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					                                 Ancillary Unit Annual Report
                               Bilingual Career Ladder Program
                                   July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Ancillary Unit

The Program‘s overall purpose is to increase the number of highly qualified bilingual teachers in
Fresno County. The focus is recruitment and retention through individual support services. This
is in direct alignment with the Kremen School of Education mission and purpose.


Administrative Housing of Ancillary Unit

The Career Ladder Programs operate in the Office of Teacher Recruitment, Kremen School of
Education and Human Development. The Program Director reports to Dr. Steve Price. Dr. Price
reports all program activities to Associate Dean, Dr. Curt Guaglianone. A program director,
recruitment specialist, fiscal manager and an academic advisor staff the office.

Two programs are funded by the US Department of Education, Office of Bilingual Education
and Minority Language Affairs. A third is funded through the Office of English Language
Acquisition, Title Three, and all are managed through the California State University, Fresno
Foundation.

Career Ladder programs are guided by an Advisory Council representing CSU-School
Collaborative Academic Preparation Initiative, Liberal Studies, Internship Office, Career
Placement Services, Fresno Regional Occupational Programs, K–12 Districts and Fresno
Community College.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

The Bilingual Paraprofessional Career Ladder Programs produce bilingual teachers for school
districts in Fresno County, which has a population of more than 47,000 students who are limited
in English language proficiency. The purpose is to develop a career ladder that enables high
school graduates and school paraprofessionals to become certificated bilingual teachers. Due to
current shortages, recruiting bilingual special education teachers is a special effort of the career
Ladder. Scholarships and support services are offered through an on-campus ―one-stop shop‖
(Paraprofessional Teacher Development Center). Participants are high school seniors completing
the Fresno Regional Occupational Program's Careers in Education; paraprofessionals enrolled in
Fresno City College's Education Career Track; and other para-educators within the University's
service region who are eligible to enroll in teacher preparation. Program benefits include tuition,
books and participation in a Paraprofessional Academy, which provides professional
development focusing on leadership skills and literacy training.
Two hundred fifty (250) paraprofessional participants have been recruited and enrolled in the
programs. Languages represented are Spanish, Hmong, Lao, Hindi, and Punjabi, as well as
American Sign Language. All participants have individual academic plans and are enrolled in
courses which apply to an appropriate degree and/or credential. All participants attend cohort
meetings and a Paraprofessional Academy one Saturday per month. Articulation is in place with
community colleges and MOU‘s established with participating school districts which enhance
and structure collaboration.

A highlight of the program has been the recruitment of seventy-five (75) promising high school
graduates with career goals in bilingual teaching. These students meet high academic and
personal qualifications and are employed as paraprofessionals during their college years, giving
them thousands of hours of classroom preparation before they are credentialed to teach.

Strong collaboration exists among Fresno County Office of Education, local school districts,
community colleges, the University‘s internship programs, and a state-funded Paraprofessional
Teacher Training Program. These program links all support success and expand opportunities
for our bilingual career ladder participants.

A Paraprofessional Academy, prepared for career ladder participants, is held one Saturday per
month during the academic year. Participants earn three academic units per semester. The
Paraprofessional Academy provides a comprehensive curriculum in-service training model that
provides a sustained program of training that allows participants to experience workshops in
diverse areas. The focus is on literacy instruction, academic language, assets based youth
development, and leadership. The special training along with peer collaboration and supervisor
input contributes to the exceptional value of the Paraprofessional Academy. Development of
literacy skills and instructional use of English are high priorities.

Support services offered through the Paraprofessional Teacher Development Center for Career
Ladder participants include:
    Individual attention to personal needs related to program participation.
    Administration of tuition payment and book stipends related to program participation.
    Meeting with University financial aid counselors during the first semester.
    Academic advising sessions to include assistance in filling out admission applications.
    Development of an individualized academic plan leading to bilingual and special education
     teaching certification.
    Tutorial assistance as needed in coursework and for the required CBEST and RICA exams.
    Mentoring by experienced teachers at school where he/she is working.
    Paraprofessional Academy for peer support, program continuity, and academic
     enhancement.
    Assistance with transition from community college to university.

Number of on and off campus participants

On campus participants number 175. Off campus participants number 35.
Participant Profile
Average Age: 29
Average GPA: 3.0
Average # of units accumulated: 93
36% earn less than $10,000.
34% earn between 10 and $20,000.

An evaluation of the effectiveness of these activities

Development and implementation of a system of recruitment, training, professional growth,
incentives, support, and placement to attract and retain qualified bilingual teachers in area
schools signals program success. Over one hundred participants are now teachers of record in
local schools.


Sources of Funding

The programs are funded through the U.S. Office of Education‘s Office of Bilingual Education
and Language Minority Affairs for $952,755 over five years (1998-2003) and $730,952 over five
years (1999-2004) (Career Ladder One and Two respectively) The Office of English Language
Acquisition funds $1,483,000 over five years (2002-2007).


Space and Equipment Utilization

The Kremen School of Education and Human Development houses the Bilingual Career Ladder
Programs and provides four office spaces complete with phone, fax, Internet capability and use
of copier. All other equipment (computers, printers, workstations) and all supplies are provided
by the projects.


Risk Management

On an annual basis, the office staff obtains all OSHA and risk management information as the
University schedules updates for employees. The Director of the Office of Teacher Recruitment
is responsible for all staff to uphold University policies and procedures.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

The following are the goals and objectives of the Career Ladder grants.

Goal One: Develop a career ladder to increase the pool of highly qualified bilingual teachers in
Central California.
Objective 1.1   Selection of high school teaching career path graduates /community college
                students

Objective 1.2   Selection of Paraprofessionals

Objective 1.3   Provide participants services and incentives to support program completion.

Objective 1.4   Establish a career ladder for both cohorts.

Goal Two: Develop and implement a paraprofessional academy at CSUF to upgrade skills
and qualifications of paraprofessional bilingual teaching candidates.

Objective 2.1   Assist participating districts in building a continuum of services and incentives
                for paraprofessional development (career ladder).


