budgetconsultationresponses by DbFl0Il7

VIEWS: 105 PAGES: 5858

									All of the questions from the
consultation are listed along the top
row. Responses go downwards on the
page. You can use the "Source" filter
arrow to see the answers from
particular groups or forums. There are
4 sheets of questions/answers
(available at the bottom of the screen).     Date       Source




                                           03/03/2010   Letter




                                           19/03/2010   Email




                                           23/03/2010   Letter

                                                        Ward Forum North, West and
                                           27/03/2010   Central Sutherland
                                                        Ward Forum North, West and
                                           27/03/2010   Central Sutherland
                                                        Ward Forum North, West and
                                           27/03/2010   Central Sutherland
                                                        Ward Forum North, West and
                                           27/03/2010   Central Sutherland
                                                        Ward Forum North, West and
                                           27/03/2010   Central Sutherland
                                                        Ward Forum North, West and
                                           27/03/2010   Central Sutherland
                                                        Ward Forum North, West and
                                           27/03/2010   Central Sutherland



                                           06/04/2010   Ward Forum, Wick
                                           06/04/2010   Ward Forum, Wick




                                           06/04/2010   Ward Forum, Wick
                                           06/04/2010   Ward Forum, Wick

                                           08/04/2010   online questionnaire



                                           09/04/2010   Email




                                           09/04/2010   online questionnaire
09/04/2010   online questionnaire
10/04/2010   Letter




10/04/2010   online questionnaire




11/04/2010   Letter




11/04/2010   online questionnaire

12/04/2010   Letter

12/04/2010   Letter
12/04/2010   Letter

12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter
12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter



12/04/2010   Letter

13/04/2010   Letter



13/04/2010   Letter



13/04/2010   Letter



13/04/2010   Letter




14/04/2010   Letter
14/04/2010   Letter
15/04/2010   Email




15/04/2010   Email




15/04/2010   Letter




15/04/2010   Letter




15/04/2010   Letter




15/04/2010   Letter




15/04/2010   Letter




15/04/2010   Letter
15/04/2010   Letter




15/04/2010   Letter




15/04/2010   Letter
15/04/2010   letter




15/04/2010   Letter



17/04/2010   4 Letters




17/04/2010   Email




17/04/2010   Letter




18/04/2010   Email




18/04/2010   Letter




18/04/2010   Letter
18/04/2010   Letter




18/04/2010   online questionnaire




18/04/2010   online questionnaire




18/04/2010   online questionnaire




19/04/2010   Email




19/04/2010   Email




19/04/2010   Email




19/04/2010   Email

19/04/2010   Letter



19/04/2010   Letter




19/04/2010   Letter



19/04/2010   online questionnaire



20/04/2010   Email
20/04/2010   Email




20/04/2010   Email



20/04/2010   Email




20/04/2010   Email




20/04/2010   Email




20/04/2010   Email



20/04/2010   Letter




20/04/2010   Letter




20/04/2010   Letter



20/04/2010   Letter




20/04/2010   online questionnaire




21/04/2010   Email
21/04/2010   Email




21/04/2010   Email




21/04/2010   Email




21/04/2010   Email
21/04/2010   Email




21/04/2010   Email




21/04/2010   Letter



21/04/2010   Letter




21/04/2010   Letter
21/04/2010   Letter




21/04/2010   letter



21/04/2010   Letter




21/04/2010   online questionnaire

22/04/2010   2 Letters



22/04/2010   4 Letters




22/04/2010   Email
22/04/2010   Email




22/04/2010   Email




22/04/2010   Email




22/04/2010   Email




22/04/2010   Email




22/04/2010   Email




22/04/2010   Letter
22/04/2010   Letter

22/04/2010   online questionnaire




22/04/2010   online questionnaire




22/04/2010   online questionnaire




22/04/2010   online questionnaire




23/04/2010   Email



23/04/2010   Letter



23/04/2010   Letter




23/04/2010   Letter
24/04/2010   Email




24/04/2010   Email



24/04/2010   Email




24/04/2010   online questionnaire




25/04/2010   Email



25/04/2010   Letter




25/04/2010   Letter




25/04/2010   online questionnaire
25/04/2010   online questionnaire
26/04/2010   Email



26/04/2010   Email




26/04/2010   Email



26/04/2010   Email




26/04/2010   Email



26/04/2010   Letter



26/04/2010   Letter




26/04/2010   Letter




27/04/2010   Email
27/04/2010   Email




27/04/2010   Email




27/04/2010   Email




27/04/2010   Letter




27/04/2010   Letter




27/04/2010   letter

27/04/2010   Letter




28/04/2010   Email




28/04/2010   Email
28/04/2010   Email




28/04/2010   Email




28/04/2010   Email




28/04/2010   Email




28/04/2010   Email



28/04/2010   Letter

28/04/2010   Letter




28/04/2010   online questionnaire
28/04/2010   online questionnaire




28/04/2010   online questionnaire




28/04/2010   online questionnaire




28/04/2010   online questionnaire



29/04/2010   Email




29/04/2010   Email




29/04/2010   Email




29/04/2010   Email

29/04/2010   Letter

29/04/2010   Letter




29/04/2010   Letter



29/04/2010   online questionnaire
29/04/2010   online questionnaire




30/04/2010   Email




30/04/2010   Email




30/04/2010   Email



30/04/2010   Letter



30/04/2010   Letter
30/04/2010   online questionnaire




01/05/2010   Email




01/05/2010   Email




01/05/2010   Email




01/05/2010   Email
01/05/2010   Email




01/05/2010   Letter




01/05/2010   Letter




03/05/2010   Email
04/05/2010   Email




04/05/2010   Email



04/05/2010   Email




04/05/2010   Email
04/05/2010   Email

04/05/2010   Email




04/05/2010   Letter

04/05/2010   Letter




04/05/2010   letter

04/05/2010   Letter
04/05/2010   Letter

04/05/2010   Letter




05/05/2010   Email




05/05/2010   Email
05/05/2010   Email




05/05/2010   Email




05/05/2010   Email
05/05/2010   Email




05/05/2010   Email




05/05/2010   Email




05/05/2010   Letter




05/05/2010   Letter




06/05/2010   Email
06/05/2010   Email




06/05/2010   Email




06/05/2010   Email




             Inverness South Community
06/05/2010   Council
06/05/2010   Letter




06/05/2010   online questionnaire




07/05/2010   Email




07/05/2010   Email




07/05/2010   Email




07/05/2010   Email




07/05/2010   Email




07/05/2010   Email




07/05/2010   Email




07/05/2010   Email




07/05/2010   Email
07/05/2010   Email

07/05/2010   Letter




07/05/2010   Letter




07/05/2010   Letter
07/05/2010   Unknown




07/05/2010   online questionnaire




08/05/2010   Email




08/05/2010   Email




09/05/2010   Email

09/05/2010   Email
09/05/2010   Letter




10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   blog
10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   blog
10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   blog
10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   blog
10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   blog
10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   blog




10/05/2010   Blog




10/05/2010   Email




10/05/2010   Email




10/05/2010   Email
10/05/2010   Email




10/05/2010   Email




10/05/2010   Email




10/05/2010   Letter




10/05/2010   Letter



10/05/2010   Letter



             Rosebank Primary School Parent
10/05/2010   Council
11/05/2010   Community Safety Steering Group




11/05/2010   Email




11/05/2010   Email




11/05/2010   Email
11/05/2010   Email

11/05/2010   Letter
11/05/2010   Letter




12/05/2010   Email




12/05/2010   Email




12/05/2010   Email

12/05/2010   Letter




12/05/2010   Letter
13/05/2010   Email




13/05/2010   Email




14/05/2010   Email
14/05/2010   Email




14/05/2010   Email




14/05/2010   Email
14/05/2010   Email




14/05/2010   Letter



14/05/2010   Letter




15/05/2010   Email



15/05/2010   Email



15/05/2010   letter

15/05/2010   Letter
15/05/2010   Letter



16/05/2010   Letter
17/05/2010   Email




17/05/2010   Email




17/05/2010   Email




17/05/2010   Email




17/05/2010   Email
17/05/2010   Email




17/05/2010   Letter
17/05/2010   University of the Third Age




17/05/2010   online questionnaire




17/05/2010   online questionnaire




18/05/2010   Email




18/05/2010   Email




18/05/2010   Email
18/05/2010   Email

18/05/2010   Email




18/05/2010   Letter
18/05/2010   Letter
18/05/2010   Rhoda Grant MSP

18/05/2010   Rhoda Grant MSP




18/05/2010   online questionnaire




19/05/2010   blog
19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog
19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog
19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog
19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog
19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog
19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog
19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog
19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog
19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog
19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog
19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog
19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog
19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog
19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog



19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog
19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog
19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog
19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   blog




19/05/2010   Email




19/05/2010   Email




19/05/2010   Email




19/05/2010   Email
19/05/2010   Email




19/05/2010   Letter




20/05/2010   Email




20/05/2010   Email




20/05/2010   Email
20/05/2010   Letter




20/05/2010   Letter




20/05/2010   Letter




21/05/2010   Email




21/05/2010   Email




21/05/2010   Email




21/05/2010   Email
21/05/2010   Email




21/05/2010   Letter




21/05/2010   online questionnaire




22/05/2010   Email




22/05/2010   Email




22/05/2010   Letter




22/05/2010   online questionnaire
23/05/2010   Email




23/05/2010   Email




23/05/2010   Letter




24/05/2010   Email




24/05/2010   Email
24/05/2010   Email

24/05/2010   Ward Forum, Tain



24/05/2010   Ward Forum, Tain




24/05/2010   Ward Forum, Tain



24/05/2010   Ward Forum, Tain



24/05/2010   Ward Forum, Tain

24/05/2010   Ward Forum, Tain

24/05/2010   Ward Forum, Tain




24/05/2010   Ward Forum, Tain

24/05/2010   Ward Forum, Tain
24/05/2010   Ward Forum, Tain
24/05/2010   Ward Forum, Tain
24/05/2010   Ward Forum, Tain




24/05/2010   online questionnaire

             Avoch and Killen Community
25/05/2010   Council

25/05/2010   Cameron Youth Centre Petition




25/05/2010   Email
25/05/2010   Email




25/05/2010   Email




25/05/2010   Email




25/05/2010   Email




25/05/2010   Email
25/05/2010   Email




25/05/2010   Email




25/05/2010   Email




25/05/2010   Email
25/05/2010   Email




25/05/2010   Email




25/05/2010   Email




25/05/2010   Email



25/05/2010   Letter

25/05/2010   Letter




25/05/2010   Letter

25/05/2010   Petition
25/05/2010   online questionnaire




26/05/2010   Email




26/05/2010   Email




26/05/2010   Email
26/05/2010   Email




26/05/2010   Email




26/05/2010   Letter




26/05/2010   Letter

26/05/2010   Letter




26/05/2010   Letter
26/05/2010   online questionnaire




27/05/2010   Email




27/05/2010   Email
27/05/2010   Email




27/05/2010   Email




27/05/2010   Email




27/05/2010   online questionnaire

28/05/2010   Email
28/05/2010   Letter

28/05/2010   Letter




28/05/2010   Letter



28/05/2010   Letter



29/05/2010   Email




29/05/2010   Email



29/05/2010   online questionnaire




30/05/2010   Email



30/05/2010   Letter




31/05/2010   Email
31/05/2010   Email




31/05/2010   Email
31/05/2010   Petition

31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber

31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber

31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber

31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber

31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber




31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber
31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber
31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber
31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber
31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber
31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber
31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber
31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber
31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber
31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber
31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber
31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber
31/05/2010   Ward Forum, Lochaber
01/06/2010   Email




01/06/2010   Email




01/06/2010   Email




01/06/2010   Email




01/06/2010   Email
01/06/2010   Letter



01/06/2010   Letter

01/06/2010   Ward Forum, Culloden




01/06/2010   Ward Forum, Culloden




01/06/2010   Ward Forum, Culloden




01/06/2010   Ward Forum, Culloden

01/06/2010   Ward Forum, Culloden

01/06/2010   Ward Forum, Culloden



01/06/2010   Ward Forum, Culloden




01/06/2010   Ward Forum, Culloden



01/06/2010   Ward Forum, Culloden




01/06/2010   Ward Forum, Culloden

01/06/2010   Ward Forum, Culloden



01/06/2010   Ward Forum, Culloden



01/06/2010   Ward Forum, Culloden

01/06/2010   Ward Forum, Culloden
01/06/2010   Ward Forum, Culloden

01/06/2010   Ward Forum, Culloden
01/06/2010   Ward Forum, Culloden




02/06/2010   blog




02/06/2010   Email




02/06/2010   Email



02/06/2010   Letter

03/06/2010   Email
03/06/2010   Email




03/06/2010   Email




03/06/2010   Friends of Duthac House




03/06/2010   Friends of Duthac House

03/06/2010   Letter



03/06/2010   Letter

03/06/2010   Letter

04/06/2010   Coulhill Primary School
04/06/2010   Email




04/06/2010   Email




04/06/2010   Email



04/06/2010   Email



04/06/2010   Letter

04/06/2010   Letter




04/06/2010   Letter



04/06/2010   Letter
05/06/2010   Email




06/06/2010   Email



06/06/2010   Email




06/06/2010   Email




06/06/2010   Email
06/06/2010   Email




06/06/2010   Email




06/06/2010   Email
06/06/2010   Email




06/06/2010   Email




06/06/2010   Letter




06/06/2010   online questionnaire




07/06/2010   Compact Partnership
07/06/2010   Email




07/06/2010   Email




07/06/2010   Email




07/06/2010   Email
07/06/2010   Email
07/06/2010   Letter



07/06/2010   Petition



07/06/2010   online questionnaire




08/06/2010   Email
08/06/2010   Email




08/06/2010   Email




08/06/2010   Email




08/06/2010   Email

08/06/2010   Letter
08/06/2010   Letter




08/06/2010   Letter



08/06/2010   Letter




08/06/2010   Letter




09/06/2010   Email




09/06/2010   Email
09/06/2010   Email




09/06/2010   Email

09/06/2010   Letter
09/06/2010   Letter

09/06/2010   Letter
09/06/2010   Letter
             Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010   Edderton




             Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010   Edderton
             Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010   Edderton
             Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010   Edderton
             Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010   Edderton

             Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010   Edderton
             Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010   Edderton
             Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010   Edderton



             Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010   Edderton

             Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010   Edderton
             Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010   Edderton
             Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010   Edderton




10/06/2010   Email




10/06/2010   Email
10/06/2010   Email




10/06/2010   Email
10/06/2010   Email




10/06/2010   Letter




10/06/2010   Letter




10/06/2010   Letter

10/06/2010   Letter
10/06/2010   online questionnaire



11/06/2010   Email




11/06/2010   Email




11/06/2010   Email




11/06/2010   Letter
11/06/2010   Letter
11/06/2010   Letter




12/06/2010   Email
12/06/2010   Email




12/06/2010   Email




12/06/2010   Email




12/06/2010   Email



12/06/2010   Email



12/06/2010   Letter
13/06/2010   Email




14/06/2010   Email




14/06/2010   Email




14/06/2010   Email
14/06/2010   Email




14/06/2010   Email




14/06/2010   Email




14/06/2010   Letter




14/06/2010   Letter




14/06/2010   Letter
14/06/2010   Petition

14/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò




14/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò



14/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò

14/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò



14/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò

14/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò
15/06/2010   Email

15/06/2010   Email




15/06/2010   Letter

15/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò




16/06/2010   Email




16/06/2010   Email
16/06/2010   Email




16/06/2010   Email




16/06/2010   Email
16/06/2010   Email




16/06/2010   Letter




16/06/2010   Letter



16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Dingwall



16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Dingwall




16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Dingwall



16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Dingwall
16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Dingwall




16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Dingwall




16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Dingwall
16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Dingwall

16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Dingwall



16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Dingwall



16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Dingwall

16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò



16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò



16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò

16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò

16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò

16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò
16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò
16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò
16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò



16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò



16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò



16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò



16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò
16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò




16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò



16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò

16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò



16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò

16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò



16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò

16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò



16/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò

16/06/2010   online questionnaire




17/06/2010   Email
17/06/2010   Email




17/06/2010   Letter



17/06/2010   Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth



17/06/2010   Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth

17/06/2010   Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth



17/06/2010   Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth



17/06/2010   Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth




17/06/2010   Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth



17/06/2010   Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth




17/06/2010   Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth

17/06/2010   Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth



17/06/2010   Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth
17/06/2010   Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth




17/06/2010   Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth

17/06/2010   Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth

17/06/2010   Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth




18/06/2010   Email




18/06/2010   Email
18/06/2010   Email




18/06/2010   Email




18/06/2010   Letter




18/06/2010   Letter




18/06/2010   online questionnaire




20/06/2010   Email




20/06/2010   Email




20/06/2010   Email
20/06/2010   Letter




20/06/2010   online questionnaire

21/06/2010   Email
             Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010   Strathpeffer & Lochalsh



             Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010   Strathpeffer & Lochalsh
             Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010   Strathpeffer & Lochalsh




             Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010   Strathpeffer & Lochalsh



             Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010   Strathpeffer & Lochalsh
             Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010   Strathpeffer & Lochalsh

             Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010   Strathpeffer & Lochalsh

             Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010   Strathpeffer & Lochalsh



             Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010   Strathpeffer & Lochalsh



             Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010   Strathpeffer & Lochalsh
             Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010   Strathpeffer & Lochalsh



             Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010   Strathpeffer & Lochalsh
22/06/2010   Email




22/06/2010   Email




22/06/2010   Email
22/06/2010   Email



             Ward Forum, Inverness City
22/06/2010   Wards
             Ward Forum, Inverness City
22/06/2010   Wards
             Ward Forum, Inverness City
22/06/2010   Wards
             Ward Forum, Inverness City
22/06/2010   Wards




             Ward Forum, Inverness City
22/06/2010   Wards
             Ward Forum, Inverness City
22/06/2010   Wards



             Ward Forum, Inverness City
22/06/2010   Wards



             Ward Forum, Inverness City
22/06/2010   Wards
             Ward Forum, Inverness City
22/06/2010   Wards




             Ward Forum, Inverness City
22/06/2010   Wards
             Ward Forum, Inverness City
22/06/2010   Wards

             Ward Forum, Inverness City
22/06/2010   Wards



             Ward Forum, Inverness City
22/06/2010   Wards
             Ward Forum, Inverness City
22/06/2010   Wards

             Ward Forum, Inverness City
22/06/2010   Wards

23/06/2010   Email

             Ward Forum, Badenoch and
23/06/2010   Strathspey



             Ward Forum, Badenoch and
23/06/2010   Strathspey
             Ward Forum, Badenoch and
23/06/2010   Strathspey
             Ward Forum, Badenoch and
23/06/2010   Strathspey




             Ward Forum, Badenoch and
23/06/2010   Strathspey
             Ward Forum, Badenoch and
23/06/2010   Strathspey
             Ward Forum, Badenoch and
23/06/2010   Strathspey



             Ward Forum, Badenoch and
23/06/2010   Strathspey

             Ward Forum, Badenoch and
23/06/2010   Strathspey

             Ward Forum, Badenoch and
23/06/2010   Strathspey

23/06/2010   online questionnaire




24/06/2010   Letter




24/06/2010   Letter

24/06/2010   Letter



24/06/2010   Letter




25/06/2010   Email

25/06/2010   Highland Economic Forum




25/06/2010   Letter



25/06/2010   Letter



25/06/2010   Letter
26/06/2010   Email




26/06/2010   Email




26/06/2010   Email




26/06/2010   Email
26/06/2010   Letter




26/06/2010   online questionnaire
27/06/2010   Email




27/06/2010   Email
27/06/2010   Email




27/06/2010   Email




27/06/2010   Email

27/06/2010   Email
             Avoch and Killen Community
28/06/2010   Council




28/06/2010   Durness Community Council




28/06/2010   Email




28/06/2010   Email



28/06/2010   Letter




28/06/2010   Lochbroom community Council
28/06/2010   Petition
             Chartered Institute of Luibrary and
             Inforamtion Professionals in
29/06/2010   Scotland




29/06/2010   Email




29/06/2010   Email

29/06/2010   Email
29/06/2010   Email




29/06/2010   Email




29/06/2010   Email




29/06/2010   Email
             Inverness Business Improvement
29/06/2010   District



             Inverness Business Improvement
29/06/2010   District
29/06/2010   Petition




30/06/2010   Edderton Community Council




30/06/2010   Email



30/06/2010   Email




30/06/2010   Email
30/06/2010   Email




30/06/2010   Email




30/06/2010   Email
30/06/2010   Letter




30/06/2010   Museums Galleries Scotland
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy



             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy



             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy



             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy



             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy



             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy



             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy



             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy



             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy



             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy



             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy

             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
             Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010   Academy
30/06/2010   Petition
30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn




30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn

30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn

30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn
30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn



30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn

30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn

30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn

30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn

30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn



30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn



30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn

30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn




30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn
30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn




30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn




30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn




30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn
30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn




30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn

30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn



30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn
30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn



30/06/2010   online questionnaire

30/06/2010   online questionnaire




30/06/2010   online questionnaire

01/07/2010   Email



01/07/2010   Letter
01/07/2010   Letter




02/07/2010   Email
02/07/2010   Email




04/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice




05/07/2010   Email



05/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice
05/07/2010   Kincraig Community Council



05/07/2010   Letter
06/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice




07/07/2010   Email




07/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice




08/07/2010   Highland Economic Forum



08/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice
08/07/2010   Letter




09/07/2010   Email

09/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice
10/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice




11/07/2010   Email

11/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice
12/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice
12/07/2010   Letter




12/07/2010   Sight Action Focus Group

13/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice




13/07/2010   Letter
13/07/2010   Petition
13/07/2010   Petition
14/07/2010   Email
14/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice



14/07/2010   Letter

15/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice
15/07/2010   Letter




16/07/2010   Email

16/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice



16/07/2010   Unison Scotland
17/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice



17/07/2010   Letter
18/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice




18/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice
19/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice

20/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice

21/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice



21/07/2010   Letter
22/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice




22/07/2010   Letter



22/07/2010   Letter




22/07/2010   People FirstFocus Group
23/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice



24/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice

25/07/2010   Highland Youth Voice




27/07/2010   Letter




             Ft Augustus and Glen Moriston
28/07/2010   Community Council
29/07/2010   Danny Alexander MP




29/07/2010   Letter

30/07/2010   Rhoda Grant MSP

30/07/2010   Rhoda Grant MSP

02/08/2010   Letter




03/08/2010   Letter




03/08/2010   Letter




03/08/2010   Letter

04/08/2010   Petition




05/08/2010   Letter
07/08/2010   Deaf Forum Focus Group

09/08/2010   Letter




10/08/2010   Email




11/08/2010   Email




12/08/2010   Email




15/08/2010   Letter

16/08/2010   Letter
19/08/2010   Letter




27/08/2010   HUG Focus Group




28/08/2010   Email




01/09/2010   Email
03/09/2010   Letter




04/09/2010   Letter




14/09/2010   Columba 1400




14/09/2010   Letter




19/09/2010   Email
20/09/2010   Email




23/09/2010   Email




Unknown      Letter




Unknown      Cameron Youth Centre




Unknown      Email




Unknown      Kiltarlity Community Council
Unknown   Letter

Unknown   Letter




Unknown   Letter




Unknown   Letter




Unknown   Letter

Unknown   Letter
Unknown   Letter



Unknown   Letter



Unknown   Letter
Unknown   Letter

Unknown   Letter

Unknown   Letter



Unknown   Letter



Unknown   Letter
Unknown   online questionnaire
Unknown   Petition
Unknown   Petition
Unknown   Petition
Unknown   Petition

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Are we running too many schools?




Don't know but need to consider travelling times




Yes, depending on locations of school.

One size does not fit all




N & W schools are sufficient for the area.



Where schools are under subscribed and fairly close together ,Yes
Change catchments areas to make sure schools are more efficient




Yes Because of falling school roles
Yes

Yes, too many primary schools




on what basis do you ask this question? geographic/financial/ ....?
Yes - but if smaller schools were to combine there would be the question of transport costs.




I have no idea whether the council is running too many schools, but I believe the balance is right for
Portree and surrounding areas. To reduce schools in remote country areas would be quite drastic I feel.
You show that a significant number of primary schools are well below capacity. This would indicate a
falling or aging population in those areas. This is a warning sign for the furture of those areas. One
mistake being repeated here in the highlands as elsewhere in Scotland and the UK is to build up the
urban cities which then suck in commuters who then want to move nearer their places of work.

Solution - to implement and support the business development within local communities together with
housing policies to support local workers. This walk- to- work policiy would enable people to remain whare
they live and grow their families there - thus supporting local schools and facilities.

I have 6 children here in Balintore - they are gradually moving through the local school system and then
out into employment. I am very concerned about their future. Where will they find quality emplyoment and
thus where will they need to live? where will they then have their own families?
Yes, if some of them are less than 40% full and there are alternatives within an acceptable distance.
The question of closing smaller school frequently arises.Are the rising costs of transport considered -
bussing children further daily and travel to other sites for more and more parts of the curriculum.
PARENTS in small village primaries already have to pay towards transport to swimming, sports and
cooperative learning sessions. The cost of this is left to the school's budget and cannot possibly be met
even now. With fewer schools, children would havbe to be more mobile.
 Rationalising schools seems sensible but could take a long time due to parental resistance so may not
be a short term option
No




No. This is a priority and I am sure that there would not be enough space in other schools if some closed
down.
Yes possibly we are running too many schools. I would support fewer schools providing the schools are
run on a more secure basis without temporary teachers and moing teachers in and out mid year - children
need stability. Also the schools would need good transport links with facilities for before and after school
clubs to help working parents (who would no doubt be happy to pay for this facility).




Looking at the number of schools with low pupil numbers, it would seem the number of schools could be
reduced. However, this must be balanced by the distance of travel involved should a closure take place.
Schools in close proximity like Maryburgh and Conon Bridge ought to be combined (as planned, despite
high profile protests). On the west coast however, travlling distances make this more difficult.
yes-particularly small primaries which could be amalgamated.
yes, look at closing some of the small rural schools and channelling the children and funding into the
larger village and town schools. Transport arrangements would have to be made.
No but you are needing to get developers, like Tullochs etc to provide more amenities as they propose in
their planning applications and not let them get off with trying to change the land for more housing
developments




In large population centres it is not expedient to have small schools. It is not equitable to have some small
schools with low teacher to pupil ratios and high running costs whilst larger schools have excesive
teacher to pupil ratios




whilst there may be a small number of schools that couls be amalgamated in the main schools are an
essential part of a community and should be retained if possible
If you take away the primary schools, people who don't have cars and have to take buses, the buses may
not be able to go on these roots and it would mean for bus drivers to go on new roots which will take up
more of there time.
Yes with so many schools now not exclusively serving their delineated catchment areas there is indeed an
overlap already existing of communities and schools. This could possibly go a long way to sorting the
placement request anomalies within many local" schools and enable more stable school communities."
Yes, particularly small primaries in remote areas - should close the smaller ones and move children to
under utilised schools near by or expand existing ones to accommodate those from closed schools.
Also, close one of the Inverness secondary schools and move children to one of the under utilised
schools.
Yes - In Sutherland, the pupils of Golspie and Dornoch High Schools could be combined again as one
school and located in one place! Golspie Primary school could also included in the High School
access to schools is of prime importance when considering other uses. School buildings are inoperative
for a long period of time. Community use will not work, however, if access is not addressed. A new
community wing at Milton is effectively barred to large numbers of people unless they have vehicles
because of the artificial isolation of communities. Barbaraville is completely cut off to the walker who
wishes to leave the village to go anywhere else because of the lack of footpath linkeage. Cyclists are
equally debarred from safe access to Milton, Saltburn, Invergordon or Kildary. This also hinders people
wishing to use the Polnicol Hall. You could have as many community activities as you wished in schools
and halls locally but they are not easily accessible to people without vehicles. It also denies any of the
health benefits of walking or cycling for people of all ages.




I think the review must take travel routes into consideration too. If families need a second car in order to
get children to school, it adds a huge cost to some families. However if improved bus and cycle routes are
added this would help justify the smaller, older schools closure.



The condition of the school buildings should be immaterial. If a community needs a school then it should
be there. Older buildings will have to be refurbished. Any strategy based on closing the "old" schools
would be ridiculous as it would be based on an assessment of fabric and not education or community
need.
Yes you are running too many schools however small rural schools should not be an easy target for cuts.

This brings the headache of long term transport costs and the need to find more decent transport
providers.

Amalgamation of town schools is a way forward no transport costs involved. Dispose of many of the older
schools within towns and investing in newer bigger town schools offering services to the larger towns
communities would be a step in the right direction.




A new school with appropriate community facilities would provide an attractive incentive for the
encouragement of economic development within a particular area. This factor should be included within
the capital investment-strategic planning model which was adopted by the Education Committee on the
13th March2009. This model which gives double weighting to roll pressure needs to be look at again as
some of the roll pressure can be overcome by using the accomodation in a more efficient manner.
Councillor Alston's review of the comments so far concerns me as he appears to identify the idea that
what the people who have contrributed to the site want is the closure of town schools. What they have
actually said is they think the closure of town schools would be the best idea if either new schools were
built or the amalgamated schools were to have much better facilities. there is a significant difference and i
think it important that highland council do not simply do an accounting exercise with numbers - pushing
one school in to another with little change in facilities. My understanding is that there must be some
educational benefit for the pupils, who attend schools which close, and will be then placed in another
school.



Look at what a community needs. A very small school with under 10 students may be better amalgamated
with another school, at least from an economic stand point, however a small school with 20 students
would seem to be viable at least on the simplistic pupil/teacher ratio.

Travel is important. At what point is travel too far for primary students, 5 miles, 10 miles. Obviously a
school with a role of 3 or 5 may well have to close with the pupils needing to travel a larger distance than
might be desirable.

Then the condition of the school. A small school with 20 students in a very poor state or repair, or capacity
issues, whilst viable may still be better amalgamated with a school in a better state of repair. But would
the cost of the amalgamation be any less that the cost of repairing or extending the existing building?

How about larger schools and town schools. Closing smaller schools might offer savings if the
pupil/teacher ratio is quite low however large savings can only come from closing large schools. At that
point teaching costs are somewhat static however building costs, especially for older schools, may well
offer the best opportunities for savings. A modern energy efficient school may be significantly cheaper to
run than an older school and have less ongoing maintenance costs. The newer school might also offer
better community facilities.
Totally agree with one forum member - yes the council can do some simple number crunching and place
one school into another but they must be able to demonstrate that there is a significant educational
benefit for the child. Many schools will need major upgrades to ensure that they can provide a better
learning experience for our children if this is a serious idea to close and amalgamate . More capital
expenditure !!

Schools are the heart for all communities - whether they be in a rural or town setting. They generate
activity and energy, they contribute to the the wider community in many ways. They are also a community
in their own right. They channel thought and creativity bringing out the very best in our children.

Bureaucracy,its cost and endless managers of this and that are killing education.
Good teachers are far more important than buildings and equipment. Education was managed for years in
small rural schools, with poor buildings and low budgets, and produced well educated, well balanced
young people. Standards often dropped when small schools were closed and children bussed to larger,
well equipped schools. So don't close small rural schools, especially as the cost of transport is likely to
escalate. Improving insulation and installing solar thermal panels are cost effective ways to improve old
buildings.
Do not cut back on additional support / special needs as early and speedy intervention prevents so many
problems later on.
As to music, drama and the arts, although important they are not essential, so private payments and use
of volunteers seems the only answer. Is it possible to ask businesses to sponsor music and drama in their
local schools?
Keep the front line staff and cut back on higher paid management jobs; and expenses. Avoid the time and
money spent on travel by use of modern communcations.
Sell off the old schools and other buildings which are lying idle, how many unused buildings do the council
own



Which one of you really thinks that it is acceptable to place a 6 or 7 year old child on a bus for 30 - 45
minutes twice a day? Surely we have the vision to see beyond this. Small primaries are the heart of the
community and provide a great sense of security for the children (oh, sorry! - the CLIENTS). No problem.
So let's keep paying out absolutely emormous sums of tax money or tiers and tiers of management, fact-
finding tours, catered meetings and special-interest projects in ALL sectors, while we place near-toddlers
on long commutes every day. How does that work for you? All right? Good, glad to hear it.




Only a handful or children at a primary school - close it.
Increased use of transport may result in more road traffic accidents
Fewer schools means fewer Police community safety inputs
The local school here has been a great success, but it is with sadness that I see the school bus coming
up the road each day to pick a few local children when mine used to walk down to Knockbain, about a
mile. I urge the council to think outside the box - schools are a massive expense but are, or could be, the
heart of local communities in both rural and town areas. Think wider - train teachers in the basics of social
care so that they can deal with supporting families and only turn to social workers, working from the same
local base, in extreme circumstances. Turn the schools into community centres, close down everything
else, where local people have a shared responsibility, either through the Community Council, or a local
Trust. Use schools as centres for the whole community where elderly folk can gather to support one
another and their wider families. Make local communities responsible for the way waste is collected - eg in
town, street by street in pleasantly enclosed areas, similarly in rural areas, to which individuals are
responsible for taking their waste - and then only use the expensive service to collect from these agreed
centres.
Are all the schools full?, are the teachers fully employed? If the answers to those 2 questions are yes then
you are not running too many schools.




Possibly, without further detail difficult to comment.


Small schools in many places are not viable options both for financial reasons and also educational
reasons- particularly in terms of the important social and collaborative skills that young people need to
develop. Also the council's plans to build dedicated Gaelic schools in places like Portree are daft given
that GM Education is already avaialable there. Making schools like Kilmuir and Staffin which have very
small EM rolls dedicated Gaelic schools is a much more sensible option and will save money and also
achieve the targets set out in the Council's Gaelic plan. Short sighted, individual, political aspirations
should not be allowed to over ride the needs of the majority, during this difficult time of financial hardship.
Schools: Despite some increases in transport costs I think we should reduce the number of schools and
have bigger average school rolls. It is a disproportionate use of funding to keep very small schools open.
Though some parents always prize small schools, I believe they are a poor social preparation for
developing the perspective, awareness and communication skills that later life experience will need. This
will enrich and build resilience in lives - whereas cuts to music tuition or other arts activities will
impoverish. Thanks for the opportunity to contribute.
Problem with school clustering-bigger fewer centralised schools is that you fail to make sure that
necessary infrastructures are put in place.For example there have been numerous occasions when
children in Invermoriston and up and down the Great Glen have been left waiting for buses that never
arrive!-and they can hardly walk the 15 plus miles to school. Equally one fatal accident on the A82
between here and Drumnadrochit(of which there are many) and the children do not get home from school
until midnight. Invariably cuts made by urban centred individuals are made with little understanding of the
profound effects they can have on rural commuities.
Yes I think this could be an area where savings could be made as long as school transport was provided.




Probably in the case of under-used primaries close to other primaries.
Yes
Yes – if an alternative school is available within 20 minutes. Too much £ spent on Gaelic, transport etc.
If a parent wishes a Gaelic education which is not their catchment school the parent should be
responsible for transporting them.

Some rural schools are too far away from other schools to be realistically closed. Already suffering by
unfair allocation of funds in terms of isolation. (E.g. KLB High School still has no maths teacher 100 miles
away from Inverness and full range of services. No housing, fuel costs etc)



Not in this area no.



Close some schools & increase transport provision.

No

No




Yes (secondary)

We think there may be cases – looked at on merits
Amalgamate small schools.
Yes – but importance in community. Numbers cut off? Gaelic over budgeted.




Absolutely not, education is perhaps one of the most vital resources, I would anticipate that this is a
viewpoint shared by most, if not all, parents.
Whilst it may be possible to streamline services within schools I would think that to have school closures
would be tantamount to a violation of most individuals human rights under article 6 of the European
Convention of Human Rights.
yes
Yes. Although in some rural areas schools are the heart of the community,m there are some on the Black
isle such as ferintosh and Mulbuie where significant numbers of children are driven there and the children
benefit from smaller class sizes. Going by bus for up to 5 miles is the norm already for many. Whilst not
ideal it is the reality that we have to accept.
Yes.
Yes, cut the gaelic budget or charge extra for the gaelic pupils.

Yes, no segregation ie. gaelic, introduce into curriculum.

Yes. No need for Gaelic Secondary School, it could have been amalgamated.

Yes
Too many buildings with many empty places – so yes, especially in towns. Rural schools a different
situation.




Yes, some are less than half empty.
Yes, (reluctantly)
Yes, amalgamate for efficiency
Yes
Yes – at primary
Yes
Yes
Quality schools be paramount
Need to have a set criteria




Urban schools e.g. Bishop Eden, St Josephs, Central, Dalneigh



 Inverness cannot do with less schools – rural schools need to be viable – more information needed on
running costs.



Yes we accept a reduction in numbers but there must be sensible distances and schools must not
become too big. i.e. Dingwall is too large. Schools must have a common link.

Not in Inverness

No



No (High School?)




No (High School?)



Probably




Yes but sensitive to local communities.

We do not know! A school is the essential core of the community.



Many operate at less than 40% enrolment; this should be addressed by closing/amalgamating schools.



Yes – Primary schools in country areas

No, education, health and welfare must be priorities
Yes, many are run at less than 40% enrolment
No, school rolls in Easter Ross are falling due to displacement of working-age residents as Nigg is closed.
Re-open Nigg and the primary and secondary customers will re-appear. Costs could be reduced by using
solar thermal heating to reduce the cost of hot water and central heating bills. Winter fuel could be
provided by willow or hazel coppice or by miscanthus for fuelling a biomass boiler in each location. This
should be planted on Council or community owned land. This would mean that the only post-
establishment cost was harvesting ensuring we have a cost-effective local supply chain cheaper than
fossil fuels.
We agree that an urgent review should be made of under-used schools, with view to closures where rolls
are too small to make the schools viable and where the rolls are unlikely to rise in the near future. We
know this will be unpalatable to many parents, especially if the primary school faces closure. Reducing the
funding to all schools instead of closures is an unsatisfactory means of dealing with the budget problem,
since lower funding affects many more children and might well result in lower standards and a less broad
curriculum for all children.
NO. Local schools are vital to their communities. Exceptions where there are 2 schools close by which
both need new buildings and there is support for amalgamation.
General feeling is yes, but practicalities of what happens when the school closes.




Not in this ward – provision matches population and distribution

Primary Schools are fundamental to the fabric of the community. If schools close transport costs increase.

Possibly

Knock on effects more for rural



In rural areas have to consider travel distances

Sadly, yes

Not in rural areas



Yes – distance and size has to be taken into account. Be flexible on space, use other buildings for
schools to reduce running costs.



No but use the ones we have with wider community use e.g. libraries, service points
Take into account the geography of Highland and travel times especially for primary age children. Look at
several schools within a cluster. Are some expendable: falling school rolls.

Clusters in certain areas. Map exercise: distance of travel.
The Parent Council has looked at the Highland Council consultation concerning proposals for budget
cuts. We have been considering the impact the proposals are likely to have on the High School, our
feeder schools and young people's access to facilities and resources in the community. Key points
include recognition of what we have already lost, particularly in the last two years; the cumulative effect of
small 'creeping' cuts which have the effect of undermining communities in remote rural areas; and the
greater impact of cuts on schools and their communities in areas such as Gairloch. This lack of stability
within the school and wider community threatens the local tourist industry on which the area depends. For
example when schools are no longer seen as attractive to families moving in who contribute to the local
economy, and local attractions and facilities close making it less attractive to tourists. 1. Cuts already
announced The cuts already announced for the Education, Culture and Sport budget are a concern.
Despite the increase of 1.75% required to honour the agreed pay award for teachers there is no allowance
for inflation in the coming year, no increase for non teaching staff and crucially an increase of 1.5% on
income budgets is now required. These have the combined impact of reducing the overall budget for our
schools and means that resources for books and other materials will fall short of what is needed to equip
Proposals for further cuts related to schools i. A host of the resources proposed for cuts are already
spread so thinly in our area as to be non-existent for practical purposes. Although these resources are
much needed, we have for some time been poorly provided with Additional Support Needs provision,
despite its statutory status. We lack access to mental health worker support and educational psychology
with waiting lists in excess of six months, far too late for effective intervention in most cases. It needs to
be recognised that this unmet need is falling on school staff, and is an increasing burden as school staff
numbers reduce.
Reducing the number of primary schools: It is important to note that school buildings in our remote rural
area are a resource for the whole community, for example in Inverasdale where the school building is
used by the community as much as by the school itself.

Probably - and it might be acceptable to combine secondary with local primary schools, if the primary
buildings are in poor condition.
Probably yes – Torridon has 2 pupils & Shieldaig is only 10 miles away.




Yes, in primary schools in some areas, travel distances should be kept reasonable.
School services should be based around the quality of provision & viable scale. There may be differing
needs within different sections & where provision is developmental, as in Gaelic medium, then provision
must be maintained.

Not in rural areas.




Yes
Savings can be made by closing inefficient schools, or to justify spending have enough pupils to be
sustained.
Why are you spending £2000 per month to have 2 pupils from Sleat, taken to and from Portree High
School, by taxi? A daily bus takes the other pupils to and from school. One pupil attends an English
nursery in Sleat. Two adults are paid to look after this child. Why? The child could attend the Sgoil Araich
where she would be able to interact with other children.
Review the school roles close some.



Provision should reflect demographic numbers of local communities.




Constant review.




Yes x 3.

Protection of rural community schools is important. Some potential for amalgamating for schools.



Cut out Gaelic Medium and Schools.

Yes, we are running too many primary schools. More primary schools should join together like Conon &
Maryburgh

Staffing.



No, not in rural areas, yes in urban areas.



Don‟t know.

No – schools are fundamental to having a strong community.
MacDiarmid school is only 3 miles away from Portree & could be closed.
It seems so in some areas but as we see demand rises as well as falls away, this could result in
population shifts into larger built up areas.



Need to look at each local/geographical area.

No



Possibly.
No. Mix primary schools with Academy



Yes

Maybe in urban areas with low <40% occupancy.



Yes



Look at class sizes if we below average consider alternatives. Do we need 3 primaries in Alness?




Yes




Yes (in towns with more than 1 school)

Yes



No
In some cases yes – Some primaries (rural schools are different).




Review with all options considered.

Rural schools play an important part of the community.

Yes
generally no- i personally think it is OK to combine primary schools in the urban areas ( so fewer shcools)-
we don't need so many but in the rurual areas i think it is vital to keep schools in the communities. These
rural communities depend on the schools for their survival whereas the towns don't.
if planning to reduce the number of schools by amalgamation, sweeten the deal by upgrading or providing
dedicated cycle routes between villages and provide bicycles for pupils who want them. e.g. if you close
alness or invergordon academies and send pupils from one school to fill capacity at the other, build a safe
cycle lane between alness and invergordon and provide bicycles to all students. this will cut down on
increased transport costs and will contribute to better health for the students.

also, stop providing separate schools on religious grounds. religiously segregated schooling should be
paid for by the parents. religious indoctrination should not be part of the school day and should not be
paid for by the taxpayer. there is no reason for providing 2 religiously based primary schools in inverness
when there are primary schools under capacity in the town.




Not in this area.




Yes, possibly primary in particular.

Generally agree too many schools - need to rationalise.




Probably.




Don‟t know.

Yes in some areas.



Yes



Possible east coast? Turn them into multi-use.




In the towns yes.




Not in Ward 6.

Yes where there is close proximity.



Not in Torridon area. School essential for school sustainability. Possible scope for some
clustering/shared resources but maintaining teaching staff at school.
Maybe but no children should be excluded or face lengthy journey times to and from school or reduced
standard of education
Delegates feel unable to comment due to the lack of information. Closing schools would require transport
of pupils to new locations

Yes – need a review

Probably too many primaries but consideration needed regarding transport




In theory Yes but it depends where they are and distances which would have to be travelled

Yes




Yes if the cost per pupil is more than £x per pupil




Probably – need to look at school rolls and see where provision could be rationalised/amalgamated

No answer




Yes. Amalgamate the smaller ones that are close to each other

Maybe – there is a rural/urban difference

Possibly but there is a need for schools. Legally it is very hard to close schools. Transport and what the
school is also used for needs to be considered




More a rural concern

On the basis of information supplied – yes!



Yes




Probably are – but no community wants to lose their school.




Yes in some cases.

There are ? schools in B&S amalgamate where possible.
Look at the central costs relating to the administration of schools.




Yes but where circumstances are least detrimental to the community especially in isolated areas.

Yes reduce where practical.

Yes.




Very important for small communities to maintain a local primary school to maintain viable community.
Gaelic obsession, small schools may need to close. Management – education – obsession culture
government. Small schools – minimum numbers? Don‟t close unless too small. Combination of
management at strategic level. Special schools not discussed – noted.




Yes but geography makes this inevitable. Primary could merge certain small schools but secondary only
possibility is removal of Dornoch which is in travelling distance of two larger schools with spare capacity.
Staff/pupil ratio should be equalised and trated on the same basis throughout the system withouth
additional levels being provided in gaelic units.
It is difficult to reduce the total number of schools on the basis of present pupil populations because it is
almost impossible to estimate how populations will change in the future. In many areas of rural Scotland it
could be of benefit to attract more people into the area and thus there would be a higher demand for
school places and overcrowding resulting in a poorer educational experience for children. In the
meantime, strategies could be put into place to maximise the efficiency of the school provision we have,
bearing in mind that different strategies may apply depending on whether the school is a primary or
secondary school. - eg by sharing school heads where there are several small schools in one rural area
thus reducing the pay roll necessary for one head teacher per rural school. By optimising the use of
school buildings, especially new buildings eg by incorporating the local library within the local school;
using the school for community events and making a small charge for this, perhaps a film club, sports
club or lunch club, or venue for the WRI and adult education groups and classes. These should be
encouraged as a way of generating income for the school and council. School residences should be used,
as university ones are, to generate income outwith school terms and if they are not of a high enough




This is such a difficult one. Schools can be the heart of a community. And in a perfect world every place
has its school. But it sounds like we simply can't afford to keep running schools everywhere. On the other
hand, bussing children has a number of cost and social implications (hours on busses, cost of fuel). If
school have to be merged, let's try and get it right this time. No PPP. No cheap schools with long term
maintenance costs over 30 years. Renewable energy and passive solar placing.
There is no doubt that closing a school and disposal of its assets achieves considerable savings which
would be hard to realise
through cost cutting exercises. Highland council must be sensitive to the impact which the removal of a
school can have on the
resilience and wellbeing of rural communities .We observe that there are cases where school closure is
justified on educational
grounds as well as financial and that in some cases small schools are serving not a local population but
the aspirations of parents
to place their children in a situation where small classes and individual tuition gives them an advantage




Yes. Travelling timer must be considered where schools are close




In towns with several schools and falling pupil numbers it should be possible to combine them and sell off
surplus buildings/sites. In rural areas distances between villages and the fragile nature of small
communities makes closures unpalatable but since education is such a large item in the budget cuts and
closures are inevitable.
On schools, I think there are far too many of them. Teanassie School near Beauly is full of children from
outwith the catchment area who have turned it into the equivalent of a private school. It's only open to
those who have the time and money to drive their children there and back every day from all parts of the
countryside - not only is it costing money to provide an additional school which is not necessary it is also a
disgrace that the council is encouraging more children being driven to school than is necessary. There
are perfectly good schools all around this area.
Yes – close schools with small numbers but this will have a geographical impact!
Close rural schools – give more social interaction for pupils. Consider transport for children. Problem –
could take life out of community!




Edderton thinks small schools should be kept open, in particular its own. It is the sole facility in the village
that invites social cohesion and communal initiative. Recently it has given rise to a community garden and
a drama group for young people.
• Closed school buildings have no asset value but require upkeep which counteracts savings made
through a transfer of teaching.
• Closing our school would be a dismemberment of a vital village facility
• Our children are receiving a quality education because of the smallness of the unit and have recently
produced fine accomplishments in a variety of fields way beyond what one might expect from the size of
the school. Pride in these accomplishments unites the residents of the village.
“Every area needs to be looked at separate, in the Nairn area we feel that we have an adequate number
of schools for the roll of children.”




“Highland wide yes. Maybe class sizes should be bigger. For Nairn the number of schools is correct.”

“Nairn requires number it has.”

NO ANSWER
“Not in Nairn but elsewhere yes where there is over provision.”



“Yes”

“Nairn, no. Highland wide, yes.”

“Schools are an important part of the community. A single size approach will not suit the Highlands.”

“Yes”
“Yes where school is running with less than 40% capacity and another school is within 30 minutes
travelling distance”



“Not in Nairn”



“Where small number of children, where travel is possible – fewer schools”

“No – not in Nairn”




“Not in Nairn”
“Not in Nairn but maybe elsewhere”




“In Nairn school classes are full. Maybe in other parts of the Highlands.”




NO ANSWER




“Yes”
no




Yes. I would not like to see the small schools in the very remote communities closed, but there are others
that are in villages clsoe to one another,that could be amalgamated.




The purpose is clearly to reduce the number of premises that have to be maintained and release the
value of the assets, which can only make one single contribution to the budget deficit. Any recurring cash
release savings are through running and maintenance costs. Savings on staff may be less than expected,
as the redistributed school roll will require additional staff in the schools remaining.

The use of either travelling-time or travelling-distance as criteria to identify schools to be targeted for
closure is a blunt instrument which fails to take the needs of individual communities into consideration.

Since its inception Highland Council has followed a policy of school closure rather than develop an
innovative approach to education provision. Technology has a role but there are other ways the broader
curriculum and specialist teaching could be provided in an area where there are many geographically
remote and small communities. Instead of requiring a school population to relocate the alternative is for
the specialist staff to be attached to a group of schools, rotating on a periodic basis. Delivering the
curriculum on a modular basis rather than over a term or a school year can prevent excessive disruption.

The assertion that fewer but larger schools are able to provide a better learning environment needs
supporting evidence to be put in the public domain before any decision is taken.

Are there alternative uses the community could use school buildings for?
Yes- specifically primary schools (some with single figure headcount) but beware of remote schools.
Additional costs may be incurred – e.g transport better for lightly populated schools & their pupils – it‟s a
good opportunity to mix with more people in larger schools, exceptions would need to be made for places
where long journeys would be incurred. Are there any schools over-populated?




PPP Maintenance might be an issue. (e.g contractor to change light bulbs)
With regard to schools and their associated extra curricular activities, we must not create a disillusioned
generation by cutting their budgets to the bone. Schooling presents a major challenge with many school
premises well short of being fully utilised and/or operating in dilapidated premises, while no community
gives up its school lightly. Again the „bullet may need to be bitten‟ and where school rolls are very low,
consideration may have to be given to closing some where the cost of bussing pupils etc. can be shown
to achieve worthwhile savings. However education is not just about money and closure should only be
considered as a last resort, having weighed up the very real benefits provided by small rural schools as
noted below.
 It is important to recognise the advantages to be gained for some children attending small rural schools
as in our opinion, these far outweigh the costs associated with running them. Note too that for children
who live in smaller communities, to be bussed to schools with significantly larger school rolls can be very
traumatic, with the danger of such children becoming „lost in the system‟. From our own experience,
schools like Alvie Primary at Kincraig (roll currently 55 but likely to increase with further new house builds
proposed in the CNPA Local Plan), are recognised and applauded for knowing and understanding (and
catering to) the needs of all their children. This is much more difficult to achieve in larger schools that
service children from different communities.

  Rather than closing small rural schools, we therefore suggest the following in the first instance:
• Share teaching and support staff – so for example, have a “cluster” head teacher who looks after say 3
or 4 small schools. The principle of sharing should also extend to PE, music and drama activity where
this is not already happening.
• Encourage schools to adopt the principal of composite classes, so instead of having 2 x classes of say
10 children, combine those 2 classes and have a larger composite class of 20.




What about community centres instead of schools in some rural areas?




Running too many Schools(especially Primary Schools)

There was general agreement that there were too many schools in the Highlands. It was felt that savings
could be made by rationalising the school estate. The creation of larger regional schools, serving greater
areas would create significant economies of scale that would offset the additional costs, such as
transportation, that would be needed to bring pupils into these schools.



Look at changing catchment area boundaries
Merge schools- reduce teachers




If amalgamate schools then need to make sure do something with the building that is left and that it is not
left to be vandalised.
The community council in the interests of the community would like assurance that the following services
are protected - Fort Augustus Schools, includes the nursery, primary and Academy, which are an
accentual element of the infrastructure of the village. In a growing community the schools must be
protected against any cuts which would effect the education of our children and young people. Within the
school, education is from nursery age, primary and then progresses through to senior classes in the
Academy. In 2009 it attained a standard of being in the top 10 senior schools in Scotland.
No. of schools needed depends on travelling distance and no. of pupils. Numbers not straightforward in
isolated areas. We need newer schools. Deaf children need to travel to Dingwall and they are happy at
that school. Schools need to be accessible to wheelchairs.
Fully staffed, properly functioning schools need to be the aim.
Need to be careful wouldn‟t lead to overcrowding
Wick could close some primary schools but at secondary staffing the most important otherwise education
suffering
Number of schools have had to lose staff and have done this through staff retirement or not filling
vacancies whilst others continue to be overstaffed as no staff turnover - this is very unfair. Would not
suggest redundancies but use any extra staff as supply to cover for absence. Either that or teach a
different subject. Needs to be robust scrutiny e.g. at present Mallaig High school is recruiting a third
Maths teacher - doesn't seem justifiable when the roll is around 130 and classes are below average in
number.
Perhaps in urban areas schools can be amalgamated. Schools in isolated areas & islands must be
retained for community survival
Or as an alternative to reducing the number of schools, should we run the same
number of schools but with 12% less in real terms for each school?




Must be max travel times, esp for primary schools.

What about combining some secondary schools where rolls don't produce?




Too many differing criteria the question is wrongly put for this area

No

More sharing of teaching staff between schools

N & W schools shouldn't be cut back.



No




No



Yes




better to have fewer, of higher quality
School budgets are squeezed enough due to a continuous stream of new initiatives
coming from local and central government.




I have no idea what this means.
this sounds daft to me.Your homework will surely establish the need for schools as far
as can be predicted.
Yes
No




Reduce the number of Head Teachers" in the remoter areas. One person as a full
time head could well cover 5 to 10 small schools in a local region. Technology should
allow immediate or urgent contact between teaching staff and the roving Head."
no
no, the schools are falling apart now, a drop in funding would finish them off
I would suggest that we dispense with 12% of staff in the council itself rather than cut
back on education for our children. There are far too many highly paid Councillors and
admin staff and far too many class room assistants. If parents cannot raise their
children properly it is not up to the rest of society to pay for it.

If the children cannot behave send them home after making sure the parents pick
them up at school.




Education is still too important to cut provision bt we need to use the budget more
efficiently




rather than a choice between closures and budget cuts a combination may offer the
best solution
don't think so .
No economically for proper provision within schools for pupils it is now not an option.
No. Difficult to see where the 12% less in real terms would come from. Better to
consolidate and give those expanded schools more funding from the savings
achieved by closing small schools.
By closing secondary schools, moving children to under utilised schools it would also
be possible to expand the curriculum.
Not sure what this means 12% less what? They don't seem to have enough money at
the moment for repairs, books, etc.
To much time and effort is spent by head teachers on non teaching matters. Form
clusters of schools each with a School manager and reduce the number of
headteachers by sharing head teachers across a cluster of schools. Head teachers
will have more time to deal with purely educational matters because the administrative
load will have been removed. This would be especially appropriate in places like
Invergordon where we have four schools all within close proximity of each other, all
with highly paid head teachers duplicating effort.




I would argue there is probably no straightforward formula for an issue like this as rural
schools would be more likely to be hit and they are the ones that can be least
expected to close. Generally speaking though, provided that transportation is put on
for pupils in rural areas, I would favour longer commutes for pupils over cutting
budgets for schools that have already been hit with 'efficiency savings' over a number
of years. There just isn't any so called waste left and a properly funded service in
fewer locations over poorly funded services in more areas would have to be more
sensible.




Yes,, too many older smaller primary school where teachers time is wasted on a cost
per pupil, along with heating, lighting, IT, admin etc. A review would be good but it
must also be considered in the review of cycle routes, bus routes etc.



I don't think this is a straightforward choice. Rural schools must be maintained and will
inevitably have lower rolls and cost more but they do represent the hear of a
community. It may be possible to amalgamate some of the urban schools in order to
reduce costs.
Schools (especially Primaries) are already quite poorly funded, so cuts to budgets
would be fatal.
The Council must accept that urban areas may have too many schools and that small
communities can no longer have the luxury of small schools in every village.
Cluster Managers might be a way forward, with a senior smember of staff appointed
for day to day running within each school.


Scotland has been lucky in the past in the area of being able to afford Primary
Schools for isolated communities and small country towns. In the days of poor
transport links, a relatively stable and static population and the school being a major
part of the community's focus this was an entirely justifiable and essential part of the
social fabric.

In today's cash strapped educational environment the centralisation of services must
be looked at as a way to saving money but also improving overall educational service
provisions. The days of small schools with classes in the single digits can,
unfortunately, be no longer justified, especially where larger primaries exist close by.
Many of these small school buildings are extremely old, extremely energy inefficient,
and extremely expensive in their overall upkeep.

Amalgamation of smaller, older schools into new, more centralised facilities may not
be every parent's ideal, especially when you consider the advantages of extremely
small class sizes, relaxed educational environment and handy location. It must surely
be better to cut the number of schools slightly than to disadvantage all Highland
Primary students by further budgetry strangulation. And unfortunately the needs of the
many must outweigh the needs of the few. When teachers at certain Primary Schools
need to buy in pencils for students from their own money something pretty drastic
needs to happen. The really scary thing is that things will probably only get worse so I




I do not agree with the comments of closing smaller schools in order to save money.
Many of these smaller schools which are mostly in villages pass with flying colours
various inspections so why should they be penalised due to budget constraints.

Not all of them are in a bad state of repair so how would you pick which ones to close
and which one to not.

Some of the larger schools are not in a great state either so would you close a smaller
school in quite good repair to ship the children into a school of worse condition?
In many of the rural areas this would mean transporting the children possibly to a town
school. Transport costs are on the rise and how many decent transport providers are
there out there? Transporting the children is a long term financial commitment.

Yes we have tough times ahead but for many rural communities the school is a vital
part of that community. Yes cluster more headteachers when possible but that is only
a small amount of savings.




On the whole better to close some schools and keep better provision elsewhere than
have budgets & standards falling across the whole Highland provision. Sorry, this is
tough, but these are tough times.




Fewer primary schools are possible in larger conurbations where they are sufficiently
close together ( within a two mile radius say).
To cut schools budgets is to cut frontline services and these have been extensively
cut already to provide savings during the previous years; these need to be increased
along with inflation so that there is adequate resources at the 'chalk face'.
as more and more villages become commuter communities with residents travelling to
work in bigger Highland towns or Inverness, as planning permission continues to be
granted for large supermarkets in central locations to which people drive to buy in
favour of the local shop, the local primary is often the remaining heart of a small
community. We want our young people to stay in teh Highlands so while
amalgamating smaller primaries and bussing children from smaller communities into
larger ones to spend a large proportion of their day might make economic sense, it
might also leave a lasting impression in their young minds that where you live is only
where you sleep - that everything else you do is elsewhere.




I feel that the effect of closing schools is a very distressing one for all pupils and
indeed parents. I doubt whether closing a number of schools would help the funding of
so many others in any significant way and i therefore would be in favour of all schools
having cuts proportionate to their size. Why should a few pupils suffer the axe in
favour of others.




There are several programs in place for schools that are of dubious nature. The one
that comes immediately to mind is the fitting of renewable energy to school buildings.
A very small school can expect to have a renewable energy system with a cost over
30.000 installed for what seems to be political reasons.

These systems are economically non viable due to their high cost relative to the power
they generate. Most are unlikely to pay for their installation costs, by energy savings,
in the next 25 years. The CO2 reductions such projects bring are insignificant and
ineffectual.

Killing this program alone, and others like it, will save significant amounts of money.




In rural areas the school is often the centre of life. In some towns however there are
clearly too many school buildings e.g. Fort William where I think there are 7 but I think
the Council has recognised this. The comparable town south of Fort William in Argyll
& Bute i.e.Oban has always managed with three. No -one like school mergers but the
fact is that it makes clear financial sense to merge half empty ones. Everyone knows
more cuts are on the way as it has been well trailed recently so we have to be realistic
and stop living beyond our means.
Whilst many will argue to close small rural schools and bus the children to town
schools I would strongly argue against this. Why should small rural communities be
even more disadvantaged?

Already by living out of the town you receive fewer services in comparison to others
and indeed the school is often the hub of the village providing more than a school
service. From these buildings many other activities operate. Football clubs, Brownies
etc, etc. Where would these groups relocate to if they loose the school?....... the town
? What then would become of the vacant building ? Its hard to sell a large building in a
rural area where services are becoming less and less. It paints a bleak picture for
small communities and villages across the Highlands.

The cost of transportation will be a long term commitment and with continual rises in
fuel you will be signing a blank cheque for this provision. The next point will be how to
transport the children? How many decent transport service providers are out there
with the long term ability to transport varying numbers of children to town schools?
With changing rules and regulations and falling profits many transport providers have
thrown in the towel. Yes amalgamation of town schools removes the need to transport
if the distance is not too long and this will involve looking at school boundaries.

Cuts in budgets have already affected all schools in this area with in many cases
Parent Councils fund-raising for nice to have equipment. A rethink on where the cuts
should fall is needed so that the children, who are the future of the Highlands are not
feeling first hand the effects of what can only seem to be mismanagement of the past.



I believe the only fair way to enable parents to continue to have adequate school
choice is to cut the budget across all schools.

Parents choose the school for their child very carefully, regardless of catchment area -
they look at the complete learning experience with many attracted by the ethos
generated. The arts, music , sports, after school clubs etc all attract many parents to
make their choice.

Surely any clustering/closure would need to demonstrate that the resulting change
would be of significant educational benefit to the child. In order to comply with Scottish
Executive guidelines the council would surely need to ensure this criteria was met. Are
they going to build brand new state of the art schools with white boards, music areas,
larger classrooms etc. Can they financially afford to do so ?

I would be very disappointed to see any school close - the Curriculum for Excellence
states

relevant, engaging, inspiring education for every child...........

we have a duty to live up to this.




Can you ever actually have too many schools?
I would ask are we running too many local councillors and are we paying them too
much?
Why not at least halve the number of councillors, and their pay in order to save
money?
Education is the heart of our society's life.
Rural schools need to exist as they are often the young heart of our communities.
Please do not consider closing rural and remote schools in order to save money.
To close rural schools and then bus or taxi the children to school further (20-50+
miles) away surely defeats the purpose of saving money and helping the environment
especially with the current fuel prices.
Education in such areas is far more important not only for the children and their
families but for the community as a whole.
Yes, we are running to many schools as the rolls in some areas are falling, the council
- or senior management has been neglecting the schools and wasting money, by
using to many support staff, which is costing a fortune, this money could have been
put to better use by looking and maintaining the schools, keeping them up to good
standards instead off letting the buildings fall into disrepair. Also too many admin
workers streamline them and also the senior management. By reducing senior
management, you can save a wee fortune.




Our rural Highland primary schools go back a long way into the middle & latter part of
the 19th century. Mainly sponsored by the religious ethic of the "Scottish Society for
the Propagation Christian Knowledge " acronym SSPCK. This was a established
church organization. This body was responsible for the education of our children
through the countless side schools that prolifirated our Highland glens. With the
gradual phasing out of church involvement & the introduction of State schooling in
1872 the way was paved for Scotlands childrens education to become the wonder of
the world. I say, rather than close a single school or sack a single teacher. Sack this
mish mashed cobbled together bunch of lib- tor rags & use the money saved for our
childrens education. Danny Alexander 1st. My anger is now so palpable it hurts.



I think primary schools could share head teachers. Maybe having one head teacher
covering 2 schools. I think it would be possible to close a few schools but then you
have to look at the alternative and how much it would cost for transporting the pupils
to their next nearest school.

I believe that where you have clusters already sharing management that this should
be reviewed. Headteachers should be freed up to carry out the Educational stategy for
the schools, may not have to share schools but would be freed up to do more teaching
in the schools saving posts which is one of the highest costs in the budget. However,
you need skilled managers who have experienec of managing budgets to manage the
actual school budgets, the amount of administration in schools now would be better
managed by personnel skilled and trained in this area. This could be done accross the
schools and would enable far more ownership for managing the budgets and making
better utilisation of schools costs in an overall region. If you had these based in each
of the areas and they held the budget for the schools then you would see less waste,
more accurate forecasting of budgets and Headteachers with the time to focus on
what they are highly skilled to do in teaching. The Financial Managers would also
have full visibility of where teachers are not being fully utilised and could offer
assistance to the local primary schools, as you tend to find the schools run in isolation
instead of part of a team. It would be interesting to see out of the total resource in
Secondary Schools the actual time against FTE that is not taken up teaching. Most
businesses now have to maximise their resource to be financially viable, again not
sure if budgets are still allocated on the expected school roll, but if it is then again time
to review this as just one extra admission can raise a budget significantly. The Primary
Yes
No
No, a minimum number of children should be set per school.



No – that will result in every child‟s education suffering.




Possibly – less classroom assistants, more volunteers? Keep class sizes as are.



12% less budget?

Not enough information! Needs to be more specific about what would actually be cut!
Some examples would be helpful.

Yes

No




This could not be an across the board category.

Stupid question. Reg of individual area.




I would anticipate that placing a figure of 12% less in real terms for each and every
school indicates that education services, and plans for education services are being
devised by Highland Council accountants. In real terms, each school plainly would
have different requirements and as a result to perform wholesale reductions across
the board without comprehension of the varying needs further indicates that there has
been little planning or understanding in regards to the educational needs across the
Highland Council area.
no
Definitely not.
No, that seems impractical.
Reduce number of schools

Stick to 1.

No, that‟s wasteful.
Less schools. Provision of school should be able to provide community provision
outwith school hours at realistic expense to users.

Enterprise and business within school to capitlise on I.T. provision.
Rural schools rolls can change quite quickly but where it is always viable (not 2 or 3
children) then they should remain open. Catchment areas can be enormous. Roy
Bride – Braeroy to Corrour – to Inverroy. Promise to grant rebuilding should be kept.
Roy Bridge has been waiting 12 years – still not got it. (Ardnamurchan seems to have
its own provision policy!)
No we need to rationalise the schools.
Not possible.
No
N/A
 No. Schools that are running at or near capacity will be penalised to support smaller
schools




 No. Schools should be utilised from perhaps 8am – 10pm for youth clubs, library
facilities etc, meetings?



 12% less of what?? 12% less means something completely different in a small under-
resourced facility versus a larger city facility




No

May be scope in rural areas to join forces – assessed on individual school role

Not a good idea

 Children are our future. Preferably no cuts or minimal cuts. Long term – better
insulation.




Use all IT – video-conferencing – sharing expertise across the area.



Yes it is possible to reduce the % but each school should be looked at individually.




The quality of teaching must be maintained and good practice must be followed.

There is a distinct lack of information on which to base answers to these questions!

 Large schools with high enrolment cannot function with a 12% budget cut; increasing
enrolment percentages at schools would be preferable.

 3% saving is crucial. Education is the largest budget therefore any percentage of the
full amount is a large amount!
No
Schools are already struggling to work within budget - 12% cuts would drastically
affect quality of education.
No




Review provision in centres of population
This is in preference to Item 1 and [possibly the schools could be more efficiently
managed

Yes if it comes out of teachers‟ wages
Schools can‟t afford to have 12% reduction in their budget as they are struggling as it
is.



Use modular build for schools so you can increase / reduce capacity as required

Prefer option 1

Buying of pupils own pencils etc.




No



Yes

Savings through bulk purchasing

Education – privatise the lot
Need to look at quality & efficiency in each school in each area.




No, not an option.



Would rather have fewer better schools.

No new Gaelic school for Portree – keep status quo.




Split areas into bigger chunks with bigger schools.
Could be considered.
Would it not be better to have fewer schools with higher investment and quality rather
than keeping running schools with low % and poorer quality.

Would have too much detrimental impact on education. Does it need to be Council
workers who go to areas to fix things can arrangements be put in place in other areas.




Cluster Heads?? Cluster department leaders??

Join adjacent schools where practical. Schools are a necessity and are running on a
tight budget at present.




No.
Reduction will affect pupils moving into Secondary. Curriculum for Excellence?
Where would 12%



No x 4.

Schools should have same budget. Schools could draw in more external funding for
projects.

Reduce schools.



Yes – encourage more community funding.



Not sure but schools also need to be staffed properly.

No.

Make each school responsible for its own budget.
Doesn‟t seem fair to penalise larger schools if more rural areas are struggling with
numbers.
Targeted costs are better than across the board cuts.
Efficiency savings?
Reduction in staff wages at higher level.
In small rural communities – care needed in ensuring that there is no accumulative
effect of various budgetary cuts i.e. Gaelic medium teachers & frozen & non
replacement of posts (Kilmuir PS example).
Education is investment in our future. All children should have the same
opportunities/facilities even if it involves travelling to a school within a reasonable
distance.
Gaelic medium education must be taken seriously – reducing teacher/pupil ratios is
not a reasonable policy. Does not take education seriously, instead teacher salaries
could be considered.

Curriculum for excellence must be considered; pupils must receive all extras, PE,
Music, Art, as well as recognised basics.
Efficiency savings & staff wage cuts (over £50k pa).

The number of schools but where any % reductions are to be considered they must be
in such a way to lessen the impacts. Also re a regenerative agenda where budget
reductions would actually compromise greatly what has been achieved to date.
Despite the current financial circumstances, it would be deeply damaging to apply
such cuts across the board with taking cognisance of the Governments own language
plan and HC plan.
Need to look carefully at population demographics & potential shift e.g. if there is a
“baby boom”.



No, think about reducing school transport back to 3 mile radius.
Give Community Centres in Inverness to Community Councils Voluntary groups to
run.

Gaelic schools = split community. Prefer if costs were focussed on current school
rather than a new Gaelic school; also make sure Gaelic is taught as a priority.

Use smaller school buildings for other uses (profitable uses).



12% less – capital?
No – reduce No. of schools (primaries only). Do not dilute the provision.
Schools pivotal to smaller communities, but look at amalgamating schools in areas of
larger population – e.g. 3 primaries in Alness, 2 in Invergordon, could some of these
be amalgamated? Not a 12% reduction across the board.

Consider rationalising school provision



No




Combine Ardross & Newmore since low numbers.

Where would this come from? Perhaps we could make better use of school buildings
– multipurpose buildings. Important not to reduce support staff in schools. Support
staff provide an essential service. Need to catch children who need additional support
early. Education is vital for the country/community.

No, there are urban schools that could be merged. Cluster Heads in other areas.



No. Spreading jam too thin.
No. Some schools will have to close but more so in urban areas than rural
communities. Alness 3>2, Invergordon 2>1.




No. It‟s hard for the school to run on what they have. As a member of the school PA I
understand there is never any spare money.




Reduce the summer term holiday. Increase winter term = save electric.
see above
Likely to lead to unbalanced curriculum and „short termism‟ in terms of cuts and
economies which would have detrimental long term effects.




Don‟t know.
If an urban area reduces or amalgamates primary schools it will not take heart out of
area as it would in a small village.




Reduce numbers as opposed to reducing the overall quality.




Not workable.



Look at balance between levels of investments in larger areas as opposed to the more
rural areas. Bigger savings will be made outwith our remote rural communities who
have had little investment.



No not realistic.




No. (Why would we look for 12% when we only need to find 6%).




No. reduce numbers of advisory staff.
No answer

Reduction in operational costs ie lighting etc while maintaining standards of lessons

Parents should pay for peripheral extras

No answer




Reducing preferable to this alternative

No




No answer
Probably not a viable alternative. What would be the impact “in real terms” of a 12%
reduction in funding? Can schools look at generating income through
sponsorship/partnership with businesses? Also by using school premises for
community use in holidays/evenings?

No answer




Will this reduce the costs and be more cost-effective? We don‟t believe it will as open
schools cost just the same. Could closed schools be used as community centres?

This may be a good idea. Geographically close schools could be merged



That is one of the most stupid questions asked!




No, wouldn‟t work! Reduced costs would harm them – not an option

Not enough information supplied

Reduce number of schools (particularly in rural areas, where there are schools located
near each other). There is an issue with primary schools not full




Prefer to have less schools – so good budget for those who are left.




Yes in other cases.

No
Better to amalgamate.




No.

No.

Less schools don‟t cut the budget to all schools.
Reduce budget but not schools. Community support could make up shortfall in
income. Communities need to keep wide age range 0-99years to ensure viable
socially supportive community. More economic to keep children attending locally not
transport them long distances.




12% less in real terms. Closures lead to long term depopulation.
How? Schools are already cutting to the bone. Not ideal.
Reduce number of schools as opposed to cutting all school budgets




No – not efficient or economical in long term.
Centralisation of facilities – in communities – link to apprentice schemes in schools;
need for classroom assistants

Overall schools – reduce budget. Need change in government strategy levels
“Are gaelic medium schools essential?”




“Schools should be run efficiently”

“Figures required”

NO ANSWER
“No. Address over provision as above”

“Close smaller schools that are within reasonable distance of other larger schools that
are not reaching their full capacity”

“Individual basis on each school, but some schools are at capacity and over”

“This is a reasonable alternative – but will it be based on pupil numbers?”

“No”

“No”



“Probably. Reduce outgoings”



NO ANSWER

“Yes”




“If provided with a safe business plan”
NO ANSWER

“How? Perhaps older pupils could take on the roll of janitor, secretary, crossing
patrollers. Schools are already desperately trying to cut heating, photocopying and
book costs. Classes are full (33 pupils). There are no assistants in P4-P7 classes.
Support for learning has been cut to such a low level it might be ruled illegal soon”




NO ANSWER




“How many city schools are running under capacity? Consensus in favour of reducing
number of schools in urban areas”
Yes

no




Would this make it possible for the very small schools to continue? In some schools
children alreaady seem to spend a lot of time being bussed around to undertake
activities, rather than actually learning. Would this reduce productive learning time
still further?
Spend should be relative to number attending school (But there should be a study on
each proposed cut)




Bigger catchment areas- what about reviewing them?
Make money from facilities.




Schools funding shouldn‟t be cut due to the money they‟re receiving already is thinly
spread. The music tuition and youthwork shouldn‟t be cut as well as extra
drama/dance classes due to the acceptance into a university can be affected by not
having qualifications if you take this away. What goes in place?
This is an attractive alternative. In small communities the school is at the centre& a
good many extra-mural activities take place there. Parent groupsare often verykeen to
help with fund raising etc. In urban areas this can prove to be difficult as many families
have 2 parents in work plus many single parents are the only breadwinners & cannot
commit to fundraising etc.
                                                                       Should we concentrate our effort and Council provision
                                                                       in remote and rural areas where private/voluntary
                                                                       providers are unlikely to run care homes, and in the main
                                                                       areas of population should we allow the private and
Should we continue to run care homes ourselves?                        voluntary sector to provide these at a lower cost?




                                                                       The function of caring should stay with the Council but
                                                                       why does it cost much more to be provided by the
                                                                       Council rather than privately?




Yes, private sector would have no interest in rural area care homes.   Yes Perception is that Council's provide better care.

Only when the private sector won't                                     Yes.
                                                                       Consideration for the travel times for relatives is very
                                                                       important.
No communities should exploit opportunities to partner with HC &
NHS to look at other models.

                                                                       If this is true then this should be happening now, Quality
Yes where there is no alternative                                      policing necessary




No as long as the standard of care can be guaranteed in the private
sector                                                                 Yes
Yes                                                                    No

Yes                                                                    Yes, as long as standards are guaranteed




n/c                                                                    Seems at least to have a rationale...
People should not really expect to go in to a local care home in the
current financial climate                                                Might be an idea




Not necessarily. If care homes can be run more cheaply, but not less
efficiently or caringly by the private sector, then yes, of course, go
down that route.                                                         I feel these two suggestions have merit.
are they at a lower cost?
I don't understand why the Council run homes cost so much more to
run. As long as the standards are the same in the privately run
homes then concentrate in areas where the private sector will not
want to run them.                                                   yes
No   Yes
No opinion. If quality canbe guarenteed why not look at private secotr
input.                                                                 Yes




Only if this can be achieved at a lower administrative cost than
equivalent facilities provided by the private sector                  The above answer also applies tro this question
no                                                                    yes-within reason. People may have to move.
no, if the standard of care is the same, relinquish control of populated
area homes to 3rd parties, and concentrate on the rural homes            yes
No comment                                                               No comment




This could be contracted out but would it save money as HC would
have to monitor standards. Also would HC staff lose out or would
T&C's be protected.




Consultation document makes sense put homes in private hands as
cheaper yet still indepenedntly monitored for quality




This may be a good service to pass to the private sector as it is well
policed by the care commission                                           yes
I don't think so becasue some of the families are working and when
they come back from work they maybe too tired to care for there own
family, but on the other hand if families want to that up to them.
Yes
There is no mention in the documents why care home provision is so
   expensive when compared to the private sector. Can the private
   sector be encouraged to cover the potential shortfall in places?
   Likewise day care centres. It is not just the actual build cost to
   be considered it is the knock on effect, costs of keeping the
   elderly in their own homes both in terms of adaptations and care
   worker support costs.
Don't know. Probably not if it is possible to get a similar or higher
standard of care from the private sector. Would need to be proved
though and close monitoring of standards implemented.                   Yes, that makes sense.
      As long as a guarantee can be made that there will be
      equal or better care home provision - it wouldn't matter
Yes   who ran it.
The issue of quality of care was raised. It was confirmed that the
same standards are applied for Council and other providers.
Resource required ensuring that independent providers are aware of
adult protection responsibilities reducing the need for investigations.
Most definitely yes. Private care homes tend to be very expensive
and not value for money. I have found from personal experience that
the standard of care is higher too.                                   Yes




Rural ones, important to provide local care wherever possible.
Urban areas may have alternative care homes established               Yes
No reason why this should not all be in the private sector.
      Yes, I think people should be cared for in the community,
      as close to their own homes as possible.

      How can the private homes provide care at a lower cost,
      why would council funded homes need to cost more? I
Yes   don't think we should rely on voluntary organ




Yes   At a lower cost to whom?
Yes, but it could be shared, a mixture of both.                        yes

                                                                       We would rather the money went to the people who
They need to be better regulated but it would be a possibility.        need it not based on location.



