for
useful technical documents, recommendations, resources, etc. This home page went live at the
beginning of October 2001.

2d. Provide assistance and support to other Americorps/VISTA Members as appropriate. (qtrs 1-4)
       Martha Moore received tech assistance at Birchwood Learning Center. Currently, a tech
volunteer is being actively recruited for her site. Kimmora McKinnie received additional
technical training and alternate support at Riley Hill Community Technology Center. A technical




                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 46
volunteer was also recruited to provide additional technical assistance at Riley Hill Community
Technology Center.

2e. For at least two of the target centers, recruit and train at least one member of the community
to provide volunteer technical support. (qtrs 3, 4)
    See 2b. above.

Goal 2: Public and private sector resources will enable the project to continue after the Members
leave.
Objective 1: Recruit and train members of the community to provide basic technical support for
their centers.
1a. For at least two of the target centers, recruit and train at least one member of the community
to work at the Center. (qtrs 3, 4)
        Afiya Carter has been trained to provide additional technical support to West End Teen
Center. Members of South Estes have been informally trained to provide technical support
(restore Internet connectivity) to their community center, South Estes.

Objective 2: A procedures manual, site inventory manual, and maintenance logs will enable
other technical support people to service the site. (qtrs 1-4)
        Technical visits are continually logged in notebook for referencing. Maintenance logs and
"HELP" signs have been placed at centers, such as Hargraves, Birchwood, and South Estes.
Inventory assessment has been created for the sites that are most frequently visited and technical
presence is considered primary, such as South Estes, Birchwood, Hargraves, Trinity Court and
West End Teen Center (see 1a. above).


RTPNet, Research Triangle Park, NC
VISTA Member: Shirlene Rogers
The primary focus of Shirl's work (since November) is assisting the president of the CTCNet
board of directors (Erroll Reese, Durham, NC) with program development and capacity building.

Shirl participates in CTCNet and local meetings, preparing agendas, taking notes, and following
up on assignments. Her work includes preparing speeches and PowerPoint slides for Erroll's
presentations on CTCNet and assisting him in setting up and delivering the presentations,
particularly in disseminating brochures and answering questions. She is helping Erroll prepare
for the National CTCNet conference in June.

Shirl is also working to get Erroll on the program and/or set up booths to promote CTCNet in the
vendor areas for several major conferences, including:
• American Planning Association (planning to shape community vision), Chicago, April 13-17
• American Assoc. of Blacks in Energy, 25th Annual National Conference, April 23 - 26, 2002
• Internet Society Conference, Washington, DC - June 18-21
• Blacks in Technology, New York:, May 11-12, 2002
• Creating Digital Dividends Conference, To Be determined



                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 47
One of the original goals of Shirl's project was to "develop a database of Triangle area
community technology centers, which can be used by RTPnet and as a model for CTCNet."
However, the North Carolina Rural Internet Access Authority initiated a "survey of organizations
in the state of North Carolina to determine the availability of Digital/Internet Literacy Training
Programs to the public" which is creating a state-wide database similar to that envisioned for this
project. In March, Shirl's workplan was revised replacing the CTC inventory with development
of a volunteer database, which is greatly needed by RTPnet. Since March 2001, more than 30
people have volunteered using the form at www.rtpnet.org/rtpnet/vol.html or by sending e-mail
to info@rtpnet.org saying they would like to volunteer. Although some have been placed, a
system is needed to make effective use of volunteers.

Commentary on Workplan

Goal 1: Assist the president of the CTCNet board of directors with program development and
capacity building.
Objective 1: Maintain a prioritized list of CTCNet board issues and tasks, with status,
assignments, and target dates, updating at least monthly. 1st Qtr. & ongoing
    The CTCnet Strategic Plan has not been finalized yet.
    Shirl participates in CTCNet conference calls and local meetings, preparing agendas, taking
    notes, and following up on assignments.

Objective 2: Find information and resources needed by the CTCNet board. 1st Qtr. & ongoing
    Shirl is helping Erroll prepare for the National CTCNet conference in June.
    Shirl is also working to get Erroll on the program and/or set up booths to promote CTCNet in
    the vendor areas for several major conferences, including:
• American Planning Association (planning to shape community vision), Chicago, April 13-17
• American Assoc. of Blacks in Energy, 25th Annual National Conference, April 23 - 26, 2002
• Internet Society Conferences, Washington, DC - June 18-21
• Blacks in Technology, New York:, May 11-12, 2002
• Creating Digital Dividends Conference, To Be determined

Objective 3: Draft reports. 1st Qtr. & ongoing
        Shirl prepares speeches (at least 4 so far) and PowerPoint slides (at least 5) for Erroll's
presentations on CTCNet and assists him in setting up and delivering the presentations,
particularly in disseminating brochures and answering questions.

Goal 2: Develop, for RTPnet, a database of Triangle area volunteers.
       This volunteer database project is just getting started.

Objective 1: Enter data already gathered from the form at http://www.rtpnet.org/rtpnet/vol.html.
3rd Qtr.
Objective 2: Prepare reports. 4th Qtr.
Objective 3: Revised the online entry form at http://www.rtpnet.org/rtpnet/vol.html to facilitate
keeping the database up to date. 4th Qtr

Goal 3: Public and private sector resources will enable the project to continue after the Members leave.



                                                  CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 48
Objective 1: Work with RTPnet volunteers to ensure that the database can be maintained easily and that
procedures are well documented. 4th Qtr


RTPNet, Research Triangle Park, NC
VISTA Member: Kimmora McKinnie
                               The Colors of Collaboration™ Inc.




A.    Goal 1: The goal of this project is to provide technical support and training support to
EWCTC. (Note: The name Eastern Wake Community Technology Center (EWCTC) was
changed after the program start-up to The Riley Hill Community Technology Center (RHCTC).

Objective 1: Provide technical support. 1st Qtr. & ongoing
     1a.Oversee a 12-station computer network.
     1b. Provide routine maintenance, including Internet access.
     1c. Install software and updates as needed.
During the first and second quarter, before Ms. Mckinnie‘s termination, the RHCTC computer
lab was maintained and systems were kept in operational order. New printers were installed.

Objective 2: Assist in training support. 1st Qtr & ongoing
     2a. Assist in recruiting 30 students to participate in an after-school tutorial program.
     2b. Assist in recruiting 30 adult volunteers to provide one-on-one tutoring and mentoring
        to enrolled students.
     2c. Supervise 5 college-student interns, who will assist school students and mentors to
        master curriculum objectives.
     2d. Match students with volunteers and coordinate assignments with school personnel.
     2e. Survey adult learners to determine an appropriate mix of adult training options. The survey
        will be conducted with at least 50 adult learners to be enrolled in 5 training programs of 10
        students each.
     2f. Assist adult learners to develop individualized learning plans.
     2g. Track adult learning progress.
During the first and second quarter, before Ms. McKinnie‘s termination, 26 adult students were
recruited and completed 3 separate introductory computer training courses. The age range of
participants was from 19 to 82. Relatives and friends of the students gathered to celebrate the
graduation (achievement) of the learners.
        The after school program was initiated with 7 students recruited through the East Wake
Middle School guidance department. Discussions were completed with St. Augustine‘s college


                                               CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 49
to recruit 3rd and 4th year s computer majors to serve as mentors to the program. Placement of
the college students remains on hold due to the inability to raise funds to provide a student
stipend. The stipend was deemed necessary due to time and travel requirement for the college
students. Three community volunteers have been recruited and interact with the middle school
students.
        The survey of adult learners has begun but no conclusions have been reached beyond the
identified need to offer introductory computer training programs to adults.

Objective 3: Administrative. 1st Qtr & ongoing
     3a. Maintain daily attendance logs of students, volunteers, and interns.
     3b. Prepare quarterly reports.
     3c. Prepare end-of-session reports for each tutorial cycle (December and May
During the first and second quarter, before Ms. McKinnie‘s termination, she demonstrated a
weakness in completing administrative duties. This report has been prepared based on a review
of actual attendance logs and other source documents.

Goal 2: Public and private sector resources will enable the project to continue after the Members leave.
     Objective 1: Recruit and train 10 members of the community to become volunteers to
        continue programs and services.
During the first and second quarter, before Ms. Mckinnie‘s termination, an advisory committee
consisting of 11 community members was formed. Meetings are held on a monthly basis. From
this group two individuals, with technology backgrounds at work, have been trained to conduct
the center‘s introductory level courses for adults. These volunteers are in addition to the youth
program volunteers.

      Objective 2: Identify resources for maintaining the Center.
      2a. Identify at least one fundraising opportunity within the community that would
       contribute toward paying expenses of EWCTC.
     2b. List resources available to EWCTC from other organizations, including schools and
       churches
During the first and second quarter, before Ms. Mckinnie‘s termination, discussions were
beginning with the technology advisory committee to form a committee to plan fundraising
events. This group was beginning to get settled and develop the level of commitment required
for ownership of a community technology center.
       Resources committed during this period include installation of a partial T1 by the Wake
County Public School System to allow access to the Nova net and other in-school curriculum to
support the middle school program. Wachovia/First Union Bank has also committed additional
donated computers to upgrade in-house training capability.

[Prepared and submitted by Robert W. Sams, Riley Hill Community Technology Center]

Hardcopy supplements to RTPNet's reports include:
    copies of "The Birchwood Tymes" newsletters produced by Martha Moore
    hardcopies from www.rtpnet.org/blc/history.html and www.rtpnet.org/vista.shtml




                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 50
Durham Literacy Council, Durham, NC
VISTA Member: Shlonda Brouchet
As an Americorps Vista volunteer, Shlonda has supported and enhanced four Durham Literacy
Council projects; the Parents‘ Part Family Literacy Project, Techcelerated Pre-GED and GED,
PC Basics, English as a Second Language and has gained valuable experience as a teacher and
trainer. She has recruited and trained volunteers to teach or assist in all projects. The Vista has
maintained a working relationship with partner sites CET, NCCU and the YMCA.

Project One: Parents’ Part Family Literacy Project
Shlonda successfully implemented Parents‘ Part in two Durham public elementary schools. A
total of 25 families have graduated from the course. All families were furnished with upgraded
IBM or Macintosh computers. The Vista expanded the manual to include a professional
development segment to encourage parents to develop or enhance their skills.

Project Two: Techcelerated Pre-GED and GED
At the Center for Employment Training and at the Durham Literacy Council‘s Main office,
Shlonda assisted students in using technology-assisted GED instruction, a DCLC project called
―Techcelerated GED‖. As a result, five students received their GED. Shlonda helped recruit and
train a total of 20 tutors using Techcelerated GED to assist their one-to-one GED students.

Project Three: ESOL tutors and students
As a tutor Shlonda has taught ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) classes, which
include creating lesson plans, leading small group conversations and trained new tutors to teach
the traditional and computer-assisted ESL software. Computer lessons also entail ESL Internet
programs enhance the lessons.

Community Partnerships/Development
Shlonda established the foundation for a continuing relationship with the YMCA and the
Durham Literacy Council. PC Basics and advanced classes were offered to all YMCA members
and staff. Persuading the regional and associate directors to continue to relinquish lease
payments were major goals accomplished. Saturday Pre-GED and GED sessions were set-up
and then maintained by recruited YMCA and community volunteers. An after school program
for Kestrel Heights Charter School students was initiated to help students do homework,
complete technology class assignments and have access to the Internet.

Shlonda facilitated a monthly meeting with the associate director and membership director of the
local YMCA. Creating and implementing ESL and ABE/GED presentations for technology in-
services to Duke University tutors, professors, current students and other recruited volunteers in
the triangle area. Training individual tutors to instruct PC Basics, Family Literacy and
Techcelerated was extremely beneficial and promotes self-sustainability.

Technical Support for Computer Labs
Shlonda has improved technical support in the YMCA, the Literacy Council and Kestrel Heights
Charter School and assisted in maintaining and installing computers in all labs.



                                                  CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 51
Durham Literacy Council, Durham, NC
VISTA Member: Luke Reinke
As an Americorps Vista volunteer, Luke has developed and enhanced three curricula; PC Basics,
ESOL PC Basics and a middle school technology curriculum. He recruited and trained
volunteers to teach these curricula and established relationships with community partners to fill
gaps where needed. All three of these curricula have been placed on the World Wide Web on
the Durham Literacy Council homepage for use by other non-profits or schools.

Project One: PC Basics
         Luke has organized a number of Computer Basics Classes that are offered free to
Literacy Council members and low-income students who demonstrate need. The first step was
to revise the curriculum to include a detailed syllabus for instructors to follow, in adherence with
a pre-existing competency checklist.
         The VISTA then created a number of activities to supplement oral instructions. These
activities were designed to allow the student to complete the task at his/her own pace—freeing
the instructor to provide one-on-one assistance.
         Once the curriculum was completed, locations were chosen: the Lakewood YMCA and
Oxford Manor Achievement School. The VISTA recruited groups of 2-3 volunteers for each
site, and classes were entirely volunteer taught. A total of 31 students enrolled with 15 finishing
the class. Out of those who finished, 11 completed the entire checklist. Feedback was received
by students and instructors. Current plans include curriculum and checklist revision by the
VISTA, followed by one session taught primarily by the VISTA and assisted by volunteers. This
will allow the VISTA to assess how well the curriculum trains students to meet intended goals.
         A partnership has been created with KB Career Services to provide more advanced
computer training for students who complete currently offered classes. In exchange for use of
Literacy Council computers, KB Services give substantial discounts for Literacy Council
members. The VISTA also assists in recruiting students and assisted with planning the
partnership.