Request for Renewal of the Unit

The Office respectfully requests renewal for the 2004–05 year.
                              Ancillary Unit Annual Report
                  Bonner Center for Character Education and Citizenship
                              July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Ancillary Unit

The Bonner Center for Character Education and Citizenship in the SOEHD was formed in 1997
to promote character education in the Central Valley through providing nationally recognized
speakers for the Fresno area, forums on character education and professional ethics, materials
and other professional resources for review, and coordination for a variety of character award
programs.


Administrative Housing of Ancillary Unit

The Bonner Center for Character Education and Citizenship is an authorized Ancillary Unit of
the CSU Fresno and the KSOEHD. Dr. Jacques Benninga is its director and Dr. Pam Lane-
Garon is its Associate Director. The Center's activities are guided by an Advisory Board
composed of KSOEHD faculty, public school personnel from Fresno and surrounding counties
and a representative of the Bonner Family Foundation.


Highlights of Significant Activities 2003-2004

    The booklet, Practices of Teacher Educators Committed to Character was published by the
     national character education organization, The Character Education Partnership (CEP) in
     early 2003. Based on a national survey, the CEP identified three exemplary universities.
     CSUF was one of those.

    The Bonner Center staff worked with the California State Department of Education in
     preparing the application for the 2004 California Distinguished School Award. This year
     the award application contains stronger language related to character education. Standard 6
     of that application contains the following wording to which applying schools must respond:
     ―How does the culture of the school promote positive character traits and good citizenship
     and support non-violent conflict resolution?‖ To achieve maximum points on this standard,
     schools must make a ―strong case‖ for a systematic character education approach that
     includes adult modeling, curriculum integration and school policies.

    A university committee was appointed by President Welty in February 2003 to examine the
     feasibility of establishing an honor code/honor system at CSUF. Jacques Benninga was
     elected chairperson of this committee. In Spring 2003 the committee studied the issue and
     in Fall 2003, in conjunction with the Center for Academic Integrity at Duke University, a
     questionnaire was sent to all CSUF students (approximately 21,000) and faculty
     (approximately 1100). Results were tabulated and evaluated and used by the committee to
    draft recommendations to President Welty and the Academic Senate. The committee
    expects to finish its work in May 2004.

   The Ethics Project, headed by Pam Lane-Garon, continues its assessment and curriculum
    development work. The Early Childhood Education Multiple Subject Program served as
    experimental group for the pre/post assessment and curriculum project designed to address
    issues of ethical preparation as defined by a four-component theoretical model. Also
    participating in the project are faculty and students of Option IV and EHD 50. Study
    results have been submitted for publication by Dr. Lane-Garon. Drs. Abramson, Macy,
    Shelton and Lane-Garon presented Ethics Project curriculum and study findings at the
    California Association for Education of Young Children in San Diego.

   In January, 2004 many of the CSUF Ethics Project faculty facilitated a three hour ethics
    education workshop for Central Valley Early Childhood Educators. The project was in
    collaboration with Fresno City College Instructors and funded by CARES.

   Pam Lane-Garon led the KSOEHD faculty in an hour-long exercise at the 2003 KSOEHD
    Annual Fall Faculty Retreat. Desired dispositional characteristics of teachers were
    generated at that time in the context of case/ethical dilemma analyses.

   The Mediator Mentors program, developed by Pam Lane-Garon, reached the 1,000 mark.
    One thousand students have been trained in conflict management skills since 1998.
    Programs are active in Fresno, Central and Hanford Unified schools.

   For contributions to Education, Dr. Pam Lane-Garon was awarded the Jan and Bud Richter
    Award for Excellence in Education for KSOEHD Faculty in April 2004.

   The 2004 Virtues and Character Recognition Award process completed its 17th year.
    Correspondence was sent to each school district in Tulare, Fresno, Kings and Madera
    Counties announcing the award and asking for participation. Bonner Center Advisory
    members were requested to help identify possible qualifying schools. Fourteen elementary
    schools were awarded at the 20th Annual Conference on Character and Civic Education on
    April 21, 2004.

   Dr. Tom Lickona of the SUNY Cortland campus was the keynote speaker at the 20th
    Annual Conference on Character and Civic Education. In addition, Dr. Lickona
    participated in a panel discussion on character education moderated by Dr. Don Wise and
    including Dr. John Cruz (Fowler Superintendent), Ms. Stacy Dunnicliff (Principal of
    Reyburn Intermediate School) and John Forenti (Tulare County Office of Education).

   The Bonner Center has established a relationship with John Minkler of the Fresno County
    Office of Education that we hope to expand. Dr. Minkler has started the Civic Education
    Network for Region 7, an organization that seeks to promote character and civic education
    and service learning in K-12 schools.
    We have added Dr. Walt Buster to our Advisory Committee and hope that through him we
     can establish working relations with the Barsch Center for Character Education at Fresno
     Pacific University.


Sources of Funding

The major and consistent source of funding is received from the Bonner Family Foundation of
Fresno, CA. Ms. Kaye Cummings is its Executive Director and a member of its board, Ms.
Dorothy Rohlfing, sits on the Bonner Center's Advisory Committee. Other sources of funding
have included: The John Templeton Foundation, the Law Offices of Hager, Trippel, and Macy,
the California Geographic Alliance, the Tulare County Office of Education and the Fresno Bee


Space and Equipment Utilization

Space for the Bonner Center‘s growing collection of related books and materials is provided by
the KSOEHD and located in INTERESC, 4th floor of the Education Building.


Risk Management

Other than regularly scheduled meetings, no activities of the Bonner Center are held in the
Education Building.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

    We're working with John Minkler and the FCOE to host and provide a home base for a
     Region 7 Civic Education Council to promote collaboration with K-12 schools, higher
     education, youth leaders, parents, community organizations, business leaders and
     government agencies.

    We will plan for the 21st Annual Conference on Character and Civic Education and the 18th
     annual character awards to schools. We will invite another national figure to be the
     keynote speaker (and then to consult with us on our research).

    We will continue to research and look for outlets for funding and to publish our research on
     character education, professional ethics and university honor codes.

    Our work continues on the research projects, material collection, and web site updates
     (http://education.csufresno.edu/bonnercenter/bonner.htm).