Not necessarily but we are concerned about impact on old people in     Yes should continue in rural areas to avoid closure. HC
existing homes.                                                        run these. If same level of service is provided.
Yes, private companies need to make a profit (fat cats). £464 - £540
is this providing the same level of service? £819 a week is not      We believe one and all, that it is morally wrong to put all
justified, cheaper staying in a hotel!                               the care homes out to private provision.



Yes                                                                    No keep them all open.

Yes                                                                    No

Yes                                                                    Value for money.




It could be done cheaper but standards would have to be monitored.
Care has to be of a high enough standard.                              Community structure.

Value for money.
Not necess – important.




In some cases, it may perhaps be seen that a private/public
partnership could work as an effective means to reduce costs to the    As indicated in my previous answer I would think that to
local authority. I would anticipate that there would be disapproval    completely privatise this service might meet with
from many should care homes be privatised completely.                  disapproval.
not if we are not ripped off by going for private provision.   yes.
Yes, providing the cost is less or equal to the private care home
costs.                                                              Yes.
No, go more private more money for care in the home for the elderly - No!!! Fort William should be considered a special case
private care has raised standards and often cheaper.                  and given
At table 6 said no, 1 don‟t know, 1 yes. Put some of the savings into
home care provision.                                                  Yes.
                                                                      Rural areas should keep their care homes and in this
Yes!!!                                                                respect

No.                                                                  Yes, the rural areas have to be catered for

As long as the level of care is maintained.                          Yes




Yes                                                                  Why can‟t council run care home as private
Yes                                                                  Yes
Yes                                                                  Yes
Yes                                                                  As above.
Yes
Yes
Yes
No. Likely more cost effective in the private sector                     Mix of housing and care in our homes

                                                                         Smaller care homes 6-12 beds in more rural
                                                                        communities would be the answer, however most private
                                                                        providers would not be able at the current level of
                                                                        funding £50 per week to provide such service. However
                                                                        if the council were prepared to fund these places higher
                                                                        than most private providers would be keen to provide. I
                                                                        also think smaller care homes (although not as
 No, build and sub-let or leave it to private sector who can provide    financially viable) are much more homely and person
same service much cheaper.                                              focused.



 Quality and cost must be competitive. Training must be built in to
providing service.                                                      Yes
                                                                         Geography and population distribution will require
                                                                        different solutions. Commercial, community trusts such
                                                                        as Lochcarron and council owned and run as a safety
No                                                                      net in remote areas.
Yes, because Council often deal with most difficult cases, not profit
making and staff better qualified                                       No
                                                                         Yes – Because the private sector are not interested in
No – let private and voluntary sector run them                          remote rural areas.



Why keep 17% of care homes? If unnecessary.                              If feasible to do so.
 How many are there? Why is there a discrepancy between the cost
of private care homes and council ones? What are the standards?
How are they inspected? As long as those who cannot afford private
fees are still cared for by a private provider, council do not need to run
them.                                                                      Quality! Liaise with NHS/Social Services



No. Give to private sector and monitor strictly.                        Yes

                                                                         How can the private sector do this more cheaply??
                                                                        People in rural areas should not be disadvantaged, so a
Under what circumstances should the council be the provider??           dual model might be necessary
                                                                         Why don‟t we close some schools in country areas and
As long as standards are maintained, No.                                turn them into nursing homes?



We have to where demographics show a need.




Yes                                                                     Yes
                                               Where care home provision is not attractive to the
                                              private sector, the council should step in and provide a
                                              service. Poor choice of venue as acoustics poor and
No – Where quality providers can be brought   very public space with through traffic!
Duthac House. Object to closure of home, care commission gives a
good report, council-run care home for the vulnerable for 210+ years,
ideally situated in town and not just a residential care home but a
meeting place and day care centre and respite centre. Service a wide
areas. Concern at upsetting elderly people, ahve a moral
responsibility to protect them and allow them piece of mind, love,
comfort and care.
Duthac House - commission report rates the quality of care and
support as being very good (level 5 of a max of 6) and rated as good
(level 4) for quality of its environment. This is the best report yet for
Duthac House and represents a job well done by the care staff who
are to be commended for meeting the individual needs of the
residents.
Yes, Council-run care homes such as Duthac House provide a much
better quality of care than private homes such as Wyvis House.
Capital investment in new homes can be postponed but the existing
homes should be adequately maintained in the meantime. Tain
Common Good Fund might be asked to assist in upgrading
equipment levels to make assisted bathing easier and to provide en-
suite facilities in a rolling upgrade programme over time. Closing
homes and transferring residents should not be considered due to the
likely impact on the residents‟ life expectancy. Operating costs can be
cut. Much of the cost of operating these homes comes from heating
bills. Oil based heating could be replaced by solar thermal heating in
summer and by willow or hazel coppice or miscanthus for heating in
winter. This would reduce the carbon footprint of the Council and
could be funded as follows:
Capital Cost:
A Community Energy Company could be established in each locality.
Assistance here would come from Community Energy Scotland. This
may well prove a better route as Partnership for Renewables (below)
seems to have a remit to make a profit which would reduce the saving
to the Council. Contact at Community Energy Scotland for Tain would
be:

Jon Priddy, Area Manager - North & East Highland and North East
Scotland
Tel: 01408 635102
Email: jon.priddy@communityenergyscotland.org.uk
or
Melanie Macrae, Development Officer - North Highland
Tel: 01408 635101
Email: melanie.macrae@communityenergyscotland.org.uk

I‟ve considered this from the point of view of the Old Folks Homes but
this solution is just as appropriate for council offices and for the
schools and their leisure facilities, particularly swimming pools.
Funding from the CARES stream is the source used by CES. Melanie
is the North Highland contact for CARES.

Assistance could also come from Partnership for Renewables, 12
Melcombe Place, London NW1 6JJ
T. 020 7170 7000 Contact:
We do not agree with contracting out of care homes especially in the
rural areas where contractors find it difficult to recruit staff. In our area
we are aware that staffing recruitment problems mean that some
contractors are unable to fulfil their contracts properly. We fully
support the proposal that care homes should be run by the Highland
Council in rural areas, such as in Badenoch, and that the voluntary
sector should only be given the opportunity to take on the running of
care homes where there are less likely to be staffing problems, etc.
We feel it is important though, that standards set for independent run
care homes should be no lower than the high standards found in
Council run homes.
I am a member of the Highland Senior Citizens' Network and was one
of the protesters when the Council was considering privatising care
homes. However, if money can't be saved any other way, I regretfully
have to say that no new Council-run homes should be built as long as
the money saved is then spent on keeping the community facilities
open.




• Care homes issue should be dealt with objectively based on local
needs and protecting public money.
                                                                       Continue council provision across Highlands as lower
YES. Private homes tend not to provide so well for residents or staff. cost = lower standards.
                                                                    Not convinced - what happens if private sector gets
No                                                                  monopoly?




Figure of £819 compared with the private sector shows either the
accounting or management practices require review. Could the care   A possible approach – provision where the need is
homes be operated on a franchise basis?                             greater.

No                                                                  No

Privatise




                                                                    Enhance support to rural areas to allow social enterprise
No, according to your stats                                         models to deliver services.
                                                                    In, general yes, but private provision should still be
Not necessary if standards can be maintained                        considered

No                                                                  Yes




Yes but concentrate on rural / remote locations                     See above



Yes with regulations                                                Yes
No, but still need care homes in either private or as a social
enterprise.                                                         Yes

                                                                    Rural provision vital
Duthac House.Have seen many years of wasteful expenditure, of
concern that has taken the current economic climate to address this.
Closure of many facilities would disappoint Highland residents but
closure of care homes would end the lives of nmany residents.
Homes mean as much to their residents as a person's own home.
Have already had the trauma of leaving their own home and have
taken time to adapt to new life and found comfort in now familiar
surroundings. Staff are dedicated and families have piece of mind.
Moving vulnerable elderly miles away from the famliar will cost lives.
Cuts are needed but keep homes open.




Grant House and ian Charles Hospital. Concern over future, many
locals put a lot of energy into keeping these vital establishments
going. Moved to Grantown in 1973 and decided to stay as felt safe
and secure despite advancing years - impressed by caring and
supportive community and key essential services like Grant House
and Ian Charles Hospital. Facilities very much part of the community,
staffed and run by local people and where local people can be
involved as volunteers. REsidents benefit from friends and family
being able to visit without having long distances. Care of elderly and
sick should be exempt from cuts. Want services to remain and to be
run for the good of the community and not solely for profit.
Duthac House - Closure of care homes would end lives of Highland
residents - the closure of one home is one too many - these are
homes to the residents as much as your home is to you. Many have
been through the trauma of leaving their own home due to ill health.
Moving vunerable elderly people miles away from their families had
been proven to cost lives.
Grant House and Ian Charles Hospital - vital establishments- unique
quality of loving care and part of the community.
If the elderly are reluctant to use what is on offer, so be it. But yes,
combining could be worth while, if the local voluntary services agree.
N/A in Skye.                                                           Not private.

                                                                        Staff in council run establishments are: trained &
                                                                        invested in, experienced & knowledgeable, wages are
                                                                        good & help to retain workforce, helping continuity of
No, unless no alternative can be found and subject to strict standards. care.

                                                                       Yes – if more choices available in areas of larger
No – private companies combined with voluntary to enforce values.      population, dependent on quality.

No – not necessary.                                                    Major cuts expected if all cuts are implemented.




No.                                                                    Yes.
                                          They do not here – why is there a big difference in
No necessary – care not to cut corners.   running costs?
                                                                           Yes - problem with this is do they cost less to run
Yes. If private providers will not provide in rural area, but need to look because the staff are paid minimum wage - in which
at provision in major centres.                                             case poor quality of care?

                                                                        Council should provide facilities only in remote areas
No.                                                                     where the private sector would not provide.
                                                                        Yes - as long as they are providing good services. But
                                                                        why does it cost more for Councils to provide as they
                                                                        should have economies of scale in terms of provision
Only in remote areas.                                                   given the size of Councils.



Yes x 2                                                                 Yes.




No not in populated areas.                                              Yes concentrate on remote areas.

No, Governing body should be in place to monitor private homes.         Rural areas are a priority. Yes



Yes. Care is much better.                                               No
                                                                        HC needs to make sure there is provision throughout
                                                                        whether it is run by HC or other. Where it is other there
Some.                                                                   should be space at a lower cost.
                                                                        Keep provision for rural areas where private sector could
Not necessarily – voluntary sector but not private.                     exploit.

Where the private sector can provide value for money services whilst Close Raasay Day Centre or lease to other
maintaining quality this should be considered.                       organisations.

                                                                        Lack of partnership working with NHS causes real
Maybe voluntary sector can do better on a not for profit basis.         problems with Social Work, increases costs, time delays.

Not if it‟s cheaper for others to do it.
For Inverness and larger areas yes but not remote and rural areas.   Yes – subject to minimum standards.
No – sell them on. Care Commission Inspection Report says private    Yes – encourage communities to become involved in
ones are often better than Council.                                  decision making process.

                                                                     It is certainly improvement to protect fragile areas where
Yes                                                                  private sector provisions would not be possible.
                                                                     Shouldn‟t be relying on private sector for care services –
Depends if they can be run competitively or not.                     needs to be Council or voluntary sector.

Wherever possible, care historically never seems to be as effective or Yes but standards must be maintained & vulnerable
efficient in private sector.                                           people protected. Remember, you get what you pay for!
No. Why is private care so much less to run?                   Yes

                                                               Yes if necessary. Though cheaper if privately run.
No privatise.                                                  Could the buildings be shared with other users?

Not all                                                        Perhaps
                                                               Private sector homes are a lot nicer & all should be run
                                                               to the same care commission standards, so should have
No!                                                            the same standard.

No – put them out to private sector. But what happens to the
vulnerable & what about funding.                               Yes – but need supervision of standards of care.




                                                               Yes. Cheaper to keep people in their own homes, is this
                                                               better value for money? Why do Council homes cost
Only where is no alternative get best care                     more to run than private ones?




Don‟t know                                                     Yes

No                                                             Yes



No                                                             Yes. Consider smaller homes being „privatised‟ too.
                                                             Yes but also see which are the best for our old folk.
                                                             Investigate why the homes cost more to run? Build the 5
Yes                                                          new ones.




No, not totally.                                             Yes

Not necessarily. There are lots of well run private homes.   Yes, cheaper often to keep people in their own home.

No                                                           Yes
Yes good idea
No.                                                                     Probably.




We need more information.                                               Yes.

Not necessarily.                                                        If the Council can provide a better service - Yes.


Same as answer for „care at home‟. (Currently rather „hotch potch‟ so
inefficient - need to have good standards/quality to ensure equity of
provision - have to ensure not „just for profit‟. Providers not end up
creating an expensive supervisory network i.e. cost effective? Better
„accountability‟ if stays with HC which should adapt to be flexible in
delivery but needs good staff. Group think HC should continue to
have role in providing care at home).                                  Yes.




4 Yes - 1 No.                                                           Yes.
Yes to ensure that facilities are available in RSL local areas. It is
important that Council provide a core service.                          In general - Yes.

                                                                        Why does it cost less to run homes privately? …. but
No it is more costly per person, BUT yes in rural areas only.           not necessarily as long as standards maintained.

                                                                        Yes, but as above (if there was an appropriate safety net
Can the private sector provide it cheaper?                              for the most needy).



                                                                        Run efficient care homes ourselves (Council). Note: The
Yes.                                                                    figures in ECS 23 are wrong.




Yes in principle.                                                       Yes.

Yes, if there was an appropriate safety net for the most needy.         Yes in rural areas only.
Council care homes should be sold off to the private sector. The cost
of £9.6 million for approx 200 places is wilful overspending and in my
experience they had less to offer than the private homes. My father
who sadly died this year spent some time in several homes and we
discovered that the council run ones(Ach an Eas and Urray House)
were below the standard of the private homes.

                                                                         Possibly but must ensure care provided by private or
                                                                         voluntary sector is same quality as existing Council
No answer                                                                cover particularly with respect to special needs areas.

Local Authority run                                                      Maintain and run by Local Authority

Yes                                                                 Quality should be same everywhere.
Council homes have better service. No profit. As opposed to private Council needs to keep its expertise in running care
home                                                                homes



                                                                         Yes as long as care homes are run well, standards are
                                                                         maintained and there are regular inspections and the
Not necessarily – why does it cost the council so much more?             residents are happy

No                                                                       Yes

                                                                         Agree private/voluntary sector to run homes where
No – but a much more realistic fee should be paid to the volunteers      possible and the Council to run in areas not covered by
and private sector                                                       private sector up to a ceiling per resident



In areas where there is no other provision – Yes. Otherwise if service
quality remains the same, go private!                                  Yes

No answer                                                                No answer
                                                                         We have a question about the private sector running
                                                                         care homes. They are seen as a profit-making
                                                                         enterprise rather than caring. Are private care homes
                                                                         properly regulated? We don‟t think so from personal
Yes                                                                      experience
                                                                         What about community organisations? Rural areas
We believe the documented cost comparison is misleading                  need council support
                                                                         Are Highland Council inefficient in that private care
                                                                         homes are cheaper but we must look after these care at
Yes, we have an aging population                                         home and our vulnerable in society



                                                                         Doesn‟t matter as long as they are cost-effective and the
Only in rural communities where there are no private facilities          quality is universal. Some private homes are terrible!
Yes Highland Council standards are deemed better than private            Not necessarily. Why do Highland Council homes cost
homes                                                                    more per person than private homes?

                                                                         The rates paid to the private sector are not enough to
No. Private sector can do it dheaper!                                    cover costs in rural areas




                                                                         One possibility – but possibly easier in urban area.
Yes.                                                                     Could look at “Trust” option for Grantown and Kingussie.
                                                                         Council provision should continue in these areas. Private
                                                                         care Sector is not necessarily of the same quality &
                                                                         small rural areas are less likely to be attractive to them
Yes but more efficiently.                                                (not enough profit)
Yes, unless well organised. May be not if we can do cheaper by
buying in.                                                               Council runs rural areas. Private in urban areas.
Keep a certain percentage to ensure setting standards & private
sector.                                                                  May need to.


Care homes: Do not put out to private sector. Do not reduce level of     Local authority have a duty to ensure provision in areas
service it will drive down standards. Keep within HC. Voluntary sector   where private sector may not choose to operate. Grant
not for profit – better service. Care commission can ruin by over        House is a good example where Council run home has a
regulation. Joint services – where are HNS? Supported Housing near       better competitive unit cost than many other Council
a care home & hospitals.                                                 homes (near to Private home costs)




Don't know                                                               Yes




Yes but the differences in costs between public and private should be
reviewed in relation to the service provided. Should not build any new
care homes
Not if they can be provided by other businesses to the same level and
for the same costs to the individuals.                                Yes.
The key issue here is not who runs the care homes but the quality of
the care provided and its accessibility especially to those most
at risk. If the council cannot compete with private companies to
deliver cost effectively the same level of care it should only provide
care where no alternative exists




The council should continue to provide provision in rural and remote
areas                                                                    Yes




                                                                         Yes. Lower costs might be achieved by employing
                                                                         immigrant workers on minimum wages. In private care
                                                                         homes staff change from week to week. Old people like
                                                                         to be looked after by local people with whom they have
                                                                         something in common. This is probably more common in
Yes. HC should not try and shed this responsibility. Private care        homes in rural areas than in the towns where there are
homes are first and foremost about making money.                         already many private homes.
II wholeheartedly support your decision not to build more public sector
care homes. The disparity in cost between providing places in the
private and public sector cannot be justified by the quality of the care
which is variable in both sectors. Focus your attention on ensuring
that you put people into care homes that are excellent in quality,
rather than worrying about whether the public or private sector is the
provider.
                                                                         Not necessarily true – private can deliver. Also develop
                                                                         good day care. HCVSO merging – coincide with
                                                                         Highland Council areas – recognition of social enterprise
                                                                         of 3rd sector growth for the 3rd sector. BID – biggest
                                                                         private sector employer – find a balance for businesses
                                                                         to flourish. Highland Council needs to look to out-
No comment                                                               sourcing – more flexibility – more opportunity




No                                                                       Go for independent homes




Edderton has no principle objection to all care homes being run by the
private/voluntary sector on condition that standards of care are not
allowed to fall. To this end we expect some of the savings made by
any transfer to be used to improve inspection routines.
                                                                           “Quality is the key issue, Council provision in remote and
                                                                           rural areas should be concentrated and controlled by the
“Yes in the wider Highland area. Nairn has no Council run care             Council. In urban areas we feel private and voluntary
home.”                                                                     sector could support”




“Care homes must be available. In Nairn private care is resulting in
issues due to moving patients.”                                            NO ANSWER
“Not if they cannot be run efficiently, e.g. Council is £819, Private is
£500.”                                                                     “Fair – as long as private sector cost is controlled”

NO ANSWER                                                                  NO ANSWER
“Where no private pension an efficiency saving”                            “Yes”
                                                                           “Agree. Businesses are less likely to set up care homes
                                                                           in under populated areas where there would be fewer
“Yes/No – No provided standards remained”                                  who would require services”

“Equality of service throughout the Highlands”                             “Give long leases to encourage private sector”

“Yes – I am convinced it is better value”                               “No, distribution across all communities”
“Not if the same service can be provided at lower cost with quality and
saving sustained long term”                                             “Yes”

“No”                                                                       NO ANSWER



“No”                                                                       “Rural communities to be Council run”



“Yes people are happier in Council run homes and staff are the best”       NO ANSWER

“No”                                                                       “Yes”


“Must provide for older generation, ie quality care homes from
Council. As a seaside resort area, swimming pool provides a life
saving skill, which is vital to this community. If there are no swimming
lessons, people will be unable to gain spaces at other pools due to      “Why does it cost £819 per person in a Council home but
demand, hence a lifesaving skill will be neglected”                      £464-£540 in a private home?”
“There are no Council run care homes in Nairn”                           NO ANSWER




NO ANSWER                                                                  NO ANSWER




NO ANSWER                                                                  NO ANSWER




                                                                           “Yes, if monitored very carefully. The quality of care is
“In remote areas, yes”                                                     paramount.”
yes
yes but with better assessments as some people are taking
advantage of this service                                                    no rural and central services should be treated equally.


                                                                             It depends on the quality of care provided. If the Council
A lot depends on the definition of a care home. Too many both local          can run family homes in ordinary houses for looked-after
authority and private sector simply provide a roof over their heads for      children, could something similar not be done for older
the residents rather than any quality of life. My own experinece with        people in rural areas? There are many large houses
family members confirms this but there is an excellent article on this       with one elderly resident living a solitary life - could such
topic in the current issue of Saga magazine. If staff conditions under       properties be fitted with stairlifts and other domestic
private sector operators were of a lower standard than those offered         scale adpations to enable people to stay in their
by the Council would the quality of staff applying for work in the care      communities, supported by local care staff If care homes
homes deteriorate? I would not like to see a situation where the             were put out to the private sector how many companies
employees are either mainly immigrants with little English therefore         or organisations would be willing to provide small
unable to communicate with their clients however good their                  facilities in rural areas to enable clients to stay close to
intentions or other people with no genuine interest in their work.           their friends and communities?




The discrepancy in weekly costs between the private and Highland
Council run care homes requires further explanation. There is either a
disparity in quality of provision or management practice requiring
appraisal before any decisions are taken. If the private sector is able
to provide the same level of service as Highland Council but at almost
half the cost the Council should review its management of these
facilities, not with a view to closure but to improve its operating costs.

The community has a responsibility to care for older people within the
community, particularly in areas where private provision is not
expected to be viable
If it‟s costing more to run care homes, why are they? (Private sector
profit)                                                                 Yes - focus on voluntary sector than private.




Smaller buildings and more of them - is that cheaper than fewer large Which gives the best quality service? – choose that
buildings?                                                            option
Retention of Council-run care homes are probably essential in remote
and rural areas (80% already so provided), where private / voluntary
providers are 'thin on the ground'. Attention should however be given
to lowering the temperature in care homes where it is feasible for
inmates to wear more clothes.




Bigger care homes and fewer?




Run by charities - but would be an inspection responsibility?




Care homes must remain; adequate home care; needs assist

Aren‟t privatised care homes cheaper because they pay minimum
wage which will have a negative knock-on effect to care
I agree with the concept that where the private sector are willing to
build and run care homes that it should be left to them to do so as
long as the standard of care they provide is being monitored by an
Independent Assessor. I think that the Highland Council must
concentrate it's effort and provision of care homes in the remote and
rural areas where the private sector will not go.




don‟t understand difference in costs between private and Council
care. Concern at loss of Council care homes as perception is that the
quality and caring environment is far superior.
No shouldn't run care homes but need to continue doing in rural areas
The community council in the interests of the community would like
assurance that the following services are protected -Telford Centre
Care Home also offers care at home and day care for the elderly in
the community. There is a duty to provide for and take care of
vulnerable adults within the community. No cuts should be applied to
this service, a study into how efficiently we cany it out is required in
order to make permanent savings yet continue to or improve the level
of service provided. Included in the Highland Council budget
consultation process was the idea to involve the communitv in such
services. Prior to the Telford Centre being renovated our local
community were very active in this area providing voluntary help
weekly and some local fund raising. Highland Council in there wisdom
decided to stop that involvement.
Need to make sure that deaf people get acces to interpretation no
matter who runs the home.
Doesn‟t matter who runs as care commission standards but need in
rural areas as not good when elderly placed away from home and
family. Provide where nobody else wants to provide, also a way of
being more efficient. As with the Joint housing list, care homes
should be a mixture across the area
                                                                         Certainly keep council provision in those areas where it
                                                                         is unlikely to be challenged by private sector. The ideal
                                                                         situation in my view is to keep the elderly in their own
                                                                         homes, surrounded by familiar objects & friends/ family.
                                                                         This must be supported by a service which is above all
                                                                         reliable & gives the client (horrible description) full
                                                                         confidence that they will be well cared for. It is imperative
                                                                         that the vulnerable & elderly people are cared for to the
                                                                         highest standards. Politically, i detest the "cherry
                                                                         picking" practiced by private companies who are in it for
Is yes, one has to ask where will they be situated?                      substantial profits




Petition in support of the retention of Duthac House and the desire to
consider each care home individually - 2523 signatories
Can we change how we provide day care for older people?




Yes, and there is capacity in the areas which has added benefit of bringing
different age groups/generations together.




Yes - Support for village halls. Options need investigating and partnerships
need developing

Yes providing the appropriate infrastructure is in place.
What about other models e.g Cambridge which has premises which is multi
use.
Yes - Make better use of the centres for social purposes, i.e. elderly people
coming to centres for lunch and social events.



Yes by using otherwise unoccupied buildings like community halls etc.




Yes providing facilities are suitable
Explore further to find out what would be provided

Yes




n/c
No comment




I don't see how. At present the day care centre in Portree is doing an admirable
job and is much appreciated by those who attend.
Yes
Day care for older people very importnt and should be priority,




Change is always possible, but more information needed to know whether the
change is better than the status quo
yes-fewer centres.
No comment




Agree to cuts




care must be taken not to slim this down for a vurnerable group in society
Too vague a question. Change it how? Increased social interaction between
all members of society and especially older people is important.
In my opinion, there is not enough day care for older people!
Yes - prioritise
The only outside contact for many in rural areas
This may be an area where voluntary organisations could help




Not if the purpose is for people living alone to socialise with others
Yes



Disability access would be a problem




no

If day care stand alone buildings then yes we share other facilities in
community.
No! Because day care is so much more than a lunch club! People are
assessed and have personal care provided – who would do all this at a lunch
club?

Duthac House provides day care and Alzheimer‟s care.

Seems to work as it is in Easter Ross.




We could use facilities if available and of good standard.

It‟s the quality of provision not who does it.
New build add ons?




In what way? -As there is no indication of any future plan or type of change to
the provision of such a service this question is effectively nonsensical as of
course you can change how you provide day care for older people, but without
indication of how it may change, or the impact it may have, it is impossible to
make a viable assessment of changes to the provision of such a service. (On
a personal note, this indicates to me the lack of forethought and planning which
has gone into making this questionnaire, which is hardly likely to endear future
decisions with a similar lack of forethought to the public....wouldn't you agree?)
Depends. Many older people woudl not manage a long journey to another
centre e,gk brora to Tain.
No structured, standard day care facilities are needed for clients.

Day care should be provided in-house and run by the council.

Where there is appropriate building, resources, etc. again there

Yes

Yes, more multiuse of facilities eg. village halls




Yes
Care at home
Yes
Yes
Yes




Yes




Church Halls, Community Centres




Yes – area primary schools could be the facility.

 Yes the Library! Especially Culloden.
 Yes, use community centres, halls, libraries instead of stand alone day care
centres as long as these are up to standard.



Yes but utilising other buildings.




Greater emphasis on family responsibilities for care of elderly relatives but
might also have sufficient support from existing Doctor/nursing centres



Yes




 Use other facilities; community centres/schools/church halls.
 Care in the home as opposed to a Care Home would be preferred by many
people.
 These buildings are set up for a wide range of activities; this likely would not
be feasible/desirable; Private companies might only focus on profits and not
provide the variety needed.




Use existing facilities e.g. culloden library
Where possible, this should be done out of facilities such as community
centres, churches etc.

Making use of community halls and leisure centres could work, but not bringing
services together. This is simply a way of closing down services. Changes of
venue are no use if the travel is further or more difficult.
No, this should continue to be provided in Duthac House for Tain & Easter
Ross but we can reduce costs as discussed above.
In rural areas it might well be impossible to make alternative provision for day
care due to the lack of suitable available people to provide them or
organisations to run them.
taking away care would affects older people and their carers - maybe could be
done better in different more integrated settings but unlikely to be a money
saver.
Probably scope to use schools and other community buildings.




The only day care we are aware of in the Ward supports people with special
needs

Yes

No




Lunch clubs etc in local community facilities

Yes – e.g. Dornoch

Already in community complex. Yes



Yes – Helmsdale Community council Centre and Timespan assist in this
already and could do more – at lower cost, but not at no cost.



Yes, use spare space in schools

Yes
Schools/ community centre / libraries/ village halls/ community halls rather than
stand alone
Day care centres are important for keeping social skills in the broad spectrum
and provides multiple services under one roof very efficiently.
All community resources should be used, there are already examples where
provisions for the elderly is placed alongside other community services e.g.
children‟s playgroups, mother & toddler groups etc. This is often of * benefit to
integrating provisions for the elderly with the life of communities too, the elderly
are isolated.



Communities could be doing more.

Does not seem possible – what other places in the community?




We have few choices.
Look for areas that already provide good value & replicate their practice
elsewhere.
Yes as long as accessible and other groups are using.



Yes. The important thing is the service not the buildings.



Here you say use community centres for day care in question 6 you say close
community centres.
Only if it could be guaranteed that such valued provision would actually take
place. Are there examples from other areas of local people (and older people)
running own day care.




Yes x 2.

Yes - use more local facilities e.g. community centres.
Staff required. Proper facilities not always in place. Problem of transporting.
Would be excellent if we could have Mackenzie Centres throughout the
Highlands!



There may be problems with using other centre. They might not be suitable.

Make better use of existing buildings through integration & joint working.
We have robust H&S procedures for our centres, community resources would
need to meet some standards i.e. water testing, risk assessed, fire regulations,
electrical checks etc.



Yes – involve more community groups & voluntary, bridges generation gap.

Encourage more people to attend, fewer groups, higher attendance.
A lot of older halls are not to a sustainable standard or lack facilities for older
people e.g. toilets, kitchens, heating, access.
Keep Tigh Na Drochaid as it‟s a valuable asset to the community. Let other
organisations use building.
Yes, pubs, hotels, school halls, community halls.
Improve social inclusion if people going out & meeting more/different/new
people.




Older people look forward to a day out, chances to dress up, be fed, social
interaction, hairdressing, advice/information – day centres are essential.

Yes – but must be DDA compliant.



No.

Yes.



No – “getting out” in the company of others is critical to wellbeing.
What other places do you suggest?



Yes provided proper facilities are in place for different users.

Yes probably
Should be combined like Station Hotel for lunch, swim in Alness pool, Bingo
Westend community centre, taken out to library. Encouraged to be taken out
i.e. group shopping.




Yes – lot of private homes run day care. Use village halls – libraries etc.

Yes, as long as it is funded properly and transport to get these funded. Utilise
existing space better. Provide support for communities to do this.




Possibly

No



Yes. Community halls/schools Hotels? Needs funding + transport.
No Change.




Yes – various options – community halls etc.

Help with some village halls but this only reduces expense for one year.

Not sure of question
Not in rural areas.




Yes, suggest multiple uses of village halls and local churches?
Doing it already. Could make more use of existing elderly
facilities/resources/buildings.




What is meant by day care services in this question? Depends on level of
need and skilled help available.




Yes.

Yes - only when adequate alternative available.



Perhaps care homes should be more utilised for day care wherever possible.



Remote areas may not have other places.



Yes - use hotels, lunch clubs, local halls, but if special care required then you
need day centre and transport.




N/A.
Again only if standard of care is not compromised.

No! Continue to be run by Council

Need proper Day Care facility
Community Care facilities need to be more flexible and multi-functional to save
on duplication of buildings and services




Community may be preferable as long as sufficient facilities can be provided

Yes




Yes – make more of commercial use of residential/nursing facilities




Yes – but must have suitable access

No answer




No. Who is going to staff them? How would they be adapted? Would all
volunteers need SCRO checks?

Yes



No we need more care centres as they in the long run reduce costs



Could we use community centres e.g. Mackenzie Centre, schools, public
buildings for lunch clubs, company, support, speak to someone

Yes. Maybe village or church halls. Explore all community facilities



Yes




Rural areas really difficult. Day care respite for carers. People need to be
accurately assessed so can get correct care.




More practical in urban areas than rural areas.

Can it be linked to residential care?
Use Boat of Garten Community Hall for some activities. There must be some
possibilities for more use of some facilities provided they meet access, health &
safety standards.




Day care: work with voluntary sector. Use the towns halls more.




Don't know




Could be provided by voluntary sector and merging of services for elderly with
other social and educational functions which would lead to savings on both
sides
I don't know enough about how the council runs day care. I only know that it is
extremely important. Yes, by all means try and get more activities in local halls,
community centre, libraries etc - which also has the advantage of keeping
these facilities viable.
The key issue here is the outcome not the way in which the outcome is
achieved. The impact claimed is that more people will
benefit benefit at a lower cost. If we can be satisfied that more of those most in
need will benefit and that non will suffer a loss of
service which render their ability to function as autonomous individuals then we
should follow this strategy and this will depend on
the total impact of other cuts suggested




Using halls and community Centres should be investigated




Instead of reducing services provided by care homes to day visitors these
should be increased to make better use of buildings, facilities and staff by
providing meals and activities for residents and pensioners from the community
under one roof.
Why not if the facility meets the standards – explore this! Example –
community gardens in Forres.




Edderton thinks the quantity and quality of day care should not be allowed to
drop. We believe that the voluntary sector may do a better job and back any
initiatives in this area.
“In Nairn we are presenting using different venues. Daycare should be
integrated with other community facilities, but resources would need to be
spent on making facilities fit for purpose. Some funding would be required from
the Council”




“Possible co-location of services – library, museum and community centre”

“It is important to provide this facility – make other savings somewhere else”

NO ANSWER
“Only where facilities are suitable and available”

“Yes because the same service can be provided in multi functional community
centres rather than stand alone buildings that are used for only one purpose”

“Yes, amalgamate, generations should mix and use buildings – maximisation”

“Yes, make use of community facilities and schools”

“No”

“Yes”



“Yes”



“Village halls and care homes could be used for lunch clubs”

NO ANSWER




“Buildings should be used to maximum efficiency”
“Make better use of community centres”




NO ANSWER




NO ANSWER




“Yes, more use of existing facilities, e.g. community centres and more use of
the voluntary sector within the community”
yes consider more community and volunteer partnerships




There is scope to make more use of community initiatives, perphaps provide
day care at village halls and give them income, rather than running specialist
centres. Many of the schools whose rolls have been falling might also have
space that could be used for day care, and both the old and the young could
benefit from the inter-action.




Although it is stated that older people are reluctant to use services that focus
on age or incapacity, isolation in a small community can contribute to
deterioration in health.

One of the alternatives to day care centres is to use local facilities, such as
community centres, for activities encouraging older people to remain part of the
community
· Make use of existing community centres




Use Young people to help (they can get achievement/volunteering awards for
this – ie MV Awards, YAA, DoE). Would improve young/old relations.
Young people teaching seniors about new technology




Lower volunteer age to 14 (check levels of responsibility)




Part of young people‟s coursework/ Schoolwork etc
In rural areas care for elderly is very important
Need to encourage more people to get involved in activities. We don't know
what day care services exist, Coucnil information for deaf people is too difficult
to understand. It needs to be in plain English.
• Perhaps a parallel with “link” drop-in in Nairn. People value the building and
it‟s purpose, would not want to use community centres.
• Use day care facility for other groups and generate income
In some areas this is possible but, as ever, physical constraints make for
difficulties. Many village halls now have improved access which allows fo
wheelchairs etc. Many halls lie empty during the day while others have several
rooms which allow for misuse
Can we reduce the number of swimming pools, community centres, museums and libraries?




Continue development of community libraries and delete separate school librarian posts.
Closure of small libraries would have a knock on effect for community halls retaining rent income e.g.
Helmsdale
Yes, in areas that have so many but no for other areas who have no public transport to allow for other
options.
Can't make a decision on whole area again one size does not fit all, carbon footprint effect on travelling
further distances. Continue Bookstart service.

Libraries should be sacrosanct. Internet seems to be over provided.

Retain the one on the North coast.
Place all 4 Inverness Community Centres on the same financial basis as all others in Highland (£1,000
PA) save £421,000 pa. Close Alness and Nairn pools. Reduce library opening times by 10% and less
frequent mobile library visits

Swimming pools in Caithness-Wick & Thurso should remain where there is over provision, pools in close
proximity should be closed. Pools help keep society fitter. Stop funding community centres in Inverness.
Maintain village hall grant scheme. Councils should enter partnerships with communities to provide
museums. Integrate libraries into existing schools
No

No, they are lifelines




These should not be lumped together - there is no strategic approach here.
As a former employee of Highland Libraries and a Chartered Librarian I am horrified at the proposed cuts.
In rural communities, libraries play a vital role for the elderly and young. The school library service has
already suffered massive cuts - removing more school librarians (will you also close the nearest local
public library too?) will affect the cultural wellbeing of young people. Removing the BookStart budget will
also be detrimental to providing access to books before children get to school. The combination of these
cuts will affect library provision to communities at all stages of their lives. CILIP (the professional body for
librarians) is urging members to lobby prospective MPs in the forthcoming election not to make cuts to
library services - I intend to join in this campaign. Highland Council will be making a huge mistake to
close so many libraries and reduce opening hours - in customer surveys longer opening hours were
always asked for. Approve these cuts and you will be reducing people's access to free information and
cultural resources.


Possibly, but we could certainly reduce the staff employed, particularly relief staff in libraries such as
Dingwall, where there always seems to be a lot of staff standing aroung gossiping. I have even heard
some of the staff saying that there were too many staff on duty. School librarians, who are school staff
and not public library staff and whose money comes from school budgets could work part time ie the
school year plus 1 - 3 weeks - this could save more than the sum proposed. Smaller schools could share
school librarians.




Horrors! Are we all to stay in our homes, staring at TVs or computer screens because the Council has
closed or reduced the number of external stimulation and activity available for its population? Or is it that
we should revert to the 'old days' when people had to make their own amusement? - I think not, those
days are long gone. You can't halt progress.
keep Inverness Museum and Art Gallery but SIGN IT BETTER,




Tain only has one swimming pool for the whole community. It should not be closed in fact it should be
improved and brought up to date. The local children use this for learning to swim. It is a busy pool and
needs to be kept.
Many local libraries are only open part time now and provide access to information and computers as well
as books. My local library is certainly always busy and if it were closed I would rarely be able to make it to
another library in a bigger town. Reducing the hours in all librarys would be better than closing some.
Yes




Yes if there is justification they are rarely used.




No, reducing the number of facilities available is not the best option. People pay council tax - what for?
For streetlights and to have bins emptied once a week? We need to feel that the money we hand over
comes back to us in some way. If it means raising council tax a little, then maybe that's what should
happen. Of course nobody wants this, but nobody wants their swimming pool/library/community centre to
close either. We have to make a choice.


In Inverness, the capital" of the Highlands these things are essential for the tourist industry. What will we
have left if they close down? As for the Community Centres I think it is absurd that this is even been
considered. We have done so much to try to keep the kids of the streets and to give them an alternative
to hanging about and "causing trouble". What are they going to do if there are no local facilities for them?
They certainly wouldnt go to another community centre because they would feel that they have been
taken out of their comfort zone. A Community Centre does exactly what the name suggests
Absolutely NOT. We have no community without these institutions. They are vital. No way should you
close Nairn pool. Look at other ways of reducing costs - increase prices - I would be happy to pay more.
Allow other organisations to help run them. Extend services to make them more cost effective and attract
more customers - engage the public to help make suggestions. Why do we have a waiting list for
swimming lessons when only a pathetic number of children are taught in a corner of the pool making snail
pace progress which is even worse since the recent revised programme intorduced by Highland. Can we
not save money on the re-tiling - does it really need to cost £170,000? Nairn museum could engage with
public more and run fund raising events.




It's possible; usage (that is supply and demand) must be ablanced.
no-these are valuable resources that give quality of life to all especially the tax payers.
Reduce the number of museums, as these are a luxury. The others are more necessary
NO. It is inconcievable that when we are all being told to become more active and to get fit and healthy
that you would consider to take away options from the public of where to go and join in in activities. On
top of that you wish to take away art & cult




No. This is the last thing you must do and the comments in the above also apply here.




Possibly but remember how vital sport is as part of a childs development and community centres and
leisure centres keep youngsters occupied and off the streets.



Swimming pools are too vital a resource for a life saving skill and to provide a healthy activity for young
folk. They are also used by GPs to encourage a healthy lifestyle and cure all sorts of aliments from the
mental to the physical. The govt is keen for us to adopt a healthy lifestyle closing this resource wont help




probably, where closing libraries could they be relocated in the local academys?
No my reasons are if we reduce all these centres down their will be to much anti-socail behavour and
nothing for kids to do atall we need more things open for this anti- socail behavour to stop in all our
places. DO NOT SHOUT DOWN OUR CENTRES OR LIBRARIES DOWN,as we have to go on
computers for job search and for important e-mail to families and for writting our c.v's out. The museums
are for children and older people and people who come of the cruse ships learn about Scotland and other
usefull information. We OF INVERGORDON don't want any of these places Shut Down. Please dont shut
down our local pools as people use them for theropy for older people and for kids to learn to swim and for
disabled children/people, so we cant shut down swimming pools either here.
No. There should be no withdrawal of a vital resource.



Yet another example of disconnected thinking from Highland Council.

Nairn NEEDS NAIRNS Swimming Pool.

Nairn NEEDS NAIRNS Library.

These were not gifts bestowed upon Nairn by Highland Council These facilities were in place for many
many years before Highland Council was imposed on the people of Nairn and they DO NOT have any
right to remove them - find another way. Improve, diversify, promote to increase usage.

As I sit here in the Library I see at least twenty people using various aspects provided.

It is through bad management that the HIGHLAND COUNCIL have found themselves to be in poor
financial shape and as a result it is expected that the PEOPLE have to suffer at the hands of a failing
bureaucracy.

NO WAY should these facilities be closed. If anything needs to be closed look closer to the seat of local
government and close down the overpaid under-employed so called Council Executives that have not
demonstrated any talent to organisation or leadership.


We were recently in Inverness for a few nights.

We managed to visit the Museum.

This was one of the few museum visits that we really treasure and love to recollect. The layout in the
space is very good as is the range of topics covered. The level of the displays was just right and we were
impressed by the availability of further material.

Even though we are pensioners we thought the interactive exhibits were super and we treasure the
rubbings of pictish decorations that we were able to bring home down south to Bristol.

It would be a shame if this well thought out museum were to close


I am a staff member at a local church and we were dismayed to find the possible closures to some
community centres. We do however appreciate the councils budgetary predicament and would like to be
part of the solution. We would most favour community groups running such sites, and we in particular
would like to look at such a solution where we could part run a site, not as a church but as a community
resource and increasing the activities there. Please get back to us.
Copy of message sent to several councillors: Dear Councillor - I write to you on the subject of library
budget cuts, as a retired senior professional librarian from Aberdeenshire. You should be aware that one
of the most appreciated services provided by local authorities is the public library service, and making
cuts to staff and services is not one of the beter choices made by councillors. Aberdeen City tried to close
some libraries about a dozen years ago, and were inundated with objections from ratepayers. They had to
re-open one closed library, and provide an alternative service in another area. However, they did
eventually listen to advice and the reopened library offered additional services, some of which the users
paid for. I would urge you, then, to reconsider your options regarding the public library service. Simple
cuts in opening hours do not save much, as basic running costs will not alter. For how long could the
service operate with a much-reduced book buying budget? What possibilities can staff offer for reducing
operating costs? Are there fee-paying services that could be added with the existing staff numbers? Can
the overdue fines system be increased to bring in more income? Should there be a charge for
reservations and requests? Would users be willing to pay a small annual subscription to support the


I have been made aware of the economic necessity being exerted on you to curtail expenditure and the
possibility of the Badenoch Branch in Kingussie being on the danger list. I would like to add the following
to all the other views I 'm sure have been made to you:

Having retired about ten years previously and through trial and error discovering all the 'necessities' of
advancing old age, before buying a house in Newtonmore we had three important requirements to watch
out for - a good library (for me): a good flat golf course (for my husband) and reasonable public transport
in that order. We found all three here in Newtonmore and would be very disappointed to lose any. (The
library moved to Kingussie. That we could cope with but would certainly not welcome a longer journey to
Aviemore for instance.) We also feel that Kingussie is the true heart of Badenoch with a reasonably
settled community and a central position both from Dalwhinnie, Laggan and beyond Aviemore whereas
the latter tends to have a more transitory population.
I am Chairperson of Ardersier Community Company. I feel disappointed betrayed at the proposal to close
local libraries. ARDCO's willingness to take over the Old School Hall has been rattled. The rent that the
library would provide the project is imprtant for the running costs of the hall. The feasibility study which is
being carried out in the community will show whether the project is viable without the income from the
library. This proposal has in effect put ARDCO's whole proposal in jepardy. As a board we are trying to
improve the facilities within the community not concentrate on fighting for the few that we already have.
As a long time Tax payer and Council Tax Payer I know the necessity for financial restaints at this time. I
notice that the Library (Nairn) may be under threat.

After a Lifetime's work reading technical books I retired and formed an Over 50's Book Group (in Argyll)
reading Classical or well known books. We chose the books and met each month. We had a memorable
and wonderful time and have remained friends for years with the Group. I have read that depression is
reduced--so benefits are widespread!

I think the Library Service provides the whole community with education, information and entertainment
and is a cornerstone of civilisation. Since retirement I have been transported in time and place by
visualising the contents of good story books. I can't speak highly enough of this Service.
I am doing a Computer Course on Philosophy that has an Essential Reading List and the Inter-Library
Service has provide excellent help.

I would recommend that there should be no cuts in this pivotal service. I think all support and alternatives
should be considered if there is any threat. I am sure many would be prepared to pay for book
withdrawals or contribute voluntary time to help with staffing.
Please do everything to conserve this essential Service--the loss would be irreparable.




Closing or reduced hours of opening of community facilities, has
   the usage of the centres in terms of who uses them and the
   frequency of use been considered? Without taking this into
   consideration the net effect on the residents could be a disaster.
   What will the effect on tourism e.g. local museums?
Close swimming pools if there is another one near by. Or come up with better ways of providing heating -
if ground source heat is available for example. Perhaps reduce opening hours rather than close
altogether or consolidate libraries within community centres. Close any museum unable to pay for itself
through admission charges. Museums can be run by volunteers - don't reduce grant funding to them
though. Which idiot thought a new museum in Inverness was a good idea when there was a small fortune
spent on upgrading the existing one the year before? Get rid of them!
I live in Golspie and believe the swimming pool, community centre and library are an essential part of the
village. We don't have a museum. As for library provision - I believe this should be combined with school
libraries (Dingwall has a lovely new school which includes the local library - a shining example of how
things could be.)
Do we really need local libraries/ a mobile service ? Virtually everyone has easy access to books these
days. Can't afford to buy new - go to a boot sale. Set up a book swop in your local community. Kids get
can get books through school libraries. Museums - charge an entry fee. If that not acceptable, have a
Highland resident free or minimal charge pass scheme (like Highlife). Charge visiting tourists.
Community centres. Most communities have to rely on a pitful £1,000 village hall grant. Why is HC still
paying the running costs for community centres particularly in Inverness? What are the total costs?
Lack of diversionary facilities and opportunities for people including sport
Impact on community cohesion
Impact on responsible citizens and children
Closure of swimming pools will take away an opportunity for people to learn to swim which can affect
community safety in particular in a water rescue situation
Closure of the Spectrum Centre may have less impact on community safety as it is less community based
Preference given to change in ownership rather then closure
Use schools instead of separate community centres
Increase usage of community centres by public sector for meetings, seminar, training and conferences
rather then hotels and other private premises
Make facilities more accessible to groups to increase facility use
Community/Leisure/Libraries - The proposed cuts in this sector would not achieve significant savings -
taken as a whole they constitute a very small proportion of the council budget. Attempting such savage
reductions in anything remotely culturaljust because they are deemed to be soft targets is cowardly. If
there must be a reduction in the libraries budget, a small reduction in opening hours would be preferable
to closing any of the libraries. You should instead start charging for use of the heavily used computer
facilities at the libary - this happens elsewhere, and could be easily administered by levying a flat-rate fee
for each session.
The internet is reducing the need for libraries, these should be reduced if possible.
No to closures - temp reduction in hours until the budget acceptable once more in the future.
Unless they are in close proximity for all.
For instance Broadford library is only 15 mins from Kyle, but if you live in Elgol or the Sleat loop road it is
a great distance to Kyle, and as most South Skye people shop in Broadford it is appropriate to maintain
the library there.
No


In response to the suggestions for making savings here are my comments.
Closure of some facilities in order to maintain others - the libraries serve remote areas where there are
few facilities and great distance to travel to the next library

Reduction in opening hours - many rural libraries already have reduced hours and this would end up
reducing numbers of borrowers and items borrowed even more.

Using public buildings differently and more flexibly providing services and space for different needs and
groups - this is a sensible idea for all departments within HC. It already works well in some communities
ie Lochcarron

Transferring the management of some facilities and services and leasing these to not-for-profit
organisations - may work in some communities especially if services could be combined with other
organisations or facilities

Increasing charges for the use of facilities - not something that would work for libraries. The concept of
free access to books is something which people hold dear and this would serve to drive them away

Other options to consider are a pay freeze (something which is already a reality for many), deletion of non
essential posts, reduction in the number of high level posts.
Reduce opening hours, cutting those times which are least used over the past year.

This won't be enough so look creatively at "using public buildings differently and more flexibly providing
services and space for different needs and groups".

We probably have a lot of buildings which only get used for a narrow range of purposes, activities and
times. Even more so when my first suggestion is implemented! More so again if we "close some facilities
in order to maintain others".

e.g. Schools that remain after any closures will be even more vital as community hubs, so we need to
ensure their resources are made best use of. Make sure that these places in the community do draw
people together.

There ought to be no significant financial gain from "Transferring the management of some facilities and
services and leasing these to not-for-profit organisations". If it would be cheaper then we should be
examining why. Our in-house services should be run as economically as anyone else can do it. Managing
facilities with volunteers and local committees carries risks including financial ones. So make sure they
have competent support or keep it in-house and efficient.

Increasing charges is a slippery slope so don't go there if possible. Public services must be as equal
access as possible.
increase council taxes. In this way, the vulnerable members of our communities would be more helped
than penalised. All your exisiting online suggestions have their advantages and disadvantages BUT your
online consultation process seems a bit like inviting the general public to „rearrange the deckchairs on the
Titanic‟ in light of the likely gap between Highland Council‟s income and expenditure in the next few
years.

Closing so many libraries in rural areas will have a severely detrimental effect on the local communities
who use them, particularly in areas where community facilities are so few. I have anecdotal evidence of
elderly people who are very upset at the thought of losing their library, as it is the only social contct they
have with other people.
Replacing the closed libraries with a mobile service will not be the same. The mobile fleet was reduced
several years ago as a result of another cost-saving exercise - will the Council add more vans - I doubt it.
The only alternative would be to revise existing routes, which would tax an already stretched resource.
Mobiles cannot offer internet access either. In remote communities, the library may be the only place
where those who do not own a computer (and yes, there are still plenty!) can access the internet for free.
If you reduce opening hours this will go directly against the feedback given in the most recent library user
survey, where respondents said they would use libraries more if they were open longer.
Ask other authorities who have 'out-sourced' their library services to non-profit organisations if it has
worked for them.
Cutting the BookStart programme and deleting School Librarian posts will effect library provision to young
people at the most formative stages of their lives.



Several decades back I came to the Highlands to help create and develop a new publicly funded
organisation - called Highland Craftpoint. History will determine whether that initiative proved worthwhile;
so, a kind of declaration of interest.
What I would comment however is this: services and provision like (but not exclusively) galleries and
museums simply aren't created easily or cheaply; they perform a particular kind of role in a developed
society, they are assumed to be there for all manner of good reasons that are easy to identify, in an ideal
world they are nurtured and provide on an on-going basis, amazing stimulus as well as moments of
important reflection or enlightenment to visitors. In difficult times is is all too easy to shut them down or
damage them beyond recovery.

My first main point therefore is to ask for recognition that it is so easy to close and so difficult to re-open.
This should be a key realisation.

My second point would be that local values and ideas should be allowed to blossom. Should a
local/regional community know of a better way to make a key resource work more economically, then
those ideas should be fully explored.

My third point is that most communities strive for 'good things', something that will put a spring in our step,
make us feel humble or valued, attract great art works or visitors from afar to our part of the country. This
short term cuts are all too easy to make to cultural activity when in the same budget as education, but
remember the Danish decision (in a time of national economic crisis) to increase taxes, cut service costs -
but ring-fence culture as that cannot be replaced once lost. Too many cuts have already been made to
this sector in the last round; area arts officers, cultural co-ordinators for schools and, before those, music
tutors and visiting arts teachers. Rather a cruel irony 3 years after celebrating Highland Culture?

Your introduction recognises that independent cultural organisaitons can run more efficiently - they can
certainly bring on more money to the area - eg Timespan Museum and Gallery, Helmsdale, brought in
£17 for every £1 from THC's (very small 14k) core grant in their last accounts - you'd be challenged to find
that investment anywhere else. For that you get - preserving and employing 10 people p/t and attacting
visitors in an economicaly fragile area, engaging vulnerable people and children in creative work that
inspire and grows confidence, preserving and understanding the built, natural and cultural heritage of the
area, and brining the best of local,national and international art (and artists) to an area where there would
be no access.

Placing independent museums as an alternative to Inverness Museum or Highland Folk Museum is
indefensible - it is no more thinkable to have no museum / gallery in the City of Inverness than to lose the
independents. THC should develop a more strategic approach to funding culture in the future, and
maximise the range of benefits they get for so little cost (1.1% of budget on your figures to the
independent organisaitons/open grants); assessing the range of benefits and appropriate funding levels.


I feel reluctant to participate in this process because I feel that it pits Highland Communities against each
another. What goes/ The Floral Hall, Wick Library or Nairn Swimming Pool? I just feel where one
community succeeds another will suffer.
There is a school of thought emerging in Nairn that you have managers paid very good wages and they
should simply mangage and come up with 10% cuts for each department and that councillors should
have the courage to decide on cuts too instead of instead of hiding behind this consultation process.
Whatever, Nairn is obviously demanding that its Swimming Pool survives this process. Perhaps the
budget cuts leader would like to have a quick browse of the 2,199 strong 'Save Nairn Swimming Pool
Facebook group'?
http://www.facebook.com/pages/SAVE-NAIRN-SWIMMING-POOL/106163849419778
What does the Highland Council spend our money on? If cuts have to be made I am of the opinion that
cutting funding to Libraries and Cultural venues like museums is the worst possible road to go down after
cutting funding to help vulnerable people in our society, especially the elderly and disabled and those on
low incomes. Highland Region has a rich cultural heritage which has to be safeguarded for the future.
What happens to the collections of our independant museums and heritage centres if funding cuts force
them to close? How do people who visit this area find the information they are looking for if archival
material is all kept in Edinburgh? What will there be left to draw people to visit our area if all our visitor
attractions disappear? The Highlands north of Inverness is already in danger of becoming a cultural
wasteland but if these cuts go ahead the situation will become critical. Heritage centres, Libraries and
service points along with local Post Offices and Community Centres are the nerve centre of our
communities. They are meeting places, information and advice centres, places where people can develop
their potential, providing internet access, workshops and courses and countless opportuities to broaden
our horizons. Life is about more than just having good street lighting, cutting grass verges and regular
rubbish collections. Turn off every second street light in the Highlands. Only cut grass verges if absolutely
neccessary and encourage more recycling so that we don't need so many rubbish collections. I'm sure if
we put our minds to it we can find a way to make savings without impoverishing life in this region for years
to come.


I would immediately take swimming lessons out of the High Life scheme. The High Life scheme is already
very good value to families and I remember when it was introduced families could not believe that their
kids lessons would also be part of the programme. With significant waiting lists for swimming lessons,
there would be no doubt that there would be a huge increase in income for the council by charging High
Life users for these lessons. I am sure the drop off in High Life Membership would be minimal.
It would have been preferable if,instead of a budget consultation exercise internally conducted,THC had
chosen to commission an independent Audit to examine expenditure throughout the Council.That would
not only have had the advantage of avoiding the risk of partiality and vested interests being taken into
account but could also have used the opportunity to review top-down process,staffing structures,asset
and revenue management etc.As it is this exercise has been narrowly focused at the Service delivery
point end of The Education,Culture and Sport Dept budget.If as is likely, in the very near future further cut
backs will be required in Local Authority expenditure,it would make sense to conduct such an Audit
sooner rather than later.
Closure of libraries,Community Centres and Swimming Pools and the withdrawal of funds from Museums
and Heritage Centres should not even be an option.These facilities between them form the
social,educational and cultural identity of the Highlands.They are the bridge between formal and informal
sorces of education and recreation. Quite apart from that closure will probably adversely affect tourism.
Despite the revamped street scapes in Dingwall and Inverness,not every tourist wantsto go shopping and
where else to go on a cold rainy day?
As has been very ably said in this blog,once these facilities are lost it will be very difficult if not impossible
to replace them.
Whatever options the Council eventually chooses,there must be parity-small communities such as those
in Muir of Ord,Invergordon ,Cromarty and Lochcarron will be disproportionally affected by the loss or
reduction in opening hours of their libraries.In addition to the traditional use of libraries for educational and
recreational purposes,the libraries are increasingly becoming social service centres providing hard copy
materials and internet access which help , jobseekers,house hunters,debtors,benefit
I would like to comment from the perspective of Chairman of the Board of Directors of one of the
swimming pools currently subsidised by a discretionary grant received from The Highland Council.

1.Given the time and energy required to discharge directors' duties by community volunteers, there would
appear to be significant potential savings for the council in handing facilities over to communities to run
these for themselves. However, there are concomitant risks: securing a board with the required skills is
no easy task, as boards of not-for-profit companies have many serious responsibilities to discharge.
Whilst the individual's financial risk is only £1.00 per head: failure of the enterprise has real and serious
implications for the community.
2.If the council transfers the management of some facilities and leases these to not-for-profit
organisations there will still be a need for these new boards to have access to informed professional
advice on a range of issues. Obviously, some support can be obtained via web based sources, but the
requirement to operate within OSCR requirements makes obtaining (for example) legal advice, an
expense for which it is not easy to budget.
3.In our particular case, we appreciate both the discretionary grant (approximately 45% of our total
income) and the development support we get from other branches of public service. We are proud that
we can argue that we play our part in helping the council achieve eleven out of the fifteen goals in the
Single Outcome Agreement (SOA). In other words, to a lesser or greater extent we contribute to all the
goals, excepting only numbers 2, 8, 9 & 15.
4.As such we believe we offer the council an excellent return on its investment in our facility through our
service level agreement.
5.The economic recession has had a very significant negative affect upon our operation. Any reduction in
the discretionary grant we receive from the council would seriously damage our ability to deliver our
It is indeed indefensible to pit Highland Council‟s two museums against the 18 independents, as if a
comparison could easily be made.
The entire Highland Council Museums‟ Service costs £1.5M, only £261,000 of which goes to the 18
independent museums, not simply as grants, but in exchange for a high level of service. By any standard
this represents phenomenal value for money – core funding of £14,500 per museum per annum allows
each museum to deliver a valuable service in its community.

The Highland Museum of Childhood in Strathpeffer brings over 22,000 visitors per year to its site – all the
visitors spend goes straight to the local economy. However, despite a high level of commercial effort with
income from tickets, shop, rents and other small grants, the museum‟s fixed costs last year were 50%
greater than its income – this is why the core funding is necessary.

I have heard it said, “Why not just give the funding to the really needy museums, those with reserves can
spend them.” What? We run a tight ship and only have reserves because of careful stewardship. We
need them for contingencies like major repairs and legal fees. Spending our reserves on fixed costs
wouldn‟t last long.

It has also been suggested, “Why can‟t the independents just be run by volunteers?” Well they can, and
we all value the time and expertise freely given by our volunteers without which we could not operate. But
there comes a point where paid expertise is necessary to maintain professional standards, meet
bureaucratic demands and inspire innovation. I believe every independent museum needs to employ a
museum professional. The core funding allows this.

The Highland Museum of Childhood has just completed a capital-build extension to grow its highly
popular educational programmes for schools and adults, reminiscence groups, mental health groups,
etc., and to develop collections‟ work. All the objects in our collections have been donated by people from
the Highland community. The principal funder of this new building is the Heritage Lottery Fund, with
match funding coming from a variety of sources including trusts and public money. Construction work was
carried out by a local firm. The development of this project was only made possible by the continual vision
and effort of its paid professional supported by a voluntary board and voluntary staff. If our core funding is
withdrawn this educational programme will be jeopardised.
No! These are vital services especially in rural areas. They help bring communities together.Museums get
volunteers from the community working together and add interest to small towns and encourage tourism.
All of these things provide a real service to the community and should be kept. THese are the positive
things that the council provides for us. Scapping them is not the answer to our financial problems, it would
save such a little in monetary terms and loose so much in community terms.




No - it is essential for everyone's well-being that they have a life outside work and in retirement.
Swimming pools are essential to this and the proposal to close the one in Nairn is outrageous.
Not in remote rural areas, perhaps in towns.



No – they are whole community facilities




Increase voluntary help to maintain current services.



Combine library with school.
Increase Highlife costs to save pools? Community centres try and use village halls/church halls where
possible/available to reduce number of community centres. More use of mobile libraries if economically
efficient.
No – we live in a rural area and if these facilities are reduced it will impact on the education of our kids at
a local level. Also the huge impact on their health.
Independent museums receive a very small amount of funding and provide a high level of return in terms
of attracting visitors to the area who spend money with local shops, hotels etc.
Reduction should be favoured above stopping but not reducing the service within a building (i.e. still
keeping buildings open and reducing the service) but reduce the buildings that are open – i.e. close some
buildings make multi use of those buildings that are kept open. People will not care whether their Pilates
or anti natal class or night class is held in health centre or the library or Duthac Hall or school as long as
the class is held as long as the capacity is there.

Each community needs the above facilities – suggest restricted hours + more voluntary help.
Not close. Reduce hours, increase charges – possibilities.
Does not matter who runs facility as long as they are run well.
No. Quality of local life.
In short, no. Given the fact that swimming pools, community centres, libraries and museums are vital
resources, some with vital impact upon life skills (swimming pools), I would anticipate that the reduction of
such devices would, at least in part, raise the number of tragic deaths seen in the area in future.
As a former lifeguard, I certainly understand the importance of our children being able to learn to swim,
and as a result I feel quite distraught that such an idea is even given consideration. I have written to my
local MSP (Jamie Stone) indicating my feelings on this matter, and would be quite happy to forward my
email to all members of Highland Council as I anticipate that such vital services, given the necessary
expenditure that they incur, would be likely targets for reduction.
Any such reduction would of course likely lead to tragic circumstance and public outcry....Should you wish
a copy of my email, please feel free to write to me at: [ email address deleted ] and I shall forward my
email to you. I am likely to write to the Chief Executive in any place to express my shock and dismay over
any such reduction, and would, if such services are removed, consider the members of Highland Council,
the Chief Executive, his depute, and all other individuals complicit in the removal of such devices guilty of
breaching several articles of the European Convention on Human Rights, and would certainly consider
As a regular visitor to Caithness (my Dad's family is from the area) I was horrified to see some of the
proposals for cuts to council run services, particularly the museums and swimming pools. The county of
Caithness has such a rich heritage and its history is surely a very important tourist attraction. To be able
to find out so much about this history at such well-maintained and interesting museums (Caithness
Horizons is just one brilliant example) is fantastic. Losing any of these museums would be a tragic loss.
And how can anyone be considering cutting back on swimming and reading??!! These are vital activities
for children (everyone in fact) and to lose out on the services that support these would be disastrous,
particularly in a country where levels of obesity are increasing and standards of literacy are dropping.
Thank you for taking the time to read my message.




As a disabled artist living and working in Caithness I feel that disabled people are already excluded from
equal participation in community life due to the lack of access to public buildings. Any further cutbacks will
imprison disabled people in their homes in a manner reminiscent of Victorian times. I understand difficult
decisions have to be made but it must not be the marginalised and disadvantaged who have to make the
sacrifices. Disabled people have a lot of skills and experience to offer to the wider community but are
often prevented from doing so, eg Wick Library and the Fergus Gallery are not wheelchair accessible,
many school buildings and community halls have dreadful access and facilities. I'm restricted in my work
as a community artist due to the lack of basic disabled access to most public buildings in the Highlands
and have encountered shocking levels of discrimination amongst public employees. However, some of
the museums on your list for possible budget cuts offer excellent facilities for disabled people and are
positive examples of good practice, eg Caithness Horizons and Timespan and it is essential that these
venues are not lost but expanded. If we move backwards and not forwards in disability awareness and
provision then it is not just the disabled individual who suffers but society as a whole. Access and equality
No. Or very minimally. The most important thing to do is to reconsider how these resources can be used.
They all play vital functions towards the health and social support of vulnerable people in our
communities. Their outreach projects often provide more for disabled people locally than any Social
Work/NHS provision. I believe the arts/culture are hugely important in their own right, as well as for
tourism and other aspects of our local economies. But in this time when cuts are inevitable, and Highland
Council maybe can't look at the bigger picture, but has to just look at its budget - factor in the role of these
cultural resources on your Health & Social Care costs. Make more of what these resources can offer.
There are skilled, dedicated and creative people working in museums, community centres etc who if
pointed in the direction of increasing their input to vulnerable groups could contribute to big savings.
Libraries- would be better to reduce hours at some libraries if that meant would not los libraries altogether
in some areas. Keep museums but look at opening hours, voluntary assistance, charges- could charge
for Inverness Museum unless you have low income
Yes.




I am just writing to register my dismay at the proposed reduction in the number of swimming
pools,community centres,museums and libraries run by Highland Council as part of the attempt to make
budget cuts.
These are all excellent community facilities which enhance the quality of life of those making use of their
services.If any closures go ahead then this will disadvantage most the poorest in our society who are
unable for example to buy books instead of borrow them from a local library or to travel a distance to an
alternative location or to pay to join a private health club.
I feel that ther must be a way for the council to retain these vital community facilities.The benefits of
locally available facilities cannot be merely measured in monetary terms as they contribute to the
wellbeing of the individual and the wider community.I know that difficult decisions have to be made but I
would ask that the council think long and hard and seek alternative solutions to closure.
Travelling library to provide better services.

Public toilets to have better opening hours – no reduction on toilets

Close pools where there are sufficient facilities close by

Create a better entry fee for museums.

Community centres which are used by young people should not be




Population centre should be treated sensitively.
Please do not take away the swimming pool – people from 1month
Swimming pools – keeing open within 20 miles.
Community Centre – utilising the facilities and promoting it.
Libraries – Caol Library uncessary.
Yes to libraries
Yes to some lesser used community centres.
NO DEFINITELY NOT – extend library opening hours.- extend the
No
This requires careful review
No
Swimming Pools & Community Centres – Yes
Museums & Libraries – No
Must be reduced level of service across the area. Scoring system. Some areas more disadvantaged.




Reluctant. Usage of swimming pools needs to be monitored and audit of usage collated then perhaps
we would be able to see which ones are not being utilised.
 No – there is too little infrastructure already – they are hubs in the community. Museums important for
visitors which support the highland economy. If the council want to cut service costs by delivering online
they must keep library access open! The 19 independent museums are not named and no supporting
detail has been given in the support document.




No

No
 Create more shared facilities; look at opening hours for libraries; retain swimming pools for health
reasons; community centres could be run by the community; opening hours and staffing.

No! Essential services for all of community for access to books, computers etc. Raise money for
Centres by utilising buildings to maximum.




 No! Museums and Libraries are sacrosanct. Unacceptable for the council to be proposing a cut of over
25% to the museum provision and 15% to the Libraries provision

 No but upgrade museums using donations of collections from collectors, make it more interesting and
charge an entrance fee. Libraries and community centres are valuable resources.




No

Swimming pools: preserve the facilities but transfer running of it to someone else.



Community Centres: Preserve as above, as used by most vulnerable.
 Museums: Withdrawal of funding could be small amounts of money compared to associated tourism
income generated by them; but perhaps the idea of trusts could be explored? Realise Culture a “soft”
option.
 Libraries: Savings generated by option compared to proposal small – not worth losing the facilities for the
amount saved.
 In large centres, Yes. Many available in shopping centres etc.
No, swimming pools are vital unless others are nearby e.g. in a local school. Libraries are essential
providing more than book loans but also for reference, internet access etc.
 No. In a recession, people need places to go for cultural/leisure pursuits that are low cost and located in
the heart of their communities. In addition, libraries are a statutory service and should provide high
quality facilities. To cut these back further will compromise the quality of delivery of these services.
No, but we can cut their operating costs as discussed above. Swimming pools should be heated by solar
thermal panels in summer and by biomass boilers in winter fuelled by coppice or miscanthus. Perhaps
people could be encouraged to donate books to libraries and to school libraries once they have finished
reading them?
Please don't close any community facilities, i.e. community centres, libraries and swimming pools. I make
a special plea for Culloden Library which is well used by various organisations as well as a library, and
they always have something special for the local schoolchildren. It has also just had a new roof and
recently the kitchen was upgraded and disabled access put in. It is a lovely light, airy place to visit.




I write to express my support for Hilton Community Centre to remain open. If it closed it would be a blow
to the heart of the community around the Hilton area and the wider area. At the very least, this centre and
the other ones could remain open for the public to hire premises via a keyholder/cleaner if the council did
plan to pay staff off.




• Could remove some services but need to think about vulnerable
• Things like libraries easier to be provided by communities as “feel good factor”
• Are all our communities equally sustainable??
impact upon community wellbeing if remove in longer run – false economy? Access - critical when
considering what services changes need to be made
o Need to think about relocation before complete closure
NO. These services are vital for people's health and well-being.
Swimming pools – no; museums – yes; libraries – close 4 of 6 in Inverness and keep rural libraries open
Swimming pools – no; community centres – what facilities would replace existing community centres?;
Museums - yes but what are the proposals for heritage centres? Will community support enable future
survival?; libraries – criteria for closure is completely inadequate. Where travel facilities using public
transport do not allow access to equivalent services provision, the criteria have to be reviewed. E.g.
residents in Dornoch have access to 30min services to Tain unlike residents north of dornoch. Closure of
Dornoch potentially releases building

No to reduction, but could be better utilised

No

In rural communities it would be difficult to close community centres as they are part of the schools
Helmsdale model should be used as an example. Each place should be looked at individually to see what
the costs and benefits etc are. Must consider the logistics on closure e.g. swimming pools. Why has
Inverness got 6 community centres. Are they owned by the Council?

Mothballing; put museums in storage; postal libraries / mobile libraries + reduce visits

Yes in city areas, no in rural
Yes but a more strategic approach needs to be taken. Arrange contracts with organisations to deliver an
appropriate amount of services in return for investment. Look at each service, individuals in relation to
distance / travel hours. Don‟t cut all funding to independent museums, essential small community
services - worst case 10% cut.
Level cut across all museums. Independents are good value for money with huge volunteer input,
supporting tourism and culture. Swimming pools – No; Keep community centres within schools where
possible.

No

Value added of museums to be a factor
Is reducing the number of community centres, swimming pools etc the key here or should we be asking
how to get these services to generate enough income to sustain themselves? Take the Floral Hall for
example. Lovely place and the only garden in Inverness. But it could offer a lot more.

There are currently no horticultural courses on offer in Inverness and by that I don't mean degree courses
but short courses that any person with keen interest in gardening would benefit from. From propagation,
compost making, organic pest control, to soft fruit growing and pruning these are courses that would be
popular if reasonably priced and delivered by the right individuals. There could be weekend courses or
slightly longer courses depending on the subject.

We wouldn't need a degree trained tutor in a suit and tie for this, just an experienced and friendly
gardener who would like to pass his/her knowledge to the public.

The Floral Hall can also be used as a venue for gardening related workshops like garden crafts for kids or
garden design and if there is a tranquil room available for hire with good views to the garden maybe it can
be hired for yoga classes or workshops.

As for the swimming pools and the travelling time being the right criteria, I would say that usage is more
important. If you had the choice between paying a bit more to use a facility near you or pay less but travel
for half an hour to get there what would you choose? I would choose the former because travelling =
money (petrol, bus fare and inconvenience).
No – they keep people well & keep a community strong & educated.




No – we could use these facilities for other things – community centre – multi-purpose buildings are key.



It would be preferable to reduce opening times/days.

Each area should be taken on own merits.

Don‟t close Broadford Library, it provides the only free internet access (via 1 computer only) for the
Broadford & Strath area, yet Highland Council assumes most people have internet access.

No
Swimming pool not relevant.
Longer term impact in terms of e.g. health (exercise, mental wellbeing) of reduction.



Here you say close community centres in question 5 you say use community centres for day care!




Yes, but must be minimised.



Dependent on level of use and state of buildings.
Not a popular decision to cut these services but it depends on their use and efficiency.

Reduce funding; Yes review provision of Community Centres in Inverness; Museums - support the
independent sector. Charges at main museums. Close one major urban library and reduce library
opening hours; Closure of swimming pools with a travel time of half an hour between existing pools


Reduce support for community centres in Inverness; Do not close the archive provision in areas,
centralisation is bad because there is then no local input, interest, pride or community spirit . Reduce
library opening hours by 10%, literacy is essential to life - it affects every area. Need to keep all
swimming pools open, travelling costs for many people suffering financial problems. Raasay Day Centre -
keep. Encourage increased use in day care centres. Staffin Respite Unit - keep open.
In certain circumstances if more than one in … area.
If facilities are reduced there must be a measure made to ensure that young people can make healthy
options. Reduce library hours. Yes - floral hall, community centres should be run well.



Seasonal opening hours.

No; Problems with Scotland‟s health, this will get worse; keeps young people out of trouble;
Libraries/museums help young people learn.

HC provide support to C.C to help with grants.



If there are libraries with close geographical locations then yes.



Archive facilities – could they charge for services.
Perhaps the nature of provisions within libraries & museum services can be more integrated in an effort to
achieve savings.
Save money by targeting Bookstart to parents & children with a genuine need e.g. I received 3 packs for
only 2 children! Play at home packs not used properly.

In urban areas where journey to next nearest facility is shorter rather than in rural areas.
Not in Skye, expand Portree archive rather than closing.
Yes to museums/libraries, no to swimming pools/community centres.
All community centres should be community owned & run.



There should be parity across the Highlands – in other areas too i.e. Plants!
Yes but that‟s quite sad – kids need to swim & exercise, we all need to read & learn from books,
communities need to have somewhere to go to meet & blether, museums are where we learn about our
history & other peoples cultures.

Community centres could be transferred to voluntary organisations & given the same grant as village
halls.
The Portree archive must be kept – it provides a local service with local records & knowledge which
would lose its relevance if transferred to Inverness, moving it would discourage donation of material by
local people.




Not in rural areas.

Vast majority of people depend on these facilities.



Essential items for strong communities.

Not in Portree/this area.



Yes – in areas where it could be done without creating excessive travel distances.

It would be a dishonour to our past and our future to close any of these.
A lot of these places are vital to a lot of poorer families as most have no means of transport, and not
much money. It would cost lots of money back and forth to take their children to further away venues!



No!

No

Some will unfortunately have to go. Keep Alness area till new Alness/Invergordon Academy open with
energy saving pool. Trust status not for profit.
Definitely no swimming pool closures this is mad. Retain support independent sector. Support Inverness
Museum but not Folk Museum. Libraries are so important. Look at better income generation. Always
show on media DVDs etc. Do not mark for transfers.




Yes



Yes Inverness has a lot. Charge a higher cost + charge for parking there (people can walk).




Swimming Pools – No; Community Centres – No; Libraries – No; Museums – yes.
No to pools. Due to huge waiting times for lessons you can‟t. Could the schools combine libraries. It is a
coastal town, 2012 & 2014 > Olympics/Commonwealth.
Pools – if the Council can‟t run them look at local trust status – pools are well used but not open enough
now. Community Centres – possibly – maybe smaller facilities. Museums – greater use of volunteers
and not for profit organisations. Libraries – possibly.
Incorporate Museums into existing buildings. Likewise for libraries etc.

You can not use 1/2 hr travel time between pools as the key criteria for determining whether pools should
close. The criteria should be in relation to the levels of deprivation in each area and numbers of
population the pool serves. “Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation 2004” Ross & Cromarty 49,655.
Population in 20% Data Zones most deprived 12,595 – 25.4% of people living in most deprived areas.

No

Only very very carefully.
no escpecially in the rural areas. These facilites are vital to the villages. many of the rural swimming pools
are community run not HC run- maybe the ones in the towns eg fort william leisure centre could also
generate some income themselves through local fund raising like the rural ones have to
Maintain facilities but reduce hours.




We do not have a swimming pool but we do not wish to see the library hours reduced or closed.

Definitely not in rural areas.




Generally yes but again difficult in rural areas where there are no other facilities. Introduce higher
charges for museums and charge for library books.




No.

No make better use of these facilities of multiple uses.



None in Torridon area - essential to maintain mobile library at current level.
Swimming Pools - Yes under ½ hour drive apart; Community Centres - Yes in relation to 6 CCs in
Inverness; Museums - Keep local museums; Libraries - reduce library opening hours and posts in urban
centres, make libraries more electronic, charge visitors for internet.

Swimming pool review - fair enough; Keep museums - we endorse fully the „Statements of Support‟ and
reasons behind retaining the current funding - limited though it is; Cultural heritage and economic impact
consequently would be too dire to contemplate. (Fewer „tourist nights‟ in area).

Libraries - use school libraries and make available to community, organise mobile library to complement
and supplement static libraries. Schools open in evening, weekends and holidays. Pay for internet
access; Keep swimming pools - activate communities to fund pools i.e. collection buckets in supermarket.

No.
1. Swimming Pools: Yes where there are clusters. 2. Community Centre: Looked at 1:1 basis with
rationalisation may be cut. 3. Museums: Impact of cuts on museums is far greater than the savings - a
loss to the Highland economy of c £3M per annum. The loss of the culture is immeasurable. 4. Libraries
- a % cut.
No – all essential to communities and vital to hold communities together.

Do not reduce numbers but increase charges for use.

No
Capital funds spent setting up these facilities would be wasted by closures so cuts in opening hours and
running costs instead
No swimming pools should close; underused libraries should close; museums should not close, we rely
on tourists and tourists need museums and archive centres. Local people deposit collections, in
particular, Archive Centres for the local population; collections which are meant to be in Portree should
not come to Inverness. Can the facilities of a community centre be accommodated nearby?
School/church hall?

Yes



More positive management to run these centres could help make them more efficient and encourage
local support
No reduction! Can we change the way we run them instead? Absolutely not acceptable to reduce
number of libraries. Museums are important for education and our culture. Swimming pools – can we
explore more efficient ways of heating etc? Could they be run as social enterprises or community
businesses?

No answer




No for swimming pools; No for community centres; maybe libraries – computers have taken over

Yes



NO

Reduce hours by 10% or museum opening on certain days; Community centres – no in Inverness to 6
community centres; Would like to “help” run community centre but not on our own; Need good quality
workshop on what communities could run on their own; many elements of what we are

These are all essential parts of the community. Pools, museums etc are used by tourists



No but charge more for using these facilities

I believe libraries and museums should be kept, community centres run themselves



It would be nice if we had them! Library facilities are essential.