Project Two: ESOL PC Basics
        A Similar class is being developed for Spanish speakers as well. This class aims to
familiarize students with the computer so that they might
        a. Use Literacy Council to develop English language skills
        b. Use email to keep in touch with distant relatives
        c. Use the Internet for resources that can help them find access to community services
        that they otherwise could not have found
        d. Advance their careers.
        The curriculum is being developed using other lessons in Spanish found on the Internet,
translating current lessons from the classes taught in English, and creating new lessons. The
classes have been taught by the VISTA and supported by a group of 5 volunteers, with aims to
turn teaching entirely over to volunteers by April. Subject material has fallen into two classes.
The first is an eight-class introduction to computers, and the second contains more intermediate
lessons including the creation of resumes and business letters. So far, 13 students have
completed the class, with the help of 5 recruited tutors. A checklist has yet to be established.



                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 52
    Project Three: Middle School Technology
           The preliminary curriculum for middle school technology classes has been completed.
    Students began taking the NC Computer Skills test in March. While scores have not been
    returned, the preliminary curriculum was evaluated by the VISTA and is in the process of being
    revised so that a more complete and volunteer sustainable curriculum is the end result.

    Americorps*VISTA Project Work Plan Summary

Goal              Time           Objective                    Activities                       Goals Completed
                  Period
Help 200 low-     Quarters          Serve as Master          1.   Complete 12 hours of        Completed
income            1-2                Teacher for                   literacy training
residents of                         Technology and           2.   Create CTC volunteer        Completed
Durham‘s                             Learning Offerings,           training manuals for 4
West End gain                        including: Parents            programs in English &
literacy/                            Part, Techcelerated           Spanish
computer skills                      GED, Career              3.   Post volunteer bilingual    Completed
                                     Passport and PC               training manuals to the
                                     Basics                        web

                   Quarters      > Create cadre of VITAL      1.   Develop ―VITAL‖             Completed
                  3-4            Volunteers (Volunteers in         training
                                 Technology and               2.   Develop Volunteer           Completed
                                 Learning) for instruction         Recruitment Plan
                                                              3.   Recruit and Train 50        Completed
                                 > Build a tech support            VITAL volunteers
                                 team to ensure               4.   Collab. with RTPNet         Completed
                                 functionality of 4CTCs in         VISTA project to
                                 Durham‘s West End:                develop tech support
                                                                   system

Document           Quarters         Design and               1.   Identify and install user   Completed
Impact of         3-4                implement user track          log-in software.
Technology                           system                   2.   Tabulate user time and      In process
Access on                           Determine correlation         activity logs
Educational                          between kind/amount      3.   Collect user test and       In process
Progress                             of computer activity          progress information
                                     and progress towards          from Literacy council
                                     literacy goals.               and other educational
                                                                   partners
                                                              4.   Analyze and present         In process
                                                                   correlation findings
Develop           Quarters 3-4      Develop business         1.   Conduct ―bench-             In process
Community                            plan for West End             marking‖ study drawing
Commitment                           Community Learning            on information provided
to CTC                               Labs                          by CTCNet member
Sustainability                                                     organizations with
                                                                   sustainable funding/ops
                                    Build support among      2.   Host a series of Open
                                     Durham business,              Houses for learders in
                                     philanthropic,                business, plilanthropy,     Series has begun /
                                     education, and civic          education ,and              in process
                                     leaders                       local government




                                                             CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 53
Durham Literacy Council hardcopy supplements include:
    News and Observer newspaper article by Rah Bickley on Parents and Children Learning
      in Public Housing, January 19, 2002
    Screen shot of login software
    Flyer advertising classes


_______________

Cyber Y Technology Center, San Diego, CA
VISTA Member: Gregory Fleischer
Unfortunately, the Cyber Y Center‘s first VISTA through the CTC VISTA Project transferred to
a position closer to home, and so there is little information to report regarding his service here.
Gregory Fleischer joined the Cyber Y in Mid-November of 2001 and transferred to a San
Francisco position in late January. For more information, contact VISTA Project Coordinator
Anne Neville at powerupvista@aol.com.




                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 54
Little Tokyo Service Center CDC, Los Angeles, CA
VISTA Member: Jannette Peterson
Jannette Peterson, the Little Tokyo Service Center CDC‘s AmeriCorps*VISTA member, has
been providing community services to the agency‘s DISKovery Community Computer Learning
Center. Ms. Peterson‘s role is to develop the capacity of the DISKovery Center‘s operations
through curriculum development, volunteer and participant outreach and coordination, and the
development of a program steering committee.

Our VISTA member has been responsible for rebuilding and designing the DISKovery Center‘s
website (http://diskovery.ltsc.org). In it, she has created webpages and links that summarily
describe our program‘s services (in both Japanese and English), public access schedules, and
requests for volunteer support. In addition, Ms. Peterson has posted three volunteer opportunities
on www.volunteermatch.org, which has generated over two dozen interests with about 10
candidates following up; four of these individuals are now regular volunteers at our center.

Ms. Peterson has also developed helpful and important outreach materials such as flyers that are
being circulated around the community. She has created a fact sheet about our program that will
ultimately be inserted into a press packet, which will include a brochure, newspaper stories about
our center, and digital images on a CDROM. Our VISTA has also assembled a PowerPoint
presentation that is available for other community outreach presentations and meetings.

Since her service began in late June 2001, Ms. Peterson has also worked closely with our
Japanese computer instructor, and has helped to design the curriculum for several bi-lingual,
project-based computer courses. Her background in Japanese also has been important in
communicating with monolingual learners and participants.

How our VISTA is making a difference in the Little Tokyo community
Ms. Peterson has co-developed a series of bilingual classes on various topics. These classes are
project-oriented, which means that learners have something to show for their time in class. Our
VISTA member has made it possible for beginning computer users to develop confidence and
tangible skills. Her program participants have created newsletters, personalized postcards,
websites, and soon will be starting a cookbook project. These classes for older adults of Japanese
descent are an important confidence builder for people who thought that they were ―too old‖ to
use a computer. Yet Ms. Peterson‘s curriculum development for our program is what will help
support the center‘s growth long after her VISTA term is completed.

In one of her community outreach visits, Ms. Peterson established contact with the local library.
Their computers are available to the public, but access to their workstations are limited to half-
hour slots, and their staff are unavailable or without the proper skills to provide technical support
and training. The head librarian was thrilled to hear that there was a community computer
learning center right around the corner, and promptly made copies of our schedule and
distributed them to her staff. Our VISTA thus established an important community contact that
has the potential for future collaboration with the library.




                                                  CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 55
Requested assistance from Project staff
As a project supervisor, one of the things I believe that would help further improve our VISTA‘s
effectiveness in the community would be trainings in community organizing, meeting
facilitation, and workload management. Workshop sessions that would involve other VISTA‘s
serving in the region would also be important to building a network of peer support and
resources.
    Also helpful would be a supervisor‘s and VISTA member‘s handbook, that would provide
information such as number of hours a VISTA member should contribute, vacation and sick
leave, activities the member is or is not allowed to participate in (for example, is fundraising
allowed?), etc.

Workplan commentary

Goal 1: To support the development of a volunteer team of computer trainers and technicians.
   This will be accomplished through the following activities and objectives:
   i.       Establish a tracking system of volunteers through the creation of a database and
            development of an intake form
   ii.      Coordinate outreach activities enlisting the support of at least 10 college students and
            professionals as volunteer instructors and/or technicians
   iii.     Develop training materials for two courses and job descriptions for volunteer
            instructors and volunteer technicians (12 months)
Summary:
   i. Data is being collected through a volunteer registration form, and is being entered into a
        database; refinement of database is approximately 30% completed.
   ii. Some volunteer outreach and recruitment has been conducted: starting to hold monthly
        volunteer orientation meetings; developing relationships with community service
        departments of local universities; co-facilitating volunteer training class to encourage
        program participants to volunteer at the center; three volunteer job descriptions posted on
        volunteermatch.org.
   iii. Curricula are 85% complete for Intro to Computers, Intro to the Internet, Microsoft
        Word, Creating Personal Newsletters, and Making Postcards. These curricula are
        available as a resource for volunteer instructors.

Goal 2: To coordinate outreach activities targeting program participants and volunteers. This
will be accomplished through the following activities and objectives:
    i.     Coordinate the development of the center‘s website describing the center‘s program
    ii.    Create a 3-panel brochure for distribution at events along with a press packet (3 qtrs)
Summary of Accomplished Objectives (please provide in measurable and quantifiable terms):
    i.     Website is 90% complete. Class schedule, public access schedule, center
           information, and student websites are now posted at http://diskovery.ltsc.org. The
           website is an ongoing project, as the class schedule and public access schedules need
           to be updated regularly.
    ii.    PowerPoint presentation has been created to give basic information about the center;
           press packet is 75% complete; all the materials are ready to be assembled in folders.
           It includes a fact sheet/brochure, photos, news clippings, and a CD containing photos
           and the PowerPoint presentation.



                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 56
Goal 3: To help establish curriculum modules and evaluative procedures for improved lesson
delivery, effective instruction, and replication. This will be accomplished through the following
activities and objectives:
    i.      Consolidate and process existing lesson plans, exercises, class outlines, and training
            materials for 2 courses into a handbook for course participants & volunteer instructors
    ii.     Create pre- and post-assessment surveys for class participants to gauge the
            effectiveness of curriculum and training for two courses
    iii.    Provide 8 computer-based course instruction to participants
    iv.     Assemble a self-paced tutorial for participants taking advantage of our public access
            program (3+ qtrs)
Summary of Accomplished Objectives (please provide in measurable and quantifiable terms):
    i.      Course handbook for Introduction to Computers, along with trainer‘s curriculum is
            80% complete; has also helped to develop four new bilingual project-based courses,
            including Creating a Personal Newsletter, Making Postcards, Building a Webpage,
            and Creating a Recipe Book.
    ii.     Developing instructor guidelines for cumulative projects that will enable us to assess
            participants‘ learning. These guidelines are about 60% completed; still in the
            process of research
    iii.    Has completed instruction of 7 courses: Intro to Computers (3) and Introduction to
            the Internet (2), Introduction to Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel; co-facilitated 3
            courses: Creating a Personal Newsletter, Making Postcards, and Building a
            Webpage. Provided training and formal instruction to 151 students since June 2001.
    iv.     One self-paced tutorial session has been implemented: the Typing Power Hour.
            Other similar projects are still in development. 65% complete.

Goal 4: To assist in the development of a steering committee composed of program participants,
residents, and other community stakeholders. This will be accomplished through the following
activities and objectives:
    i.      Identify and organize 8 potential steering committee members composed of center
            participants, local residents, and other community stakeholders, to initially meet on a
            monthly basis towards a quarterly schedule
    ii.     Co-facilitate meetings with steering committee members to determine the program‘s
            direction and the community‘s needs
    iii.    Document meeting outcomes and discussions to be posted on our website (4 qtrs)
Summary of Accomplished Objectives (please provide in measurable and quantifiable terms):
    i.      Steering committee held its first meeting in February, and will be meeting again April
            6th. Seven steering committee members have been recruited.
    ii.     Co-facilitated steering committee first steering committee meeting in February.
    iii.    Discussions not yet posted to website, pending approval from members.

Other Developments:
    Ms. Peterson has also been involved in helping to develop a collaborative of API CTCs in
      Los Angeles. She has attended 6 meetings, and has taken minutes for five of them. She
      also serves on the collaborative‘s website subcommittee.
    Involved in planning LTSC CDC‘S volunteer appreciation event.
Hardcopy supplements include CTC flyers and Power Point program print-outs.



                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 57
DSSA Management/Chicago Housing Authority
VISTA Members: Yurora Saylor, Thomas Johnson, Roshawnda
Joiner, Alycia Alexander
                                                      During the period from August 2001
                                                      through February 2002, three of the 4
                                                      VISTAS at DSSA Projects have
                                                      completed their year of service. The
                                                      fourth VISTA will complete her service at
                                                      the end of April 2002. We are expecting
                                                      4 replacement VISTA Members during
                                                      the months of April and June, 2002.

                                                     Success: During this first year, some of
                                                     our greatest success stories include:
                                                     creation of Resident Steering Committees;
                                                     development of a strong cadre of
                                                     volunteers and computer-users; skills
                                                     training so that most volunteers can teach
                                                     new guests some basic skills;
strengthening of relationships with community based organizations; and recording of curriculum
and how-to guides. During our Second year, we will need to revise the work-plan based on both
the successes and failures of our first year.