    We hope to work on evaluation criteria for a rubric to assess character education at the high
     school level. Several members of the Bonner Center‘s Advisory Committee have
     expressed interest in this work.
    CSUF has initiated a major fund-raising campaign. An idea was proposed for a Center for
     Professional Ethics that has generated interest on the campus and was recently voted as a
     top priority. The Bonner Center‘s staff hope to be involved in conceptualizing this center.

    Susan Schlievert and Jacques Benninga are meeting with the local Public Radio station to
     look at the feasibility of writing 90-second programs related to ethics through Aesop fables.

    Jacques Benninga is on sabbatical for Spring 2004, during which time he hopes to engage
     in several research projects related to character education in public schools


Request for Renewal of the Unit

See attached.
                    Bonner Center for Character Education
                      California State University Fresno


Budget Request for 2004:

   Personnel…………………………………………………………………..….$9250.00

      Administrative Time for Director……………………….$4500.00
            (2 days per month at $225.00 per day X 10 months)
      Administrative Time for Associate Director…………… $3500.00
            (2 days per month at $175.00 per day X 10 months)
      Administrative Assistant/Supplies………………………$1000.00
            (Processing of all necessary forms)
      Graduate Assistant……………………………………….$ 250.00
            (Data entry)

   Travel………………………………………………………………………….$1500.00

      Travel to character education conferences…………….….$1500.00
              ($750 each for two directors)

   Special Projects………………………………………………………………..$5250.00

      Virtues and Character Education Award Program………… $1000.00
      Research Projects…………………..……………………… $1000.00
      Books, Materials, Supplies, etc……………………….…… $ 750.00
      Special Speaker/Consultant (for April 2003)……………….$2500.00


      TOTAL REQUESTED………………………………………………………$16,000.00
                                 Ancillary Unit Annual Report
                                    California Mini-Corps
                                  July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Ancillary Unit

The California Mini-Corps Program at California State University, Fresno is unique in that it
consists of two components or cohorts each with twenty-five participants. These components are
currently known as C.S.U., Fresno Mini-Corps Programs #1 & #2. This semester 50 Mini-Corps
students were selected to participate and provide services to Fresno County and Fresno Unified
School Districts. These Mini-Corps students are placed in schools that are highly impacted with
migrant students. In the 2003-2004 school year the program served 10 school districts, 35
schools, and worked with 126 teachers in grades K-12 in Region IV, Fresno County, which is
our designated service area. A strong emphasis of our involvement was in collaborating with
regional migrant and district personnel to provide instructional services for all aspects of migrant
education including supplementing the regular school programs and migrant intersessions.

In addition to providing direct instructional services, Mini-Corps students also receive extensive
inservice training through a university course and educational workshops, which emphasize
methods and techniques for assisting migrant children. C.S.U., Fresno Mini-Corps students are
required to compile a professional portfolio, complete a reflection paper, complete a self-analysis
on a videotaped lesson, organize subject matter and workshop materials in a curriculum binder,
and participate in community service activities.


Administrative Housing of Ancillary Unit

The California Mini-Corps program at CSU, Fresno is housed within the Curriculum and
Instruction (C&I) Department of the Kremen School of Education and Human Development.
Annual reports and other program information are provided to Paul Beare; Dean, Curtis
Guaglianone; Staff and Associate Dean, and Joan Henderson-Sparks; Chairperson of the C&I
Department. In addition, the Mini-Corps program works in close cooperation with the Migrant
Regional Director in regards to the placement of the Mini-Corps students and the services
provided to the migrant students as well as attending Migrant Regional meetings for the purpose
of informing the Director and Migrant staff of any Mini-Corps program updates. The Mini-Corps
program also works collaboratively with the migrant operating agency, county, and local school
districts in the area of staff development to identify relevant topics available to the students and
site coordinators.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

There were numerous special events and honors attained by the C.S.U., Fresno Mini-Corps
program. These special events were earned collectively and individually. Some of the Mini-
Corps accomplishments were:
    100 percent of the students who completed our program were hired by various school
     districts.

    Throughout the year, students have participated in numerous community and university
     functions such as: Migrant Youth Day, Character and Civic Conference, C.S.U., Fresno
     Teacher Fair, Big Brothers and Big Sisters Programs, the Regional Migrant Parent
     Advisory Committee meetings, the Annual Regional Migrant Parent Conference, State
     Migrant Parent Conference.

    We participated in a two-day Educational conference, which included over 120 participants
     from CSU, Fresno, CSU, Bakersfield, Porterville College, College of the Sequoias and
     West Hills Community College.

    Approximately 100 students participated in our inservice training program for the 2003-
     2004 academic year. Because of the collaborative nature of our program we were able to
     network with the Teaching Fellows program.

    A large percentage of students were honored academically by achieving a 3.5 or better
     G.P.A. and making the Dean's List.

    A total of 9 students will graduate in the 2003-2004 academic school year.

    Our 50 students logged over 39,000 hours in the classrooms and provided services to
     approximately 1,600 migrant students in grades K-12.


Sources of Funding

The Mini-Corps program is a federally funded migrant education program and part of the
statewide component of the California Migrant Education program. It is administered through
Butte County Office of Education.

       A: Statewide Budget $7.1 million.
       B: CSU, Fresno student salary expenditures: $345,027.00


Space and Equipment Utilization

The California Mini-Corps program at CSU, Fresno is housed within the Curriculum and
Instruction (C&I) Department of the Kremen School of Education and Human Development.
Risk Management

The Mini-Corps site coordinators are updated yearly on matters related to the states Workman‘s
Compensation program for work related injuries by the Butte County Office of Education to
assist in the compliance with the system wide and university policies related to risk management.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

1.    To increase the pool of ethnic diverse teachers for California schools.

2.    To expand our involvement in community and university services.

3).   To implement training aligned with the California Standards for the Teaching Profession
      that will support our Mini-Corps students' professional growth throughout their teaching
      career.
                                Ancillary Unit Annual Report
                          California Reading and Literature Project
                                 July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Ancillary Unit

The mission of the California Reading & Literature Project (CRLP) is to provide high quality,
standards-based professional development in reading and language instruction to help ensure that
every California student PreK-12 achieves the highest standards of academic performance. The
CRLP collaborates with partnership districts to support and sustain continuous improvement,
including the implementation o State Board adopted instructional materials.