Higher charges for facilities rather than close them. Re-instate charges when they have been wained. Is it
correct that whilst THC would close down owned museums would it not be prudent to keep open &
charge people entry fees and to run as a business? Marketing & profitability could improve income.

No.
Not in rural locations as there aren‟t many in Badenoch (comparatively speaking) also if closures take
place the facility is likely to be lost irrevocably.




Keep teenagers facilities. Museums (see extra notes) Not close two & keep one open! All educe HC help
& make up difference privately. Closing Highland Folk Museum would lose 40 jobs.
Increase charges. Reinstate charges. Why remove tourist destinations. Museum trust. Libraries provided
another close by or mobile service to replace.
Folk museum – keep it open – introduce a charge. ? Bring in volunteers. Aviemore people want a
swimming pool over all.



Some libraries could be community run. Highland Folk Museum must be kept! But you could charge
entrance.




Community centres etc. Cut budgets not close – it will never re-open again – reduced hours of opening.
Combine libraries into community buildings. Spread it equitably. Better management of existing facilities.
Trusts for museums. No swimming pools to shut down
If there is another swimming pool within 15 miles / half an hour travel time, yes. Otherwise no. Integrate
local libraries and / or museums with schools where there is existing space.




Closure of facilities. In general this should only be done as a genuinely last resort. All other possibilities
should be examined first. Closure is the easy option. Before doing that, consider: a) charging (or charging
more) for use; most users would prefer this to closure; b) cutting paid staff time; c) cutting staff pay; d)
sharing building facilities; etc. Most people would prefer a cut in hours to the loss of a job. Facilities and
organisations set up at public expense should not be lost lightly.




No, , closure not acceptable. Savings should be made by reducing hours and/or increasing charges.
Floral hall invaluable, opportunity for training for adults with learning disabilities.
19/5/10 museums, libraries and swimming pools All of these facilities are important for a well functioning,
physically and mentally healthy society and of particular value in rural areas. If there is to be a reduction in
provision, perhaps this could be managed within the city of Inverness where travel is much easier than
between rural centres. I do not support a reduction in the provision of museums or local archives. These
are crucial in the understanding of any community, or area; they are important for the tourist trade and the
museums we have in Highland are excellent. Perhaps a small charge could be made or donations
encouraged to maintain them.




No. The proposed cuts are decimating culture, leisure and learning, and I am absolutely sickened by the
way we think that this are extras. They are fundamental to our society.

Libraries - I declare an interest here (I am relief asst librarian), but I think libraries are very important to
communities. Aside from the obvious source of books and entertainment, the libraries also provide
internet assess which is so important to people these days, especially in the remote areas. Did the
council not get funding to promote internet for just this purpose? If you close libraries this is lost. The furor
which has been raised about library closures shows how these too are valued. By all means explore how
to integrate libraries with other services - service points, schools, post offices, museums etc. Explore
opening hours. But keep them!
The closure of museums libraries will have a significant impact on the richness and quality of life
experience of members of these
communities In all cases alternative community based solutions for keeping these open should be
explored first

• People should have access to swimming pools and travel time to a facility should be a consideration.
• All village halls and community Centres should be run (with a small grants £1000) as happens in remote
areas. Communities should take this responsibility if the want to keep these facilities
• Cultural issues should be worked more closely with the Private sector sharing facilities.




No, these are fundamental to the general well-being, health; education; culture and basic quality of life of
our community. Some are Council owned and run some are community owned and managed and
Ullapool Museum for example is community owned and managed but fund assisted. Rural villages have
already lost many Banks, POs, petrol stations, shops and pubs. Some facilities might be able to share
premises – eg museum and library.
Alternatively the library could be put in other facilities such as the schools or even local privately-owned
facilities. Why not have a local library in the local hotel, along with the public toilets. Indeed why not pay
the local hotel to provide their function suite for community use? There are not enough examples of the
public and private sector working together for the common good. Yes the hotel might make some money
out of it, but they also employ local people and it might help them keep their hotel open during the winter
months, thereby providing a better service for tourists and improving the quality of jobs in the service
sector. There are many opportunities for providing libraries, or other services in local areas - in the post
office, the church hall, the local shop. Our local co-op is already offering second hand books for a token
amount in aid of charity - and every jumble sale or fete in the local area has a book stall. Libraries belong
to a bygone age when books were incredibly expensive and people earned less. A quick glance at the
people using our local library shows they are largely middle class people or children. I think you also need
to take a long hard look at our community centres - I believe that many of them are a thing of the past.
Again why not work with the private sector to see if you can offer community access to classes and
leisure activities, rather than paying for expensive buildings that are not always used.
Assess the level of use – consider outsourcing; senior Highland Life fees – increase? Level of activities
and range of activities – funding levels to each Community Council



Run similar to Spectrum – Go limited by guarantee –run by volunteers. Highland Council building. Hilton,
Spectrum, Merkinch – stay open but review opening hours and each take care of a smaller centre.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Well, it doesn't seem fair. Nairn is already rubbish and taking all that
away would leave Nairn with nothing. So don't.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think they should try and keep swimming pools etc., so loads of
hardworking people don't lose their jobs.
Nairn swimming pool and Library:I am unhappy about this. It's a loss to our community.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: It is not good and it should not happen.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I believe the proposed budget cuts are barbaric as with the cut in the
facilities for the hard working-class man and student will tempt the bored people into low level crime and
the cut in waste collection will make Nairn into a mini Baghdad.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that it is really stupid about what your doing and it's not right. A
lot of people use these facilities and it keeps us off the street.
Nairn swimming pool and Library They shouldn't be cutting highland music tuition. And if we don't have a
pool or library, I don't think Nairn can really offer much else to young people.
Nairn swimming pool and Library I think that it would be awful to lose all the stuff that is great for Nairn. If
the swimming pool, library and youth work is gone then Nairn will be boring. People need the library to
study for exams and without it we won't get good grades.
Nairn swimming pool and Library As a young person, I feel such amenities are extremely important to
keep in Nairn and will eventually boost the economy if left to do so.

Nairn swimming pool and Library Don't you dare close theh leisure facilities because they keep kids off
the streets. Also, whatever happened to being healthy? Now people are going to get fat. Hope you happy!

Nairn swimming pool and Library This is rubbish, we should cut down on things that don't apply to us.
Nairn swimming pool and Library I think the idea is terrible. Lots of people us the pool and library and
although I don't use them at the moment I would still like the option to.
Nairn swimming pool and Library I feel that the whole 'idea' is completely unfair. If you take cuts from
education you take cuts from childrens' lives and plans for the future will not be the same.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: It will be terrible without the swimming pool.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel that it will be hard on outgoing people but I think we will all
manage.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: What I think is that instead of spending money for this area, you should
spend the money for poorer areas because we already have too much and I just think it is right to help the
poor.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't think you should take away these places because people will
lose their jobs.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel this is gonna leave a memory I will never forget. How everything
was so different.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Absolutely no way. I fyou take away everything, what will the children
have to do?! They will be on the streets making trouble. Is that what you want? The Aquadome is 30 mins
away. What if we fancy a swim after school?

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Many people won't have a chance to learn to swim or go to the gym.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Try not affect the swimming pool. And you might improve the museums.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Nairn will be boring as nothing to do even though I don't even use
these.. Ha ha…

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I understand cuts need to be made, however, there are ways of making
cuts without closing local services, eg close swimming pools for two days a week would save money.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel not pleased they should not affect the swimming pools and
libraries.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: My sisters go to synchronised swimming at Nairn swimming pool and if
that closed they could be devastated.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: It won't be good because there will be nothing to do.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think this is one of the worst things that has happened to our local
area.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Keep our leisure facilities because is no swimming there's nothing to
do, so keep them.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel let down since there is more people coming into Nairn and it
seems weird that they would close down the swimming pool.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: You should not shut things down because many people luse the pool
and library and if you close all that down, what will people do? Workers will lose jobs and it's not fair.
Many people enjoy this stuff and many people are against this.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that they should get rid of most museums and libraries but keep
swimming pools and don't do anything to education either.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Keep the swimming pool, close the library.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: If all that gets cut there will be nothing for the children to do in the
holidays and at the weekends.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think this is outrageous, getting rid of the pool and libraries. I myself
am a swimmer and enjoy the use of the pool, and I'm now in 3rd year and I'm going to need the libraries in
future.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Don't because we won't be able to go swimming or anything.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't approve of this idea because there's not that much to do in Nairn
but since we have the opportunity to go to the swimming pool, it makes it a lot more fun. I don't think you
should take these things away because people like to use them.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's unfair if there is no library or swimming pool. No tourism it will drive
Nairn away. It would be a ghost town. I joined the campaign to stop Nairn pool closing and I signed the
petition. It shouldn't be right.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Not good because I go swimming often and its not fair.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: To be honest, it's ridiculous! Nairn will be a boring place and the pool
etc is good for holiday makers etc. Also, how can they cut our education? And stop collecting rubbish.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Angry. Most of the cuts are happening outwith Inverness. This is not
fair. Inverness is not the only place where things should be available. Nairn is a tourist town with hardly
any facilities available so when tourists visit Nairn what are they meant to dissapointed

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that if you take away the swimming pool you will lose the putting
green as well. So Nairn won't have anything for children and Nairn won't get as many tourists.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think its not fair to cut these things away from a tourist town like Nairn.
Everyone loses these places all the time.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It means there will be nothing in Nairn for young people and children to
do.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't think they should cut on all of the items on the list.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't think that this is good. Especially theh swimming pool cause it's
the only one in the area and I ain't going to Inverness to swim.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think its not fair for the tax payer because there paying more for less.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that Nairn without a swimming pool means there won't be much
to do in the holidays. And even if you don't always use it, it is amazing.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I go to the swimming pool twice a week.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think closing the libraries and swimming pool will just give more
reasonsn for teenagers to become unfit and the most of people will stop reading and teenagers will play
more video games and become anti-social.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Things we do in school make it more interesting to learn. Pools are a
great way of keeping fit. If you're to cut the budget Nairn would have to travel to Inverness just for a
decent swim.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Lots of people wouldn't learn to swim if swimming pool wasn't there.
Also we live beside the sea so it would be safety practice.




Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't go to libraries or museums.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Wouldn't make a difference as don't use any of these things anyway
and Nairn is already boring and can't really get any worse.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel bad about this because I go to the swimming pool and is very
good and lots of people go there. I will lose my education a bit. I'm not happy about it.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Annoyed!!! Because we don't have enough as it is in our area.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's not very fair - they should be putting money towards these things
(maybe they should shut up).
Nairn swimming pool and Library: There will be more teens on the streets and it won't be good for the
school if they have to make cust and we might not learn so well.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel that this is just another way of the council boosting their pay check
without thinking about the people who suffer. These cuts will make my life more harder to live.
.Nairn swimming pool and Library: The swimming pool is used by the young and theh old and closing it
seriously harm the activities done by the people of Nairn.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Annoyed and gutted.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel upset because the swimming pool is a fun place to be. +
education is really important, to lose a bit of it.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that closing the Nairn pool, for example, will mean many people
will not get to go swimming. It is really far to the next nearest pool and many people won't be able to
travel. Also the library and museums are good for research and provide extra ac

Nairn swimming pool and Library: The council has to make cuts so to me it is inevitable.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel that these cutbacks will badly affect our tourist attractions. The
swimming pool is used for swimming club etc and if it closes this may affect peoples' future careers.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's ridiculous! What reason do they have to take our fun hangouts away
from us?! :-(

Nairn swimming pool and Library: This is very bad. Although not many people go to these places, the rest
who do go, go very often. The people who love these places are very clean and loving and I am sure that
as well as myself, these people are being deprived of the things they like.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's not going to change anything no matter what I say but I don't mind!
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's pointless making these cuts to get money back. Just to 're-do' the
High Street and make businesses close because of it. Nairn is a tourist town and needs these things to
attract tourists.

It think the waste collection, libraries and museums would be a loss, however, the swimming pool and
education facilities should remain the way they are as it benefits many people old and young.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that it's a really good idea.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't think that they should shut the swimming pool, libraries or the
museum because most people would lose their jobs and the town would become boring.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that it is stupid because we are just going to lose money when
tourists come and also there will be nothing else to do in Nairn.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I would hate it if the swimming pool got shut down because it is fun for
everyone and it keeps me fit.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Not very happy if there's no pool for the younger and no gym.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: This is not good. Without swimming pools how re we supposted to
keep up with exercise. Without libraries and youth clubs young people will have nothing to do, resulting in
people creting more trouble because they are bored. More time needs to e spent on a
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel this is a bad idea because our education etc shouldn't suffer
because of budget cuts.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that the closing of the swimming pool will be quite bad. It's a
good place to go at the weekend. Education is very important too. Also it will be rather boring if there is no
where to go.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Pretty unhappy. What if I get bored and cold from swimming in the sea?
I regularly go to the gym at the swimming pool and the pool itself. Many of my friends also use the
facilities at the pool and it would be a shame to se it go.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel that they shouldn't get rid of the swimming pool, as in the summer
many tourists come, and the swimming pool is a main attraction. Nairn survives on tourists. And definitely
don't cut roads and waste collection!
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think this is stupid. To cut all the things kids have to do would create
more problems in the long run. More kids would be wandering about the streets causing bother than
being at clubs which they enjoy. I don't see a reason for taking all the childrens
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that they should concentrate on all these things instead of
wasting in on the High Street.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that its bad.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't think its really fair taking away the swimming, museum etc
because young kids and adults like to go and visit these places and if you take them away people won't
be impressed.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: It shouldn't affect education.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't go to museums to be honest.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel really annoyed with this proposal. I am part of the local
Synchronised Swimming Club and if the pool closes then it would be the end of the Club. I really hope
nothing happens to Nairn pool.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Swimming pool should not be closed because it is one of the things
good about Nairn. Or else Aquadome will be packed. Libraries should be funded or something. Museum
is not popular so it can be affected but overall not fair.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel annoyed because this will affect my everyday life.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think it‟s a bad idea because its unfair about the swimming pool
because otherwise we have to pay for petrol or bus.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't like this cut. Education pupils will want. A lot of people go to the
swimming pool. Not fair.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I not very happy! These places are popular and do very well! The
swimming pool is great and everyone loves going especially the swimming clubs! The education is fine
and there's no need to change it!

Nairn swimming pool and Library: This is going to affect me by education the most and many others.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Not good - more teenagers in the streets.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: We don't want anything to go as we would be more bored and also stay
inside andn go on the laptop tv/xbox etc and we would become unfit/unhealthy and fat.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Not a good idea.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: If they were to go away we will not have anything to do. No-one could
learn to swim. So I disagree with this plan.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: You would have to travel a long way to another swimming pool etc. It
keeps us occupied in the holidays and without them there won't be as much stuff to do.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel shocked and amazed that as the children of today use most of
these things to study or to help them get into uni. Without this we might not become successful. Nairn is a
lovely town but unfortunately without the swimming pool there will be nothing
Nairn swimming pool and Library: If these were to go we would gain more weight, have less to do and no-
one could learn to swim. I do not agree with their plan.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: We need the swimming pool for everyone in Nairn and the other things
to attract tourists.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Taking away the pool, gym etc would ruin the community. And for
young people who cannot drive or afford the bus fare to Inverness, the local facilities are great.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: They don't need to make cuts. They need to sort their management.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's not good because it's going to affect children, adults, old folk,
tourists and many more and your probably going to make Nairn boring and its ridiculous to travel to
neighbouring towns just to go swimming - kids on the streets!

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Why does Nairn even have a swimming pool anyway - get rid of it!

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that things such as the swimming pool should not be cut
because then children may not exercise as much anymore. Also if the swimming pool gets cut then if
children get into the sea and can't swim then because of your cuts you will be causing death
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's not fair if they close swimming pool etc because everyone will move
away as there's nothing to do.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It just makes everything so much harder to do, eg study, travel to
swimming. I feel that this is a bad thing as if I wished to go swimming I would have to go into Inverness
and I would not be able to study in the library and the roads are in bad condition
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I am ok about everything else apart from swimming, as it just seems a
bit pointless to close/raise price of somewhere that people enjoy.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: No, I don't want this to happen.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's stupid and will ruin everything in the community. Closing the Nairn
pool will ruin the NDASC and public swimming!!

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Get rid of the pool. No-one uses it!
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Don't affect swimming/libraries - everything else is fine. But kids
actually hang out at the pool.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't think it's fair because nobody will want to stay in Nairn if there's
nothing to do here; everybody will be bored here and move away.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Well, it doesn't seem fair. Nairn is already rubbish and taking all that
away would leave Nairn with nothing… So don't
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think it's a good idea to spend this money on swimming pools,
libraries, museums, roads and education.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that they shouldn't be closing these buildings because loads of
people use these every day and especially the swimming pool because that would stop a lot of kids from
learning to swim so that they couldn't swim at the beach.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel that these cuts are stupid especially getting rid of the swimming
pool as we would have to travel many miles just to go and have a swim - ridiculous!
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Keep the swimming pools but the rest I don't really care that much
because you're just being stupid and screwing up the earth.

Museum is good so keep it open. Don't know about waste.

I don't think it is good because people use all of these resources.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: The swimming pool is used by lots of people such as the swimming
club and synchro. The education is important to most of the kids in Nairn.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think they should raise money to keep them open.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think it's silly. A lot fo people use the swimming pool, library etc. Don't
do it.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think the decision has to be made.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: These cuts should be made elsewhere. SPEND LESS ON NUCLEAR
WEAPONS!!!!
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Not pleased: 1) tourist season will be hit, as well as jobs. 2) However, it
it will help in the long run, then it may have to be done.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Adults moan that kids behave antisocially because they don't have
enough to do. If the government is meant to be tackling antisocial behaviour, surely they should be
improving facilities rather than getting rid of them.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that the swimming pool should stay open.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I am unhappy about this and feel it will be a huge loss to the
community.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It shouldn't affect roads and that would put people out of jobs which is
harsh.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel that we should not close these as they are tourist attractions and
have many jobs. I believe that instead of cutting budgets, cut the MPs expenses.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think they should try and keep swimming pools etc, so loads of hard
working people don't lose their jobs.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I am unhappy with this decision as these cuts will be a big loss to the
community and these buildings are a part of people's lives and it will be upsetting for them.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel that it shouldn't happen because people do like to be active and
people can learn out of books. Also adults are trying to get children to read more.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's one of the worst things that has happened to this area.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't use any of these so it wouldn't make any difference.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Ii don't like this.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Not good. Nothing to do so more teens on the streets. I will be really
bored.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I use the library sometimes.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel ok about everything except the swimming pool.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Save the swimming pool.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I'm not terribly happy about this. I like the pool and other resources in
the area.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's a pretty stupid idea as it only benefits the people who work at the
council and not the community, which should be the priority of the council.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel it's unjust. You disgust me.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's not fair.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: This is not right as the cuts in the area will drive people away.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I'm not happy about it. I love going swimming.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I am unhappy about this. It's a loss to our community.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't think they should close the swimmig pool or the roads. They
should be kept in good condition.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think this is awful. If they take swimmign pools way children will not
get their lessons and other people who use the pools as a gym will also become unfit. The schools are
already in a bad way so why make it worse by using more cuts.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Save the swimming pool!
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It is too harsh as some schools re needing more money and people
need and enjoy swimmign pools from all ages.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think they should keep the swimming pool because it brings profit to
the town.

Museums could be cut.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Nairn needs swimming pool and library as we don't have very much
here. We'd have to travel to Inverness for most things and some families do not have the money to do
this.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think its disgusting that in the present climate economically and also
with growing rates of obesity it is vital that we fund pools, education etc and provide constructive outlets
to experience culture, music and drama. Thanks a lot Danny Alexander!
Nairn swimming pool and Library: The cuts in the area will drive us away. Nairn would be a ghost town.
SAVE NAIRN SWIMMING POOL

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't think some of these places should be affected. DON'T DO IT!

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Get rid of the swimming pool!
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think this is a very bad thing. Nairn already doesn't have much
attraction and things for kids to do. This is going to make it worse and upset people.
In Nairn there is not much to do But if you take away any of the few things we have like the swimmig pool,
then what will we do? People may turn to crime. I don't use the swimming pool often now but I used to a
lot and if it got taken away it would be rea
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I hate the idea. I want them all to stay open. Ms Robson says I am
selfish.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that the cut is really stupid.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel sad that because the Highland Council has to make £12 million
pounds worth of cuts a year, they say that facilities that lots of young people use have to go and these
people have to suffer and it is a shame. Also it is sad for the education of pupils
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't think that it is right that we should have to close the swimming
pool because people will have to now go to Forres and Inverness for lessons, creating more business for
them. We could lose money this way.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't think the pool should be closed. It's very popular and it provides
a place for many primary schools to hold swimming lessons and if the pool wasn't there children would
miss out on the opportunity to learn to swim.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I really don't care about this cause. But we need the swimming pool.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Rather annoyed as we are young and this could ruin all of our future
potential.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It will affect tourism and so less money will be generated, causing more
budget cuts to be made.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think it's a really stupid idea because there is nothing to do in Nairn for
kids. The swimmig pool is the only thing at the moment. It would be a wrong thing to do.
Nairn is quite a bland place but works well with the lovely scenery. The swimming pool brings not only
entertainment but also character to Nairn. I would disgusted if this plan happens.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: They managed to build a new community centre, maybe they shouldn't
have wasted their money on that. And the renovation of the High Street/bandstand was also a waste.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I am not happy. It's a shame. A loss to our community. It sucks.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel it is extremely unfair how all our facilities in Nairn could be taken
away, like the swimming pool as so many people use it. There is not already that much things to do in
Nairn but if you take away some of the things we have, many teenagers will o
Nairn swimming pool and Library: What little money the Highland Council has should not be cut, mainly
because it will drastically affect the area around me and only cause local life to become more strenuous
on the currently running services provided.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: When I read this text, I felt completely sickened to think that a youth's
fun will be taken awaya from them. With no swimming pools or libraries, youths will congregate on the
streets and this will most likely load to havoc in the community. I heard that

Nairn swimming pool and Library: If these things got closed people that use them would have nothing to
do and would just be hanging around on the streets. Also people won't have things to revise for test that
would get good jobs for us when we are older. Lots of people will lose their jobs
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's not going to be a very nice place if there are no facilities like a
swimming pool or library. They shouldn't close them.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: The swimming pool doesn't affect me because if I want to swim I go to
Inverness. I have also only ever used the museum twice in the six years I have lived here and both times I
was disappointed. On the other hand I have often used the library and would be
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I like to go to the swimming pool so it would be annoying if it closed
because I know lots of other people enjoy it too. Also, if the library and museum close, people will have
nothing to do.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think you are being unfair. You should work harder on improvements
in little towns and stop taking all the money (MPs). Stop being so spoilt - it's harsh!!!!
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Libraries and museums - fair enough. Swimming pools and waste
collection - poor show.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Why are they re-doing the road on the High Street when it isn't
necessary and our swimming pool is - the money should be better spent.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: It would drive us away!
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Keep the swimming pool!! Nairn needs to keep these activities etc. to
keep it a successful community.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think this is wrong. If we lose all that things what will be do in the
holidays?
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's a bit of a disgrace. There isn't much for young people to do as it is
and if the swimming pool gets closed down, there will be less to do. Education is very important and with
cuts in education and local library this will affect young people in curre
Nairn swimming pool and Library: This is not very fair as we are going to be running low on things that we
might need.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: If there is no swimming pool, there will be not be anything to do. And
people would not be as healthy.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I love swimming. It is my happy place!

Nairn swimming pool and Library: We need a pool in Nairn for tourists, locals and young people.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: It will make Nairn be boring and have nothing to do.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Save the swimming pool!!!!!!
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel that these cuts shouldn't take place. Especially in a thriving tourist
town such as Nairn, all local amenities are extremely important in bringing income to the town as well as
providing facilities for locals. There are limited activities in our ar
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I am a member of the local swimming club and disgusted with the
waste of money and threatening to close community projects which will affect the lively sprit of Nairn
community.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think nothing should be changed, none of it should go. Nairn wouldn't
be good if it didn't have a pool etc. I think they should be kept the same.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I wouldn't like the pool or library to shut as it is too far for us to travel to
Inverness, and I wouldn't get to enjoy these things.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Keep the swimming pool open!
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't think that you should close these buildings because lots of
people use them and it wouldn't be right without them.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Won't be good because there won't be anything to do.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't like swimming or reading but lets spend millions on pointless
roadworks on the High Street.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that this is really bad. Loads of people need the swimming pool
as it's the only thing we can actually do in Nairn. Also I think there should be no education cuts because
this will affect our teaching. Leave the swimming pool and just cut everything
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Please Please please don't take away the swimming pool. And can you
please also make the top of the ramps at the skatepark bigger?
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that the swimming pool will be sadly missed but everything else
won't be.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I like the swimming because if it goes then we have to pay more money
to take a bus all the way through to Inverness or Elgin.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It will affect me because if the swimming pools close where else can I
swim or meet up with my friends.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's not good as it's affecting public places. People might lose jobs too.
Roads may be affected - could muck up things for people to get places.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Nairn is already rubbish but if they take away some of this stuff there
will be nothing for kids to do.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: £36 million is excessive. I respect what they are trying to do but at most
I would expect £18 million worth of cuts.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel like it will affect Nairn in a big way. I will not be able to swim
because I am apart of the Nairn swimming club.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel that this isn't fair. Lots of kids will be going out drinking and taking
drugs because they have nothing to do.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think this is ridiculous. By making these cuts it is going to ruin the
whole community. It is things like this that keep kids off the streets. Without them there will be nothing to
do in Nairn.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think this is not fair to young people inNairn cause we are a great
community and we love goin swimming.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't know because I don't think it will affect people much.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's not very fair - they should be putting money towards these things
(maybe they should shut up).

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel this is unfair on school kids.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: If the council were cutting these activities, some of the things that these
activities do are very important. Perhaps the boardroom staff's places should be questioned.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that all aspects of the Highland Council should be looked at in
the budget cuts and not just local amenities.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: The swimming pool is my life. I would DIE without it.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel angry about this and don't think that Nairn swimming pool should
be closed.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: The swimming pool plays a huge part in the social life of many people.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think it is stupid because the pool has been in Nairn for years and
years, and it is a useful facility.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that it would be quite bad because then we won't be able to swim
or have an education and all tourists coming to Nairn won't have anything to do.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel angry at this. In our community we only have the swimming pool
and the parks (that have graffitii on them). If the pool ends up from this to close, there will be hardly
anything for teenagers to do in Nairn.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel bad because these things keeps Nairn better to live in.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think the idea is good for education.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think things we don't use often or don't need, like renewing the Nairn
High Street, should be cut. But things that we need shouldn't and thinking about the older population in
Nairn, which is a high population, should have the right to keep the museum
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel outraged because Nairn is already boring enough with the
swimming pool (etc). If they close it then there will be nothing to do.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I would not like any of these things to go, especially the swimming pool
and library - they are some of my favourite things to do and some of the only things.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think Nairn would be boring and the worst place to live to be honest.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: They should only make spending cuts in larger areas as the swimming
pool/library etc are of great value to a small town like Nairn.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Annoyed because it will affect our education so we will not get good
jobs.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I enjoy using the swimming pool and library and I would be very upset if
they closed. I think it would also be bad for the whole town and lots of children would have nothing to do.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think this is going to affect everyone who is a swimmer/people who
like to read and much more. Closing down all these things won't just affect people who use them but
people are going to lose jobs.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that none of this stuff should have to go. The library is very
important for us as the books come in handy and help us with our studying. The swimming pool is a great
addition to Nairn and is a great place for many people. We should stop spending
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I understand why they would do the cuts - but these things benefit the
community as a whole - so would be sad to see these things go.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: No way... Nairn needs to keep what it has got - you can add things to
Nairn but not take away. It's not fair in taking these away as loads of kids and adults use them. I don't
want Nairn to turn into a rubbish place where no-one would want to stay.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that it's bad because it will affect the tourists.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Nairn pool rocks.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I can't express my feelings in words…..so, I have drawn this angry
shark attacking a dolphin instead…
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I hate this idea. I use this pool all the time and I will soon need the
library for school. I disapprove of the whole idea of cutting back amount of money.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I am not really bothered cause I don't use half of these facilities - I just
go to Inverness.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: If these places close young people would ause havoc on the streets
and Nairn's tourist industries would suffer.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel that the cuts should be made toward things that are not going to
make such a huge impact on the community. The pool is used by all ages and closing it would be a great
loss.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that Nairn doesn't have that much for youths to do and the
closure of the pool will have a hugely negative effect on Nairn. It has good facilities and many people will
lose out if it closes. I think that there are other places that the council can
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Save the swimming pool.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's ridiculous the cuts have to be made on such important areas to all
people such as education of everyone.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel angry about the swimming pool maybe getting closed cause
people use it everyday, same as libraries and roads.

You can't take away the gym as I go every day after school.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I use the swimming pool.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Keep the swimming pool.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: This is annoying as Nairn does not have many facilities as it is. If you
cut these, Nairn will have nothing - this will also decrease the amount of tourism. Also the roads are in
such a bad state so cuts in this will not help. You also cannot leave waste

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't use the swimming pool, library or museum but if cuts are made
in waste collection, education or roads, it would be stupid because those things are needed.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: They are spending over 1million on doing up Nairn High
Street…..£800,000 from the Scottish Government, so they felt they had to spend it doing up the road. So
they're getting rid of the swimming pool. THIS IS RUBBISH.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't like it.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's not fair.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't think it's fair because we're going to have to pay and travel to go
to different swimming pools, gyms and things like that. There will just be more kids/teens in the street.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: Don't shut the pool because everyone goes and it would suck.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that is really stupid, as it could affect the community.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: No. I don't agree with this.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think that the cut is really stupid.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's not fair.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I think this isn't good.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: I feel upset because the swimming pool is the place in Nairn that most
tourists go.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: This is very unfair. Why take it out on the young people that need these
things, when there are rich people all over the place, that could help support these things. It would take a
lot away from Nairn if these things are taken away. The swimming pool is

Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's not fair.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: It will make teenagers bored, which will lead to drinking and taking
drugs.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: It's not very good.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: I don't go to any of these things. ("I don't go to eney of theys things")
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Has a big affect in Nairn. The town is a place where people come for
their holidays and taking it all away would make the town less attractive for tourists.
Nairn swimming pool and Library: Doesn't have a big effect on me but since Nairn doesn't have many
things to do anyway, it's not very good.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: The pool is da bomb! U is a loser if you cuts it lol.

Nairn swimming pool and Library: It is not good and it should not happen.
“Not Nairn, but different business model possible. Library needs longer hours.”



“Swimming pools are essential for maintaining health of all age groups. Nairn Swimming Pool caters for
people from far and wide and is a central feature of a popular holiday town. Why is this pool to close for
tile renewal in September at a lengthy cost when it may be closed for budgetary reasons?”
“At the worst scenario, close Alness to make a saving as they can travel to Invergordon or Tain. Keep
Tain and Nairn open
Swimming is a life saving skill. Can you put a cost on a life? These communities are surrounded by
water and tourists are attracted to the pool.
Health reasons/obesity, lifelong participation, particularly with the trend for an older generation.
Efficient operation: implement community trust to manage/maintain operation. Nairn is the only
community in the whole of the Highlands that has two professionally run clubs who work closely with the
governing body”

“Swimming pools – not in Nairn

Community centres – not in Nairn

Museums – not in Nairn

Libraries – not in Nairn”
“Cut some swimming pools or private pools. Buy into high life. Increase high life membership. Means
test high life. Keep Inverness museum and HFM. Cut smaller ones. Cut opening hours. Cut
independent museums budget”
“Its not about cuts its about increasing their uses. Libraries – computers open at night for online
application forms. Use in school. Automatic book withdrawal. Charge those who can afford. Swimming
pools – travel times”
“These are key community facilities but should be a sensible and pragmatic approach. We have to invest
in the young and the vulnerable!”




“No”
“No, but perhaps combine facilities into the same building. Review library opening hours”




“Reduce museums and libraries”

“Swimming Pool – keep Nairn open, we need it for children and for healthy lifestyle. Community centres –
Nairn community centre keep open but increase charges. Museums – in Nairn it is run by volunteers.
More for tourists than local people. Libraries – could reduce opening hours in Nairn”

“No. Why can‟t Culloden swimming pool be closed as an alternative to Nairn? Every child should be
given the opportunity to learn to swim. Closure of Nairn will effect tourism in town. Travel to an
alternative to Nairn facilities will increase our Carbon footprint. Reduction in use of Council Hi-Life card
as no easy alternative to Nairn Pool. Loss of synchronised and swimming clubs in Nairn”
“Possibly, but need to take into consideration location, ie rural or urban”




“No. Make sure they are better managed and better promoted”
“Closing swimming pools is a false economy – people swim and use gym facilities for their health – it will
be more expensive for the NHS to treat people deprived of leisure facilities”
“1/2 hour travel time from Nairn to Inverness pool is not realistic therefore Nairn could not be closed under
this curtain. Alternative criteria could be to take the decision on the level of use. Improve management of
all pools to maximise service and efficiency”
“Nairn can NOT lose its swimming pool. 16 miles to Inverness is too far. More efficient running.
Disabled/elderly/non-driving access. More shared use of pool. Very little support for running museums.
Reduce library hours.” Later in their form, Table 18 also commented: “Why the capital expenditure on
library and pool in Wick?”




no




With difficulty - swimming pools are a valuable means of encouraging exercise and fitness for all ages
and abilities, as well as teaching what can be a life-saving skill.
Community centres could perhaps be given over more to the local communities,as the village halls have
been, with fewer, more peripatetic staff to support the local organisers. Museums are an important part of
heritage preservation, as well as an educational resource and tourist attraction, but they are probably too
expensive for local communities to run properly without external support and trained staff Some very
small libraries could perhaps be closed, where there are others within easy reach of the users (who from
observation are often elderly or very young, therefore less likely to have their own transport). As with
Museums however ,libraries could be much more of an informational and educational resource, and
retained wherever possible, possibly moving into shared premises rather than stand alone buildings.




If service provision is to be reduced the greatest benefit is obtained if a complete building can be released
for alternative use. Many libraries operate as part of a school complex. If these are closed the savings are
minimal compared with closing a library which is housed in its own building.

As a criteria for identifying locations where service provision can be removed, distance to the nearest
similar remaining service location is not acceptable. People able to walk to a library may not have access
to private transport or, as with many of the proposed closures, access to public transport.

The existing mobile library service is unable to cater for the number of proposed closures. In most of the
proposed locations for library closure there is no alternative access to reading materials.

The proposed savings should also be assessed for the number of residents, as opposed to visitors, who
are affected. Using this a criteria rather than distance or travelling-time shows removal of library facilities
will have a greater potential impact on small communities compared to, say, removal of museum facilities.

Many rural communities have no village hall or community centre and there is an inequality of provision
across Highland. Absence of community facilities and activities leads to breakdown within the community
with an increase in the associated problems exacerbated by remoteness.
Don‟t get rid of Nairn S. Pool!




Swimming pool closing will have an impact on people in the town & people in need of it most will have to
travel further than they need to!
If Tain pool closes next pool is Invergordon




Helps younger kids learn how to swim so don‟t close swimming pool!




If money on swimming pools need to be cut, don‟t do it in
Areas which have few facilities and depend on it.
Trust pools/ centres – happy to pay slightly more to get in.




Make greater use of trusts
Reduce opening hours




Get rid of Inverness museum or Charge for museums- mostly used by tourists who are happy to pay.
Museums important for tourism trade.




Review museum entry prices and maybe increase entry prices. Higher profiling and generate their own
income




If you stop funding museums the museums will be forced to shut down – therefore lots of people will lose
their jobs. What happens to them? What are they meant to do?




Take into consideration sporting heritage of each area.




Don‟t need a library separate from in the School




Museums bring in tourism. So maybe cut hours in the winter month and open in the summer
Mobile library- use more
More frequent mobile library services are needed, libraries should become more efficient and merge with
information (tourist), service points etc

Annual Membership fee‟s should be introduced into Library‟s £10 per year eg £5 per young person




Services for people most important




Swimming pools - better to charge more as it is already cheap but could also close smaller ones and
people would still travel. Other option is to get someone else to run them. Community Centres - close
some as don't need six in inverness but consider usage before doing so. Could get someone else to run
them, could work in some areas e.g. Merkinch where vibrant, may be more flexible and respond to what
people want e.g. restore Crumpets cafe in the Spectrum, current one always quiet. Museums no to
closure but could charge to get in. Libraries could reduce opening hours but it doesn't matter who runs
them so could transfer. Service points important, especially in rural areas where no alternative so best to
reduce opening hours.
Lochaber Leisure Centre is needed and cannot and should not be closed. It is the only one for miles and
miles
You are asking too cut services such as libraries, swimming pools etc. In Fort William there is rather new
visit Scotland tourist info and a library. You could join things like them together to make savings and the
tourists might benefit from this.
Community Centres should be promoted more with more events to ensure good usage and charge to
make money to keep it open
These shuld stay open for young people to avoid boredome and trouble for them. These buildings need
better DDA facilities for deaf people - fire alarms and interpreters for e.g. working the gym equipment.
Buildings could be shared better. Information of what's on needs to be translated into BSL.
• Services very important to people‟s mental health
o Assumptions being made about distances to closest facilities, not just about books also computer
facilities.
• High Life very good value and couldn‟t afford private, exercise good for mental health
•Impact on health services as exercise good for mental health
Could increase charges for some facilities BUT many on benefits and on low incomes wouldn‟t be able to
pay more. Need to target charges
• Museums etc- concern at impact on tourism sector – economic impact
Surely these are part of education? Physical exercise is part of healthy living & is necessary to improve
health & wellbeing of those especially in towns. Community centres do a good deal to encourage young
people to communicate with others. They can provide a safe environment for youngsters & can "keep
them off the streets"!! Museums & libraries are essential for education. Many museums hold collections
donated in perpetuity by individuals both past and present so that others may view & learn from the
generosity of the donors.




Cut the opening times of all Council pools so the saving is throughout the area not just picking one to
close completely or maybe close on Sunday when quieter or put more lessons on in quieter times to
make full use of the pool or more public awareness of pool i.e. put them in paper.
Can we reduce the number of public toilets?




No these are a basic human right, but yes if there is alternative provision.

No why not improve facilities and then charge for income?

Remember tourists and disabled people.

Toilets are fundemental for the area. Better use of public money could be made on the style of the buildings.



No




In rural areas Council should look at encouraging communities to operate toilets
No

No, there are precious few of them




find out! - private partners etc as you suggest
In towns, probably yes, but in various isolated tourist spots eg Silver Bridge where there are no alternatives
(hotels, shops etc), no.




Certainly not in Portree. There is only one public toilet available and that is clean and well maintained and
much appreciated by people, local population and tourists alike. Hotels have toilets, but I am sure they do not
want non-paying customers trooping in and out of their facilities. Some public buildings have toilets available,
but said buildings are not open 24/7.
Knock down that hideous toilet at the castle steps. It completely dominates the access to the museum and
art gallery and makes access to them particularly unattractive . Relocate if absolutely necessary - nearer, or
within, Town House?
Where there are suitable alternatives.




Toilets I don't see the need to maintain toilet facilities where there is a marked low level of usage. If
businesses are genuinely happy to welcome the public to use their toilet facility, that is a good news indeed.
Yes
Older people find public toilets really vital. ? provide self cleaning pay ones instead?
Yes perhaps reduce where alternatives available




I am not aware of the whereabouts of existing ones! They could be reduced if local shops, garages etc.,
could be persuaded to allow access to their facilities in return for a token reduction in their business rates.
yes-there are always restaurants and hotels around.
yes, if an area has toilets the public can use which are privately run, get rid of the public loos
NO It is hard enough for tourists to find public toilets that are open all year round without you even
considering reducing the number available.




Only if businesses like bars and restaurants are to make their toilets available to the public which they should
do.




Most definetly who uses public toilets anyway?




Agree to cuts




not in invergordon!! This does take courage.
We need our public toilets back in INVERGORDON as there are people who come off cruse ships and the
rigs.
??
Pointless! Minimal tinkering. Need to grasp bull by the horns by closing schools instead of messing about
with tiny budgets such as these. Close the toilets in the towns and villages but only if the retail sector can
provide an alternative. Perhaps keep one open in Inverness of an evening. Perhaps work with private sector
e.g. hotels, harbours etc for providing toilets elsewhere.
Public toilets should be provided for each community
Use of other facilities
Certainly not. I suffer from IBS and often need the toilet at very short notice. This is bad enough on it's own
but often I am faced with toilets signposted but when I get there they are closed. The elderly need toilet
facilities and the fact that many public toilets are closed outwith the tourist season is a disgrace. We pay
council tax up here not the tourists, toilets should be open all the year round. If money is short then I suggest
the council stops employing people in non-jobs and stops repairing roads which do not need it (ref Contin)




possibly , too little detail to comment
probably - these are few and far between in the Highlands and most are of poor standard.
No there are hardly enough as it is.




Only if you can replace them with the kind of scheme where businesses allow access - think Birnam might be
an example.
What about using volunteers to run them, less open times.



No – although do they need to be staffed full time?




Combine public toilet with service point.



Sell toilets and run privately with a service level agreement.



How absurd!

No

Yes




No. Charges are acceptable for all.

Only with alternative provision.
Not that many.




Once again the wording of this question shows a lack of forethought....Of course you can, the question is
SHOULD we reduce the number of public toilets? Honestly, if you cannot even consider how to word the
question correctly, the question should then be asked:
Am I capable of performing in the position I have been assigned?" Please feel free to answer this question to
the email address indicated previously and I shall answer yours in return
Yes, but only if local businesses will make their toilets accessible. Also consider opening hours of nearby
local businesses. Make sure people are clearly signposted to alternative toilet facilities.
Yes- if there is an alternative nearby. Costs per toilet look outrageous.
No.
No – make payable
We need public toilets – perhaps they could be in existing places eg. hotels, village halls etc, rather than the
costly mode in Fort William.

Using existing facilities such as hotels (extending the highland comfort scheme)

No

Yes, if alternative provider. Keep those that exist open in evening.




No
Possibly
No
No
 Absolutely! I have never felt it was the council‟s responsibility to provide public toilets. There are plenty in
shops, bus/train stations etc. The one exception is public parks like Whin Park.




Get rid of those posh ones in Golspie!




No hot water or heating in them. Yes if shops and restaurants provide the same facility.

No, but reduce opening hours to summer/tourist season only.
Introduce a charge; sponsored by local businesses

 No. Offer them to the local Community Council and see what happens. Even if you have to pay – better than
using the verge!




No




No



No




No. Not in Inverness – cannot comment on other towns!

No except where alternative facilities are available in vicinity



Stop hot water in public toilets.
Yes
No, but we could use rainwater to flush them and save on water bills here and throughout the Council estate?
Reductions might easily be possible in urban and city areas where there are shopping malls or a wide range
of businesses that stay open for long hours. In rural areas this might not be possible, where distances
between settlements are large, where businesses and shops are likely to be small and limited in range, with
few facilities and they are unlikely to stay open for unsocial hours.
would leave you with stinking messes if you did and a very poor welcome for tourists!
Yes




No (however community building could have public toilets)

No




Only if provision is maintained – Highland Comfort Scheme

Not in rural areas




Yes, more local businesses could provide these.




No – could be run under community ownership

No – put pay 20p
Whilst I welcome the fact that some local business have agreed to allow their toilet facilities to be used by the
public there doesn't appear to be a list one can access to find out who and where these businesses are.
As elderly fold, we would be reluctant to see these reduced. To combine with local business would require
good signage.
Not in this area.




The Highlands need more, not less, particularly for tourism.



Use comfort scheme or close. Brogaig, Staffin.

Using other private sectors, businesses to open their toilets to the public.

Why consider paying hotels for allowing access to toilets, normal practice in European countries – should be
free.

Yes
Encourage hotels to provide facilities.
Yes.



!! Increase !!




In England the Council provides a grant to e.g. local pubs for use of their toilets it seems to work.



Only if possibility of using e.g. local businesses (hotels) is viable - which presumably have a cost.
Where are they?




Sponsorship by firms to provide toilets.

Yes - Keep tourist toilets open e.g. Bught Park.



There are very few open anyway!



You could close as long as there was somewhere to go.

Difficult.



Yes – it should be a statutory function.



People keep raising the tourism issue; let VisitScotland provide them then or the tourist businesses.

No – I am getting older and may need to stop more often!
1.7 million toilets a year.

Be careful with this one, you could end up spending more on clean up!



If other/alternative facilities available

No not in Portree



Where similar facility exists nearby.

Please not!
No.



No.

No. Inverness has very few free public WCs. Alness none. You get to my age and you need them!



Only if there are other facilities or companies willing to provide services.
Toilet provision is essential. Important for tourists, families & elderly. Could charge more for facility. Do not
want human waste to spoil countryside. Comfort provision advertised and encouraged by hotels and
restaurants.




No toilets for tourist. No toilet in Invergordon – why not have pay as you to like Tain in Invergordon for cruise
ships etc – funding from cruise ships.

Who knows – no figures. Some areas need public toilets and don‟t have them. Toilets need to be clean and
supervised.




Yes

Yes – use pubs & hotels & pay toilets & community centres.



No. ones with ?????????? must be best value as they are a pleasure and don‟t get vandalised.
No. We need toilets – Invergordon. Tourists and locals need toilets.




Invergordon don‟t have any!

No there are not enough as it is, maybe cubicle type though.
Yes. Charge kids over 5 years old even 10p would mount up. Most people who use the toilet facilities are
kids!
There are vey few already i think




That the public toilets have an automatic charge of 20p for both ladies and gents.
only in towns where there are supermarkets open and able to take the strain. stop closing the rural toilets -
the ullapool road toilets for example. or at least sign post where the nearest alternative is.




No.




Preferably no, but the answer is area specific. Make toilets charged.

Use hotels and village halls were possible. Charge for toilets, use honesty box, turnstile entry.




No.




No.

No.



Let communities run their own.



No - charge instead.




No but charge.




No could charge. Lack of consistency across Highland - manned/unmanned charge.
No answer

No

Except in remote rural areas

No!




Possibly in Inverness and other main towns but not in country areas/seaside areas

Yes




Possibly – review wages and charges

With caution – where businesses allow toilet use. Could we charge 20p entry and have them open all year
not just for 6 months?? Can they be lit with solar panels? Can they be provided by other agencies e.g.
forestry commission??

No answer




Yes by a few!

Yes



Where these are important for tourism it will increase waste if they are closed




Share facilities with hotels/supermarkets etc

Adopt the European way. Public can use facilities in shops and public buildings



Yes (toilets are important for tourists)




Depends where you are. Most might be better with portaloos rather than public toilets – easier to keep clean
(ND Dulnain Bridge).




Yes where there are alternatives.

No.
Not in rural areas. We need more areas.




Yes.

Yes.

This could be looked at may be they could be run by local community.




Using hotels – reduce their rates




Don't know




Public toilets. These are essential, particularly for tourists. Instate charges for free toilets and, if necessary,
increase charges for those already charging but do not close them!




Where there is the option of alternatives e.e. Inverness this is fine but not in country e.g. Corrieshalloch
Gorge
Public toilets Encouraging businesses to attract the public to use the facilities in pubs, restaurants and shops
is a good idea and should be recognised and rewarded, perhaps by supporting publicity. In rural areas and
beauty spots frequented by tourists (and the elderly driver requiring frequent use of a toilet stop) think of the
consequences of not having toilets. Those I have used in Highland have been very well maintained and I am
always pleased to use them. I would be happy to make a small payment or donation in a secure place before
leaving - not before using.




 Do we really want to promote ourselves as a tourist destination, and then not have public toilets? We can
only do this if we do as the consultation document suggests, working with businesses, identifying areas which
have other capacity etc.
We were shocked by the level of costs the loss of council run public toilets should only
be agreed where suitable alternative are available and accessible to all . Perhaps a charge as exists in train
and bus stations could
be introduced




No, we already have had reduction at Corrieshalloch. The only other toilet in Ullapool itself is to be renovated
starting in Nov. after being postponed for several years. This must proceed as agreed by HC. Toilets are few
and far between. Numbers using them may not be high but there are often no alternatives for miles and they
are greatly appreciated! Charges could be introduced.
No



The Highland Council to contribute to cleaning coasts. Look at partnership deals e.g. restaurants, hotels,
visitor attractions, supermarkets. No facilities in Old Town




Edderton does not support any reduction in the number of public toilets. We wonder whether a saving could
be made by turning some manned toilets into unmanned.
“No”




“Charging but better quality”

“If near a play/picnic area should be kept open”

NO ANSWER
“Not in tourist location”



“YES! Privatise public toilets”

“Pay to use. Not use less – essential in tourist season”

“One facility per community minimum”

“No”

“No”



“No”



“Keep all open, but if hotels agreed or if there was charging for toilets that would be okay”

“Yes – charge for those remaining. We don‟t mind paying as long as high standards are maintained”




“Yes”
“No. Outsource?”




NO ANSWER




NO ANSWER




“In Nairn – No”
no




Only if alternative provion is made, e.g. by paying local business a fee to provide decent public access toilets.
The current lack of facilities in many of the towns and tourist areas is an embarrasment.
We have trees and bushes




Don‟t pay 20p for toilet use- should be free.
The Council currently runs 105 public toilets and would like to reduce this number to save costs. Remember
that those of us who live here may not see this as a problem, but it is very real if you are visiting outwith your
home territory. Closing public toilets, particularly in rural and remote areas, is not sensible in an area
dependent on the tourist trade. Vandalism needs to be dealt with and those found responsible made to
refurbish the damaged premises where practical to do so. Another option is to encourage local businesses or
other community facilities to extend access to passers by in return for support from the HC 'Comfort‟ Fund
which was confirmed to continue to exist at the Ward Forum. The funds would contribute to cleaning and
other costs, noting that access need not be counter productive if business results from drawing people into
such premises.




Cut old style toilets- keep the ones in shopping centres but random ones on the street are pointless.




Comfort care scheme- private business allowing use of WC‟s.




Open longer + charge 20p
No but should increase charges
Comfort scheme is a god idea but hotel provision must be DDA compliant and for wheelcjhairs. Also need
better signage about where the loos are - it's embarressing to ask when you are deaf.
• Broadford not very good
• Wick closed one set – not been a problem
• Comfort scheme in place of toilets
Public toilet should have an automatic charge of 20p
If alternative provision can be arranged this seems reasonable. In rural areas lack of provision can present
problems. Shoppingareas & hotels etc can provide facilities




Petition in support of the retention of the public toilets near the Corrieshalloch Gorge just off the A835
Ivnerness-Ullapool Rd - 1226 signatories
If we cannot afford to maintain and run all of the local facilities, what is the best way of finding out how to
reduce the number and still provide the services needed?




Why continually reduce? Ask people to pay more.

Survey local communities to find out establishments who are willing to provide local facilities.




Multi use of current facilities instead of new builds.



look into general reduction of opening times.




Consult with local communities
Yes

Set up a local panel?




place funds at the point of delivery / in the community, reduce back room and senior posts.
Surveys using current staff to look at use and to look at feasible alternatives.




I don't know. It's for you to work out.
Leisure facilites have generally been designed to run on a combination of subsidies and charges. If you
now deduce the subsidy element the charges will become too high to sustain them.

Solution -re-model the provision of leisure facilites to include a commercial money-making element other
than just admission charges. Muti-use and flexible use facilities would be better than say 'just a
swimming pool' or 'just a bowling center'. Or can the grade of such facilites lend themselves to
championship preparations or competitions?
There may be the option of amalgamating some village halls, libraries and school buildings to maximise
their use throughout the day and year. Perhaps event commercial premises and public toilets could be
based at these sites to maximise their use and benefit to the community and tourism
Review use, availability, distance and population catchment.




Again if we dont use it ..we lose it. If we do use it ..promote it (at no cost on the web) and we can all use
it some more.




 holds a community together. Without them you would be ripping the heart out! They are one of the only
places where you will find all ages from toddlers to O.A.Ps and learning groups together."
Public consultation is vital.




Research into current usage, and gauge the value placed on the service by the users, in terms of cash
amounts they would be willing to pay to ensure they remained in place
try it and see the response.
consultation with the locals, they know if there other facilities which can fill the gaps
If you cannot afford to give free services then you need to apply charges




For a start get rid of the useless Scottish Government. Reduce all quangos. Stop appointing consultants
at greatly overinflated rates. Cost out projects properly and make sure the contractors stick to the
estimates given. The streetscape project was a joke




Surely usage numbers have to be taken into consideration and also some could be run by schools or
community groups even businesses might run halls and put on events?




Facilty audits and robust community consultation would be a good start. Ward forums are not reaching
out to communities and more engaging methods of consultation need to be put in place to seek
substantive veiws.
Do we have too many managers etc can costs be cut through non replacement of staff delegate and
amalgate. Share resources with other authorities. Speak to people councillors. Not questionaires to
staff on the front line ask them what the savings are going to mean to the services that they provide.
Ward meetings councillor surgeries speak only to a select number of constituents - get out and speak to
as many people as possible
I do not feel represented I do not have the opportunity to give my views personally to anyone - and I do
not feel or expect my views to be valued- so why bother asking in the first place your minds are already
made up.
Why don't you make it a provision of giving planning for wind farms etc that energy provision to local
properties, council properties, facilities or indeed the Highlands is free? Free energy would compensate
somewhat for any negative impact on tourism / NIMBYists.
Combine facilities
The local school here has been a great success, but it is with sadness that I see the school bus coming
up the road each day to pick a few local children when mine used to walk down to Knockbain, about a
mile. I urge the council to think outside the box - schools are a massive expense but are, or could be,
the heart of local communities in both rural and town areas. Think wider - train teachers in the basics of
social care so that they can deal with supporting families and only turn to social workers, working from
the same local base, in extreme circumstances. Turn the schools into community centres, close down
everything else, where local people have a shared responsibility, either through the Community Council,
or a local Trust. Use schools as centres for the whole community where elderly folk can gather to
support one another and their wider families. Make local communities responsible for the way waste is
collected - eg in town, street by street in pleasantly enclosed areas, similarly in rural areas, to which
individuals are responsible for taking their waste - and then only use the expensive service to collect
from these agreed centres. THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX!
limited hours rather than permanent closure
More money from central government, this is where the big money is often wasted on expensive projects
like defense spending that we don't need and can't afford as a nation




That question is not logical - there is no sensible way to reduce the number and still provide the services
needed. It makes no sense to expect people to go out of their local community for a swim.
Check the number of people using the facilities.



Increase the highlife payments. Increase the budget highlife. Increase checks on budget qualification.




Speak to local users and staff. Look at costs for each.

Rent out meeting spaces in Council buildings. Libraries etc make buildings multifunctional, rent out
spaces thereby reduce number of buildings.



Cut senior HC management. Cut top salaries by 50%.

Monitor use/flow.

Council‟s job.




Local Management. Voluntary organisations.

Record of usage?




,I would anticipate that the best way of finding OUT how to reduce the number would be a public
consultation or referendum (surely not a shock to a local government body).
Consult on the specifics. Then more people will get engaged in the debate/.
The facilities that are being underused should be shut and the buildings sold so the Council is not
lumbered with an unoccupied building to maintain.
A study of facility usage and groups who use it and who would be affected with closures

Cancellation and measuring use of services

Don‟t know

Conduct a “usage of existing facilities” survey (are the facilities being used their maximum capacity)

We would wish the Council to be more innovative and entrepreneurial.




Canvass Community Councils
wonderful facilitiy.
Community service, volunteers




An audit of use to determine if it is feasible to remain or has to go.




Look at poorly used facilities, especially those in close proximity to better used facilities.



 Remove unnecessary levels of administration e.g. ward managers (saving £2m and only approx. 20 lost
to redundancy)
 Small increases in charges are better than losing the facility completely. Increase community
involvement – provide coffee shop within for revenue.




 One day per week closure possibly. Maximise use of centre. Use in evenings. Make more user
friendly.




Scoring system



Make more use of facilities
Needs analysis – “Talk to the People”
Using public buildings differently and more flexibly, providing services and space for different needs and
groups.
Reference has already been made of the need to see the Nigg oil yard re-opened with a focus on
renewables. GE is a turbine manufacturer with a renewables HQ in Glasgow who might be encouraged
to throw their hat in the ring as possible operators at Nigg. They recently announced an intention to
invest £100m in an offshore wind plant in the UK. Could we at least try to interest them?

Mark Maguire
Corporate Communications Director
GE UK
T: 020 7302 6068
M: 07717 517 071
mark.maguire1@ge.com
www.ge.com

Aberdeen City Council wants extra income from business rates associated with the re-development of
Union Terrace Gardens to be retained in Aberdeen to pay for the project, a scheme known as TIF (Tax
Incremental Funding). Highland Council could make a similar case for capital spending through
compulsory purchase of Nigg. This would have a pronounced positive multiplier effect on Easter Ross
and East Sutherland.
Reference is made to reducing the spend on buildings and reducing the number of buildings but this
process has been ongoing for many, many years. Many towns and villages have no idea what their
Council Tax is being spent on as little seems to appear locally. Spend per settlement accounting would
shed some light here ward by ward.
We would wholeheartedly support a move to provide local areas with their own budgets to control many
local services, such as school transport, cleaning, litter collection, day care facilities, library/information
services and other issues relevant within their geographical boundaries for example, the many small
repair/maintenance tasks. These budgets, issued by Highland Council, could be operated by local
business initiatives, or community interest companies, with appropriate personnel employed to
administer them.




• Sharing of buildings – public services being run from a 3rd sector building (flexibility) & vice versa.
Possibly based on travel time and travel costs to get to facilities? I would still rather pay higher taxes to
maintain services.
Retain core services; a suitable comparison might be prior to 1974 amalgamation

See Item iii)




Talk to community before making changes




No closures where only service; reduce in bigger areas where alternative



Each service needs to have their user numbers looked at. THC‟s return for investment. How multi
purpose the building is.




Analyse uptake of services within any community: usage
Put them in the open market and see if anybody would be interested in running them privately?
Give community centres in Inverness to community to run.




Watch out for repetitive consultation exercises.



Not sure.

Identify usage & needs.




Consulting & partnership working but communities need to co-operate and help provide solutions, not
problems!
Appoint a “doorstep” consultant, actively seek out public views door to door, use community councils,
they will be the foot soldiers.
Maybe get the community to rank things in order of importance.



Do essentials only.




Questionnaire to communities in usage of facilities.

Speak to whole community. Needs assessment.



Community Council.



Ask communities.

On line.



Community Forums.



Only consider reducing those where travel distance to next similar facility is short.

SR01 bases.

Social Audit.
It‟s to do with ensuring minimum standards & avoiding excessive travel distances.

Use facilities that are in place (schools)



Surveys.

Ask the people.



Through consultation at a local level.
Increase your pay freeze to 3 years.



You already have the data. Use it!

Decisions have to be made and bite the bullet – affecting the least number of people possible.



Proper analysis




Discuss possibilities with the public.




Poll on Electoral roll.

If there are more than 1 community facility in an area perhaps they could be combined.



Combine facilities. i.e. starbucks/tea room into the library. Look at usage figures.
Look at usage (obviously!!)




Look at population numbers, numbers of usages 34,000 in Alness pool in 1 yr. Compare these to Tain &
Nairn!




By a ballot!
very difficult but look at distance to facilities nearby escpecially in towns
Doesn‟t make sense.




Ask the individual communities.

Carry out a survey.




Open meetings . Community Council. Yearly survey with Council Tax bill.




Look to models in other communities e.g. Sweden.




Questionnaire - canvas local views.



Public consultation. Review alternative - use previous users - date collected.




Conduct a community survey.



Toilets - these could be in a local hotel; Library - situated within High School or service point; Museums -
it is important that these are in local areas - not all in Inverness.
No answer

Take note of priorities given in the meeting and others en route!

No answer

Ask for local advice and volunteers




Ask the people that use them – Community Councils

No answer




Monitor the use against criteria




Ask people! Use buildings (like schools) more flexibly.

No answer




Small nominal charges

No answer



We are not qualified to answer. People get paid £100k to answer this!




Workshop, courses on unused facility as a percentage of local community; feasibility/business plan

No time. Too many people!



Evaluate usage and consult with local communities




Only cheap way is to ask each community (depends on how good community councillors are)




Allow efficiencies to be made using common sense rather than shift things

Ask local communities.
Talk to community, but reduce costs rather services, simplify systems




Don't know
Use it or lose it.
The suggestion is well made However care must be exercised to ensure that communities which are
most needy and have least
capacity to help themselves are not disproportionately disadvantaged




An audit of each community




We only have the Macphail Centre; the Service Point and the Leisure Centre owned by HC and these
cannot be „reduced‟. Each of them already shares with another facility e.g. Service Pt in Mo Dhachaidh
private nursing home, Library and Macphail Centre within High School etc.. There is no realistic way to
reduce this and provide any of their services. Services in other areas could similarly be amalgamated to
make best use of one building, allowing the other to be sold.
Best Value
“More communication and consultations with the communities”




NO ANSWER

“Each area has to be looked at individually”

“Reduce opening hours”
“Engage user groups to facilitate best way forward”



NO ANSWER

NO ANSWER

NO ANSWER

“Assess utilisation first”

“Review opening hours”



“Efficient use of staff”



“Make more use of library and community centre, eg lunch clubs”

“Don‟t know”




“No comment”
“Canvas locals and holidaymakers”




NO ANSWER




NO ANSWER




“Local survey”
look at the most used facilities and put up their prices to subsides those in rural areas with smaller
populations




Talk to local communities - individual users and non-users of the services. Ask service users which
services they would be prepared to pay, or pay more for.

For facilties that users travel to, look at population distribution, and distance people would have to travel
to reach an alternative service, assess whether public transport is available and if so,whether the
transport frequency would make it possible to access that facility at an altenative venune, without undue
difficulty. Assessing accessibility by car journey time immediately excludes a significant proportion of
the population, who tend to be the most vulnerable.

For other services, assess whetthr the service could be provided less frequently, or in a different way.




This proposal should be adopted before any further action is taken to reduce or remove service
provision. For example, arrange opening hours for neighbouring libraries to permit staff to work at more
than one location.

If a school building is under-utilised, such as Brora Primary School, consider moving the library into part
of the building.
Questionnaires - Short, to the point




Ask all age groups, cultures, groups etc
Investigate use of facilities




Ask the employees how they can make savings in own depts.




Face to face
Look at integrating Community Centres and other offices, clubs, etc could there be more amalgamation
of facilities and buildings




Need to think about joint use of buildings e.g. volutnary sector and HC sahring buildings
Sharing buildings to save money is a good idea. Council could share a building e.g. in Nairn social work
are moving into the new bit of the hospital and the GP survey is going there too. In Nairn the lunch club
is already in the community centre, would be quite possible for the service point and library to be in there
too. Council should also think about sharing buildings with the third sector.
• Village hall & school hall – competition between the two – need to consider a bigger picture
• Highland Council must put the community first
There are as many answers to this question as there are responders!!
Would local people be willing to work with us to identify all the buildings in public use locally and to
work with us to agree how to change the use for their community, reduce the number and find
savings?




Yes, this could be a community council function

Yes

Feel uneasy about Council passing the buck.

Yes




Yes discuss with community councils
Yes

Yes




find out!
Yes




I am sure there are community-spirited people willing and able to contribute to this consultation.
yes
Yes




Yes




Yes - I would.




Compared to the other suggestions this does not seem a bad option.
Yes




Need to define public buildings. Those owned by the governement of a local council, or does it also
include those run by charities etc.,, that receive funding from a government or LA, or does it go as far
as to shops offices and garages to which the public have regular access, sometimes 24 hours a day
as at Tesco Inverness Retail Park.
yes
yes, its better to have some say than have the axe fall without option.




Empty council buildings in less populated areas could be rented out to generate income, (as they are
unlikely to sell in the current climate), especially in rural areas there is major need for premises for
business.
Why do you not know this already. Are there no records of this?




Yes




as ever this would likely be a small band of volunteers in each community.
There is a lot of unemployed people like myself if we got the unemployed people to to help out to get
us to work on a place it would be good to do something to a building to give it it's use back as
something else.
Stupid question. Why can't the council identify all these buildings? Who isn't taking the strategic
view on this already?!
Yes
I would certainly be interested in working with the council on this.
In addition - give me a list of council jobs, their purpose and their salaries - I will tell you how to save
millions!



I am sure they would, speaking as a former comm councillor. But there must be proper and honest
consultation. Everyone understands the need to make cuts but you need to attend meetings which
are announced to the public and be honest and open. Which unfortunately is not always the case.
Yes




Surely the council knows what buildings are in public use locally?
yes



Yes more services in one building.




Of course, very important as we are the people in the know who use local facilities.



yes

As long as Duthac House remains we are willing to discuss different uses e.g. Drummuie House
Golspie.

yes

Yes. Community Council is the obvious vehicle.



HC produce a review of each area and should already be aware of what premises they manage, the
cost and if and when they are used. For those buildings that are not in use can they be leased or
sold.

Ind area more vested interest. Who exactly.




,I would anticipate an affirmative answer."
I think people would be willing. It'd need excellent leadership though,as people are so emotionally
invested in their communities, not just passive 'consumers' of services or 'users' of buildings.
yes. The Black Isle Lesiure centre could be used more intensively- often very quiet at weekends,
compare say with Strathpeffer Community centre which is run by community and is much more
itnensively used, but there may be reasons why that is possible?
They have no choice as savings must be made.
Yes, the public should have more consultation.

Yes, if people are given the correct fact

Yes

Yes, is this not why we‟re here tonight.

Yes




Yes
Yes
Yes
Absolutely! Continue with public consultation if this is needed.




Schools to become much more of a community centre




Yes




Yes

Yes – If people thought they would lose it, they would!

Yes



Yes




 Judging from the difficulty in finding people (and with necessary expertise) to join the community
council. Means unlikely that more people will come forward (without incentives?)



Yes
Yes
Yes




Given the correct and acceptable incentives this should be pursued.

Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
I know I would.
Probably, a certain percentage would.




If you are honest with them.

Door to door.
Ensure all buildings are DDA compliant. Don‟t just pay lip service to it. Get S&L Access Panel
involved so that proper disability access audits are done. Ensure planning prioritise checking &
ensuring DDA compliancy on every planning application.

Yes
Council have knowledge to draw up plan and then discuss with public.
Yes - speak to all young people. Budget consultation should have a meeting at Dingwall Academy
with young people.



Yes good idea.



Yes x 6.
Rationalise use of all facilities – Tigh Na Drochaid, can they be transferred to private sector.
If they could see results & actions more likely, could also identify best practice from voluntary &
community groups.



Makes sense.

Yes – to some extent



So long as you advertise this opportunity within rural areas.
Yes



Yes – we do that now.

Yes



Yes



Yes




Yes – many public buildings in Alness are community run.




Probably

Yes

Yes the community would be willing to help find solutions but you are the experts & get paid a
considerable amount more than volunteers.
Yes. Discuss with public – through Community Councils?




A least ½ of households I expect!

Yes

Yes local people & organisations would be willing.
yes within reason-we shouldnt complain if we have been invovled- and listened to
Community Councils could be consulted.




Yes.

Yes.




Yes.




Yes.

Yes.



Yes.



Yes.




Possibly




Yes - include young people and old people to be consulted.

Yes.




Yes - multi function library or school for example.
No answer

Yes

Probably – older people

Local interest groups should provide assistance




Ask the people that use them – Community Councils

No answer




Yes




Yes

No answer




Yes

No answer



Yes but should they not know what buildings the council have?




Yes but need information properly; sheriffed by Ward Manager

No time. Too many people!



Evaluate usage and consult with local communities




YES




It varies. Some have 3 jobs, some welcome it.

Yes. The community know what is needed.
I think so - if the alternative is closure.




A need to look at flexible delivery methods was suggested, for example by using village halls to
deliver a number of services
I suspect they would. And there would have to be an assessment period. People can say they want
something saved, but if it is not used, then they are only doing lip service.
Yes




Yes. We could work with HC to see what if anything might be done but as in previous question no
reduction is envisaged as possible in Ullapool. Other communities could follow suit.
Yes – Community Councils are the route
“Yes”




NO ANSWER

“Yes”
“Yes, local and governing body – Scottish Swimming very willing to help with changes for best
practice”
“Yes, limited scope in Nairn as already under way”



NO ANSWER

“Councillors are elected to represent us, they should know what facilities are in use”

NO ANSWER

“Yes”

“Yes”



“Yes”



“Interested in looking at this, eg use Town House in Nairn for other things”

“Move the library to community centre to save lease costs”




“Have local people been approached?”
“Yes”




“Probably”



“Yes, the Council should be able to provide utilisation figures BUT the Council should be doing this
anyway”




“Yes”
Yes

yes




Probably.
Yes- People in their own communities
If people felt they would appreciated I'm sure there would be volunteers. The problem is to retain
enthusiasm for the tasks.
Can we transfer the running of swimming pools and leisure centres, archives and museums,
community centres and libraries to a not-for-profit organisation to reduce costs and avoid some
closures?




Where would they get the finance from?

Already applies in many areas libraries must be retained or improved.

Yes for some eg. Leisure Centres, definitely no for some - libraries

Regional Museums should remain under HC



Yes




Yes if there is a willing and suitable organisation.
Yes

Yes




Agree with the principle of placing funding for local centres/services in those communities,
where possible. Perhaps you should cut your costs at the level of senior posts (as they have so
few front-line posts to run since the last round of redundancies)
Has moving Glasgow libraries away from local authority control worked?




Why not.




Certainly, if this can be achieved.
worth exploring
Yes
Leisure Centres I am very concerned about the possibility of reducing hours or closing
swimming pools, leisure centres, community centres, archives, museums and libraries. It's not
just food and drink that we need --culture is what keeps us alive. However, if it were possible to
maintain the same quality of service, I would be in favour of transferring the
ownership/management to not-for-profit organisations.
Yes




Yes




Yes, please do if it means they stay open. The so-called capital of the Highlands with no
museum and no art gallery? Please! Turn them over to not-for-profit organisations. Let them
keep the income from their cafes so Highland Council doesn't have to subsidise them so much.
The museum building will need to be heated / maintained even if it's closed. The exhibits will
have to go somewhere. Stop thinking in terms of open vs closed and find a middle way.
Yes




Yes, it should already be in operation, if the cost would be lower.
quite possibly.
Yes, there will be more people looking for jobs as a result of these cuts, and where communities
feels strongly about losing some facilities they should have the option to run them.
If that is the way forward then yes




Surely they are already run by a not for profit organisation.




Yes, but again bear in mind the importance of access to facilities.




Yes this is a good idea




This would help reduce costs, but I think closures will still be required. facilities with low and
limited opening hours are probably not fulfilling a service need well.
to avoid closure maybe reduce the cost of places to go in if they are too expensive for people
who are unemployed.
Possibly
Frankly I fail to see where the cost reduction would come from. Property costs are hardly the
significant cost in running these facilities. Ask the hard questions, make the tough decisions -
do we want you to close facilities and pay off staff. If the Council don't need to provide the
service by law, don't provide it.
As long as there are not-for-profit organisations out there to transfer these services to and they
can be monitored to ensure that they provide an equal or better service . If they are not out
there, the council should be obligated to continue to provide
Yes, why not, we do it in Wester Ross because if we didn't the facilities would be lost




possibly in some cases
Possibly swimming pools and leisure centres would be better run in private hands.
Yes if these services can be safeguarded in some way




How on earth would that work when there is not a swimming pool in the country that makes
money?
Yes



Yes providing the correct H&S standards are met.




Concerned about ability of not-for-profit orgs to cover running costs etc.



No. Provided service priorities remain the same. SLAs.



No
Museum grants have been frozen for 7 years while costs, especially fuel costs, have risen to
almost double.

Yes, provided they remain properly funded.




Possible

Not sure. However many of these are already not for profit. Not suitable for all of the above.
Only if you invest in supporting the volunteers.
Through being of some relative support basic safety net. Charge more.




I would think that the likelihood of the answer to this question to be in the affirmative also.
Maybe. This is worth exploring.
its not clear whether you are talking about an arms-length council body (like the Glasgow
leisure and museums) or individual local groups. The council has a duty to ensure that whatever
new solution is found for management of these facilities, is sustainable, ie they wont simply be
cast adrift and allowed to fail. these facilities/ services are in the main, intrinsically a debit
funded operation. If income can be made from them under a nfp management, could it not be
the same under council management? We dont want to be charging for museum entry any more
than we would want to charge for attendance at school.
Would need some sort of suppor system to ensure facilcities did nto fall by the wayside after first
flush of enthusiasm.
Yes.
Yes! public consultation is needed.

Anything to avoid closures of these vital community resources should be considered.

Yes, eg. Glasgow sport and culture model.

Only if the alternative is closure – A LAST RESORT.

Yes




Unlikely
Yes
No
 Possibly, but on a case-by-case basis. The exceptions are libraries, which, as a statutory
service, MUST be provided by the council.




Why not private sector? Yes I think it is a good idea.




Yes




Yes e.g. Spectrum Centre

Need to know how it was run first to be able to give an opinion on this.

Yes



Possibly partly??




Yes



No. Does “not for profit” mean voluntary or a “not for profit” company?




Ultimately as prices would likely to deter many and ultimately result in closures anyway
 Shared facilities are a terrific idea but not without flexibility from all parties. (i.e. can‟t be closed
during school hours).
Research would have to be done thoroughly.
Transferring the ownership and/or the management of some facilities to not-for-profit
organisations
Once again, communities will be forced to do the Council‟s job for them or see their facilities
reduced to nothing. This process is again nothing new. People involved in running community
facilities will well know the pattern that has developed over time with funding cut to every
community facility and a need for the development of Management Plans and Single Outcome
Agreements being enforced to receive even this diminished support. There is little spare
capacity in the voluntary sector to bear any additional burdens. A cull of managerial roles in
services administering the straitjackets placed on voluntary groups would fairly easily reach the
total required. Often people are found with salaries larger than their budget. Without the salary
the budget would often be well able to cope (Ward Managers excepted as their role is key).
In our view, providing there is no overall loss of facilities and services, so long as they are run
well, then handing over (sale or leasing) to other organisations could work well.
Voluntary organisations have opportunities to raise grants for improvements to buildings that are
unavailable to the Highland Council. This could result in significant improvements to the building
stock as well as preservation of community facilities.
In Kingussie we already have experience of just such ventures. The Community Hall (Talla Nan
Ròs) is owned by the Highland Council but is leased by, has been refurbished by, and has been
very successfully run by a community group for more than five years. The Society of Badenoch
and Strathspey Artists has just signed the lease for the Iona Gallery, with the purpose of raising
substantial grants for refurbishing the decaying buildings to provide a top rate public art gallery.
If the will, enthusiasm and community support are there, then it can work well.
Handing over buildings though to community groups does not release the Highland Council
totally from some of its responsibilities, and some community organisations will only succeed in
such ventures if there is some continuing measure of Council financial support for several years
at least.
o Challenges if transferred e.g. Bettyhill struggling
Would you get the same community spirit in urban areas as in rural?
Often need a crisis print before communities will take on
Can‟t use purely no‟s if company urban and rural services p often rural services more valuable
o Formula can‟t be per capita base
o Travel for clients as well as workerso
Don‟t believe people care who provides but continuity of care important
o If 3rd sector can provide more efficiently a good think
o 3rd sector can be more flexible in use of premises – generating income
o Shared premises
o Ability for 3rd sector to provide services when Euro etc funding goes leads to implications for
communities
o Needs to be considered
o If going to transfer need to look at social return on investment
o Need to think about sharing but not just public sector facilities under one roof or 3rd sector run

the day care facilities in Brora and Portree be run from different facilities locally. Multi-use
buildings
o If transferring all - need to think about economics of scale. E.g. a collective of 12 swimming
pools cheaper to run than 2 or 3.
Does that just mean passing on the funding difficulties to other organisations?
Yes, but how realistic?




No; archives, museums heritage centres – yes.

Yes




Yes




No to trust; stay within community



Yes in some cases. Dependent on each service and their resources; “buddying up” of
organisations is a good thing in some communities.




Yes




 In Lochcarron there is a separate council service point in a separate building to the library. If the
service point were moved into the library, this would represent a huge saving on running costs,
income could be generated through the sale of the service point building (probably in the region
of £100 000 - half of the savings you are trying to make from the proposed closure of 17
libraries).
If they can be operated to the same standards, at less cost, this should be done. But, recent
examples suggest that inspection by box-ticking can miss important aspects.
According to Pareto 80% of your costs are incurred by 20% of the service departments. It is
these departments that must provide the savings. Trying to make savings by looking at
Museums and Libraries is not the most productive approach. These services are vital for our
communities and visitors and must be retained. By all means make better use of available
buildings by combining services. Careful consideration must be given to redundant buildings
and if it is certain the Highland Council (THC) has no use for them and the local community have
no interest in adopting them then they must be sold to generate income. But, once sold, there is
no way back.
If it saves money.




Most definitely.



Possibly.

Yes, identify not for profit organisations.




Yes
Not for profit community run services very well prove alternative to certain communities and
should certainly be considered where there is a clear community interest.
Charitable trust? Makes no difference to users. Could it work?



Yes, if standards monitored and preserved.




Some Council‟s have already done this so join the Club.




In principal yes, in practice hard work - legislation, Health & Safety.

Yes x 3.



Only if Q5 - e.g. provision for more disadvantaged groups like older people can be ensured.



Yes for leisure centres.

Possibly – providing a suitable framework for operation exists.



Substantial grants?
Yes if it keeps all archives open.

Only with assurance of core funding.



If it isn‟t broken, don‟t fix it.

This should be explored.

Would quality of service & cleanliness be maintained, what is incentive for “not for profit”
organisations to do this – potential impact of training etc for those people to do so.
Yes



Yes worth looking in to.

Would be v difficult.



We need the expert advice of Cllrs to help the transition over.



Yes if service the same.


There is not enough provision in other pools to provide swimming lessons for children who
would normally go to Alness pool. Why not charge for museums which are free/ We should not
reduce the number of swimming pools, - they provide an essential service – especially
swimming lessons. Used by all ages perhaps they could be open more – to generate more
income. Lifelong leisure and fitness facility. Library provision should not be reduced but located
within e.g. new build schools e.g. Dingwall. This would encourage life long habits. Access to
internet important in this day & age. Also information centres – for local facilities & services.



Yes. As long as they are run properly.




Yes x 2

Difference of opinion. Only where not-for-profit org can run it without making a loss.