Curriculum Changes: The new VISTAs walk into Computer Learning Centers where residents
and community visitors have already learned the basics and are now ready to teach newcomers
the basics. These Resident CLC Volunteers are much more interested in one-shot workshops to
improve high-level skills rather than a 6 week long curriculum. Furthermore, most of these CLC
Volunteers have taught newcomers the skills they have learned. Thus, the New VISTA role is to
promote CLC Volunteers as teachers both on the informal day to day level and to recruit these
Volunteers to post flyers advertising for a formal workshop they want to teach.

Steering Committee Changes:
Steering Committees were
developed at all four sites. This is a
great success for a number of
reasons. The single most important
task for sustainability is to promote a
sense of ownership for the CLC in
the Resident CLC Volunteers. If the
CLC is to sustain itself through
resident decision-making, resident
volunteers, and resident leadership,
from its inception the CLC must be
a resident initiative. Starting with



                                              CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 58
resident focus-groups and resident surveys, equipment and software was acquired. These
resident committees have been creating their own goals, their own policies, their own volunteer
contracts, and their own curriculum from the first day of the project.

Grass-Roots Organizing: Some of our hierarchical structures have not been successful for we
have found some of the ―Presidents‖ to be autocratic decision makers or apathetic title-mongers.
Thus, we have been working with University of Illinois Extension‘s expert on grass-roots
organizing to develop a strategy to convert leadership roles into more meaningful task-oriented
positions. Furthermore, Extension is working with VISTAs to hold monthly Summit Meetings
where resident leaders from all four buildings meet to discuss common concerns and useful
solutions. These Summits are helpful in building a sense of elite membership in the CLC
Volunteers. That is, Residents who are CLC Volunteers at one site now see themselves as part
of a movement where other smart, dedicated peers are working on similar activities.

                                                      Intergenerational Programs: All four
                                                      VISTA Members spent quite a bit of time
                                                      reaching out to a variety of Community
                                                      Based Organizations (CBOs) during their
                                                      first year. These CBOs included Schools,
                                                      Universities, Churches, Youth Groups,
                                                      YMCA, and other Community Technology
                                                      Centers. In our original planning, we had
                                                      anticipated a strong exchange program with
                                                      Chicago Public Schools (CPS). We
                                                      successfully found Residents who were
                                                      interested in promoting good-will with the
                                                      Schools. Unfortunately, the Schools were
constrained with legal concerns and were not (on any ongoing basis) able to allow their students
to travel to our Computer Learning Centers for intergenerational exchange and instruction.
Thus, we aimed our intergenerational outreach to included a variety of non-school youth groups,
like the Interfaith Youth Core, the YMCA and other Church groups. We also promoted
intergenerational activities with an older group of Students both in local Universities and High
School Service Learning Programs.

Community Based Organizations: Other valuable CBOs include the technical resources from
Devry, Illinois Institute of Technology, The Jim Mullen Foundation and GHA-Clad. Each of
these institutions provided technical support, donated equipment, and/or training for the VISTA
Members. University of Illinois Extension has provided grass-roots organizing support
throughout the first year and has made the commitment to the second year VISTA Members as
well. With local CTCs and the YMCA we have shared curriculum and identified new policy
approaches.

Special Events: We have also relied on CBOs to collaborate on creative one-shot initiatives.
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra sent a Quartet to perform for our Volunteer Recognition
Luncheon. Illinois Institute of Technology created a web-site where seniors could enter their
life-histories. The Americorps Common-Corps group celebrated Martin Luther King Holiday



                                               CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 59
recording life histories, helping residents make digital photographs, t-shirts and poetry.
Interfaith Youth Core held a full-day intergenerational event to promote religious tolerance and
understanding. Loyola University Volunteers held monthly Bingo Games where residents who
are taught by Loyola Volunteers all came together for leisure activities.

Summary of Year Two Plans: As we look
at our upcoming VISTA year, the emphasis
will be less on gaining basic skills and more
on developing high-level skills with
workshops taught by resident experts. The
Steering Committees will re-organize with
each Resident CLC volunteer serving as the
CLC Specialist in one or more areas.
VISTAs will continue to work with CBOs
but will increasingly ask Resident Leaders
to make contact with these resource
providers. Intergenerational programming
will continue with older-student Service
Learning Programs and NGOs like
Interfaith Youth Core. And finally, VISTAs
will be challenged to collate all written
materials, instruction guides and curriculum
to develop a ―How To‖ manual for Resident Run CTCs in Public Housing Developments.
Previous VISTA Volunteer Alycia Alexander will become a paid employee for DSSA and will
take-over the role as VISTA supervisor and ―How To‖ editor.


Workplan Commentary — Third Quarter

Goal I. Develop A Computer Learning Center (CLC) for                                    1 – At all 4 CLCs, VISTAs have
Residents at Assigned Public Housing Project. Including:                                created a friendly, welcoming
seniors and disabled adults.                                                            environment where community
    Obj. 1 Using the designated computers and space, create     Obj. 1 – Completed      members feel comfortable to learn.
    an inviting atmosphere for the CLC where residents and      during first month.     2 – Some CLCs have more guests
    neighbors feel welcomed by keeping the center open at                               than others. On average, we have 8
    least 6 hours per day.                                      Obj. 2 – Completed      guests per day at most sites.
    Obj 2. Serve a minimum of 8 CLC guests per day.             during first quarter.   3- A healthy cadre of Volunteers
    Obj. 3 Train, Support and Supervise Volunteers so that                              have been trained at each site and are
    they may provide adequate support to new guests. Hold       Obj 3 Completed         actively teaching their neighbors to
    monthly volunteer meetings to insure that their needs are   during first quarter.   use computers. Most sites have
    met.                                                                                monthly volunteer meetings.
    Obj. 4 Each volunteer must serve a minimum of 2 hours       Obj. 4 Completed        4- Some volunteers are more active
    per week either helping you run the open lab hours or       during first quarter.   than others. Not all volunteers are
    working with students as tutor/mentors.                                             consistent in their weekly 2 hours.
    Obj. 5 At the end of each 6 week training class, all        Obj. 5 Completed        5- Most students who have
    students will be required to serve a minimum of 12          during all 4            completed a 6 week training class
    volunteer hours.                                            quarters.               have served as a volunteer for the
    Obj. 6 Quarterly Volunteer Recognition Events will be       Obj. 6 Completed        required 12 hours.
    held. You will sum all of the volunteer hours for each      during all 4            6- At least 2 Volunteer recognition
    CLC Volunteer and distribute awards accordingly.            quarters.               events at all 4 buildings.



                                                         CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 60
Goal II. Abating historical animosity between residents and                               1- Each VISTA member has
their neighbors, the CLC becomes a hub of activity for the                                conducted some outreach in their
surrounding neighborhood. Members of the surrounding                                      surrounding neighborhood aimed at
neighborhood are welcomed into the CLC at each building.          Obj. 1- Completed       sharing the CLC with the
          Obj 1. Invite members of local churches, schools,       during first quarter.   community.
          CAPS groups or other community groups to serve                                  2 - Various Community
          as members of the steering committee and to use         Obj. 2- Completed       organizations have members active
          our CLC as a resource.                                  during second           with the CLC. These members are
          Obj 2. Encourage community group representatives        quarter.                drawn from local schools,
          to become members of our CLC.                                                   universities, Mosques, and Churches.
Goal III. Use of the CLC is a privilege where resident must                               1- All computer users who received 6
contribute to the CLC in exchange for free-air time. Each                                 week classes have served 12 hours as
new CLC user must contribute to the CLC by tutoring                                       a volunteer, or a child-tutor of both.
children and/or acting as Lab Monitor. While the seniors can                              Though VISTAs have advertised for
mentor and tutor the children, these children can show the                                new 6-week and one shot classes,
seniors how to use a mouse and how to navigate on a                                       residents at most buildings have
computer.                                                         Obj 1-Completed         declined. Thus we don‘t have a
          Obj. 1 . Access for seniors should be contingent on     during first quarter.   growing cadre of volunteers.
          either (1) Acting as a Lab Monitor or (2) tutoring a                            2 The local Grammar Schools are
          child. When a resident or community member                                      unwilling to send their children to
          registers for a 6 week training class, they should                              our CLC. Recognizing that there is
          commit to 12 hours of volunteer time when this          Obj 2 – Completed       no school reciprocation, VISTA
          class ends.                                             during first quarter.   members are unwilling to continue
          Obj. 2 Work with local grammar school to develop                                traveling to the school as tutors.
          an after-school program for the children who want                               3 – VISTA members who have
          to use the CLC. VISTA Member should                     Obj 3. Completed        completed their 2nd quarter did travel
          demonstrate good will by traveling to the local         during second           to the local school with 3 or more
          school and acting as a tutor for 3 hours per week.      quarter.                resident volunteers.
          Obj 3. During the second quarter, recruit 3 or more                             4- Grammar schools are unwilling to
          residents to travel to the school as tutors with you.   Obj. 4 Completed        participate
          Obj 4. Work with school‘s extend-a-day program to       during second           5- Grammar schools are unwilling to
          encourage students to come to CLC after school.         quarter.                participate. Thus, most VISTA
           Access to the CLC for school children should be                                members have revised their plan to
          contingent on completion of homework.                   Obj. 5 Completed        recruit high-school students instead.
          Obj 5. Ten school children a week should receive        during 3rd quarter.     6 – We have not completed 4th
          tutor/mentor assistance and/or computer time.           Obj. 6 Completed        quarter.
          Obj 6. During 4th Quarter, identify resident leaders    during 4th quarter.     In Sum: In light of Grammar
          to run the tutor/mentor volunteer program.                                      Schools‘ disinterest,
          Introduce these leaders to School Liaison and                                   intergenerational programming must
          facilitate monthly meetings with these leaders.                                 be re-vamped.
Goal IV. Rather than a top-down approach where staff                                      1- Steering Committees have been
guesses what the community wants from their CLC, the                                      elected at all 4 buildings. Recogizing
VISTA member will meet regularly with a steering                                          that some Committee members are
committee.                                                        Obj 1 – Completed       autocratic or apathetic leaders, we
          Obj. 1 Develop a steering-committee that meets          during first month.     have instituted 6 month term limits
          monthly to establish goals and remove barriers                                  and residents from 2 buildings are
          related to use of the CLC.                                                      voting on new leadership.
Goal V. Develop a plan for technical support using free                                   1- Though VISTA members have
community resources. Find volunteers from schools which                                   done some outreach, only one CLC
have community service requirements.                                                      meets the standard of 4 hours of
     Obj. 1 Contact local high schools and Universities for       Obj 1- Completed        School-aged volunteers per week.
     volunteers. For example: Dunbar High School and IL           during 3rd quarter.     Disappointingly, one of the VISTAs
     Institute of Technology are close to Lincoln Perry.                                  who has made several attempts to get
     Loyola University and The Waldorf School are close to                                Illinois Institute of Technology to
     Sheridan-Devon. Train these school volunteers and hold                               participate has not received any
     monthly meetings with school volunteers. By the end of                               cooperation.


                                                           CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 61
    the 3rd quarter you should have 4 volunteer hours per                                  2 – We have identified a School
    week. Celebrate volunteer efforts with a quarterly                                     Liaison with Devry Technical
    recognition event.                                             Obj, 2 Completed        Institute. It is not yet the 4th quarter
    Obj. 2 Identify school liaison who will continue to feed       during 4th quarter.     so we are not sure if we will have a
    the CLC volunteers after your departure. Link this                                     resident who will be capable of
    school liason with 2 resident volunteers who are active        Obj. 3 Completed        contacting the school liason.
    in the CLC.                                                    during 4th quarter.     3- We have learned that leaders
    Obj 3. From the Volunteer Pool, Steering Committee                                     should be limited to a 6 month term.
    members should be re-elected to serve for 1 year term.                                 At each site, the Volunteers and
    Define hierarchy of volunteers. Write Volunteer Job                                    Leaders have written policy,
    Descriptions and ask volunteers to sign agreements.                                    developed job descriptions, signed
    Give the most committed volunteers incentives to                                       agreements, etc. VISTA members
    reward their efforts (e.g. gold or silver stars on their                               have developed incentives to reward
    photo ID badges).                                                                      the volunteers for their efforts.