The key elements of the project are focused on student achievement, teachers doing the
discipline, the RESULTS model of professional development, district implementation of
instructional materials, supporting the development of teacher leadership, and building
leadership capacity through collaboration with California State University, Fresno and other
educational agencies.


Administrative Housing of Ancillary Unit

The California Reading & Literature Project grant was originally funded and administered in the
College of Arts & Humanities. However, the administration of the project, the project office and
in-kind support of the project is in the Kremen School of Education and Human Development
(KSOEHD). The project regional director is Rosie Arenas, a full-time faculty member in the
Department of Literacy and Early Education in KSOEHD and is given release reimbursement
time to direct the project. Dorothy Gaona is the administrative assistant and works in the project
office, ED220C. Members of the leadership team for the project work out in the field from their
respective districts in Kern, Tulare, Kings, and Fresno counties.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

Leadership Invitational Cohort, academic year 03-04
       Continued leadership development with classroom teachers (13), administrators (2),
       university faculty (3)
RESULTS Institute, 40-hr. summer institute
       Professional development for classroom teachers (21) focused on RESULTS model based
       on teamwork, reflection on practice, and assessments
7-12 Secondary Leadership Invitational Institute, academic year 03-04
       Professional development in Reading and Language Arts across the curriculum to middle
       and high school teachers (8) and school site and district administrators (4)
Literacy Outreach, summer 03
       Community event that included volunteer work by CRLP teachers (5) and CSUF teacher
       education students (12)
Regional Leadership Retreat, Fall 03
       Leadership development of and planning by leadership cohort, which includes classroom
       teachers (13), administrators (2), university faculty (3)
Statewide Leadership Training: A Focused Approach, 2 days
       Statewide training hosted by CRLP Fresno region at CSU, Fresno (25)
Using Reading to Teach History, one-day workshop
       Professional development for 7-12 teachers (30) in collaboration with the California
       History/Social Science Project
Regional Leadership Retreat, Spring 04
       Leadership development of and planning by leadership cohort, which includes classroom
       teachers (13), administrators (2), university faculty (3)


Sources of Funding

Funding for the CRLP comes from the California Subject Matter Project, English Language
Learner/Leadership Development and the California Professional Development Institute budgets
administered through the University of California Office of the President and expended through
the California State University, Fresno Foundation. Income generated from for-fee services
during 02-03 has been carried forward to our account.

Space and Equipment Utilization:

The CRLP is housed in ED 220C. The project director and assistant use the LEE department
copy machine. Computers, printers, fax machine, and office furniture are property of the CRLP.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

The CRLP plans on providing additional training to existing leadership cohort and doubling the
number of teachers in the cohort. These teachers will provide training to teachers in the field
during professional development events. The following events are planned:
    Leadership Retreats, Fall and Spring
    Adult Fiction Book Clubs, English (on-going) and Spanish (new)
    Results Training at school sites throughout the region
    Secondary Leadership Institute, for fee
    ELD/Focused Approach through Houghton Mifflin Reading, Kern, Tulare and Fresno
     county teachers (approx. 500), for fee
    ELD/Focused Approach through Open Court Reading, regional teachers (approx. 100), for
     fee


Request for Renewal of the Unit

I request that the ancillary unit, the California Reading & Literature Project be renewed for
another year.
                                Ancillary Unit Annual Report
          Center for Research, Evaluation, Assessment and Dissemination (CREAD)
                                July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Ancillary Unit

The Center for Research, Evaluation, Assessment, and Dissemination (CREAD), housed in the
Kremen School of Education and Human Development, was developed in order to provide
support to faculty and students in both JDPEL and KSOEHD on their research, grant writing,
master‘s theses, and dissertations. In addition, CREAD contributes to the mission of KSOEHD
and the University by offering research and evaluation services to school districts in our service
area through contracts with the Foundation. CREAD also organizes and contributes to the
research efforts of the Central Valley Educational Research Consortium (CVERC), a group of
former doctoral students and others who are interested in doing research on educational issues in
our service area. These contracts provide opportunities for faculty and doctoral students to work
with CREAD staff on projects, either by their contribution of needed skills to accomplish the
project goals or by learning new skills by working on the projects with CREAD staff and faculty.
CREAD staff also apply for grants to support the mission of the KSOEHD and the University.


Administrative Housing of Ancillary Unit

CREAD is housed administratively in the KSOEHD; it is not part of any department or program.
The two co-directors, Phyllis Kuehn and Sharon Brown-Welty, oversee the Center and manage
the work, develop grant and contract proposals, work with faculty and students, and manage the
budgets of the various funded programs. Responsibilities are assigned to staff and to other
faculty according to need and area of expertise. CREAD has no existing relationships, other than
contracts through the Foundation, with any other public agencies or organization.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

Contracts: CREAD was awarded several new contracts this year and completed two of its
existing contracts.

A.   Contracts

     1.     Hanford Elementary School District II/USP. CREAD has continuing contracts
            with Hanford Elementary School District for II/USP school evaluations. A new
            contract for $40,000 was awarded in November 2003. to CREAD for continued
            evaluation of four schools through October, 2004.

     2.     Fresno Unified School District II/USP. CREAD has received contracts from two
            middle schools in FUSD for on-going formative evaluation of improvement programs
          funded by the State. The two contracts total $24,000. The contracts run from June 1,
          2004 through May 31, 2005.

     3.   College of Agriculture. CREAD serves as evaluator on two grants awarded to the
          University from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Agricultural Education
          Curriculum Innovation Project is in the third year of funding and a new project, The
          Community Outreach and Recruitment Project, was funded this year (we provide
          formative evaluation services and prepare annual reports). The Intersegmental
          Coordinated Outreach Program in Agriculture and Associated Professions Project
          was completed in 2003. CREAD staff wrote and submitted the final project report to
          the USDA.