Sounds a good idea „leisure trust‟
Possibly. We fund our own museum. Maybe Inverness Museum should be voluntary –
run/charge?




Alness pool going in to a trust CLL – Community Learning and Leisure which would save 700k.

No – Libraries are central. So books etc can be transferred Foc otherwise duplications.

If so why wasn‟t this done a long time ago.
Yes - see above but does need commitment from local community
no. this will not achieve the savings required. what happens when the council decide to reduce
the payment for services to the NGO? closures will be required then. there are no examples of
this happening for reducing costs anyway, only for delivering the services in a different way.
what costs would be saved?




Only in certain cases.
Swimming pool already is in Poolewe and community centres in local area. Only have school
library and that is limited outside school hours. Gairloch Museum run mainly by volunteers but
need grant to employ qualified curator to maintain accredited status. „Closing‟ museums has
considerable cost implications in continued „collection care‟!

Already being done.




Possibly.




If anyone will.

Charitable trusts.



Yes.



Would require an evaluation of cost.




Yes if the community are willing and able to be proacting.




Yes - trust.

Yes especially HFM.
Yes provided careful monitoring of finances and accountability to prevent organisation going into
debt etc.

50/50 Yes with appropriate expert support

Some scope for outsourcing

Yes – needs investigating




Not enough info on what this means. It is done in Glasgow by a trust but is it a success or an
excuse to close facilities and reduce staff/change employment conditions??

Possible




Yes




Yes if it means keeping them open

No answer




Yes

No answer



Yes as long as its open and a “not for profit” trust, salaries are kept low




No; Either council / community or a bit of both

No time. Too many people!



Possibly
Not-for-profit organisations: if they are not already over-burdened. But if they are grant-
dependent, this may produce a hopeless cycle.



Possible – but more likely in urban area.



More consultation required – community groups etc. – we need to be able to run things in a
profitable way.

Yes.
Not completely.




Yes if able to grasp, like with like, lots of consultation, should be profitable i.e. re invest profits
into product.




No - as it would facilitate arms-length and unaccountable closures.
I don't understand this. Are you asking if we can transfer *all* of them to one not-for-profit
quango, or are you seeking to encourage such organisations to cherry pick? Ultimately,
however, if a not-for-profit is willing to take something on, and the council finds it is having
difficulties supporting it, it makes sense.
Again this is OK if the transfer of ownership does not markedly disadvantage those most needy.
and support will in many cases
have to be provided to grow these social enterprise groups




Yes in some cases




We are already involved in the management of local facilities pool/leisure centre and locally
owned museum. The day to day management and staffing is minimal and there is no scope for
reduction without closure and with the limited facilities here that is not acceptable. Other
communities may be able to take over running of local amenities but would need support.
Yes - outsourcing
“Would need much more information about this, however, social enterprise has worked
successfully in other areas. The down side would be bidding wars and competition, a partial
resolution, could possibly be a cluster enterprise”




NO ANSWER

“No”

“Community Trust”
“Yes - need longer term agreement and suitable management structures”



NO ANSWER

“Given running costs, not a reality”

“Is Inverness not an example – does it work?”

“Only with Council finance”

“Yes – the local museum is an example”



“Yes”



“Would be concerned if charges increased, especially if pay‟s being frozen”

“Yes”




“See question 6, plus hold local public consultations”
“Yes”




“Probably



“This may reduce costs to the Council but the community will still have to pay separately for
these services – this may as well be achieved by raising council tax”




“Yes (but without Interim Closures)”
yes




It may be possible, but is it desirable? I would anticipate that within a short time either the
organisation would be concentrating on those sections that produce the most income, leading to
further decline in the other services and their eventual removal because they have become so
unattractive that people no longer wish to use them or charges will have risen so much that the
services are unaffordable to those who would benefit most from them.




The proposal to allow services to be operated by “not for profit” organisations or companies
limited by guarantee requires further explanation. The available documentation does not contain
details of the funding stream, what control the Council proposes to retain, the reporting and
monitoring of the service provision, and the projected recurring budget savings. Without details
such as these the public could both be funding the service through the Council and paying for
the use of the service. More respect would be given to the Council if it justified the need to
charge for the use of certain services in the public domain rather use other financial vehicles
which are not open to public scrutiny. There are too many unknown factors in the current
proposals. If the facilities are to be run by not-for-profit organisations what model would
Highland Council use to finance the service provision and possibly acquisition of property?

If the services are operated by a not-for-profit organisation what financial model will the Council
use? Will a "service level agreement" be used and, if so, will the public be expected to pay for
the use of the service where there is no current charge? What will the reporting and monitoring
requirements be?

Libraries should remain within the public sector but museums, archives, sports centres and
swimming pools lend themselves to this model.
Yes- Inverness Aquadome is a good example
Also cited at the Ward Forum was that transferring 'Culture & Leisure' provision to management
by a 'not for profit' Trust could offer savings of £750k and offer greater flexibility. Eden Court is
already so managed. If the figures continue to look attractive on detailed examination, then we
would support such a move.




1. Many communities and local voluntary groups are adept at raising funds from within their
communities and from other sources such as the Lottery, charitable trusts, local businesses etc.
for local projects which have significant community importance. These could be used to
augment scarce HC funds to provide facilities which would otherwise not be affordable including
desirable (as against essential) components of main stream HC services like education and
taking over some less main stream HC services where there are strong local feelings that these
should be continued. But to work, this will require a genuine partnership between HC and
communities to agree priorities, ensure running costs are properly covered etc.
2. The key to unlocking significant community contributions is often finding sufficient people with
the right experience, able and willing to put in the time. Although many people are already
generous with their time and may be prepared to do more to help their communities get through
the difficult times ahead, “volunteer fatigue” is a serious issue. Thought needs to be given to
how best to encourage and support this voluntary effort at modest cost.
    Examples worth considering might include –

a. encouraging volunteering by HC staff
b. providing access to professional advice from HC depts.. such as tech services, legal,
insurance, planning (although care will be needed about what and how much can be offered)
c. considering whether more can be done to share experience across communities encouraging
best practice, avoiding duplication of effort etc
Need to also think of for care services a company limited by guarantee could then negotiate
wages etc to bring in line with the independent sector
Transfer to a charity is good.
• concern if transfer that could result in an increase in charges
How much would this cost? Often starting costs rise rapidly once the initial contracts are signed
so long term contracts must be fair & very firm
Do people using these services mind whether the Council or another organisation provides
the service if it means fewer closures?




Yes, Public ownership, could lead to asset stripping.

No as long as they are efficient

Yes we do mind especially for libraries




The availability and quality of the services is the important issue not who provides it.
No

No




n/c
As long as they are run effectively.




No




I shouldn't think so, I know I wouldn't mind.
personallly I don't think I would if the other organisation" was reliable"
No
No




No as long as it stays open who cares who runs it.




I don't mind who runs a place as long as it's run well.




I know the people in Community would be happy to pitch in and figure out what is best for us
all.
No - just don't want to lose sevices which are at the heart of he community. I would rather
have less refuse collection - could prvide more re-cyclingpoints instead?




The service is what is needed, not who runs it; however it must remain commercially viable.
no
no
As long as the facility remains open and if there are charges they are not so high that they put
the facility out of reach of the people who wish to use it then it does not matter who is in
charge




I would think it is unlikely the public mind who runs it as long as there are fewer closures.




No probably not.




No as long as the service remains




they care about the service level rather than the provider.
As long as they are retained and appropriate charges are applied to the public why not.
No.
No - as long as the service is equal or better than that provided previously and that the
service is monitored to ensure the service continues.
The provider is immaterial - it's the service which is important




possibly in some cases
No as long as the services are safeguarded and the local community has control.

Perhaps the council itself needs re-organising if it can't run things efficiently




No if there is no cost and easy access at times when people want to use them.
You have to be careful of the private sector not taking on too many clients for reduced pay
etc. The clients suffer as has been shown on TV in England etc.



Service dependant. Subject to regulation.




No



No. Provided service priorities remain the same. SLAs.



It depends which services we are talking about!

Yes, provided they remain properly funded.

No




Interested in quality not who provides it.

Does not matter.




Perhaps you would be better asking this questions at the point of contact.
I don't think people mind. It's the service that really matters, not the provider.
no
No, especially if it means fewer closures.
Yes! Public consultation is needed.

No, as long as its more at tone same standard and the services are provided.

No, as long as its there at the same standard and services are provided.

No

See above.




No
No
No
No
No




No




Maintain public scrutiny of standards




No

Yes we do but if the only option is closure then……

No. But libraries are a statutory service and need to be provided by the council.



No if some service provided




Yes! Standards need to be maintained.



No




No provided there are guarantees of prices and non closures
Don‟t mind as long as the facility remains.
The move to outsource services where applicable to the private sector is quite acceptable
provided that the existing management structure of those services is also discontinued, thus
saving the administration costs as well. Actual figures for current administration costs should
be made readily available for the public to be completely aware of the full picture regarding
management expenditure, and this level of personnel must be seriously reviewed and
reduced appropriately.
Only if services continue to be funded and maintained long-term.
Most couldn‟t care less




Yes

No as long as it is sustainable in the long term

Shouldn‟t matter as long as standards are maintained.




No as long as standard of service is maintained




Yes would accept local community




No




No but needs to be quality assured
As long as the fees don't go up too much I don't mind if another organisation runs these
services.
As long as there is something for everyone then that‟s better than nothing.




People are certainly interested only in the quality of provision and the security of on-going
provision.
Try using a system of time-banking, where volunteers are rewarded for their skills & time
given in service to their community.




No
No as long as quality is maintained.



Of course not!




Probably not.

Alternative providers must be able to provide same quality of service and decent conditions
for staff.




If ran smoothly it wouldn‟t matter

No x 2.



It wouldn‟t matter so long as they have a service.



As long as they are good at running if, it shouldn‟t matter.
Role of community development trusts & social enterprises?

No – so long as they have a proper framework for being run.



No, if well run & a good service.

We don‟t think people mind who provides services.
As long as it is run properly.



No. This already happens in some areas – successfully.

No



As long as they are kept open you would need a fail-safe to keep it open.



Yes prefer Council.




No – they want a good service for a fair price.



No




No.

Look into resources spent on Gaelic services. Prioritise!



They don‟t mind.
No




No as long as the pool is preserved for mairly the use of school pupils and teaching the
children to swim.

No

No. As long as standards are met.
no they dont mind. I do no think the council is always efficient or the most cost efficientor
effective provider any way
this is a biased question.




No.




Providing it has the same facilities and it is run properly.

Require consultation in each case.




No.
Point that‟s come up many times during our discussions is the differences of provision (and
providers) between the various localities within Highlands. Community spirit and involvement
seems much higher/stronger in Wester Ross/Lochalsh and could be used as
examples/models for the „urban‟ areas.

No if quality is maintained and accountability.



No.



As long as services are provided to a high standard.




Anyone as long as service is good.




No.

Probably not.
No – providing standard of service remains the same and cost of service is not increased to
users.

Yes if quality is maintained.

No! As long as it stays open (this was not a unanimous statement by the group)

No!




Probably not!

No answer




No



Not at all. We don‟t mind who runs it as long as we get to keep using it and it‟s still
accessible in terms of cost and opening hours.

No answer




No

No answer



Only if it‟s efficient




No

No time. Too many people!



Look at services which could be outsourced to private sector/third sector




As long as quality is the same.




No provided the services are as good or better.

Provided the service level / quality is better people will not mind.
Councils are accountable, transfer organisations would be accountable only financially.
Not if the service provision is the same and the costs are comparable.
As long as service was kept at the same cost




The local situation with combinations of local management and local HC staff works well and
we cannot see any room for changing this. The library and the Macphail Centre have HC
staff of course but changing these to another organisation is simply not feasible. So yes
people do mind in a small rural situation it can‟t make sense.
No
“As long as standards are maintained we feel that they wouldn‟t mind”




NO ANSWER

“Yes”

NO ANSWER
“No”



NO ANSWER

“No”

“Keep facilities open!”

“No”

“No”



“Not if it is run properly”

“Council is more accountable than other bodies – it would mean more control over public
resources”

“No, as long as standard of service stays the same or is improved”




“As long as we have the facilities, and they are run effectively”
“Fewer closures preferable, as long as efficiency savings identified”




“The Aquadome is not run by the Council – I don‟t think users mind who runs facilities (but
affordability is vital)”




“No – so long as conditions of employment are not compromised for those affected”




“No”
no




Probably not - most people will consider the short-term benefit only.
As long as it still runs and is up to standard




No people do not mind. We are sure most of the public don‟t know all of which the Council
runs anyway
I would think not.
Provision of Community Centres in Inverness. The Council provides funding and staffing for 6
community centres in Inverness at a cost of £0.425m. In most Highland Communities, the equivalent
provisions made through village halls with a standard grant of £1,000. Can we reduce the support for
Community Centres in Inverness? We would like to have your views on whether we could reduce our
expenditure by closing 3 or 4 centres, or whether we should reduce the funding for all the centres




Yes, reduce the number of centres




n/c
Could different sources of funding be found? eg increased lets or increased charges for all users.




I feel that closing 3 or 4 centres would be too drastic and it might make it harder for people without
transport to access them. Reducing funding for all the centres would, I feel, be a better road to go
down.
Such centres are at the heart of the community and allow those residents in such areas to utilise them
for many purposes.
Cameron Youth Centre build as a boy's Club in 1953 and a living war memorial to those who died in
the 1939-45 war. The duke of Edinburgh is Patron of the club. Iin 1969 it was taken over by the LA
as a Youth club. Although ECS provides staff and funding, ownership of the building and grounds are
retained by the trustees of the Queens own cameron Highlanders Ar memorial Youth Club. Since its
days as a boys club the centre's activities have ecpanede to encompass those of a community centre
meeting the needs of all ages opffcering after school club activities, adult education classes and
sport. As a regular user of this excellent faciltiiy ib wisk to stongly protest against the Council's
prposal to possible close the Cameron Youth Centre.




Cameron Youth Centre - living war memorial to those who dies in the 1939-45 war. Although at the
present time ECS still provides staff and funding, ownership of the building and grounds are retained
by the trustees of the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders War Memorial Youth Club. The centre
meets the needs of all ages offering after school club activities, adult education and sports.
Cameron Youth Centre - living war memorial to those who dies in the 1939-45 war. Although at the
present time ECS still provides staff and funding, ownership of the building and grounds are retained
by the trustees of the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders War Memorial Youth Club. The centre
meets the needs of all ages offering after school club activities, adult education and sports. (same
letter as above)
Cameron Youth Centre - living war memorial to those who dies in the 1939-45 war. Although at the
present time ECS still provides staff and funding, ownership of the building and grounds are retained
by the trustees of the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders War Memorial Youth Club. The centre
meets the needs of all ages offering after school club activities, adult education and sports. (same
letter as above)
Cameron Youth Centre - living war memorial to those who dies in the 1939-45 war. Although at the
present time ECS still provides staff and funding, ownership of the building and grounds are retained
by the trustees of the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders War Memorial Youth Club. The centre
meets the needs of all ages offering after school club activities, adult education and sports. (same
letter as above)
Cameron Youth Centre - living war memorial to those who dies in the 1939-45 war. Although at the
present time ECS still provides staff and funding, ownership of the building and grounds are retained
by the trustees of the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders War Memorial Youth Club. The centre
meets the needs of all ages offering after school club activities, adult education and sports. (same
letter as above)
Cameron Youth Centre - living war memorial to those who dies in the 1939-45 war. Although at the
present time ECS still provides staff and funding, ownership of the building and grounds are retained
by the trustees of the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders War Memorial Youth Club. The centre
meets the needs of all ages offering after school club activities, adult education and sports. (same
letter as above)
Reduce funding for all, assuming they are all currently being well utilised, otherwise close.
Merkinch Community Centre - the facility is the essence of a true community centre, serving all age
groups and abilities and bringing together people from all around Inverness and the surrounding area.




Merkinich Community Centre - Works there on a voluntary basis - centre needs to be saved as it does
a great job for the community
Benefit of Merkinich Centre to the good of the community - used by many groups and busy from
morning to night. The facility supports many people requiring social care - valuable work carried out
there.
Reduce funding for all centres




What happens to communities when community centres close? Have you explored alternatives?
Social enterprise?




If the change over does not affect the public then why not?




Merkinch Community Centre - son has downs syndrome and should the centre close he would have
very little to do for 4 days per week as I am a single carer and have to work full-time. We would be
looking for support from social services to fill the gap which would have financial implications for the
Council.
Reduce funding rather than close. when I was in England we had to work very hard to raise money to
keep our local community centre open and a local volunteer group ran it.




Merkinch Community Centre - how important the role these centres play in providing a framework for
a full and rewarding social life for not only our less advantaged fellow citizens but also those of us
who - in spite of material well-being - are enabled to benefit from opportunities that are not available
outside the public sector. Closure would mean that the people who benefit most would experience
the greatest reduction in a narrowing sphere of their social, creative and cultural outlook. The council
has put £400,000 plus of capital investment into upgrading the facilities in recent years; surely no
Councillor is now going to say to the citizens he represents that all that was just a mistake?




It would be more helpful if we were told the cost per capita of the population served by these centres.
close 3/4 centres in Inverness. £1000 is very little.
Cameron Youth Center is used extensively and I cannot state strongly how the Council is ripping the
heart out of the communities, and sending our young people out onto the street to find their own
entertainment.
I am writing to express support for the facilities provided by the Spectrum Centre.
I have been able to use the centre for an event and also to spread the word about learning – a key
initiative of the Scottish Government.
I hope that this Centre is allowed to carry on providing the many services which are valued so much
by the diverse peoples in the Inverness area.
Cameron Youth Club - valuable resource serving not only its local area but many other users from
much further away.




yes, Inverness isn't that big! Close 3, spend a little more on the remaining, and save the rest.
Are there charges made to the public for there use? If not I am sure most people would not mind a
nominal charge if it helps to maintain them and this is being seen to be done.




Reducing funding across the board would be better than 1 closing also asking the community to raise
money through running events to keep centres open.




Reduce funding and encourage them to be more self sufficient like other Highland halls eg Seaboard,
Balintore , Ardross




I believe the Highland Council should prioritise other possible savings rather that close the Spectrum
Centre, which I believe is an important community asset which is popular and well-used.

Please note my views (as an Inverness resident) as part of the consultation.




Cameron Youth Centre - the council has treated youth clubs, community centres and audlt education
as a soft option. To the extent that a service wjcoj was set up tp support, advise and promote youth
and adult sections is now a spent force. War memorial - the land and buildings are property of the
Trustees.

It is not consistent to target village halls and continue this high level of subsidy in Inverness. Surely
subsidies ratios should increase in relation to the rurality of the facility.
Community centres provide a focal point for many communities within the Highlands and are well
utilised by many local groups for young and old alike. For many elderly people, it is the only place
they can go to interact with others.
Cannot comment
Merkinich Community Centre - aiming the blows at the community centres is cutting community
support off at the ankles. These centres were fought for, tooth and nail, to bring specific
understanding of local needs at ground level. They provide invaluable facilities at a remarkably small
cost to a wide range of people. The centre provides services which bring everyone together in a
sense of pride and belonging.
Cameron Highlanders War Memorial Youth Club - shock and disbelief at the possibly closure of this
building which is what it is called "a living memorial" to our servicemen who gave the ultimate sacrifice
in the Two World Wars and who are still serving in conflicts around the world.




The Duthac centre is a vital part of the community where many local activities take place. It is also a
venue for many events which attract audiences from miles around.



Cameron Youth Club - - living memorial




I moved to Raigmore estate over 20 years ago and remember the fund raising events that took place
to help build the community centre many people were involved, but now Highland council see it as an
easy target to save a minimal amount of money. Highland council should remove the free meals
councillors get at meetings and provide there own lunch as most working people do,the Gaelic
laungage is almost dead and is probably only spoken by less than 5% of people in Scotland yet
millions of pounds are spent propping it up in schools or on road signs that most people cannot read
these extravagances are ok in prosperous times but not in the present climate.
If the community are so against centre closures, let them set up a hall committee and run the centre
themselves with their £1,000 grant. After the council have set them up with free energy / consolidated
other services into free space etc. Again, corporate strategic view needed here along with the review
of property - who isn't doing their job with regards to this?
Provision in Inverness should be exactly the same per capita as that of other highland communities.
The closure of any of the community centres indicated would be an absolute tragedy for the
communities concerned. The value of a community centre goes far beyond anything measurable in
the community plans or quality assessment documents so favoured by local authorities. To see the
true value of what could be lost by closing these facilities, senior council officials and councillors need
to visit the centres concerned and speak to the people who use them; ask them how the centre has
enriched their lives. Several years ago, I was involved in a community outreach project at the centre in
Merkinch - it was the highlight of my two-year contract to see how the community there responded to
their centre and the work I was trying to do there. I can only imagine that the loss of that particular
centre will undo all of the positive changes that have been made in that community as well as the
others. Serious thought needs to be given to where the users of these centres will go if they are no
longer able to access the services provided in their community. Asking them to travel elsewhere will
not work and will only result in residents not getting the services and support they need which will
have far-reaching consequences beyond the short-sighted cost saving in the short-term.
The community centres provide a valuable source to the community. They provide 1 a place where
children can meet after school, 2 a place where mothers, a lonely job most of the time, can meet and
discuss their children, 3 where unemployed can learn new skills, 4 where pensioners can meet each
other and be entertained, 5 where anyone can learn new skills because of the courses being run. I an
a singer and give my services for free for those groups and would like to see them kept open as they
are a valuable resource. Not only do they help me by giving me experience in live audiences, but give
them so much please.
Sports Hall - Dornoch Academy should become part of the educational suite of buildings that is
important to the economic and social development of East Sutherland and the surrounding
communities of Easter Ross.
Merkinch Community Centre - regular user and this centre is a life line for people who would be very
deprived without it.
Cameron Youth Club - war memorial providing a wide range of services at little cost.




Merkinch Community Centre - very impressed with the centre and all the acitivities that take place
there. Tragedy for the community if closed this facility.
As the Council has made the decision to hand over all Community Centres in outlying areas such as
Perrins Centre Alness to local community groups. I feel very strongly that all centres in Inverness
should also be handed over to local community groups or closed.
Funding for Highland communities is important, we get very little for our council tax in remote areas,
the least councils can do is to provide adequate funding for the community owned and run facilities
without which these facilities will cease and a valuable asset obliterated.




look at the overall efficiency of individual centres - also proximity to others
I'm sure a city the size of Inverness would have the resources to fundraise to support some of its
community centres.
Community centres and village halls across Highland should be put on an equal footing with funding
allocated in a way that is fair and consistent. Highland Council should cease funding community
centres such as those in Inverness. Instead the centres should be given over to communities and
where they are needed, used and supported by residents, they will survive. The village hall grant
scheme should be expanded to include community centres with the maximum grant (£1,000)
remaining at the current level.
Merkinch Community Centre - area classed as the most deprived area in Inverness - centre is the hub
of the local area and also attracts people from across the city - it is truly a place of diversity, inclusion
and opportunity, providing social and learning support for all ages of people.




Surely these centres are needed. Perhaps they could be run more efficiently




Cameron Youth Centre - purpose build by boys club in 1953 - living war memorial - since its days as a
boys' club the centre's activities have expanded to encompass those of a community centre meeting
the needs of all ages offering after school club activies, adult education classes and sports.




Not if they are providing a valuable service to the community.
I would think that there would be outcry within Inverness at this proposal, however, I personally rarely
utilse services within Inverness I feel it unfair for me to voice an opinion on this matter.




Petition submitted protesting against the closure of the Cameron Youth Centre - 216 signatories
I am both saddened and disgusted at the above proposals, people are noe being encouraged to be
looked after in their own homes, rather than go into care homes - why then is the Council proposing to
make sure that they stay there and do not have any place where they can interact with people of their
own age and interest. At these centres there is often help and advice given to people who would find
it extremely difficult or impossible to get elsewhere. It is hard to believe that the Council, if they have a
mind to and genuinely care about the community whom they are meant to represent, cannot save the
equivalent amount of money by another means which does not effect the same number of people.
Yes, you can reduce the support for Community Centres in Inverness. There are so many other
resources and opportunities in Inverness, in addition to council provision. There are also transport
options between community centres in Inverness that do not exist, or are not practical, in other areas.
The Community Centres in a city are the equivalent of Village Halls so the grant should be the same -
£1K each. If two nearby centres wanted to amalgamate then the grant should be £2K.
 Work more closely with the voluntary sector to avoid overlaps of services. Keep community centres
operating and do more out of them. Charge visitors to highland libraries for internet access.
Has a decision been made about which cost centres are to be closed if indeed any? If a centre is
closed down, what will happen to the buildings? Will it be up for sale? Are there other things planned
for them?

Cameron Youth Club - Horrified that closure could ever have been contemplated given the fact that it
is an excellent facility and that some committee members remember using it in their teens.
What is the function of the staffed centres? Is the staffing historical? Could these Inverness centres
be run along the same lines as community halls in rural communities, which rely on voluntary, unpaid
people? Our preferred option is the review of the Inverness centres with moves towards putting them
on a voluntary staffing basis, plus a reduction in funding for all centres and halls across the Highlands
– not irreversible in the future.
Community Centres – I believe they have to remain open for a variety of reasons, not least the issues
raised by Etta Mackay when we met.

The 3 main centres – Hilton, Spectrum, Merkinch – should only be open when busy. I understand that
at present staff are paid to man these centres but go home early in the evenings when no classes are
taking place. As most evening classes cease during the summer months it should be easy to cut
back on staffing costs. I realise this would not be popular but if we all have to make cutbacks then
surely having a job is better than not being employed.

The 3 smaller centres – Raigmore, Cameron Youth, James Cameron – should only be open when
classes are booked.
Great wastage here currently of staff manning a building not utilised. I hear stories of staff sitting with
their feet up reading newspapers in an empty centre!

Going forward I would like to suggest that the co-ordinators of the 3 main centres also manage a
smaller centre each.
Just a suggestion but closer control of the smaller centres by the more experienced co-ordinators
should drastically cut costs. Also the smaller centres tend to have the same standard room layout so
there is no need for more than one member of staff to be on duty unlike the Spectrum where room
layouts change often according to the booking requirements.

I am aware also of the high cost HC pay for the cleaning of these centres so I would like to suggest
that this aspect ceases and that each centre employs someone who can multitask - cleaning,
Inverness has by far the largest concentration of people in the Highlands and taking any community
centre away means taking away the heart and support of a local community within the city.
Merkinich Community Centre - centre is well used and a great amount of funding has been used to
refurbish the theatre - merkinch offeres a great varity of activities.
The number of people who are 75 or over in the Highlands will more than double between 2008 and
2033 - the demand on community care services grows markedly in the over 75's - also look at the
numbers with learning disabilities, autism and mental health issues will continue to rise and thier
needs become more complex.
As a 1st time mum my local community centres have been life savers. I've met other mothers and
have had support when times got hard. Cuts are necessary, I understand that, but comunities need
places to go, surely it's a false economy to close them, loose the projects that run from them and then
spend time building community capacity again when it all goes wrong. Many Centres have more than
one room, could some rooms not be used for Council staff offices allowing you to close some staff
buildings. This serves to keep council staff (or councillors)at the heart of the community they serve
and allows you to close buildings and use community centres for a dual purpose. Won't be too
popular among staff I know but we all need to compromise when budgets are tight. And on another
note the use of Consultants for any type of Council work should be stopped immediately. If council
staff can't come up with solutions themselves they are not doing their jobs well enough.
Yes - if the rural communiteies have to run their own centres than so should the town ones. Reduce
finding to all of them and the ones that survive will be the ones with the communites behind them
Dornoch Sports Hall - with the exception of the squash court within the town, there are no indoor
sports facilities for young folk.
volunteers could and should play a big part in them, ideally without paid staff.
Reduce the number in Inverness.
Merkinich Community Centre - the centre has helped me to gain confidence and make friends -
people pf all ages attend the Centre and receive lots of help and encouragement - upgrade work is
being carried out and I see it as a terrible waste of money if it closed just when it was brought up to
the right standard.

Merkinch Community Centre - karate club held at this centre and is vital that the club continues to
operate here as there are no other facilities in the area - Merkinch is an area of social depravation and
the majority of families can not afford the luxury of personal transport.

Merkinch Community Centre - please keep the centre open as it is so important to lots of people.
Spectrum Centre Inverness - regular attender at an Alcoholics Anonymous group who meet at the
centre - 3 meeting per week are held and numbers can be 20+ - for me a regular meetings are an
essential lifeline. Huge range of activities offered.




Merkinch Community Centre - is such an important feature within the local community and dreadful if
closed - vital part of the local community - cannot over emphasise the benefits the centre brings to the
local community.
Close three centres




You are not really comparing like with like here, since village halls serve smaller population centres.
And as far as I know community centres are heavily used in Inverness. What would be the impact of
reducing funding for all centres? Would this result in closures?
Each closure needs to be explored case by case to ensure that the support these offer to the most
vulnerable are protected and to
give communities to opportunity to create alternative solutions




If services are being duplicated then they should be consolidated into fewer buildings in Inverness.
The annual £1000 grant is money well spent to keep community halls going. They provide a gathering
point and a wide range of events and activities take place in them. There are usually no alternative
buildings available.
Would it be possible to merge Community Centres within Inverness. This would make the potential
closure of similar centres in smaller communities less likely.
no community centers are important but could be run more effectively.




Yes, why should large communities in Inverness receive so much support, when many rural
communities with tiny active populations stuggle to maintain their halls. The support should be
reduced gradually but significantly, with the centres being supported towards becoming more self-
financing.




There are many communities in Highland without any community facilities at all. Grants of £1,000
hardly cover the cost of keeping a village hall open and cannot contribute to long-term maintenance
and repairs. The average grant of nearly £71,000 to each of 6 community centres in Inverness
demonstrates the inequality of provision across Highland.

Are there other community centres in urban areas receiving similar funding? Would the Council
consider transferring the responsibility for the community centres to community organisations and
reducing funding to the same as that received by other communities over, say, three years?
Dornoch sports hall (no original letter)




Petition in support of the retention of Spectrum Centre - 1560 signatories
Petition in support of the retention of Community Centres in Inverness - 4191 signatories
Merkinch Community Centre - recovering from chronic illness and volunteer at facility - recently had
studio theatre - seems really unfair and insane to close such an asset to the city.




Over 4000 signature petition - as the population of Inverness increases the need for our community
centres grow - they serve what the name indicates - from the cradle to the grave - the young,
teenagers, adults and senior citizens.
Merkinch Community Centre - we run a very well run centre by people of all ages and abilities with
very good feedback from users therefore I would hope that Merkinch Conmmunity Centre will be able
to continue operating in the future with the present staffing levels.

The Management Committee of the Cameron Youth Centre have looked at the annual Highland
Council budget for the Centre.
They have identified the following savings that could be made:

• Electricity Management Committee pay extra 10% making it 60% instead of current 50%
• Cleaning Materials Management Committee could take on 100%
• Stationery Management Committee could take on 100%
• Photocopier Management Committee could take on 100%
• Postages Management Committee could take on 100%
This amounts to approximately £2,500 per year savings on the current budget. The staff costs are not
something the Management Committee has any control over. The current staff levels are as low as
possible for the centre, with the co-ordinator being part time at the centre. We will continue to pay for
the minor inside maintenance such as painting and floor covering as we have been doing in the past.
The Council will still be responsible for keeping the building wind and water proof. I hope that this in
some way will show that the Cameron Youth Centre is willing to make a contribution to the overall
savings that are required.




At the meeting of Kiltarlity Community Council held on 19 May 2010 the Council after discussion
decided as part of the consultation process to make representation to the Highland in support of the
continued funding of Community Councils. The meeting was of the view that the range of services
provided to the communities served were vital to the range of groups and age groups which benefit
from the Centres. The Council were of the opinion that closure of the Centres would ultimately lead to
other issues arising which might well require significant future expenditure by the Highland Council.
Budget saving suggestions from Hilton Community Centre - separate booklet and spreadsheet
provided. Savings ideas include: Reduce opening hours by 4 on a Saturday, open 9-3 instead of 8-6.
4 hours x 52 weeks x £8.26 x 1.5 + 21%; Reduce opening hours by 0.5 every day, open 8.30am
instead of 8.00am. 2.5 hours x 52 weeks x £8.26 + 21%; Reduce Centre Co-ordinators hours by 3. 3
hours x 52 weeks x £13.70 + 21%; Change current arrangements for cleaning, by creating 1 post of 5
hours per day managed by HC centre staff, instead of 3 posts totalling 7 hours per day managed by
Contract Cleaning. 10 hours x 52 weeks x £6.13 + 21%; Centre Co-ordinator - as well as managing
Hilton Community Centre, is also responsible for managing Culduthel Hall and Smithton Hall; Clerical
Officer - as well as all Hilton Community Centre work, clerical officer also deals with bookings and
payments for Culduthel Hall, undertakes admin duties for Active School Co-ordinator and takes
holiday activity bookings for all venues in Inverness area; Active School Co-ordinator - Inverness
Royal Academy Primary School cluster ASC uses an office in Hilton Community Centre




Merkinch Community Centre - regular attender and enjoy the activities which are very important to
me. Going to the centre has helped me to get out of the house, make new friends and enjoy learning
new skills.




Merkinch Community Centre - don't dare close this facility - best run and cleanest in town.
Merkinch Community Centre - very vibrant and flourishing centre - 3 minute dvd enclosed! Many
letters and a petition has also been signed by a large number of users of the facility.
Petition in support of the retention of the James Cameron Centre - 37 signatories

Petition support of the retention of Raigmore Community Centre - 763 signatories




Petition in support of the retention of Merkinch Community Centre - 826 signatories




Petition in support of the retention of Hilton Community Centre - 3419 signatories
Archive Provision. The Council has opened a new archive centre in Inverness and has satellite
archives in Fort William, Portree and Wick. The Wick archive is to be combined with the new
National Nuclear Archive in Caithness. 2 staff are employed in Fort William and 2 in Portree. We
are seeking your views as to whether we should close the Fort William and Portree archives and
house these collections in Inverness.




No




Consider amalgamating these into local community facilities, or independent / THC museums /
access via Am Baille - if you don't also cut that!
Difficult to travel, due to distance, for some people from Fort William/Skye to Inverness. If this
were to happen, more resources would have to be available on-line.




I don't know a great deal about the archive centres, but I feel that housing these collections in
Inverness could be useful.
not qualified to say
Yes unless they are well visited in their existing location.
Close Fort William and Portree




I am sure the majority of people would rather the facilities stayed open no matter who they were
run by.
Yes, house them in Inverness unless a lot of people are using them.




Archives are historically important for the areas where they arise. Therefore the Fort William
and Portree areas should be retained. If it is felt now that the whole Highland area can be
covered in Inverness, it is a only a small step before the Westminster government could decide
that the entire Great Britain archives would be best housed in a single centre in say the West
Midlands.....
yes.
Yes, its more efficient and cost effective.
I am sure the people in Fort William and Skye would be delighted with that suggestion!!
However as I am unsure what is stored in them and whether or not they are accessible by
computer I cannot really comment further.




House in Inverness
I was concerned when separate Archives were opened for Fort William and Wick. I understand
the desire for local access but this is a specialised service which would be more effectively run
from Inverness.




If there is a good financial case for this.
House them in the library.
No - I believe that collections should be held in the location they apply to and not solely held in
Inverness or Wick
Close them - they are an unnecessary drain on resources.




all should be individually assessed as to usage/cost effectiveness
I am appalled that having just opened a really excellent new Archive centre in Portree, there
appears to be a move to close it and take all the contents to Inverness.
Please take note that I shall ask for the return of all the material that I loaned to the Archive
Centre, currently held in Portree on the very clear understanding that it should not leave the
island.
This is a first class facility, extremely important for the future of tourism and the prosperity of the
Island and every possible effort should be made to retain it. There must be opportunities for
young people in particular, to run a Family Tracing facility for which charges could be made, as
well as other money making efforts, if only to help to preserve this important record.
You MUST try to keep it here in Portree.
I was startled to read in the Highland Council‟s Webpage and in the local press that the closure
of the Lochaber Archive is being considered as part of the Council‟s forthcoming savings drive.
As you know from the papers I have already deposited in the Lochaber Archive, the public
desire for a repository in Fort William has been ongoing for over thirty years. I promoted it when I
was Vice Chairman of the former Lochaber District Council and had the full support of Cllr Dr
Michael Foxley then and after regionalisation by both he and his colleagues. The main objective
in these early days was to provide a local facility to which the public could bring archive material
to prevent it being destroyed. There was absolutely no interest in sending it to Inverness and or
Edinburgh. That is still the case.
Due to my interest over the past fifty years I probably have one of the best collections of West
Highland and Lochaber papers extant. Some of these I have already deposited on loan in the
Lochaber Archive in Fort William including many local authority papers which appear not to
have survived elsewhere. As you know from previous correspondence I have made the
necessary legal arrangements for all my papers to be gifted to The Highland Council after my
death providing they remain in Lochaber.
I appreciate the need to economise in the present financial climate but if the Lochaber Archive is
closed it is my opinion there is a danger that a very great quantity of nationally important, social
This would save pennies




Skye & Lochalsh Archive Centre - excellent facility - invaluable source for anyone doing local
research - surely the value of this centre should be taken into acount, as apposed to the cost? I
have boxes of documents relating to farming in Skye from 1935 to the early 70's and I am in the
process of cataloguing them - i had proposed handing those over to Dualchas however unless I
know for sure that they will not disappear into the vaults in Inverness I will keep them in the
family.




Seems reasonable.
I would suggest that the individuals that live in Fort William and Portree would be better placed
to give an answer than I.
I have recently used the above facility as a postgraduate student at UHI.Please do not close it
and relocate material to Inverness nor run down the excellent service provided by the staff and
facilities there.I realise there are difficult budget decisions to take but the hub and spoke system
is one that works so well in such a rural area as the Highlands.
I think you should be wary of centralising everything to Inverness.
Lochaber Archive: It is with great concern that I read consideration is being given to the closure
of the Fort William Archives. It seems so recently at the opening that the „core statement‟ from
the Highlands and Islands Council was that, “As a branch of The Highland Council Archive
Service, the Lochaber Archive Centre is responsible for locating, preserving and making locally
accessible documents and other records relating to the history of Lochaber These archives are
the recorded history of our Lochaber ancestry, which although separated from for the past five
generations, is still held in deep respect by all of our Cameron family.

With permission from Lochiel I was first privileged to view the material in the Attic rooms at
Achnacarry, page after page, paper after paper held information of Lochaber‟s past, there are
Rent books, dealing with the Lochiel Estates wherein tenants are listed, the rents payed by each
indicating their position in the Clan, Fishing rights, Cameron political activity, Church lands and
grants, the personal memoirs of Allan Cameron, (Uncle of Gentle Lochiel) Jacobite Agent to the
Old Pretender and his under-cover travels from the French Jacobite Court to London and
Scotland carrying messages to Jacobite sympathisers.

To those of us outwith Scotland whose past families were „encouraged‟ to leave for the colony of
Australia in the early 1800s, this archival material is all there is to fill in all we can ever learn of
those years prior to becoming Australian. To have this material readily available in Fort William,
so near to the ancestral lands that they rose from, is so important to present and future
researchers, that this need, this desire to understand this ancestry can only flow on as Family
Research Tourism which is becoming more and more possible to the Diaspora as more and
more records are made available.


Lochaber Archive: As a working Highland historian based in Lochaber I must protest against the
proposed closure of the Fort William archive. Research visits to Edinburgh and elsewhere are
sometimes necessary, but in one paper (for the Gaelic Society of Inverness) I made a point of
acknowledging the value of local sources such as the libraries of Sabhal Mor Ostaig and the
Clan Donald Centre. I am currently involved with Valerie Cameron Smith of New South Wales
in a major work, 'Jacobite Traitor? Coll MacDonell and the Prince', and have found the
Lochaber Archive particularly useful. It would be a great shame to shut it down.
The council gained support for its Inverness archive on the promise of a hub and spoke model,
providing archives of local interest in the secondary population centres. we have no real
promise that the Wick National Nuclear Archive will materialise, since its sponsor NDA will
probably be abolished by the current government. nothing will fuel renewed calls for a break-up
of the council better than centralising services in Inverness.
Lochaber Archive: I have just learned that the Council is considering closing the Lochaber
Archive Centre in Fort William.
Please do NOT do this, but instead consider ways to make it more viable instead.
My reason for this plea is because I'm sure that I am not the only person to have
been able to gain knowledge of their ancestors and family through time spent there.
Last July, after attending the Home Coming celebrations in Edinburgh, the New Zealand
tour group I was with travelled to Lochaber to also attend the Clan Cameron Gathering.
A small group of us specifically stayed on a week after that so that we could do some
research, and hopefully find our ancestors.
I spent a couple of days amongst the Inverness records, including a 3 hour session
with a gentleman on your staff, before returning to Fort William.
A headstone I found in the Kilmallie Churchyard had the names I was searching for,
but the death dates were no longer readable. After spending a few hours going through
the Rent Books, which Lochiel has kindly placed in the Lochaber Archive Centre, I was
able to track and find when these 2 folk died. With only 2 minutes before the
Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages Office closed, I sped along the corridor and
was able to procure their death registrations. From the death registrations I learned that
yes indeed I am related to these folk, even though they were not from the branch of
family I thought they were!
All this would not have been possible had it not been for the Lochaber Archive Centre.
Lochaber Archive Centre a distance, time in Scotland was very limited, and that type of
Having come from such
With regard to the above establishment, I was both amazed an angry to hear of its possible
closure due to the need for economies by the council. The facility has only been open for two
years. I am afraid that this proposal tells us a lot about the Council‟s forward planning and grasp
of its own fiscal matters in the short term, never mind the long term!
     That aside, we in the local area have waited a long time for this archive. The alternative is to
travel the long distance to Inverness or even Edinburgh when research is required – something
which time and money often prohibit.
      I had thought that with the Year of Homecoming 2009, Scotland and its Lowland powerbase
were beginning to wake up to the fact that thousands of descendant emigrants arrive here
annually, to research their family roots in the Old Country. Their love of our country and our
shared ancestry, is palpable and many save for years to make a once in a lifetime pilgrimage.
Instead of the brave new Scotland recognising a unique opportunity for cultural currency and the
resultant financial advantages this brings, we start girning about cost. So, jettison some of these
nice, expensive, politically correct policies and pay attention to what really matters.
         We know that the country‟s finances are in a diabolical mess and we also know that it
there will be a price to pay but, could someone please enlighten me as to why our language and
culture are, as always, the first to hit the cutting room floor. After all, this country spends millions
instructing immigrants in the learning of English, but has a tendency to regard anything Highland
as “below the salt” and a bit of a liability. Of course we can, in the present-day lightweight




yes.
Lochaber Archive: Please do all you can to prevent the closure of the above facility- a facility
which is so valuable to those of us whose historical roots are in this area. We have so far to
travel and so little time to research our history at any one time.




This is not a vital service and savings must be made the archives in Fort William and Portree
must be closed.

I have been alarmed to hear that Lochaber Archive Centre may be the subject of the finiancial
axe. I have used the facilities infrequently.
Then , earlier this year, I was shown round the premises on the same day that I deposited three
newspaper extracts.
Since then, I have realised how easy it would be to do some modest private research and my
family have been happy to hear of my donation, knowing that they can easy scrutinise the
material for themselves, should they so wish. I wouldn't consider using the facilities in Inverness.
It is too far away.
Really, the suggested closure is a short-term finiancial gain out of all proportion to the long term
academic and educational value of a rich cultural gem.
I do hope that common sense prevails, and Lochaber Archive Centre remains as it is.
Lochaber Archive: As a Great Grandson of John Cameron of Corriechoillie 1781 - 1856, and
one of more than 200 New Zealand descendants of the above person, I wish to record our
dismay at the fact consideration is being given to the closure of the Fort William/Lochaber
Archive Centre.
These Archives contain the recorded history of our Ancestry from the days before our more
recent forebears were encouraged to leave Lochaber for Australia and New Zealand.

As members of Clan Cameron New Zealand Inc. we are fiercely proud of our Scottish ancestry
and we feel that if these archives were closed then the Scots who have remained in the
Homeland have let us down.

We strongly support the retention of the Fort William Archives and our Ancestral Records.



Lochaber Archive: ! have just heard of the suggestion that the Lochaber Archive Centre might
be closed. In my position as Lochiel's Commissioner for Australia and as Genealogist for Clan
Cameron in Australia I am, to say the least, extremely disappointed that this is being
considered.

I am in regular contact with genealogists throughout Australia, as well as those in New Zealand,
North America, and of course Scotland. I know how much we all welcomed the formation of the
Archive Centre, with the ability to study Cameron and general Lochaber history within the local
area. I can only imagine the economic benefit to the area as use of the Archive Centre inevitably
grows over the years. The enthusiasm of overseas Camerons at last year's Gathering at
Achnacarry was something to be seen, surely not un-noticed in the local economy.

To get an idea of the degree of interest by Australians in their Cameron ancestry, nearly all with
roots in Lochaber, you might like to have a brief look at our clan website at http://www.clan-
cameron.org.au/index.php to see just how much has been accumulated through research over
the last 30 years or so.

I might hope that this plea for reconsideration of the suggestion will be tabled at your meeting
this evening.
Lochaber Archive: I read with dismay of your plans to move the Lochaber archives to Inverness.

 As an Australian member of Clan Cameron, I read with joy, such a short while ago, of the
opening of the archives, and now their existence is threatened.

The presence of the archives, in their homeland, is not only important to the local community, it
creates an attraction to tourists, such as myself. There would be less appeal in using similar
facilities elsewhere.

I believe any cost savings to the council would be outweighed by the losses to local businesses
and the like.
Lochaber Archive: As one of the descendants of the earliest known families, the Macgillonies
who were living in Lochaber during the Thirteenth Century; we are now known as the Camerons
of Strone, I was extremely disappointed to read that there is the possibility that the Fort William
Archives could be closed down and shifted elsewhere.

In my position as Lochiel‟s Commissioner for New Zealand, I was quite taken back that some
people do not realise just how important these records mean to us who live in far distant lands
such as New Zealand and Australia. We look forward at every chance to visit Fort William, the
home of Clan Cameron and knowing that this valuable material is readily available to us in Fort
William and so near to our ancestral lands. It was such a thrill to find some more records about
the life and times of my 4 x great grandfather, Capt Donald Cameron of Strone that we did not
know about.

Just last year, we were part of the 800 Camerons who arrived in Fort William for the
International Clan Cameron Gathering that was held at Achnacarry and Fort William. We were
delighted to go and see these records and then afterwards to hear so many favourable
comments from other Camerons who went to see the Archives at Lochaber College. One must
also remember just how these archives are bringing economic benefit from tourism, and will
help those who are living in the surrounding areas.

Many items, including estate and family archives of our Chief – Donald Cameron of Lochiel and
Mr Ian Thornber, other material from many parishes, some dating back for many years have
been loaned to the Fort William Archives. All of us have nothing but praise, to think these
exceptional people like Lochiel and Mr Ian Thornber had the foresight and thought to allow their
own records to be placed in these archives for all to see.


Lochaber Archive: As a member of the Clan Cameron, I am writing to express my concern about
the proposed closure of the The Lochaber Archive Centre.
The formation of the Archive Centre has allowed important national and international archives to
be returned to the Lochaber area and created a safe and secure facility to enable vital personal
collections.

I have traced my paternal lineage back to Duncan Cameron of the CAMERONS from FIUNARY
in MORVERN in the late 1700's, but will need to visit Fort William to trace my Highland heritage
further.

To those of us residing outside Scotland but with family connections to the Lochaber region, it is
vital that there is a hub for genealogy research. This is important, not only for individuals to
research their own ancestry, but as a trusted repository for documents of general interest
regarding the the rich Highland history of this region.




Skye & Lochalsh Archive - unique facility providing a free and accessible centre for the cultural
heritage of our island. School pupils are regular users of the facility.
We recommend promoting the new Centre in Inverness given the investment made in it recently
and either closing or reducing staffing and opening hours of the Portree and Fort William
centres – even though we recognise there is likely to be fierce local opposition. We assume that
the new Centre has the latest technology and has the facilities and staffing expertise to allow all
documents to be digitised and thereby allow searches of documents on line at remote locations.




Lochaber Archive: I am most concerned to hear of the possible closure of the Fort William
Archive at Lochaber College. This archive offers a unique service to researchers from home and
overseas. Following the success of Homecoming and the Clan Cameron Gathering in Lochaber
in 2009 the archive can only be of increasing value both to the community and internationally in
the future.

The £80,000 facility was only achieved in 2008, after a long fight by local people, community
leaders, historians and international support, to find an appropriate venue for regional material.
The archive now houses items such as the papers of Cameron of Lochiel and those of the
historian Iain Thornber, as well as a host of others including the Clan Cameron Association,
overseas donors and local organisations. The contents include material back to the 15th
century.

Let us hope that this fine archive is allowed to stay and not become the object of a cost cutting
operation to the ultimate loss of the community and a much wider appreciative user network
Lochaber Archive: I recently learned that there are plans afoot to close the Highland Council
archives at Lochaber College in Fort William.
As a serious researcher studying emigration from Lochaber to Canada in the late 18th and early
19th centuries, I would like to voice my strong opposition to such a move. I have spent about ten
days in Fort William in each of the past two years identifying and assessing the resources
available to do a comprehensive study of emigration from the region. I was so delighted with the
archives at the College last year that I spent three full days going through some of the Lochiel
records and I was hoping to spend even more time there in September 2010. Darren McFadden
was especially helpful in suggesting various records and accommodating my needs. I greatly
appreciated such ready and easy access to documentation on an area in the Highlands where
there is such a dearth of early information. It would be a great pity to close such a wonderful
research facility..

Although I understand the need to curtail unncessary spending at all levels of government in the
UK in these difficult economic times. I feel it would be a mistake in the long run to close the
archives. There has been a recent surge of interest in Highland social history throughout
Australia, New Zealand, the US and especially Canada in recent years. Lochaber has long been
neglected by social historians. A knowledge of history creates a sense of identity which is
We would accept a rationalisation in the newly opened facility at Inverness; but consider that
maintaining archives where the decisions and papers of public bodies are publicly available is
an essential part of the freedom of information agenda and hence of the transparency on which
democratic values depend.
We would accept a rationalisation in the newly opened facility at Inverness; but consider that
maintaining archives where the decision and papers of public bodies are publicly available is an
essentation part of the freedom of information agenda and hence of the transparency on which
democrative values depend.
It depends on how often these collections need to be accessed and if the centres are primarily
used by locals.
I was extremely disappointed to read that there is the possibility that the Fort William Archives
could be closed down and shifted elsewhere.
In my position as Lochiel‟s Commissioner for New Zealand, I was quite taken back that some
people do not realise just how important these records mean to us who live in far distant lands
such as New Zealand and Australia. We look forward at every chance to visit Fort William, the
home of Clan Cameron and knowing that this valuable material is readily available to us in Fort
William and so near to our ancestral lands. It was such a thrill to find some more records about
the life and times of my 4 x great grandfather, that we did not know about.
Just last year, we were part of the 800 Camerons who arrived in Fort William for the
International Clan Cameron Gathering that was held at Achnacarry and Fort William. We were
delighted to go and see these records and then afterwards to hear so many favourable
comments from other Camerons who went to see the Archives at Lochaber College. One must
also remember just how these archives are bringing economic benefit from tourism, and will
help those who are living in the surrounding areas.
Many items, including estate and family archives of our Chief, other material from many
parishes, some dating back for many years have been loaned to the Fort William Archives. All of
us have nothing but praise, to thank these exceptional people like Lochiel and Mr Ian Thornber
had the foresight and thought to allow their own records to be placed in these archives for all to
see.
We, as members of Clan Cameron New Zealand are fiercely proud of our Scottish ancestry and
I am writing in regard to the Lochaber Archive Centre located at Lochaber College, Fort William,
and to voice my concern at suggestions that it may be closed, and the archives transferred to
Inverness.
There are are a number of reasons why this idea should be reconsidered. In brief:
1.) The archives should stay in Fort William because they pertain to Lochaber, and the residents
and clans of that area;

2.) In recent years much volunteer time and effort was put into the creation of the Lochaber
Archive Centre, and large amounts of material donated, and so those people who contributed
would rightly feel that any suggestion of closure is going against everything they have worked so
hard for; and

3.) Many people from all over the world visit Lochaber to reconnect with the land of their
ancestors, and the Lochaber Archive Centre is an invaluable resource for those visitors. When I
was in Lochaber last year for the International Clan Cameron Gathering, I visited the archives,
but would not have done so if they were in Inverness. Highland Council should be doing more
to enhance Lochaber as a tourist destination, rather than making decisions to reduce its appeal
to visitors.

I very much support the attempts of Highland Council to balance its budget, and would like to
see this occur, but without the closure of the Lochaber Archive Centre. Saying that people can
Petition with 767 signatures to save Portree Archive
no please do not focus everything in inverness
Skye & Lochalsh Archive Centre - once close it will never be restored as an archive centre and
put an end to much local history research in the area - encourage visitors to use the facilities -
school children also would be affected.
House in Inverness or Ft William.
Close the Fort William and Portree archives and house these collections in Inverness where you
have a new purpose built archive building.




What a step backward! You open new provision, and now you want to close them. It is a long
way for people in Fort William and Portree to come to Inverness to view archives. What are the
usage figures, both for local and tourists at these sites? Do tourists target these provisions? If
they aren't heavily used, then reluctantly I would agree. But the Archive provision in Inverness at
the same time must be more friendly and useful - eg popular materials like Valuation Rolls kept
on open shelves.
this is probably rational but HE organisations such as UHI should be consulted to ensure that
access to these collections by
scholars is not impaired Perhaps they could be managed by UHI




It‟s too far to expect people to travel from Portree or Wick to Inverness to look up archives. The
National Nuclear Archive should remain in Caithness.
• Museums and archives: we would support a centralisation of archives. ECS 26
yes




Possibly the Portree and Fort William collections could be moved to Inverness, with a core local
collection remaining in local museums or libraries. Could other local facilities be persuaded to
take them, e.g. Sabhal mor Ostaig on Skye?




Probably only a small number of people would be affected by the proposal.
At the recent meeting of the Manawatu Branch of Clan Cameron the group became aware of the
proposed closure of the Fort William Archives.
This is a big concern to our group and we disapprove of the plan to close.
We are all agreeable that it is important to have these records freely available for everyone to
use.
Please seriously reconsider your plans to go ahead with this.
Concern at closure of Archive Centre in Portree. Become a focus for heritage in Skye and
visited by local people and scholars from across the world. Sited on High School campus
means it is important to students. 242 visitors between April and June and 19 learning events
which have had a spin-off effect on other businesses. Have personnally gifted the MacDonald
Collection to the centre, comprises of family tree, artwork, associated literature. Considered an
important collection by a number of academics. Could have been sited elsewhere but wanted
them to reami on Skye. Concern such a collection would be lost in Inverness. Tryig to promote
the work of the archive centre and generate income which could go towards the running of the
center.
I have been a visitor to the highlands for over 50 years and have enjoyed many stays on Skye. I
have just learned that the newly opened archive centre in Portree (I believe) is likely to be
closed as part of the cuts. I would urge that this should not be done as the history available to
locals and visitors in such an archive will be lost to visitors if it is moved to Inverness.

I understand the need for savings but believe that this is important for the heritage of the island.




My locus in this matter is that [ ] was my father's first cousin and nominated me as her next of
kin. In the process of finding a suitable home for her in mainland Britain, we unearthed this
remarkable collection of art and artefacts to which the [ ] sisters devoted their lives. Like many
of their contemporaries, they retained strong links with their families in Skye which clearly
influenced their work. I imagine this was typical of those who found themselves part of the
Diaspora from the Highlands to most parts of the Empire and beyond.

Several of our family members, though widely scattered, have strongly supported the efforts
my brother has invested in bringing the recognition of this collection thus far and will share his
disappointment if it is removed from what appears to be a tailor made location in the former
Elgin Hostel of Portree High School. Having served for many years in the public service myself,
latterly as Accounting Officer for the Scottish Development Department concerned with local
government finance, I am not unfamiliar with the technique of presenting an authority's case
against government cuts with what some would call the "bleeding stumps" among their services
where reductions would render the service undeliverable. I am not accusing you or the Highland
Council of any such approach or advocating its adoption but mothballing of an entire and new
project could attract that criticism

I hope, therefore, that you and your colleagues will be able to see your way to avoiding this
Skye Archive: I am astonished and dismayed to learn that the much-heralded and welcomed
Archive opened in Portree in December 2009, is now to be closed. Due, it seems, to cut-backs
in spending on „non-essential‟ services. In the past few years I have helped prepare my father‟s
cousins‟ Collection for this Archive. They were Macdonalds: daughters of a mother from Staffin
and a father from Portree. Despite living away from Scotland most of their lives, they spoke and
read Gaelic; and maintained an interest in the Highlands via The Oban Times. Indeed, a very
interesting part of their artwork consists of Gaelic cartoons on contemporary subjects. For these
reasons, all the art experts who examined their work (including an appearance on Antiques
Roadshow) recommended finding a permanent home for the Collection on Skye.

The Macdonald Collection was formally deposited in the Portree Archive in March 2010, with the
generous cooperation of the Archivist for the Highlands. It was very pleasing for our family to
know that this Collection (and this Archive) would be available for interest and research by all in
Skye, and all who visit Skye in search of their past.

Surely the economies of the „investment‟ in the island by visitors will offset to some extent the
comparatively paltry sum (of the whole £570 million) from the Highland Council Budget required
to run the Archive annually?

I refer you to my cousin Murdoch MacKenzie‟s submission to you of 5 August, and endorse
every word.
Skye Archive: I would like to add my name to the many that see the proposed closure of the
Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre as misguided and wrong.
The value of these archive centres near to the source of information is crucial.
I am well aware of the cuts in services which are being made across the board in Council
services and understand that you would like the public‟s views
When I ran a Bed and Breakfast business I frequently had guests from all over the world visiting
to be in the vicinity of their kinsfolk and to find out all that was possible. I have witnessed this
also when visiting Tiree.
Please think long and hard before you remove this irreplaceable asset to the local community.
I have followed with interest my friends in the MacDonald family who have gifted the Macdonald
Collection the Skye Centre. They have lived in Skye for generations
Their artwork of over 800 pieces, together with textiles and other artefacts, Skye family history
and associated literature has attracted much interest and has been seen on Alba television.
Another reason why Skye is the most suitable place in which the collection may be housed is
that both of the Macdonald sisters were fluent Gaelic speakers, with some amazing cartoons in
Gaelic, and that the Gaelic College, Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, is also located in Skye.
I hope you can understand that there are good reasons for my responding to your invitation for
people to submit their views regarding the proposed cuts to be made in the Highland Council
budget and that you will give serious consideration to all that has been said




Skye Archive: I am contacting you regarding the future of the Skye Archive Centre.
  My congratulations go to those who had the vision and drive to found such a Centre and, with
hours of hard work, made it a reality. Its proximity to the High School makes it an invaluable
educational resource.
Archives allow us to learn more about our region, our heritage and our past. I was born and
brought up on Skye and although I now live in exile, like many others who had to leave the
island, I do return home from time to time and feel that such a Centre must be maintained even
in tight monetary times. After all, 160,000 pounds has already been invested and it would be a
complete waste of that expenditure should the Centre be closed. Apart from it being an
educational asset, as mentioned above, it would be of enormous interest to tourists and to
people like me who visit the area. It is my understanding that the building is a listed one and
would, presumably, require maintenance even if empty. Therefore, part of the annual running
costs would not be saved.
It is vitally important to preserve these archival records. Families are part of the history of Skye
and their documents, photos and memories are therefore extremely important in enabling future
generations to know about their past, understand the present and see how Skye has developed.
This is especially important for a people too often marginalised or ignored in the past.
I am concerned about what would happen to all the exhibits etc.if they were to be packed up and
stored in Inverness. It could cause them to them to be doomed to dust, damage and, over time,
Skye Archive: I have heard that due to proposed cuts, the Archive Centre may be closed and
write to say I am strongly opposed to this. The Archive Centre contains a wealth of material on
the history of families like mine, with connections to Skye. Having this based in Skye means it
is accessible to the community on Skye, gives it a context, and makes it accessible to those of
us who travel back now and again. In the future it will give my children the opportunity to
explore aspects of their family history, they may never otherwise be aware of. Whilst we do visit
Skye, we are very unlikely to make the trip to Inverness.


Skye Archive: As Murdoch MacKenzie's niece, I am one of the next generation of Trustees of
the Macdonald Collection. The opinions of the experts who have advised us so far, combined
with the fact that so many of our family still live in Skye, support the importance of the Collection
being housed in Skye, in order for it to be viewed in context. We feel strongly that the Collection
should not be moved to Inverness, and hope that you will take this into consideration when
deciding the future of the Archive Centre.



Skye Archive: I am writing both personally and on behalf of everyone at Columba 1400 at
Staffin on the Isle of Skye to express our collective dismay that the Isle of Skye Archive Centre
in Portree may be closed.
This would be tremendously sad news not merely for the many local people and increasing
number of tourists who have had occasion to visit and to enjoy such an impressively useful and
helpful facility but also it will have an adverse affect on the itineraries of the many visitors and
tourists who make their way to the North End of Skye - there amongst other things to spend time
at Columba 1400 where many have reflected with great satisfaction and pleasure on the Isle of
Skye Archive in Portree.
I would be grateful if you would add this e-mail to those who have expressed similar concern
and disappointment at the thought of losing such a valuable local resource, so essential to the
proper understanding and future development of the Island as indeed the surrounding area.


Skye Archive: I write to register my dismay at hearing that the recently established and very
valuable Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre is now possibly under threat of closure.
I myself have family roots in Skye going back generations and so am particularly interested that
an archive centre be maintained, to preserve the local history and culture of the area and as a
resource for the local community, the Skye and Lochalsh diaspora and other interested visitors.
In addition, my father recently organised for the housing of the Macdonald Collection of artwork
by two artists from Skye, who were relatives of ours, in the new Archive Centre, as the perfect
location for such a collection full of local historical interest.
Please find attached a copy of my father‟s letter to you in which he sets out a strong and more
detailed set of reasons as to why closing the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre would be a
mistake and why the Council should do everything possible to ensure it continues as a very
valuable and much needed local resource. I strongly support the points he makes in his letter,
and for my part would urge you and the rest of the Council to do everything possible to ensure
the Centre survives.


Skye Archives: I was shocked and saddened to learn that the Council was considering closing
the Archive Centre for Skye and Lochalsh and Portree.
I grew up in Skye during the 50‟s and 60‟s and was looking forward to visiting the Archive on my
next visit and giving my sons an appreciation of their Skye heritage.
This note is brief……we are awaiting the arrival of Hurricane Igor….. but I felt I must add my
voice to those who feel that this treasure must not be lost in the Inverness archives.
Skye Archive: Many of us have been astonished to hear that having just been opened on 7th
December at a cost of £160,000 the Council is contemplating closing the Archive Centre for
Skye and Lochalsh in Portree. We are well aware of the cuts in services which are being made
across the board in Council services. However the amount spent on maintaining the archive
center in Portree is a tiny fraction of the total budget. It has already become increasingly
important to people in Skye and Lochalsh as a focus for the heritage of that unique part of
Scotland. Not only is it being visited by those local people and scholars from across the world
interested in the rich history of Skye and Lochalsh, but also by tourists who would never make
the journey to Inverness, where it would be somewhat lost amidst the archives for the whole of
The Highlands."
My grandparents came from Skye, my great aunts and uncles lived there all their lives and many
of my immediate cousins live there now. My brother has a house there and our family are
frequent visitors. I am thirty three years old, live in london and consider myself part of the
Highland diaspora. Please make sure this collection and the extraordinary story it represents is
not lost to the people of Skye.

Skye Archive: I wish to protest against the closure of the recently opened Archive Centre in
Portree. It would be extremely short-sighted to close this centre so soon after opening. It is a
wonderful Resource for the area; of interest to visiting tourists, school pupils, those researching
their family links to the area etc. etc.
My late husband's family are related to the Macdonald sisters whose collection is now housed in
the Centre. This Collection alone provides an insight into the excellence of artistic work
possible before the age of computers, where personal imagination and unique experiences are
evident in their work.
Both my sons are now living in Australia, but both maintain strong links with the family home in
Staffin, I would like to think that they and their descendants could use this facility in the future to
trace their Ancestry.
I cannot stress enough my dismay if this centre is to be closed; our unique Scottish Culture must
be available for future generations in the Area to which it relates.
Museum provision. The council runs 2 large regional museums, Inverness Museum and Art Gallery and
the Highland Folk Museum and supports 19 independent community museums throughout the Highlands.
The museum budget totals £1.5 million. Can we reduce this provision? The Council would continue its
obligation to look after collections that have been gifted over the years. We are seeking your views on
whether we should retain only Inverness Museum and Art Gallery, only the Highland Folk Museum, or
only our support for the independent sector.




Is is also clear that the museum service will be affected.




Could these not be put out to the private sector?




All of these should be continued. If we lose our culture we lose our identity, and local collections cannot
be sustained. Funding for culture should be ring-fenced, as the Danes did in their major national budget
crisis.
Retain Inverness museum and Art Gallery (in another building????) as it is a major attraction to the city.




I feel that the Highland Folk Museum of the two mentioned would be the more worthy to be retained.
Local history is important. Independent community museums I feel could be run and administered by the
local community.
As the Chair of the Board of Timespan, I was dismayed to read that the proposed choice for cuts to the
museum sector lay between either one of the two museums supported by the Highland Council or the
whole of the service level agreement (SLA) for all the independent museums in the Highlands. Please let
me assure you that the independent museums value extremely highly this contribution from the Highland
Council. Although it represents just 15% of our core income in Timespan (and only 6% of our total core
and project income for 2008), it is a constant battle to achieve break even year on year and a loss of a
further £14,500 each year would put a further reliance on fundraising where trusts and foundations are
already stretched to the maximum. Our latest set of filed accounts for 2008 show that for every £1
received from the Highland Council, Timespan generates a further £17 of commercial income and project
funding. The fact that Timespan is able to attract this project funding from other sources shows that the
support of the Highland Council gives confidence to other funders to invest in us. If this is removed by the
withdrawal of the SLA then we could see the decimation of museums in the Highlands. This would have
far reaching consequences and huge knock on effects on the local communities. Helmsdale, for example,
has been designated a fragile area - an area of social deprivation. The loss of Timespan would increase
I think it would be a tragedy to cut back on Museum and Gallery spending. Inverness is woefully short of
facilities for the visual arts. There should be funding for MORE not less. The arts create an ambience for
the entire city and help to encourage an inward movement of talented people. This creates commerce
and affluence.
I think it would be a tragedy to cut back on Museum and Gallery spending. Inverness is woefully short of
facilities for the visual arts. There should be funding for MORE not less. The arts create an ambience for
the entire city and help to encourage an inward movement of talented people. This creates commerce
and affluence.
Invrness Museum and Art Gallery is a beacon of civilisaton in the town. But you MUST improve the
access to it - many visitors find it impossible to believe that it is up there and past the public toilets.
Vastly increase the signs and advertising for it at street level at that corner - which would go some way to
covering up the awful steps to VisitScotland. cover up as much of that corner as possible with signs for
IMAG!!




On a recent trip to the highlands. nethybridge to be exact. my family took our regular trip to the highland
folk museum and was appalled to learn that it faces closure. you must not let this happen as it preserves
the scottish peoples history and engages people to learn more. any council that permits this will find me
not voting for their party in may




After reading with dismay about your plans to possibly close the Folk
Museum in Newtonmore I am writing to object in the strongest possible terms.

I wonder if you can guide me to where it might be possible to see a copy
of the original agreements regarding the continuation of the musuem and
the nature of the council ownership of the land on which it stands?
Would it be necessary to do this via a formal request process and if so
who should I contact?




Please keep the Museum (Highland Folk museum) open as it is a fabulous attraction for people to learn
about Highland Life
I wish to express my support to retain the The Highland Folk Museum it is a well loved and great
attraction to visitors


I write in response the the article in the Badenoch Herald.

The folk park is a triumph in the provision of tourist information and activity. Tourism is so vitally
important to all of the highlands and the success of visitor attractions like this creates knock on invisible
income throughout the area.

Rather than considering closing the facility, thought should be given to how to maximise income from the
40k plus visitors, and how to increase the number of visitors.

Regional Councils are not entrepreneurial, nor should they be, but with some consultancy, and some
positive marketing, it would not be difficult to entice some of the many thousands of visitors on the A9 in
to this facility. I have absolutely no doubt that the figure of 40k visitors could be greatly enhanced.




Highland Folk Museum: To think of closing this seems very short-sighted. The Highland Folk Museum is
a national treasure! Maybe not viable to keep it as a free attraction, but it has so much to offer that it
would certainly give good value for any entry fee.

Something very precious would be lost if it were closed, and its resources denied to the public.
Highland Folk MuseumI understand that closure of the Highland Folk Museum is under discussion as part
of your budget cuts package. Such a step would be madness. The museum is the jewel in the crown of
the Highlands and is better than all the other museums up there put together. It is also often the average
visitor from the South's first point of contact with the Highlands, and as such helps generate money not
only for the Badenoch and Strathspey area but balso for the Highlands and islands as a whole. As a
regular visitor I would be quite happy to pay £2 or £3 entry if it would ensure such a wonderful asset would
be kept intact. I understand it also plays a major role by employing a lot of local people. The fallout from
closure would be far-reaching..




As a regular visitor to Newtonmore, I was shocked when I read in last week's Strathspey Herald the
"Cloud hangs over folk museum".
To me, the Folk Park was the most successful development in Badenoch in recent years. The Folk Park
was much more than an ordinary museum. It was a wonderful way to help Highland children understand
their heritage and a wonderful way to show visitors what life was like in the Highlands.

Visitors to the Highlands do need something to do, and a visit to the Folk Park is a very rewarding
experience.

I had in the past heard about sheilings, read about shelings and visited the sites of old sheilings, but it
was only after a visit to the Folk Park that I really appreciated what life at the sheiling would have been
like.

I appreciate the money is tight, but please do not close a very successful educational venture.
I am both stunned and disappointed to learn that there are question marks over the future of this
magnificent and unique resource in the strath. I
t offers such a valuable living experience of Scottish heritage to its thousands of visitors who are able to
witness life as it was lived in days gone by. It is my experience and understanding that it achieves 100%
satisfaction in its customer questionnaires so I am at a loss to understand how something so superb can
be under threat. Those who work there are thoroughly passionate and professional in the setting and I
feel that it presents history in a palatable form that really means something to those who visit the
attraction. With over 40 000 visitors last year they are clearly providing a sought after service that in my
opinion should be supported not challenged. I truly hope that the Highland Government will reconsider
any moves to diminish this very worth while service to the community and world at large.
Sell all to private sector
I would suggest that if you dont use it..lose it" is the best and fairest policy here.I feel strongly about the
proposal that Inverness OR Newtonmore museum could go when they both serve totally different needs
for different members of the community. Closing is too drastic a move when other methods of finding
income to cover costs have not been fully investigated. ie entry fees and feese for use of premises for
functions. Why close an award winning Museum i(e Newtonmore Folk museum) to save money when the
easier solution is to go back to charging an entry fee. People I have spoken to who visit this provision can
not believe it is free ent




As I said before I dont feel that this is a good option. Most Community centres do not run at a high profit
so I dont think they would cope with this and they would probably have to close in the end anyway.
Please ................... don't close our museum! It gives pleasure to many many people. Staff are always
knowledgeable and extremely helpful. Cut monies for fireworks, free lunches etc, holiday bin collections.




Get the museums to fund raise and engage with the community more.
As a recent visitor to the Inverness museum may I say that it was all most interesting and very well
presented. I understand that it may have to close because of budget cuts and that would be most sad as
it informed this visitor from England about so much of what is good about Scotland and Inverness. Please
try to keep it going.




No comment
keep all.
The budget should not be cut in regards to either of Highland Council's own Museums nor to the
indepedent Museums that the Council supports through its SLA's. It has been noted at national level how
important cultural work is in relation to economic regeneration in Scottish localities. The Collections held
by the Council's own Museums and those of the independent Museum's that the Council currently support
play a key role in the tourism industry of the Highland Council region and are therefore central to the
regional economy both directly, by creating employment and indirectly by attracting visitors who then
become customers of other local businesses. The quality and importance of all of the Museum's
operating in the Highlands and their Collections are a major factor in attracting repeat and foreign visitors
to the Highland Council region and encouraging them to extend their stay beyond the traditional high
summer season. All of the Museum's and Heritage Centre's supported by the Council provide
employment and opportunities for volunteering. They are an important element in the make-up of the
communities that they serve. The social impact of the Museums and Heritage Centres that the Council
supports financially can broken down into three categories; 1) Lifelong Learning 2) Health and Well-Being
The budget should not be cut in regards to either of Highland Council's own Museums nor to the
indepedent Museums that the Council supports through its SLA's. It has been noted at national level how
important cultural work is in relation to economic regeneration in Scottish localities. The Collections held
by the Council's own Museums and those of the independent Museum's that the Council currently
supports through its SLA's play a key role in the tourism industry of the Highland Council region and are
therefore central to the regional economy both directly, by creating employment and indirectly by
attracting visitors who then become customers of other local businesses. The quality and importance of
all of the Museums operating in the Highlands and their Collections are a major factor in attracting repeat
and foreign visitors to the Highland Council region and encouraging them to extend their stay beyond the
traditional high summer season. All of the Museums and Heritage Centres supported by the Council
through its SLA's and the Council's own Museums provide employment and opportunities for
volunteering. They are an important element in the make-up of the communities that they serve. The
social impact of the Museums and Heritage Centres that the Council supports financially through its




Highland Folk Museum: I wish to log my support of the Newtonmore Highland Folk Museum,
I believe that this wonderful amenity has done and continues to do
great good for the highland heritage past and future.
I would keep the 2 large museums, and provide advice for the others on how to secure their own budgets,
using small admission fees, active participation to engage people through theatre, etc
Short answer is no. The museums should remain as they are, where they are. They are important to the
culture of the areas they are in not only for locals but also for visitors. Our history shows us who we are.




How are the public to view them if they are stored away in Council buildings especially as you do not
know what buildings you have. Support should continue for them all.




Reduce provision and encourage donations backed up by gift aid as ht eWildlife park near Aviemore does
On balance I would favour continuing with the present support for museums in the Highlands. These
museums, including rhe locally run ones, are important visitor attractions. The Council's funding is
investment not support.




This is difficult as they provide a valuable service for education and tourism - tighter budget control would
be the best start.
This is a desperate action, museums are part of local history and should encouraged not cutting. I notice
your cuts are from the bottom up to overpaid bosses. Surely you will save by getting rid of excessive
'managers' first and then work down to the staff that need the employment. There are lots of examples in
todays departments of the Council of quiet wage promotions.Possibly the most obvious, retirements,an
example a Chief Fire Officer plus rapidly a Deputy CFO that retired I wonder how they managed to
increase their salaries to their excessive levels. In conclusion the 'Council' should lose some of the
managers rather than losing museums staff.
A real link to the past - a tourist attraction - our past - do you really want to lose these resources and their
accessibility for a large number of people.
When are the council going to realise that the only lasting asset that the Highlands has is tourism and that
they should concentrate more fully on maximizing this. The museum is part of this asset and, rather than
cutting its funding, more should be done to promote it with better advertising and, dare it be mentioned,
relocating it. Perhaps a nominal entrance fee could be charged to assist the funding ?
The funding received from Highland Council is vital for the Museum, and its place that attracts visitors
from all over the world (and locals). The Museum staff fill in a substantive accreditation document to
attract funding from the Highland Council.




Don‟t close museums - they are vital community resources and get little enough funding already.
Support for the independent sector. Folk museum can make its expenditure back on admission charges
(got rid of in 2007, no?).
Again, tinkering - close some schools and make some real savings.




I am a student at Inverness College in the Supported Learning Department. This year we have beeen
studying Scottish history and we have on three occasions visited the Inverness Museum. We learnt a
great deal during our visit to the museum and used the handling boxes in the classroom. I am a
wheelchair user and found the museum particularly easy to move around. We are extremely
disapppointed to hear that Inverness Museum's budget may be drasticaly cut and would like to raise our
concerns over this. We hope you will listen to our concerns.
I am a student at inverness college in the supported learning department. this year we have been
studying Scottish history and we have on three occasions visited the Inverness Museum. we have we
learnt a great deal through the handling boxes in the classroom. one of our students is in a wheelchair
and found the museum particularly easy to move around. we are extremely disppointed to hear that
inverness museums budget may be drastically cut and would like to raise our concerns over this. we hope
you will listen to our concerns
I am a student at Inverness College at the Supported Learning Department. This year we have been
studying Scottish history and we have on three occasions visited the Museum. We learnt a great deal
during our visit to the Museum and used the handling boxes in the classroom. One of our students is a
wheelchair user and found the Museum particularly easy to move around. We are extremely disappointed
to hear that Inverness Museum's budget may be drastically cut and would like to raise our concerns over
this. We hope you will listen to our concerns.