Goal VI. Teach Basic Computer Skills to all interested               Obj. 4 –              4 – Throughout the first qtr all
residents and community participants.                                Completed             VISTAs offered a minimum of 5
     Obj. 4 During First Quarter: Teach basic computer skills to     during 1st            class-hours per week to residents.
     residents and neighbors for 8 class-hours per week.             quarter.              5- During the second quarter,
    Obj. 5 During Second Quarter : Teach basic computer skills       Objective 5           residents‘ interest in classes waned.
to residents and community for 4 class hours per week. Spend         Completed             Though VISTAs offered 4 class
2 hours per week training Volunteers to become Teachers.             during 2nd            hours per week, residents did not
    Obj. 6 During Third and 4th Quarters: Spend 2 hours per          quarter.              show-up for classes. However, many
week training Volunteers to become Teachers. With your                                     residents who stepped-forward to
support, Volunteers will begin teaching classes 4 hours per          Objective 6 –         offer their skills to teach classes.
week.                                                                Completed             6- Most VISTAs spend part of each
                                                                     during 3rd and        week training residents who want to
                                                                     4th quarters          be teachers.
Goal VII. Insure that the CLC is sustainable and replicable.                               1- Though we are not yet into the 4th
   Obj. 1 Collaborate with the other 3 CHA VISTA Members             Obj. 1-               quarter, most VISTA members have
and your most active Volunteers/Steering Committee Members           Completed             already written chapters of this book,
to write a CLC Start-Up Manuel. At the Minimum, this                 during 4th quarter    including user-friendly curriculum,
Manuel should include chapters on Steering Committee                                       software and web-site suggestions,
development, volunteer recruitment, community promotion,                                   role of steering committee members,
and user-friendly curriculum/software.                                                     etc.

State of the Project – 4rd Quarter Report

Goal I. Develop A Computer Learning Center (CLC) for                                       1 – At all 4 CLCs, VISTA members
Residents at Assigned Public Housing Project. Including:                                   have created a friendly, welcoming
seniors and disabled adults.                                       Obj. 1 – Completed      environment where community
    Obj. 1 Using the designated computers and space, create        during first month.     members feel comfortable to learn
    an inviting atmosphere for the CLC where residents and                                 new skills.
    neighbors feel welcomed by keeping the center open at          Obj. 2 – Completed      2 – Some CLCs have more guests
    least 6 hours per day.                                         during first quarter.   than others. On average, we have 8
    Obj 2. Serve a minimum of 8 CLC guests per day.                                        guests per day at most sites.
    Obj. 3 Train, Support and Supervise Volunteers so that         Obj 3 Completed         3- A healthy cadre of Volunteers
    they may provide adequate support to new guests. Hold          during first quarter.   have been trained at each site. These
    monthly volunteer meetings to insure that their needs are                              volunteers are actively teaching their
    met.                                                           Obj. 4 Completed        neighbors to use computers. Most
    Obj. 4 Each volunteer must serve a minimum of 2 hours          during first quarter.   sites have monthly volunteer
    per week either helping you run the open lab hours or                                  meetings.
    working with students as tutor/mentors.                        Obj. 5 Completed        4- Some volunteers are more active
    Obj. 5 At the end of each 6 week training class, all           during all 4            than others. Not all volunteers are
    students will be required to serve a minimum of 12             quarters.               consistent in their weekly 2 hours.



                                                          CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 62
    volunteer hours.                                              Obj. 6 Completed        5- Most students who completed a 6
    Obj. 6 Quarterly Volunteer Recognition Events will be         during all 4            week training class has served as a
    held. You will sum all of the volunteer hours for each        quarters.               volunteer for the required 12 hours.
    CLC Volunteer and distribute awards accordingly.                                      6- At least 2 Volunteer recognition
                                                                                          events ere held at all 4 buildings.
Goal II. Abating historical animosity between residents and                               1- Each VISTA member has
their neighbors, the CLC becomes a hub of activity for the                                conducted some outreach in their
surrounding neighborhood. Members of the surrounding                                      surrounding neighborhood aimed at
neighborhood are welcomed into the CLC at each building.          Obj. 1- Completed       sharing the CLC with the
          Obj 1. Invite members of local churches, schools,       during first quarter.   community.
          CAPS groups or other community groups to serve                                  2 - Various Community
          as members of the steering committee and to use         Obj. 2- Completed       organizations have members active
          our CLC as a resource.                                  during second           with the CLC. These members are
          Obj 2. Encourage community group representatives        quarter.                drawn from local schools,
          to become members of our CLC.                                                   universities, Mosques, and Churches.
Goal III. Use of the CLC is a privilege where resident must                               1- All computer users who received 6
contribute to the CLC in exchange for free-air time. Each                                 week classes have served 12 hours as
new CLC user must contribute to the CLC by tutoring                                       a volunteer, or a child-tutor of both.
children and/or acting as Lab Monitor. While the seniors can                              Though VISTAs have advertised for
mentor and tutor the children, these children can show the                                new 6-week and one shot classes,
seniors how to use a mouse and how to navigate on a                                       residents at most buildings have
computer.                                                         Obj 1-Completed         declined. Thus we don‘t have a
          Obj. 1 . Access for seniors should be contingent on     during first quarter.   growing cadre of volunteers.
          either (1) Acting as a Lab Monitor or (2) tutoring a                            2 The local Grammar Schools are
          child. When a resident or community member                                      unwilling to send their children to
          registers for a 6 week training class, they should                              our CLC. Recognizing that there is
          commit to 12 hours of volunteer time when this          Obj 2 – Completed       no school reciprocation, VISTA
          class ends.                                             during first quarter.   members are unwilling to continue
          Obj. 2 Work with local grammar school to develop                                traveling to the school as tutors.
          an after-school program for the children who want                               3 – VISTA members did travel to the
          to use the CLC. VISTA Member should                     Obj 3. Completed        local schools to promote bilateral
          demonstrate good will by traveling to the local         during second           volunteerism. Unfortunately CPS is
          school and acting as a tutor for 3 hours per week.      quarter.                unable to reciprocate.
          Obj 3. During the second quarter, recruit 3 or more                             4- Grammar schools are unwilling to
          residents to travel to the school as tutors with you.   Obj. 4 Completed        participate due to permission slips.
          Obj 4. Work with school‘s extend-a-day program to       during second           5- Grammar schools are unwilling to
          encourage some students to come to CLC after            quarter.                participate. Thus, most VISTA
          school.                                                                         members have revised their plan to
           Access to the CLC for school children should be        Obj. 5 Completed        recruit high-school students and/or
          contingent on completion of homework.                   during 3rd quarter.     work with local youth groups not in
          Obj 5. Ten school children a week should receive        Obj. 6 Completed        the CPS (Chicago Public Schools)
          tutor/mentor assistance and/or computer time.           during 4th quarter.     6 – CPS has resisted this program,
          Obj 6. During 4th Quarter, identify resident leaders                            thus this task was never completed.
          to run the tutor/mentor volunteer program.                                      In Sum: In light of Grammar
          Introduce these leaders to School Liaison and                                   Schools‘ disinterest, intergener-
          facilitate monthly meetings with these leaders.                                 ational programs must be re-vamped.
Goal IV. Rather than a top-down approach where staff                                      1- Steering Committees have been
guesses what the community wants from their CLC, the                                      elected at all 4 buildings.
VISTA member will meet regularly with a steering                                          Recognizing that some Committee
committee.                                                        Obj 1 – Completed       members are autocratic or apathetic
          Obj. 1 Develop a steering-committee that meets          during first month.     leaders, we have instituted 6 month
          monthly to establish goals and remove barriers                                  term limits and residents from 2
          related to use of the CLC.                                                      buildings are voting on new
                                                                                          leadership. We are also
                                                                                          experimenting with a less
                                                                                          hierarchical leadership approach by


                                                           CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 63
                                                                                          identifying each resident‘s
                                                                                          specialty(ies). For example: Internet
                                                                                          Specialist, Greeting Card Specialist,
                                                                                          and Music Specialist…
Goal V. Develop a plan for technical support using free                                   1- Though VISTA members have
community resources. Find volunteers from schools which                                   done some outreach, only one CLC
have community service requirements.                                                      meets the standard of 4 hours of
    Obj. 1 Contact local high schools and Universities for         Obj 1- Completed       School-aged volunteers per week.
    volunteers. For example: Dunbar High School and IL             during 3rd quarter.    We are slowly building a relationship
    Institute of Technology are close to Lincoln Perry.                                   with IIT and Loyola but we are also
    Loyola University and The Waldorf School are close to                                 building relationships with Interfaith
    Sheridan-Devon. Train these school volunteers and hold                                Youth Council and the YMCA.
    monthly meetings with school volunteers. By the end of                                2 – We have identified a School
    the 3rd quarter you should have 4 volunteer hours per                                 Liaison with Devry Technical
    week. Celebrate volunteer efforts with a quarterly                                    Institute and Illinois Institute of
    recognition event.                                             Obj, 2 Completed       Technology. One of the sites has a
    Obj. 2 Identify school liaison who will continue to feed       during 4th quarter.    Resident Leader who is capable of
    the CLC volunteers after your departure. Link this                                    ordering repairs. The other 3 sites
    school liason with 2 resident volunteers who are active        Obj. 3 Completed       should have strong leaders by 2nd or
    in the CLC.                                                    during 4th quarter.    3rd quarter of 2002.
    Obj 3. From the Volunteer Pool, Steering Committee                                    3- We have learned that leaders
    members should be re-elected to serve for 1 year term.                                should be limited to a 6 month term.
    Define hierarchy of volunteers. Write Volunteer Job                                   At each site, Volunteers and Leaders
    Descriptions and ask volunteers to sign agreements.                                   have written policy, developed job
    Give the most committed volunteers incentives to                                      descriptions, signed agreements, etc.
    reward their efforts (e.g. gold or silver stars on their                              The VISTA members have
    photo ID badges).                                                                     developed incentives to reward the
                                                                                          volunteers for their efforts.

Goal VI. Teach Basic Computer Skills to all interested               Obj. 4 –             4 – Throughout the first qtr all
residents and community participants.                                Completed            VISTAs offered a minimum of 5
     Obj. 4 During First Quarter: Teach basic computer skills to     during 1st           class-hours per week to residents.
     residents and neighbors for 8 class-hours per week.             quarter.             5- During the second quarter,
    Obj. 5 During Second Quarter : Teach basic computer skills       Objective 5          residents‘ interest in classes waned.
to residents and community for 4 class hours per week. Spend         Completed            Though VISTAs offered 4 class
2 hours per week training Volunteers to become Teachers.             during 2nd           hours of Workshops per week,
    Obj. 6 During Third and 4th Quarters: Spend 2 hours per          quarter.             residents did not show-up for classes.
week training Volunteers to become Teachers. With your                                    However, there were many residents
support, Volunteers will begin teaching classes 4 hours per          Objective 6 –        who stepped-forward to offer their
week.                                                                Completed            skills to teach small classes or one-
                                                                     during 3rd and       on-one instruction.
                                                                     4th quarters         6- Most VISTAs spent part of each
                                                                                          week training residents who want to
                                                                                          be teachers.
Goal VII. Insure that the CLC is sustainable and replicable.                              1- Most VISTA members have
   Obj. 1 Collaborate with the other 3 CHA VISTA Members             Obj. 1-              already written chapters of this book,
and your most active Volunteers/Steering Committee Members           Completed            including user-friendly curriculum,
to write a CLC Start-Up Manuel. At the Minimum, this                 during 4th quarter   software and web-site suggestions,
Manuel should include chapters on Steering Committee                                      role of steering committee members,
development, volunteer recruitment, community promotion,                                  etc.
and user-friendly curriculum/software.




                                                          CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 64
Fenway CDC, Boston, MA
VISTA Member: Rob Hall
The period from November 5-February 15 has exceeded our expectations for the VISTA
program. We are very fortunate to have retained the services of Rob Hall, a recent graduate from
the Rochester Institute of Technology to serve a one year VISTA term. Rob‘s dedication,
expertise and helpful personality have allowed the CDC to launch an innovative and demanding
program preparing low and moderate income urban adults for careers in networking
administration and information technology.

Rob is spending most of his time as the lead instructor for the New Economy Technology
Training (NETT) Network Associates program. The NETT Network Associates program is an
innovative new training program designed to prepare unemployed and underemployed adults for
entry-level network administration and user-support positions. Based on the Cisco Certified
Network Associates program, the program incorporates training in network administration,
software and hardware troubleshooting, customer service, communication skills, job readiness
skills, problem-solving/critical thinking, research skills and other ―soft skills‖ needed for success
in the information technology sector.

When we hired Rob in the early Fall, we expected that given his relative lack of experience and
youth, he would assist a more experienced teacher to launch the NETT/Cisco Certification
program. It quickly became apparent that Rob possessed the requisite skills to lead the program
himself. The first step in the process was for Rob to take a Cisco Certification ―training of
trainers‖ course offered at Bunker Hill Community College. The course is offered in four
consecutive semesters and only twice per year. Because of the timing of the start of the VISTA
program, Rob missed the first semester of the training course, meaning that he was at risk of
needing to wait six months to begin his training. Fortunately, because of his strong previous
preparation in networking support, we were able to negotiate an independent study arrangement
for him through the college, which enabled him to study for Semesters 1 and 2 simultaneously.
Rob handled this demanding course load ably and was able to catch up with his cohort of
trainers-in-training within six weeks.

While Rob studied for his Cisco instructional certification, he simultaneously led the extensive
publicity and outreach campaign for the program in November-December. He assisted with the
development of promotional materials and advertisements and conducted a series of ten
informational sessions at the Fenway CDC. During this period, he fielded phone calls and walk-
in inquiries from approximately 120 individuals interested in the program. Through this process,
he was able to help to screen for appropriate candidates and to refer those who were not eligible
for the program to appropriate trainings at other CTC‘s or at the Fenway CDC.