B.   Grants

     1.   National Science Foundation. CREAD was awarded a three-year grant from the
          National Science Foundation (NSF) in order to develop and implement a certificate in
          program evaluation to build capacity and expertise in this area in the Central Valley.
          The first cohort of students is completing this 21-unit, 7 course program of study.
          The second cohort of students begins coursework in April, 2004. The second year of
          funding for this program started in January, 2004.
     2.   Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE). This is the final
          year of a three-year grant from FIPSE for further development and dissemination of
          the academic language assessment and curriculum developed by Kuehn. A no-cost
          extension of this project was requested for the 2003-2004 academic year in order to
          complete the final grant activities, and CREAD will continue to support the
          dissemination aspect of the this project.
     3.   Digital Campus. CREAD was awarded funds from the University‘s Digital Campus
          program to develop two courses partially online for the NSF program. Faculty
          teaching these courses devoted time to attending the Blackboard training courses and
          have already developed and delivered the two courses. As a result of this funding and
          training, all courses in the NSF program are being offered partially online.

C.   Other

     1.    CVERC. In July, 2002, CVERC published and began distribution of its second
          monograph, API: What Works: Characteristics of High-Performing Schools in the
          Central Valley. The third monograph is now being published and a fourth study is
          being designed. A publication is being prepared and will be submitted to a refereed
          journal. A second group of CVERC (called HE-CVERC, which focuses on higher
          education issues) has just completed a study requested by the Central Valley Higher
          Education Consortium.

     2.   Assistance to Districts, Faculty, and Students. CREAD continues to provide
          assistance to district personnel and faculty who are writing grants or who need help
          with designs or data analyses. CREAD staff also provide support for master‘s
           students research projects through research design advice, help with development of
           survey instruments, and analyses of data.

Participants. All participants in CREAD activities worked on campus or at home but traveled to
contract sites as needed.

     Faculty Participants: Phyllis Kuehn
                           Sharon Brown-Welty
                           Don Wise
                           David Tanner
                           Pam Lane-Garon
     Staff and Others:     Ann Mayse
                           Heather Berg
                           Norma Delgado
                           Susan Tanner


Evaluation of Effectiveness

While no formal summative evaluation has been developed, staff and contractors work closely
together in a formative evaluation model to ensure that project work is completed as planned and
is effective. For federal grants, formal evaluation plans have been developed and are submitted
as required by the funding agencies. The work of CREAD has grown because of its
effectiveness and because we are serving an identified need in the Central Valley. All contracted
agencies have continued their contracts and have expressed satisfaction with CREAD‘s work in
other ways as well. CREAD has met all deadlines for reports and has accomplished all work to
meet its deadlines.

CREAD continues to help on-campus and off-campus organizations and faculty in designing the
evaluation component of their grant proposals. We also help with editing proposals and offering
suggestions for project design. Currently there are seven grant proposal pending for which
CREAD has designed the evaluation plan and will carry out the evaluation if the projects are
funded. These proposals came from the Schools/Colleges of Education, Business, Engineering,
Science and Mathematics, and Agriculture.


Sources of Funding

All funding for the Center came from external grants and contracts awarded to CREAD through
the efforts of the two co-directors and the CREAD staff. All funding was awarded through and
is managed by the Foundation. Partial funding of CVERC research and dissemination was also
provided by the KSOEHD office of the Dean. Funding sources for ongoing and new projects are
outlined in the following table.
 Funding Agency             Project Title              Amount of            Amount
                                                        Grant or         Expended for
                                                      Contract for       July 1, 2003 to
                                                      this Activity       May 1, 2004
CSUF College of      Evaluation of Agricultural      $5,000             $5,000
Agriculture/US       Education Curriculum
Department of        Innovation Project
Agriculture
CSUF College of      Evaluation of                   $2,500             $2,500
Agriculture/US       Intersegmental Coordinated
Department of        Outreach Program in
Agriculture          Agriculture and Associated
                     Professions Project
CSUF College of      Community College               $5,000             0
Agriculture/US       Outreach and Recruitment
Department of
Agriculture
Hanford Elementary   Evaluation of II/USP            $40,000            $40,000
School District      Schools
Fresno Unified       Evaluation of Two II/USP        $24,000            $24,000
School District      Middle Schools
National Science     Development of a                $275,371 (over     $54,146
Foundation           Certificate in Program          3 years)
                     Evaluation
Fund for the         The Academic Language           $11,001.50         $7,999
Improvement of       Project: Dissemination          (final year, no-
Postsecondary        activities only, this funding   cost extension)
Education            period only
California State     Central Valley Educational      0                  $5,673
University,          Research Consortium:
Fresno/JDPEL         Monograph publication and
                     dissemination
Bonner Family        Arts Education Evaluation       $3,000             $467
Foundation Arts
Program Evaluation
Fresno Covenant      Parent Information and          $35,636 (year      $35,636
Foundation           Resource Center (PIRC)          1)
Dean‘s Office        Development assistance for      pro bono           pro bono
KSOEHD               survey for credential
                     program students.
                     Analyses of responses.
CSUF Students for    Fresno READS                    pro bono           pro bono
Community Service
Space and Equipment Utilization

No extra space or equipment is being used to support CREAD; all work is done in the existing
space of the two co-directors and the staff or faculty who work through the Center.


Risk Management

All CREAD faculty and staff who are full-time employees of the University support and conform
to the system-wide and university policies and procedures related to risk management as they do
in their regular university roles. Any part-time staff who work with CREAD are trained and
managed by University faculty and are therefore subject to the same policies and procedures
designed to manage risk.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

1.   Continue offering research and evaluation services to local school districts and other
     organizations.

2.   Continue offering research and evaluation services to faculty and students in the KSOEHD
     and across campus.

3.   Continue to seek external funding for projects, research, and programs that contribute
     directly to the mission of the KSOEHD and the University.

4.   Complete the on-going evaluation projects already funded through CREAD.

5.   Continue to provide research advice and support to CVERC.

6.   Continue to administer the NSF certificate in program evaluation, seek other support for
     continuing and expanding this three-year program, and continue to recruit appropriate
     participants in the project.


Request for Renewal of the Unit

We request that the unit be renewed for 2004-2005.