I am a student at Inverness College in the supported learning Department. This year we have been
studying Scottish history and we have on three occasions visted the Museum and used the handling
boxes in the classroom.One of our students is a wheelchair user and found the Museum particularly easy
to move around . We are extremely disappointed to hear that Inverness Museum's budget may be
drastically cut and would like to raise our concerns over this. We hope you will listen to our concerns.
I am a student at Inverness College in the Supported Learning Department. This year we have been
studying Scottish history and we have on three occasions visited the Museum. We learnt a great deal
during our visit to the Museum and used the handling boxes in the classroom. One of our students is a
wheelchair user and found the Museum particularly easy to move around. we are extremely disappointed
to hear that Inverness Museum budget may be drastically cut and would like to raise our concerns over
this. we hope you will listen to our concerns.
I am a student at inverness college in the supported learning department. this year we have been
studying scottish history and we have on three occasions visited the museum. we learnt a great deal
during our visit to the museum and used the handling boxes in the classroom.one of our students is a
wheelchair user and found the museum particilarly easy to move around. we are extremely disappointed
to hear that inverness museum budget may be drastically cut and would like to raise our concerns over
this we hope you wll listen to our concerns


I am a student at inverness college in the supported learning department this year we have been studying
scottish history and we have on three occasions visited the museum and used the handling boxes in the
class room. one of our students is a a wheel chair user and found the museum particulariy easy to move
around. we are extremeiy dlsappointed to hear that lnverness museum s budget may be drastically cut
and would like to raise our concerns over this we hope you will listen to our concerns
TECS/36 Review level of grant to Community Transport Schemes. If the Community and Voluntary
Transport budget is reduced, the cost of replacing these services by public or private sector organisations
would be tenfold and would make no financial sense. In order to become more sustainable these groups
need to be included as partners in the single outcome agreement, enabling them to generate income to
continue their work in supporting THC and NHS.
£1.5 million does not seem like an awful lot of money for 21 museums. Not sure what is meant by
support for the independent sector"!"
I too, would like to echo some of the previous comments regarding Am Baile. What fantastic value for
money it provides through the creation of a virtual museum! After all of the awards and accolades and
years of hard work building up their collection of resources, it would be tragic to see this resource
mothballed, particularly as I believe it to be a cornerstone of the council's Gaelic plan.
I am extremely concerned at your proposal to cut funding to independent museums across the Highlands.
I am a board member at Timespan and am concerned about Timespan's, and other independent
musuems, ability to continue without the funding they receive from THC. In 2008 Timespan generated
through commercial activity and obtaining funding from trusts and donors £17 for every £1 received from
THC, a huge inflow of resources to the area. Timespan employs 10 staff, the largest employer in the area
and is a popular visitor attraction in an area which depends upon tourism. The risk to the Helmsdale area
in terms of income generation were Timespan to be unable to continue would be significant. Not only
would cultural deprivation be increased but there would be a significant risk of social deprivation as well.
Timespan has a record of encouraging cultural participation throughout East Sutherland as the only arts
centre in the area. We have high rates of participation and our recent cultural hustings was very well
attended with the venue full to capacity. I am sure that many of the comments that I have made apply
equally to other independent museums in the area and I can only hope that you decide not to withdraw
your support for independent museums throughout the Highlands given the potential cultural devestation
you risk wreaking
Is the IMAG cafe still losing money (as reported in the Inverness Courier a couple of years ago)? If so why
not close the cafe, and make the space into an indoor picnic area, something which Inverness does not
have, could very much do with (given the unpredictable weather) and it's something that Scotland's
National museums and art galleries (in Edinburgh) are already doing.
I write to express my outrage and deep concern over the proposed cuts in funding to Highland
Independent Museums and in particular Groam House Museum.
This museum has a long history of providing extremely high-quality and high-profile exhibitions,
community programmes and academic lecture series with publication.
Groam House Museum is highly regarded locally and nationally and in the past three years has attracted
significant external funding to the area.
The museum‟s minimal running costs represent exceptional value for money and the museum‟s activities
are a true focus for the wide-ranging community including schools, older adults and a very active
volunteer work-force. In addition the museum contributes to the local economy in its role as a quality, 4*
rated Visitor Attraction.
The impact of the proposed cuts would almost certainly result in the closure of this highly regarded
facility.
For a figure of £14,562 annually from The Highland Council, Groam House Museum represents
exceptional value for money. In these difficult times, with The Highland Council increasingly looking to
fulfil its community service obligations, GHM is surely an outstanding example of a successful community-
led partnership organisation.

I should like to express my deep concern and alarm over the proposed cuts in funding to Highland
independent museums, and in particular to Groam House Museum, which I have supported for many
years.
Groam House Museum is a truly exceptional enterprise which engages with a wide audience, both local
people and Highland visitors, in a way that has earned high respect and support. Its exhibitions are
always excellent, its community programme is greatly appreciated and its academic lecture series and
publications place it in the forefront of Scottish historical endeavour. The museum has created a special
niche for itself with its focus on Pictish art and George Bain, and the local community is rightly proud of its
international reputation. This pride can be seen in the number of volunteers involved in museum
activities.
The museum achieves all this on an already minimal budget, which represents exceptional value for
money, and any reduction in its funding would inevitably curtail its vital role in Highland education and
community service. It is such an outstandingly successful example of a community-led partnership
organisation that I would beg you not to implement the proposed cuts in funding which threaten its future.




I write to express my outrage and deep concern over the proposed cuts in funding to Highland
Independent Museums and in particular Groam House Museum.
This museum has a long history of providing extremely high-quality and high-profile exhibitions,
community programmes and academic lecture series with publication.
Groam House Museum is highly regarded locally and nationally and in the past three years has attracted
significant external funding to the area.
The museum‟s minimal running costs represent exceptional value for money and the museum‟s activities
are a true focus for the wide-ranging community including schools, older adults and a very active
volunteer work-force. In addition the museum contributes to the local economy in its role as a quality, 4*
rated Visitor Attraction.
The impact of the proposed cuts would almost certainly result in the closure of this highly regarded
facility.
For a figure of £14,562 annually from The Highland Council, Groam House Museum represents
exceptional value for money. In these difficult times, with The Highland Council increasingly looking to
fulfil its community service obligations, GHM is surely an outstanding example of a successful community-
led partnership organisation.
The above is a paltry sum of money compared to that which cd be saved by making swingeing cuts to the
layers of senior and middle management employed by The Highland Council who can hardly be said to be
impartial in their drawing up of the budget consultation exercise documents.
museums important part of culture/heritage should be kept open where possible. perhaps reduce hours
temp.
"We were recently in Inverness for a few nights.
We managed to visit the Museum.
This was one of the few museum visits that we really treasure and love to recollect. The layout in the
space is very good as is the range of topics covered. The level of the displays was just right and we were
impressed by the availability of further material.
Even though we are pensioners we thought the interactive exhibits were super and we treasure the
rubbings of pictish decorations that we were able to bring home down south to Bristol.
It would be a shame if this well thought out museum were to close.

Please protect Groam House, one of Ross-shire's precious jewels. Some things are worth paying for.
Strenuous attempts should be made to keep IMAG and the independent Museums open.
One option might be to consult with the Chamber of Commerce to identify multinational businesses
operating locally eg Lifescan,MacLean Electrical which might be interested in sharing annual
management costs with the Council in return for brand advertising on the Highland Council , HI-Art and
Museums websites and in the Museums themselves.
THC might also consider appealing to the private sector on behalf of the Museum Sector as a whole for
free marketing advice to increase the revenue in Museum shops and for other revenue generating ideas
eg the hosting of "Dinner with the Curators" in large private residences such as Castle Leod.
I am thinking here of such people as the retail expert,Mohammed Al Fayed who is said to be now retiring
to his Balnagowan Estate in Easter Ross.
As a volunteer at one of the core funded museums I don‟t see how you can pit the 18 independent
museums against the two fully funded Highland Council Museums, nor can I see the sense in
jeopardizing the viability of any of the museums seeing what a valuable service they all provide in their
respective areas.

I am aware that we all need to face cuts but to force the closure of any of these museums does not seem
a sensible option.

One of the questions I would like answered is what will happen to the respective collections of these
museums if they were to close their doors?
Many of the donors that come too our small museum donate to us because they feel their item will be of
significance to our collection, they did not want to donate it to a larger museum where they feel their
donation will be placed in some archive and never seen again. Many of the smaller museums also are
topic specific often closely relating to their local area and this is what visitors enjoy. If their collections had
to be relocated to one of the two larger museums then their local focus would be lost.
And the collections of our larger museums where would they go…Perth,Glasgow??? It is a long way for
children from the Highlands to go to see their heritage.

I really do feel that a fairer way can be found maybe along the line of Jennifer‟s suggestion with a cut
across the board, it would mean all the museums would have to look to their budgets but hopefully they
could all be sustainable and so this valuable contribution to our heritage would not be lost.
I agree with the previous commenters and would also like to add that our museums are a huge draw to
visitors, one of the things that brings visitors to the HIghlands is our history, which is so ably shared via
our museums. I have visited many of them over the years, including Groam House, Museum of
Childhood, Gairloch and the wonderful Timespan, each one is unique in flavour, as is Inverness Museum
and the thought of any of them closing is abhorrent..

I think that the suggestion made about reduction in library hours would fit this consultation too. Why does
support have to be removed from small museums, or one larger facility closed, would a reduction be
possible instead? Once again communities are very invested in their museums, fundraising for a small
relatively amount per year might just be possible, raising £14,000 per museum an impossibility. Perhaps
subscriptions could be raised, a newsletter distributed to supporters, giving dates of forthcoming events
etc, Museum trails advertised etc.

I also think that Am Baile should be examined against this background. Am Baile is hugely popular, it
receives thousands of hits a month, far higher than the circulation of any Highland newspaper and,
uniquely it has worldwide exposure. It could be used to promote our museum and library provision. Tourist
offices across the area have information on any number of attractions, a mechanism like Am Baile could
focus on museum provision and how excellent and diverse it is. I think that Am Baile and the Museum
provision ought to be examined in the light of how much money they generate for the Highlands via the
Diaspora and those interested in the Highlands, its genealogy and its history.

Cutting back the support to such excellent and income generating services seems very short-sighted
indeed. Its comparable to a supermarket chain cutting back its most popular lines because they are more
expensive to purchase. If money does have to be saved from this area then I think far more research has
I am not surprised there have been so few responses to the consultation via 'the blog'. By the time I had
registered, worked through 12 detailed pages of explanation and tried to find the right place to post
comments on this particular issue, I had almost lost the will to continue and only did so because of the
unacceptable threats to vital Highland resources.

I am a local historian, whose 5 years of research has resulted in a 'just published' book. There would have
been no book without access to the resources of my local library (often via the 'online' services), museum
(Gairloch) and the central library - especially the reference section - in Inverness. My appreciation of the
importance and support of the museum has resulted in my becoming a volunteer - now Secretary - for the
Museum, which is a model of good practice in 'local enterprise' and responsibility, with volunteers
enabling the one (poorly paid) professional curator to provide the expertise to service a resource which is
of great benefit to the local community - in terms of tourism and income generation for the area, as a hub
for Gaelic, traditional and artistic culture, as well as for genealogists from across the world, historians,
local schools and senior citizens. The financial benefits, ('savings'?) of cutting such community resources
would be minimal and almost certainly negated by the costs to the Council of the dispersal and storage of
the resources of all museums for which it would subsequently be responsible. This is a 'no-brainer' in
Our local museum in Gairloch is a treasure and an attraction for visitors from far and wide, the majority of
whom comment on leaving (I am one of the volunteer helpers) "What a wonderful museum!". Our area
would be immeasurably poorer without it.
It is quite right to say that for the independent museums trying to "find" or earn an extra £14,500 per
annum to pay for fixed costs would be an uphill struggle. We at the Highland Museum of Childhood have
a high level of commercial activity with income from tickets, shop, rents etc, and strive for sustainability.
We are not hooked on public funding hand-outs, every penny is a prisoner as far as I am concerned when
considering expenditure. It is a common misconception too that if a museum is skilled in securing grants -
we have secured many over the years with the jewel in our crown, over last year and this, of £425,000
mainly from the Heritage Lottery fund and 8 other smaller funders to build a brand-new building to extend
our education programme and bring our entire reserve collection on site - if one is "good" at this kind of
thing then we can't need revenue funding. WRONG! We cannot spend project money on paying the
overheads. And constantly seeking funding is pretty time-consuming and counter-productive as it takes
resources out of actual delivery of museum services. I am the ONLY paid employee, and we simply could
not open without our volunteers.
I like the analogy that if you need to slim down you don't cut off your hands.... hm, exactly! We are happy
to go on a little funding diet if every other service does so too. I repeat my suggestion - a small % cut for
two years for every service. But don't cut our funding 100%. We'll go under after a year or so.
Since Historylinks opened 10 years ago it has gone from a heritage collection to a Museums Libraries
and Archives fully accredited, Visitscotland 5* museum.

In the last 12 months Historylinks has:

• Answered 206 enquiries relating to research and collections.
• Gained 284,116 web hits of which 81,103 were research enquiries.
• Received 6,557 visitors.
• Engaged 788 participants in outreach activities.
• Acquired over 300 constructive comments from the Image Library, which has a world wide following.
• Contributed to the year of Homecoming and „Their Past Your Future‟

The Spring 2010 primary school project will involve four classroom activity visits and result in the
production of a report for Inverness archaeology unit and the provision of images to Am Baile, concluding
with an exhibition at Historylinks.

The next education project, scheduled for June this year, will provide five workshops (4 school and 1
public) and result in an exhibition in both the Cathedral and the museum.

The museum loans 3 resource boxes to schools and community groups.

The museum has an annual holiday project with „Allsorts‟ after school club.

The museum has around 20 volunteers, including 8 trustees, who freely give up about 2000 hours of their
time a year. There are 3 part time employees including an Education and Outreach Officer.

Historylinks has published two new books to add to its list of 8 books and a DVD, all researched by
volunteers. Demand for in-house publications has led to further print runs to replenish stock for the 2010
season.

The museum is a principal tourist destination in Dornoch and is a recommended attraction by many
accredited guides and coach companies. We are open every week of the year .

Given that there is equitable percentage budget reduction applied to all independent museums, our
contingency plans for budget cuts are:

• To progressively reduce the amount of outreach work with the possible loss of 1 part time job.
• To reduce the opening hours, including all winter hours.
• To reduce the number of changing exhibitions and star projects



I agree with Jennifer Maxwell and Peter Wild. Dunbeath Heritage Centre is in a similar position. Having
risen from a Heritage Centre to an Accredited Museum, 4-star facility with the ability to attract project
funding, we need to have core funding to function to capacity. The back-up supplied to our volunteers by
paid staff is crucial and is the reason we are successful. The requirements of not only Accreditation but
also the Service Level Agreement with Highland Council can only be met by the paid staff - I imagine our
volunteers and Trustees would be reluctant to step in to undertake the demanding paper-work on a
voulntary basis. We, along with all the other fantastic museums, are providing an excellent value-for-
money product for Highland Council. A 'percentage reduction' could be handled as part of general 'credit-
cruch' budget measures without endangering the very existence of the independent museums.
The thought that The Highland Council can consider dispensing with any of the museums listed in their
proposal is outrageously short-sighted. Our Highland museums are all cultural icons, that once lost are
unlikely ever to be reinstated; they hold and maintain part of the cultural fabric of the Highlands for the
public benefit.

As a part-time paid curator at one of the independent museums I can assure you that the independent
museums provide a first-class cultural service and represent phenomenal value for money, spread across
the Highlands. The excellent service provided by the independent museums is a credit to the Highlands
and to The Highland Council.

With the small amount of core funding provided by The Highland Council, many of the independent
museums seek and obtain additional funding. Both Groam House Museum and Tain Museum were two of
the three successful Scottish applicants for a Heritage Lottery award to develop areas of their individual
collections. The Highland Museum of Childhood secured funding from Heritage Lottery for a major,
prestigious development of their premises. These three projects are ongoing.

The public needs to be aware that without this core funding independent museums may well have to
close their museum and dispose of their collections. There is a real possibility that iconic items donated,
acquired locally or through Treasure Trove will disappear from the Highlands, never to return.
In addition to their cultural value, museums are extremely important for tourism. The economic impact of
the loss of museums is likely to be great and is currently being re-assessed for the Highlands and Islands
Museums Forum.

These are all valuable facilities. They have all been vetted and graded by Visit Scotland, the nationwide
and professional standards laid down by the Museum‟s Accreditation Scheme as well as fulfilling The



I agree with my colleagues from Strathpeffer, Dornoch and Dunbeath. Their points are well made. I could
make the same ones for Tain & District Museum.

We are a not for profit organisation, run by volunteers from our community who wish to serve the
community. We help to protect and pass on the heritage and culture unique to our area, not only to locals
but to visitors to the Highlands.

We raise a proportion of our running costs through admissions, fundraising, donations and shop sales but
it would be difficult to continue without the vital financial support provided by the Highland Council. We
are already doing what the Council is seeking to do with community halls and other services and doing it
to a high and professional standard. We give incredible value for money.

Making a percentage cut in the budget will put considerable strain on an already lean operation. Cutting
the budget totaly risks losing 46 years of community work and an irreplacable repository of local
knowledge.
It is disingenuous to suggest that the independent museums in the Highlands can, in some way,
substitute for any closures of central, THC-funded museums. The collections in all these museums are
individual, they are mutually exclusive, they are simply unique.
If a museums closes what will happen to its collection? A dispersed and disparate collection would be
impossible to reconstitute at some later date. Closure is a one-way process.
Museums are part of our communities; they are a focus for cultural heritage, for community activity and
for community identity. They are the memory banks by which we can reach out to our bored or isolated or
impoverished or infirm.
Museums are an embracing treat for the tourist and researcher alike. They are storehouses of the
ordinary and the extraordinary; the grand and the simple; the banal and the beautiful. They are visitor
attractions, job creators, income generators.
More than this, museums of all shapes and sizes have a unique role to play in education and learning. A
museum is not just simply a box of delights, full of fine objects and interesting books. A museum is the
mechanism by which we can explore living history and understand the relevance of previous experiences
and of lessons learnt. Through museums we can approach history, engage with personal narration and
tackle difficult (and current) issues such as prejudice and intolerance.
We threaten the existence of museums at our peril and risk the censure of our children.
TIMESPAN-HELMSDALE
 I am writing in support of the above. I am originally from Helmsdale and went to school there. I moved to
Aberdeen as a student, moving closer to home 5 years ago. I now live outside Nairn and work in
Inverness. I remain closely linked to Helmsdale and am fully aware of the excellent facilities provided by
Timespan. I am a supporter and regular attendee there.
Timespan offers a unique blend of heritage, arts and culture. This means that there is the potential to
appeal to everyone.
There are the obvious benefits to tourism and the economy. There are also close links with local
businesses and with schools in the area which should be taken into account. For example, a recent
Barbeque brought school children together for a moonlight walk with food provided by the local Butcher.
As you will appreciate Helmsdale falls into the category of being a fragile area. The impact of losing
such a vital facility on such a small community would have a devastating impact on the economy. It
provides work for 11 staff who would otherwise be forced to look outwith the community for employment.
Also, there are a large number of devoted volunteers who are actively involved in Timespan. This
provides some with a purpose, some with an opportunity to socialise, help others etc and some with the
chance to feel valued within a safe and welcoming environment.
The other important issue relates to the social implications of losing such a facility. In an area such as
Helmsdale, there are a limited number of opporunities for socialising. Timespan offers people the chance
to enjoy a ceilidh, listen to story telling, barbequeing etc. These are things which are not readily on offer
Nairn museum - hope the current museum continues




GROAM HOUSE MUSEUM
I was alarmed to hear that there are proposed budget cuts in support funding for small museums in the
Highlands. As one of more than thirty volunteer workers at Groam House I would beg you to consider the
possible consequences of core funding cuts on GHM and other independent museums.
Many museums are Visit Scotland starred attractions catering in total for around 100,000 visitors every
year. In addition GHM is widely recognised as a centre for the interpretation of Pictish sculpture and we
provide a series of both popular and academic lectures which attract large local audiences. We have
also involved the local community in our programme of exhibitions, a recent example being one devoted
to local archaeologist and collector Dr William Maclean.
Although we have been successful in attracting project funding, including a recent HLF grant towards
conserving and promoting the work of the teacher and artist George Bain, any reduction of the Highland
Council grant would almost certainly mean the closure of this museum after thirty years of existence.
I hope you will take these points into consideration during discussions about future funding of
independent museums in the Highlands.
This would save pennies in areas that need more funding not less.




having recently become a member of Groam House Museum I am very concerned about the prospect of
CnG limiting (worse still removing) its funding support to the museum.
On first visiting the museum last year I was impressed with not just its collections but principles and
aspirations to the extent that I sought to have them publish a short book that I am currently finalising. For
me GHM would have been well placed to publish and sell this book on wholly new research on the
decoding of Pictish Standing Stones symbols. Unfortunately they have not been able to take up this offer
due to the uncertainty of their funding model. For my part I would not have been looking for financial gain -
this could have been an income stream (however small or otherwise) to the museum. So, in this instance,
the uncertainty of financial support from yourselves has had an unseen but direct impact.
I sincerely hope that CnG continues to fund GHM and other independent museums so that these
showcases of Highland history and culture are not lost. They also help to keep the Gaelic language alive.
In anticipation of a beneficial outcome




why not just cut the budgets for all three?
It is indefensible to pit Highland Council‟s two museums against the 18 independents, as if a comparison
could easily be made.
The entire Highland Council Museums‟ Service costs £1.5M, only £261,000 of which goes to the 18
independent museums, not simply as grants, but in exchange for a high level of service. By any standard
this represents phenomenal value for money – core funding of £14,500 per museum per annum allows
each museum to deliver a valuable service in its community.
The Highland Museum of Childhood in Strathpeffer brings over 22,000 visitors per year to its site – all the
visitors spend goes straight to the local economy. However, despite a high level of commercial effort with
income from tickets, shop, rents and other small grants, the museum‟s fixed costs last year were 50%
greater than its earned income – this is why the core funding is necessary.
I have heard it said, “Why not just give the funding to the really needy museums, those with reserves can
spend them.” What? We run a tight ship and only have reserves because of careful stewardship. We
need them for contingencies like major repairs and legal fees. Spending our reserves on fixed costs
wouldn‟t last long.
It has also been suggested, “Why can‟t the independents just be run by volunteers?” Well they can, and
we all value the time and expertise freely given by our volunteers without which we could not operate. But
there comes a point where paid expertise is necessary to maintain professional standards, meet
bureaucratic demands and inspire innovation. I believe every independent museum needs to employ a
museum professional. The core funding allows this.
The Highland Museum of Childhood has just completed a capital-build extension to grow its highly
popular educational programmes for schools and adults, reminiscence groups, mental health groups,
etc., and to develop collections‟ work. All the objects in our collections have been donated by people from




I am appalled at the news that Highland Council is considering cutting core funding to the Highland
Museum of Childhood in Strathpeffer.
I am sure I don't have to tell you that Strathpeffer attracts a large number of people on bus tours and
independent travellers. The Museum of Childhood is an important visitor attraction for them - for most of
the season the only one apart from gift shops, hotels and restaurants! It would be terrible if this
interesting educational attraction was to close.
The museum attracts over 22,000 visitors every year. Everything the visitors spend goes into the local
economy. However, the money going into the museum funds only meets about half of its running costs so
core funding is vital to its survival.
This May a wonderful new extension was finished. This was paid for by HLF funding and money raised
publicly - what a dreadful waste it would be if this facility was never used because the museum did not
have enough funding to remain open. Already the museum has 500 group visits each year and the
extension was built to support these visits.
The museum is supported by a team of volunteers but in order to maintain professional standards and
inspire innovation it must have paid expertise. Without core funding this would not be possible.
I believe it is unreasonable of the Highland Council to pit its two museums against the independent
museums. Not only would this be unfair to the museums, it would not be fair to tourists and local people if
the smaller ones had to close because of lack of funding. Only about one sixth of the Highland Council
Can you instead work on promoting the museums as I would think that the facilities indicated do not
perform to their designed maximum potential.
I am very concerned at the prospect that funding to community museums across Highland will be cut.
Many of them already survive on a shoestring and if they close there will be a significant reduction in the
local tourism infrastructure, with real economic impacts. Why not maintain that support and instead
reduce the Council's grant to VisitScotland, which seems to be of far less direct benefit to these
communities?
In response to the budget consultation I must say how horrified I am about the whole thing. Museum and
library services are absolutely vital to the community, especially in remote areas such as Caithness and
Sutherland. Cutting 7 school librarians is penalising not only the wider community but also the children
who take advantage of the services. Learning is difficult enough in the current climate without taking away
a vital resource. The idea that has also been mentioned of moving Wick library into the High School is
also not being thought through properly. Older members of society are known to be intimidated by
teenagers and would not feel safe entering a library on a school site, also the children's safety would be
grossly compromised. Security would be non-existent. Library services as a whole are vital for the elderly
as a form of integration into the community, they enable the less well off to engage in leisure activities
they could not otherwise afford, and allow children to read for recreation & for school work. Museums are
also very important to the area. They bring a connection to the area for the pople that live here, are a
massive tourism pull, bring exhibition space and are a meeting place for sections of the community. As a
genealogical reseacher I personally use both the museums and the libraries and know that visitors to the
area use them extensively too. Any further cuts in the arts, museum and library sector would be the
beginning of the end for Caithness and Sutherland..this sector should be encouraged to grow, not be cut
back any further than it already has been.
I agree with several of the points offered above. It is extremely difficult to try to weigh up each vital
service, one against the other. No-one is going to come out of this exercise unscathed. However, it
seems particularly harsh to denigrate and effectively remove for many areas the provision of culture
through museums as is suggested in the budget consultation document
Independent museums value extremely highly the service level agreement from the Highland Council. It is
a constant battle to achieve break even year on year and a loss of £14,500 each year would put a further
reliance on fundraising from trusts and foundations, which are already stretched to the maximum, in order
to keep going.
Losing local museums would have far reaching consequences and huge knock on effects on the local
communities. In Helmsdale, a designated fragile area, the loss of Timespan, for example, would increase
social deprivation as well as bring about cultural deprivation. Timespan has become a vibrant meeting
place between our past and our future – where we can learn from mistakes of the past. Timespan is there
for the community – for the young and old, the vulnerable and the isolated. It encourages learning and
improves social skills, imparting a sense of self worth, community and pride. It has not been easy to
achieve this. Confidence has slowly built up over the past 2 decades and to have this dashed will affect
the whole community. As is stated above, it is so easy to close museums but so difficult to open them
again.
Using public buildings more flexibly seems like a good way forward. Indeed, Councillor Deirdre Mackay in




Independent museums and other arts and cultural organisations already exist on a knife edge. Significant
reduction or withdrawal of the grants they receive would result in the permanent closure of cultural
facilities around the region, not just a temporary limit to activity. The wider economic impact on these
rural areas will be devastating. Helmsdale for example, an already recognised fragile area, would be
greatly hurt by the loss of Timespan. 10 jobs would be lost. The centre attracts over 13000 visitors per
year. It is the cultural heart of not just Helmsdale, but of Sutherland as a whole. I think it is worth
considering how hard your investment works in each organisation - for every £1 you invest in Timespan,
the organisation secures on average another £17 from national public funding and trusts, and a
significant level of earned income, donations and voluntary support. Your support is not only a critical
financial element, but essential to demonstrate to other funders the value placed on the organisation and
its role in the cultural infrastructure to gain their investment into this area. It is extremely difficult - if not
impossible - to secure funds for core costs. Asking independent museums to compete over already hotly
contested funds would prove fruitless on many occasions. Not just the ability to attain funds, but they
would have to do so on reduced resources. Some organisations may be able to look at other ways of self-
earned income - on Timespan's current resources it would be hard to increase what we earn through the
cafe, shop, museum, corporate events and workshops enough to cover the loss in this core support. We
do aim to always increase this area of the business and are always investigating new methods of income
generation.
These supply excellent value in relation to the grants paid by the Council under the SDA. In Grantown the
Museum is an ongoing community project. Museum fundraising activities are a regular part of the life of
the community. There is a substantial paying membership and the essential work done by the volunteers
is highly valued. It is the town's only 4-Star visitor attraction. The Highland Council grant is much
appreciated and is also vital to the running costs. Were this grant to be significantly reduced, it is
probable that the museum would have to close, and this would certainly be to the detriment of the local
community. Please type your message here
Don't reduce this provision to independent museums throughout the Highlands. I don't know about the
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery or the Highland Folk Museum. Diversify what you expect to get in
return for your support for the independent museums, so that they help meet other needs and reduce
other budgets.
Glencoe and North Lorn Folk Museum - object to the severity of the cuts - important tourist destination
and work if difficult to find in Glencoe.
The council helped create Caithness Horizons and set it up as a charity on the promise of continued
funding. its ethos and indeed design would make charging admission difficult. Horizons is a 5 star visitor
attraction in an area that has little else going for it in tourist terms. I believe the highland folk museum
could operate commercially in the way that Beamish operates, but its practically invisible under council
control. inverness art gallery and museum has outgrown its premesis and should be relocated
somewhere it could grow into a much better facility for visitors and citizens alike.
As you consider the budget cutting exercise that will form part of the regional strategy, I am writing to you
today to make the case for protecting the small and fragile progress that has been achieved in the
villages of Helmsdale, Kildonan, Kinbrace, Gartymore, Port Gower and Loth over recent years.
It is impossible to overstate the vulnerability of this collection of NE Highland villages. Already high on
the indices of poverty in Scotland, with remoteness that exacerbates the disadvantages of rural isolation,
attempts to achieve a tiny measure of stability are already on the edge of collapse.
We have one of the highest levels of unemployment in Highland and a weak seasonal economy. The
diminishing opportunities available to young people inevitably drive them southwards – which is
disastrous for our aging population.
Struggling against these odds in order to provide a community and economic resource is Timespan. An
independent museum and gallery, Timespan was created out of voluntary local effort nearly 25 years ago.
It supports 9 local, part time and year-round jobs. It is a meeting place for mums, toddlers, young and
older school children and the unemployed of all ages. We are engaged in regional educational projects,
providing work experience for youngsters and cross generational programmes in art, cultural and natural
heritage.
Timespan is a well known tourist destination which through its own efforts attracts 12,000 visitors a year
and supports local hotels and accommodation providers. The overwhelming atmosphere in Timespan is
one of enthusiasm, activity and an obvious commitment to quality. Yet behind this excitement is the
continual and terrifying prospect of closure - not just of a much loved establishment – but the lifeblood of
our six villages.
Four years ago, Timespan embarked on an essential refurbishment programme in order to comply with
challenging national and EU regulations for public buildings. The works included energy conservation




Not sure if we need both bits of the Highland Folk Museum but open air bit is absolutely fantastic. Could
bring back charging for it. Need to support all but maybe less and gap woudl need to be filled with
volunteers.
Caithness Horizons - houses nationally important collection that relates to the nuclear research facility at
dounreay - attracts tourist and creates employment and delivers lifelong learning.
Gairloch Heritage Museum - cutting the annual grant of £15,000 would mean the museum would not be
able to employ a curator and therefore have to cut down opening times.

Tain Museum - museum volunteers who kee our history alive are themselves hidden assets to the
community and save the public purse many millions of pounds in the process - most museums fundraise
themselves. The committee felt that the Highland Council has a duty of care towards our history and
culture and that once major elements in their conservation are lost they may not be recovered.
West Highland Museum - houses a collection which is widely acknowledged to be of national importance,
privately run charity - well advanced in the planning stage of an ambitious redevelopment and extension
programme - perform a key role in education in the wider locality.




The number of visitors to each museum must be taken into consideration before closing any, as these
museums are likely to be an important part of the tourist industry in the Highlands.




Caithness Horizons - tremendously sucessful and popular venue not only important museum collection
but also for tourists.Thurso gave up its one public hall to accommodate Caithness Horizons.
timespan: Helmsdale and District Community Council wish to show their support to Timespan for
continuance of funding as an Independent Museum.

Helmsdale has already been recognised as a fragile area and the lost of Timespan would mean a loss of
10 jobs. Timespan attracts over 13,000 visitors a year and is a cultural centre not just for Helmsdale but
for a much larger area. It does also have volunteers but could not run on this support alone.

Timespan needs your core support. Self earned income for Timespan is raised through it's cafe, shop,
museum, and various workshops and events but it does need your continued support. Although there are
volunteers Timespan also needs to employ local people. We think that this is essential when so many job
opportunities are scarce in this area.




Groam House: I am responding to The Highland Council‟s Budget Consultation in my role as an honorary
trustee of Groam House Museum and more broadly as amuseum professional working in a Scottish local
authority.

Whilst I recognise the difficult financial situation that The Highland Council faces, I am hugely
disappointed in your proposals to cut funding for museums. I believe this is flawed and fails to recognise
the importance and life-affirming value of cultural heritage to the Highlands, whether for its diverse
communities or its diverse range of visitors. Dismantling the infrastructure that helps to protect this culture
and keep it alive means everybody looses and when it is eventually rebuilt, at greater cost, much will have
been irrecoverably lost.

For a figure of £14,562 annually from The Highland Council, Groam House Museum represents
exceptional value for money. In these difficult times, with The Highland Council increasingly looking to
fulfil its community service obligations, GHM is surely an outstanding example of a successful community-
led partnership organisation: it runs at minimal cost and is a true focus for the wide-ranging community
including schools, older adults and a very active volunteer work-force. In addition the museum contributes
to the local economy in its role as a quality, 4* rated Visitor Attraction.

I would particulalrly draw your attention to the museum having secured an award of £99,000 from the
Heritage Lottery Fund to develop the internationally important Collection of Celtic art by the renowned
Highland artist George Bain. This major collection has been an important element of the museums
collection since its initial donation in 1998. In donating the collection, the Bain family stipulated that,
Groam House Museum - fail to recognise te important and life-affirming value of culture heritage to the
Highlands- GHM is surely an outstanding example of a successful community-led partnership
organisation - GHM secured an award of £99,000 from the Heritage Lottery - museum has a long history
of providing extremely high quality and high-profile exhibitions, community programmes and academic
lecture series with publication.
Gairloch Heritage Museum - 4 page feature from an issue in the Gairloch and District times - the funding
for the independent museum in the Highlands is a good example of the Council as an enabler for
communities and, I would suggest, is very good for the level of support provided.
Can we wear our museum hats now? I think you know that a substantial cut in revenue funding would just
be the final straw for most of us volunteers in the sector (even the status quo will not ensure the survival
of Tarbat) Under freedom of info., I got the relevant funding figures for all the ind. museum sector and the
two Council facilities. While recognising the aims of free entry/social inclusiveness etc, that's simply a
luxury that HC can no longer afford - and that should apply to all the nationals as well! They have staff
sitting at entrance desks anyway, and a charge of a couple of quid or so could free up a lot of cash.
Finally, I do find it ironic that HC insist on us preparing budgets two years hence as part of the SLA
agreements and yet an intrical part of those calculations involves HC suppport which is only confirmed a
matter of weeks before the relevant financial year - lets have a 5Year plan, once so much favoured by the
USSR!
Caithness Horizons - - important museum collection and houses nationally important collections - visit
scotland 5 star visitor attraction and vital to tourism - vaired programme of lifelong learning acitivities and
contributes to tackling social inclusion.
Timspan: It would be very short sighted to withdraw funding from small local museums and libraries. The
sums involved are not large and therefore the savings would not be significant, yet the services provided
are essestial to isolated communities. Once these facilities are lost they would cost proportionally much
more to replace in the future. They provide recreational facilities for many and employment, whether paid
or voluntary for a significant number. Find some other way of making savings which will not have such a
devastating effect on community life.




Caithness Horizons - cares for and make accessible to the public the regionally important Museum
collections - showcases the achievements of the former nuclear research facility at Dounreay - life long
learning activities and contributes positively to social inclusion.
The options proposed fall into the “irrevocable irreversible category” and worry us. The proposals are
familiar, whenever cuts are to be made then the arts and culture are easy targets. We do not support
these proposals.
The Inverness Art Gallery and Museum should be retained and get more promotion, they are one of the
few art, educational and cultural centres freely available within the city.

The Highland Folk Museum has already been reduced to operating on one site due to lack of investment
in the Kingussie buildings, and this has adversely affected the economy of Kingussie. Closure of the
Newtonmore Centre will seriously adversely affect all the Badenoch communities, which rely very heavily
on tourism. It is one of the major employers in Badenoch, where there are too few alternative jobs. It is a
very popular tourist destination and as a consequence supports the wider economies of Newtonmore and
Kingussie and the smaller villages of Laggan, Dalwhinnie and Kincraig.
Decisions to divest the Highland Council of responsibility for the Highland Folk Museum and its
collections will certainly result in an outcry from people, whose families have donated treasured family
heirlooms to the Museum in the past on the understanding they will benefit the wider public.

If savings are to be made then the re-introduction of an entry fee for visitors is to be preferred.

Independent community museums and art galleries. Many of these places already rely on a measure of
voluntary support to run them. If financial support for these largely rural ventures is withdrawn, then it is
doubtful if they will survive in the longer term, with all the consequential adverse effects on the wider
economies of their communities.




Groam House: We are very concerned about proposed cuts in funding to independent museums in the
Highlands and particularly to our local museum Groam House in Rosemarkie.

Of course we are aware of the difficult economic situation at the present time and the need for "tightening
of belts" all round. However, Groam House is an excellent facility for both locals and visitors to the area,
who provide much needed income. As you know, Groam House is a 4 star rated Visitor Attraction and
brings together groups such as schoolchildren, retired people and volunteer helpers within the
community.

Our great fear is that without Highland Council support Groam House will be unable to continue. This
would undoubtedly be a huge loss for the village and Highland region as a whole.

We urge you to think again about these proposed cuts.
Gairloch Heritage: We are very concerned at the possible withdrawal, or decrease, of the
Highland Council grant to the Gairloch Heritage Museum. The Museum
is a thriving one and the grant funds the professional Curator without
whom the services offered would be much reduced. These services
include conservation, tracing family connections for visitors to the
area with Scottish roots, open days and educational activities. Although many tasks at the Museum such
as manning the ticket desk are
undertaken by volunteers, the Curator is essential to its running. The
Council grant is relatively modest (less than £15K).
  Gairloch Museum, founded in 1977, has won several awards over the
years. It is a genuine community enterprise and is full of interesting
and informative displays about the local area. It is a valuable
visitor attraction, especially appreciated on wet days (and there are
some of those here!). The comments in the Visitors' Book attest to its
appeal.
Please do all you can to ensure the continuation of the Highland
Council support for this excellent Museum.
Gairloch Heritage: I am a Civilian Instructor with the local Air Training Corps. 832 (Wester Ross)
Squadron based in Gairloch.

Over the past 10 years I have lived in the area and served with 832 Sqdn. the ATC Cadets have actively
worked with the Gairloch Heritage Museum on the Liberator Project. This has entailed research into the
1945 crash of a USAAF B-24 Liberator bomber named 'Sleepy Time Gal' which ended it's days, along
with 15 aircrew, in the area of the Fairy Lochs near Gairloch.

In the past the museum has hosted a temporary exhibition and are about to open a small permanent
exhibit which will be created and maintained by the Cadets.

This Project is of considerable local and visitor interest, especially those from the USA. The research
work continues and the museum is the ideal location for the disemination of this material. Both the
previous curators of the museum were also Civilian Instructors with the ATC.

The support grant to the museum on the one hand is an essential source of funding, and on the other an
extremely beneficial and effective spending of limited public funds, to the benefit of both local people and
a major attraction for some of the visitors to area, which is so reliant on tourism.

I trust the merits of the Gairloch Heritage Museum are given due consideration when you review any
future spending plans related to this museums support grant.


Gairloch Heritage: I write regarding the possible cuts to the Council funding for local museums including
Gairloch Heritage Museum. In the first instance I should mention that I am a Highland Council employee
but my job is not connected to the Museum. I work as a Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages in
Inverness but was brought up in Wester Ross where my family have been as far back as I've been able to
trace.

I could write at length about the value of the Museum to the local community, to me as an individual and
to visitors to the area but time is short before the council meetings so I just wanted to express my support
for the Museum and to ask that the funding for the curator's post is continued. I am sure you will be
aware that this post is the only paid post and all the rest of the work carried out is by volunteers.
Unfortunately, although I have a subscription to the Museum, I am unable to volunteer at present because
I live in Inverness and the limited time I do have in Wester Ross is normally spent with my elderly father.

I'm sure the curator himself will be advising you of all the excellent work which goes on at the Museum so
I will just concentrate on my own personal experiences of it. My interest is in family history and local
social history so the Museum provides a lot of the resources I am interested in from the displays, books,
photographs, archive records, oral history recordings, etc. One example of an important resource I
discovered by chance in the Museum a few years ago is the collection of school photos. I had always
believed that the photo we had of my father as an eighteen year old in uniform during WWII was the
earliest photo of him in existence. Imagine my surprise and delight to find myself face to face with him on
the wall of the Museum in two different photos, aged 5 and 14 years of age!

I would be very sad to see funding cut to the Gairloch Heritage Museum as the new curator has only been
in post a short time and I feel there is a lot more scope for developments in the future. It would be a huge
loss to all generations in the area from the young who will use it as a resource for projects and to see how
Economic Impact of the budget proposal in indpependent museums. See file for detail
Groam House and Tarbet Discorvery Cente: Between AD 671 and AD 869, much of present-day Scotland
was dominated by the kings of a kingdom called Fortriu, encompassing the inner Moray firthlands; these
dominions gradually came to be knitted together into a greater kingdom called Alba in Gaelic, and it was
from this realm that the kingdom of the Scots sprung. During this 200-year era the inhabitants of Scotland
became, for the first time, heavyweights in British and Irish politics and the culture flourished in Scotland
that we speak of today as „Pictish‟, distinguished in the popular mind by a corpus of carved stone
monuments which (as my „europeanist‟ colleagues often remind me) collectively rank as one of the major
cultural achievements of
any people in post-Roman Western Europe. In no small part because of the impact made upon the eye
and the heart by these puzzling and evocative artefacts, Pictish culture is studied across and beyond the
Anglophone world by ever-increasing numbers of amateur enthusiasts and professional researchers. The
engine which drove all of this achievement, placing Scotland on the political and cultural map of Europe
for the first time in her recorded history, was the little kingdom of Fortriu. Nowadays two museums
currently funded by the Highland Council act as repositories of the great works and deeds of the people of
Fortriu, and as vital avenues through which their story reaches the local and international community. I
speak of Groam House Museum in Rosemarkie and the Tarbat Discovery Centre in Portmahomack; and I
write out of grave concern for the future of these two fine establishments.
If the Council allows either or both of these museums to close due to inadequate financial support, the
blow will be very great to those committed to raising local, national and international awareness of the
major historical significance of Easter Ross and its people in the Pictish period. Both establishments
maintain uncommonly close linkages with the academic community within and outwith Scotland, assisting
us greatly in one of our core missions (and one which government currently stresses strenuously):
engaging as closely as possible with the public in an accessible way. For example, by organising, hosting
and publishing an annual public lecture on Pictish studies, Groam House Museum enables specialists to

Highland Museum of Childhood - threat to education unit which provides much enhanced environment for
established education programme which is delivered across the community, loss of over 22,000 visitors,
removal of public access to rich cultural heritage and opportunity for research, loss to the highland
economy and loss of opportunities for structured traiing of volunteers.
Groam House Museum and the Tarbat Discovery Centre - two museums currently funded by the Highland
Council act as repositories of the great works and deeds of the people of Fortriu and as vital avenues
through which their story reaches the local and international community. If the Council allows either or
both of these museums to close due to inadequate financial support, the blow will be very great to those
committed to raising local, national and international awareness of the major historical significance of
Easter Ross and its people in the Pictish period.




Highland Folk Museum - presentes local, scottish history in a very accessible way in complete contast to
the traditional museum format. Having animals also provided attraction - attracts people to the area.
Caithness Horizons - high quality service it provides in looking after and displaying a regionally and
nationally important collection. Caithness Horizons is a key long-term contributor to the economic future
of the North |Highlands, creating direct and indirect employment as a high quality visitor attraction and
acting as a crucible forTrustees of the Highland Museum of Childhood in Strathpeffer, urgently request
We, the Directors and local education and cultural activity.
that you take note of our serious concerns relating to the above:

EDUCATION/OUTREACH
Threat to our recently completed education unit which provides a much enhanced environment for our
well established education programme
Threat to our education programme which is delivered across the community including school groups,
care homes and special needs.

ECONOMIC BENEFITS AND SUSTAINABILTY
Loss of over 22,000 visitors per annum to the museum site
Loss of additional spend of museum visitors within the village and surrounding area
The loss of support from the Council would jeopardise the continuation of the museum despite our proven
track record of sustainability

CULTURE
Removal of the public opportunity to view the rich cultural heritage of the Highlands
Removal of the opportunity for research by a variety of recognised bodies and individuals into local history
and artefacts

TOURISM
Loss of the significant contribution to the fragile Highland economy
Loss of a principal tourist destination which is highly regarded - 34% of visitors come to the museum by
personal recommendation

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT
Loss of opportunities for structured training of volunteers with beneficial effect to the individuals including
returning to the job market
Loss of a professionally managed facility which is a vital link in the community through local participation
within the Board, the volunteers and the wider community

We understand fully the requirement for cuts but we propose a more manageable 5% across all
museums which we consider would be in line with your given target. This course of action would avoid the
We believe that experience elsewhere shows that museums can be successfully run by independent
charitable Trusts without diminution of the enjoyment and experience of visitors. Provided collections are
retained we can accept that savings can be made in this area. The Highland Folk Museum is an excellent
resource for Badenoch & Strathspey; whatever management changes may occur, the experience it offers
to holiday makers and its contribution to the local economy should not be jeopardised.




Highland Folk Museum - what a boom it was to the local economy when it opened - people travelled from
all parts of Badenoch & Strathspey.
We seek in principle to retain small local libraries as they serve not simply their primary function as
libraries but also as important community centres and social assets. If "the opportunity to maintain or
become socially active was key to people retaining their independence and confidence to live at home"
and if "access to meaningful and flexible training, employment and voluntary opportunities enables people
to feel more confident and widen their own expectations of living independntly", then the supports the
library services offers exactly to small communities out not to be removed.




Gairloch Heritage: I am writing to express my support for the Gairloch Heritage Museum (GHM) and to
register my protest at any attempt to withdraw THC support from the the GHM.

I am a local resident and always ensure that I visit the museum to see the current exhibition and to meet
and talk with the numerous volunteers who assist the Curator in maintaining what has become a most
prestigious asset for Gairloch and the surrounding community.

Isolated communities need help in many ways and one of the most practical ways in which THC provides
help is by providing support for the curator, without who's presence the museum would surely die. Aging
volunteers who assist the curator will always try to do their best, however they do not have the resource or
indeed vision to maintain the vibrant programme of events that the population have come to rely on. It
must not be forgotten that in an isolated community such as Gairloch, there are very limited choices and
to risk the future of the one highly successful venture is unthinkable.

Not only is the GHM's appeal restricted to the local population. The GHM is vital to the tourism industry in
that it provides the visitors with something to do and somewhere to go on those all too frequent wet days.
It is a real pleasure to be in the museum to find young people from the UK and elsewhere avidly learning
about the Highlands and the traditional way of life of bygone days. Tourism is vital to the continued
existence of the rural west coast communities and to lose any amenity would reduce the appeal of the
region and hasten its demise as a sought after tourist destination.
I think it would be criminal to close this valubale resource for the following reasons. 1: It is an invaluable
education resource. 2: It is a large local employer and if the people were not employed the government
would still have to pay them benefits and we all know that providing jobs is far better. 3: It is a large local
attraction that draws people to the area and supports other atractions and businesses. 4: It has taken
generations to bring this collection together and it would be criminal to disband it. 5: It belongs to the
people and the people do not want to lose it. We want to continue the debate but where, very few people
knew about this site / blog.




Could you perhaps charge an admission fee?
Why are you not charging an entry fee to your own Inverness Museum and Highland Folk Museum when
you have fully paid staff there anyway,who could collect the money. If you charged £3 each to all your
visitors that would nearly pay for for all the independant museums support. Or do you want to close all
museums elsewhere in favour of your own,so Inverness would have everything and less visitors for other
areas.I know we live in difficult times and you have difficult choices to make,but please think about what I
have suggested.
I would like to thank those people responsible for the heritage park at Newtonmore. What an excellent
resource! As a depute head teacher at a special school in SW Scotland I was able to take a number of
photographs to show to my pupils and make history real for them.

I could not believe that this resource was free and I have been recommending to family and friends at
home and abroad that they must visit Newtonmore and the heritage museum.

Not only was the park remarkable but the staff were extremely knowlegeable, friendly and able to answer
the many questions being fired at them from visitors. I am surprised that visitscotland does not make
more of an attempt to advertise such a resource worldwide.

I hope that this resource will develop further in the years ahead despite the financial challenges facing us
all.

Once again thank you all



This is a wonderful, fun, educational, learning Resource in Highland.
Over the years I have visited it several times with friends and relatives and each time I learn more from
observing, from listening to the Guides or tapes, from reading, and enjoying the ambience. I am always
struck by the knowledge of the Guides and of those repairing or renovating properties and by their
willingness to share this with inquisitive members of the public. . This year I have made many inquiries of
the staff because I am taking a group of elderly and disabled adults to the Folk Museum in July and at all
times the staff have been most helpful and informative.
Long may this Museum continue in its present form and develop.!
PROPOSED CUTS TO INDEPENDENT MUSEUMS
I am deeply troubled and concerned to learn of the cuts proposed to the funding of Highland Independent
Museums generally and in particular to Groam House Museum. This is a well-established museum
renowned for its collection, its special exhibitions, and its high academic reputation. Any break in
continuity will destroy much if not all of this.
The proposed cuts will be insignificant when seen against the total budget of The Highland Council, while
being highly damaging - probably fatal - to Groam House Museum. It attracts visitors who spend time and
money in the area, invaluable to the economy as a whole. In addition, the Museum, being in Rosemarkie,
gives encouragement to visitors to carry on to Cromarty, and indeed, ferry permitting, to Easter Ross, and
thus forms an important part of a cultural tour of the Highlands.
The Museum depends heavily on the work of volunteers, and this in itself brings benefit and encourages
interest. But the expertise, knowledge and enthusiasm of the qualified curator mean that extremely high-
quality and high-profile exhibitions and community programmes are arranged, and each year a series of
lectures is delivered by academics highly esteemed both in this country and even internationally,
extending the reputation of the Museum and of the Black Isle.
Were the Museum to close, the special collections would be lost to the area, probably for good, as would
the benefit of having a 4* Visitor Attraction in the village. The work done with schools, and the
participation of volunteers in projects relating to local history would cease.
If the Museum does not survive, Rosemarkie and Fortrose in particular, and the Black Isle generally
I am deeply troubled and concerned to learn of the cuts proposed to the funding of Highland Independent
Museums generally and in particular to Groam House Museum.
The proposed cuts will be insignificant when seen against the total budget of The Highland Council, while
being highly damaging - probably fatal - to Groam House Museum. It attracts visitors who spend time and
money in the area, invaluable to the economy as a whole. In addition, the Museum, being in Rosemarkie,
gives encouragement to visitors to carry on to Cromarty, and indeed, ferry permitting, to Easter Ross,
and thus forms an important part of a cultural tour of the Highlands.
The Museum depends heavily on the work of volunteers, and this in itself brings benefit and encourages
interest. But the expertise, knowledge and enthusiasm of the qualified curator mean that high-quality and
high-profile exhibitions and community programmes are arranged, and each year a series of lectures is
delivered by academics highly esteemed both in this country and even internationally, extending the
reputation of the Museum and of the Black Isle.
Were the Museum to close, the special collections would be lost to the area, probably for good, as would
the benefit of having a 4* Visitor Attraction in the village. The work done with schools, and the
participation of volunteers in projects relating to local history would cease.
If the Museum does not survive, Rosemarkie and Fortrose particular, and the Black Isle generally, would
lose the flow of visitors, who add to its prosperity and to the activities of its inhabitants, and become




Gairloch Heritage Museum: As a native of Aultbea and someone who has holidayed in the Aultbea area
for the last 40 years together with my husband and family, I am horrified to hear that the museum is under
threat.
It is a fantastic local resource, which we have visited often with our children over the years. Please do all
you can to ensure that this does not happen.
Highland Folk Museum - views held by others in Badenoch that the axe usually seems to have to fall on
areas out with Inverness! - museum is hugely important visitor attraction.




Groam House: I would like to express my support for Groam House Museum, and its continued funding
by Highland Council. It is a beacon of intellectual quality on the Highland tourist circuit, providing a
welcoming and informative venue for all visitors. In addition to providing a first class service for passing
trade, it also serves as an important focus for identity and local activity.
 Isolated rural areas can suffer from a stifling intellectual vacuum, especially for older folk who cannot
travel away for entertainment and cultural experience. I have been privileged to give several talks to the
Friends of Groam House, and I know how much the service and opportunity for social interaction is
appreciated. I am always fascinated by the mysterious and ancient atmosphere on the Black Isle, and the
little Museum goes a long way to explain why the area is so special.
I am also involved in a parallel museum run by Historic Scotland, at St Vigeans, Arbroath. This is another
venue for instruction about Pictish art. It is vital that this local network of museums, including also Meigle
and Tankerness Orkney, provide opportunities for studying the Picts in situ. As can be seen with the
interest at Hilton of Cadboll, the Pictish stones arouse strong local passions, and it is vital that their study
continues in the locations where they were made, and they are not only accessible in Edinburgh. I am
aware that there are also funding problems with the museum at Tarbat: all the more reason to keep little
Groam House afloat. It represents VERY GOOD VALUE, and provides a hub of intellectualt stimulus
I wish to express my extreme concern at the Highland Council's proposals
to cut its funding to a range of museums in the Highland area. As a
lecturer in Museum and Gallery Studies I know most of the museums
concerned and many of the curators whose jobs are threatened by this
move. You have a highly skilled and dedicated workforce in the region.
Over the years many of the curators and museum managers have taken our
postgraduate professional training course in St Andrews, usually at
their own expense, in order to fit themselves better for their work. In
proposing to make cuts to the small budgets which sustain these museums
you risk the loss of an extraordinary range of skills and expertise held
locally, which it would be hard to recover in the future.

 From my own research when based in the National Museum in Edinburgh I
am very conscious that local museums in the Highlands hold many
collections of national and international significance, which are
essential to our understanding of Scotland's past. Apart from the issue
of the importance of museum collections and displays for any region in
establishing and maintaining a sense of cultural identity, however, the
proposed cuts would have a wide range of unfortunate effects. New
archaeological finds made locally would no longer be able to be
allocated by the Treasure Trove Panel to local Accredited museums,
leading to a repeat of the dissatisfaction felt historically when
objects were sent away instead of remaining in the area where they were
found. And local schools would no longer be able to extend their pupils'
learning out of the classroom through museum visits, as recommended by
all educationalists, while loan boxes of original objects would no
longer be available for borrowing by schools as inspiration for pupils
and teachers, since these boxes require professional preparation and
maintenance.

Museums do not simply engage with children and formal education but also
provide opportunities for social engagement by older people through the
volunteer schemes which provide much of the labour in museums (at
minimal cost to the Council) and also give many of the volunteers a
sense of purpose and social value.

The ways in which museums provide excellent value to the communities in
which they are based provide, in my view, all the justification needed
for the retention of the small grants from the Council which enable them
to operate and plan ahead. But there are also economic aspects which are

highland Folk museum: I am writing to you regarding the forthcoming cutbacks in Highland Council
spending. I would like to register my concern for the future of both the Newtonmore Folk Park and the
Kingussie Am Fasgadh buildings. If the Highland Council is considering closing down the museum,
selling off the properties or redistributing museum artefacts, I hope time will be made for those of us who
live in the area to organise ourselves into a community group and have the option to take on the
responsibility for these valuable assets to our communities and run them ourselves. It would be a great
disappointment and a huge loss to our local economies and our quality of life if these museums were sold
off to developers. Please bear in mind that there is a great deal of enthusiasm and energy and ability
amongst our communities that simply needs a little time to gather. It would be great if the handling of this
delicate matter were to become a flagship for excellence in empowering the local community to take on
new responsibilities regarding running facilities for its own benefit, as our MP Danny Alexander is
recommending people should be doing across the nation. I have also written to him about this matter


Gairloch Heritage Museum: The mueum houses a remarkable and diverse collection of local heritage but
its importance is much broader. Not only is it one of the few quality undercoer experiences for tourists in
the area but it is also unique from a teaching and cultureal perspectice for all local people not least
children. The museum is irreplaceable. The museum coalesces the efforts of the HC together with that
over 40 volunteers to creat somthing special and something that can only exist with the valued
contribution of both parties. If the HC were to withdraw or sustantially reduce its funding the Gairloch
Heritage museum would likely close with the loss of so much for relatively so little. The museum is an
excellent example of where a catalyst inventment by the HC has led to much greater direct and indirect
economic, social and cultural outputs resulting in what I suspect is one of your better investments. I
implore you to continue to invest with all of us who care about the Gairloch Heritage museum.
Highly skilled and dedicated workforce in the region - local museums hold many collections of national
and international significance which are essential to our understanding of Scotland's past - new
archaeological finds made locally would no longer be able to be allocated by teh treasure trove panel to
local accredied museums - museums provide opportunity for social engagement - providing excellent
value to the communities.




Highland Folk Museum holds a collection of both national and international significance - one of the
oldest folk life collections in the UK and also one of the oldest established open air museums in the
UK.One major consequence o fthis is that the collection held by the National Museums in Scotland has
largely been developed to cover those parts of Scotland not represented in Kingussie and Newtonmore.
The collection is therefore in many instances unique and of unquestionable value.
Caithness Horizons: I would like to register the support and assistance I have received from Caithness
Horizons in promoting public engagement with Science and Technology in the Caithness area. My
current remit for the British Science Association involves me in promoting the aims of the Association
throughout Scotland. The association envisages a society in which people from all walks of liek are able
to acess science, engage with it and feel a sense of ownership about its direction. Caithnes horizons has
provided me and the volunteers in the local branch of the association with an ideala venue and significant
support in delivering various events over the past couple of years. The location of Caithness Horizons, its
welcoming atmosphere and the facilties it offeres are idea for the purpose of engageing with the local
community. I would be particularly disappointed if the Highland Council's budget consutlation were to
result in any negative effect on this magnificent resource which is so ideally located for the work of the
association in caithness.




don't know enough about this but again i don't think the foucs should be inverness. if you are supporting
museums there then you need to do so in the rural areas too




Highland Folk Mueseum: http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/DONT-LET-THE-HIGHLAND-FOLK-
MUSEUM-BECOME-HISTORY/128363533852672 Please, please have a look at the link to the Facebook
page that has been started to support our Highland Folk Museum. It is tremendous the support it has
uncovered from all sorts and types of people. Please, please also look at the comments on the online
petition which are heartwarming. We realise it could be moved to Inverness (at immense cost) but, in all
conscience, it would be like a fish out of water.



Save the Highland Folk Park Museum at Newtonmore
The Highland Folk Museum is an important asset to Speyside and the Cultural Heritage of Scotland.

Consequences of Closing :-
* Major Blow to Tourist Economy
* Loss of Employment
* Disastrous Loss to Local Economy
* Loss of Major Tourist Attraction
* Loss of Educational Recourse
* Removal from Public/Academic Domain of Major Collections
* Loss of Local and National Cultural Heritage
* Loss of an Accredited Award Winning Museum
* Directly in Opposition to the 1st & 4th Aims of the Cairmgorm    National Park Authority

Dear Councilors,
The above is sent with full support of the NVCC & NBA and on behalf of the Save our Highland Folk
Museum Campaigners.
Strathnaver museum: On behalf of Strathnaver Museum, I ask that you consider our situation and the
service we provide to this community, the wider Highland area, nationally and overseas. We hope you
will see how essential it is that we continue to receive our service delivery agreement funding from
Highland Council in order that we can maintain this valuable service.

I am attaching a report which outlines the work we do and the service we provide to the community and
our heritage. I am also attaching letters of support which augments the information given in the report.
Note additional booklet available




Groam House: I am writing to support continued funding for Groam House Museum. I have been a
member of the Pictish Arts Society, Historic Scotland and Groam House Museum since 1992. I come to
Scotland originally researching information about the Arthurian Legend and discovered so much more.
Through friends I have made and the many return trips to visit, research and attend conferences I have
come to know, love, and respect the story of Scotland and especially the Picts. I often come to Scotland
with friends and we never fail to stop at Groam House. The most recent acquisition of the George Bain
material has been very exciting and tells us the story of a period of return to Celtic roots, both in art and
culture that remains with us today.

I am a retired teacher, librarian and college professor from Duluth Minnesota. Since retirement, I have
been working for a small group of three museums here in Superior Wisconsin. We have a house
museum, an old firehouse museum, and a boat museum that is the only boat of it‟s kind above water
anywhere in the world and was designed and built by a Scotsman, Alexander McDougall. These are also
small museums with great stories to tell about the history, culture, character and nature of the people who
built these two communities in the late 1800‟s. As I give tours and work with school groups I‟m constantly
reminded that our young people are very far removed from Victorian culture and that seeing any one of
our museums makes history much more real for them and helps them connect to their own past and the
past of their community. It gives children a sense of community meaning and pride.

Groam House Museum offers so very much to everyone who visits or is associated with it. The
accreditations, the special grant awards, the growing visibility, the Bain Collection and traveling exhibit,
the partnerships formed, and the constant addition to the growing knowledge of the Picts through
Academic Lectures all make Groam House a very bright light in the world of small museums.
Phase out support for independents.




Independent museum provision. I take this as an example because of my own knowledge of it. Here,
where much of the work is already done voluntarily, a relatively small amount of Council funding, which is
considerably boosted by income generated by the institutions themselves, enables a very large amount of
good work to be done, e.g. in boosting tourism income and in encouraging local interest and involvement
in their heritage. In other words the cost/benefit ratio for this expenditure is extremely low. Could this
model be extended to other areas?
I am very disappointed to read about the proposed budget cuts to some of the small Highland museums.
Visits to these museums have been a highlight of many of my trips to the highlands; already operating on
a tight budget, these museums - some award-winning - do a great job in educating locals and visitors
alike about the history of the highlands, and in attracting people to areas that depend a great deal on
tourism. I realise that savings have to be made somewhere, but feel that it would be a shot in the foot to
deprive the museums, which have such an important role to play, of funding in these difficult times. I do
hope that you will reconsider.




Retain the Highland Folk Museum which is of international importance and the only one of its type which
deals with our Highland heritage. Also retain Inverness Museum and Art Gallery. Community museums
can self-finance as shown by the very successful Clan Macpherson Museum in Newtonmore.
My colleague, our curator Joanne Howdle, has already represented Caithness Horizons on behalf of the
Highland Museums Forum, but before the current budget consultation process ends I would like to add a
few thoughts on the provision of cultural services generally.

Basically, culture works. As a teacher, arts worker, and heritage sector representative, my experience
proves time and again the irreplaceable educational value of cultural activity. The Lifelong Learning
model demands of us that we no longer consider education for the very young – Learning never stops,
and neither does the hunger for it.

During the past fortnight here at Caithness Horizons, we spent a week with Scottish Opera, Eden Court
and local teenagers creating a totally original Caithness opera inspired by our collection. We‟ve had a
week with a disabled artist working with teenagers from both local high schools teasing out themes
related to disability and the social mores of our attitude to „Otherness‟. Today our foyer was filled with
local food producers, showing off to visitors their produce as one way of reducing the carbon footprint;
meanwhile in the education room next door speakers invited by the British Science Association were
offering the public an opportunity to learn about the current spectrum of Renewable Technology. Next
week we‟ll have residents from a local care home coming for an activity, as well as two groups of learning
disabled adults working for three days on art workshops. Believe me, this is just a hint of the range of
activity that now occupies what was once a decrepit building.

In the current climate, no-one can afford to be complacent. I can assure you, my delight in telling you a




Strongly disagree here. Museums are important both on a personal and a tourism level. The council
supports so few, that we really can't afford to cut them. Already many of the independent museums work
on good will and volunteers. Highland Folk Museum is a fantastic resource. Inverness Museum is a
terrible building but a good collection. If we close museums, or funding cuts cause them to close, where
will the collections go? Where will the interest in our heritage be focussed. What will be the impact on
tourism? Again, if necessary explore multi-purpose locations. But keep the museums.
I am writing in response to The Highland Council‟s public consultation on certain budget cuts. Overall, I
have not found the process particularly user-friendly or embracing. Neither have the proposed cuts been
put in the context of other possible options for saving money.

I respond to the proposal to remove funding from the cultural sector, in particular that of the museums
service and specifically that of Groam House Museum. The proposed removal of funding is in my opinion
very short sighted given that establishments such as Groam House Museum make up a large part of the
culture available and accessible in the Highlands. I would go further and assert that it is a proposed act of
cultural vandalism.

Whilst I appreciate The Highland Council‟s statement that it faces financial challenges I am less
convinced that a full analysis of all Council expenditure has been explored to identify alternative savings.

For instance:

The total number of Highland Councillors could be reduced.
The posts of Ward Managers could be removed or reduced in number and Councillors could undertake
these duties themselves or share Ward Managers.
The cutting and slashing of our Highland verges could be curtailed.
A reduction in street lighting should be undertaken as well as turning street lights off after 1am.
The provision of key services could be contracted out, such as IT provision.
The revenue from wind-farms known as “community benefit” could be used to provide the funding of
culture. After all, anyone who travels around the Highlands suffers from the blight of wind-turbines sited
on almost every hill.
In order to continue the funding of the independent museums that provide extremely good value for
money, I would urge Highland Councillors to consider where alternative savings could be made and in
particular those that I have identified.

The proposed savings identified by The Highland Council from cutting museum services amounts to
GROAM HOUSE MUSEUM - IMPACT OF PROPOSED BUDGET CUTS
I am responding to The Highland Council‟s (THC) Budget Consultation from my position as curator of
Groam House Museum (GHM).
I recognise the difficult situation that THC is in but I am seriously concerned over the impact that the
proposed cuts will have on the Highlands Independent Museums in general, and GHM in particular.
Groam House Museum is indisputably a very successful venture on many levels, and an example of
successful partnership with THC. The service we provide represents exceptional value for money and if
funded entirely by THC would cost in excess of £45,000 annually.
At a time when THC is increasingly looking at ways in which services can be delivered through
community groups surely the Independent Museums are an excellent example of exactly this.
GHM caters for wide range of age and interest level and is very much a „living museum‟ and a highly
valued local resource.
The museum‟s professional achievement is particularly illustrated by our recent Heritage Lottery Fund
(HLF) award. GHM was one of only three successful Scottish applicants in the unique HLF Collecting
Cultures initiative securing an award of £99,000 from HLF towards our £110,000 project to “develop the
George Bain Collection” (www.groamhouse.org.uk see The Bain Collection and Development). The
associated publicity related to this prestigious project, both Scotland wide and internationally has resulted
in interest worldwide resulting in our receiving many donations of work by Bain from members of the
public.
Our Collecting Cultures Bain project is due to end in January 2012. Throughout 2011 we have planned a
very exciting public programme with a year-long exhibition in Groam House Museum and completely
different exhibitions in two other high-status venues (Iona and Edinburgh). This public programme
includes workshops for adults, children and schools and lectures, including a themed programme of
lectures at GHM featuring new academic research and given by renowned academics which, on
completion, we propose to publish.
We have planned additional Bain exhibitions, together with a public programme of events, for 2012 in
Groam House Museum provides a unique service representing outstanding value for money and
investment made possible through The Highland Council funding.

Gheibhear aig Taigh-tasgaidh Taigh Ghrom seirbheis shònraichte le luach air leth bhon airgead a thèid
an taisg tro mhaoin bho Chomhairle na Gàidhealtachd.

Our key contributions are:

1. Groam House Museum (GHM) is an Accredited Museum and a Visit Scotland
4-star Visitor Attraction. We are a popular tourist destination with associated economic benefits.

2. We are staffed by a professionally qualified curator, supported by a team of 34 trained volunteers.

3. GHM is widely recognised as the interpretive centre for the Pictish sculpture of Ross and Cromarty. We
have a national and international reputation as specialists in this field.

4. We provide a platform for new research into Pictish topics by leading academics through our Annual
Academic Lecture series.

5. Our general lecture programme of four popular talks attracts wide audiences and is usually themed to
the museum‟s changing annual exhibition.

6. We have secured and conserved a large collection of internationally important works by the renowned
Highland, Celtic revival artist, George Bain. Heritage Lottery Fund recently awarded GHM £99,000
towards the 3-year research project into the importance of George Bain‟s artistic output and influence.

7. We have formed successful partnerships with external organisations including Glasgow Museums,
Historic Scotland, National Galleries Scotland, National Museums Scotland and the National Trust
Scotland as well as Highland Council Museums, all to the credit and benefit of Highland organisations
and giving kudos to The Highland Council.

8. Community participation projects are an important part of the museum‟s philosophy. One recent
example being our working in partnership with ARCH and NMS to facilitate the production of a community-
created exhibition.

9. We are committed to providing a school service with loans boxes on the Picts and Celtic Art.


During the last year the 18 Highland Independent Museumssupported by Highland Council have
achieved:
- 100,000 visitors in person to Highland independent museums
- 370,000 users which includes web research hits, outreach and educational visits
- 330 volunteers are involved in running Highland independent museums
- 130 voluntary board members govern Highland independent museums
- 34 staff are employed directly by Highland independent museums
- 17 museums have achieved a 3* Visit Scotland grading or above with 7 gaining 4* and Historylinks in
Dornoch 5*
- 11 museums are Accredited, others are in the process of applying and all aim to gain this National
quality standard
by the end of 2010
- Over £750, 000 of external funding has been secured including:
o Collecting Cultures Fund (Heritage Lottery Fund) Tain Through Time £98,000 and Groam House
Museum £99,000
o Capital development (main funder Heritage Lottery Fund) Highland Museum of Childhood £400,000
- Highland projects and partnerships as part of Museums Galleries Scotland nationwide initiatives eg.
Their Past Your Future and Show Scotland
Together, Highland independent museums provide a diverse yet high quality service, working hard and
accomplishing ever increasing standards to benefit the local community, schools and tourist visitors as
well as supporting the local economy.
n order to continue the funding of the independent museums that provide extremely good value for
money, I would urge Highland Councillors to consider where alternative savings could be made and in
particular those that I have identified. The proposed savings identified by The Highland Council from
cutting museum services amounts to £400,000. This appears to be the amount of grant aid currently
given to the independent museums, including the post of Museum‟s Officer and indicates to me that the
council has decided on cuts in this area. I do seek your reassurance that I am mistaken and that the
consultation is open, honest and fair.
Groam House Museum - very successful venture, service provides exceptional value for money. Recent
heritage lottery fund award.
would regret the closure of such provision which make a significant contribution to cultural development
Specifically Groam House is an important cultural and economic asset which should not be closed but
might be managed
alternatively




I suppose I have no proper status for objecting to the Highland Council‟s apparent proposal to withdraw
annual funding of £14,500 to 19 Museums in the financial year 2011/12, living as I do in London.
However, as a Scotsman by birth, a former member of the Black Watch during WWII, and, more
importantly perhaps, a member of the charity The Friends of Hugh Miller and the husband of the late
Marian McKenzie Johnston who before her death last October was the oldest living great-great-
granddaughter of Hugh Miller of Cromarty, perhaps I may be regarded as someone with some moral right
to have views. The Hugh |Miller Museum and Cottage in Cromarty are not directly affected by the
Council‟s proposal, but indirectly they could be seriously affected, because the museums under threat are
a very important tourist attraction so that any threat to their continued viability is a threat to a very
important part of the general economy in the Highlands (and therefore to the continued viability of the
Hugh Miller properties). But it is not only the economy that matters. Museums are a vital part of the
education and culture of present and future generations of the whole British nation. I realise that in these
GROAM HOUSE MUSEUM – to be made in OBSERVATIONS But I understand that the CUTS
parlous days economies have CHAIRMAN‟S public expenditure.ON PROPOSED BUDGETmuseums
As Chairman of the Board and Director of Collections for Groam House Museum I am responding to The
Highland Council‟s Budget Consultation regarding proposed cuts.
The Highland Council will receive many observations on the importance of Groam House Museum,
locally, regionally and nationally. Leading scholars have written to THC about the cultural disaster that
would result if the museum had to close and others have outlined the economic disaster that museum
closures would mean to the local community and to the loss of tourist income in the Highlands. I am sure
THC understands this but what I want to do is to make the recipients of this letter aware of some of the
less obvious consequences of the proposed cuts.
Groam House Museum was awarded £99000 by the Heritage Lottery Fund Collecting Cultures Initiative to
develop the George Bain Collection. This is ring-fenced money that can only be used to enlarge, improve
and conserve the collection and to display and interpret the significance of George Bain (born in the
Highlands) to the Celtic art revival, something of immense significance to the Highlands as well as
nationally and internationally. Groam House Museum has forthcoming exhibitions at the National Gallery
of Scotland in Edinburgh and on Iona (in conjunction with Historic Scotland). Can you imagine our
embarrassment if we had to inform National Galleries of Scotland that owing to cuts by The Highland
Council the proposed exhibition cannot now take place?
I believe that THC is considering offering storage to mothball museum collections, but all museum
collections, and particularly the Bain collection, need proper environmentally controlled storage as well as
ongoing conservation. Objects lent to a named museum would have to be returned to their owners, with
tarbat Discovery Centre - the centre holds a file of letters from senior figures in the Musum and University
worlds who after visiting the site testify to the unique value of the excavations and the quality of their
interpretation at the centre.




This does not directly affect our area but we would compare it with closing the British Museum – it would
save a lot of money. Museums store display and most important educate all ages about the history,
heritage and life all around our area and region. They are practical displays and treasures of our
civilisation and withdrawal of funding for any museum large and small must be al last resort. Grants could
be frozen but should not be stopped. Charges or voluntary donation boxes could be introduced. Most staff
are unpaid volunteers.
I am writing on behalf of the Dounreay Stakeholder Group (DSG) which represents over 20 community
organisations to offer our support for the work of Caithness Horizons in Thurso.

We understand that Highland Council are considering cuts in museum services and we are writing to you
to urge that the nature of these budget reductions does not severely impact on Caithness Horizons.

Caithness Horizons opened to the public on the 1st December 2008 and welcomes 80,000 visitors in its
first year of operation. It cares for and makes accessible to the public the regional important museum
collections and also houses a national important collection that relates to the nuclear research facility at
Dounreay.

At a time when Caithness & North Sutherland is trying to diversify away from the activities of Dounreay
which contributes a significant economic benefit to the county it is even more important to sustain
facilities such as Caithness Horizons which will play a vital role to the regional tourist economy both
directly, by creating employment and indirectly by attracting visitors to the area.

Caithness Horizons has a varied programme of lifelong learning activities, temporary exhibitions and
special events that benefit the local communities that the Museum serves and visitors to the area.
Caithness Horizons provides an education service for local schools that supports the curriculum and it
runs a varied programme of activities that provide informal learning opportunities for children, families and
adults. Caithness Horizons also delivers lifelong learning activities and projects aimed at people with
special needs in partnership with local community groups such as Key Housing and Health and
Happiness.

Caithness Horizons contributes to tackling social inclusion by using its Collections as a basis on which to
run outreach activities that improve physical and intellectual access to the heritage of the North
Highlands. It also runs a wide range of family friendly events and develops and maintains links with
schools and community organisations such as Brownies, local history groups and societies.
As a member of Groam House Museum I am writing to express my grave concerns about the Council‟s
proposal to cut funding to the 19 independent museums in its region.
There is a particular case to be made for continuing support of Groam House Museum but others have
already written to you very eloquently, such as the distinguished academics James Fraser and Jane
Geddes, and Dr Eric Grant, our chairman. I cannot improve on what they have said but I do urge you to
take account of their views.
Instead I want to draw attention to the wider consequences of the proposed funding cut. The independent
museums are already all run on a shoestring and they have virtually no discretionary expenditure which
they can cut. Many of them have succeeded in attracting grants from other bodies but these are always
for specific projects and do little or nothing to help with everyday running costs. The financial support
received from the Council is therefore literally vital and the reality is that if that funding is cut by even as
little as 20% many if not all of the 19 museums will probably have to close their doors. Once closed
those doors would be unlikely ever to reopen.
As a consequence the Council would be seen to have perpetrated an almost unparalleled act of cultural
vandalism which would be a stain on its reputation and standing for generations. I chose the word
unparalleled with care for it seems to me that the wholesale closure of umpteen museums would in fact
stand out as a 21st century „highland clearance‟. In the original clearances the people were removed
from their land, now we are facing the removal of the people‟s access to the preserved heritage of the
I am writing in response to the Highland Council‟s budget consultation process, with a particular reference
to the Council‟s intention to impose cuts within the independent museum service.
As a former Arts Development Officer with Ross and Cromarty, and through my work as Arts Manager for
the Highland Council, I have gained significant experience in maintaining a viable level of cultural
services and activities during times of financial challenges. In fact, during the period when the Highland
Council was first established, bringing with it strict financial economies, we were able to increase the level
of arts provision throughout the region.
This was achieved through taking a strategic approach to service levels – recognising essential aspect of
the service, and pruning away non-essential activities. The exercise was supported by a robust Arts
Strategy that was recognised by national funding agencies. We were therefore in a strong position to
attract significant levels of external funding which supported and helped develop our essential services.
I believe that a taking a strategic approach is the only viable way forward when faced with difficult
financial management decisions.
In the case of the independent museum network, I believe that it forms the strategic core from which a
wider range of cultural provision can grow and prosper. These small organisations are also ideally placed
for attracting sizable amounts of resources into the Highlands, along with attracting positive attention to
the Highlands as a cultural destination. They therefore represent a strong investment in terms of Council
input – not a mere expenditure.
Groam House Museum receives an annual grant of £14,500 through a Highland Council Service Delivery
Agreement. For this very small amount, the Council benefits greatly. The museum is a four star visitor
attraction and is recognised at a national level as playing a strategic role in Pictish research and


On a recent trip up north I visited the Heritage Museum at Gairloch. I have to say it was the highlight of
my trip. I fully intend to return because of the facilities found there. Everything is so well maintained and
the volunteer staff informed and helpful.
It is a wonderful and important addition to the west coast, an area sadly lacking in so many other things.

It has come to my attention that, due to funding cuts this amenity may not survive and I would like to say
that I feel it would be a loss of great magnitude should the funds not be found to sustain this valuable
asset.
Petition in support of retention of Groam house Museum - 907 signatories




I am writing to express my distress at the current proposals for the removal of funding from independent
museums across the highlands.
In my personal experience, Timespan (as an example) contributed invaluably to my continued
advancement as an artist.
Museums such as Timespan
are at the core of the community with direct community involvement and ownership
protect and preserve the heritage of the area for the public benefit
provide a principal tourist destination for visitors and locals alike
bring economic development and tourism revenue to the Helmsdale community area
Research opportunities are provided through its historical collections and archive
provide a professional service and preserves for posterity collections of national and international
importance for the public benefit.
provide educational programmes for schools, adults and many other groups
Please consider that we may be destroying our future to save our present situation; the arts flourishes in a
recession and now is your chance to be steadfast, to show a community what is important: them.
I have heard that this is the last day to register support for museums and wish to register my support for
the Museum of Childhood. Museums give so much to the community and enrich all our lives quietly and
peacefully.
I am a Director of Groam House Museum, Rosemarkie which preserves and displays the Pictish sculpture
collected within Ross and Cromarty together with other items of historical interest from the Black Isle and
have been for many years, giving up my precious time to actively support this small but very high quality
museum with a high profile nationally. To illustrate this we were lucky enough to enjoy a first class talk by
Professor Mick Aston of Channel 4‟s Time Team last autumn with a capacity audience in Fortrose
Leisure Centre of 155.