During the months of December-January, Rob accepted applications from interested individuals,
administered computer skills and educational assessments for potential candidates and conducted
first and second round interviews for finalists. Rob screened the applications for completeness
and worked with applicants to obtain missing documents from their applications. In addition, he
administered and scored the skills assessments. He participated in the final interviews and
provided a technical assessment of the candidate‘s ability to participate successfully in the


                                                  CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 65
program. Finally, he met individually with all candidates coming from a non-technical
background to ensure that they understood the technical requirements and overall content of the
training program.

The NETT Network Associates program was launched on January 28, with twelve students. The
program is a six month intensive training program. Rob maintains a rigorous teaching schedule
of 3-4 hours per day with the remainder of the day dedicated to class preparation and one-on-one
student tutoring. The class is off to a good with no attrition during the first two weeks of the
program. Rob has also managed some innovative enhancements to the program including an in-
depth PC technician workshop to teach students about basic PC assembly and repair.

Throughout this period, Rob has also provided valuable troubleshooting and technical support
both to the employees of the Fenway CDC and to CTC users. He helped make a number of
important technology purchasing decisions for equipment purchased for the CDC, for the CTC
and for the networking class. Among the items purchased during this period were six Dell
computers for the CTC expansion, an LCD projector and a digital video camera. He relocated
the CDC server in order to accommodate the space requirements for CDC staff. He managed
user accounts and the relationship with the CDC‘s Internet Service Provider. He has also
assisted with maintaining and updating the CDC web site.

We are very pleased with Rob‘s work for the CDC and look forward to continuing to work with
him during the remainder of his VISTA term.

Workplan Summary


                           Column A                                        Column B               Column C
AmeriCorps*VISTA Project Goals and Objectives                                                 Summary of Accomplishments
                                                                                              (quantifiable.)
1) Establish an intensive 6-month training program to prepare             1st and 2nd Qtrs    Program launched on Jan. 28th
    participants for network administration and user support                                  and will be completed at the end
    positions.                                                                                of July 2002
Obj. 1: Interview, test and screen 50 candidates;                         1st Qtr            • Accomplished

Obj. 2 Obtain CCNA trainer certification                                  1st Qtr             Rob is finishing up the fourth
                                                                                              semester and expects to take the
Obj 3 Launch training program with twelve participants;                                       CCNA certif. exam this Spring
                                                                          2nd Qtr             Accomplished

Obj 4 Conduct six month program and achieve 80% completion
rate for program.
2) Introduce 2 short (40 hours or less) higher level skills training
classes for residents (web design or programming) with a targeted         2nd and 3rd Qtrs      In process
total enrollment of 24 residents;
3) Provide network and technical support to Fenway CDC
Obj. 1 Update and maintain Fenway CDC website;                            3rd and 4th Qtrs      Next half of year
Obj. 2 Implement computer network in Fenway after-school
program;
Obj 3 Maintain and troubleshoot CDC and computer learning                 Ongoing               Accomplished
center computer network and PC‘s.



                                                           CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 66
4. Create sustainability plan for programs implemented                Ongoing                Accomplished
Goal 1: Based upon success of pilot networking program, secure        1st Qtr                In process
private charitable funding to support the program
                                                                      Ongoing                Accomplished
Goal 2: Train permanent CLC instructor to teach higher level
skills classes;
                                                                      Qtr 4                  Next half
Goal 3: Train permanent CDC staff to maintain systems and web
site;                                                                                    




                                                        CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 67
Black Family and Child Institute, Lansing, MI
VISTA Members: Elizabeth Carreon, Mary Fisher, Victoria
Jackson

Elizabeth Carreon

Elizabeth has completed training in several Office 2000 Application Programs through New
Horizons Computer Learning Center; she has taken classes in Windows 2000, Word 2000 and
Excel 2000. Elizabeth has started an A+ certification class at Michigan State University in
February, but has not completed class or taken any of the certifications test, she plans on
attending Lansing Community College summer term. Elizabeth has completed her 1-year Vista
assignment.



Mary Fisher

Mary has completed training in several Office 2000 Application Programs through New
Horizons Computer Learning Center; she has taken classes in Windows 2000, Word 2000, Excel
2000 and Illustrator. Mary has recently completed an A+ certification class at Michigan State
University and will start taking the A+ certification tests in April. Mary still needs to improve
her writing and spelling skills.
In order for Mary to become a more effective instructor, I would suggest that she writing and
spelling classes at the local community college. Mary will have completed her 1-year Vista
assignment in June 2002.



Victoria Jackson

Victoria has completed training in several Office 2000 Application Programs through New
Horizons Computer Learning Center; she has taken classes in Windows 2000, Word 2000, Excel
2000 Access 2000, HTML and PowerPoint 2000. Victoria has recently completed an A+
certification class at Michigan State University and will start taking the A+ certification tests in
April. Victoria presentations skills have been greatly enhanced while working for the Closing the
Gap program; she was a co-presenter at the Aspira Technology Conference last December in San
Juan, Puerto Rico. Victoria still needs to improve her written communications skills, Victoria,
will have completed her 1-year Vista assignment in June 2002.




                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 68
Adult Literacy Resource Institute, Boston, MA
VISTA Member: Larry Syms
Goal 1: Select three to five suitable community-based adult literacy/basic education/ESOL
programs which will provide good service and learning opportunities for VISTA Volunteers.

We have had one VISTA volunteer this year, Larry Syms. This has been his second year of
service. Larry has continued to work with the International Institute of Boston, Project Place,
and the Community Learning Center. He has also added the Somerville Center for Adult
Learning Experience (SCALE).

Goal 2: Each VISTA Volunteer will work with 10-20 students per week either one-on-one or in
small groups to introduce them to computers and the Internet, and to help them with learning
projects which involve using computers and the Internet. This work will include using the
A.L.R.I. introduction/applications process consisting of:
    a) Introduction to computers and how they work
    b) Introduction to the Internet: The WorldWide Web and E-mail
    c) Searching for information on the WorldWide Web
    d) Basic word processing (as needed to accomplish other activities
    e) Introduction to other tools such as spreadsheets, databases, and desktop publishing
         programs
    f) Helping students to design simple Web pages
    g) Using a digital camera
    h) Making simple graphics using a Paint program
    i) Integrating technology with constructivist, learner-centered projects

In the period from September 1, 2001 -March 15, 2002 Larry Syms assisted 179 students. The
average number of new students he worked with in a two-week period was 15. The average
number of students he worked with in a two-week period was 54. In addition to regularly
accomplishing all of the above tasks, he also worked with students to scan images.

In the past year, Larry has found many opportunities to improve his skills in Web page design
and to work with others to acquire these skills. For example, he worked with the A.L.R.I. Field
Technology Coordinator, Akira Kamiya, to offer a class in Web page design. He also worked
with students at the International Institute of Boston to help them create their own Web pages
and he worked with Project Hope students to design an excellent set of Web pages on
Dorchester Now and Then.
[http://alri.org/ltc/prohope/dorchester/] Larry also completed a VISTA Web page.

From time to time, Larry has used the ALRI-developed Website, E-Square, with students. For
example, he familiarized Project 90 (workforce) students at Project place with the Job-search
Websites on E-Square.

Occasionally Larry has had an opportunity to do solo teaching at the Community Learning
Center and at Project Place under the supervision of the site supervisor. For three days Larry had
an opportunity to try solo teaching with ―Lost Boys‖ from Sudan. He offered them an


                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 69
introduction to the Internet which was very exciting because they found Web sites about other
Lost Boys, for example in new Hampshire. This enabled them to connect with people in other
parts of the country with whom they could share the special immigrant circumstances which they
were experiencing.


Goal 3: Each VISTA Volunteer will participate in at least two staff training and development
activities at the A.L.R.I., University of Massachusetts, the state Adult Education Conference,
Network 2000, the CTCNet National conference, or other opportunities to gain further skills in
community-based, technology or literacy/ESOL work.

This is an area where Larry has taken advantage of many opportunities: He attended the
Massachusetts adult education conference, Network 2001, and the CTCNet national conference
last year in San Diego. He has attended many training sessions offered by the VISTA project at
UMass Boston. He regularly attends the monthly, two-hour meeting/training session for the
Technology Collaborative of Boston (TCBoston), Web page design and the use of new
hardware and software. He will be attending the CTCNet Conference in Austin Texas in June,
2002.

Goal 4: Each VISTA Volunteer will participate in at least two student learning projects (such as
a Virtual Visit, a student publication, a class-made Web page) during the year of service.

Larry‘s student learning project this year, at Project Place, involved teaching a new computer
literacy class which enabled two groups of eight students each to learn basic computer literacy
skills needed to qualify for a word processing certificate class. For one day a week, two-hours
per class, Larry has worked with neighborhood people in the South End, residents from halfway
houses and other low-income residents to help them get comfortable with basic computer literacy
skills.

One story may be illustrative of the kind of work Larry has been doing through this project: One
of the adult learners Larry has been working with, from the Ukraine, was an architect in his
country. He is enrolled in English classes here and is a painter. Larry helped him to get e-mail,
and also to use a text-to-speech program to improve his English. Recently he has been writing e-
mail letters to a friend in the Ukraine – in English. Everyone Larry works with gets an e-mail
address. At least half use these – primarily a community computing centers, adult education
programs and libraries.

Larry has been an active team member in the UMass VISTA project, seen as a leader among his
peers, and is very well-respected at the A.L.R.I., and the adult literacy programs where he works,
and within the VISTA project.

Larry‘s service was so outstanding last year at Project Place that they offered him a paid teaching
position. He gave this serious consideration but turned it down for a second year of VISTA
service. But Larry might well consider a new career direction as a teacher!




                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 70
Street-Level Youth Media, Chicago, IL
VISTA Member: Ben Buckley
Securing an Americorps VISTA through the CTC program has been of great value to Street-
Level. The additional support for program delivery has helped us at a time when program staff
members have been overextended and struggling to deal with extreme demand for our services.
While it had been the agencies hope to secure two placements, Ben has been a vital addition to
the program team.

In our Project Work Plan, Street-Level established a number of goals for the placement. Central
to the plan was the broad goal of increasing our capacity during program time, enabling us to
serve more youth and provide more one-on-one attention to participants. For the large part, this
has proven to be the case. After-school program time at each of our neighborhood multimedia
labs is staffed by a coordinator, an instructor, and a student intern. Most days we see an average
of 40-50 youth participants. With the addition of a VISTA, our youth to staff ratio has decreased
by 25%. By assigning Ben to general supervision during access time, senior staff members have
had more time to focus on specific instruction and program documentation. Ben's time is split
between programming at both of our sites to give him the opportunity to work in two distinct
communities. As a full-time staff member, he participates in all program-planning efforts and
attends weekly staff meetings. He contributes through his unique perspective as a volunteer and
temporary member of the team.

It had been our hope throughout this year to begin implementing a new on-line tracking system.
Our VISTA placements were originally slated to assist in this effort. Street-Level has not been
able to secure adequate support at this time to implement this initiative, but the agency has every
intention to move forward on the plan as soon as resources are available. A beta version of the
on-line tools will be tested started June 1, 2002.

As with any placement, Street-Level tries to tailor work activities to best match the skills and
interests of the employee. Ben has shown considerable interest in both technical support within
the lab and the development of database resources. Through Ben's leadership, Street-Level has
implemented a new equipment tracking system. Also part of his assignment for his placement,
Ben has created a web site chronicling his experience. We are aware that for any volunteer
position of this nature, there is always a degree of learning that is fundamental to the experience.
We are working to give Ben as many opportunities as possible to learn from our youth and staff
and we in turn are learning to better supervise and assist volunteers.

The success of this placement, Street-Level intends to secure another volunteer for this June. It
is our intent to stagger volunteers, adding a second VISTA in August after Ben's year is
complete. This approach should allow VISTAs to learn from each other's experience and benefit
by mentoring their peers. Ben will assist in the selection of the new VISTA and will help revise
the job description based on his experience.

VISTA Member Summary

1.)See vista web page for specific accomplishments within Street-Level Youth Media.


                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 71
2.) Stories for PR

My part of Street Level is to help with the day to day of the After School Progam's labs. So for
success stories, check out the SLYM website. Thus far, the most useful contribution my
VISTAship has made to the community is entirely coextensive with the successes of the SLYM
After School programs.

3.) Difficulties encountered.

My difficulties can be easily summed up with an inversion of the old saying, "Everything shall
be asked, and everything shall be given." In my case, I feel that very little has been asked of me,
and in return I've been stymied as to what to give or how to give it. This has led to a great deal
of miscommunication and resentment between myself and my supervisors. I won't dwell for
long on who is at fault, but I will say that while a VISTA should be expected to hit the ground
running, a VISTA be given a very firm and clearly mapped ground to land on. In less flowery
terms, this means that I can safely chalk my difficulties in delivering on my time and return
deliverables is the result of being handed a vague work plan.