APPENDICES

This is CREAD‘s fourth year. The previous three annual reports are attached.
                                Ancillary Unit Annual Report
                        Central California Reading Recovery® Project
                                 July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Ancillary Unit

Reading Recovery is an early literacy instruction for children in first grade who are at risk of
learning to read. The program is delivered as a supplemental, short-term intervention in public
schools and is delivered to identified children by specially trained teachers who have been
prepared to work with the lowest performing children. California State University, Fresno,
serves as the university coordinating and training center for Reading Recovery in the central
California region and for the western United States. In this capacity, California State University,
Fresno, serves as one of 23 institutions of high learning in North America charged with the
dissemination, on-going support, and expansion of Reading Recovery for service to children in
local school districts.

The California State University, Fresno, Reading Recovery training center is housed in the
Kremen School of Education and Human Development as the Central California Reading
Recovery Project. Project personnel provide training in Reading Recovery methodology to
teachers in school districts where Reading Recovery is being implemented as an early
intervention program. The Reading Recovery Project at California State University, Fresno,
therefore, is a provider of in-service training to teachers, as well as as a provider of consultation
and implementation assistance to school districts.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

During the 2003-2004 academic year, the personnel affiliated with Central California Reading
Recovery Project carried out the following major activities and events:

    Trained and certified 38 new Reading Recovery teachers for service to children in schools
     within our service area as well as the larger geographical region represented by the project.

    Trained and certified one new Reading Recovery Teacher Leader for one school district.
     This involved delivering 14 units of graduate level coursework, on-site coaching of
     teaching, and providing field-based training activities.

    Provided on-going professional development for trained Reading Recovery teacher leaders
     throughout the year. A total of 8 days of professional development were held; 4 days were
     located on site in school districts, 3 were held on campus, and another was held in Portland,
     OR. During 03-04, 20 teacher leaders at 17 district-based training sites were affiliated with
     the project.

    Conducted 4 visits to affiliated sites in California, and Nevada for consultation and
     implementation assistance.
    Provided monthly Continuing Contact sessions for 10 trained Reading Recovery teachers in
     Clovis Unified School District; in addition, 17 coaching visits were made to these teachers
     at 4 Clovis schools.

    Monitored and disseminated outcomes data to schools for 74 children served with Reading
     Recovery intervention in Clovis Unified.

    Participated with the state-level Reading Recovery leadership team to conduct state level
     business and to plan and implement the annual West Coast Institute.

    Established webpage links to Reading Recovery Council of North America and Reading
     Recovery Council of California.

    Participated in the international network of Reading Recovery professionals by attendance
     at meetings in Columbus, OH (2 meetings); Scottsdale, AZ; Kansas City, MO and
     Orlando, FL.

    Represented the university and project at conferences in Wyoming, Oregon, South Dakota,
     Rhode Island, New Jersey, Illinois, Ohio, and California (San Diego).

    Provided international professional leadership as Editor-in-chief for the Journal of Reading
     Recovery, a practitioners‘ publication of the Reading Recovery Council of North America;
     two issues were published in 03-04.


Sources of Support

Financial support for the activities of the project was provided via contracts with 20 separate
local education agencies (see list, attached). Monies were utilized primarily for personnel and
for related professional and supervision travel.


Space and Equipment Utilization

As a university training center, the Central California Reading Recovery Project served 17 local
and out-of-state district-based teacher training sites through an office with a full-time
secretary/project assistant. This office is located on the atrium level of the Education Building
(ED 25) and shares space with the Early Education Center staff. Among the many functions the
office served were:
      •     First point of contact for inquiries and requests by the public and university offices;
      •     Communication with 20 affiliated Reading Recovery teacher leaders including
            regular mailings as well as telephone and electronic contact;
      •     Creation, preparation, and dissemination of publicity materials;
      •     Handling all fiscal matters including preparation and reconciling budget information,
            requesting and monitoring invoice procedures, and maintaining up-to-date files;
     •     Monitoring data for all children served by Reading Recovery teachers at affiliated
           sites;
     •     Acting as liaison between district training sties and the National Data Evaluation
           Center for Reading Recovery data collection at The Ohio State University.
     •     Arranging travel itineraries and handling all travel paperwork.
     •     Coordinating the activity of the project with two other training centers within the
           state.


Plans and Priorities for 2004-2005

1.   Continue to work for collaboration with the KSOEHD Director of Development for
     acquiring private donations to augment the resources of the project. One goal is to provide
     training awards to districts for the training of a teacher leader.

2.   Sponsor and hold a meeting for Site Coordinators of affiliated sites.

3.   Visit 2-4 affiliated sites for one-day visits as provided in site fee contracts for services.

4.   Continue monitoring and overseeing the training of 57 teachers by teacher leaders at 16
     affiliated sites.

5.   Continue to work with teacher leaders and districts in the Northwest for the support of
     current Reading Recovery implementations there.

6.   Continue to work with state leadership for state-wide planning and coordination.

7.   Continue providing regular professional development activities for affiliated teacher
     leaders.


Request for Renewal of the Unit

On the basis of a successful and productive year of service to public schools within and beyond
our service area and in concert with the mission and purpose of the Kremen School of Education
& Human Development, request is hereby made for renewal of the Central California Reading
Recovery Project as a recognized ancillary unit for 2004-05.
                                          Appendix
                                      Sources of Support

The following local education agencies contracted for the services of the project in 2003-04:

California                                          Nevada
Burton Elementary SD                                Lyon County Schools
Coalinga/Huron Unified SD
Clovis Unified SD                                   Arizona
Kings Canyon Unified SD                             Cartwright SD
Lindsay Unified SD
Los Banos Unified SD
Madera Unified SD                                   Washington
Manteca Unified SD                                  Bellingham SD
Modesto City Schools                                Evergreen SD
San Luis Coastal Unified                            Spokane SD #3
Selma Unified SD                                    Wenatchee SD
Sonora Elementary                                   Ferndale SD
Turlock City Schools
                              Ancillary Unit Annual Report
                 Central Valley Educational Leadership Institute (CVELI)
                                July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


1.   The mission of the Central Valley Educational Leadership Institute is to assist school
     districts throughout the central valley to create cultures of high achievement for students.
     CVELI will accomplish this mission through conferences, training, coaching,, and
     consulting activities in collaboration with the 150 school districts served by the Kremen
     School of Education and Human Development (KSOEHD).