Huge efforts are made by members of the local community working as volunteers for this museum not
only to keep the museum OPEN but also to make it FRESH AND INTERESTING to all who visit.
Currently we have 39 volunteers and 6 highly professional members of the board who all work hard to
further the aims of the museum and update and keep alive the exhibitions. It is not an unchanging picture
at Groam House Museum and despite budgetary restrictions over the years, great efforts have been
made and still are made to achieve this. The museum is run wholly by voluntary contribution with one
part-time paid very excellent curator – quite an achievement for the area. The enthusiasm and
enjoyment of all of the visitors and volunteers is plain to see.

I beg that very careful thought is given to the withdrawal of funding for this museum which is situated in
the quiet village of Rosemarkie and yet manages to draw visitors from all over the world thus generating
well-needed income.
I have heard from Jennifer Maxwell at Highland Museum of Childhood that the council is considering
drastically cutting the funding it provides to the museum. Although I appreciate we live in difficult times,
and there will have to be some financial tightening of belts, I do feel it is very short-sighted to reduce
council funding to such an important facility.
Apart from the building and location, which are unique in themselves, the museum and its contents
represent a vital part of the area‟s history. As you are well aware, we need to understand and learn about
the past to have a chance to make a difference in the future. The HMOC may well have been built on a
doll collection but has grown to encompass all aspects of Highland childhood, including living histories. It
is an essential resource for many, especially local schools, youth groups and tourists, and one we should
be doing as much as possible to preserve.
All museums and historic buildings rely on funding from bodies such as yourselves to help keep them
afloat – the nature of the „business‟ is such that it is not generally one where vast incomes are generated
from visitors. Granted, there are some who charge inflated entrance fees, but with the current financial
situation, people are much more aware of their budgetary constraints and will avoid these. HMOC‟s
charges are kept to a level where people can afford to visit, but at the same time will not, in all probability,
generate enough to cover all costs.

Highland Museum of Childhood - the museum and it's contents represent a vital part of the area's history-
we need to learn from the past to have a chance to make a difference in the future - the museum has
grown to encompass all aspects of Highland childhood, including living histories.

Museums Galleries Scotland (MGS) is the strategic voice of museums and galleries in Scotland, advising
Government on sector issues and the future of the industry.
We work alongside the nation‟s museums and galleries to achieve the shared vision of a welcoming
museums and galleries sector that opens doors and celebrates collections, inspiring creativity, learning
and enjoyment for all.
Museums bring £800 million into the Scottish economy and attract 25 million visitors a year. Museums
and galleries are central to the tourism offer and form a major part of the diverse product that tourist visit
Scotland to see.
Consultation response
MGS is responding to Council paper ECS 29 on the review of museum provision. The Highland Councils
current support to museums in the Highlands is vital to the future economy of the region. Our economic
impact analysis carried out in 2008 said 383,855 people visited museums and galleries in the Highland
area.
The Highland region is particularly rich in museums which play a vital role in the local tourism economy as
they are fundamental to the Highland‟s tourism offer. All three aspects of Highland Council‟s museums
provision are vital not only to attracting visitors to the region they are also an import resource to local
communities.
Over half the workforce in Scottish museums and galleries are volunteers and the high percentage of 19
independent community museums demonstrates how important local heritage is to the communities of
the Highlands, people are passionate about their heritage and want to actively participate in collecting,
conserving and interpreting it. These independent museums are also social enterprises and make an
important contribution to the local economy either through direct employment or through their use of local
suppliers.
These museums work together through the Highlands and Islands Museums Forum and MGS has
supported projects such as the Homecoming 2009 guide to museums in the Highlands and Islands area
Petition in support of the retention of Groam house Museum - 39 signatories
continue to support all




It is difficult to see how the Council can continue to appropriately look after collections that have been
gifted and at the same time reduce financial support. Keeping the local musuems around the Highlands
open is essential for tourism and as a local educational resource.

Museums and libraries are the hallmark of a civilised society and surely they should be preserved
Caithness Horizons - not only does the museum house a collection of local and national importance,
which is easily accessible to local inhabitants and visitors, but it also runs an active programme of events
and projects of benefit to the local community.




To most council taxpayers, the loss of a museum and art gallery is unlikely to have any impact at all. It
might be seen as the loss of a tourist attraction, but do attendance figures warrant the continued
expenditure on this facility? How many people resident in Highland have used the facility and, more
importantly, how many use it on a regular basis?

Most of the independent community museums receive funding through other sources. Again the question
is whether the majority of residents in Highland would object to the removal of funding.
Locally, evidence of support for the Highland Folk Museum is being requested, while HC has it on the list
for possible closure. One suggestion is to „moth-ball‟ it, but this would seem to leave a maintenance
problem, while vandalism would be a further worry. Given our dependence on the tourist trade,
maintaining „things to do / go to see‟ are important, so the first choice is to come up with ideas to
immediately help bring in money or save costs. There is also rising evidence of community support for
keeping the attraction open following the increase in the number of visitors since the Home Coming
celebrations. Assuming that the HC will be looking to make a significant reduction in the current level of
support, a number of suggestions occur:
• Re-introduce an entry fee. Collection of money at the gate will have to be done without employing an
extra member of staff in order to maximise the gain. It is suggested that the gate money should aim to
generate at least half the total wage bill for the site (see also next bullet point). However a balance needs
to be struck in order to avoid the fee being set too high to dissuade family entry and thereby prove
counter-productive. Suggest £2 per head for adults, £1 for children under 18, with family entrance at £5
for two adults and two or more children (one adult and three or more children). With family disposable
incomes expected to fall, getting the balance right will be crucial.
• The suggested (required) savings in the HC proposals amount to £400k. The setting aside of £3.5m for
a museum archive store was cited at the Ward Forum in Boat of Garten on 23 June to ensure that gifted
(legacy) items would not be lost were museums to be closed (but you can't put the Folk Museum
buildings etc. in a shed). Rather than building the store, this sum, taken in association with the re-
introduction of entrance fees and a possible trimming of staff numbers, should enable museums with a
good foot-fall to remain open for (say) a foreseeable (20 year) future.
• Review the number of paid staff numbers and explore the potential to recruit volunteers to fill
appropriate gaps.
Caithness Horizons - the work carried out there has impressed and delighted me by providing a facility of
the highest standard which is easily accessible to individuals and groups and which I feel proud to take
visitors to experience.
I have recently picked up on a couple of emails and letters which set out various author's thinking
reference the Highland Council funding for Caithness Horizons. To prevent any confusion occurring in the
future with respect to this subject could I please point you to the minutes of the Highland Council meeting
held on 6 September 2007, which state:

"2. Recess Powers

It was NOTED that the recess powers granted by the Council at its meeting on 28 June 2007 had been
exercised by the Chief Executive, in consultation with the Convenor, Vice Convenor and Chairman of the
Resources Committee, in respect of an addition and two alterations to the funding package previously
agreed at a number of meetings in regard to the Caithness Horizons project.
........................................................ Finally it had been agreed to substitute a further capital sum of
£500,000 in place of a previously agreed annual revenue contribution of £90,000 for a period of up to six
years. "

It should be noted that when this "short term" funding agreement comes to an end, Highland Council
revenue funding of £90,000 p.a. will continue under the agreement as recorded in the minutes of the
meeting of the Highland Council of 5 September 2005.




Highland Folk Museum - the loss to Newtonmore would be devastating affecting not only the village but
also the surrounding communities - loss of employment, loss of tourists and loss of a local and national
cultural heritage - also severely affect the local economy in terms of shopping, business, hotels and
holiday accomodation.
Highland Folk Museum - fabulous example of a tourist attraction for all the family and improves year by
year- provides important employment in a remote area and is also a good advert for speyside and
inverness-shire as people travel north by train.
Highland Folk Museum - our constitution includes the aim of promoting Newtonmore as a toursit
destination for the benefit of the village and the whole cairngorms national Park - award winning status on
the international stafe as a folk museum - immensely important to this community as an employer and as
a magnet to visitors to the area.




Highland Folk Museum - (ORIGINAL DOCUMENT NOT ATTACHED)

Gairloch Museum - hard work of volunteers resulted in a fully accredited Museum which is a valuable
resource to the Community, providing economic benefits as a tourist attraction, preserves cultural
heritage of the area, provides educational opportunities for both school pupils and adults and is regularly
visited by people doing genealogical research sometimes from very far away.




Gairloch Heritage Museum - great reputation throughout the country - visitors are astonished to find a
museum of such quality, so far away from the central belt of Scotland.




Here in Dunbeath, we feel we provide outstanding value for money under our SLA with the Council and
are keen to be able to continue to do so - attracted in the last 4 - 5 years £116,000 for a re-development;
£60,000 for fishing project at the harbour and £37,775 for archaeological excavations within dunbeath
area.
The Highland Folk Museum is a fantastic place to visit and a lot of work has gone into it in recent years. It
would be a scandal if the whole place is mothballed.

I visit with groups of foreign visitors and they are always very impressed.

I should be happy for a small entrance charge to be introduced.
Economic Impact Analysis - study commissioned by Highlands and Islands Museums Forum. Separate
booklet available




Museums cannot survive without financial assistance - huge amount of money raised by lottery grants -
22,000 visitors a year who bring trade to the café and shop.
Petition in support of the retention of Gairloch Heritahe Museum - 614 signatories
Library provision. The Council has 40 local libraries ranging from very small to
significant, and provides a school library in our 29 secondary schools. Bookstart is
the early year‟s library service for young children and their families. Can we reduce
library provision? Tick any options you feel are appropriate.




And that there will be savings made with the library support unit and of couse am
baile. The item which I am seeking clarification is reduction in library provision - are
you in a position to clarify to me what exactly is meant by this? I would assume that
it means a reduction in the number of local or mobile libraries - over the years I have
seen the library service develop from stregth to strength - a service the public values
highly.




Reduce library opening hours by 10%|Remove 7 school librarian posts|Cease the
Bookstart service




Reduce library opening hours by 10%
Close up to 17 small local libraries|Close one major urban library |Reduce library
opening hours by 10%|Cease the Bookstart service




Reduce library opening hours by 10%|Remove 7 school librarian posts|Cease the
Bookstart service
Reduce library opening hours by 10%|Cease the Bookstart service
Nairn Library: I was very concerned to read suggestions for the review of library
provision in 'Further Savings Ideas ECS 31' and the potential threat to libraries
across the Highlands. As a user and not a library expert, I can only speak about our
library in Nairn. It is an excellent local library which seems to me be very well used
and valued by local people. I have just been in there and as usual it has a large
number of people choosing books and a range of ages using the computers. Nairn is
growing raidly in size with both an elderly population who rely on a choice of books
from an accesible local library and a lot of toddlers and young people who can
develop the reading habit through the excellent sections devoted to them. The library
is a vital element of our social fabric in Nairn: please protect and develop it.
Reduce library opening hours by 10%
Culloden Library: I understand that the Community Library at Keppoch Road in
Culloden, may be one of the proposed targetted closures in the future, and would
like to express my deep concerns regarding this proposed action. The service which
is provided by the local Library in Culloden is invaluable, and serves an area of
considerable growth. The staff are both pleasant and efficient, and there is ample
parking in the close vicinity of the Library. Furthermore, the Council has just spent a
considerable amount of money in refurbishing the Culloden Library! The Inverness
Farraline Park Library however, is not as well attended, nor is there any convenient
parking in the immediate area. Perhaps it would have been more prudent to have
avoided the scandalous BID Inverness expenditure, prompted by the now-departed
Stefan Krause, to "invest" thousands by littering the City Centre walkways with
unwanted pieces of rock sculpture and artwork. It was patently obvious at the time
this work was being carried out, that an impending financial crisis was looming, and
apart from Herr Krause, I fear that many more senior development heads should roll,
to assist with the provision of the additional funds required at this late stage!

I am totally opposed to any cutbacks in the library service,it offers so much. A lifeline
for rural communites, PC acccess for all. Audio books for blind or partially sighted.
Encouragement of literacy & numeracy. I could go on for hours!

Cromarty Library: I find the proposal to close the various Libraries in the Highland
region, (Cromarty in particular), totally incomprenhesible.Libraries are a fabulous
source of information, recreation and learning. These fulfil a direct need, especially
in the smaller communities where we can live in a Cultural desert. When I think
about the money that has just been spent, to make the local library accessible to the
wheelchair bound, I can only wonder at the lack of thought that has gone into this
whole suggestion! I would urge, whoever is in charge of this proposal, to think again
before turning off one of main the sources of wisdom and enlightenment in the
Highlands.
Reduce library opening hours by 10%|Remove 7 school librarian posts|Cease the
Bookstart service




seminars and workshops relating to heritage and tourism."




Why spend so much money building the one in Inverness when you were needing to
save money? I am sure Inverness could have done without it.


It has come to my attention that a number of school libraries in Highland Region are
due for closure. Now, I have spoken to Joyce Watson (Libraries and Information
Services Co-ordinator), and she advised me that this whole issue is up for public
consultation. However, I should like to enquire, under the Freedom of Information
request opportunity, if appropriate, WHICH school libraries are mooted for closure,
or at least, consultation to consider closure. I should be grateful if you would let me
have a response as soon as possible, and certainly a confirmation that you've
received this email and my request is being processed.
Knoydart and Mallaig Libraries: I am writing as I was outraged at hearing the
Highland Council are considering cutting not only the Knoydart library service but the
Mallaig service too meaning that I would have to travel and stay overnight in order to
visit my nearest library. Our library isn't open very many hours but is an educational
and cultural lifeline particularly in the winter months and I believe if counted has
more useage per head of population than most libraries in Britian. I love that I can
order books from any library in Britian and they are delivered here to Knoydart. We
need libraries in remote rural communities more than most places. I run a small film
production company in Knoydart and having access to research materials is vital to
my business as well as my general well being. I would seriously consider leaving the
Highlands if there were no local library and I will do everything in my power to
campaign to save it. I hope that you will reject any such proposals and defend our
library service against cuts.




Reduce library opening hours by 10%|Cease the Bookstart service




Close up to 17 small local libraries
Remove 7 school librarian posts|Cease the Bookstart service
In light of the recently published budget documentation can you please enlighten me
as to which School Librarian post you have identified to cut to make a saving of
£97,000.
Culloden Library am really astonished that closing libraries is one of your solutions to
your budgeting crisis. Surely it is part of your remit to encourage all ages to further
their reading skills and to become involved in a community facility. For over 25 years
I've had the pleasure of using Culloden library with my family, my book group and
also with the playgroup I was involved with for 11 years. Your over-indulgence of
funding for council junkets and events, the cost of sending councillors to
unnecessary events at home and abroad,the excessive amounts paid for Gaelic
road-signs that only a small majority can read and the never-ending money to the
Gaelic Primary school could all be better allocated. Ask any housewife how it is done
and I'll guarantee you that there will be savings made but not on the things you seem
to place such high importance on.




I write to urge you not to cut or reduce library services, with particular reference to
rural facilities in The Highland Council area. To use one example, Ardersier library
possesses a small stock but permits residents - particularly elderly residents and
very young residents - to access books and participate actively in reading and
gaining knowledge. For very young people, this means the Bookstart scheme, which
sees children from homes - some of them not linguistically rich - obtain and gain
pleasure from, reading. In addition to this, limited internet facilities are provided
locally for the use and good of all residents. Libraries in rural areas - Ardersier and
other smaller villages like it - are vital to retain a rich culture of learning and acessing
knowledge. Closure of these facilities seems to suggest that only those in a city
need to access knowledge - and those who aspire to that knowledge ought to travel
there. Rather, The Highland Council ought to value its means of enabling and
disseminating knowledge, and this means retaining local library services.




Considering Bonar Bridge has only two retail outlets - to close our library would be
like sounding the death bell for the community.
I write to you on the subject of library budget cuts, as a retired senior professional
librarian from Aberdeenshire. You should be aware that one of the most appreciated
services provided by local authorities is the public library service, and making cuts to
staff and services is not one of the beter choices made by councillors. Aberdeen City
tried to close some libraries about a dozen years ago, and were inundated with
objections from ratepayers. They had to re-open one closed library, and provide an
alternative service in another area. However, they did eventually listen to advice and
the reopened library offered additional services, some of which the users paid for. I
would urge you, then, to reconsider your options regarding the public library service.
Simple cuts in opening hours do not save much, as basic running costs will not alter.
For how long could the service operate with a much-reduced book buying budget?
What possibilities can staff offer for reducing operating costs? Are there fee-paying
services that could be added with the existing staff numbers? Can the overdue fines
system be increased to bring in more income? Should there be a charge for
reservations and requests? Would users be willing to pay a small annual
subscription to support the service? Can the number of professional staff (the
highest-paid section of staff) be reduced by devolving responsibility? Are there some
ancillary services which exist more to "look good" than actually be needed? Can the




Library service in the Highlands - constituents greatly value the service, but feel that
more should be done to promote their use generally, and in particular the use of
some underused facilities such as Inshes. Strong views are held that young people
should be attracted to use libraries more.




Close up to 17 small local libraries|Reduce library opening hours by 10%|Remove 7
school librarian posts
Reduce library opening hours by 10%




Reduce library opening hours by 10%




Reduce library opening hours by 10%




The Library Support unit has a hefty number of unproductive staff who appear to
undertake a limited range of tasks. Instead of cutting front line services we need to
cut out the unproductive elements and devolve some of the tasks to the professional
librarians in the schools who seem to work part time




Reduce library opening hours by 10%
Ullapool Library: Dear Sirs, I have read the full document concerning 'Further ideas
on budget savings' and wish to register my protest at the proposed budget cuts to
the Library services in Highland Council. I use the Ullapool library on a regular basis
(weekly) both to borrow books, ask for info and use the computers. I have always
found the staff there to be very knowledgable and helpful at all times. They find
books for you, interact well with all customers, young and old, and provide a valuable
service to this local community. The nearest other library is some 45 miles away in
Dingwall and Ullapool Library also represents the community and local schools
exceptionally well. In fact, closures and restriction of opening hours are not what is
needed. The opening hours should actually be extended into evening openings daily
and more events could be held in the library to encourage local attendance. In this
day and age when young people are encouraged to read more rather than look at
computers, how can this be done if the library closes?
Close one major urban library |Remove 7 school librarian posts




This is the most appalling suggestion I've heard in a long while. The so-called capital
of the Highlands without a library?? This will hit those who cannot afford to buy
books or have their own computers - shame on the council for even considering
such a thing. Libraries are precious centres of learning at a time when jobs are few
and study is essential to so many - are all Highlanders to become Philistines only
interested in bagpipes, tartan and haggis???
Referring to your document "Further ideas on budget savings" section ECS 31 on
the review of library provision. The library service is only 0.7% of the current budget.
The total saving you could make by adopting all the cuts suggested is £384,700.
Which is peanuts in the scale of things. Yet in making such cuts you risk reducing
the level of literacy in the community, a capacity without which education is
pointless. Poor literacy can cause a lifetime of frustration, relative poverty, mental ill-
health and possible criminality. It will certainly reduce a person's ability to pay council
tax, even should they be able to read the form. Keep the libraries going as they are.
In tough times they are at the very least a warm haven for the unemployed. We now
need them more than ever. I support your valient and sensible attempts to make cuts
in other areas of the budget, where alternatives are available. For the libraries, there
is no alternative.




Culloden Library: It is with great dismay that I have learnt of the possible closure of
Culloden Library. This is an excellent community resource which provides a wide
variety of amentities for local residents of all ages. I have been a lifelong user of
local libraries and certainly see Culloden Library as an enhancement to my lifestyle.
With all the housing development which is taking place in this area of Inverness it
becomes even more imperative that local amentities are maintained not closed. If
budget savings are essential I would certainly prefer to see the opening hours of
Inverness Library reduced rather than Culloden closed.
Closing libraries should not even be contemplated.




There must be smaller cuts that can be made with the library service without closing
libraries completely. Once a library is closed will it ever open again, whereas doing
away with a small service, such as Bookstart can be worked round, by the public -
parents can take their children into the library and read to them and encourage them
without the need for stickers, posters etc. As with some of the not so remote clients
the van delivers to, these people obviously get their shopping in by what ever
means, why not use the same means to get library books and cut out the need for
the van. I am sure there are a lot of adjustments that can be made and still leave the
libraries open.

As for the closing of the swimming pools, town like Nairn have so few ammenities, it
would be disasterous to loose the pool. It is well used but could be used more given
the chance, if the management allowed the public in at different times.

Without access to the libraries internet, I will not be able to apply for and / or seek
(foreign) employment which undoubtedly, will be my only means of dis-associating
myself from a 'life of benefits'
Pleasekeepme informed on any developments.
I hope no closures are contemplated




Don‟t close libraries - they are vital community resources and get little enough
funding already.




I write with reference to your proposed closure of Invergordon library and other small
libraries across the Highland region. If my maths are correct you will save less than
500,000 pounds each year if you carry out your plan. In the grand scheme of this
things this is peanuts. Education and more importantly reading are an essential tools
for our children, take this away and you lessen a childs ability to learn. Old people,
families with young children and ordinary folk will not or cannot travel to either
Alness or Tain to visit their libraries, your actions will reduce our quality of life and
that of our children. I appreciate that budget cuts have to be made but please rethink
closing any library or indeed any community facility. Rural communities are still
reeling from the closure of local post offices, close our libraries and swiming pools
and you might has well use that famous saying,'will the last person to leave the
Highlands please put out the lights' because thats what will happen. regards
S.A.Hamilton
Kindly refer to my comm. 00006864-0081 /or - 0014 in which I lodge
fullest objection to your destructive intended policy with its rascist
overtones against semi-rural, vs city, populations and with its removal of
computer access to both HCC and UHI. Our minimal library budgets should not
be touched until you have cut 35 % of central and/or staffing /Servicepoint
budgets, ie. especially after the level of administrative building funds of
50 million expended on Drummruie offices..
To remove sole general amenity from people calls into question both why people
should pay Highland tax when much of remaining HCC costs are merely
down-loaded central government costs , and also why Sutherland & Caithness
should remain as part of Highland administration for culture/amenities
purposes.
Clearly we need citizen-Parliament / citizen-regional authorities on the
recent Icelandic model, so that policymakers are now seen as servants of the
people.


Culloden Library - facility used by all ages and schools for pleasure and education
where resources can be accessed easily by the community. The area is a
developing area with houses being built constantly with very little addition to the
facilities in the area. To reduce these facilities is a step in a backward direction. I
do not think this proposal has been thought through with the community at interest.




Libraries provide services including used from babies/toddlers, school childre,
families/recreation use/educational use/ IT access for learners/people without IT
access at home/ elderly people access/ students working in areas/overseas students
to access emails/ service point and essential service/encourage children to
read/interest in books.
My objections are on the grounds of inhuman and degrading treatment with racist
overtones especially whilst the central inverness facilities, service points and admin,
staffing budgets are left virtually intact. Since library is sole general amentiy in semi-
rural sutherland/caithness, levies again persons in these areas without provision is
clearly an act of state-error. Even at the height of Tsarist/Soviet terror in Siberia, the
Gulag towns (Tomsk, Chita) had library provision. Any actions purely against semi-
rural remote populations call into question the whole question of why should
sutherland and caithness authority be in an enforced union with Inverness at all!
Further, to axe libraries when highland has spent countless millions on new staff
offices at Drummuie is grossly offensive.
Close one major urban library |Reduce library opening hours by 10%|Remove 7
school librarian posts|Cease the Bookstart service
I am very concerned at the proposal to close the library at Culloden Inverness. This
is a facility used by all ages and schools for pleasure and education where resources
can be accessed easily by the community. The area is a developing area with
houses being built constantly with very little addition to the facilities in the area. To
reduce these facilities is a step in a backward direction. I do not think this proposal
has been thought through with the community at interest.




Reduce library opening hours by 10%|Cease the Bookstart service




my family has been living in Inverness for 4 years now. We all use the library at
Culloden very frequently. My 6 year old son has been a member since he was 18
months old - he loves going to the library, he is very keen on finding out anything
factual and loves the history books most of all - we take out around 30 books every 2
weeks. The library is always very busy, with friendly staff that are very helpful and
there is a great welcoming and safe atmosphere. I cannot understand why the
council would even consider closing this well used and frankly, extremely convienent
community facility - especially when only last year it was refurbished and recently
has had major repairs to its roof. I can honestly say if the council closed this library I
cannot see myself or my family travelling into Inverness to use the main library so
often - therefore depriving my son of his precious thirst for knowledge of which at his
age should be encouraged and nurtured.PLEASE DO NOT CLOSE CULLODEN
LIBRARY!
I have spoken to several of the professionals involved in the delivery of Bookstart
across Scotland and I am extremely concerned that Highland Council is proposing to
stop its involvement in this important service. There has been no attempt by the
Council's Administration to be clear as to exactly what the results of their proposal
will be and the information that is in the public domain is innacurate.

In its Budget Consultation process Highland Council has suggested “ceasing the
Bookstart service” as a potential saving. This description is inaccurate and
misleading. Bookstart is also described as an “early years library service”. This is not
the case. The facts have been made available to the Council administration but they
persist in including this “potential saving” in their proposals. This potential saving will
actually jeopardise a key building block in the multi agency approach to early years
provision in the Highlands. The other partners, NHS Highland, HPPGA, SCMA and
Homestart are all signatories to a partnership agreement with Highland Council to
deliver this programme.

Please do not make decisions based on inaccuracies and whilst not in full
possession of the facts. Have the implications of this proposed cut been discussed
fully with the other partners?

The evidence about the benefits of parents being involved in their children‟s
education in general, and their children‟s literacy activities in particular, is
overwhelming. Research shows that parental involvement in their children‟s learning
positively affects the child‟s academic performance in both primary and secondary
schools leading to higher academic achievement, greater cognitive competence,
greater problem-solving skills, greater school enjoyment, better school attendance
and fewer behavioural problems at school .

Surely as a responsible councillors, you would want to be responsible for achieving
these positive outcomes for our children.

The implication is that book-gifting and advice to parents, during their child's first five
years, is a cost effective way of raising standards. To do this effectively it has to be
co-ordinated professionally. The removal of the staff support for this programme
would defeat the object and has high long term cost implications for Highland
Council in dealing with the failure to raise these key standards.
I am very concerned about the possible closure of highland libraries, our family use
the muir of ord branch every week for our reading needs, we also take advantage of
the information on the notice boards, I have done course which I discovered in the
library. My children greatly benfit from this service, from rhymetime to borrowing
DVDs. Surely the cuts could be made elsewhere, normally expenses are a easy
place to save money - cheaper training - less entertainment - paid lunches. I have no
computer at home so this is also a valuble resource, from typing this to reseaching
for the childrens homework. Please consider very carefully before losing the
community service.
I am very upset to hear that you might be closing down Nairn's local Library. I am a
member of the Library and i have been since i was little. I am only 12 but i think that
closing down the Library is very bad idea! On a daily basis i use the library every
week. I use it for the internet and getting books out. I use the internet for checking
my emails and for research. If you close the library then lots of jobs will be lost and
as we are in a recession it will be very bad for these people. Nairn Library is loved by
many on Nairn's residents old and young.
Thank you for taking some of your time to read this and i hope you put this into
consideration.


We have just heard about your proposal to close Muir of Ord Library. How much
thought has been given to this idea?? Do you realy expect people to go to
Dingwall/Inverness?? I am sure you have figures which show how many people use
this branch. A mobile is not an option as it could not cope with the volume of
borrowers inside and we would have to wait outside in all weathers. Perhaps some
cost cutting could be done in the councils own budget. (1) Take one penny per mile
of your milage. No other company pays so much. (2)End free meals at meetings and
trainig sessions. Most people pay for there own food or take a packed luch . (3)
Make more use of video conferencing. Why do councillors need to travel to and from
the likes of Sky? How much is that in expences? (4)Do councillors need to stay in
Cromarty after meetings? and why is the allowance so high for accomodation. We
need our library so Hands Off


I am opposed to the closure of the library because not every one can afford new
books and the selections in the second hand shops are only by what is put in at the
time. At this moment in time the unemployed can not afford computers and a lot of
vacancies require an online application. Computers at the library are free. Also you
can freely borrow books from different branchs so there is a lot of information that
would be lost of you shut the library.


I am opposed to the closure of the library because not every one can afford new
books and the selections in the second hand shops are only by what is put in at the
time. At this moment in time the unemployed can not afford computers and a lot of
vacancies require an online application. Computers at the library are free. Also you
can freely borrow books from different branches so there is a lot of information that
would be lost if you shut the library.
 Support for early years should not be withdrawn
- impact difficult to foreseen as issues may come later In peoples lives which as a
result may impact on crime

I am writing in support of Nairn Library. There have been stories in the media that
Highland Council is looking to close libraries in order to save money. I would like to
make a case for retaining Nairn Library.
It is very well used by all sections of the community from the very young at Rhyme
Time right through all age groups.
I (aged 56) do not have access to a computer at home and as there is no other
public internet facility in Nairn,
I would be completely lost without access to the Library. I also regularly read the
papers and use the reference sections.
This morning at opening time there were already six people waiting to get in, and as I
have been here at the computer there has been a steady stream of people coming
in.
A town the size of Nairn NEEDS this facility. Please look carefully at the case for
keeping Nairn Library. Thank you.


I have just learnt that you are considering closure of some highland libraries and I
would like to let you know how upset I am that Lairg is being considered within this.
It is an excellent local resource and I use it for the internet (I can not afford
broadband) as well as borrowing books and DVDs. I do hope that you do not rob the
village of such a valuable service as it would be sorely missed by many.
Glenelg and Arnisdale Community Council would like you to note that we believe
that the mobile library service to remote communities (and therefore schools within
those communities)should be protected as far as is possible. People living in remote
communities are in greater relative need of such services due to transport issues
and isolation. Loss of services thus acts in a disproportionately detrimental way on
such recent visit to
On a communities. the Inverness Museum and Art Gallery, after complimenting the
staff on what I think is one of the best cultural museums in the UK (if not all Europe),
I was told that it was in danger of being closed. I want to express my severe concern
on this potentiality.
I am an American of Scottish descent now living in the highlands and I have made it
a point to visit the museum both individually and with American tourists with great
frequency. I take great pride in my Scottish heritage and believe this museum is
brilliant in conveying the country and culture I have come to love. Every person I
have ever brought to the museum comments on how effectively and vibrantly it
brings the amazing narrative of Scotland and its history and culture to life. It is well
designed, thoughtful and encompassing in covering the varying aspects that weave
together to create a place and people.
Additionally, when I mentioned this potential closure to various highland townspeople
the responses were unanimous in their extreme concern, most comments were that
their children/grandchildren/nieces/nephews        " love the place". When young
people "love" going to somewhere that teaches them their heritage, the foundation
for cultural pride and respect of place is ensured through the generations.
I have served on several boards of the Field Museum of Chicago as well as the
Natural History Museum in New York City and understand the challenges that face

We have heard that Cromarty Library is earmarked for possible closure due to
budget cuts.
We wish to register our strong support of Cromarty Library and urge Highland
Council to keep it open as a hugely valuable resource for our
community. We very much hope the Highland Council will not close it in order to
make savings, and perhaps look to reducing opening hours in
other libraries (Cromarty is already on limited hours) rather than opting for any
closures.




Lairg Library - as Scotland was the first country to establish the public library system
it must not be a leader in bringing about the demise, but find acceptable ways of
moving with the times to provide an effective, useful public resource within the
monetary restrictions should reamin a high priority for our public guardians.
it was reported in the press recently that the council may be considering the closure
of some local village library services. in particular I am concerned at the possible
closure of the muir of ord service. this service which is only available for some 17
hours per week is never the less a vital service toa number of elderly residents of
muir of ord and the hinterland many of whomdo not have the facility of travelling to
dingwall or any other library the library is one of very few services available in the
area. there is only one small mini market shop a chemist and a fish and chip shop.
as elderly residents do not require education services the highland council do not
have to provide much in the way of services other than perhaps once aweek bin
emptying a considerable number of the houses in the hinterland are in the band g
dnd h categories in relation to council tax and as such are surely deserving of as
much as possible from the highland council the very least being a local libraryI
request that the council give very cnsiderable thought to this possible closure and I
recognise that many services have to be considered as a means of saving finance in
the current situation of restricted funding but surely a tiny library such as muir of ord
is a minor matter to all but those local residents who depend on it so very much . I
thank the council members for their consideration in this matter
Having already cut the mobile library services, they cannot be cut any further without
there being a huge impact on those who rely on the service. In fact they are in
desperate need of up-grading. The larger Libraries are also in need of protection
from any cuts in a service that is already not as good in the Highland council area as
it is in others. There is also a case for longer opening hours, and an increase in
stock.




I am writing in concern to the proposed closure of our library in Knoydart. I myself
use the library and my little girl is starting to be of an age to visit the library to get
books out. We do not have the finances to buy new books and would have to visit
the next nearest library which is in Mallaig (a whole day out and a trip on the ferry)
which I believe you are also considering closing. I know of more than a few regular
library users from outwith the village of Inverie who woud be very sadly affected.
One example is my neighbour (in the 60+ bracket) who visits the library every week
(he only very occassionaly visits the village twice in one week) and uses the trip to
have much needed social interaction. My neighbour does not have an internet
connection and I feel that should both libraries be taken from the area it would be a
great tradgedy for him in particular. I would love to be able to take my daughter to
the library and share in its delights as I once did as a child (no mater how small it is).
I also feel that the cost of posting our library books out would be more expensive
than closing a library that operates under 4 hours in the week. Closing Inverie
Library would be a huge loss to the village - but also to the folk in the smaller
hamlets of Knoydart - Rhian na darroch, Sandaig, Doune, Samadalan and
Inverguserain who being more remote and living off grid devote alot of our spare
As a librarian in a former life - namely Yorkshire - I appreciate how important
a library is to a local community.
Libraries offer so much more these days than just books and so encompass a
wider spectrum of the community and age group, which in the Highlands, given its
remoteness
can help people live a more varied and fully life, plus being a meeting point, not
intended, for borrowers. Reading groups are the intended meeting point and
usually have a good attendance.
I hope the Council think long and hard before closing any of these much
cherished sites.




Sutherland Libraries - foolish idea - libraries are an integral part of the village.
It was with utter disgust that I read in my local newspaper that you may intend
closing Cromarty Library.
Do you not realise that the library in Cromarty is used by all ages from the
nursery,primary school to the old age
pensioners on all the days that it is open . In fact I think it could do with opening
more days a week than
it does. I for one use the computer every time I am in and use a lot of the referance
books regularly for
research .
I would be very upset if this facility were to close
Foolish idea as the library in Bonar Bridge is also a highland council service point -
integral part of the village and as well as reading being informative and enjoyable to
adults it is so important to encourage children to read and develop a love of reading.
Could some libraries open on a rota system




Remove 7 school librarian posts|Cease the Bookstart service




Reduce library opening hours by 10%|Cease the Bookstart service




I use Muir of Ord and Beauly libraries to borrow books for my children and to order
new books for myself which saves me spending £14-£20 on a new book (I have a
very tight income as a childminder) and the proximity of the local libraries means we
can use them whenever I go shopping locally. They are invaluable when my children
have a project at school for extra reading material. If our local libaries were closed
we would have to travel to Dingwall or Inverness which isn't feasible in the time I
have between dropping a child at nursery and collecting him. So both myself and my
children would lose out. Just about every time I go in to Muir of Ord library the
nursery children from Tarradale School are enjoying a lively reading session and this
is an invaluable learning resource for them. Plus there has been a big expediture
recently on disabled access to the building so I don't see why it should be closed. If
any local library should be closed, close Beauly and extend the opening hours at
Muir of Ord - M of Ord has an attached school which uses it all the time.
Reduce library opening hours by 10%
When I first heard about the proposed cuts to the library provision in Highlands I was
absolutely appalled. I still am. From recent comments in newspapers and elsewhere
it seems that people are suggesting a reduction across the board, rather than
stopping a service altogether and that seems to be to be the best of a number of bad
options. Bookstart is the cornerstone of children's library services and especially in
the more rural areas it is completely vital to developing literacy. I can only agree with
the previous commenter, in what he says about Bookstart, the information in the link
provided in many ways speaks for itself.

No one so far has mentioned school librarians - at least not in this thread. Again, a
reduction would surely be better than losing this service. School libraries and ensure
that the children in our schools have access to the information they need in order to
learn for themselves. The Highlands has a great tradition of learning, of sending its
children to university, knowing how to use a library is the basis of learning. My own
daughter has just finished her first year at university and her ability to use the
resources that are available to her, both online and in the university library have
made a huge difference to both her confidence and her grades. School libraries are
where the scholars of the future learn to learn.

Finally the suggestion that so many libraries be closed is the most abhorrent of all.
Small communities need their libraries. In areas like Lochcarron and Broadford they
are vital to the most fragile members of our society. To the elderly who come to
borrow books and meet their neighbours, to young families who use the online
resources, access story sessions and access high quality books that they might
It seems that saving only £185,000 by closing 17 local libraries is a bit of a no
brainer - how many people would be adversely affected by the loss of these
facilities?
Elderly who do not have access to a car to take them into large towns where the bus
stop may be a long walk from the library - like in Dingwall. They also enjoy the
company in local libraries and meeting up with other people from their community.
Young parents who do not have a car and find it easy to walk to a library with a
buggy and chilren in tow. School children who do not have computers at home who
can come and access the services free of charge to do homework. All the parents
and children who attend the regular rhyme time sessions which is a very important
part of their social diary. At these sessions new mums are made welcome - with their
prams!- and can meet other people in their local area who have children of the same
age. People who are lonely and just want to see a friendly face or two and have
some human contact. Visitors to the area who want local information about the
surrounding area where their ancestors came from, who need directions or want
internet access to stay in touch with home. People with no internet access at home
or with no computer - there are still plenty who have no computer and no desire to
have a computer who may need the facilities every now and then. Not to mention the
people who want to read books, hire DVD's, listen to audio books on both CD and
cassette tape and use the many books on all subjects to help them with their DIY
projects, gardens, health issues, improving their cookery skills, etc etc etc.
It would be very interesting to know how many people actually use these 17 libraries
over a year. I think the Library Service should be applauded for providing such an
I‟m unhappy about a consultation process which is potentially divisive in pitting one
community‟s needs against another.

However, my particular concern is about the effects of the threatened cuts to library
services in the Highlands on library users and potential users. Public and school
libraries meet a wide range of social needs and open up new worlds to people of all
ages in ways which can be genuinely transforming. The loss or restriction of library
access will have long lasting effects which unfortunately cannot be neatly calculated
in a profit and loss account but which as others have suggested are none the less
serious for that: library services bring a range of benefits which, as John Bostock
has pointed out so well in relation to Bookstart, 'produce a cost saving in terms of
health and social expenditure‟.

Over recent years politicians have exhorted us „to develop the knowledge economy‟,
'make a smarter Scotland‟ and „develop lifelong learning‟. All these would suggest
we need to nurture and develop these vital library services rather than slowly kill
them to save a relatively small amount of money. Indeed, your own party seems to
recognise this need in other parts of the UK: to give just one example from several
on the web, Nottingham Liberal Democrats are publicising their fight against the
closure of a local library saying that „local people have enjoyed using this library for
decades, so why close it now?‟ [http://nottinghamliberaldemocratg...ote-to-close-
beechdale-road-library/]
Our library is a social gathering place its the one day a week when you know where
everyone will be. Other events (plant sales/charity raising mornings/raffles etc)are all
organised to be on that one day mid week to catch all the library goers>It was
specifically included in the design of our new hall as requested by Highland Council
11 years ago. The whole community would be losing a time honoured landmark
everyone(kids to granny) know Wednesday is Library day. Please don't take it away
Wednesdays would never be the same again.


I am writing with regard to Inverness Library appearing on the list of services which
could be cut.
I understand that schools and public libraries coming together are good way forward
to save costs as we have seen with the many throughout the highlands. However
Inverness Library is a city library used by locals who come to the city centre for
various tasks and take in the library at the same time. The computers are in steady
use and in the tourist season this is an essential service for people from other areas
who may want to check with their families - book ongoing accommodation or travel
tickets etc etc. Inverness is not a city without a library - museum - Spectrum Centre.
Using the buildings in a better manner may be a consideration for the council and I
hope that this will be the way forward instead of cutting the service. This is a
valuable service for both children and elderly alike and is surely part of the 'Council
Tax' deal
I want to write to you after finding out about the Culloden Library being on the closure
list for the sake of saving some money. I am 21 years old and have lived in Culloden
since I was born. The library is a major part of the community. I went to Toddlers and
Playgroup there, met many of my best friends there. It provided my friends and I with
a peacful place to study when we were in Primary school, because for many people
it is hard to find peace at home. It was there when I needed to find books for my
classes in secondary school. It is one of the only places for people to go in Culloden
which is truly local, and I feel it kept me out of trouble when I was younger, giving me
somewhere to go, something to do. It is the place where I discovered my love of
reading. I have just graduated with an honours degree in Business Management and
before this, a diploma in Musical Perfomance. I dont think I would have been able to
achieve this without Culloden Library giving me the opportunity to enhance my
reading skills and keep me on the right track. If the library is closed, a very important
part of the community will be gone. Younger people and children will not have
anywhere to go unless they have enough bus fare to get into town (which I know for
a fact is very inconvenient and expensive). They wont have the opportunity to
develop themselves intellectually, like I had. They will be bored. This will have a
Nairn Library - hope the current library continues
Unison launced a UK wide "love your Libraries" - libraries are essential for the
cultural and educational well-being of the Highlands and often the hub of local
communities - although suggestions to offset with a mobile library they already run a
3 week timetable and cannot therefore meet the needs and wants of the Highland
area population.




I have today signed a petition in Balloch stores for the retention of Culloden Library.
There are few enough community resources for the large population of
Smithton/Culloden/Balloch and it will be very detrimental to this community to even
consider removing this library. I use it regularly, and have noticed how much it is
used by school and pre-school groups, the elderly and also by those without their
own computers.




Please kindly note that I much appreciate there being a library in Nairn. I moved into
the area last December, and visit the library at least twice a week - to gather
information and use reference books, to borrow books, to read a range of
newspapers on the same day - for pleasure and research purposes - and to use
photocopying services.
Not having a dog to walk or children, the library is a wonderful way in which to meet
people, and the librarians are most welcoming and helpful.
So, as a tax-payer, I would much appreciate retention of this facility.
I know what will work to keep the rural libraries open...install espresso shops inside.
Set aside a small part of the library to sell coffee/espresso and make it like a Barnes
& Noble atmosphere. I have seen this successful in many churches to pay off
buildings and their expenses. You won't believe how much money will come in if
folks can have a place to get a good cup of coffee and read. No alcohol...just coffee
products.
Having lived in the Cromarty area for over 45 years I would like to say what a
disaster it would be to close the Library. I have used it regularly for all these years
and would miss it greatly as would many others. I have often asked for books not in
stock and have always got them, surprisingly quickly in many instances.
I did for a time have access to the Mobile library (an elderly neighbour at that time
was disabled) and good though it was it was nothing compared to the actual library.
I implore you not to even consider closing this amazing facility. The Library is at the
heart of the Smithton/Culloden community and is a lifeline for so many, young and
old. Not everyone has easy access to the Library in the town and when you consider
a mother and daughter have to pay £5.00 for a return bus ticket to town, I can't see
the access problem changing! I also wonder why Libraries would even be ear
marked for closure when the new Curriculum for Excellence that Highland Council
supports has Literacy at it's very heart. Please don't take this valuable resource.
Thank you for listening.




Reduce library opening hours by 10%
Need more detail about the potential impact but 10% reduction in opening horus
would be ok, would seem to be less of an impact than closing or reducing school
librarian posts
In response to the budget consultation I must say how horrified I am about the whole
thing. Museum and library services are absolutely vital to the community, especially
in remote areas such as Caithness and Sutherland. Cutting 7 school librarians is
penalising not only the wider community but also the children who take advantage of
the services. Learning is difficult enough in the current climate without taking away a
vital resource. The idea that has also been mentioned of moving Wick library into the
High School is also not being thought through properly. Older members of society
are known to be intimidated by teenagers and would not feel safe entering a library
on a school site, also the children's safety would be grossly compromised. Security
would be non-existent. Library services as a whole are vital for the elderly as a form
of integration into the community, they enable the less well off to engage in leisure
activities they could not otherwise afford, and allow children to read for recreation &
for school work. Museums are also very important to the area. They bring a
connection to the area for the pople that live here, are a massive tourism pull, bring
exhibition space and are a meeting place for sections of the community. As a
genealogical reseacher I personally use both the museums and the libraries and
know that visitors to the area use them extensively too. Any further cuts in the arts,


I would strongly defend the continuing existence of the Wick Carnegie Library as an
important community facility. The library itself, the North Highland Archive currently
sistuated there and the St FergusExhibition gallery all play an important role in
community life. It is true that these funtions could be provided in future new projects
eg The new Archive or a new high School but these projects are but glimmers on the
horizon which will recede further as public expenditure cuts bite. As an extra thought
on cost saving I have been unimpressed by the Highland Ranger Service. I have
done a lot of walks which have been poorly organised and attended. This year the
advertising has been innacurate and chaotic. The younger Rangers I have met have
been very poorly educated on matters of local history and culture.I would get rid of
them before touching a library.I would keep the broch interpretation centre to let it
get going before perhaps looking at a community solution for running it with
volunteers.


I have resided in Culloden for 11 years and for the duration of that time have been
an active library member / user as have my husband and child (my child got his first
library card aged 5 months!). Our library is at the centre of our community and is
very well used by various groups and members of all ages. If it were to close the
loss to us would be huge. The staff are warm, friendly and helpful. Culloden Library
is an absolute asset to our area and should NOT close!


Mobile libraries on the train. I know there are mobile libraries on the road, where the
van goes out to remote communities and this service is excellent, but have you have
thought of all those people travelling up on the train from Inverness to Thurso or
Wick,for example, bored out of their minds for nearly four hours? Wouldn't it be a
more productive use of this inertia if these consumers of time could borrow a book or
magazine to fill this void? I leave it to others to work out the mechanics of this:
perhaps the train company could issue book-vouchers, for example?
if the highland Council has to close libraries then afew of these must be:-
Close every library in the highlands of scotland except
Golspie
Wick
Inverness
This will leave everybody in the highlands within a library within within a resonable
travel time of 30 minutes for most people in the highland of Scotland.
Please keep inverness library open as it is the main library of the highlands and
covers more people than any libray anywhere in the highalnds 40,000 people in the
highlands and it's central location means that other libraries can be closed instead
saving money but leaving inverness library within a resonable travel time of 30
minutes for most people in the highland of scotland.
why?
these places have a library within a 30 minutes travel time which i a reasonable
travel time/distance.
This is the best way to save money.
the sooner the better.
sorry bothering you the sonner the better.
Why? to drastically cut the £165 billion uk overspend in May 2010.
The closure of Helmsdale Library would be a devastating blow to the Community.
The Library includes the Service Point, the District Registrar and Public Access
Computers and is the face of the Highlnd Community. The Centre houses the 'Over
Sixties' Club, the Toddler Group and an IT Suite. It also provides both the
Community and beyond a venue for meetings, training, fundraising events and
indoor sports. It is also used for receptions and music events. The Centre employs 6
people including giving young people work experience. Why not think laterally?. See
how the Highland Council and the Community Centre can work together to lessen
the impact on the Community.




Unhappy about the potential closure of Cromarty Library. One of the few things that
is available in Cromarty for children, have to travel for everything else.
Culloden Library - extremely well run with very knowledgable and helpful staff with a
range of facilities.
My family was shocked to learn that the Invergordon library is proposed to be closed.
This is totally outrageous and unacceptable. Up until recently we frequented the
library every day and now at least twice per week. My son regularly uses the
computers there, and all of my children always have several books on loan. We
need to keep the library open for youngsters for their complete education. It is very
short-sighted of anyone who may want to close it. The library has only just been
adapted for disabled access.
I can understand that the council needs to cut corners and reduce their budget,
however closing a vitalthat The Highland Council is wrong.
I was horrified to learn community service is surely contemplating the closure of
three libraries in the Highland region. this would, in effect, deny access to books to a
great many people - the old,young mothers and children and the poor.Transport is
not cheap in the region and a mobile library is no substitute for the opportunity to
browse which a library with a wider selection offers. Books are an essential, if not the
essential element in Scotland's cultural heritage.through them we gain an
understanding of ourselves and others, widen our horizons and stimulate our
imaginations. In short, we educate ourselves. Books are the building blocks of any
free-thinking and enlightened culture and to restrict their availability to all would be a
regressive and repressive measure.it would also be a betrayal of the liberal
education of which we, in Scotland, are so proud. Surely even John Logie Baird
would turn in his grave if he thought that our small children were being condemned
to the mindless passivity of swiching on and tuning out.Instead of closing libraries,
perhaps their scope could be widened to include reading sessions with pre-school
groups. When the government is bending over backwards to promote reading and
literacy skills, it is difficult to understand why you propose to restrict access to
reading materials in order to Coigach Community Council to protest in the strongest
I am writing on behalf of the save a comparitively paltry sum of money.
terms about the possibility that our local library based in the Coigach Community
Hall be closed. It is already staffed for a very short time (four hours weekly cannot
be significant to the HC budget) To lose the library and the services it provides
would be a very great loss to the Community. It is well used by all ages and is so
important to the schoolchildren who are taken down every week,and it is their first
experience of using a library. Both the librarians are a fund of information.This is so
important now that we no longer have a visit from the Locality Officer.It is also a
meeting point for the socially and geographically isolated, a function which could not
be filled by a Mobile Library Service in the same way.
We do not think that there are enough people available to run the library on any sort
of voluntary basis.We are a volunteer-rich community but volunteers are already
stretched,running the Community Hall in which the library is situated, the Lunch Club
(no longer funded by the Social Work Dept) youth club and so on. If the running of
the library service is to be handed over to another body ,HC would need to be very
sure that there was to be no cut in wages for the staff and that the service did not
suffer in any way. We are both aghast and saddened at the thought of losing our
Library
Sleat Community Council disagree with the proposed closure of Broadford library
and
service point and will strongly resist this closure. Instad of targeting fragile rural
areas the Council should look at its staffing levels with a view to removing a tier of
management and the reduction of back office functions. It stands to reason that
budget
reductions on the scale proposed will reduce the amount of management required
and
an appraisal should be carried out on the use of Council vehicles by staff


The council are alarmed at the scale of these cuts which will impact very seriously
on he council are alarmed at the scale of these cuts which will impact very seriously
on rural areas such as Sleat.This area is already poor!y served and the loss of any
of the existing provisions will impact very seriously on this community. The proposed
closure of the Broadford library and service point will remove the only contact point
in the south of Skye with the Council. Has any thought been given to how this
service will be delivered in the future or will people just have to do without a service
once these cuts take place.? The Community Council disagree with the proposed
closure of Broadford library and
service point and will strongly resist this closure.




Broadford library - will remove the only contact point in the south of Skye with the
Council - outlying villages have no regular public transport and if residents have to
travel to Portree or Inverness this will add significant to their costs.
Reduce library opening hours by 10%




Potential Closure of Knoydart Library

Whilst I appreciate that looking at costs is something you have to do; the
potential closure of Knoydart Library would be a great loss to the
community.
It is the main (only; apart from the refuse uplift) direct service available
locally to all members of the community from the Highland Council. As such
it is not only a library but the public face of the Highland Council in
Knoydart.
It provides not only book borrowing service but a wide range of leaflets and
information on all sorts of topics. It is particularly valued by older
members of the community but has a wide membership. The library is only open
two hours per week; but always busy; and its costs must be quite low; as the
premises and electricity are provided free by the community and community
members help the librarian to shift boxes of books to and from the
ferry; all this is mark of the value afforded to the service.
 Without Mallaig library either then Fort William would be the next stop - a
huge and expensive journey, not possible in a single day on public
transport; nor by ferry and car. For those who are less mobile and for
children travelling to a library is simply not possible. Our local school
children do well at school, we have a number at university and a number who
have returned to the community to take up work here, following successful
education post school. Having a local library service is part of the early
years education of local children and part of the ongoing education of
adults.
 If a mobile service is one of the alternatives you are considering; I doubt
if it could be brought in at a lower cost than providing a librarian for 2
hours per week.
I hope that you will consider the wider impact that losing such a service
would have on the area.
With best wishes; and hoping that you are able to find ways to meet your
I am a targets without the loss of Public Library, I believe a study is being carried
budgetregular user of the Golspie front-line services.
out by THC into potential for budget savings which may involve closure of this
facility. I am incensed that such a proposal can even be considered- the nearest
other facility that would be available is in Brora, which would not be convenient to
Golspie residents in that a visit to Brora Library (6 miles away)would involve (the
majority having to use public transport during the day (a visit in the evening would
not be possible due to the vagaries of public transport timetables). A daytime visit
would take a 1/2 day due to the bus frequencies. Any proposal to close Golspie
library on the basis of usage would be unjustified as the frequency of book issues
equals that of the Brora library which is open for longer hours. The Golspie library
employs one part time librarian (Brora has 2 staff & is often double
manned!)Therefore any cost savings from a closure of Golspie library would be
minimal. I believe the only cost of this library, incorporated into the School and
Community Centre, is for staffing as HL&P are part of the school complex costs. I
reiterate my initial statement that any proposal to close the Golspie library would
poorly serve the public of Golspie and any savings would be so slight as to be
negligible. The Golspie library is a focal point of the village and a literary and
Reduce library opening hours by 10%
I am writing to express my concern with regard to recent press reports that an
extensive cull of many rural libraries is under consideration. While I certainly
appreciate that costs have to be cut, I would put it to you that ripping the heart out of
culture provision in the Highlands will have huge consequences for its people,
particularly in remote areas where getting to a library is not easy at times. As I am
sure you are aware, they do not only provide books but a range of other facilities
such internet, newspapers, reading groups etc and importantly for children as well. In
view of this could I add our voice to the protests that I know are currently underway
and urge you to limit to the utmost any proposed closures.

Close up to 17 small local libraries|Close one major urban library |Reduce library
opening hours by 10%|Remove 7 school librarian posts
I would object strongly if you were to cut funding for our Libraries, while at the same
time, creating three new posts of Community Development "Officers". We don't need
them. We need Libraries. The cost of £150,000 to us of creating yet more "jobs for
the boys" is unseemly, to put it mildly.




I would not like to see library services cut as they provide a vital service to the
community. I use the library for computers (not having a computer at home - or a
landline), books, puzzles, research, look at leaflets, read newspapers etc.

I think savings could be made eg. in Inverness library, and others from newspaper
reports, heating systems do not have thermostats installed. Sometimes too hot in
Inverness library. Don't think need large plasma screen at entrance or advert tv
screen on wall. Never see anyone looking at these.

With regard to Bookstart - this is an unnecessary expense, parents should buy their
own books for children and if they can't afford to, there are plenty in the library to
take out, so a saving could be made here.

I don't think library hours should be reduced or any closures as the rural areas- they
are only open a couple of days a week and then not for a whole day. I thought the
govnt wanted everyone to have access to a computer too?
 Not saying poor, performing libraries shouldn‟t close, but to lose around about 50%
of library service not an option.
I would like to express my support for the local library and my opposition to any
budget cuts that may be proposed at council level in the future.
Skye & Lochalsh Archieve - unique facility providing a free and accessible centre for
the cultural heritage of our island. School pupils are regular users of the facility.
I am told we are not on the list for closure yet and hope this will not happen. I just
feel we all need to be aware this could happen and it is best to stop it.
If the proposed closure of these libraries goes ahead how can the Council ensure
good library provision, using a mobile service which is already over-stretched?
The proposals also fall into the irrevocable and irreversible category.
Libraries play an important educational and social function in all communities. The
closure of 17 small libraries will have serious consequences for those communities
unless neighbouring libraries are close by and within easy reach and are retained.
The question to be asked first is “Where are the nearest alternatives?” Reducing
library opening hours, while regrettable, is the least damaging option.

We do not support the loss of school librarian posts, they have a very important
function in the development of independent study skills for young people and help to
promote interest in the written word.

We do not support ceasing the Bookstart Service , which not only introduces the
world of books to young children, but also empowers and encourages young mums
and dads to share the joy of books with their children. This is especially important in
the more deprived communities.




Please do not close any libaries, these are a vital lifeline to people who enjoy the
facilities they offer. I use both Drumnadrochit and Inverness and find them both first
class with friendly helpful staff.
libraries: again I have a vested interest because I am a relief library assistant. I am
not the only member of staff rather shocked by the increase in spending at the library
because we now have a school librarian -- before we managed on staff none of
whom did a 35-hour week. Having experienced the library under both regimes, I
have to conclude that the library has benefited most by the increase in new titles
allocated to the library. However, I'm not sure why this could only happen with a
school librarian in place. I notice that having a school libraries co-ordinator is an
option. This was suggested in the past but never really got off the ground, as far as
I'm aware. Perhaps the idea should be revisited. I'm afraid I don't feel I should
expand in writing why I feel the present set-up at the library at which I work has
introduced some wasteful spending. As far as Bookstart is concerned, it is clearly a
great scheme, but extremely costly. Having two daughters who were brought up to
borrow mountains of books from the local library when they were toddlers I rather
feel that parents who are keen to do this would do it anyway, whether the toddler
receives a box of stuff or not. And most toddlers I have ever known have pots of
crayons without the library service giving out even more. I wonder whether nearly as
much would be achieved by librarians liaising with mother and baby/toddler groups




Libraries – I believe they need to be retained but with much shorter opening times. I
gather the peaks and troughs are being investigated just now so the libraries should
only open at peak times.
Future of Culloden Library

We have lived in Milton of Leys for over 7 years now and in that time none of the
promised local supporting services have materialised (apart from a postbox and a
bottle-bank). We use those available at Culloden and shop at the Co-op, butcher,
pharmacist, etc., and rely on the doctor's surgery and library.

The withdrawal of the last would be a very great blow. Not only do we take out
books on loan and keep up to date on local information, forthcoming events, etc., but
can even request books held at other branches for collection at Culloden. In
addition, we can also park there - not a feasibility readily available at the main
Library at Farraline Park, unless driving to a nearby multi-storey car park (and paying
the fee).

The library at Culloden is an amenity we would not like to be without. We urge you
to ensure that it is not a casualty of any forthcoming budget cuts. It serves a wider
community than that merely of Culloden and Smithton



Helmsdale and district petition of 414 to closure of library along with background
information on the model of oepration of their commuity buildings - see file copy.



I am writing to object to the proposed closure of Lochcarron library. I believe this
would be a devastating blow to our community, and that the losses entailed from
removing this service would far outweigh any short term financial gains.
Lochcarron
        I believe the closure of the library would negatively impact the local economy,
reduce literacy rates, slow gaelic language development, reduce the quality of life for
older residents, who form the majority of the population, and negatively impact the
whole community, all areas that the council pledges to support.

       The library is at the heart of our community. It is never empty and very
welcoming to all ages from baby to retirees. It serves as a meeting point on an
informal and more organised level, hosting a book group, writing group, chatterbooks
(a school aged club) and rhyme time (a pre-school aged song and story session).
The services are accessed not only by Lochcarron residents, but the whole of
Wester Ross. Indiiduals, schools and play groups from Applecross, Shieldaig,
Torridon and Kinlochewe all use the Library as well as the many visitors to the area.

        It provides invaluable access to information, that would be costly for many
people to purchase personally, providing an excellent selection of books and a
request service, internet access, information on educational courses, council
policies, plans and local events and adult learning. On a personal level, it has been
a helpful resource of parenting information, thus having a social impact, and by
being able to request books, I have been able to participate in continuing education,
enabling me to retain my current employment. There fore it has had a personal
economic impact.

         Closing the library would also impact on literacy rates, one of the four key
areas in the new Curriculum for Excellence. Improving literacy across Scotland is as
I understand it, a government priority. The library provides motivation and inspiration
for children to read. Apart from the school visits and chatterbooks club mentioned
above, the library provides access to a large range of books appropriate to a child‟s
stage of development and reading levels, that otherwise would not be affordable to
many individuals, and personally we have been able to request many books to
We consider that small rural communities are those most in need of the range of
resouces and facilities which the library service offers - we have not local library but
we can well imagine that a serious blow it would be to rural communities to have
such a long-established service withdrawn.




Inverness prides itself on being a thriving Millenium city. How can it call itself a city
when even Ardesier as small as it is has a library and Inverness as big as it is won't.
I call that a disgrace.

Books are always going up in price. They have become a luxury to a lot of people.
The unemployed can not afford computers but most jobs now require you to respond
by computer. DVDs and CDs are a luxury most people can not afford these
days.These are all provided free by the libraries. They are a necessary life line to
this city and should not under any circumstances be closed.

To err is human, to forgive, canine.
Please submit my objections to the closure of the Achiltibuie library to the
appropriate address (councillors) along with my suggestions for possible savings.

Closing the Achiltibuie Library is a dreadful idea because the library is an essential
part of local community life. We are such a small community with few amenities for
the local people but the library is one of them and a very lively one. Library mornings
are well attended by people of all ages: (pre) school children, mums and pensioners
alike. We come to the library for the books, obviously but for a chat on what's
happening too. I myself use the library at other hours too (we have a much used self
issuing machine) and always have at least 5 books on loan at any given time. Books
are for myself, my husband and are 8-month old son so the whole family uses the
facility. Also, I personally use the Internet and the computer in the library and would
be quite lost without these facilities as it helps me maintain contact with friends in my
home country.
Finally our local reading group is run from the library and is well attended and a
welcome addition to entertainment, especially during the winter months.

As far as spending cuts at the Council go, I have various suggestions.
We live in a council house and all maintenance is done by parties from as far away
as Aultbea and Achnasheen. My partner has put in an official offer to work for the
council (he works as a builder) last October but your housing services still has not
made a decision on which companies they are going to work with. In the meantime
you are using expensive labour from far away places to make their way to
Achiltibuie. A ridiculous situation which could have been remedied months ago!

On a different matter, I have been corresponding with your housing department and
benefit department about financial complications of my partner (dating back to before
we got together). I have sent numerous letters and requests for information, have
spent ages on the phone just trying to get through to the right person. I never got a
formal reply, never got a clear explanation about why certain decisions were made or
reached. You might thinkretainthis is just costing me time and money simply theircost
We seek, in principle, to that small local libraries as they serve not but it does
primary function as libraries but also as important community centres and social
assets.

If “The opportunity to maintain or become socially active was key to people retaining
their independence and confidence to live at home” and if “Access to meaningful and
flexible training, employment or voluntary opportunities enables people to feel more
confident and widen their own expectations of living independently”, then the
supports the library service offers exactly to small communities ought not to be
removed. In particular: The Inter-Library Loan service allows resources for home-
study to be accessed in remote locations; The Audio- and Large Print Book service
provides essential resources for the elderly; Public access to inter-net enabled
computers, hard-print newspapers and magazines etc in a social environment is
surely part of what the NHS means of „being socially active‟. No other social
institutions offer the potential range of experience and opportunity.

** Without knowing the details of each library listed we cannot say for sure that all on
the list should be retained. Perhaps staffing hours might be cut if volunteers could
assist? We suggest:
- that those are in remote areas where they do indeed provide a focal point for a
scattered crofting community be retained.
- that those that are joint Library/Service Points should be particularly protected.


Closing one major urban library (saving £87,000): We can, reluctantly, see logic in
not retaining libraries at both Inverness and Culloden; but does either have sufficient
storage for the stock or the staff to organise the redistribution if preferred? De-
commissioning a service is costly in itself and the building will also need
maintenance whilst awaiting either re-opening or a change of use. If either were
closed it could perhaps be „moth-balled‟ pending a future improvement in the
council‟s financial status.

Reducing library opening hours by 10% (saving £71,000): We could accept this - but
Culloden Library - large increase in area must be one of the reasons to keep it open -
caters for all ages with other facilities such as computers, etc.
A service that calls less than once a month (and may be missing due to public
holidays, or missed due to absence or illness) is hardly a service at all. If a mobile
service is justified to a community, it ought to call not less then every three weeks.
Some libraries charge for ILL loans or requests, but age and benefit related
exemptions should be available.




4) The only proposal re libraries that I feel could be acceptable is to reduce all
opening hours, but surely, larger libraries have a bigger potential for cuts than ten
percent (eg shut for a whole day each week, would be closer to 20% saving. Our
rural library only has ten hours as it is; two evenings, one morning and an afternoon.
Cease the Bookstart service




Lochcarron library - uses the wide range of facilities at the library.



The libraries opening times are current limit to further reduce times
is backward step.
 ii. Review Highland wide Swimming Pool provision - we would not have a problem
with reducing the number of swimming pools where these are within 40 miles of
each other.
I understand that the library service is an area the Highland Council is looking to
make budget cuts. I'm writing to plea for the preservation of the mobile library. In
North-West Sutherland, we have no permanent library and the mobile library is the
only way we can access the Highland Library's collection. It is an excellent service
with a great choice of materials. Everyone in the village looks forward to the library
coming, and in this sense it provides a social as well as an intellectual service.




Why has the council proposed to close one urban library in the Highlands - why were
Wick, Culloden and Inverness targeted - we already proposed for the 8 libraries a
reduction in hours and the cutting of one part-time member of staff - this would save
the closure of one urban library.


Library service - Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross - libraries have come a long
way in terms of the range of services that they provide and the public have come to
utilize them with maximum effect. Would be grateful if you would share with me the
council's thinking on how libraries can be best protected during the difficult times
ahead. The financial settlement afforded to the Highland Council by the Scottish
Government is crucial to this issue and I wonder if you feel that a suitably thoughful
Written Question from me in the Scottish Parliament would be helpful at this stage?
I am writing to protest at the possible closure of Invergordon Library.
 Should this go ahead, Invergordon will loose a valuable asset and one that is used
by many people in the town.
 During the year 2009/10 Highland Council spent a considerable sum upgrading the
library and providing a disabled access - is all this to be wasted when the current
slogan is "saving money"?
 For readers, the two nearest libraries are at Alness and Tain - 3 miles away and 12
miles away respectively. In view of all the promotion of "green living" - how can the
Council's plans for libraries meet the aims of this? How are people supposed to get
to the alternative libraries? By bus? This involves two journeys and for younger
families a cost they might not be able to afford. By car? Where is the "green"
perspective in that?
 The closure of libraries is a retrograde step and one that will benefit NO
communities. People are not going to travel to borrow books and the closure of the
library will deprive many of your Council Tax payers of a great facility.
 From the tourist point of view, many cruise passengers visit the library to use the
computers and to look at local history.
 PLEASE DO NOT DEPRIVE INVERGORDON OF A LOVED AND MUCH USED
LIBRARY.
Lochcarron Library: As frequent visitors to Scotland in general and the Wester Ross
region in particular, my husband and I have holidayed many times in the Highland
village of Lochcarron. Even though our aim is to get away from it all whenever we
visit Scotland, being busy professionals means we cannot entirely sever the ties with
our customers and team members, even while on holidays. As such, it has been
extremely useful to us that during our stays in Lochcarron we have been able to read
our e-mails at the Lochcarron Library. Over the course of the years, we have been
welcomed and felt at home checking our business committments using the Internet
service provided by the library. As avid readers ourselves, we also enjoy keeping
tabs with the endeavours of the local community in the usage of the library and its
related activities.

Besides the usefullness of the service that has been provided to us, in a place where
Internet connections are not readily available for visitors, what strikes us the most is
the fact that the library is used and enjoyed by the local community. No matter what
day of the week we pop in, there are always local people using it, either reading or
using the Internet connected PCs. We have also noticed that it‟s used by all
generations, from small school children to senior citizens. It is a very well organized,
loved and used place, a little gem of literacy hidden away amidst a breathtaking
scenery of mountains and seascapes.

As such, we were dismayed to hear the news about the possible closure of the
facilities due to cost cutting decisions. Coming from a country, Portugal, which has
Helmsdale: As someone who has recently moved to this area, and a daily user of the
Helmsdale Library (including internet) I am concerned at the proposed closures of
libraries within the Highlands.

Given the isolation of those villages, the library (including
internet) are vital not just for the older population but also for the children -
knowledge is education and in learning society is better equipped for the future.

Whilst I realise cuts are necessary within Local Authorities, I do believe that libraries
(especially in locations such as Helmsdale) need to be saved as a vital community
service.

Perhaps one area of cut backs can be of councillor expenses indeed, abolishing
councillors - who drain the revenue.

Another area of cut backs, can be abolishing the taking home of council vehicles,
this would be saving of significance in the long term.

I hope you will look closely at my comments and consult with the residents of those
possibly affected areas prior to further discussion of possible closures.
I was seriously concerned to learn that, due to the need to cut costs, it has been
proposed that a number of school librarian posts are to be axed in Highland. I was
one of the first Chartered Librarians to be appointed to a secondary school in
Highland. First as librarian in Inverness High School and then as librarian at Wick
High School.

Along with the few other chartered librarians in schools at that time in Highland, I
fought hard to have librarians appointed to all secondary schools and for those
librarians to have responsibilty to provide a service for their feeder schools.
Eventually a Senior School Librarian was appointed and a central recource service
extablished, although I understand that post has also gone.

We school librarians are a unique breed, we have expertise in education and work
very closely with the teaching staff in our school. We have expertise in current trends
in children's literature and so work closely with the pupils in our school. We have
expert ise in IT and are able to support children and staff in their search for
information and once found, how to deal with it. We do not acquire these skills
overnight. We are trained at university and then are supervised by more senior
librarians while we work for our Charter.

By removing these posts, Highland will deny their teachers and pupils of a very
valuable resource which cannot be replaced by a weekly or fortnightly visit by a
Muir of Ord: WE USE MUIR OF ORD LIBRARY AT LEAST ONCE A FORTNIGHT,
SOMETIMES MORE. I HAVE HARDLY MISSED A RHYME TIME WITH MY
CHILDREN SINCE IT STARTED,THIS A WONDERFUL WAY TO INTRODUCE
CHILDREN TO THE LIBRARY AND IT ENCOURAGES THEM TO READ AND
ENJOY A WIDE SELECTION OF BOOKS. GOING TO THIS LIBRARY IS VERY
MUCH PART OF OUR ROUTINE AND WE AS A FAMILY WOULD REALLY MISS
IT. THIS IS ALWAYS A VERY BUSY LIBRARY AND IT IS THE ONLY FACILITY WE
HAVE LEFT IN THE VILLAGE. PLEASE DO NOT TAKE THIS AWAY FROM A
COMMUNITY THAT REALLY NEEDS IT AND USES IT FULLY.




Lochcarron Library - well used - children access to books encourages them at an
early age they benefit educationally. Not all families can afford to purchase books -
proposals make access to facilities difficult -this is a massive stepback.




Reduce library opening hours by 10%|Remove 7 school librarian posts
I am against the suggestion to close our library because I feel it is one of 3 things
Firstly a place where we can borrow books to read which are now getting very
expensive to buy, it is also a good place to get helpful information, and a place to
meet and have a chat, and has access to free internet for those who don't have a
computer.
Plockton Library
We were very disturbed to learn that the closure of Plockton Library is being
considered as a priority when it comes to money-saving measures in the area.
 I acquired the habit of using my local library almost as soon as I could read and this
has stayed with me wherever I have lived and throughout my adult life. I have
benefitted personally from the abilty to borrow a wide range of books, both fiction
and non-fiction, as well as having access to a wide variety of reference books.
The young people of the village should have the same chance to develop such a
valuable, fulfilling and educational habit that takes them away from the tv, computer
games and other indoor pursuits.
The library is also a valuable source of information on proposed plans locally for
buildings or extensions, change of use of property etc, as well as government advice
leaflets and access to a computer. When we were having trouble with our broadband
the library was invaluable to us.
It is also a social meeting place for those who don't frequent bars or mums and
toddler groups and it would be sorely missed by many, especially the older people in
the village.
I believe that the alternative for us would be to use the library in Kyle - but how would
I get there? I am not the only person in the village who doesn't drive, so are we to
use public transport? There is no regular bus service and I hope you aren't going to
suggest that we pay for taxis every time we want to change a book or consult plans.
Council tax is not cheap and I appreciate the need to make savings but I would urge
you to look elsewhere for them. The library is a valuable resource for the village and
once gone, it would be expensive to replace and so likely to be gone for ever. Yes
there is a computer in the post office but the hours are not extensive and not always
convenient and the library provides alternative hours.
Tourist income is important to the village and the library is a great asset here. I often
see tourists either using the computer to research their holiday in the area or for
other personal use.
The nearest bookshop is many miles away and I dislike the idea of buying books on
the internet. Many expensive mistakes can be made if you can't browse and many
Both Inverness and Culloden libraries should remain. No city should be without its
library. Culloden Library is I believe well utilised and is currently open 5 days per
week. This could be reduced to 4 days.




Need to keep libraries open – internet access; need to make sure internet and
phone enquiries effectively dealt with.
Reduce library opening hours by 10%|Remove 7 school librarian posts




Libraries. These should on no account be closed – especially those in the more rural
locations (what about the requirement to provide internet access?); consider
reducing hours, manpower, charging, before closing them. Can more use not be
made of voluntary help here?
 Libraries - see above improved use of school buildings. Also, libraries are an
important resource and not only for the loan of books, which, in itself is a vital
function. Libraries are used for internet access, as a quiet place to do research, to
access public information, and encourage people of all ages to read as an
independent occupation for leisure and information, especially with the support of
library staff, for those who have not had a positive experience of reading while at
school. They can be the centre for associated events such as book clubs, history
project groups etc. Perhaps a charge could be made, not for library provision per se
but for auxiliary activities.




Library provision can be reduced as suggested in your consultation document. In my
view the Central Library in Inverness should be retained.




Reduce library opening hours by 10%|Remove 7 school librarian posts
would regret these measures particularly the loss of bookstart and access to local
rural libraries perhaps we can rationalize the
situation to make sure that there is no duplication between local libraries and school
libraries and perhaps local libraries should be
offered the opportunity to be run voluntarily by communities Cvertainly reduction in
hrs would be preferable to closure




No even more than museums, libraries are the foundation stones of our culture,
heritage, and education and should have top priority. History is full of examples of
what happens when books are relegated or libraries closed. Our libraries are of
course much more than book stores and provide a wide variety of services to young
and old alike. As it is a universal facility it should be truly ring-fenced and left alone.
None of the five options given are acceptable.
Libraries may be amalgamated as in Ullapool – the old library closed but was
incorporated into the new Community High School.
Response by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals in
Scotland (CILIPS) to the Budget Consultation by The Highland Council The
Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals in Scotland is the
professional body for Library and Information Professionals. The library profession
and library staff are fully aware of the financial pressures on Scottish local authorities
but believe that any changes to provision should included proper consultation with
the public and workforce development, and retain a balance of provision in local
communities with appropriately skilled and qualified staff. The level of budget cuts
required are significant and complex and this public consultation is very helpful. The
Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals in Scotland is pleased to
have an opportunity to respond to the consultation. We have had a number of
enquiries from our members and members of the public about how the level of detail
and the likely impact on them as individuals. Comments include: . libraries are an
asset, because in a place as large as the Highlands, small community libraries are
far more valuable than the cost to run them would suggest . people would use
libraries more if they were open longer It is clear from the comments that local
residents and indeed some local councillors, had no idea that their own libraries




In terms of budget savings I believe you should look at closing public libraries and
look at alternative ways of providing these services. It would arguably be cheaper to
give us all an amazon book voucher every year, but even if that is not possible, there
are more imaginative ways of providing a similar service. Why not looking at a
centralised warehouse where people can phone and order a book which can then be
sent out to them and returned in a pre-paid envelope. Alternatively the library could
be put in other facilities such as the schools or even local privately-owned facilities.
Why not have a local library in the local hotel, along with the public toilets. Indeed
why not pay the local hotel to provide their function suite for community use? There
are not enough examples of the public and private sector working together for the
common good. Yes the hotel might make some money out of it, but they also employ
local people and it might help them keep their hotel open during the winter months,
thereby providing a better service for tourists and improving the quality of jobs in the
service sector. There are many opportunities for providing libraries, or other services
in local areas - in the post office, the church hall, the local shop. Our local co-op is
already offering second hand books for a token amount in aid of charity - and every
jumble sale or fete in the local area has a book stall. Libraries belong to a bygone
A response by the Scottish Library and Information Council to the Budget
Consultation by The Highland Council The Scottish Library and Information Council
is the advisory body for all libraries in Scotland and reports to Scottish Ministers,
government and its members. The Highland Council Commissioned the Scottish
Library and Information Council (SLIC) in 2009 to assist with a review of the library
service. SLIC is pleased that The Highland Council has implemented some changes
and is consulting the public on the budget proposals. The level of budget cuts
required are significant and complex and public consultation was one of the
recommendations, which was made in SLIC's report. However we have had a
number of enquiries from members of the public about how they access more
detailed information about exactly what the budget proposals entail, which highlight
that despite best intention there is still a lack of clarity in Highland communities
about the proposals which still need to be addressed. The savings proposals for
library services should consider the way in which library services support and
encourage skills development, regeneration and community capacity building and
ensure that savings so not conflict with the council's overall objectives and the stated
terms of the single outcome agreement it has with Scottish Government . It should
consider, in particular, those most at need or risk, such as older people or the young.
• Libraries: since libraries now supply many important services, Edderton does not
wish to see any reduction in the number of facilities or their opening-hours.
Over 2500 have signed petition to save Wick library facilities.
Reduce library opening hours by 10%|Cease the Bookstart service

Reduce library opening hours by 10%|Cease the Bookstart service




Reduce library opening hours by 10%
Museums and libraries are the hallmark of a civilised society and surely they should
be preserved




Closing up to 17 small local libraries: the criteria used for identifying the candidate
libraries for closure is discriminatory and is not based on the actual use of the
provision by the community. There is no indication given of how many books are
issued in a year or how many people actively use the library. The library service
provides access to more than just books to a community. In some communities the
library acts as a focal point for the community and is the only community service
provided by the Council.
Removal of service from the rural libraries cannot be mitigated by the use of the
mobile library service. Proposal ECS 32 suggests that the existing mobile library
provision is reduced, presumably to include areas affected by library closure. The
mobile library service already has difficulty in maintaining a three-week schedule.
Closure of small libraries will impact on the mobile library service to very rural
communities.
Where the number of books issued in a year is low, the existing mobile library
service might be able to meet the demand. Is there any logic to retain a library where
only 300 books are issued in a year? Where the library already shares a building
with other services, such as in a school, the library should be retained (for example,
Golspie). If the library can be relocated in another building in the same community it
should be retained (for example, Brora).
It is inevitable there will be a reduction in library opening hours and 10% would seem
reasonable.
Without adequate evaluation of the school library provision and Bookstart service it
is not possible to comment on the potential loss of these services.
Most of the libraries in Highland provide the only public access to the internet. If
these facilities are removed there is no alternative provision.
The library service is inclusive in that it is open to all people in the community and its
activities encompass many interests. In this particular instance most of the proposals
should be rejected, with the expected savings being made elsewhere.
Consider the proposal to close the library in Golspie and retain the library in
We have been following the budget consultation process instigated by David Alston.
We are particularly concerned at the suggestion that the number of school librarians
could be reduced. We have discussed this issue at some length with pupils, parents,
teachers and school management resulting in the unanimous opinion that this would
be unthinkable, We have asked school management to outline the importance of the
school library and librarian to the running of the school and I enclose a copy. I would
stress the importance of a supervised library at lunchtime and other breaks given the
lack of space around the school.
The Library and Librarian are integral and essential parts of our school. The ability of
the pupils within the school to make use of the help and advice given by a trained
librarian, along with the wide variety of facilities within the library, is a key factor in
their learning experience.
Examples of the uses of the Library and comments from staff/Departments are
detailed below:
• We use the library regularly throughout the year in blocks. We take S1 and S2 up
to the library to work on the computers and to research from books. The Librarian
has been fantastic at purchasing subject specific books for geography, and for
helping us with internet use. She has also put together resource packs specifically
for investigations that we regularly do. We sometimes send pupils up in pairs or
small groups to work in the library if they need to do extra research from books,
internet or to do a test that they have missed during class lessons. This is also
useful for the Advanced Higher History dissertations.
• The library is nearly always full at break and lunchtime with pupils doing homework
or using the computers.
• In the past, we have had spells of no librarian, or spells when the librarian has been
shared with other schools. Books were soon lost/pilfered and the library was of
much less use to the school as a whole.
• The Librarian is of key importance in getting all our pupils reading. Reading for
enjoyment and for information is of vital importance to any person and vital in terms
of improving comprehension skills. The loss of the Librarian would have a major
effect on the learning of all the pupils in the school in relation to all their subjects. We
have all the pupils from S.1 and S.2 in the Library every week. All Middle school and
Senior pupils require the help of the Librarian in choosing texts as part of their
coursework requirement. The ability of the Librarian to access information sources is
important with regard to all research work done by pupils in all years for informative
and discursive essay writing. She has set up visiting authors to come to work with
students and arranged for Scottish Book Trust broadcasts to be viewed by pupils.
• Chemistry teachers have emphasized the need for access to all reference sources
relating to Science especially for the carrying out of project work. They stressed the
importance of the facility for senior pupils to be able to research texts and journals. It




Ross-shire Writers exist to encourage local writers; we engage with other community
groups and have a strong belief in the importance of libraries as cultural centres. As
institutions libraries are continuously evolving. We support the idea of subscriptions
(with exceptions), of promoting volunteer use in libraries, and of sensible
rationalisation of public space. The loss of libraries will be akin to losing a window on
the wider world for many rural communities
Library provision extends into all secondary schools and this needs to be preserved.
Examine the scope for amalgamation of community and high school library services
where appropriate.
I write to express our strong concern about the proposed cuts in Library services
within the Highland region. Although our communities are not directly affected by
the proposed cuts to the 18 rural libraries being considered for closure, we deplore
the possibility that those communities may be deprived in this way. We consider
that small rural communities are those most in need, in the Highlands, of the range
of resources and facilities which the library service offers. If these libraries were to
close, some people might be able to compensate by using personal computers, but
it would be the most disadvantaged local residents who would suffer most from the
lack of access to inforamtion which the libraries can provide. We ourselves have no
local library, but we can well imagine what a serious blow it would be to rural
communities to have such a long-established service withdrawn. And we suggest
that when the relatively small amount of noney that would be saved is seen in the
light of the impact of these cuts on these communities, there is a strong case for
retention. We have not local library, but we do however have visits from the
travelling library and we very much hope that this too will be allowed to continue.