While the work plan I was given is long on percentages and improvements, two things have
happened. The first is that the duties actually expected of me have been almost entirely in the
role of support staff. So while my work plan calls for me to take on several capacity-building
tasks, my time has been assigned to the largely undefined and unstructured tasks of capacity-
maintenance, i.e.: monintoring the program labs while the instructors and coordinators lead
workshops, maintaining the rapidly aging computer stations, and taking care of the space. I have
no intention of demeaning these tasks; in fact, I enjoy doing most of them and feel like I've done
a decent job at it. However, acting in this capacity has entirely lacked the mileposts and
benchmarks provided by having *project* based work to do.

Furthermore, this mode of employment has led to mixed signals and crossed expectations of the
output of my time. On the one hand, I spend half of my work week in the labs, where I'm either
on my toes answering questions, tutoring the youth (or simply talking to them and building
relationships), maintaing the computers, or answer the phone. When I'm not kept up with other
tasks in the labs, it's often the case that I am the only employee to monitor them or only one of
two, in which case I can't spend that time on other projects. This created the impression that I
haven't been getting anything done.

To counteract that impression, I initiated an inventorying project that has grown into a database,
build from the ground up, that will hold a complete list of everything Street-Level owns. It has
been my hope as well that completing this project according to schedule would perhaps earn in
the eyes of my supervisors the responsibility of the more task-based projects that would have
suited me and the VISTA model better from the start. In other similar situations, such as
whether or not to lead a workshop of my own, or even to assisst another instructor with their
workshop, I've expressed a mixture of apprehension and desire to take on the responsibility,
suggesting that I would like to ease my way into that, perhaps firts by observing, then assissting,
and finally leading. These suggests have never been taken up and followed.



                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 72
In sum, my greatest challenges as a VISTA have grown out of mismatched expectations. What
Street Level expects of me does not match up to what I was led to believe would be my
responsibilities, and what they do expect of me has not matched up neatly to what I've
understood to be my job description. I feel that more and better planning by SLYM, prefereably
involving the specifics of what I had/have to offer would have greatly reduced these challenges.
I've made this point to my direct supervisors, but I feel that it should be made to the CTCNet
project coordinators as well.

4.) Assistance that CTCNet VISTA project or CNS could provide

It seeems to me that the two most valuable things that CTCNet/CNS could provide for Street
Level Youth Media would be, first assistance procurring equipment and the technical expertise
needed to make it useful, and second, assistance crafting realistic, individually tailored, capacity-
building work plans for future SLYM VISTAs. The first is self-explanatory. The second I think
is absolutely necessary in order that future SLYM VISTAs and SLYM both get maximum
returns on their investments and expectations.




                                                  CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 73
Kids Computer Workshop, Washington, DC
VISTA Member: Benedict Tisa
This report covers the period of October 15 to March 15, 2002. Mr. Tisa has provided the
services outlined in his work-plan in addition to new tasks that have added to the capacity of our
organization. He has meticulously developed training materials designed for our partner
organizations, yet other ctc‘s have also found the information useful as well. The materials have
been piloted with students in our programs and modifications were made according to the
feedback from students and volunteers.

A curriculum was also developed to be used with a group of Senior Citizens who expressed an
interest in learning about computers and the internet. The participants have been learning a great
deal about technology as well as how to be more political active, identify resources regarding
their health on the web, and being more proactive in community affairs. The participants really
enjoy the class and appreciate the patience of their Vista instructor.

In an effort to improve our capacity, partnerships were developed. A partnership initiated by the
Vista, with Digital Sistahs, resulted in a series of activities that highlighted the contributions that
women have made to technology and promotes self-esteem among young girls.

A second partnership initiated by the Vista with Oyster Bilingual Elementary School, which is
helping us developing assessment tools and organizational templates that can be used to assess
and guide sites we intend to expand to.

The information that follows will provide a slightly more detailed account of the objectives and
the summary of the accomplished objectives.

Workplan Summary

Objective 1: Develop a series of activities cards for computer learning
       a. Identify 15 topics and start to develop content, along with instructional materials.
       b. Develop 40 individual cards or lessons
       c. Pilot test material on program that will train 20 tutors.
       d. Modify based on experience during implementation.
Planned Period of Work: 2nd quarter Oct 15- Jan 1, 2002
Summary:
This has been accomplished. All of the educational topics have been identified and the materials
developed in draft form. The result is a notebook of project ―keys‖ that gives instruction for over
20 pieces of educational materials that are used by KCW and schools that they support. These
materials are now available to be used in the KCW after school programs and on the KCW
website: http://www.kcw.org/software.htm

Objective 2: Develop resources section for the KCW website
       a. Develop resources that can be used by students, tutors and parents.
       b. Maintain and update resource section.
       c. Identify person to maintain and update the resource section of the web site as needed.


                                                   CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 74
Planned Period of Work: 2nd- 4th quarter Oct 15 – June 2002
Summary:
The resource list has been developed as part of objective 1. Resources have been developed for
the following topics: Math resources for students, community services and activities as well as
resources for adult class now being offered at the YMCA by VISTA. An assessment guide for
schools has also been developed. A copy of the work done for Oyster School has been sent to the
Vista Office. We have decided that High School students could be utilized to update the
website.

Objective 3: Develop and implement classes for seniors
         a. Develop and implement course materials based on feedback from two focus groups.
         b. Develop a series of five short courses geared to the needs of 20 seniors‘ from the
            Shaw/Columbia Heights community.
         c. Identify two volunteers to continue working with senior outreach.
Planned Period of Work: Quarters 2nd –4th Oct. 15 – Jan 1 2002
Summary:
Senior classes were developed by Vista worker during October and classes began in late
November 2001. The Vista created survey tools that were used to identify the technology needs
and interest of seniors. The classes are held each Thursday; the enrolment had to be limited to
15 participants due to space requirements. Courses and class materials have been developed that
not only teach computer skills but also are focused on activities and resources that empower
seniors to take proactive approach to community, governmental, social and health issues and
activities. The list that follows highlights some of the topics that the course will cover:
              Using Email
              Community and government information sites
              Web sites for Seniors
              Health sites for adults, family heads and seniors
              Discovering your roots
              Digital photography
Images and comments from the adult classes at KCW can be seen at:
http://www.kcw.org/adultclass.htm


Objective 4: Develop and implement community outreach activities in the Columbia Height-
Shaw area of the District of Columbia
           a. Identify at lease two potential partners to strengthen and increase programs‘
               capacity.
           b. Working with other CTC in the Columbia Height/Shaw area, develop outreach
               programs in the community.
Planned Period of Work: Quarters 2nd –4th Oct. 15 – June 2002
Summary of Accomplished Objectives:
   Two additional partners have been identified and are in the process of implementing or
   developing activities with KCW.




                                               CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 75
       1. A partnership with Digital Sistas, http://www.digital-sistas.org/, who are presenting a
          gender class once a week at KCW. This is a sustainable relationship that will add a
          gender component to KCW educational activities.
       2. A partnership is being developed at the Oyster bilingual public school in DC. Oysters
          dual language model is a comprehensive Spanish/English academic
          program with certified English dominant and Spanish dominant teachers in
          every classroom. All students learn to read and write in English and
          Spanish from the time they enter Pre-K. By the time students complete
          the 6th grade they are literate in both Spanish and English.
              We have developed a series of templates and exercises that will help the school
          think strategically how they will use technology to support their programs and is
          serving as a model for the same type of assessment at Simon Elementary School in
          the SE. The objectives and tasks performed in this collaboration have included:
               Integrate information technologies into classroom and education curriculum
                  activities. IT use should be content driven projects or activities such as:
                  yearbooks, homework preparation, research, web exchanges,
                  Videoconferences.
               Develop student activities that are skills driven and project developed to support
                  learning computer skills: yearbook, school web page, and classroom work
               Assist the IT committee to develop an educational plan for the use of
                  educational technology to support Oysters academic programs.
               As needed, hold workshops for the teachers and the technology committee and
                  help them develop a plan.
               Assist in identifying and developing a tutoring and after school activity that
                  would include technology activities
               Assist the appropriate staff and teachers in the development of IT programs,
                  resource materials and programs to be used by students, teachers and staff.
               Assist the IT committee in the following activities:
                      o Determine how best to provide training for teachers in use materials in
                           their class
                      o Determine to what extent their video conferencing could be used in an
                           educational activity
                      o Determine how best to use the schools mobile lab
               Determine and make suggestions as to what type of software would be best to
                  support their programs, much of this would be freeware and web based.

Add to initial Summary: As a member of KCW I participated in the Columbia Heights Shaw
Center based outreach activities that have included attending planning meeting, preparation and
presentation of a kids workshop in November on graphic arts and the planning for the upcoming
April 2002, or the Technology Rodeo where CTC organizations involved with the community
center based activities will present a competition and demonstration of various multi media
project presented by the student participants through out the community.

Additional activities have included developing PR materials and updating the KCW web site as
needed.



                                               CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 76
Excellence By Choice, Town Park, Miami, FL
VISTA Member: Kylie Ferguson
The project was provided an after school project and a summer camp for over 60 kids in the
Town Park housing development. Kylie Ferguson was instrumental in the success of both of
these critical programs by leading the effort to provide the needed program services, outreach
and support. Listed below are the accomplishments of her service (per attached VISTA Project
Work Plan):

          Organized after school program at Town Park for 30 youth during 2001-2002 school
           year
          Led several adult internet training sessions at Town Park
          Facilitated two community focus groups to engage community residents
          Sought community partnerships with several key partners including: Sierra Club
           Inner City Outings, Miami Dade Community College and the Overtown Community
           Task Force
          Managed 2 community service projects during the school year 2001-2002
          Participated in numerous community awareness activities that raised the visibility of
           the Town Park Plaza North Community Technology Center (CTC)

       The Americorp Vista program enabled the Town Park CTC build up its capacity to
       deliver programs to the residents of impoverished community --- Overtown. There were
       no difficulties that were encountered during her tenure.

Hardcopy supplements submitted include:
    HUD Neighborhood Network April 27, '01 success story profile of Kylie
    NEA June 12, '01 press release on Youth Leaders for Literacy with Town Park Plaza
      profiled as one of five models.




                                               CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 77
Inquilinos Boricuas En Accíon (IBA), Boston, MA
VISTA Member: Alison Hale
Current responsibilities:
        Daily co-operation of El Batey Technology Center
        Researches available curriculum for use in El Batey
        Intro to Computers classes/Microsoft
        Maintains participant files for El Batey Technology Center
        Recruits participants to technology training at El Batey
        Structure the monthly training calendar and schedule for El Batey
        Assist in distribution of machines to residents
        A little but of fun every once in a while

        The El Batey Technology Center has undergone drastic changes in the past nine months
of operation, Staffing, Remodeling, Class Schedules, Hours of Operation, Attendance, and
Upgrading. Surprisingly the mainstay of continuity in the Center during these times has been
Alison Hale, whose relationship with El Batey has been an ongoing achievement in personal and
community development. Aside, (at times ahead of) various staff members, Alison has helped to
build a reputable program that truly serves the technological needs of the community and
surrounding areas. Her level of commitment to the center and the community saw her spending
many late nights and Saturdays at El Batey (the center is open until 8:00pm), including being
involved with social issues, Alison attended Youth Worker Alliance meetings as well as a public
hearing about the loss of BHA funded after school programs. Without Alison, El Batey
Technology Center simply would not have been successful, she is an intelligent young woman
with many talents and a true interest in community. The Villa Victoria has gained a wonderful
friend in Alison and we hope she knows she will always have a home here.

Work Plan Summary

Goal 1. To develop a basic computer literacy training program designed to give 20 adults an
        introduction to computers.
     Obj. 1 Recruit 30 community residents to participate in the program on a regular basis.
     Obj. 2 Coordinate time with trainers, develop a schedule, and supervise the trainings.
Summary: Alison, assisted in launching and implementing the Introduction to Computers
course at IBA, a course designed to give residents of the Villa Victoria community a basic
understanding of computers via a three day training. This training was conducted using a general
curriclum developed by Aspira.com but has since been catered to the audience of the Batey.
Since its inception the program has trained over 200 people and distributed 72 machines to
families in the Villa Victoria community
        Alison and Barbara Collins have led much of the Training at the Batey, scheduling
trainings in the center was conducted by a sign up system developed by Alison. Alison took over
the Spanish only trainings when a previous volunteer could not continue to do so.




                                               CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 78
Goal 2. Develop and implement youth activities that combine educational enrichment with
computer skills development.
     Obj. 1 Recruit 30 youth from after-school program
     Obj. 2 Organize and coordinate the program so that 20-30 youth are involved in
        technology activities.
Summary:
Alison brought the Creative use time 3:00-5:00pm program time to the El Batey schedule as a
way to introduce youth into the center in a manner more conducive to learning as opposed to
simply surfing the net. The time is also devoted to homework assistance, which Alison takes a
part in. Youth from two programs are represented in the Creative use time, the Villa‘s own
Caciques Academy and youth from the Cathedral after school program. Alison boosted the
programming by introducing various types of software to the creative use time.