2.   CVELI will operate in collaboration with the Education Administration Program of the
     Kremen School of Education and Human Development. Dr. Walt Buster, Superintendent
     in Residence and Full-time faculty member of the Education Administration Program, will
     be the institute director. The Education Administration Program coordinator will chair the
     standing advisory committee that will participate in setting the institute‘s goal and
     objectives and in evaluating its effectiveness. The Director of CVELI will report to the
     Dean of the Kremen School of Education and Human Development.

     CVELI will operate as separate entity, but will maintain a close working relationship with
     the Education Administration Program and the KSOEHD throughout all activities and
     functions. The Director will plan, communicate, implement, and report on all activities of
     the center on a regular basis. All temporary and long-term staffing and services will be
     contracted within approval budgets.

     CVELI has already established a relationship with Lozano Smith and Associates, a local
     law firm which has made a five-year financial commitment. The Fresno Business Council
     has provided funding for a conference coordinator. Fresno Unified School District is
     actively collaborating with the planning of the first activity to take place June 14-16. The
     Association of California School Administrators (ACSA) has promised funding for
     superintendents‘ training to take place in August 2004 and throughout the 2004-2005
     school year. The Bay Area School Reform Collaborative (BASRC) has promised training
     for superintendents with Fresno State becoming the location for this training in conjunction
     with CVELI. Houghton Mifflin publishing has promised $5,000 for the summer
     conference. As of this application, several other donors are considering donations and/or
     collaborations.

3.   The proposal advisory committee will be chaired by the coordinator of the Education
     Administration Program and will review institute planning, budgets, and activities. The
     advisory committee and the institute director report to the Dean of the KSOEHD.

4    The institute plans to conduct research in collaboration with the JDPEL, the Central Valley
     Educational Research Consortium (CVERC), and the Center for Research, Evaluation,
     Assessment, and Dissention (CREAD, all organized units of CSU Fresno.
5.   Primary funding will be received from donors such as Lozano Smith and Associates,
     ACSA, BASRC, as noted earlier. To date the following funding has been promised or
     received:

     Fresno Business Council (FBC)                                 $40,000
     Lozano Smith and Associate ($25,000/yr for 5 years)           125,000
     Fresno Unified School District (approximate)                    2,000
     Bay Area School Reform Collaborative (BASRC)                    3,000
     Association of California School Administrators (ACSA)          3,000
     Houghton-Mifflin Publishers                                     5,000
     Other supporters will be included later.

     All funds will be received by the California State University, Fresno Foundation.
     Disbursements will be made through an account established by the institute, which will
     request funds from the Foundation .

6.   The institute, comprised almost entirely of CSU Fresno faculty and staff, is cognizant of
     state and university policies and procedures including risk management and will conform
     to all policies, guidelines, and requirements.

7.   Project budget, revenues, and expenditures, and a detailed listing of anticipated resources
     required, including space and equipment utilization, technological support, faculty assigned
     time, student assistance, and a plan for their implementation

     At this time, no additional space, equipment, or other resources are requested. The institute
     director, Dr. Buster, already has an office and equipment through the Joint Doctoral
     Program in Educational Leadership. Requirements may change as the program expands,
     however.
                                 Ancillary Unit Annual Report
                                 Central Valley Science Project
                                  July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Ancillary Unit

Philosophically, the CVSP aspires to build a learning community that promotes science
achievement for all students through providing high quality professional development and
leadership experiences for teachers.

We believe:
   that effective science teachers are competent in science content, are capable of delivering
    standards-based content to diverse groups of students through sound pedagogical strategies,
    and are willing and able to assume leadership roles within the discipline.
   science is for ALL students; consequently gender, status, cultural and linguistic equity
    issues are integral components of all site programs.
   science learners, whether teachers or students, gain conceptual understanding and develop
    investigation skills through actively "doing" science.
   that teachers learn from other teachers by sharing their best practices.
   teacher leaders are a key factor in improving science achievement.
   that assessment of student learning should inform our program design and implementation.

Geographically, CVSP serves an area of four counties: Madera, Fresno, Kings, and Tulare.
Included in this region are urban centers such as Fresno, with the fourth largest school district in
California, suburban communities and large rural areas. With changes in the CSMP enabling
legislation, CVSP has more recently focused its resources in serving partner school sites, while
still maintaining a strong and visible presence in the region. Partnerships include:
      Parlier Unified School District
      Fresno Unified School District
      Selma Unified School District
      Sanger Unified School District
      Fresno County Office of Education

The CVSP leadership team, composed of University professors, classroom teachers and district
science administrators, is uniquely qualified to implement professional development content and
leadership programs. The accomplishments and affiliations of these individuals testify to their
qualification in science content, pedagogy, and leadership. It is through the combined efforts of
these professionals and our many collaborators that CVSP proposes to make positive and far
reaching contributions to science education.
Administrative Housing of Ancillary Unit

The Central Valley Science Project is operated out of the Department of Curriculum and
Instruction in the Kremen School of Education and Human Development at California State
University, Fresno.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

In the past year, CVSP has conducted 6 major events that impacted 130 teachers from throughout
the Central Valley. The activities fall into four broad categories:
1.    Summer Institutes: content, EL and instructional materials.
2.    Follow-up and academic year workshops: content, networking, leadership development.
3.    Content workshops
4.    Leadership Development: Teachers on Special Assignment

                                                                           K-12
                                     Program                               Schools
Event Name              Participants Hours         Start Date     End Date Served

CVSP 2004 Summer
Science Institute                75         120            6/14         7/2          0
CVSP Fall 2003
Follow-up                        26          15           10/17       10/18      17

Earth Science Content
Workshop: Ecology                14            8            2/4         2/4          8


Earth Science Content
Workshop: Geology                14            8           12/9        12/9          6
Earth Science Content
Workshop: Heat &
Energy                           22            8           3/10        3/10      11
Science Assessment
Lead Teachers
(SALT) program
2003-2004                        54          45            8/25        5/31      54


Sources of Funding

Funding for CVSP comes from the University of California Office of the President through the
California Subject Matter Project program.
Space and Equipment Utilization

CVSP does not use or require campus space or equipment beyond that of a faculty office for the
Project Director.