Charge for Library membership
Petition - Culloden Library


HELMSDALE LIBRARY As with all small communities, the Library forms an
essential element of focus for residents. We are blessed with a Post Office, Pub and
Church still, and these are important. But the Library at Helmsdale has an
ESSENTIAL (and not easily replaced) role in EDUCATION. As a University Lecturer
and teacher of youngsters aspiring to a profession, I have noted the constant flow of
12-16 year olds in the Library at Helmsdale - both books and computers. Without a
LIBRARY, Helmsdale and the wider Sutherland community will be the poorer in short
and medium term. Don't close, please!




Petition by Unison Scotland, 45 signatures - We understand "Love our Library" &
don't want THC to close or cut the excellent public service that the Library offers




Libraries- reduce hours, increase mobile libraries, you can close some libraries but
why 17, that‟s too many!
On behalf of the Lunch Club at Helmsdale Community Centre. Support for the
retention of Helmsdale Library. Life line for the community
Helmsdale Library is a life line for them and are extremely concerned about
proposals,




Muir of Ord Library - petition from muir matters group, 400 signatures and additional
comments regarding the value of Muir of Ord Library
Our local library is already delivering a dual service to the school and the community
within a streamlined staffing provision.




Bookstart provision - the importance of providing local and accessible facilities for
people within the area.
lochcarron Library: Against the suggestion to close as one a place to borrow books
to read which are now expensive to buy, two a good place to get information and a
place to meet and chat, thirdly has free internet access for those who do not have a
computer


At a meeting of Kiltarlity Community Council on 19 May 2010 the Council considered
a letter from retired librarians concerning the possible closure of local libraries
including Beauly. The meeting decided to support the arguments advanced in the
letter and to respond as part of the consultation to urge the Highland Council not to
close local libraries which are much required and supported by readers of all ages.
We were of the view that the 8 mobile libraries will not be sufficient to compensate
for the loss of local libraries.
Cromarty Library - school regularly use the library and out with school my children
use the library - I cannot afford a computer and rely heavily on the library facilities.
Petition in support of the retention of Lochcarron public library - 337 signatories
Petition in support of the retention of Plockton public library - 151 signatories
Petition in support of the retention of Nairn public library - 41 signatories




Petition in support of the retention of Invergordon Library - 154 signatories



Petition in support of the retention of Wick Library - 2500 signatories
Highland wide swimming pool provision. The Council manages 12 swimming pools
and provides grant aid to 9 others. Can we reduce the number of swimming pools? We
would like your views on whether we should use travel time of half an hour between
existing pools as the key criteria for determining whether pools should close. This
would suggest closing Alness, Tain and Nairn pools. Alternatively, should we use other
criteria? If so what criteria should the council use to identify potential pool closures?




Close the 3 pools or let out to public sector

As a regular user of Nairn Swimming Pool, I do not want to see the pool close. It
serves a very useful purpose in Nairn. There must be other ways of cutting costs.
nairn Swimming Pool - objects to pool closure



It is difficult to agree to closures where schools use the facilities. If more schools were
to use fewer facilities that would leave less time for the paying public maybe resulting
in less income for the council.

Nairn Swimming Pool - No consultation carried out with staff involved. If you close
Nairn Swimming Pool you will squeeze some of the lifeblood out of a town that has
seen ups and downs due to the vicarious nature of the industries that surround it.
Nairn is a town that needs life breathed into it, not sucked out. Niece is a budding
swimming star of the future.




Your criteria of travel time of half an hour between existing pools has merit.
Nairn Swimming Pool - Child goes swimming at pool and has swimming lessons there -
where would this provision happen if Nairn Pool closed?
With so many lochs and rivers in the area, not to mention the sea, it is essential
everyone had the opportunity to learn to swim.
Spare a thought for public health and fitness.

Nairn Swimming Pool - tourists will not come if no swimming pool - no tourist income.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.



Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming Pool - the pool is one of the few facilities in Nairn where the
community can come together and enjoy each others company. It is well used by
families, schools and other groups and it's closure would leave a big void in Nairn
community life. If anything opening hours should be extended. facebook campaign
1600 fans!
Nairn Swimming Pool - a swimming pool is an necessity for attracting visitors.
I don't think that travel time should be used as the means of deciding which pools
should be closed. Perhaps waiting lists for swimming lessons and number of lessons
undertaken in the areas should be looked at, I know in Tain the lessons are over
subscribed and there is a long waiting list for kids to learn to swim, if all these lessons
had to move to another pool, along with Alness children also, then there just isn't
possibly going to be the space for all the children. I think that if you are looking for
ways to cut spending or increase revenue, then perhaps looking at the charges for
swimming lessons may be the way forward, at present if you pay a family membership
for highlife (£21) per month, this entitles you to swimming lessons for all the children in
the family on a weekly basis free of charge, most families would be willing to pay more
than this for children to have swimming lessons. Also the charges for school holiday
clubs and intensive week courses of swimming lessons should also be looked at being
increased. I feel that it would be putting childrens safety in jeapordy to close Tain and
Alness pools, as these children are going to loose out on the swimming lessons as
parents are going to be unable to get their child booked into lessons.




Nairn Swimming Pool - best synchro clubs in scotland not to mention the swim club.
Kids have put in hours of training and won medals all over scotland. School provide
swimming lessons there and there is a huge waiting list. As a sea side resort it would
be utter most CRAZY not to have a pool for the many visitors whom on a rainy day
there is not a lot else!
Nairn Swimming Pool - I am a qualified fitness instructor and am one of the few people
who will take obese people at my classes. A great start for the prople is low impact
exercise and water based exercises is preferrable for their joints!
Nairn Swimming Pool - most valued facility


Nairn Swimming Pool - valuable source for the local community and closing it would be
a huge loss to the health and wellbeing of the people of Nairn and Nairnshire. We are
increasingly seeing individuals with obesity being referred to out service, putting
additional strain on resources and to close down this council run facility would only
further close an opportunity to get people more active.
Nairn Swimming Pool - vital local facility and very important to families. Swimming
promotes physical and mental health.Without pool NDASC (Swimming club- 70
members and a waiting list) and synchro club would fold.



There is a facebook campaign on saving Alness Swimming Pool. I haven't heard of a
threat of closure about it and neither has anyone I've asked so have absolutely no idea
of there is a problem!

BUT, just in case, I think the pool needs a lot of money spent on it to bring it up to
acceptable standards - when that's done a lot more people will use it. My children
have been taught to swim there, 3 already and 2 still learning, and, until the showers
became so pathetic, I used it for exercise, too. There have been times when I've taken
my daughters in recent years for their swimming lesson and found that for weeks on
end there has been no toilet seat in the ladies changing room and the showers are so
feeble they cannot be used to wash the girls hair. It is almost as if there is a deliberate
policy to make the place as unattractive as possible so that fewer people use it thus
making it easy to close down. I hope that isn't the case.

Please treat Alness swimming pool as an asset.


Nairn Swimming Pool - met with large group of users and it is clear that the pool is a
very popular facility - with particular significance both to children who are learning to
swim and to families and older people swimming for exercise, health benefits and
pleasure. People taking part in enjoyable physical activity - consider the long term
difference this makes to physical and mental health. One of the very few pools in the
north that is suitable for synchronised swimmin and there is an active club based there.
Might be significant revenue loss to the council if the users of Nairn facilities ceased to
take part in the High-Life card. Nairn is a tourist town - the revenue from visitors is the
mainstay of the local economy.
Tain Swimming PoolPlease do not close Tain swimming Pool. Both my children attend
for swimming lessons. I feel children need to be able to swim, it's not just for fun. There
would be no where else to take them.Invergordon would be full. Plus the fact they
would not get to go swimming at the weekend. My girls love the pool, and I feel a lot of
people believe the same as me.
Nairn Swimming Pool - Swimming pool promotes physical and mental health.
Important to tourism and costs and environment effect of travelling to Inverness.
Water safety is very important in Nairn due to the sea. Without the pool NDASC and
synchro club would fold. (Same letter as above)
Nairn Swimming Pool - Swimming pool promotes physical and mental health.
Important to tourism and costs and environment effect of travelling to Inverness.
Water safety is very important in Nairn due to the sea. Without the pool NDASC and
synchro club would fold.
Nairn Swimming Pool - an essential service providing healthy exercise.




Tain Swimming Pool I MOVED TO TAIN ABOUT THREE YEARS AGO AND MY KIDS
LOVE GOING UP SWIMMING AT THE LOCAL POOL DURING THE WEEK AND THE
WEEKENDS,ALSO MEETING UP WITH THERE MATES ETC AT LEAST THE KIDS
ARNT HANGING ABOUT THE STREETS. PLEASE KEEP THIS POOL OPEN FOR
THE LOCALS ESPECIALLY FOR THE KIDS.




Nairn Swimming Pool - It's not nice, they will have to change swimming club -
inverness is full.

Nairn Swimming Pool - Inverness SC is full so if you save it it will save the folks from
Nairn driving from Nairn to other clubs and it‟s a big part of their community.

Nairn Swimming Pool - Inverness pool is difficult to reach as its on the opposite side of
town and it is very environmentally unfriendly to suggest people drive that distant to
swim. Culloden pool has very restricted opening hours. A significant number of
people use the pool, cycling there which is a great low impact activity.
Alness Swimming Pool We wish to record our concern at the possible closure of this
pool, which has meant a great deal to pupils and the public over the years.
Alness Swimming Pool i feel alness swimming pool is a valuable resource to the
community
i feel alness is lacking with things for kids to do
so therefore i believe the swimming pool should stay open and am sure there are other
folk from alness who agree with me on this too


Alness Swimming Pool: I am dismayed at the prospect of Alness Swimming Pool being
closed. Not only did I learn to swim in that pool, I am aware that it is a valuable resorce
in the community it serves. I am acutely aware of the budget cuts required but feel that
for a town such as Alness, the loss of the pool would be a huge blow not only to the
community but also to the school. This would involve thousands of people travelling in
cars and buses to Invergordon or Dingwall thus increasing significantly the carbon
footprint of the area. Please reconsider.




Nairn Swimming Pool - my whole family use this pool from my 9yr old who is in lessons
after school to my 19yr old who has just nvested £500 to do syncho coaching courses
to coach in Nairn.
Nairn Swimming Pool - Swimming pool promotes physical and mental health.
Important to tourism and costs and environment effect of travelling to Inverness.
Water safety is very important in Nairn due to the sea. Without the pool NDASC and
synchro club would fold. (Same letter as above)
Nairn Swimming Pool - Swimming pool promotes physical and mental health.
Important to tourism and costs and environment effect of travelling to Inverness.
Water safety is very important in Nairn due to the sea. Without the pool NDASC and
synchro club would fold.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Alness Swimming Pool: I am contacting you in regard to the recent notification to close
Alness Swimming Pool.

I feel that the plan to close Alness Swimming pool is a huge error. There is a huge
publicity drive at the moment about obesity among the children of this country, and the
council wants to remove something that will help to prevent this!

The next nearest pool is Invergordon or Dingwall, both involving getting buses through.
The bus fare to Invergordon is £3.00 return for an adult, and around £2 for a child. So
in addition to the entrance fee for the pool itself (ranging from £1.50 to £3.00). For
many unemployed people this is an expense they can do without. So they will do
without, and will not go swimming, which again will contribute to obesity and ill health.

I myself have learnt to swim in Alness Pool, and learnt how to scuba dive there. I do
not like the idea of having a pool miles away from where I live, I am also unemployed
and to go swimming 3 times a week will cost me £9 a week plus the entrance fee, and
even with the High Life Card it is approaching £15 to £20 if you take into account me
taking my son a couple of times a week. This is an expense we can do without at this
time.

Anytime I go in to the Alness pool there are a lot of folks in there. Alness is an
expanding town with a rapidly expanding population. Why on earth remove facilities
like the swimming pool from such a large town.

Don't make silly decisions that affect the health and wellbeing of the people of our town
for the sake of saving money. There are other ways to save money.
Alness Swimming Pool: I am writing to express my concern at the impending closure of
Alness Swimming Pool. Whilst I no longer live close enough to use the facility
regularly, I can honestly say that I spent many happy years there as a teenager training
and dreaming of a swimming career which no youngster in Alness will be able to
achieve now should the pool be shut down.
Alness is a town with rapidly dwindling facilities as it is, and I feel that the closure of the
pool would simply be a further nail in the coffin of a once thriving town. Not only did it
provide me with a competitive dream, it also gave me a career path of learning a
bronze medallion and working towards training badges.
I sincerely hope you take mine and others concerns seriously.




Nairn Swimming Pool - I suffer from ankylosing spondylitis which has left me with a stiff
back and very little movement in my neck. Nairn swimming pool was the only pool
which would allow me to use a snorkel and goggles when we came here in 1996. My
wife and I both swim at the pool - swimming being good for my condition.

Nairn Swimming Pool - Regular swimmer at pool. The closure of the pool will have a
huge impact on the local community - swimming is one of the best forms of exercise.
Nairn Swimming Pool - Swimming pool promotes physical and mental health.
Important to tourism and costs and environment effect of travelling to Inverness. Water
safety is very important in Nairn due to the sea. Without the pool NDASC and synchro
club would fold. (Same letter as above)
Nairn Swimming Pool - the pool is one of the most valued facilities.
Nairn Swimming Pool - Swimming pool promotes physical and mental health.
Important to tourism and costs and environment effect of travelling to Inverness.
Water safety is very important in Nairn due to the sea. Without the pool NDASC and
synchro club would fold.




TAIN swimming pool should not be considered for closure. There has recently been
investment in it. It is fully utilised providing swimming lessons for schools and club
lessons in the evenings. The 30 mile line is not relevant here because it services
places other than Tain: Tarbat peninsula, Dornoch and Embo and the Ardgay area. It
has one of the few successful competitive swimming clubs in the area. The people
who benefit most from the facility (young families, youths and unemployed) are the
least able to afford or have access to transport to further away facilitties. The Cost of
running the pool could be signifuicantly cut by installing solar water heating. Much of
the cost of covering lifeguard duties goes to young people from the school/area who
gain a great deal from the qualifications, experience and small income they get from
doing this job.




Tain Swimming Pool: This is a valuable community resource, generations of people
have learned to swim and get fit at the TRACC facility. There are strong social and
environmental reasons to keep TRACC open. Jobs in the council should be cut before
a facility like this is even considered for closure.
Alness Swimming Pool: My children benifet alot from this pool. My youngest attending
lessons there. My eldest did, but has finished achieving the levels, which couldnt of
been achievable without the pool. Now my eldest is at the teenage stage i am
delighted that she does not hang around the street but has been going swimming twice
a week with her friends. And i'm sure if you care about the youth of our community, you
will not discourage this activity to them, probably forcing them to hang around on the
street. I strongly hope you take my word for this.




Alness Swimming Pool - The Alness Pool cannot be closed. At present the pool is
available for the school children during the day. Hundreds learn to swim. In the
evenings the pool is available for the public. The Alness community contributed to
secure this availability. Alness pool is a 25metre pool and does not have flumes, which
makes it a better pool for swimming galas and for lifeguard training, lifesaving and
swimming clubs. Invergordon pool is less suitable.
The idea of a community of this size to be deprived of a swimming pool, is just
ludicrous. Many people are deprived as it is. Swimming gives everyone so much
pleasure. Youngsters can walk to the pool and have fun for 50p. Many of these
youngsters could not afford to go to Invergordon. Many would just lose out. Is this what
we want for the next generation? I beg you to have a long think of what the long time
effect will be on this community? This community worked hard initially to ensure the
young and old would benefit from the Alness pool. Please make sure we keep our
pool.


Nairn Leisure - Nairn access panel was delighted at the extensive upgrade of Nairn
pool and was very actively involved in the planning and implementation of the upgrade
to this facility, which when completed, made the pool side disabled changing room,
enables the poool to be used by both children and adults allowing families to
participate in swimming together. It is such an essential service providing healthy
exercise. The pool gym is also very accessible and used regularly by disabled
members some of whom have Highlife membership.
Nairn Swimming Pool - unless yo propose to replace it by a bigger and better pool I
think your proposal is madness. This is supposed to be a seaside holiday resort with
tourism as a main industry.

Reduce swimming pools. Use half our travel time criteria.




Close one major urban library |Reduce library opening hours by 10%|Cease the
Bookstart service




Nairn Swimming Pool - I feel this would be a retrograde step in promoting the health
and well being of our children in the community. My granddaughter uses the pool
regularly and is a member of the swimming club at Nairn.
Nairn Swimming Pool - Banks were bailed out almost overnight, yet a small seaside
holiday town has to lose its leisure facilities. I dread to think what future cuts hold for
communities such as Nairn.
Tain Swimming Pool: I am very much against the proposed closure of Tain Royal
Academy Community Complex. The name its self "community complex" shows its for
the community and we would lose out if it was to close. There are a lot of local
residents who use the facility and travelling to Invergordon is not an option for a lot of
them. As it is there is almost a 2 year waiting list for swimming lessons in Invergordon,
the closure of Tain would increase this even more. Invergordon MOST weekends if at
capacity so even more people trying to use it would not be an option. I feel that there
are better ways of saving money in your budget, reducing the wage which staff receive.
Its a high wage compared to other "NON SKILLED" jobs around. And as for the double
time at weekends for relief staff, again this could save you up to £6 an hour. I am very
against the idea and hope you reconcider, as i dont feel you have taken into
concideration the local people.




I don't agree with your travel time of half an hour. It takes longer than half an hour to
get to Inverness from Nairn - we wouldn't use Inverness for general day by day fitness
and could't possibly get the childrenthere for swimming lessons. And if that is your
criteria why not close Culloden rather than Nairn which is in the middle?
NO NO NO to pool closures - make them work harder instead.




Nairn Swimming Pool - Please Highland Council do no be short sighted. Isn't local
government policy about building healthier communities and a green future? Closing a
local pool is contrary to both of these objectives.




Forget the travel time" and concentrate on whether there is demand for the pools
use
Alness Swimming Pool: Re the recent situation regarding closures of speciality
facilities to the local population I wish to support the non-closure appeal pertaining to
Alness Swimming Pool due to the immense local support that this amenity has had,
prior to and after, its construction.
The pool is a great source of fitness to the local population and is of suitable length.




Tain Swimming Pools: I would like to comment on the swimming pool closures
particularly in Tain where I am a resident. I use the pool quite regularly and have done
so since my own school years. I now take my 2 year old son there. He is and has been
on the waiting list for the swimming lessons for over a year now and is still not at the
top of the list - showing that the lessons are very popular. The changing facilities in
Tain are not as good as many of the pools around yet they are still well used despite of
this. You have asked for suggestions on how to make more money - I think it is unfair
that some people get completely free/reduced price leisure activities, could this not be
increased by even a small amount - say to 75p or £1. Play schemes are included on
highlife memberships - this is a great 'deal' for parents but I am sure they would still be
happy to pay a small fee for the well used service
Alness Swimming Pool: Alness pool must not even be considered for closure.
I pay for a family Highlife card and lane swim at Alness.
Councillors should stand up against any mention of a closure to the public pool.


Alness Swimming Pool: I wish to register my opposition to the prospect of Alness
losing their swimming pool, it is such a valuable resource in this day and age when we
are told that kids need to be active and healthy, I learnt to swim when I went to
Invergordon when it had no pool, so we went through to Alness and learnt there.
 It will be a scandal if the pool closes, especially when it is a safe environment to learn
to swim.
Please think long and hard about your decision, as resources such as the pool are
invaluable




Nairn Swimming Pool - as a local resident of 44 years of age I remember with great
sadness the years Nairn has had no pool in the late 70s/early 80s, sadly during this
time many locals did not learn to swim, myself included.
Nairn Swimming Pool - this facility is used on a regular basis by local schools teaching
youngsters to swim, which being a seaside town is essential. Also Nairn is very proud
to have an award winning synchronised swimming team and would find it very difficult
to practice together if this facility closed.
Nairn Swimming Pool - Swimming pool promotes physical and mental health.
Important to tourism and costs and environment effect of travelling to Inverness.
Water safety is very important in Nairn due to the sea. Without the pool NDASC and
synchro club would fold.

Nairn Swimming Pool - it would be a disaster for the community if the pool closed. Our
kids need all the lessons they can get and it they'd travel for these it would cost the
school more and take up more class time to transport them .

Nairn Swimming Pool - very valuable asset to Nairn and important for youngsters to
learn to swim. Apart from time and cost involved in travelling to inverness these
facilities would not be able to provide regular lessons for people from nairn.
Alness Swimming Pool: I object to the closure of the swimmingpool as my daughter is
learning to swim and my other dughter is going to lern when she is 5 if u close the pool
thay will not be able to learn as we would have added cost to travel to swimmingpool


Alness Swimming Pool: Why, why, why are you even thinking about closing this well
used facility. Adults and children alike are keen users of the pool. Schools in the
surrounding area use it for swimming lessons which are invaluable. Highland council
are supposed to be promoting healthy active kids yet are wanting to take this away
from schools. In Alness there are many children whose parents do not take them
anywhere but they are able to go to the pool on their own and have fun and exercise
for free or very little money. This is a fantastic facility in the heart of a quite deprived
area so it makes no sense to take it away from them. i do hope you have the decency
to save the pool. Perhaps the councillors can take aclosure of Tain pool. pool home to
Tain Swimming Pool: I disagree with the proposed pay cut to keep the It is open!!!!!
the very successful Tain Amateur swimming pool which provides a healthy club
catering for 8 -18 year olds. The pool is necessary for swimming lessons which could
ultimately save one's life. The neighbouring pools in Golspie and Invergordon could not
cope with the demand. The pool is a cornerstone in promoting a healthier lifestyle
which ultimately benefits the population/tax payer. If money needs to be saved one
shold look at revisiting the highlife card. It is a fantastic idea and well received.
However maybe it provides to good a deal. It would be better to increase subscriptions
rather than close a resource such as a pool. Perhaps charges could be made for
swimming lessons rather than just be covered by highlife subscription. Maybe we
should examine sponsorship by PLCs of the pool by say Tesco/Asda. British Gas were
recently offering free swims. Saving a health concious resource would be good PR for
such companies and probably very cheap advertising. Alternatively local businesses
may be happy to support a local resouce they deem important for the area eg B&Bs
Hotels, sports shops, Doctors surgeries, tourist organisatons Tain has a social work
house in Scotsburn Road which has been boared up for several years. If this resource
is no longer required why not sell it and then have the benefits of council tax revenue




Nairn Swimming Pool - opinion the the present senior management has not only
hindered the development of the club but has also run the pool so inefficiently that the
town of Nairn is now under threat of losing such an important facility.




Yes, if there is another pool close by then close some. Widen the range of facilites at
the remainder to make then more able to pay for themselves.
No comment.


If using the 30min rule why isn't either Wick or Thurso included in your list? Alness
seems badly used and is quite run down. Look at usage numbers and then also think
about increasing the cost of Highlife as I am sure families would rather pay more and
have a pool close to them open. Open pools for longer and encourage clubs to hire
the time and run fun events that would bring in more customers.

No to closures. Too valuable a resource, Pools are full with swimming lessons, other
pools could not cope with the increased demand. Schools would increase travel
budget to transport for lessons and lose lesson time. Suggest you rework the highlife
card with increased charges and phas in charges for swimming lessons




Alness Swimming Pool: I ask you please not to close the pool. The only reason why
children use the Invergordon Pool and not the Alness pool is because there is a slide
at the Invergordon Pool. If you were to build a slide at the Alness pool it would be very
popular.

My children use the Alness pool for swimming lessons. I have to take some of the
parents and the children because there is no bus service.
If I am not available they either walk or get a taxi. If you were to close the Alness pool
and they had to travel to Invegordon this would be impossible for some of the parents.
The bus service is awful and it would be very expensive for taxis.

If there is anything I can do to stop the closure please let me know.
We need a pool within the Alness area as it is the largest town in Ross- shire. Maybe
update the pool rather than closing it would be a better option.
Nairn Swimming Pool - cost for a family to get to Inverness isn't possible if by bus! We
are a holiday town, the weather isn't always suitable for the sea.
Nairn Swimming Pool - a town that promotes itself as a holiday destination cannot
close it swimming pool!




This will be very dissapointing for the communities and | am aware of a facebook
campaign to save the alness pool, but how many of these signatories actual use the
pool regularly.
There could be people who cannot drive or aford to get to other places if the amount of
pools closse down and you must think of disabled and people who need therapy.
Alness Swimming Pool / Tain swimming pool: As a regular user of Alness swimming
pool I write to express my deep concern at the proposal to close the pool. I am also
concerned about the proposed closure of the Tain pool as 2 of my daughters and their
families are frequent users of this pool.

I feel the argument for closure is extremely weak. I doubt that a true economic
evaluation has been made. Have the knock on effects of closure been calculated?
What would be the loss in Highlife Card income? I pay monthly solely to access
swimming pools, I use Alness 2 to 3 times a week and Invergordon once. Alness is a
training pool where I swim lengths, Invergordon is a leisure pool not really suitable for
length swimming as the shallow end is too shallow and the pool is shorter. Therefore,
in the event of closure of the Alness pool I wouldn't transfer to Invergordon for my
training sessions. I would also be unlikely to transfer to Dingwall as it is an extremely
busy pool and I often find that the overflow from Dingwall use Alness. I would therefore
be likely to give up swimming and stop paying my monthly direct debit, this would have
effects on my health and wellbeing.

Invergordon is also a busy pool. Is there spare capacity to cope with increased
demand? I doubt it. Last Sunday I made a comment to the receptionist about how
busy it was as the reception area was full of people waiting to get in to the pool when
the previous session left. She said it was nothing compared with Thursday night when
she had had 90 people attending swimming lessons.

I think this shows how important acquiring a skill such as swimming is to so many




Nairn Swimming Pool - part of the few wet-weather attractions for locals and visiting
families - waiting lists for lessons demonstrate need? Raise price if need be, but keep
the service
Health and exercise the mantra for all and you want to close these
resources?????????
Utter madness. To some this is the only accessibile type of exercise in their locality.
Have you really tried to commute from Tain to Invergordon and back again on our fully
integrated transport service or do you think the 30 minutes between centres of
population is covered by a brisk walk?
Nairn Swimming Pool - frequent swimmers as part of their commitment to remain
healthy and fit. I am equally concerned that the pool continues to flourish as a feature
of the leisure and touism attractions of our town, and as an essential aid to the health
and safety of the young people born and raised in this sea-side resort.
Tain Swimming Pool: As a parent of 3 children I find it unbelievable that the Council
propose to close Tain pool. The facility is well used with 8 feeder primary schools, daily
swimming lessons, aqua aerobics, swimming club and stroke development groups.
With other pools already having long waiting lists what is to happen to the children is
this area. Is it feasible for the council to transport these children to Invergordon or
Golspie and to meet the costs to do this. These pools cannot possibly meet the
demand it will put upon them with extra lessons. The public swimming time would have
to be drastically cut. As a user of Tain pool, the temperature is warmer than that of the
water I would bath my child in (a reading last week was 32.8 degrees). Surely the
council could look at other alternatives to cost cut. Raise the cost of the highlife card, I
have a family of 5 and we only pay £21.80 a month which I feel is extremely cheap and
I would be happy to pay £30 per month to still have the facility open. Scrap the 50p
swims and instead of free swims to low income families charge a £10 per block of
swimming lessons or £1 per swim. On another point, my eldest child plays the violin
and is also a member of Tain Amateur Swimming Club. What is she going to have left
to do if music tuition is withdrawn and the swimming pool to close. We want to have a
future for our children it is in your hands to give it to them.




Nairn Swimming Pool - I have mobility problems and am advised by my doctors to use
the pool for exercise, so for me I need a local pool.
Tain Swimming Pool - - communuity council opposed to proposalt to close pool as it is
a vital resource to the general population of Tain, the school curriculum and Tain
Swimming Club. If there is no pool in tain many people/families etc will not necessarily
be able to travel to the nearest one in Invergordon because of the cost and time
involved. Obesity levels are rising, and if this resource is cut, it may lead to poorer
health of Tain residents.
Nairn Swimming Pool - I swim for Scotland thanks to Nairn Swimming Pool. There will
be nobody else if they close it.
Alness Swimming Pool: I am writing to voice my very strong objection to the proposed
closure of the ALNESS Swiming pool, as reported in the local news papers.

I use this pool regularly 2 - 3 times per week in the evenings, for length swimming to
maintain a quite high level of fitness (80 - 100 lengths per session).

I live in Ardross, so Alness is convenient for me; Dingwall is too far, has limited length
sessions (lunchtimes with only two busy lanes). The Dingwall pool in the evening is
taken by Club swimming.

Invergordon pool is far too small for proper length swimming, plus the chute hangs
over large section of the pool - it simply is not suitable for fitness training.

Tain is too far away and not practical to travel to regularly, for time and petrol cost.

I have young children (toddler age) and also take them to Alness Pool, and as they
grow, will be taking them weekly.

Rather than closing this pool, the use of the pool should be encouraged and advertised
in Alness and area to try and alleviate the mass level unfitness locally, and self
induced sickliness, of a large section of the popualtion which would likely save money
in the long term through reduced medical costs.

The closure of this pool would affect me andf many others adversely, and must not
happen.
Nairn Swimming Pool - The nairn community sees the Pool as one of its most valued
facilities and to close it would be contrary to the objective stated in the main issues
report, namely, "A Healthier Highlands". Furthermore Nairn, as a seaside resort, is
dependant on tourism and the pool is an unrenouncable asset as an alternative to the
beach on a rainy day.




Nairn Swimming Pool - I am very disappointed to hear the plans to close Nairn
swimming pool, as an ex-resident and frequent visitor to Nairn I feel it will be a great
loss. I learned to swim there and had many happy times there in the summer holidays.
Alness Swimming Pool: I would like to register a strong objection to the proposal to
close the Alness Swimming Pool.

I learned to swim here as an adult, completed my bronze medallion and award of merit
life-saving qualifications here and my kids have learned to swim here.

The pool is the best one for swimming lengths in the region being 25m long and
without flumes or leisure features to cause obstacles. The other pools at Invergordon
and Dingwall are not as good for this purpose because they contain these features.

Moreover, given the social issues in Alness, and the emphasis on trying to encourage
young people to take exercise, it is impossible to see how removing this amenity from
this community either makes sense or can be justified. I would fully expect health
professionals to endorse these arguments for retaining the pool.

I urge you to find another way to achieve the cost savings you need to, instead of
removing the swimming pool serving Ross-shire's largest population settlement. If you
need to put the prices up, so be it, but I am sure you will be able to find other areas of
expenditure which do not have an effect on health and social well-being that could be
cut instead.
Alness Swimming Pool: I object to the closure of this facility since i used to be a
regular using it many of my friends have worked in this facility and some still do. I think
it would be a great shame if the Alness Swimming Pool was closed and hope that i
among others can dissuade this action from being taken.
Nairn Swimming Pool - frequent user of the pool and enjoy the facilities and hopes it
will remain open for at least another decade.
Nairn Swimming Pool - too important an asset of the town to lose. Sporting facilities
are part of a healthy and active life style that both national and local government are
tying to encourage and surely a public swimming pool is a major asset in this overall
policy. Nairn relies on tourism as a major part of the economy- visitors can use the
pool when the weather is bad. Importance of children being taught to swim especially
given the sea.

Nairn Swimming Pool - too important an asset for the town of Nairn to lose - part of the
healthy and active life style- relies on tourism and visitors can visit the pool when the
weather is bad - close to the sea so very important that children learn to swim.
Nairn Swimming Pool - no original letter just the response



Government is always preaching about healthy lifestyles - closing swimming pools is in
direct conflict with this. No pool closures.


Was really shocked to learn that Alness Swimming Pool to be closed. My son began
swimming lessons at Invergordon Pool and after 2+ years he wasn't able to swim and
each week was a struggle to get him to go. Most lessons were spent by the side of
pool as class sizes too big and not well organised. I contacted Alness Pool and my son
was able to start lessons and the difference is amazing. After a year and half he can
swim a width and is in the second group and enjoying every minute. The classes are
well organised and structured and in stark contrast to Invergordon the instructors know
the childrens names as there is a constistancy in teaching. After being at both Pools
for lessons I find it hard to believe that you would close Alness which in my opinion is
providing an important service by teaching children to swim.
Invergordon Pool struggle with the lessons they have at moment how on earth will they
cope with children from Alness and Tain if the closures go ahead.




I would like to lodge my objection to the planned closure of Alness swimming pool.
Both my children have learnt to swim there in the past and although the pool is in need
of some attention remains a valuable resource both to the school and the wider
community.
I also currently use the pool in my work as a CSW and for social purposes as part of
my excercise routine.
Please reconsider these plans and invest in the community rather than erode it even
further
I would like to express my disappointment at the proposed closure of the Alness
Swimming Pool and object to its proposed closure.
Nairn Swimming Pool - pays hi-life membership which would be cancelled if Nairn pool
closed. People don‟t have time to travel to another pool.
I greatly regret the prospect of Alness Academy Swimming Pool closing. This is one of
the most important value added experiences children in Primary schools have.
I hereby lodge my formal objection.




I am writing to show my concern at the councils plans to close my local swimming pool,
Alness and raise support. The council in the Highland region has to make cuts like
many other departments in this current financial crisis. One option they have come up
with is closing Alness swimming pool. I feel this is going against current government
guidelines and protocols and would be detrimental to an already deprived area. These
are my reasons for why I feel it is a bad move. On the Scottish Government‟s home
page they state that their aim is to “encourage participation in a diverse cultural life and
widen access to sport. Arts and culture can bring real benefits for communities and
individuals and sport can make a significant and positive contribution to many areas of
our lives. It is vital that everyone has the opportunity to participate”.
It also states that they are “committed to removing all barriers in anyone‟s path and
encouraging people to take part in sporting activities at all levels”. How this possible if
the barrier becomes removing the sporting facility itself!
Swimming and exercise in water provides one of the best forms of exercise for all
ages, using the whole body but also can be non-weight bearing therefore beneficial for
many who could not gain from other forms of exercise e.g. elderly, disabled and obese.
Obesity and lack of physical exercise is well known throughout the population,
especially for children. Swimming can be undertaken by all ages at all levels. The
government continues to issue publications and initiatives to reduce obesity and
improve fitness in all levels and socio-economic areas. Alness is a deprived area and
families within the town can walk and cycle down to the pool, many of them can not
afford to take the bus or car to use another pool further away.
Alness does not make a profit but in the long run it is saving money through
Nairn Swimming Pool - water safety very important in Nairn, Rosebank School children
attend swimming lessons there- doubtful if Culloden would have space to teach the
kids, current waiting list at Aquadome is 29 months - swimming promotes physical and
mental health and can be enjoyed by all.
I have just heard that Highland Council are considering the possibility of closing Tain
Swimming Pool.I understand the need that councils have to cut their budgets but I
consider that this would be a very short-sighted move for the following reasons:-
 1 It is generally accepted that obesity levels are rising in all age groups and
particularly in the young. Every encouragement should be given to all age groups to
get and keep fit The further people have to travel to a swimming pool the less likely
they are to swim, which is such an excellent exercise.
 2 The less healthy the local community is, the greater the cost to the national health
service and therefore costing the government more in the long run. There is a
requirement for some creative management of this resource such as encouraging the
local medical profession to 'prescribe' exercise (at a cost to the NHS) instead of
prescribing drugs for some remedies such as, post-operative orthopedic care, some
mental health issues etc. I am sure that there maybe other ways that funding for the
swimming pool could be found such as increasing the cost per session, season tickets.
3 If the Tain Swimming pool closes, the schools will face an increase in their financial
costs of transporting children further. This would also be a cost of time and thereby
reducing classroom teaching time, not an inconsiderable issue to be considered.
4 The closure of this pool will inevitable increase demand on other swimming pools in
the region, thereby reducing the opportunity for open sessions for public use. I
personally swim on a weekly basis to aid my mobility - I am sure that there are many
Please don't close Tain swimming pool I need it to keep fit.




Re: Possible Closure of Tain Swimming Pool I write to register my opposition to the
closure of the public swimming pool in Tain. This facility serves not only the immediate
environs of the Royal Burgh but also a much wider area, including to the north and
west of the town. For the first time in, at least, 25 years it is possible to access a
swimming pool from Invershin, Bonar-Bridge and Ardgay by public transport. As all of
these villages are served the scheduled public bus service which originates in Lairg
and terminates in Tain - operated by Macloed's Coaches. The swimming pool manager
arranges with the coach company, as authorised by Highland Council, for this bus
route to be extended on one day per week (the specific day can vary from month to
month dependant upon the requirements of Tain Academy), from its terminus in
Lamington Street to arrive at the pool by 1150; to marry into a public swimming
session; The bus departs from the pool at 1255. Closing Tain pool would remove the
opportunity for those without maybe the means, or the ability to travel by private
vehicle, or those like me who would have difficulty in walking to / from a bus stop or
train station, to benefit from aquatic exercise. No other pool in either Sutherland or
Ross-shire is accessible by public transport in this way. It seems to me that one way of
ameliorating the running cost of the pool is to increase public usage - and therefore
Nairn Swimming Pool - don't shut the pool we can‟t go swimming and they say people
in Scotland get fat how can we exercise when they are going to shut the pool.




Tain Swimming Pool - the facility serves not only the immediate environs of Tain but
also a much wider area with public transport agreements in place - improves both
physical and mental well being.



Nairn Leisure - protests to closure as uses the pool a lot.
Nairn Swimming Pool - it's a disgrace - Nairn has the bigest primary school in the
Highlands. This situation would not of happened if the pool was open to its full
potential.
So many people rely on this pool, please dont close the pool.




living here on Skye, half an hour between pools would seem reasonable. Priority given
to those that fit the above criteria who are most used/cost effective




I argue that the closure of Alness pool would be unfair and impracticable.
 1. Invergordon is a leisure pool, pleasant for families particularly with small children,
but useless as the training pool our area so much needs and which Alness fulfills-
dingwall is far too busy and serves a different area.
 It is too cold for older people. I gave up after 36 lengths because I was so cold.
 there is a strong current and for an older person-I am 76- it is impossible to swim in a
straight line.
 Because it is a deck style pool it is very difficult for back stroke swimmers as they
have to count each stroke-in Alness that is completely uneccessary as on can see the
side out of the corner of the eye. That also makes remedial work with those with back
problems who go to the Alness disabled session virtually impossible.
What about Invergordons' innaccessibility?
From the nearest bus stop it is over a mile to the pool and back and there is no
footpath beyond the Academy so it is dangerous for pedestrians. Nearly half of
Alness folk have no cars. It would cost a family of 4 from the West End £18 in bus
fares to get there and back-in a deprived area this would effectively rule out swimming
for many people.
That of course applies even more to Tain folk! Dingwall would also be more
expensive.
If Alness closes more children will risk the river-and if there is a heat wave following a
spell of torrential rain there could be drownings-I am not the only person to fear that....
clsoing a pool in a deprived town with a river running through it is criminal. Alness
people have put in so much to improve their town. Is this their reward?
How could lessons for Tain and Alness academies and the primary schools be fitted
Nairn Swimming Pool - costs and difficulties travelling from Nairn to Inverness - in
contrast to being able to walk/cycle around nairn is free. The financial aspect of
people travelling to inverness for swimming. Tourism (as important to Nairn as
Inverness) must also be taken into account.




There is little enough provision for you people in the Highlands -closing well used
facilities like swimming pools and libraries would once again be depriving rural
communities of much needed facilities - particularly as transport links are very poor
nort
I think that you have to look very closely at how the pools are being managed and what
they are doing to entice communities in to use them, are they running to full capacity,
are the open hours best to suit the local community, are they friendly and welcoming,
are swimming lessons running to full capacity, can clubs that already use the pool can
they be given more time?, I think travelling to another pool half an hour away is not a
suitable and I do not think this is the best way in trying to encourage a healthier and
wealthier scotland.




I do not think that 30 minutes travel time is a reasonable criteria as, in the case of
Nairn and I assume other threatened pools, people will not be able or willing to travel
such distances. The swimming clubs would fold and children would be denied the
opportunity to learn to swim. Swimming is such a great sport enhancing the health of
all age groups.

The council should be looking at how the pools can be run more efficiently with greater
access to all members of the community. Since the announcement of possible pool
closures, it appears to me that Nairn pool staff are already putting many actions in
place to increase the income and usage of the pool.

I am sure that a combination of the following:
a) more efficiently run pools,
b) more flexible and greater access to the pools,
c) new ideas for income generation at the pools being put in place.

would result in more extra income to the council than the £380k that the council state
as the indicative saving of closing 3 pools.

A generation of kids that can't swim growing up beside a beach, harbour and river - the
consequences are too frightening to imagine!
I would urge the Council to look very closely at ensuring the Nairn Swimming Pool can
be better used 7 days a week. Closing it is in my opinion folly of a very high order.
The entire catchment area of schools in Nairn would lose the ability to allow children to
have swimming lessons in School time. They could not travel to Inverness for
swimming lessons.
It is already costly to transport them in terms of travel and also time out of the school
day.
Excellent clubs such as the NASDC and the local Synchro Clubs make great use
which could be even more if the Pool management allowed greater Pool time to the
clubs.
Your criterion of 30 minutes travel time is not realistic as I would defy you to get from
the East side of Nairn to the Aquadome through all the traffic and into the pool in 30
minutes.
Similarly I would challenge any suggestion that you could get from Tain to Inverness
Pool in 30 minutes or less.
Additional usage by groups that pay for pool use must be looked into and encouraged.
NASDC have many children travelling an incredible weekly distance from Nairnshire to
Inverness at ridiculous times of the day to take part in HST training.
This could be achieved if they could get greater access to the Nairn Pool at
appropriate times each week.
Look closer and do not close Nairn Pool.

I think the 30 min criteria is a mistake. Travelling by bus or car in itself is costly to the
environment and for the pool users affected. The majority of children I know couldn't
wait to be old enough to go swimming independently without mum or dad and how
many parents would be willing to let their 8 yr olds travel by themselves to a pool 30
min away?

In a society increasingly affected by the costs of providing health and social care to the
physically unfit and obese the closure of a facility which provides access to an all
inclusive form of exercise would be very shortsighted.

In the past Nairn pool senior management have not endeavoured to attract more users
through an imaginative approach to opening hours and shared pool access. More
creative ideas for the future running of the pool would see it become much more widely
used and therefore more financially viable in the long term.

The two competitive clubs using Nairn pool regularly bring sporting success to the
town and continue to inspire more young children to take up a sport for life. These
clubs will fold if the pool closes and approximately 100 children will no longer have
access to their chosen sport.

I recognise that the budget savings must come from somewhere but the outright
closure of a facility should be the last resort not the starting point.




Nairn pool is a fantastic local facility which is enjoyed by people of all ages within the
community. We should be encouraging people to be active as part of a healthy lifestyle
- why take away a facility which clearly supports health, fun and water safety?
Having another facility within 30 minutes does not mean that Nairn pool should close.
This is ridiculous! Many people within the community will not make this journey so will
stop swimming altogether. A 30 minute journey involves additional cost and has
environmental impact. Many people (including children) currently walk or cycle to Nairn
pool because it is so accessible within the town. It is also a great facility for local
tourists.
Please don't close the pool. Please look at ways it can generate income, for example
by allowing fee-paying groups greater pool time.
I understand that running a swimming pool is done with a stretch to the counil's budget
however it seems to me that the benefits brought to the community of Nairn at large is
to be considered very strongly and in my view outweighs the decision of closing such a
valuable sport & leisure facility. The community using the pool in the more recent
weeks has increased thanks to staff taking in their own hands with ingenuous ways to
maximise the pool use by the whole of Nairn & surrounding area; look how much the
Fun and the Happy hours have increased in the frequentation, it seems to me that
adults and children alike from the community at large are demanding more access, so
why close?
The health benefits gained by enabling more people using the pool is surely something
else to consider as schools, NHS and the government are warning of the danger from
young peolple and children becoming more and more inactive... swimming in this part
of the world, especially in the long winters, seems to be one of the physical activity that
bring pleasure, strength and fitness to its users and more people become regular
users.
On top of this, the clubs swimmers attending regular training are in more demand of
pool time, both the NDASC and the Synchro club train at high level and the training in
Nairn pool is so important in allowing younger swimmers to develop. Parents who bring
their younger children to Nairn pool would probably not travel to Inverness, as I know
the swimmers who attend HST training have to have a certain level of abilities in the
four strokes and the development of those younger swimmers is done in their
cherished local pool through pool lesson programme ( which could be maximised as I
often have people asking why they have their children/ babies for so long on the
waiting list, some for many months) and well developed clubs that are growing in

In a time when the government and National Health Service are trying to promote a
healthier life style why is the Highland council trying to go against this by closing the
Nairn swimming pool.
For some children the only swimming lessons they get are with the school, if Nairn pool
closed this would be taken away from them as it would not be possible to travel to
Inverness and back in time allocated.
The swimming pool is a way of life for a lot of the children in Nairn if they need
something to do during the weekend or school holidays all they do is call one or two of
their friends and arrange to meet at the pool.
Like many other people I think the first step would be to look at how the pool is run and
managed, and look at ways to generate more income.
Please don‟t close the pool our children and Nairn need it.



As a parent and helper at the NDASC I was shocked to hear of the suggested closures
to our Highland swimming pools. I like many other parents travel to the Inverness
Aquadrome as my child has qualified to swim for Highland Swim Team juniors and this
achievement has only been successful through the hard work at Nairn pool. I would
also like to take the opportunity to point out the folly of closing a coastal town pool and
dread to think that Highland Council are increasing the chance of a potential aquatic
accidents.

My final thought is to agree with previous replies to the forum over our children's health
and fitness. Having recently taken my Level 2 Amateur Swimming Association
Coaching course a paragraph from the training manual springs to mind "Regular
exercise benefits the strength, stamina and suppleness of the body" (often known as
the three S's). A pamphlet provided by Health Education Council " Look after yourself "
provided a table that showed that swimming was the only sport to have 4 stars ( 4 stars
being the highest ) in all three categories.

I hope that the Council reconsider their future plans for the closure of pools in the
Highlands and start thinking of an alternate means to improve on the running and
budgeting both at the pools and within the Council. It may not be the easiest of routes
to take, however nothing in this day and age is ever easy without hard work and
dedication. You need only ask the swimmers who compete at the highest levels within
the Highland Counties and Scottish Nationals.

Daz Smith

Volunteer Coach and parent at Nairn ASC
1. some how i dont think if I were to go stand at the bus stop in auldearn 30mins later i
would be in the pool in Inverness, however I could be in the Nairn swimming pool.
Opps how did the council assess the time allowed to get to the pool ?
2. Will the council take the responibility of ensuring that children in auldearn have
enough time to attend thier weekly swimming classes if they have to travel to Inverness
and the extra cost of the transport ?

Graham Marsden take heart that the 2,212 facebook users subscribed to the save the
nairn swimming pool campain probably dont live in nain , possible can afforded to be
ignored as they never comented on this blog and can certainly be overlooked because
if they didnt bother signing up to the council forum they are unlikely to turn out at an
local election!

Concerned Elector (ward 19)


You cannot use arbitrary criteria such as travel time to inform a consultation exercise.
Each service should be looked at on the value it provides to the local community it
serves. This may mean that certain services are more relevant to some areas of the
Highlands than others and it maybe that the criteria for evaluating that service changes
based on the location. You also suggest, from the list of which pools might close, that
travel is one way. Maybe people from the larger urban conurbations may benefit from
travelling in the opposite direction and getting out of the bubble that is Inverness.

In towns like Nairn, largely dependent on tourism for its income, a pool is a valuable
amenity used to attract visitors and to keep them there. Lower utilisation by the local
population may be acceptable if it is a valuable amenity for visitors and informs their
decision on whether to come and stay. Ease of travel (public transport links, safety and
security for young people), not just travel time, are also key factors when looking at
pools that serve outlying rural communities as well as the town or village they're
located in.

Before you look at cutting vital local community services you may want to draw your
attention to inter-department communication and service efficiencies within the council.
I find it incredible that for some council services I am still asked to send a cheque
(credit and debit cards incur a service charge) and cannot pay through internet banking
or offered a direct debit option from the start. To get one service I pay for annually,
changed to a direct debit, a fact I only found out was possible through a friend, not
through the council, I have been in communication with the service department and the
Nairn is department separately on a number of such as theI pool and associated the
finance a tourist town and therefore amenities occasions. have had to wait for
activities, eg the paddling pool, crazy golf, etc, are a vital part of its attractions.
However, these facilities are also fully utilised by the local folk and not just the ones
from the town of Nairn itself but the outlying villages and hamlets. The 30 minute travel
distance indicator is misplaced as it may take 30 minutes to drive from Nairn to
Inverness but not from Nairn to the Aquadome which is completely on the opposite
side of town and adds at least 10-15 mins to that journey. That said, I am sure the folk
from Alness and Tain can come up with equally valid reasons why their pool should be
kept open. If the Council needs to make the 0.38 m savings then there are easier and
more efficient ways of doing it without devastating the local communities and setting
towns against towns in order to keep these amenities. One example would be to scrap
the replacement of road signs with bi-lingual ones in both Gaelic and English. To think
outside the norm when looking as the running and management of amenities, one
suggestion would be - does the Council need to run any swimming pools at all
themselves - could a charitable trust not be established to run the facilities. The
aquadome is an example of such a trust and while I am certainly not advocating this
action is taken, it is an example of not just looking for slash and burn policies but some
positive action that maintains these amenities and develop them. The Councillors are
elected by us to look at these issues and come up with suitable, viable suggestions
We have recently moved into Nairn, and what fantastic facilities it has.
My daughter has joined the local swimming club and is loving the club and it's
coaches. It would be a terrible waste of a great swimming club if the council was to
decide to close the pool. Not to mention the waste for the syncho club also, which is
also a great club for the local kids.
I cannot believe that the council could even consider closing a pool in such a popular
tourist area. How silly would it be for Nairn a fantastic seaside town not to have it's own
pool!




Nairn Swimming Pool the only pool in the Highlands with two established swimming
clubs, Nairn District Swimming and Nairn Synchronised Swimming , both of them for
over twenty years. If Nairn Pool closes there will be over one hundred children affected
in these clubs alone, never mind the children from lessons and the children and good
folks of Nairn and district who just come and enjoy the pool . These clubs are not just
about teaching swimming, they teach children how to work together, how to work hard,
how to achieve and how to deal with successes and failures, all part of growing up , so
it is not just a loss of a vital facility to the town and district, it is a bigger loss overall to
the development of the children
These children cycle and walk to the pool, especially in the summer months, they
cannot cycle and walk to Culloden Pool, or the Aquadome.
Welcome to Nairn, sun, sea, sand and no swimming pool!


I believe the '30 minute' criteria to authorise closure of swimming pools to be simplistic
in the extreme.(in any event Nairn swimming pool is not within 30 minutes of Inverness
Aquadome and, even if you accept this premise, why is the aquadome not considered
for closure as being within 30 minutes of Nairn?)I can not imagine a commercial
enterprise simply shutting branches purely on the basis of geography without
investigating the merits of the individual branch.
Nairn swimming pool is used by the whole community,there are few facilities that
appeal to such a broad cross-section of the population.
Nairn swimming pool has two vibrant and successful swimming clubs that cannot be
accomodated elsewhere within the region.
Nairn swimming pool provides the local Primary schools with swimming lesssons.They
cannot go elsewhere.Some of these children will have no other opportunity to learn to
swim,essential for safety in a seaside and riverside environment.
Nairn is a popular tourist destination,a swimming pool is often an essential criteria for
choosing a family holiday in Scotland.I have no doubt the closure of the pool will affect
the tourist industry and sends out the message that the town is on the downturn.

It would be madness to shut Nairn pool and deprive our community of a rich resource
that improves our quality of life and allows our children to lead a safer and healthier
life.A decision to shut such a fantastic facility MUST NOT be made on a 30 minute
criteria but investigation made into the merits of the facility which would surely result in
the decision to keep Nairn pool open and allow it to continue to play an important part
in the day to day lives of the people of Nairn.
This is a much needed facility in a community where there are already too few
activities for young people in this area. It is a very busy pool and has a long waiting list
of pre school children eager to learn to swim. The swimming club is excellent and it's
dedicated coaches and various parent helpers ensure that the club regularly come
home with medals from various swimming events around the area - not to mention that
several of its members have gained entry into the Highland Swim Team.

As this area of Ross-shire is easily accessible to the sea I feel it is imperative that
children have the opportunity to become competent swimmers - it is, after all, one of
the few sports that is also a life saving skill.

With the rising numbers in childhood obesity, what better way to combat this then to
use your local pool? Indeed, swimming is part of the curriculum in schools and all the
local primaries in the area enjoy the facilities in Tain. I cannot imagine it would be more
cost effective to bus these children to Golspie or Invergordon and I don't think there
would be enough time in the school day to allow for the extra travelling time required.

We are also told of the need to reduce our carbon footprint, and if Tain were to close
then there would obviously be an increaes in this footprint if we had to travel further
afield. Also, on the occasions I have visited Golspie or Invergordon, these pools seem
to very busy anyway and I don't think they would be able to cope with the additional
influx of people.

As to other ways the Council could raise funds to supplement the swimming pool,
I think if 30 mins is the only criteria to decide whether Highland Council should close
Nairn Pool then they are mad to think that people from Nairn including tourists would
be able to get to the Aquadome in less than 30 minutes.
I understand that cuts have to be made but surely the income generated from the
residents in Nairn and surrounding areas on the Highlife card would outweigh any
savings as most folk would cancel their Highlife Card membership if there was not a
pool or gym in Nairn.
I also believe that Nairn would lose out on income from tourism as I dont feel that Nairn
would have the same appeal if it did not have a swimming pool, it is unthinkable to
think that a tourist town like Nairn would not have a swimming pool.
Highland Council spend a lot of money on promoting Healthy Eating and Kids Activities
to help prevent obesity but then they want to remove the ability for kids in Nairn to walk
or cycle to the pool and then have fun whilst swimming.
What about the carbon footprint on the extra journeys to Inverness that parents will
have to do to take their kids swimming.
The cost of transporting school kids to swimming lessons in Inverness would surely out
weigh any savings made by closing the pool. The kids in nairn have to learn to swim as
they are surrounded by water at the beach, harbour and also the river that runs through
Nairn so it is a necessity that the school kids have swimming lessons.
Nairn has a very successful Synchronised Swimming Club and Swim Club and it would
be devastating to take these award and medal winning clubs away from Nairn and it is
undoubted that NSSC would fold if there was no pool in Nairn for the girls to train in.
I feel it is ludicruous for councillors to be thinking of closing this much needed amenity
So, a 30 min criteria has been plucked from the air to establish the future of such
pools? Where's the evidence and support for this? I see Cllr Alston is also unsure on
his suggestion.
To save a bit of money lets close the pools down! Yes, short term savings, but long
term this is adding to the many health problems, physical and mental, that faces
Scottish people of today (Cllr this means more money, more projects, more effort)
Scotland has the highest rate of heart disease and Stroke in the WORLD, not to
mention us coming pretty close to our American neighbours in the obesity scale. Can
you really justify closing the swimming pool, in which regular exercise has shown to
dramatically reduce these and many other conditions?
I do not think that the council has considered the social impact on closing these pools
will have on the community. The swimming pool is a place where parents take little
ones to meet other parents. For children to have fun and even join a club which gives
them exercise, discipline and a sense of achievement. It allows people to relax after a
stressful day at work and also a great place where elderly people come to meet friends
and exercise in a safe manner. Only today, a report was published regarding an
increase of people feeling isolated and lonely, in particular single parents and the
elderly. Is the council prepared to add to these figures by taking away this important
social meeting place?
How does the council expect to get these children, adults, families and elderly to a
swimming pool 30 minutes away? In such communities with such little public transport
methods this is unacceptable.
Nairn pool is a great pool, fantastically located that people can walk to, ride their bikes
to and take as many kids as they can keep a hold of to. The number of people who
enjoy swimming at their local pool would dramatically drop if they had to travel 30




As a parent off Nairn Synchro club i do not agree with the closure off the Nairn pool. I
also don't agree with the 30min travel too another pool. This is certainly not very
practical. Are you really going to see

1. The elderly travelling 30 min's for their morning or lunch time swim.
2. The Nairn Synchro and NDSC travelling 30mins to train up to 4 times a week.
3.Mothers travelling to take their babies and toddlers for a swim.
4.School children being able to keep up their fun hour sessions with their friends.
5. Tourists travelling to go for a swim when they have come to Nairn for their holidays.
6.Children and adults being able to continue with swimming lessons.

I say keep Nairn pool open as it benefits the young, elderly and tourists. It also benefits
the two clubs and Nairn as a whole.


I think it is absolutly shocking to close Nairn swimming pool, especially as there is so
little else in the town! It is one of very few places where the town folk can easily access
health and fitness. It is also runs swimming lessons for hundreds of children and I dont
think it is practical for parents who often have other young children to travel 30 minutes
to get to another pool. Nairn swimming pool has been around for a long time and it has
established two competitive clubs - the nairn swimming club and the Synchro club. To
close nairn swimming pool would be a waste! It would reduce holiday makers, there
will be fewer things to do for children especially and im sure they will find other ways to
entertain themselves e.g causing trouble on the streets!

Closing the pool would be suicide to Nairn!
I feel that in a society where obesity and unhealthy lifestyles are an increasing prolem
it is vital to encourage the population of Nairn to fight this trend and swimming is a
sport that is accessible to all no matter what age, size or level of current fitness you
have. Travelling half an hour is not accessible to all. Also, we are a beach loving,
seaside town where it is vital that children, and adults, can swim so to take away the
facility for learning this skill would be detrimental and dangerous.
Nairn is a popular pool and has very active swimming and synchronised swimming
clubs that would be unable to continue in the event of a closure, greatly affecting
possible champions of the future and fun in the present. Council and pool
management time may be better used to identify new income generating ideas and
better use of the pool rather than creating a population of non swimmers.




Who on earth came to this conclusion ????? The people of nain live near the beach
and has a river running right throught the middle of it, it should be a priority that the
swiming pool stays open so that every child who lives in nairn and district be given the
safest, lesson the right to learn to swim....What on earth would happen if a child
drowned in any of the fore mentioned areas????? Would the council hang thier head
in shame ( i doubt it) Some people in Nairn can not afford the extra bus fare to put a
child to swimming lessons in culloden or even inverness, adding an extra burden onto
a tight budget all ready in place. and also to the elderly how can they justify spending
extra for the bus fare with the pension they get.....

Not only would nairn lose a swimming pool but also 2 very successful clubs, sorry this
must not be allowed to happen



The idea of using half an hour travel time as the key criteria is simplistic. I already
spend over an hour each week transporting my daughter to Nairn pool to participate in
3 synchronised swimming sessions.As I live out to the East of Nairn I would not be
travelling to Culloden - it would simply be too far. I fear the closure of Nairn swimming
pool would be the death knell of at least one vibrant go ahead club. The pool and gym
provides an excellent facility which I have enjoyed using over the last few years. We
live in an age when we understand how important it is to look after our health by
excercising regulary. our fitness as a family is much better because of Nairn pool - it is
also a super pool to swim in - someone somewhere has got something right and what
happens - its threatened with closure. Simply a travesty!



As has been pointed out by many reply's here, Nairn pool is critical for the survival of
the swim club and the synchro club. So critical is it to the synchro club that there are
no other Council run pools in Highland with the depth and width requirements to carry
out the sport safely........result no synchro club. It is the only synchro club north of the
central belt and just happens to be the most successful one in Scotland having held 40
Scottish and Open National titles since the mid 80's and current holder of 6. This has
been achieved from a town the size of Nairn, which in terms of National competition, is
nothing short of amazing given the level of competition in English clubs.

Setting that aside for the moment, if the pool is not meeting its targets for throughput or
cost, then it might be more sensible to try and look at the numbers a bit more closely
(user headcount in particular), and find ways of boosting turnover through; more
flexible pool times early and late; more events and activities to get users in; reviewing
overheads; more swim training for school kids; special deals for tourists. It shouldn't be
rocket science. Provision of facilities to boost the health and wellbeing of the
population is a National priority, so closing access to a pool like Nairn, which clearly
has local demand and strong local support, is perverse in the extreme.
I heartily support and agree with all the messages left on this site. DO NOT CLOSE
OUR POOL ........ doing so would take away so much from so many people, both
young and old, local or visiting.

As a mother of three, the facilities at Nairn Pool are used on a frequent basis. My girls
alone attend five times a week as they are members of the Nairn District Swimming
Club and Nairn Synchronised Swimming Club. To close the pool would mean that both
of these very successful and competitive clubs would cease to exist - that would be
unthinkable!
Please don't close down our pool. I go there for swimming club and I think it is the best
thing I do. I will be really upset if you close down the pool because I will have to stop
swimming because there is no other proper club near to my home. I think swimming is
really good exercise and it keeps you safe when you live next to water. I have learned
so much since I started going there and that means other children won't be able to do
this, (Age 10)
Tain Swimming Pool - concerned as pool is used by the children attending St Duthus
Special School - all their children have special needs and swimming provides a
particularly important form of therapy for them.
Nairn Swimming Pool - I note from their website that the City of edinburgh grant aid the
lesiure service, which has a status of a charity and a "not for profit company". I would
hope that the Highland Council would consider the merits of such an arms-length
relationship for its leisure services rather than axing valuable services as the only
money saving option.




Sirs In my opinion it would be a retrograde step to consider closing this pool. There is
no viable alternative with availablilty. The community make use of the pool and a fitter
healthier community is ultimately less of a drain on services. I believe it would lose HC
revenue to close the pool - parents have taken out family high-life cards when their
children go to swimming lessons and continue to pay this monthly to the council coffers
(in my own case for about eight years). We take out family subscriptions because of
the availablity of the gym while our children are swimming - whether we go or not. If the
availablity of the pool was removed then the the ability to use the high-life card is
reduced and it becomes a cost with little benefit. A lot of families would then take the
step of seriously reconsidering the scheme. An increase in the cost of the family High-
life of, for instance £1 per month would not be so great as to force people to reconsider
their membership, but when multiplied by the number of subscriptions would go a little
way into covering costs. Please note that when High-life began, Tain Pool was not
available and therefore, like many others who took out our cards at that time, my
subscription was taken out through Invergordon and this may, in a small way, be
distorting your figures. Tain Pool is not a leisure pool, therefore if the temperature was
dropped slightly a saving in heating costs is possible.
Closing Tain Swimming Pool would be a backward step in a town with a large
catchment area. It is vital that the children in our town and area be taught to swim - it is
a skill that could save their life! It is also important to encourage the uptake of
sport/exercise to combat the increasing weight gain of our population and swimming is
an exercise that you can participate in on your own up into old age with no damage to
aging joints. With regard to raising revenue, one of the reasons I personally took out a
High Life subscription was because of having the pool within a 10 min journey,
especially on winter nights. If the pool were to close I would seriously reconsider
whether to continue to subscribe to the High Life scheme. I cannot speak for others on
this matter but would imagine that there are quite a number of people and families who
are members of High Life because Tain Swimming Pool is open to the public in the
evenings and week-end. Again I cannot speak for others, but I would be more than
willing to pay more for my High Life membership, £1 extra a month would not be
unreasonable.




Are the pools well used? THis may be a way of assessing local demand




No that would be a dreadful idea - swimming pools need to be local. If Inverness is
being suggested as the alternative to Nairn it is ridiculous to suggest that parents
would undertake that drive for swimming clubs etc. Young people need to be able to
walk or cycle to swimming pools and have some independence - we rely far too much
on parents as taxi drivers.
Alness Swimming Pool: It is clear that many folk use to pool who would otherwise find
it impossible to get access to a facility of this quality. I imagine in many cases savings
afforded by the health benefits they enjoy as a result of this would be quickly lost in
increased NHS care etc if they could no longer swim. Likewise if the school children
who must be taught to swim have to be bussed to another place then that is expensive
, increases risk and reduces teaching time .
Alness is in the process of enjoying an upturn in its fortunes and facilities such as the
pool help make it a good place to live increasing its diversity of population and as a
result social sustainability . There is a pride amongst the people in Alness and rightly
so.
Will school swimming lessons be delayed until secondary stage? Not a good policy in
itself. Transferring primary school children to other pools could lead to reduction of
their open session hours - loss of income. Extra transport costs to get children to
alternate sites. Any saving will be less than the current estimate. Will dealing with the
consequences wipe out any saving altogether?
No, I don't believe that the council can or should reduce the swimming pool provision,
and I have recently contacted Jamie Stone MSP to discuss this, we jointly came to the
conclusion that it may be possible to run some pools as a public private partnership,
and I suggested that pools at risk should apply to the national lottery for funding.

No as potential numbers would increase at main pools such as Inverness which is
already very busy.



I am writing on behalf of the Knockbreck Primary School Parent Council and also as a
parent to voice my concerns over the proposed closure of the swimming pool in Tain.
This pool is used by a large proportion of the community and I feel that it would be
detrimental to the local area to close the pool. The Government are trying to
encourage us as a nation to be more healthy and to ensure that we and our children
get plenty exercise. Surely closing the pool goes completely against this. Also - isn't
swimming part of the curriculum?
Tain Swimming Pool - petition submitted protesting against the potential closure of this
pool. 1,285 signatories
If you make cuts to things like swimming pools, be ready for the consequences of
increased obesity/poorer fitness and other related physical health issues, with the
related costs that these will bring. I don't know how you factor that into your criteria
though.
If you factor in travel time, make sure that considers public transport provision to the
next available pool, and not only is there a service, but what's it like. It's only about 20
miles between Wick and Thurso, but the bus journey can take 40-50 minutes one-way,
plus the time of getting to and from the bus stops on foot at either end. For a half hour
swim, someone might be taking on two hours or so of travel time.
For someone who regularly uses the Wick pool, but who doesn't live in the town, it may
become impractical for them to access the Thurso pool instead.
closing local provision once again disadvantages those who cannot afford to travel and
prevents use by local schools.
Only if travel time is by public transport.
Tain Amatur swimming club - Solicitors letter with responses fro Tain Ameteur
Swimming Club.




The half-hour travelling time criteria seems fair.
Tain swimming pool petition - 2087 signatories




reduce hours of Fort William Pool especially at weekend.
75 Letter from children of Coul Hill Primary regarding the closure of Alness swimming
pool
Nairn Swimming Pool - I cannot understand why this closure should even be
considered.

Alness Swimming Pool - Coulhill School will miss their lessons - Alness gathered
money to make the pool into a 25 metre pool - Invergordon pool is more of a
recreational pool- Alness has less cars per head of population than almost every other
town in Highlands making travelling to other pools more difficult for them.
We support the review of travelling times as criteria for retention or closing. Can steps
also be taken to ensure closure is regarded as a temporary rather than permanent
decision?


After attending a meeting in Tain regarding budgeting for 2010 and forward and the
possible closure of Tain Swimming Pool, I was aghast to see a notice on the door of
Tain Swimming Pool yesterday saying that it would be closed 4 2 weeks for a disabled
access to be built. Why would a local council be spending money on a service which is
looking at being closed in the not too distant future. Or is it that a decision has been
made to keep the pool open, but this has not been communicated to the public. If the
decision has not been made, what it not make sense to stall the works until the
decision has been made, as otherwise the money may be being spent for only a few
month of use at a time when money and spending is obviously tight.
The closure of Alness Swimming Pool is very much a retrograde step and one that
should be avoided. I feel that the pool should be retained on both educational and
health grounds.
EDUCATIONAL
The pool is an integral part of the PE Complex at Alness Academy and serves both the
secondary school and all its feeder primary schools in Alness, Evanton and Ardross.
Swimming is part of the Curriculum and should remain so. It is so important that pupils
of all ages get the opportunity of learning to swim and to receive instruction in basic life-
saving techniques. Pupils in the Alness area should not be deprived of this valuable
teaching facility.
HEALTH
In this age of health promotion, it seems to me, unwise to close such a valuable
recreational facility which is used by both pupils and members of the public, of all ages,
who enjoy the benefits of swimming as part of their keep-fit routine.

Instead of opting for 'soft targets' such as educational establishments I am sure that, if
you really thought about it, you could make your cuts elsewhere.
I would like to object to the proposed closure of Alness Pool.
I would like the budget for Britain in Bloom and flowers and shrubs to be looked at
instead, as swimming and child safety, sport and fitness, which includes health
promotion and primary care targets should take a priority. The Alness provides a
valuable resource for swim training, ordinary swimming when the Invergordon Pool is
often crowded, and makes Alness Academy a more rounded Community School.
An alternative could be to have Pool opening times between Dingwall, Alness and
Invergordon rota‟d on a planned and coordinated basis, to have a smaller cohort of
trained staff working between the 3 centres.
Swimming pools are expensive to run but mean so much to people's health. It's
already really difficult to fit in lessons for school pupils so please don't close pools.
OBJECTION TO CLOSURE OF ALNESS POOL
I went to school in Alness and learnt to swim at the pool. I now have two sons who
used to go to Invergordon for swimming lessons. I moved them to Alness for lessons
as I felt they were not progressing enough at Invergordon. The instructors are great,
my kids really enjoy their lessons and having the same instructor each week has really
helped. I also like the fact the instructors are in the swimming pool with the kids and I
can sit at the edge of the pool and witness their lessons. Alness in my opinion has a
well structured programme for learning to swim. We also use the pool at the
weekends. I think it is very important for everyone to have use of a swimming pool for
life saving skills also leisure. Many people would have to take the bus to Invergordon
then have to walk to the pool which is not very encouraging when you have children in
tow! ALNESS NEEDS A SWIMMINGthe Forum in Tain was so worthwhile. There was
I just wanted to write to say that I felt POOL
really good communication on both sides. My personal issue is with the Swimming
Pool and it was obvious that there is a great deal of support to save it. Cllr Alston came
to our table and appeared to take on board our views. My daughter swims every day -
2 evenings in Inverness and 1 morning before school that involves rising at 5am. The
other days she swims in Tain at the swimming Club. The impact for our family would
be massive as I would never be off the road with her. At least she can swim and it will
be the little ones who are just starting out on their swimming career that would lose out.
As I said to Cllr Alston on the evening of the Forum I feel that a 16 year old lifeguard
who is still studying at school does not need to be paid £7.90 per hour. My eldest
daughter is 16 and works in a nearby hotel (she is doing her highers) and is paid £5.25
per hour. She is delighted with this wage and amongst her peers it is actually very
good. Why the Council feel the need to pay £7.90 to a 16 year old is quite strange. I
am a Nursery Nurse in the private sector and I don't earn that. The music tuition is
another issue as I also said - actually most people are now not paying tuition fees as
they appear to be in receipt of some sort of benefit so it becomes free. It would be
perhaps beneficial to look at the amount of people that are actually paying for tuition
Nairn Swimming Pool - objects to proposed closure.
I would like to add my name to those who are protesting about the closure of Alness
Swimming Pool. I am a retired nurse and have been using the pool for the past ten
years. Instead of closing the pool I think that every effort should be made to encourage
people to use it. At a time when stress is manifesting itself in so many different ways in
the lives of young and old and we are told how good exercise is for us, not only to keep
us fit physically but also to give us the 'feel good' experience mentally, can we justify
this move? Swimming can be carried on long after other sports become too strenuous.
Nairn Swimming Pool - I have lived in Nairn for 7 years and use the pool regularly. I
am also expecting my first child and always thought I'd be able to push a pram to the
local pool and teach my child to swim. Lastly I have an elderly neightbour who walks
to the pool every 2nd day for a swim - these activities will no longer be if you remove
our local facility - please don't - we dont want to be poor cousins of Inverness yet
again.
Nairn Swimming Pool - objects to proposed closure.

If Alness swimming was to close where would the pupils in Alness go
for Swimming?, and has travel cost been taken in your budget If swimming pools are
reduced what would the impact be on over
capacity?
Review Library provision - our local library is already delivering a dual service to the
School and the community within a streamlined staffing provision.
Alness Swimming Pool - retrograde step - important community facility should be
retained on both educational and health/recreational grounds - integral part of the PE
complex at Alness Academy, promotes health, Alness pool does not benefit for our
monthly contribution to the high life card.
My view on the criteria for determining how to achieve £380,000 saving on swimming
pool provision is based on a fair approach of a reduction across the 21 pools which the
highland council run or grant aid. My approach in all your suffested savings would be
to take a similar tack - do not discriminate against any individual community but that
every community has to suffer some pain evenly and proportionately across the whole
of the highland region and proportionately across all departments within the highland
region,
Alness Swimming Pool - the community pool and the place are central to the well
being, safety and education of young people in Alness and to the community at large-
they play a central role in our duty to care and it would be appalling act of social
vandalism if they were closed.
We think that the alness pool is an excellent community
facility for the whole of this area. We have been to
alot of classes & parties and everyone is always
welcoming and helped with any problems. as a family
we hope that the alness pool stays open because we
 have had alot of fun there over the years.
Nairn Swimming Pool - vibrant local clubs operate and deliver high quality programmes
and are actively working in partnership with Scottish swimmers to achieve swiMark
accreditation. - if closed concerns are no swimming lesson programme, collapse of the
swimming clubs, no provision for disabled swimmers, loss of local heros, synchro
cannot operate without a minimum depth of 2 meters and six lanes.
Tain & Alness Swimming Pool - will cause problems for familities, especially those who
have to rely on public transport. They will have to take their children to either
Invergordon or Golspie pools and would obviously have to tie in convenient times for
the children's swimming seesions with bus times.




the communites could be more invovled and generate income for these pool as the
gant aided ones already have to do
Travel time of 0.5 hours or distance (15 miles) is appropriate.




Nairn Swimming Pool - it beggers belief that Nairn in its capacity as a popular holiday
resort should be deprived of a pool which is widely used by all sections of society.
The ability to swim is vitally important both for safety and health but in times like these
we have to be radical and yes, travel time of half an hour between existing pools
should be used as the key criteria for determining whether pools should close. We, in
Badenoch, would be delighted to have a travel time of half and hour to our nearest
public pool.




Fair enough if there is public transport to nearby ones.
this sounds like a good suggestion but the half hr criteria should be by i public
transport and a proper analysis needs to examine
the impact of closure on the numbers visiting main pools which are already very busy




Closing pools is a backward step for children‟s health and safety and should only be
considered as a last resort if there is over provision within an area or if the building
requires large investment for refurbishment etc
Petition in support of the retention of Nairn Swimming Pool - 2105 signatories
• Pools: we most decidedly believe all pools in rural areas should remain open. They
are often a significant facility for the well-being of all residents wishing to develop water
skills or use them for therapy. Should our local pool (Tain) close our primary school
pupils, who now receive less than five hours swimming instruction a year, would
probably receive even less instruction, if any, because of the extra travel time needed
to reach the nearest pool.