Goal 3. Involve 10 families in the publication of the Villa Tech Community Newsletter.
     Obj. 1 Recruit 10 families
     Obj. 2 Coordinate the writing, article assignments, and publication of the newsletter.
Summary: The Villa Tech community Newsletter was a project started by a previous staff
member, this project, however was taken over by the community outreach worker who blended
the project with the Villa Victoria community newsletter.




                                               CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 79
Grand Rapids (MI) Community Media Center
VISTA Member: Jason Crow

The second half of Jason‘s term has been one of flex and change. Whereas the first six months,
he was directly involved in writing, producing, and editing many Grand Rapids Television
(GRTV) productions for local and regional non-profits, his second six months has been dedicated
to broader scope of projects. He has been working to help develop the GRTV help desk capacity
where the general public receives assistance with editing, shooting, checking out cameras, setting
up the studio, reserving production facilities, and other miscellaneous needs.

While maintaining his general focus on Project Ethiopia‘s long-term goals of helping to build a
world community through media, Jason will be spending his last month devoting his time to
helping regional non-profits create ―no-budget‖ media. He has helped on a biweekly show
―NPO Showcase‖ by running camera, doing sound, and shooting B-roll to be used in the 30
minute show. In addition, he is producing, shooting, and editing short pieces on the Grand
Rapids Public Library Restoration, The National Issues Forum: Racial and Ethnic Relations-
What should we do? involving the Mayor‘s Youth Council, and he will be profiling local artists
as they begin a community based art space to hold exhibitions, film presentations, and lectures in
a dynamic downtown setting. These pieces will be aired on our Channel 25 and will be apart of
GRTV produced show called ―Weekly View.‖

―Digitize This!‖ Spring Regional CMC Conference
        1. Designed, created, and maintained the ―Digitize This!‖ (digitizethis.grcmc.org) spring
           regional conference website.
        2. Performed curator duties and participated in ―7hrs a day,‖ a media art installation
           exhibition that was apart of the spring regional conference. The media art
           installations included two reception events, live broadcast on ―LiveWire‖ Channel 24,
           16mm projection, DVD projection, interactive wireless video transmission, and other
           site specific installations.
        3. Designed the ―image and look‖ of the ―Digitize This!‖ conference including print
           materials, website, and press releases.
        4. Presenter/Speaker of ―Social Media on Global Scale‖ session.

Project Ethiopia
        1. Traveled to Ethiopia to help jumpstart the first ―Community-Based‖ Social Media
           department at Misericordia Ethiopia, a Sister Media Center in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
        2. Received 2 Macintosh G4 Tower dedicated editing machines as a donation from
           UNESCO‘s International Institute for Capacity Building in Africa (IICBA)
        3. Written a 30-day curriculum to be distributed to all UNESCO offices in Africa.
        4. Drafted a 22-page report to be distributed to all interested parties that includes a
           project summary, the curriculum, and syllabus for the video production class.
        5. Attended regional meeting to give suggestions for topics to be discussed at the UN‘s
           Summit on Information Technology Conference in 2003 in Geneva.
        6. Researching grant opportunities to help fund the finishing of a 30 minute
           documentary/DVD on Project Ethiopia.


                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 80
Jason‘s work on Project Ethiopia and the Digitize This! Conference was commendable and
worthwhile, but it also led to a level of detachment from GRTV to a focus on work with GRTV‘s
umbrella organization the Community Media Center. It was a departure from the original goals
of his VISTA commitment at GRTV which was to assist the local non-profit community through
our video services.

It‘s important that in his last month he focuses on producing segments for area non-profit
organizations and works to make an impact on the local community through GRTV and its
services.




                                               CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 81
Bruce Wall Ministries/PREP Computer Center, Boston, MA
VISTA Members: Michael Allwood, Jackie Corliss
Michael Allwood has been progressing well in his VISTA work plan this year. He has been
developing technology curriculum for our after school program and computer club (Goal 1). He
has been testing this curriculum by teaching it in various classes to youth, and so far it has
seemed to work very well. Most of his focus has been on developing curriculum for media
classes for youth. He has done extensive work on curriculum for youth using digital music
mixing programs like Hip Hop eJay and Acid Music. In addition, he is also working on
curriculum for youth for Web design and graphics design.

Two major projects that Michael has been working on is developing two new groups for youth
called a computer club and a volunteer apprentice program. The goal of the computer club is to
provide a more relational group out of our walk-in lab visitors that can work on more advanced
topics and go on field trips. Michael is also developing a curriculum for this group and helping
to teach them classes. Most of the youth in the computer club are from 3rd-8th grades. The
second group is our volunteer apprentice program, which is focused on providing one-to-one
mentors to youth to prepare them to work in a technology career. Youth ages 13-18 work as tech
apprentices in Web and graphics design. We hire some of the youth to work in our youth-run
Web design business called PREP Enterprises. Much of the curriculum materials Michael is
developing can be used with this group also.

As we have adapted our organization‘s priorities, some of Michael‘s objectives and goals have
changed. As an organization, we recently decided to develop two new groups with the computer
club and our volunteer apprentice program because we needed them to bridge the gap for youth
between the high commitment/skill activity in the PREP Enterprises youth-run business and the
low commitment activity of our walk-in computer center. Because of this, Michael‘s goal 2 has
been modified from developing systems for youth staff/interns (which is already fairly
developed) to developing systems and curriculum for our computer club and volunteer
apprentice program.

Two other projects that are just starting in development are integrating Technology into our teen
summer job placement program (New Horizons) and our summer camp (Camp Ozioma).
Michael has developed training materials for youth in New Horizons and is also teaching classes.
In addition, Michael will be developing technology curriculum and teaching computer classes for
our summer camp in the next few months (Goal 4). Michael has also been assisting with
technical support, and is still in process of further developing our documentation around this.

Overall, Michael has been progressing fairly well in his position. The only difficulties he has
had are around time management and taking on too much. We plan for Michael to compile his
curriculum for youth at the end of the year. In particular, we expect that he should have some
excellent materials that would allow other community technology centers to replicate his work in
digital music mixing with youth. We plan to have him develop a Website and presentation that
will allow other centers to replicate this work.




                                               CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 82
Jackie Corliss 's term of service was ended early by mutual consent. For more information,
contact VISTA project coordinator Andrew Sears (asears@alum.mit.edu).




                                              CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 83
KCNet, Lockhaven, PA
VISTA Member: Sarah McCoy
Sara McCoy has been a successful VISTA member. Regular accomplishments include:
• Schedule upcoming classes
• Make sure teachers will be available
• Write articles for local newspaper and radio stations to publicize
• Design monthly classroom schedules for all teachers
• Make sure there are no classroom schedule conflicts
• Collect attendance sheets and use the information to create attendance reports for Board
meetings
• Call or email users who have signed up for classes and confirm
• Find someone to fill in for an instructor who is unable to attend class

Sara participates in the decision-making process for the following:
• Which ―special‖ courses to hold
• When to schedule the classes
• Price of the classes
• Number of sessions in each course
• Which instructor is best suited for the course

Some of the ―special‖ courses Sara has been involved with include Microsoft Excel, Microsoft
Word, Digital Cameras, Digital Photo Manipulation, Web Page Design, and Scanning. She is
currently helping to create a new course that hasn‘t yet been offered at KCnet called
Fundamentals of Public Presentation Skills.

Sara has created a website for Senior Adults in Clinton County called the ―Health Matters‖
website. It is located at http://www.kcnet.org/health. However, she is in the process of
redesigning the site. The work she has done on it so far can be viewed at
http://www.kcnet.org/~smccoy/vista.

Sara keeps the webpages with the class schedules updated for our members. These schedules
can be found by going to http://www.kcnet.org and clicking on ―KCnet Classes‖. You can also
go to http://www.kcnet.org/Education/classcalendar.htm and
http://www.kcnet.org/Education/sc.html.

We also have outreach at the Mill Hall Senior Center and the Lock Haven Senior Center. Sara is
in charge of the Mentor who goes out to the Mill Hall Center. Sara is the Mentor at the Lock
Haven Center.

Sara is at the Lock Haven Senior Center:
• Every Thursday from 1-3
• Answer any questions the seniors have
• Take information for the seniors to read during the week

Order of skills to teach


                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 84
• Solitaire to allow the user to get comfortable with the mouse and how it works.
• How to open and close a program.
• How to shut down and restart the computer.
• Word Processing to allow the user to get comfortable with the keyboard and how it works.
• When to minimize/ maximize/ close a program.
• Toolbars- where they are and how they work.
• How to connect to the Internet.
• Sending and receiving email.
• Typing a URL.

The goal is to prepare them for classes at KCnet.

Our senior educational program has never been one to produce an income. With the advent of
the Education Coordinator, KCnet has narrowed the gap between cost and income for computer
classes. Our income for classes over a period of a year is barely $10,000; membership fees pay
for our class offerings. We strongly believe that computer education will raise the level of the
economy in the Clinton County area.




                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 85
Allston-Brighton Community Development Corp., Boston, MA
VISTA Member: Chelsea Thompson
(Chelsea's term of service ended in September; this is the report primarily for the last reporting
period.)

Allston Brighton Community Computer Collaborative Members:
     Allston Brighton Community Development Corporation
     Allston Brighton Healthy Boston Coalition
     Boston College Neighborhood Center
     Brighton High School
     Brighton Main Streets
     Camelot Court CLC
     Commonwealth Tenants Association
     Connect 5 Initiative
     Faneuil Branch Library
     Gardner Extended Services School
     Jackson Mann Community Center
     Veronica Smith Senior Center
     West End House Boys and Girls Club

Chelsea provided essential support to the Allston Brighton CDC over the past year. The Allston
Brighton Community Computer Collaborative was fully staffed for the first time, and held
monthly meetings. We are pleased to have most of our goals for the first year. The work that
Chelsea did also laid the groundwork for the coming years.

Goal One: Strengthen the Allston Brighton Community Computer Collaborative.

The ABCCC is currently comprised of thirteen community agencies, libraries, and schools that
work together to increase access to technology resources to community residents. Since Chelsea
began working in September, she added four members – The West End House Boys and Girls
Club, The Connect 5 Initiative at Boston College, the Gardner Extended Services School, and the
Veronica Smith Senior Center. Many other members increased their participation by attending
monthly meetings and helping recruit for classes, including the Tech. Goes Home classes.

The Computer Collaborative established regular monthly meetings on the second Thursday of
each month at the CDC. Meetings were and continue to be well attended and productive. In
addition to regular meetings, Chelsea met individually with Collaborative members to determine
their past and present involvement with the Collaborative, and to gather information about their
programs for our new web site, ABCCConline.org.

Computer Collaborative members participated in a technology forum entitled ―The Digital
Divide: How computer technology access affects you, your children, and your community.‖ We
held the forum at one of the Allston Brighton Healthy Boston Coalition‘s monthly community
meetings at St. Elizabeth‘s Hospital, and explored issues of technology access in Allston


                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 86
Brighton. We discussed the Computer Collaborative, our new web site, the Technology Goes
Home program, and the new PowerUP lab at Brighton High School. We held small group
discussions to brainstorm around classes the community would like to see available in the new
PowerUP Center. We also held a raffle for a refurbished computer donated by Boston University.


Goal Two: Provide improved access to technology classes.

Six of the member organizations have computer labs, and the other seven either represent a
constituency in need of computer classes or resources to assist in providing access to technology.
Of the six organizations with computer labs, the CDC has held classes in the Commonwealth
Tenants Association, the Jackson Mann Community Center, and the Faneuil Branch Library. The
Camelot Court CLC, located in a HUD public housing development, holds classes that are open
to their residents and to the public. The CDC has helped in recruitment for these classes. The
Veronica Smith Senior Center teaches introductory classes for seniors over the age of 65. If the
CDC receives inquiries from seniors, we usually steer them to the Senior Center. The Gardner
Extended Services School installed a new IMac lab in the spring, which is used by their after
school program. They also hold ESOL classes in the lab. We have been talking about additional
ways in which the school can open the lab at night to the community.

One of our biggest obstacles over the past year was the unavailability of the neighborhood‘s
computer learning centers. The Jackson Mann Community Center, where we have held classes in
the past, was in the process of renovating their computer lab during Chelsea‘s entire year of
service. The Commonwealth Tenants Association‘s lab was similarly in flux, with server
problems and unreliable PCs and with no staff person to maintain the CLC. We were able to hold
two classes there in the fall, but discontinued our classes after that. We mainly used the Faneuil
Library‘s computer room on a limited basis, during their evening hours on Tuesdays and on
Saturday mornings. We held six classes at the Library over the past year. Because of this limited
access to the community‘s technology centers, we were unable to take complete advantage of the
funding we raised to provide computer classes.