I am very concerned about the proposal to close the Nairn Swimming Pool. It is a
valuable facility and one frequently used by residents and visitors. It makes no sense
in a tourist town like Nairn - with its internationally famous golf courses - to be without a
swimming pool. I think the Council should look more closely at its Glenurquhart Road
Offices to identify savings. I am sure the Leisure Department could shed sufficient
managers to realise the savings required without closing much needed facilities. It is
ironic that in all the leisure proposals put forward in your savings consultation that all
the cuts fall either to staff or facilities in the community - why not a reduction in
management! After all if the reductions proposed are implemented - what will be left for
them to manage!!!
“Stop the Council from running pool and implement a community trust to manage
facility. Use Nairn pool as a core centre for development in the Long-term athlete
development programme. This will maximise and efficiently use pool time effectively
for the Highland area and work in partnership with the Aquadome delivering
performance.”




“Facility swimming pool could be run more efficiently opening longer hours using pool
time, sharing pool with difference organisations. Management need to be proactive in
promotion/ marketing. Review High Life programme to change so more income is
generated.”
use travel time for criteria.
As a regular swimming pool user, I would be willing to pay a substantially increased fee
for use of my local swimming pool.

look at alternative business or not for profit community partnershp rather than closure.




Travel time should be half-an hour by public transport, including evenings and
weekends, not by car. Invergordon pool is away from the town centre and the tranport
links.Even with a car, people in central and north Sutherland and probably other areas
as well, would have to travel for more than half an hour to reach a pool.

Other criteria could be running costs, standard of the facility and any unique factors - I
believe Alness is the only competition length pool for serious swimming training.




The travelling time criterion is again discriminatory. There is no indication of the use
made of the swimming pools identified for potential closure. Although there is a similar
facility in Dingwall, the use made of the swimming pool and other facilities in Alness
would suggest there is an established demand for this provision.

Swimming pools are an integral part of a leisure complex and it makes little sense to
remove a part of that complex without removing the whole.

Is this a provision where the Council could increase the charge to reflect the expense
of maintaining and running a swimming pool?
Some local swimming pools should be taken away as they‟re not used frequently
although transport to other pools would cost a lot in some cases.




Closure of Nairn pool an issue as has a disabled hoist so many people use the pool for
this purpose. For someone with no transport, going to use the Inverness pool would
take in all around 4-5 hours.
 About cutting swimming pools, there is Dingwall, Alness, Tain and Invergordon. I
really don‟t think we should shut Tain or Dingwall pools as tain is able for the disabled
to have a swim etc..also alness can travel to dingwall for the pool as well as inverness




Tain Swimming Pool - if closed many of the young people around Tain and the
surrounding area will not have any access to swimming provisions- a vital life skill -
also the affects of driving on the environment.


Nairn Swimming Pool - essential not only for recreational, keep fit, learning to swim
and touism but particularly in view of the fact that the town sits on the River Nairn.
Swimming club one of the most successful - it only takes the death of one youngster in
either the river, sea or being cut off by the incoming tides to underline how essentail it
is in a coastal area to learn to swim.
Tain Swimming Pool - stenuous objection- the school policy is at present to ensure that
all children are able to swim one length unaided by the time they reach academy - if
Tain pool closed funds will not be availabel in the school budget to bus these children
to another facility.
We would not have a problem with reducing the number of swimming pools where
these are within 40 miles of each other.
Alness Swimming Pool: The proposal to close Alness Swimming Pool could have
serious consequences for the local children, who could be denied access to learning to
swim and therefore be vulnerable if they found themselves in deep water and be
unable to save themselves.
The children pass by a river on a daily basis and there have been drownings in the
river on previous occasions, children are invariably drawn to water.
We live in a coastal community. To close Alness Pool and rely on Invergordon pool to
have enough time for all the children in Alness area and Invergordon area, along with
possibly Tain and beyond, to have access to swimming lessons is untenable.
The Council would be held accountable if children were to get into difficulty in water
after being denied the basic skill of learning to swim.
These children will become adults who need access to fitness facilities to prevent
obesity and ill health, living in the cold, wet, dark harsh climate of the north of Scotland
swimming is one of the activities which can be enjoyed all year round.
Evidence in support of the retention of Nairn swimming pool from the Nairn District
Amateur Swimming club. Including: swimming club would not get the pool time
required elsewhere, temporary closure in 2009 demonstrated swimmers unwilling to
travel elsewhere, local children not able to access swimming lessons due to travel and
lessons elsewhere oversubscribed, schools would struggle to afford the cost and time
to travel elsewhere, safety issues where a generation of children will not learn to swim,
inequality of access for the population in an area where there are pockets of
deprivation, nairn pool could be made more financially viable if local and regional
management would be more flexible in terms of staff shift patterns and access to the
public and clubs, clubs are an income generator and pay for their poltime seperately to
High Life system. Evidence includes: hearing from childre, children's successes and
achievements, the club programme and squads, the governing body and it's influence
on the club, the heath gain benefits of swimming, local investors and sponsors and our
own fundraising efforts. Additional booklet available.
Nairn Swimming Pool - Swimming pool promotes physical and mental health.
Important to tourism and costs and environment effect of travelling to Inverness.
Water safety is very important in Nairn due to the sea. Without the pool NDASC and
synchro club would fold.
Tain Swimming Pool - (member of the Tain Amatuer swimming club)- pool and the club
keeps me fit.




Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Nairn Swimming pool - will have an affect on tourism in nairn; synchronised swimming
club; history of pool; swimming lessons; jobs; spoil a lot of fun for the kids - swimming
is one of the funniest ways of keeping fit.
Petition in support of the retention of Nairn swimming pool - 178 signatories




Petition in support of the retention of Alness Swimming Pool - 1860 signatories
Petition in support of the retention of Nairn Swimming Pool - 663 signatories

Alness Swimming Pool - no original letter just the response
The Floral Hall in Inverness annual budget is £0.115m. It provides a visitor
centre and training for adults with learning disabilities. We would like your
views on whether the Floral Hall should be closed if more cost effective
ways of running it cannot be identified.


Regular visitor to Floral Hall. Floral Hall and Museum the only tourist
attractions in Inverness. Plant collections such as the Floral Hall cannot
be produced overnight. Once lost, it would be difficult to reproduce in the
future. Eight jobs mentioned, but what about the members of disabled
people who gain self respect throught employment. Grave concern that
the land which the Floral Hall is on will then be sold for council revenue
and further development. Inverness already over developed.




It is clear that the Floral Hall is at risk of closing and undoubtedly this
facility will be greatly missed by locals and tourists.

Frequent patron of Floral Hall I am appalled at the proposed closure of this
most attractive feature. Rather than close why not make plans to more
fully integrate the locally very popular Floral Hall into the tourist scene.
Existing and unique feature of the Highlands and needs to be preserved.




Leave as is




n/c
No - I am sure more effective ways of running it can be found. It is a great
asset to Inverness.




I know nothing of the Floral Hall, but I am sure there are other
organisations who provide similar support and training. Therefore the Hall
should be closed.
another item that needs massively more publicity and good signage.
Personally I would missit greatly and I am awareof its big contribution to
adult special education
Sell to private sector




if we dont use it....


Definately not. The Floral Hall is one of the few delightful places to visit in
Inverness, for residents and visitors alike. It's a wonderful asset and
should be treated as such. I speak for many of my friends when I say that
we don't really mind who runs it, as long as it's well run. Good, well-run
social enterprise companies like the Aberdeen-based Inspire could help
the current staff work towards becoming independent of Highland Council,
and they may then be eligible for grant funding. The heating system could
be replaced by a more efficient, more environmentally sound one such as
a biomass boiler or use of solar panels; this would save a lot on running
costs. There's tremendous potential for development of the Floral Hall,
what it needs is a dynamic, well staffed team behind it. Closing the Floral
Hall would be an absolute disaster for Inverness.




Reduce library opening hours by 10%|Cease the Bookstart service
I have no experience of the floral hall.




 and if so how much the people who use theme would be willing to pay.
Supply and Demand "
yes
I don't know enough about it to have an opinion
No to closure, this is an important venue for locals and visitors




Being a frequent visitor to the Floral Hall with my grandchildren I cannot
advocate its closure and would again refer you to my earlier comments




Close it




Find more cost effective ways of running it.
A lovely resource I'm not sure about this one.
Don't close Floral Hall - it‟s a tourist attraction and a community support
resouce - publicise it better!
The importance of this attraction to visitors who can enjoy the splendid
exhibition of plants and fish, often followed by a meal or a snack in the tea
room. Step it up walking groups meet there each week and we observe
many disabled folk enjoying their visits to the hall with their carers.




This could be better run to increase income. Increase the number of folks
using it and keep it open. Surely it could be marketed for wedding photos
now the registrar is nearby? See how it goes then close it if it doesn't pick
up.
I didn't know this was a visitor centre - what kind of visitor centre? You
don't say how much training goes on there to hard to have an opinion on
this.
Floral Hall - there are already a number of garden centres in Inverness.
Floral Hall should be self-supporting - apply a working commercial
business plan. Maybe a social enterprise?
Particular interest in cactus house as a fellow member of the H&I Cactus
Club and assists in the maintenance of the Hall and many of the plants
have been donated, both locally and across Scotland. Considerable
community support for the hall. Hall is well used by local people and
visitors. At a time when people are losing contact with the natural world -
both the hall, surrounding gardens and fishpool provide useful introduction
to horticulture. Unique amenity in the Highlands - often told Inverness is
doing something well and I think it would be a shame to lose it.
??
Without a doubt I think a social enterprise would be the best move for the
floral hall, and opening up with more opportunities for volunteers
The Floral Hall would make an excellent location for a social enterprise
hub in Inverness. It should be possible to build on the exisiting visitor
attraction to involve a number of social enterprises and increase visitor
numbers, this in turn creating more training and volunteer opportunities.
As the social enterprises would need to raise ever-scarcer funding
themselves, Highland Council should make a decision on this as soon as
possible.
No don't close it, it does a good job




Surely the training is more important than cost-effectiveness - it is a
relatively small budget
I would anticipate that more cost effective methods would be easily
identifiable.
Good tourist attraction. Could they charge more for entry?
I love the Floral Hall and would be sad to see it go as is just the right size
to walk round. What about having courses there on taking cuttings from
plants etc? Think it should be advertised more.
Family have had a catering business at the Floral Hall for over 10 years.
Writing to plead argument to keep hall open is to invite you to read some
of the several hundred personal testimonies from our patrons. The floral
hall is a jewel in the crown of the wonderful facilities in the Highlands.
With an events manager you would be able to put on so many local
events.
We support the proposal that it should be retained and run as a Social
Enterprise venture; this will ensure it can continue to provide meaningful
training and work for disadvantaged and disabled people, and also
function as a visitor centre.
Look at ways of making more money out of it as a venue - closure would
be a terrible loss in terms of training, jobs and visitor attraction for locals
and tourists.
See comment above. If cost effective ways of running it cannot be
identified perhaps it can be privately sold.
Floral Hall – transfer to social enterprise company.
Please not. This is an asset to the town and a place it should be proud of.
not sure
Closing of the Floral Hall would be petty and wasteful. This is an attraction
that appeals to both visitors and local people. In addition to this it is a
training centre for people with disabilities
Don't know
Floral Hall should be closed if more cost effective ways of running it
cannot be identified




No. It provides a supported learning environment.
no view see general comment regarding maintenance of quality; impact on
most vulnerable; and opportunities for communities to
be supported to make alternative provision




no comment
yes close




Closing it would be a pity. Efforts should be made to reduce running costs,
or increase income by extending the uses made of the Floreal hall.




The Floral Hall is a “hidden gem” in many ways and it is preferable to
retain this service and making the savings elsewhere. If the entire cost of
the museum service is removed from the budget, services such as this
could be retained.
Recovering from chronic illness and volunteers at facility - helps adults
with learning difficulties.
Recent visitor with friends from England and were astonished at the
glorious display and impressed with the overall design of the building and
friendly knowledgeable staff. Floral Hall is unique in Scotland and the very
finest of it's kind in Britain. Please take all possible action to keep it open.
Suggest name change to attract tourist "The Exotic Garden".
Petition in support of the retention of the Floral Hall - 316 signatories
Day care facility at Beachview, Brora. The service is registered for 20 people, and
has around 75% usage. We are also seeking to support more people in a wider
range of community settings, not day centres, e.g. village hall. Accordingly, we are
consulting about withdrawing this service in Brora, providing different models of
support locally, and providing places at provision in Tain, for those people who
require a day centre and live within travel distance.




Don't know




n/c
No comment




This is a thorny one. The use of village halls, etc. for day centres can be a bleak
propositiion. Not all village halls are welcoming or comfortable places. I myself
would hate to have to attend a village hall for activities and social interaction. I
presume closing Brora and diverting people to Tain is a financially viable
alternative?
Provide different models of support locally



People with learning difficulties have few opportunities as it is and the closure of this
would not be a good idea. Plants are sold of at vastly reduced prices to just get rid of
surplus stock but why? Plants coud be sold at more competitive prices to the public
and again the hall could provide classes to members of the public in the evening
who have interest in botany or gardening..achieving income.
Sounds possible?




If it were closed, how much would the Council have to pay for providing trainign
elsewhere for those with learning difficulties? The financial saving cannot be the
£115,000 mentioned.
close it
Village halls do not have the facilities available in day centres. They are cold, musty,
uncomfortable and ill-equipped. If the plan is to use them instead they need to be
brought up to standard, possibly using some of the facilities fromt he closing cent
No comment




Agree
Cannot comment
Makes sense.
In Golspie we don't have a village hall and our community centre is in use daily.
75% usage would appear to me to be very reasonable usage. No - to closure of this
facility.
??
I think 75% is a good level of usage, it keeps the community alive having thes things




Why does it not have 100% usage?
I would anticipate that 75% usage is quite positive given the fact that Brora is fairly
remote, I would further anticipate that moving this service to Tain would meet with
disapproval from the people of Brora and other parts of Sutherland.
I have no problem with you withdrawing this service, and other day care services like
it. But if you're planning to support people to access a wider range of community
settings - you need to support those other community settings instead!!!! By all
means save money by cutting day care, but don't also cut funding to museums,
libraries, swimming pools, community centres etc. Huge savings can be made to
Highland Council's health and social care budget if there is a healthy infrastructure
of other opportunities available locally - to arts activities, music, heritage, books,
sports, employment etc. Opportunities like these also make for stronger
communities, so that the relationships are made where people will help each other,
paid or unpaid, disabled or not. But if you cut both day care and other local
services, you've got a time bomb on your hands of crisis situations for vulnerable
people which will ultimately cost Highland Council and NHS Highland an awful lot
more money.
Too far from Brora to Tain for old people.
We recommend retention unless the as yet unexplained alternatives are better.
not my area
Don't know
withdraw this service in Brora and provide different models of support locally, and
places at provision in Tain, for those people who require a day centre and live within
travel distance




I don't know enough about this to answer. However, Tain is a real distance from
Brora. People need a local day care facility.
no view see general comment regarding maintenance of quality; impact on most
vulnerable; and opportunities for communities to
be supported to make alternative provision




no comment
should be decided by people in Tain not Inverness




75% usage, with a population that is ageing, does not seem unreasonable. Tain is a
long way to go for people who are not very mobile. The carers of the clients still
need a whole day in which they can relax, attend to other things and refresh
themselves ready to continue caring.




The overall cost of the four services on the budget is £426,000 and provides a
service for 87 people. This is a cost of nearly £5,000 per person; if Beach View is
excluded from consideration this is a cost of about £3,500 per person. The cost per
person appears to be excessive for the service provided.

With regard to withdrawing the service provision at Beach View, the journey from
Brora to Tain is just less than 30 miles. If a person is already travelling from the
north of Brora the overall journey is potentially stressful. There is a need for service
provision for people with learning disabilities and mental health problems in the
area. Previous proposals for outreach provision have not been taken forward and it
is difficult to identify what different models of support could be put in place.
Learning disability day care service at Tigh na Drochaid, Portree. Tigh na Drochaid
provides a day centre and outreach base for people who have a learning disability. It is
registered for 25 people and has less than 50% usage. We are also seeking to support
more people in a wider range of community settings, not day centres. Accordingly, we are
consulting about reducing the level of this service, as well as providing different models
of support locally.




Don't know




n/c
No comment




This seems a reasonable proposal going by the figures. The alternative also seems
reasonable.
Provide different models of support locally
Less than 50% usage makes it an obvious target but would need to know more to
comment




No comment
reduce it.
Closure is fine if the service is provided in another way. Can some of the disparate
services be brought together and combined?
No comment




Agree to reduction
Cannot comment
Close it but increase alternative provision.
You don't say what your different models of support are". If 25 people need it then they
should have it."
agree
Make it more efficient but don't take it away.




Again why is it underused?
I would anticipate that this is the most practicable suggestion made by Highland Council
thus far.
See above.
Before cutting this service you need to find out why usage has dropped. Perhaps an
improved service would attract more people and make better use of the centre.
Why only 50% current use? Can the facilities be used by other groups? Can it play a
wider community function to enhance its usage? We suggest review of its under-use and
take steps to enhance the usage by more community groups.
it seems very under used -can other peopel use it to increase usage and make it more
cost effective to run
Don't know
Why is the Council going for cuts to the most vulnerable? If there is only a 50% usage,
this presumably means there is scope for other use of the building - eg day care.
no view see general comment regarding maintenance of quality; impact on most
vulnerable; and opportunities for communities to
be supported to make alternative provision




no comment
This is a decision for the people of Portree




Possibly. as with day care, the carers of the clients still need a whole day in which they
can relax, attend to other things and refresh themselves ready to continue caring. Having
just built a new school/community complex in Portree, it is a pity something could not
have been incorporated onto that campus.




The overall cost of the four services on the budget is £426,000 and provides a service for
87 people. This is a cost of nearly £5,000 per person; if Beach View is excluded from
consideration this is a cost of about £3,500 per person. The cost per person appears to
be excessive for the service provided.

With regard to withdrawing the service provision at Beach View, the journey from Brora to
Tain is just less than 30 miles. If a person is already travelling from the north of Brora the
overall journey is potentially stressful. There is a need for service provision for people
with learning disabilities and mental health problems in the area. Previous proposals for
outreach provision have not been taken forward and it is difficult to identify what different
models of support could be put in place.
Raasay Day Centre. Raasay Day Centre provides a one day per week
combined day care and lunch club service to between 10 and 12 people.
We are seeking your views about discontinuing that service and making
the building available for other use.




Don't know




n/c
No comment




No, no and no. To take away this service is a terrible proposal. What
'other use' is proposed for the building? And cannot that 'other use'
accommodate the one day a week service? Shame!
Provide different models of support locally
No comment
make it available for other use
Continue the service, in a different setting. Where else could it be
provided?
What is the other use you propose?




agree
Cannot comment
Is there not a village hall or hotel where this could be housed?
Surely, the building could still be made available for other use and still
retain the day care centre and lunch club.
utilise the new hall
This would save pennies, don't take it away




hard to answer if 'other use' not specified.
I would think that the people of Raasay would likely object at the removal
of what must be seen as minimal service provision.
How easy is it to provide this small island community with alternative
care and social activities? We support seeking ways of retaining the
Centre and asking other organisations to take over the running of the
Centre for a wider range of uses.
Could this service be provided in the hotel instead?
Don't know
Raasay Day Centre provides a one day per week combined day care and
lunch club service to between 10 and 12 people.
Raasay seems to have little in the way of public services – I think the
combined day care and lunch club service should be continued but
perhaps there are other places in which it could be provided – do they
not have a new community hall?




See comments above about cutting services for the most vulnerable.
Where would these people go?
no view see general comment regarding maintenance of quality; impact
on most vulnerable; and opportunities for communities to
be supported to make alternative provision




no comment
This is a decision for the people of Raasay




Can the service not be provided elsewhere? The day care and lunch club
is probalby an essential respite for the carers of these people, as well as
being a valuable social contact for the clients themselves.




The overall cost of the four services on the budget is £426,000 and
provides a service for 87 people. This is a cost of nearly £5,000 per
person; if Beach View is excluded from consideration this is a cost of
about £3,500 per person. The cost per person appears to be excessive
for the service provided.

With regard to withdrawing the service provision at Beach View, the
journey from Brora to Tain is just less than 30 miles. If a person is
already travelling from the north of Brora the overall journey is potentially
stressful. There is a need for service provision for people with learning
disabilities and mental health problems in the area. Previous proposals
for outreach provision have not been taken forward and it is difficult to
identify what different models of support could be put in place.
Older people‟s care at Tigh na Drochaid, Portree. Registered for day care for 30 people, but
around 15 people use it. We are also seeking to support more people in a wider range of
community settings, not day centres. Accordingly, we are consulting about reducing the level
of this service, as well as providing different models of support locally.




Don't know




n/c
No comment




 I am fascinated by what is meant by 'seeking to support more people in a wider range of
community settings'. What community settings are these? Cold church and community halls?
You do not explain. This is all too vague and smacks of official gobbledy-gook. Does Council
have any idea of how these plans affect attendees and staff alike? Some people who attend
this Centre come from very remote areas and have varying degrees of ill health or incapacity.
Please do not penalise them by taking away their one or two days a week where they can
experience the pleasure of interaction with other people and activities to stimulate their lives.
There may be no other alternative for them. Reduce the level of service if you have to but
think very carefully about what you mean by 'providing different models of support locally.'
Provide different models of support locally
No comment
reduce the level of support
No comment




Agree
Cannot comment
Alternative support.
If 15 people use it then 15 people need it.
agree
Concern at proposed budget cuts and impact on people who use the servive
Proposals will have an adverse effect on the centre and those who rely upon the services it
provides.
Don't get rid of local services




If it is not operating at full capacity, either sort it so that it does provide what people want or
use the resources to provide the service in a different way.
Perhaps you should concentrate instead on increasing the usage of the service.
as above
Don't know
See comments above about cutting services for the most vulnerable. Where would these
people go?
no view see general comment regarding maintenance of quality; impact on most vulnerable;
and opportunities for communities to
be supported to make alternative provision




no comment
This is a decision for the people of Portree




As above.




The overall cost of the four services on the budget is £426,000 and provides a service for 87
people. This is a cost of nearly £5,000 per person; if Beach View is excluded from
consideration this is a cost of about £3,500 per person. The cost per person appears to be
excessive for the service provided.

With regard to withdrawing the service provision at Beach View, the journey from Brora to
Tain is just less than 30 miles. If a person is already travelling from the north of Brora the
overall journey is potentially stressful. There is a need for service provision for people with
learning disabilities and mental health problems in the area. Previous proposals for outreach
provision have not been taken forward and it is difficult to identify what different models of
support could be put in place.
Staffin respite unit provides residential respite for children affected by
disability and their families over long weekends throughout the year. It also
provides outreach support to families within their homes and communities.
It is largely used by families in Skye & Lochalsh, but also from elsewhere
within reasonable travel distance. We are seeking your views about its
closure.




Don't know




n/c
No comment




I don't know enough about this centre at Staffin to make an informed
comment, but it appears to me that it is giving good service to people who
in all probability are extremely tired and in need of such support from time
to time. I think closure would be a disaster for these families.
Provide different models of support locally
No comment
This group use up a lot of resources; it could be reduced.
I don't think this should be closed.
Can it not be made available to families further afield?
Cannot comment
Sounds like a valuable service and should not be closed.
if fully used it could be an important facility. you do not state usage levels?
No it is not right to close it




Surely this is a valuable service for a disadvantaged section of the
community.
If it is largely used then I would think that the people of Skye & Lochalsh
see it as a vital service.
No.
We do not support any measures that will result in either the loss or
reduction of this important provision for families that need support in their
often difficult and harrowing day to day lives.
Please don't close
could families from all across Highland not use it. Respite is essential
Don't know
This unit sounds very useful but does the unit lie unused during the week?
Could it be funded by charities who are concerned with a particular
disability?




See comments above about cutting services for the most vulnerable.
Where would these people go?
no view see general comment regarding maintenance of quality; impact on
most vulnerable; and opportunities for communities to
be supported to make alternative provision




no comment
This is a decision for the people of Staffin




Respite can be invaluable to enable families to continue caring, rather
than having to place the cost an responsibility for care permanently onto
the community. If it is not fully utilised by local families, could
acommodation be offered to families from outwith the Higlands, for a
cost,as a holday venue?




Respite care is an important part of supporting people in the community. If
this service is withdrawn what alternative arrangements could be made?
Would the Council consider transferring the facility to an appropriate
charity?
                                                 Can we change how we provide care at home, by paying organisations in the
Date                Source                       private and voluntary sectors to do this for everyone receiving this service?
                    Ward Forum North, West and
       27/03/2010   Central Sutherland           No
                    Ward Forum North, West and
       27/03/2010   Central Sutherland           Not enough time to discuss this item
                    Ward Forum North, West and
       27/03/2010   Central Sutherland           So long as it is efficient and frequently inspected
                    Ward Forum North, West and
       27/03/2010   Central Sutherland
                    Ward Forum North, West and
       27/03/2010   Central Sutherland

                  Ward Forum North, West and
       27/03/2010 Central Sutherland
                  Ward Forum North, West and
       27/03/2010 Central Sutherland
       06/04/2010 Ward Forum, Wick               Yes

       06/04/2010 Ward Forum, Wick               Yes

       06/04/2010 Ward Forum, Wick               Yes




                                                 Probably yes as long as clients receive same care and staff don‟t loose their
       06/04/2010 Ward Forum, Wick               jobs



       10/04/2010 online questionnaire           Only if cheaper




                                                 If private and voluntary sectors can provide this service more cheaply than
                                                 Council, then I consider this would be a good move and should not adversely
       11/04/2010 online questionnaire           impact upon the people receiving this service.



       13/04/2010 Email




       13/04/2010 online questionnaire




       13/04/2010 online questionnaire           Yes
19/04/2010 Email



19/04/2010 online questionnaire
                                  As long as continuity of care is not affected. My grandparents have care at
                                  home in another council's area provided through private organisations and
                                  they have a different care person every day who come at different times each
20/04/2010 online questionnaire   morning and it is quite dif




21/04/2010 Email




22/04/2010 Email
22/04/2010 Email




22/04/2010 online questionnaire   Yes




22/04/2010 online questionnaire
25/04/2010 Email




25/04/2010 online questionnaire   No comment




28/04/2010 Email



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28/04/2010 online questionnaire

28/04/2010 online questionnaire   If it saves money, yes




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10/05/2010 Email
11/05/2010 Community Safety Steering Group Need to train cares in fire risk (existing THC staff trained already by HIFRS)




11/05/2010 Email



11/05/2010 Email




11/05/2010 Email



                                               Private organisations tend to have lower costs, see below, and in this sector
11/05/2010 online questionnaire                as in many you tend to get what you pay for.




12/05/2010 Email




13/05/2010 Email
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16/05/2010 Email




17/05/2010 Email




17/05/2010 Letter




17/05/2010 University of the Third Age




17/05/2010 online questionnaire
                                  If they are trained up to a certain standard and can be inspected then why
17/05/2010 online questionnaire   not. I know some elderly people who employ a cleaner, like a home help.

18/05/2010 Email




18/05/2010 Letter




21/05/2010 Email




22/05/2010 online questionnaire   Only if it can be properly monitored and is genuinely cost effective.



24/05/2010 Ward Forum, Tain       What about a mixture of private and Council.
24/05/2010 Ward Forum, Tain       Dependant on level of service.



24/05/2010 Ward Forum, Tain       Why not.




24/05/2010 Ward Forum, Tain       No

24/05/2010 Ward Forum, Tain       No

24/05/2010 Ward Forum, Tain       Don‟t know enough to comment. With current standards – need to ensure
24/05/2010 Ward Forum, Tain       Does not matter who does it as long as it‟s done well.



24/05/2010 Ward Forum, Tain       Difficult to achieve.

24/05/2010   Ward Forum, Tain
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24/05/2010   Ward Forum, Tain
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24/05/2010   Ward Forum, Tain



           Avoch and Killen Community
25/05/2010 Council




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                                   If it is cheaper, but only if service is equal and workers are not exploited.
                                   Working conditions for home helps shoudl in any case be reviewed- they
27/05/2010 online questionnaire    currently have to work 12 days running.

28/05/2010 Children's Forum Card



                                   Changing the way care is provided should only be done if the same high and
                                   consistent levels are given by other sectors. The £1M saving seems paltry
                                   compared to the anxiety a feared reduction in this vital and personal service
29/05/2010 online questionnaire    will cause amongst vulnerable elderly and disabled people.




31/05/2010 Ward Forum, Lochaber    Yes. As long as standards are maintained.




31/05/2010 Ward Forum, Lochaber    Yes, if standards can be maintained.




31/05/2010 Ward Forum, Lochaber    No, the provision should be kept in house and run by the council.
                                  Standards should be monitored more closely to maintain high levels of care
31/05/2010 Ward Forum, Lochaber   to the elderly.

                                  Direct payments. Model rolled out across all sectors from children to elderly.
31/05/2010 Ward Forum, Lochaber   Provision of support to manage.



31/05/2010 Ward Forum, Lochaber   Yes, as long as standards are maintained.



31/05/2010 Ward Forum, Lochaber   Yes, providing the level of service is maintained and monitored.



31/05/2010 Ward Forum, Lochaber   No



31/05/2010 Ward Forum, Lochaber   No



31/05/2010 Ward Forum, Lochaber   Care at home has social and health benefits



31/05/2010 Ward Forum, Lochaber   No



31/05/2010 Ward Forum, Lochaber   Council to Continue providing the care



31/05/2010 Ward Forum, Lochaber
31/05/2010 Ward Forum, Lochaber
31/05/2010 Ward Forum, Lochaber




01/06/2010 Email



                                   How would this be monitored? Good idea for some but most in need would
01/06/2010 Ward Forum, Culloden   be most vulnerable.




01/06/2010 Ward Forum, Culloden   If it‟s possible to do so. As long as some level of care.

                                   Feel that if council pulled out then private sector would become more
01/06/2010 Ward Forum, Culloden   competitive.

                                   Yes in principle, but standards must be maintained. On going review of
                                  requirements to match need with availability. Wide variant in levels of care
01/06/2010 Ward Forum, Culloden   for particular debilitating illnesses. Liaise with NHS is vital.
                                   Is this cheaper? What are the costs involved? How are standards
                                  maintained? Can the voluntary sector be expected to deliver such a service?
                                  How would the voluntary sector be regulated? Depends on level of care
01/06/2010 Ward Forum, Culloden   needed. Professional and trained staff are needed for this commitment.




01/06/2010 Ward Forum, Culloden   Yes – but keep standards or improve standards




                                   Yes provided it does not affect the quality of service or the level of service
01/06/2010 Ward Forum, Culloden   provided to the most vulnerable.*

                                  What matters is the quality of the carer coming through the door. Highland
01/06/2010 Ward Forum, Culloden   Home Carers, for example, are very good.

01/06/2010 Ward Forum, Culloden   Already being done.



01/06/2010 Ward Forum, Culloden   Yes – look at Crossroads.




                                   Not answerable – Only the budget decision makers can answer this based
01/06/2010 Ward Forum, Culloden   on INFORMATION!
                                  If private care is more cost-effective it indicates inefficiency in Council
01/06/2010 Ward Forum, Culloden   provision of care

01/06/2010 Ward Forum, Culloden
01/06/2010 Ward Forum, Culloden



01/06/2010 Ward Forum, Culloden
                                  Direct payment will suit some people very well but not all. Often lack of carers
                                  is a problem in rural areas because of the distances carers have to travel. Is
                                  there scope to use direct payment to caring individuals who are not part of
                                  'inspected organisations' where the cared for person is confident about
                                  organising their care.
02/06/2010 blog




02/06/2010 blog
                                    choosing to fund private organisations or local authority is not the best option.
                                    a mix of the two is needed to give people choice. More use of direct
                                    payments in all areas of care at home and moving to a more personalised
                                    way of funding care is the way forward for the future. Allow individuals to
                                    purchase what they need to live independantly and you might get a surprise
                                    as most people are used to looking for value and budget keeping. Empower
                                    people instead of assessing and disempowering them by dictating what they
                                    can have and when they can have it.
02/06/2010 blog




                                    This is the way to go – outsourcing delivers considerable savings provided
                                    the private and voluntary sectors can meet demand throughout the entire
                                    Highland Council area. If the private and voluntary sectors do not have a
                                    presence the Council may have to pro vide to give reassurance. Issue of
                                    packaging. There are also issues where there are salary differentials
                                    between the public and the private/voluntary sectors.

                                    By outsourcing this could dramatically reduce staffing, travel mileages and
02/06/2010 Environmental forum      the Council‟s carbon footprint.

03/06/2010 Children's Forum Card


                                    No, private sector firms provide poorer levels of care with impunity or has
                                    everyone been moved from Wyvis House and I‟ve not been told? I‟d love to
                                    see the Oracle Cost Centre 10 Report (period 13) for this assertion as Social
                                    Work have a history of creative accounting to justify closures and transfers
                                    which don‟t bear up well under scrutiny. I‟d suspect the cost of senior
                                    management is being absorbed in the overhead attached to each in-house
                                    contract which will make the remaining in-house packages ever more
                                    expensive and ever more in need of privatisation. The last in-house care at
                                    home recipient will be costing £2 or £3 million a year to provide for using this
                                    methodology. De-layering of management is what is needed to pay for
04/06/2010 Email                    savings not cutbacks and new private contracts.



05/06/2010 Email




                                    Care in the community does not work here in Badenoch and this should be
                                    well known to councillors and officials. There is too little provision and a
                                    shortage of potential carers. There are significant recruitment problems.
                                    Those willing to undertake this work are tired of waiting for contracts. Private
                                    contractors are unable to recruit staff and are consequently not fulfilling their
                                    contracts. We know of several local cases where local people are acting as
           KINGUSSIE AND VICINITY   voluntary carers without reward because of the absence of care provided by
05/06/2010 COMMUNITY COUNCIL        the Highland Council. In our view this lack of paid care is unacceptable.



06/06/2010 Email



06/06/2010 Letter
                                             • Recognise impact of self directed support
                                             • Care at home could be delivered by community groups to provide
07/06/2010 Compact Partnership               additionally & & holisticity




07/06/2010 Email




07/06/2010 online questionnaire




                                             Other organisations may provide care at less cost, but do they provide a
                                             better service? If so, the Council should consider using more services from
                                             other organisations, as the client contact time and operating regulations for
                                             Council staff provide a minimal service to the clients.

                                             Would other organisations be able to recruit sufficient suitable staff? It is
                                             likely that their wages and conditions for their employees will be below those
                                             of Council staff, even ithough Council care workers are at the bottom of the
                                             salary scale.

                                             More community care is needed, to reduce the number of people forced to
                                             extend hospital stays because there is insufficient local support for them.
                                             The longer these people stay in hospital, the less able they become.

                                             Many rural communities now have significant numbers of elderly people living
                                             alone, often in large houses. Rather than force them to move away, could a
                                             large house perhaps be adpated to enable them to share one house, perhaps
                                             with an able younger person/family also in the property to provide assistance
08/06/2010 online questionnaire              when required.
           Boat of Garten & Vicinity
09/06/2010 Community Council

09/06/2010 Letter
           Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010 Edderton                        Not for everybody, good idea but…

           Ward Forum, East Sutherland and   My experiences of services provided by the voluntary sector are inadequate
09/06/2010 Edderton                          and unreliable.
           Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010 Edderton                          Yes as long as everything is quality controlled i.e. by the Council
           Ward Forum, East Sutherland and   Rural communities will struggle with transport costs to provide adequate
09/06/2010 Edderton                          service to people at home. Not viable or cost effective
           Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010 Edderton
                                           Vol sector unreliable; very difficult to out source but not impossible; HC must
           Ward Forum, East Sutherland and consider logistics of delivering the service i.e. Golspie base could not
09/06/2010 Edderton                        adequately service Helmsdale.
           Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010 Edderton

           Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010 Edderton                            If careful regulation of across-service costs to protect service user
           Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010 Edderton                            If it saves money but doesn‟t reduce quality
           Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010 Edderton                            No change
           Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010 Edderton                            Yes
           Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010 Edderton
           Ward Forum, East Sutherland and
09/06/2010 Edderton




10/06/2010 Email




11/06/2010 Email




11/06/2010 Gairloch Parent Council



12/06/2010 Letter

14/06/2010 Email




14/06/2010 Email



14/06/2010 Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò          Yes, but not private, not for profit provide a better service.
14/06/2010 Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò     Voluntary sector.



14/06/2010 Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò     Private works on profit motive & encourages corner cutting/bad service.



                                          Yes – people should have more choice & these services must be monitored
14/06/2010 Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò     closely. Who will monitor this?

14/06/2010 Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò     Not sure.




14/06/2010 Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò     Service provision should be based on quality, dependability.
                                          Voluntary sector will struggle if their funding is cut. Often private sector, as
                                          we see from experience, does not offer same levels of care in real terms and
14/06/2010 Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò     often en up costing more.



14/06/2010 Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò     Where it exists & is cost effective, a problem in remote rural areas.




14/06/2010 Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò     To protect those most vulnerable in our communities.

14/06/2010 Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò     Needs to be a mix between HC & private sector, especially in rural areas.



14/06/2010 Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò     Direct payments.



                                          What is wrong with the way the council are providing this service? It is not
                                          always cheaper. Direct payment & self directed support need to be more
14/06/2010 Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò     user friendly.



14/06/2010 Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò     If proper training & supervision.

14/06/2010 Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò     How can we encourage voluntary sectors if it will be pulling their budget?
                                          Is there more opportunity for social care “day groups” rather than individual
14/06/2010 Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò     visit?

                                          How do you encourage private sector to move into & provide services in
14/06/2010 Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò     remote areas.



14/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò
14/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò
14/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò
14/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò
14/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò
14/06/2010   Ward Forum, Eilean a‟ Cheò



                                          Privatising services all too easily leads to poorer quality services for users
14/06/2010 online questionnaire           and poorer working conditions for staff.
15/06/2010 Email




15/06/2010 Shetland Islands library




16/06/2010 Ward Forum, Dingwall




16/06/2010 Ward Forum, Dingwall       Only if money is being spent on quality work and monitored.

16/06/2010 Ward Forum, Dingwall       Yes, as NHS. Ideas for future as long as good service.




                                      Care at home not always feasible because carers can‟t always go to outlying
16/06/2010 Ward Forum, Dingwall       areas.




16/06/2010 Ward Forum, Dingwall       Yes
                                      Concern that if the cost of service provision is the driving factor, the quality
16/06/2010 Ward Forum, Dingwall       (e.g. time spent with each client) will suffer.



16/06/2010 Ward Forum, Dingwall       Already agree.


                                      Should people receive attendance allowance and free personal care, does
                                      this need to be looked at. For the voluntary sector is it cheaper or are
                                      services subsidised through other fundraising, need to look at full cost
                                      recovery. Why is it cheaper for voluntary and private agencies to provide?
16/06/2010 Ward Forum, Dingwall       Can charges be made to bring Council costs into line?
                                      Care at home is not always feasible because carers can‟t always go to
                                      outlying areas. The problem would be the same for private or public sector.
16/06/2010 Ward Forum, Dingwall       Private if services are same quality.




16/06/2010 Ward Forum, Dingwall
16/06/2010 Ward Forum, Dingwall
16/06/2010 Ward Forum, Dingwall
17/06/2010 Email




17/06/2010 Email




17/06/2010 Email



                                        Yes so long as there are strict quality controls in place & binding contracts
17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth   are in place to avoid costs escalating because of monopolies.



17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth   Yes exactly that!

17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth   Leave in Council. Dangerous to move it – no accountability.
                                        No – not always practicable in remote organisations, may be easier in
17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth   urban/central areas.

17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth   Problems arise with wages being kept too low.




17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth   Don‟t object to this so long as standards of care do not suffer.




17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth   Yes

17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth   Yes, already being done.

                                        Not the private sector, they need to make a profit, and cut corners to increase
17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth   profit.
17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth       Yes but what about rural areas and getting out.

17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth       We wouldn‟t object if the standard of care was the same.

17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth       Possibly though standards have to be carefully monitored.




17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth



17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth

17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth

17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth



17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth



17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth

17/06/2010 Ward Forum, Cromarty Firth

                                            By using private and voluntary sectors it could increase standards as it would
18/06/2010 Highland Youth Voice             be specialised companies providing the service




18/06/2010 online questionnaire

                                            Maintaining standards by making sure the council are monitoring the actions
19/06/2010 Highland Youth Voice             taken by private/voluntary sectors




           Myra Carus, Convener Highlands
19/06/2010 and Islands Green Party

20/06/2010 Email



20/06/2010 Highland Youth Voice             The voluntary services would be more effective as they would want to help

21/06/2010 Highland Youth Voice             Should have an appropriate number of volunteers for each private care home
           Ward Forum, Wester Ross,   See answer for 1 on looking at our community facilities. (Yes - only when
21/06/2010 Strathpeffer & Lochalsh    adequate alternative available.)
           Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010 Strathpeffer & Lochalsh    Yes if standards are maintained or improved.


                                      Currently rather „hotch potch‟ so inefficient - need to have good
                                      standards/quality to ensure equity of provision - have to ensure not „just for
                                      profit‟. Providers not end up creating an expensive supervisory network i.e.
                                      cost effective? Better „accountability‟ if stays with HC which should adapt to
           Ward Forum, Wester Ross,   be flexible in delivery but needs good staff. Group think HC should continue
21/06/2010 Strathpeffer & Lochalsh    to have role in providing care at home

           Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010 Strathpeffer & Lochalsh    4 - No. 1 - Yes



           Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010 Strathpeffer & Lochalsh    Where can you find care providers in rural areas with an ageing population?
           Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010 Strathpeffer & Lochalsh    No.

           Ward Forum, Wester Ross,   Yes - the people providing service need to have right attitude and want to
21/06/2010 Strathpeffer & Lochalsh    care.
           Ward Forum, Wester Ross,   Ok to go private providing level of care and service is maintained or
21/06/2010 Strathpeffer & Lochalsh    improved.

           Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010 Strathpeffer & Lochalsh    If it is done properly

           Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010 Strathpeffer & Lochalsh    Yes, but more specific details required.

           Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010 Strathpeffer & Lochalsh    Some changes already.
           Ward Forum, Wester Ross,
21/06/2010 Strathpeffer & Lochalsh    Yes, probably more efficient.
                                      How do you reach the most vulnerable people? Explain what services are
           Ward Forum, Wester Ross,   available so folks can decide if they need them. Free up carers to be allowed
21/06/2010 Strathpeffer & Lochalsh    to use common sense.




22/06/2010 Email
22/06/2010 Highland Youth Voice                If its cheaper then people won‟t mind




22/06/2010 Ward Forum, Inverness City Wards Only providing standard of care is not compromised.

22/06/2010 Ward Forum, Inverness City Wards Yes ensure proper governance

                                            Some of the private companies providing home care are taking the Council to
22/06/2010 Ward Forum, Inverness City Wards the cleaners! - Should be provided by direct-paid Council Staff



22/06/2010 Ward Forum, Inverness City Wards To encourage home care is preferable to having to go into an old folks home




22/06/2010 Ward Forum, Inverness City Wards Same as for care homes – if the quality of service is maintained

22/06/2010 Ward Forum, Inverness City Wards No answer



22/06/2010 Ward Forum, Inverness City Wards Yes

22/06/2010 Ward Forum, Inverness City Wards Yes as long as standards remain high

22/06/2010 Ward Forum, Inverness City Wards No answer




22/06/2010 Ward Forum, Inverness City Wards Is this not being looked at by the Scottish Government at the moment??

22/06/2010 Ward Forum, Inverness City Wards We believe that voluntary is better than private




22/06/2010 Ward Forum, Inverness City Wards No. It will cost more in the long term



                                            Not just “older” people; Private provider – not paid enough by council; quality
22/06/2010 Ward Forum, Inverness City Wards can be compromised; should not necessarily go to the lowest tender
22/06/2010 Ward Forum, Inverness City Wards Not in favour but if Highland Council could monitor toensure high standards
                                            Could be changed, with stringent regulating. Important to keep people in their
22/06/2010 Ward Forum, Inverness City Wards own homes

22/06/2010 Ward Forum, Inverness City Wards

22/06/2010 Ward Forum, Inverness City Wards

23/06/2010 Children's Forum Card




23/06/2010 Email



                                               Could outsource home help for old people as long as the care is kept at a
23/06/2010 Highland Youth Voice                high standard

           Ward Forum, Badenoch and            It would be good if you did provide care at home. Numbers of people requiring
23/06/2010 Strathspey                          it are going up quickly – so this should be planned for.
           Ward Forum, Badenoch and            In Badenoch there is too little provision & a shortage of carers. Private care is
23/06/2010 Strathspey                          not necessarily the way forward.



           Ward Forum, Badenoch and
23/06/2010 Strathspey                          No – because info provided in document inaccurate apparently.
           Ward Forum, Badenoch and
23/06/2010 Strathspey                          No, voluntary sector who provides grant aid.


                                               Use cheaper paper in all Council services. In public consultation process it is
                                               difficult to make sensible suggestions when we have no idea the spread of
                                               need across the Highlands. The principle of whether care home or acre at
                                               home will vary in different areas. Voluntary sector already works hard & would
                                               need funded adequately if taking over care at home service. Benefit of
           Ward Forum, Badenoch and            localised voluntary sector services is that they understand their local
23/06/2010 Strathspey                          community.
           Ward Forum, Badenoch and            Join up care with voluntary sector. Social enterprise. Training required.
23/06/2010 Strathspey                          Integrated services. Work with public organisations.
           Ward Forum, Badenoch and
23/06/2010 Strathspey




23/06/2010 online questionnaire                Possibly - if there are savings without loss of service quality.



                                               Folk want to stay at home. If it‟s cheaper then they definitely should stay at
24/06/2010 Highland Youth Voice                home
25/06/2010 Email

25/06/2010 Email




25/06/2010 Email




25/06/2010 Email



25/06/2010 Highland Youth Voice   Get no1 of ? especially AISISA



25/06/2010 Letter




26/06/2010 Email
26/06/2010 Email
                                  If care work is to be contracted out then the council HAS to ensure that the
                                  care workers + facilities are of a high standard and inspect each project
26/06/2010 Highland Youth Voice   regularly




                                  I don't know enough about this to comment. But if the standard of care is the
                                  same, and the pay and conditions of the employees in private sector are euql,
26/06/2010 online questionnaire   then yes, it makes sense to outsource the work.

27/06/2010 Email



27/06/2010 Highland Youth Voice
27/06/2010 Letter




                                        We are very concerned with this measure
                                        These are the most vulnerable people. The quality of the provision which is
                                        already stretched must not be put at risk put at risk and
           Avoch and Killen Community   we must not not contribute to an increase in poverty by condoning the
28/06/2010 Council                      exploitation of an already very poorly paid care workers




                                        As long as there is the same level of care and Highland council remain
28/06/2010 Durness Community Council    ultimately responsible

28/06/2010 Email
28/06/2010 Email




28/06/2010 Email



28/06/2010 Email




28/06/2010 Email



28/06/2010 Email



28/06/2010 Highland Youth Voice
28/06/2010 Letter




                                            If another organisation provides the same service it would or should cost
                                            more as they have a profit element in their charges. We cannot therefore see
                                            where the quoted potential saving of £1m could come from unless from a
                                            reduction in the provision. In rural areas people know their carers and home-
                                            helps. They provide an important social contact that would probably not be
28/06/2010 Lochbroom community Council      the same if outside firms were providing the service.




29/06/2010 Email

29/06/2010 Highland Youth Voice

           Inverness Business Improvement
29/06/2010 District
                                            Develop direct payments to those in need of care to access care themselves;
           Inverness Business Improvement   Develop voluntary/charity organisations; Outsourcing; Utilising of means
29/06/2010 District                         testing criteria




29/06/2010 Letter
                                         Edderton does not object to more private service providers on condition the
                                         standard of quality monitoring is maintained at least as high as now,
30/06/2010 Edderton Community Council    preferably improved.




30/06/2010 Email

30/06/2010 Highland Economic Forum       Private sector thin on ground outwith main population centres.
30/06/2010 Highland Youth Voice
           Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010 Academy

           Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010 Academy
           Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010 Academy
           Nairn Youth Forum and Nairn
30/06/2010 Academy
                                         “Recruitment problems”. “It has been tried and has failed eg Home Care in
30/06/2010 Ward Forum, Nairn             Nairn”. “YES BUT!!”
30/06/2010 Ward Forum, Nairn             “Yes!”

30/06/2010 Ward Forum, Nairn             “This has to be run by the Council to maintain quality of provision”
30/06/2010 Ward Forum, Nairn             “Yes – need to maintain quality and level of service”

30/06/2010 Ward Forum, Nairn             “As long as level of care is high”



                                         “Mix of private and public, one sector not able to solely support it. Private not
30/06/2010 Ward Forum, Nairn             enough time spent. Cheaper generally to maintain someone at home”
30/06/2010 Ward Forum, Nairn      “It must be through a not-for-profit organisation”

                                  “Yes, providing quality of care and coverage unchanged, and sustained at
30/06/2010 Ward Forum, Nairn      current level). Council should seek national experienced providers”

30/06/2010 Ward Forum, Nairn      NO ANSWER

30/06/2010 Ward Forum, Nairn      “Handed to not-for-profit organisations”



                                  “The Council should do it. Private sector put prices up and standards not the
30/06/2010 Ward Forum, Nairn      same. Council carers are the best”



30/06/2010 Ward Forum, Nairn      “Yes”

30/06/2010 Ward Forum, Nairn      “Yes, as long as it is cost effective and meets the standards”
30/06/2010 Ward Forum, Nairn      NO ANSWER
30/06/2010 Ward Forum, Nairn      NO ANSWER




30/06/2010 Ward Forum, Nairn      NO ANSWER



30/06/2010 Ward Forum, Nairn      “Yes, with guarantees of standards and close monitoring”

30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn
30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn
30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn
30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn
30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn
30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn
30/06/2010   Ward Forum, Nairn



30/06/2010 online questionnaire


                                  Having worked for a private company I would say you are being ripped off. It
                                  would be far more efficient to have community based council run schemes
                                  than to have people going from one client to the enxt across the highlands
                                  and getting paid for transport. Also some of this care has been assessed at
                                  the wrong level and people are getting services when they have plenty of
30/06/2010 online questionnaire   existing family support.




                                  Possibly, if the quality of care were closely monitored and standards enforced
                                  so that residents could still enjoy life, not be left to vegetate.

                                  Would these other organisations cater for people in their own local
30/06/2010 online questionnaire   communities?
01/07/2010 Highland Economic Forum   Issue of meeting needs and how these are defined.

01/07/2010 Highland Youth Voice



                                     The discrepancy in costs between the private sector and Highland Council
                                     run care services requires explanation. There is either a disparity in quality of
                                     provision or management practice that has to be assessed before any
                                     decisions are taken. If the private sector is able to provide the same level of
                                     service as Highland Council but at a reduced cost the Council should review
                                     its management of these facilities, not with a view to removal of the service
                                     but to improve its operating costs.

                                     When comparing costs it has to be on the basis of the same service
                                     provision.

                                     Independent inspection is certainly not the same thing as democratic
                                     accountability when considering the welfare of the most vulnerable people in
                                     our community.

                                     Experience has shown that private and voluntary organisations may be able
                                     to supply a limited number of core services at reduced cost but where
                                     services have to be tailored to individual needs either they are unable to offer
                                     a service or the cost increases substantially.

02/07/2010 Email

02/07/2010 Highland Economic Forum   Opportunity to sort.



02/07/2010 Highland Youth Voice




03/07/2010 Email
03/07/2010 Highland Economic Forum   Realistically achieve savings.



03/07/2010 Highland Youth Voice
04/07/2010 Highland Economic Forum   Not often present in remoter areas.



04/07/2010 Highland Youth Voice

04/07/2010 Highland Youth Voice
04/07/2010 Highland Youth Voice
05/07/2010 Highland Economic Forum




05/07/2010 Kincraig Community Council




06/07/2010 Email
06/07/2010 Highland Economic Forum




06/07/2010 Highland Youth Voice
07/07/2010 Highland Economic Forum
08/07/2010 Highland Economic Forum




12/07/2010 Sight Action Focus Group




22/07/2010 Email



22/07/2010 Email
                                                Doesn't matter who provides the services as long as it is the care and support
  22/07/2010 People First Focus Group           you need. Continuity of staff is important though and need to think abu this .




                Fort Augustus Glenmoriston
26/07/2010      Glengarry Business Initiative




             Ft Augustus and Glen Moriston
  28/07/2010 Community Council



                                                Whoever provides the care needs to make sure that the communication
  07/08/2010 Deaf Forum Focus Group             needs of deaf people are taken into account - signing, lip reading




  09/08/2010 Letter




  11/08/2010 Letter
    16/08/2010 Email




    27/08/2010 HUG focus group



Unknown       Cllr Maxine Smith




                                     Old people must be protected from cuts - support groups need more help not
Unknown       Eden Court             less.

Unknown       Email
Unknown       Email

Unknown       Letter




Unknown       online questionnaire   In some areas this would work by outsourcing but which areas?

Unknown       Petition



Unknown       Petition
Unknown   Skye young people
Unknown   Unknown




Unknown   Youth Development Workers Team
Do the people using these services mind whether the Council or another
organisation provides the service?

Yes, they have confidence in council provided services

not enough time

So long as it is efficient and frequently inspected

Council provides a good service and it has the support structure




No

No

No as long as the standard of care is guaranteed




Don‟t think so as long as standard is the same



No comment




I can't speak for others, but if I were to receive this service, I don't think I
would mind who provided the service.




No. As long as the service is the same (it often improves on a per £ basis).
Don't know
From past experience, it doesn't matter who provides the service providing it
is provided to an acceptable standard. The problem often faced is when a
provider is not available and a replacement is outsourced: either is of
inadeuate ability or even just
There is an instinctive preference for the Council to be the provider, because
of standards being higher, staff turnover being lower, conditions for staff
being better and provision being more consistent.
?




If the service meets their needs and is provided in a caring way I shouldn't
imagine so.



No
Service dependent



No




No

Yes

Yes
Standards need to be kept.



As long as done well.

No. High standard maintained.
No, providing the standard is high.



No. They just want a good job done, regardless whether it‟s council or
private.



If done by professional then the standard should be maintained – can the
community be encouraged to do more!




No
We would suppose that these people would be happy as long as service as
good.



We believe that such people will be happy as long as the service is provided.



No



No, providing the quality is maintained.



We favour care at home in public sector



No




If done by professionals then the standard should be maintained – can the
community be encouraged to do more!




Some would mind.




No as long as it is provided.

Care in the community is important as long as standards and availability is
maintained. Quality and range of specialist care is overriding factor.



 As long as standards are maintained – No. Chair of responsibility with
council/government provision.
No. Quality of service more important. Enforce standards.



No provided it does not affect the quality of service or the level of service
provided to the most vulnerable.*




No. Most people either don‟t know or care.



No. quality is the key rather than who provides

Why not ask the users of these services?




How does the private sector keep the costs down? Highland Council needs to
study this so the same service can be provided at the same price.


I feel I can comment on this because, aged 75, moving to a care home is
something I have to start seeing as a possibility.

I have no problem about going into a privately-run home. For two reasons.
One, sadly, is that privately-run homes appear to more accountable to public
comment and criticism than homes which are protected behind a wall of
Council bureaucracy. Another is that the staff of privately-run homes seem to
be more flexible and therefore likely to provide a better service to those in
care.

It would be good if the Highland Council could cut the costs of running its own
homes, but since it seems unable to do so, it should opt now to close all its
homes in areas where private providers can be found.
The users of the service do not seem to mind who is providing the service
though there is a perception that the Council provides Care in the Community
+ - e.g. to a higher standard.

Some people therefore feel the Council has a duty to provide this service
hence staff and families may have issues if it is outsourced.
Probably not as long as the service is good



Yes the Council has a legal duty of care, unlike private organisations

No as long as the service level is maintained
As long as contracts for standards of care provision are scrutinised then it
could be private or Council

As long as standards are maintained to a high level
Level of service is paramount whoever provides it




If services are maintained at set quality standards
Profit from care is morally questionable. In some cases this may be
appropriate.

No as long as standard is maintained

No as long as it‟s a quality service regulated by the Care Commission




No.
Don‟t think it matters as long as service provided is of good quality.



No but differently organised – more safeguards.



Some do but they need to know there is a structure in place & a feedback &
complaints procedure whoever provides the service.

Public referendum required.




Providing there is a quality benchmarking of services & value for money
people would, in most cases, be happy to receive services from a range of
service providers.



As long as care is provided then people shouldn‟t mind.



Not if service is as good or has a structure for development or improvement.




People feel they get a better deal with the council – have more of a say.

Would prefer HC, public would worry about private sector.

People prefer the council but if the choice is between no provision or another
organisation they would choose another organisation.




Continuity of care is important.

Private care homes are coming out as good, if not better, than HC care
homes when inspected by Care Commission.

Choice is important.

Can‟t say.

Dependable staff base, cover when people are off sick or on annual leave.
Needs to be efficient care.

Not sufficient to say that all services are regulated – are private sector &
public sector operating at same standard?




Yes, wary of privatising services. And generally concerned about sufficiency
and quality of services.
Yes users would not have peace of mind.

As long as the level of care is good people wouldn‟t mind.




No x 2




As long as the services are equivalent it won‟t matter.
Don‟t think it matters as long as a consistent and high quality service is
provided.



Yes - If non-profit making.




Probably not but private bodies must pay more than the minimum wage to
encourage commitment and honesty.
This question was asked previously - see the previous sections answer.
(Alternative providers must be able to provide same quality of service and
decent conditions for staff).
No so long as the level of care is high and maintained.



No. As long as the service was met to the same standard as present.

No

No – as long as its there and a good standard.

Generally, no, if the level of care is good.

We don‟t know. We assume they will not mind so long as standards of care
is high. Private care would need to give consistent care e.g. main carer stays
the same not different people taking over. Needs to be regulated.




As long as they receive a good service.

Yes



?
Some people may be concerned by private companies profit making. People
might be concerned about lack of consistency. Depends on how well it is
regulated.

No unless big charges.




As long as the standards are maintained and services are kept open it is
irrelevant who opens it




no - it is the quality that matters and a local serivce provided by local people

It is irrelevant, as long as good standards are kept and the council are not just
handing the responsibility over




As long as the services are kept in place and maintained to similar standard,
it doesn‟t matter if they‟re run by other organisations, especially if its voluntary

As long as the services are continued to the standards wanted
No provided it is a quality service.

As long as the standards are maintained.




No as long as quality is assured.



No.




No providing level of care and service is maintained or improved.

No - again people want respect and good care to a high standard.



Question of quality of service. Yes - stay with the Council.

No as long as the service is up to standard.



1 - Yes, 4 - No,

Do they have a choice? They want their needs met as best as possible. Not
possible to generalise.



No - if standards are maintained or improved.
People are happy so long as standards remain




No – providing the standard of service remains the same and is properly
monitored.

No. Ensure quality of care

Not until service fails; monitoring of private contractors by the Council is
abysmal!



Probably not.




Probably not as long as the quality of service is maintained

No answer



No
You need to ask the service users. If standard is maintained then it should
be ok

No answer

Some of these folks don‟t even who is providing the care! It is the quality of
care that is important. The supervision of care delivery is also important; the
assurance that staff are properly trained. Empathetic and knowledgeable

Only quality is important

They would feel more secure if it was council rather than private
organisations. It is standards that matter. Private companies can employ
very poorly qualified individuals

No – as long as the service is compatible; Perception can be that private
provider is less – not the reality; Little difference found on personal
experience
Probably not as long as needs are met

No, as long as the provision is of good quality




If the price and standards are similar, there should be no problem. If price is
too high, issue, may occur



Yes, they do. A Highland culture.

If it‟s consistent & high quality it shouldn‟t make a difference.



Quality more important than who provides (ask customers for feedback via in-
depth organisation)

Usually people do not mind provided good quality care/help is provided




Don‟t know, likely provision of service more important than who provides it.
Reliability & standard of service matter. Compensation culture means
services by voluntary sector or volunteers needs professional protection.




Probably not.
Yes they mind, they want the best service that the council can provide not the
poorer standards that are available from the companies that would be hired to
carry out the jobs
I don't know. I suspect that ultimately it is the quality of the service and the
response to problems which is the main factor.
Not if they receive a quality service
No



No
Just want good, consistent service.




“It is important who delivers front line service, not entity”
“Trust is important”

“Losing current carers are important”
“They don‟t mind – so long as the case is good”

NO ANSWER




“No, if level of service maintained”
“Yes, provided level of care is high”

“See 1) above – depends on quality of service. As long as you get the service
that is the main thing”

“Yes – customer needs to be sure their interests come first”

“No, provided change is transparent”




“No, as it is at an acceptable standard”



“Would prefer Council”

“Yes, in Nairn, people prefer the Council doing it”
“No, as long as they receive same level of care”
“No, as long as the services are provided”




NO ANSWER



NO ANSWER
“No – not so long as the front-line people providing those services are given
the same employment terms as with the Council”
“No. Housing, however, is a Yes”




They don't know and that makes it pretty difficult for them to complain or
maintain standards. If these were council run then they are more easily held
accountable.




Probably not, provided that the service is reliable,of a high quality and is no
more expensive to them than the Coucil service.
Less risky with the Council.




Accountability.
Provided the service is satisfactory & reliable this might be the case
Can we encourage a reduction in the amount of waste we produce and
provide fewer bin collections?

Yes




Yes

There has to be kerbside collection in place before such changes.




What about more local landfill sites rather than sending south?



Yes but we must encourage recycling

Yes
Increase the range of products that can be recycled. More education needed
to reduce the frequency of collections
Yes encourage recycling, Blue box is not big enough, reduce collection of
garden waste in winter. Fortnightly collections provide and extra wheelie bin if
households have at least 4. If paper/tin bucket was large enough this could
reduce collections to once a fortnight. Garden bin could have some
household compost waste.

More could be collected eg plastics and cardboard from the roadside. That
mighht encourage more recycling




Certainly encourage a reduction in the amount of waste we the population
produce, but I'm not sure about reducing the number of bin collections.




Absolutely - it is obvious the time is right for fortnightly residual collections.
I'd like to see strong support for waste reduction work, such as that
undertaken by LEG, RoWAN, the Highland Real Nappy Project and others. I
also believe that we have pl




No. Rats and fly tipping will increase.
Since the buckets for recycling have been delivered we are now struggling to
fill our waste bucket every week. If the council gave every household 2
buckets for waste and 2 for recycling then the waste pick-up could be done
fortnightly and the recycling once a month which should be quite a saving

Yes think a fortnightly service should be considered and it might force the
public to increase thier usage of recycling facilities provided.



We would be happy to have fewer bin collections, e.g. general waste one
week and recycling the next week.
Refuse collection During the past year, with only a tiny effort to remove paper,
cans and cardboard, and composting organic matter, I find our rubbish has
easily been reduced by half. Consequently, at the moment we could easily
manage with kerbside collection every other week, along with once/month
collection of recyclable materials. If further measures were taken to recycle a
wider variety of plastic products that would reduce the rubbish amount even
further




Alternate weekly bin collections are again a win/ win situation even though
some folk will be resistant to it.




Replace blue box with blue bin to increase recycling in Inverness area
Most of our waste is the result of excessive packaging, using non-recyclable
materials. Importantly, the amount of junk mail and unsolicited mail order
catalogues enveloped in virtually unopenable plastic covers accounts for
more than 50% of my recycle b
move to a better integrated system to encourage recycling - in Fortrose we
have a silly blue bin for only ertain types of rubbish - which is not great and
fills too quickly - could a multi purpose wheelie bin be devised for recycables
I already do this. I recycle and coudl easily cope with Fortnightly collections
and I'm in a family of 5
Yes. Could also provide township bins in rural areas, perhaps a caged area -
to prevent animals getting in about it - with paper recycling, tins etc. Folk
could use these instead of having a bin each, drop off their waste on their
way past and this could be emptied once a fortnight. Community compost
heaps?
Increase in fly tipping

Stop the collection of Garden Waste (brown bin) during the winter months of
December, January and February. I am a keen gardener with quite a large
garden and rarely put my brown bin out for collection during these months.




Recycling rates have improved enormously but there is still a long way to go.
REDUCTION of waste is crucial. Targets should be set for overall reduction in
waste arisings and moving to fortnightly collections is part of this, along with
awareness and educ
Replace weekly bin collections with 2 week collections BUT also provide
recycling points for PLASTIC milk containers




Reduce the collection of certain wastes e.g. garden wastes in winter.
If think we could go to fortnightly collections if the council provided a better
recycling service. Other councils provide kerbside recycling for glass,
cardboard and milkbottle cartons is this not something that can be done
here?

Also to run fortnightly brown bin recycling during the winter is a waste of
council money. I think this service should be cut altogether for a 3 month
period over the winter.
I think if i crushed my blue bin waste, the three weekly collection would be
okay. every two weeks for my other bin would be okay to. I compost and i
think that makes a big difference. how about some sort of reduce council tax
for those who have less waste?




If proper kerbside re-cycling facilities were provided for every household,
including food caddies, the green bin household waste collection could be
reduced to fortnightly as there would be virtually nothing in it. At the moment
we have to take plastic, glass, cardboard, tetrapacks to re-cycling sites which
if you don't have a car is impossible and if you do have a car is not good for
the environment.
Yes! Why are people in the country provided with large blue bins for
recycling while people in the towns have a very small box! You could then
cut down the amount of weekly collections.
Yes



Yes




Yes, not consistent over the HC. Increase awareness as to what is provided
in the way of recycling facilities. Educate people.

Yes

Yes
Yes
Look at provision of bins. Size of bins – depending on house/family size and
perhaps increase no of bins for families. Therefore could reduce collections if
more/bigger bins.

Yes
Yes
Yes
I think moving to a fortnightly collection is a very sound and sensible
suggestion. As well as saving council money, it will also encourage those who
don't already recycle to recycle more. I can't see how anyone loses out on
this particular deal. I take it food premises would still enjoy a weekly collection
though?



Local collections could be reduced if waste generation is reduced by a better
spread of local recycling points for metal, glass, plastic and paper. Our
community of over 175 households still faces a two mile drive to the nearest
bottle bank so it all goes into the bins. Reuse of garden waste by better use
of shredding and composting would reduce the need for the brown bin to
emptied even fortnightly. What is the cost of a community shredder against
the cost of 13 visits by a great big yellow lorry? The unused visits could be
used to deal with the recyclates whilst the land fill savings would be seen on
the balance sheet.

I have no problem with fortnightly collections, Dingwall is well served with a
good recycling centre and by recycling plastics, glass, tins, paper, cardboard
and green waste my bin is are never full .

Fortnightly collections would not be a problem for our household (two adults
and a toddler) but those in larger households may struggle with this. Also if
the council wishes householders to recycle more they could do more to assist
with this. For example people living in rural areas may have a substantial
drive to recycling points/centres and those in deprived areas may be nearer
to recycling points/centres but not have access to transport to take items
there. It's easy to say those without transport could walk to recycle but
actually getting them to do this is another matter! We already collect plastic,
glass and used batteries at home to take for recycling (as well as the
tins/paper and garden waste bins the council provide). We would like to also
collect cardboard but do not have space for another box. If the council offered
a recycling pick-up of a wider range of items such as these, more people
would be inclined to keep them rather than bin them and I think this is the
only way fortnightly pickups will be succesful. I agree with M Gowans on two
points mentioned - (1) Brown bins (green waste) collections in winter are
almost pointless and (2) the blue boxes (tins/paper) are of very low quality.
The lid of ours quickly broke meaning it could not be fastened properly to the
box. Because of this it then blew away onto the road, was run over by a car
and further damaged. Now our paper is often wet and sticks to the inside of
the box and there is usually paper left in it after it has been emptied.
We are a household of only 2 adults and 1 child so a fortnightly collection is
easily achievable. Our rural community is served by GREAN who pick up our
recyclable waste weekly- a brilliant service. We could probably manage a
fortnightly service of that too. Couldn't garden waste be chipped/composted
at the local refuse/recycling centre and turned into useable compost for either
mulching council beds (saving time on weeding) or given away or sold to local
gardeners?




Alternate weekly collections are a move in the right direction; particularly if
more items were re-cycled. To encourage less non-recyclable waste half size
bins could be offered to smaller households when they need replacing.



On my street, hardly anyone uses their brown bins. I would suggest that this
service could be cut back or suspended over the winter unless it could be
upgraded to accept food waste as well as garden waste. I lived in Nova
Scotia where this was done and it really helped to reduce non-recyclable
waste. That is the only way I would manage a fortnightly green bin collection.
In addition, the blue boxes are impossible to open and close and would be a
nightmare for anyone with arthritis. Better quality blue bins would result in
more people using them.




We run a household with only two adults and recycle a lot of waste and also
burn paper and cardboard as household heating. We only put our rubbish out
every 3 weeks or longer and even then the bin is less than half full; we mainly
put it out to be empty to avoid it getting too smelly. Some households seem
to put out over stuffed bins every week. So I would guess if you go to two
weekly collections some households may need a second bin.



Seems to me that Highland Council want it all ways. They expect us to accept
a cut from weekly collections to fortnightly but as yet I have seen no mention
of a cut in Council Tax to make up for this. OR do they expect to do less for
the same money?




As we only have two adults living in our household we could easily cope with
a two weekly collection. I note the comments about brown bins and blue
boxes for paper collections. We live in an area where there are no brown bins
or blue boxes for paper collections but instead have a blue recycle bin which
is the same size as the green wheelie bin. Do the Council have any plans to
roll these out to all areas of Highland? Before we had this bin we could not
have managed with a two weekly collection but due to our new recycling bin
we could quite happily live with a collection every three weeks. Perhaps to cut
down further on household waste a promotion of free compost bins for a
period of time would encourage those who wished to compost to do so
without having to pay a minimum of £8 to buy a compost bin.
this is a difficult one because I would have no problem with a fortnightly waste
collection whereas I know another similar sized family struggles with once a
week.Recycling: Incentives? They work on some people. Others only notice
penalties. The suggestion that some households should be issued with two
bins is not practical, surely? Where I live we have no kerbside recycling, even
though we are served by bin lorries from Dingwall. Now those communities
nearby were informed they wouldn't have kerbside recycling because the
Gairloch depot can't handle it. I think we need to re-think strategies for the
west coast because one size really doesn't fit all - we need a more local
solution

We are a household of 3 children and 2 adults. We could easily have our bin
collected fortnightly as we recycle as much as possible via the blue bin,
brown bin and the Janetstown facility. I think moving to fortnightly collections
is an easy and relatively painless saving to make for the council.

Due to the fact that there are only two people in our household we could cope
with fortnightly collections as we currently recycle a significant amount of our
waste. We have to do this ourselves as there are currently no kerbside
recycling facilities in our area.
My concern is that people who are less able to transport waste to recycling
facilities, i.e vulnerable groups such as the elderly, will be seriously
inconvenienced by this. No fortnightly collections should be implemented until
kerbside recycling is introduced.
Another serious concern is an increase in fly tipping in an area largely
dependent on tourism



I initially thought this was a brilliant idea - after all, if we think carefully about
the unnecessary packaging of what we buy (and lobby supermarkets or
purchase locally but that's another matter) and re-cycle as much as we can,
we should not need a weekly lift.

However, I live on a mile-long unadopted road with around 15 houses and no
waste collection service at our houses - we all take our non-recyclable waste
to large roll-top bins at the main road. We have no brown bins or blue bins
either. (Nor street lights for that matter!) We only have about one large black
bag of non-recyclable rubbish per week, but I have noticed recyclable stuff in
the bins from time to time, and they overflow too, so it would take a shift in
attitude. We have to dispose of our garden waste by other means and take
our recyclable waste to the dump or recycling point.

I still think fortnightly would work if we make the effort. After all it is in
everyone's interest that we share the burden of service cuts. (And don't moan
about the council tax!)
Yes please as soon as possible




Yes, but the cost of educating the majority to co-operate and produce less
waste and get used to fortnightly bin collections may cost more than the
saving.




Yes: need to recycle more. Legislation on packaging




Yes, from manufacturers.



An issue of a free compost bin to every house would be beneficial and eco-
friendly.
Better and more recycling facilities are required in rural facilities



Reduction of bin uplifts would lead to bad smells and vermin in hot weather.



Fortnightly collections.



We would encourage this as long as people used then correctly.

Opportunity for private enterprise for someone to collect while goods etc in
trailer etc.



We would encourage this as long as people were



Yes – definitely, 1 x fortnightly.

Reduce the amount of packaging. Have local community recycling eg. bins
on every street



Yes



Reduce waste, increase recycling, reduce bin collections
Yes
Yes




 2-weekly cycles for each type of bin e.g. general/paper/composting. Reduce
landfill with cardboard collection. Can this be provided? Encourage national
government to pressurise retailers/manufacturers to reduce packaging.




Larger blue bins needed. Larger green bin.

 Yes. Council rural blue wheelie bin for recycling would help. Monthly
collections.
 Approach Tesco and other major supermarkets to help with waste cuts e.g.
Invite them to meet (100%) the Highland Council‟s waste management costs.
Must provide incentives to public to reduce their waste in cooperation with
supermarkets (purchasing etc).
Yes – More recycling. Sharing of bins in relation to household size.
Community composting to support garden schemes.



 Yes. Every two weeks alternate with recycling collection. In winter brown
bins collected one a month.


ortnightly wheelie bin collections are a good idea, but recycling options MUST
be improved for it to work. Look at Halifax Regional Municipality‟s (Halifax,
Canada) waste and recycling program for inspiration! In particular, more
should be accepted in blue bags and sorted in a facility in order to get more
people to participate. Taking organic waste in brown bins would also help, or
suspending garden waste collection over the cooler months.

 Yes, recycle once a fortnight. Rubbish once a fortnight. Alternate the two
services each 4 weeks.
 Cut down on supermarket packaging; use less plastic bags and more paper
bags.

 Yes. Look at brown bins in winter, less garden waste; more community
recycling




Provide smaller bins; recycling facilities in each community for glass etc.

 Yes. Fortnightly collections good. Encourage more recycling.
Yes lobby manufactures to and food suppliers to reduce parking. Reduce bin
collections or charge for extra collections
There seems to be little doubt that reductions in the amount of waste
produced can be achieved and savings delivered through reductions in uplifts.
However, there are concerns that there needs to be standardisation and
consistency across Highland and between local authorities to avoid confusion
about what is being recycled. This is a huge issue for tourism for self-
catering and holiday accommodation.




Yes, what do people put in green bins? This is a very good idea. Businesses
should also have recycling bins provided to push the percentage up.




An admirable aim, but it relies on cooperation from supermarkets and other
retailers in reducing the amount of packaging; on the Highland Council
providing a wider range of readily accessible recycling points in communities
and materials they accept for recycling, plus education! Many Councils
already successfully provide only fortnightly kerbside bin collections, with
alternate week collections of recyclable materials There is no reason why,
with careful planning, it should not work in Highland region.

I think it is a reasonable idea to empty the wheelie bins once a fortnight
instead of once a week

Could be even more efficient with the use of hot composters which we
undersand also deal with food waste which is currently not recycled here.
It will only work if recycling is more widely available

The Council has failed to implement a comprehensive waste management
strategy since 1974, overly relying on the Longman land fill site.

Yes
People want front end services to be provided at a certain level. Provision is
to remain as it is.

Recycle a bigger range of products, provide fewer bin collections
Alternate with recycling e.g. dustbins fortnightly; expand recycling to small
points ion each community = more recycled




Yes fortnightly in area where recycling is available

Yes

Yes alternate weeks

Yes - reduce reuse recycle

Green bin once a fortnight if recycling weekly collection

less refuse collection in winter;




Yes move to alternate week collection, but the difficulty is that so many
householders cannot be bothered to allocate correctly, flatten boxes etc.




Yes
Education

Council needs to design fastening to stop rubbish blowing away when bins
blow over – it gets very windy on Skye!




Yes – increase the number & range of items which can be recycled.

Bin for garden or other waste forms




Supermarkets & manufacturers/producers need to use less packaging &
more responsible.



With improved info & education, collections could be dramatically reduced.



Fortnightly collection is adequate for black bins




Monthly collection for blue bins

Increase bin sizes.
Absolutely, people could definitely help more in this area & if
informed/educated as to costs, may help in terms of recycling & considering
options. Make businesses pay more where possible.

Yes – I take all my rubbish (not a lot) to the dump myself as I pass it on my
way to work. People who live more remotely need collections. Perhaps
people need to be asked if they are willing to convey their own rubbish to the
dump and there could be a corresponding reduction in collections.
Transportation costs of waste are huge, why don‟t we use rail? Possible
waste incinerator in Fort William e.g. central location. Could generate income
from other Authorities.

Stop switching them on in broad daylight in the afternoon!

Work with other agencies to get rid of junk mail, supermarket packaging etc.
Look carefully at food procured, prepared & possibly wasted at council run
services such as schools, care homes & could you look at use of local food
for local people not just for tourists & visitors?
Get community group/social enterprise to collect rubbish locally – they can
only take a certain type of rubbish, rejecting stuff they can‟t sell to the
Council.




Waste incinerator for Portree/Corpach.

Yes - especially by encouraging reduction, reuse and recycling. But it has to
be easy for people to encourage more than just the most enthusiastic. (A few
people cannot easily reduce their waste e.g. if they suffer from incontinence).
3. We would support the reduction in refuse collection to fortnightlu provided
that the frequency of collection of recyclable waste is increased to a
satisfactory level. .




Yes, not only households but businesses, schools - Eco-schools status,
community facilities. Reduce bin collection and more recycling pick ups -
more education and tougher measures on those who do not recycle.

Yes. Refuse recyclable items; Issue fines for people who don‟t recycle.




Reduction in waste packaging - more pressure on shops. Yes if adequate
policing and bigger bins.




More different bins.

Yes.

Possible to reduce green bin collection to fortnightly in many areas. Risk
would be an increase in fly-tipping.




Yes. Maybe fortnightly collections instead of weekly. Encourage recycling.



Yes fewer collections.

If wheelie bin for recycling was provided and green waste/composting
possibly able to reduce collections. Mixed Recycling bins; extended opening
hours at recycling centres - close for lunch!
Fortnightly collections – as long as there are appropriate number of bins per
household in relation to numbers of people.

Provide more education on recycling – more standardisation of recyclables –
more blue bins. This could lead to fewer collections.
Every fortnight would be acceptable as we recycle ourselves it would
encourage others to do so.

Provide more bins, to those of us who are waiting.

Yes.

Yes. Big recycle bins – Fewer collections. Incentive scheme as per Windsor
& Maidenhead to recycle. (See Tina MacAfferty for details or Cllr Maxine
Smith).

YES! Bi-weekly blue and green bin collections. Introduce food composting
bins for households. More recycling points & more materials recyclable.
Blue bins for everyone. Oct to March no brown (gardening) bin collection.
Yes. Fortnightly OK for landfill. Fly tipping must be stamped on. Pay for
r