A major success of the past year was the installation of a PowerUP computer center in Brighton
High School through a grant from the Technology Goes Home program to the Allston Brighton
CDC. The High school has allowed us to hold Technology Goes Home classes and practice
sessions in one of their computer classrooms since our first session in the spring of 2000. When
we learned of the opportunity to receive a PowerUP center, we approached the high school as the
logical location for the center. Having this center will enable the CDC to hold regular computer
classes and plan for the future. The computers were installed in November, and we will begin
holding classes there soon. Moving our groundbreaking partnership with Brighton High School
to this level was very exciting and due in large part to the professionalism of our technology
staff.

Chelsea has begun investigating new locations for computer classes. Over the past few months,
several of the schools in the neighborhood have emerged as potential sites. Many schools have
received new computer labs recently, and are interested in using them in the evening. Several of
the schools are in the process of becoming ―Community Learning Centers,‖ meaning that they



                                                CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 87
will be open for before and after school programs, and will hold adult classes in the evening. The
Gardner Extended Services School was the pilot site in Allston Brighton, and has been
operational for over a year at the Thomas Gardner Elementary School. The Gardner became a
member of the Computer Collaborative in September of 2000, and their computer lab opened in
the spring. Chelsea has also made contact with several other schools and was involved in
meetings about the Taft Middle School‘s CLC process. We hope to increase our involvement
with the schools as more Community Learning Centers come on line. Another resource identified
by Chelsea in the past year is the West End House Boys and Girls Club, which she also recruited
to join the Computer Collaborative. They had only a handful of computers in the past, but are
undertaking a major renovation and will be installing a new PowerUP computer lab.

Through a survey that was sent out to all former participants in our computer classes, Chelsea
determined what kind of follow-up classes people would be interested in. These included Excel,
Power Point, Access, advanced Internet, and computer classes in Spanish. We hope to be able to
offer all of these classes in the PowerUP Center in the coming year.

The classes at the Faneuil Library were taught almost exclusively by volunteers. Chelsea worked
with the head librarian to recruit these volunteers and plan class schedules. The CDC also shared
curriculum with the volunteers to ensure a high standard of instruction.

Goal Three: Increase funding base for the Collaborative.

Over the past year, Chelsea assisted with several proposals, helped to locate funding resources,
and did research for grant proposals. Chelsea wrote a successful $10,000 grant to the Harbus
Foundation for the Computer Collaborative. From this money, we were able to make small
grants to some Collaborative members with computer labs to help pay for materials used during
computer classes that we sponsored at their sites. She also wrote a successful proposal to Boston
CyberArts, Inc. for Adobe Photo Deluxe software. She assisted with several other successful
grants by writing and collecting letters of support, putting together attachments, and proofreading
and editing the proposals. Chelsea visited Associated Grant Makers to research new funding
resources, as well as doing online research about funding sources.

Chelsea found information and statistics about technology in low-income and minority
communities from the Benton Foundation, from studies conducted by Vanderbilt University and
the Packard Foundation, from the Computer Intelligence 1998 Technology Survey, and from a
report entitled Falling Through the Net: Defining the Digital Divide. This research was critical to
our grant writing success.

Goal Four: Connect training opportunities with local employment opportunities.

Our workforce development efforts shifted during the year and we allocated Chelsea‘s time to
the Technology Goes Home Program.

Goal Five: Coordinate the Technology Goes Home Program.




                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 88
Technology Goes Home (TGH) is a family computer class that meets for two hours twice a week
for ten weeks. The class is comprised of twenty students, all of whom are Allston Brighton
residents. One parent and one child from each family attend the class. One night a week is
devoted to a structured class and the other is a practice/ homework session. Each graduating
family receives a new computer system with a color printer.

For the first month of Chelsea‘s work here, she coordinated the startup of the Fall 2000 TGH
class almost entirely on her own. She attended planning meetings with the City program
coordinators regarding Allston Brighton‘s involvement in the program. She also organized and
performed outreach, including creating flyers, and doing mailings and literature drops. She also
met with Collaborative members to inform them of the class dates and the application process.
She distributed flyers and applications for them to give to their program participants. After
collecting applications, Chelsea scheduled family interviews. She then participated in the
interview and family selection process. Nineteen families applied for the fall 2000 class, and ten
were accepted.

During the VISTA service year, we held three TGH cycles. Chelsea was very involved in all of
the classes, attending class every week and participating in the recruitment and selection process
for each new round.

The ABCDC hired a full-time TGH coordinator in October 2000, who took over the
administration of the program. Chelsea continued to be very involved in the program. She
participated in the family interviews, which were scheduled in the evenings between class
sessions, and helped to determine which families would participate in the next class. She also
assisted the TGH coordinator by attending class nights and practice nights. Her help was
essential to the smooth operation of the class. While the instructor was at the front of the room
teaching, Chelsea circulated among the class participants to offer assistance.

Some of Chelsea‘s other responsibilities with the TGH program included keeping Collaborative
members informed about and involved in the program. Many Collaborative members assisted
with the interview process. In addition, to encourage increased community involvement among
community residents and agencies, a central goal of TGH, many Collaborative members came to
class to speak about their organizations and programs.




                                                 CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 89
          Column A                   Col. B                                   Column C
 Project Goals and Objectives       Planned                      Summary of Accomplished Objectives
                                     Period                    (Please provide quantifiable information.)

Goal One: To strengthen the
Allston Brighton Community
Computer Collaborative

Obj. 1: Establish regular monthly   1st           Done. The Collaborative has met monthly since September of 2000.
meeting date for Collaborative.                   Meetings are scheduled for the second Thursday of every month.
                                                  Chelsea staffed all of the meetings.
                                    1st – 4th
Obj. 2: Recruit new members for                   Done. The Collaborative had nine members prior to Chelsea‘s start
Collaborative.                                    in September. Since then, she has added four new members: the
                                                  West End House Boys and Girls Club, The Gardner Extended
                                                  Services School, the Veronica Smith Senior Center, and the
                                                  Connect 5 Initiative at Boston College. In addition, many of our
                                                  existing members greatly increased their involvement in the
                                                  Collaborative over the past year.
                                    1st – 4th
Obj. 3: Distribute relevant                       We have provided information regarding technology purchases,
technology-related information as                 conferences, as well as offering free computer equipment to
necessary to Collaborative                        Collaborative members.
members.
                                    1st
Obj. 4: Interview Collaborative                   Done. Chelsea met with most of the Collaborative members during
members regarding goals for                       her first two months of work to talk about their programs and past,
coming year.                                      present, and future involvement in the Collaborative. In addition,
                                                  she collected information from them over the year to include in the
                                                  Collaborative‘s web site, abccconline.org.
                                    2nd – 4th
Obj. 5: Explore feasibility of                    Done. On April 2, 2001, we held a Community Forum on the
―Technology Forums‖ using JMCC                    Digital Divide along with the Allston Brighton Healthy Boston
Family Nights.                                    Coalition. Approximately fifty community residents attended, and
                                                  translation was available in Spanish. State Rep. Kevin Honan spoke
                                                  about technology in Allston Brighton, and the Mayor‘s Technology
                                                  Advisor spoke about the new PowerUP Center planned for
                                                  Brighton High School. We showcased our new website, and
                                                  discussed the Technology Goes Home program and the Computer
                                                  Collaborative. We ended in small group discussions about what
Goal Two: Provide improved                        community residents want to see happen in the PowerUP Center.
access to technology classes.
                                    1st
Obj. 1: Schedule at least 10              – 4th   Done. Since September, the Computer Collaborative has held eight
classes.                                          classes in two different computer labs. The Allston Brighton CDC
                                                  sponsored three classes at Commonwealth Tenants Association by
                                                  hiring teachers through Jewish Vocational Services. The other
                                                  classes were taught by volunteers at the Faneuil Branch Library in
                                                  Brighton. Chelsea created and distributed flyers, registered students
                                                  for the classes, and helped with the recruitment and orientation of
                                                  volunteer teachers.
                                                  In addition to regular computer classes, the CDC held four Tech
                                                  Goes Home classes since last September.

Obj. 2: Identify new sites for      1st and       Many Allston Brighton computer labs have been under construction


                                                           CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 90
          Column A                      Col. B                                    Column C
 Project Goals and Objectives          Planned                      Summary of Accomplished Objectives
                                        Period                    (Please provide quantifiable information.)
classes in underserved                  2nd        for the last year, including the Jackson Mann Community Center
neighborhoods.                                     and the Commonwealth Tenants Association. Chelsea has explored
                                                   several other options in the neighborhood. Many of Allston
                                                   Brighton‘s schools are in the process of becoming Community
                                                   Learning Centers, meaning that they will be opening their doors to
                                                   the community in the evening. Chelsea has spoken to several
                                                   schools regarding holding computer classes in their centers, and
                                                   they have been receptive to this idea. The Gardner Extended
                                                   Services School, the first CLC in the neighborhood, has a new
                                                   computer lab, which they have been using for evening classes. In
                                                   addition, the West End House plans to hold classes in their new
                                                   PowerUP lab as soon as their major building renovation is
                                                   complete.

Obj. 3: Improve the registration       1st – 4th   Chelsea has worked with the individual class sites to facilitate a
process.                                           better registration procedure. For example, the Faneuil Library uses
                                                   their own sign-up sheet, which they then forward to Chelsea for her
                                                   database for future mailings. CTA shares registration
                                                   responsibilities with the CDC. They use a registration form for their
                                                   own records, in addition to our registration form. In this way
                                                   Chelsea has grown her database over he year.

Obj. 4: Provide follow-up to class     1st – 4th   Chelsea sent out a survey to our computer class mailing list asking
graduates to determine additional                  what classes people would be interested in taking. We found that
training needs.                                    there was a demand for Power Point, Excel, Access, advanced
                                                   internet, and classes in Spanish.

Obj. 5: Assist with recruitment of     1st – 4th   The Faneuil Branch Library has used three volunteers to teach a
new volunteers for the                             series of introductory computer and internet classes. We assisted in
Collaborative to improve public                    their recruitment, orientation, and provided curricula for them to
access opportunities.                              use.


Goal Three: Increase funding
base for the Collaborative

Obj. 1: Research new funding           1st – 4th   Done. Chelsea visited Associated Grantmakers, as well as doing
sources.                                           online research about funding sources.

Obj. 2: Assist with proposal           2nd –       Done. Chelsea wrote a successful $10,000 grant to the Harbus
writing.                               4th         Foundation, and also wrote a successful proposal to Boston
                                                   CyberArts, Inc. for software. She assisted with several other
                                                   successful grants.

Obj. 3: Assist with research           2nd –       Done. Chelsea found information and statistics about technology in
regarding the digital divide and its   4th         low-income and minority communities from the Benton
effect on low-income populations.                  Foundation, from studies conducted by Vanderbilt University and
                                                   the Packard Foundation, from the Computer Intelligence 1998
                                                   Technology Survey, and from a report entitled Falling Through the
Goal Four: Connect Training                        Net: Defining the Digital Divide.
opportunities with local
employment opportunities.




                                                            CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 91
          Column A                     Col. B                                 Column C
 Project Goals and Objectives         Planned                    Summary of Accomplished Objectives
                                       Period                  (Please provide quantifiable information.)

Obj. 1: Contact Human Resources       2nd –       These goals were not addressed due to more resources being
staff people at key area employers    4th         directed to the Technology Goes Home program than we expected.
to invite them to speak at computer
classes.

Obj. 2: Identify under-utilized       3rd and     Ditto.
training resources at local           4th
corporations and plug Allston

Brighton residents into unfilled
slots as possible.

Obj. 3: Participate in ABCDC‘s        1st – 4th   Done. Chelsea helped with outreach as well as attending meetings
Workforce Development planning.                   with Allston Brighton community organizations.

Goal Five: Coordinate
Technology Goes Home
Program.

Obj. 1: Develop outreach and          1st and     Done. Prior to the hiring of a TGH program coordinator, Chelsea
recruitment plan.                     3rd         conducted the outreach and recruitment, and participated in
                                                  applicant interviews. She continued to be involved in all of these
                                                  activities after the coordinator was hired.


Obj. 2: Update and distribute         1st         Done. Chelsea distributed applications through the Computer
application.                                      Collaborative members.

Obj. 3: Coordinate volunteer/         2nd and     Done. …# of families have participated in a variety of volunteer
community service requirements of     4th         activities.
participants.

Obj. 4: Staff TGH Planning            1st – 4th   We did not have resources to staff a Planning Committee, but
Committee.                                        Chelsea did attend Tech Goes Home meetings with the City
                                                  program administrators.

Obj. 5: Coordinate recruitment and    2nd and     Done. There have been ..># of applicants, …# of interviews. We
selection process.                    4th         have selected a total of 44 families for the program.

Obj. 6: Manage class scheduling
and coordinate participation of       2nd –       Done. Collaborative members attend TGH classes and speak about
Collaborative members.                4th         their programs; assist with recruitment of families; and offer
                                                  assistance during Collaborative monthly meetings.




                                                           CTC VISTA Project — Program Progress Affiliate Reports — 92

								
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