Risk Management

CVSP conforms to all systemwide and university policies and procedures related to risk
management.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

For the period of July 1, 2004 to June 30, 2005, CVSP proposes the following activities:
     CVSP will continue its partnerships with area school districts.
     Partner school teachers, together with other teachers from throughout the region, will
      participate in an annual, Summer Leadership Institute designed to build teachers‘
      standards-based content knowledge. The three-week summer institute will consist of a
      minimum of 45 hours of content instruction, together with experiences in effective
      pedagogy (especially for EL), selection and use of instructional materials, and teacher
      leadership.
     The experiences of the summer institute will be extended through academic year Follow-up
      Retreats held during the Fall and Spring semesters. These 2-day retreats will provide
      opportunities for teachers to share ―best practices‖ and to gain more content knowledge and
      pedagogical skills.
     While working in our partner schools, CVSP will also establish active collaborations with
      area professional organizations and other science education-related projects.


Financial Report

Total budget for FY2003-2004 consisted of carry forward funds only. New funds to back fill
this past year and to support activities in ‘04 - ‗05 have been verbally awarded by the Executive
Director of the California Science Project but to date no funds have arrived on campus.

Financial report for this FY will be available August 1, 2003 as per California State University,
Fresno‘s Foundation account policy.


Request for Renewal of the Unit

Please allow this report to serve as our formal request to continue the Central Valley Science
Project as an ancillary unit of California State University, Fresno for the 2004-2005 academic
year.
                                Ancillary Unit Annual Report
                              Fresno Family Counseling Center
                                July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Ancillary Unit

The mission of Fresno Family Counseling Center (FFCC) is to provide affordable, high quality,
time-efficient professional counseling services to Fresno Unified School District (FUSD)
children and their families with the ultimate goal of improving students‘ academic and social
functioning. In addition, the Center‘s mission is to provide superior training in marriage and
family therapy and to model for the central valley community the highest standards in current
treatments, professionalism, and counselor education. FFCC also provides low cost professional
counseling services to the community-at-large.


Administrative Housing of Ancillary Unit

Fresno Family Counseling Center is a joint venture between Fresno Unified School District and
the Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) Program at California State University Fresno.
Advanced master‘s level MFT trainees and University faculty, who staff the center, provide low
fee services to district families. This past Academic Year starting July 1, 2003, Dr. Juan C.
Garcia was appointed Director of FFCC. Dr. Chris Lucey and Dr. Sari Dworkin are the
supervising faculty. Several faculty who are licensed professionals provide supervision for
student trainees. Several recent graduates from our program continue to provide services to the
community from FFCC as MFT interns. In addition to Fresno Unified, the Center has contracts
with Homan Elementary School and a referral contract with Homan Elementary School
Proposition 10, preschool program. While administrative support has been provided by FUSD in
the past years, funding for this AY 2003-2004 and next (2004-2005) has been cut. The State-
funding crisis has impacted FUSD‘s ability to maintain an administrative contract with FFCC.
This year 2003-04 FFCC has been operating without operating overhead support from FUSD.


Clients Served

According to the Fresno Family Counseling Center data program we had 166 cases files serving
324 individual clients at FFCC. This does not include clients at the two other agencies where
FFCC provides anger management and domestic violence groups. This also does not include
clients provided with anger management groups counseling at FFCC. Seventy-four of the 166
cases were referred by FUSD. Table 1 reports that 36% of the clients seen were adults, 17%
were children, 11% were couples, and 26% were families.
Table 1: Type of Counseling
Counseling Type             Per Cent
Adult Individual            37
Child Individual            17
Couple                      11
Family                      26
Unk                         9
                            100

Some of the prominent concerns presented included parent/child relationships, anger,
depression/hopelessness, anxiety/worry, and communication problems. The annual income of
the clients serviced is presented in the next table. There was a large number of cases in which
the income was not identified. We presume that these clients are low-for services are on a
sliding scale starting at $25 for the first session and $10 for each of the next 10 sessions. Our
policy is not to turn anyone away for lack of funds. There are many clients who are only being
charged $5 a session or less.

Table 2: Household Income of FFCC Clients
Annual Household Income        Per cent
Under 10,000                   20
10 – 19,999                    23
20,000 – 29,999                12
Above 30,000                   17
Info Unavailable               28
TOTAL:                         100

FFCC provides approximately 400-500 sessions per 15-week period. If we were to charge the
Medi-cal rate of $57.00 per session we could be generating at least $98,496 per year. This is not
counting the Homan school clients (about 60 sessions a week), and the clients seen by advanced
field placement students (about 20 a week). In this case we would be providing 3,600 sessions in
a 45 week period. The medic-cal rate of $57 would potentially generate $205,200. The total
generated would be $303,696.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

    Renewed contract with Homan Elementary School to provide on-campus counseling for
     $12,000. Also will be renewed for 2004-05.
    A second project with Homan Elementary School, the Homan Tobacco Free Pre-school
     Project developed a referral system for counseling for up to approximately $8,000 through
     June 2005.
    Although there may have been a contract with Sanctuary Youth Shelter to provide
     counseling to youth and their families they have not been referring clients on a consistent
     basis thus it is difficult to determine how much revenue was actually generated from this
     source. Recent contact with the Sanctuary Youth Shelter staff promises to be productive.
    Served approximately 150 families per week at Fresno Family Counseling Center and 60
     children per week at Homan Elementary School: Total 185 families per week.
    Average client satisfaction score for therapy services: 4.1 on scale of 7.
    Average client satisfaction score with center administration: 5.5 on scale of 7.
    Level of functioning increased for clients 14 points on a 100-point scale using the DSM-IV
     tool Global Assessment of Functioning.
    Expanded service languages: Spanish and Hmong.
    Increased number of court referrals.
    Increased services to other agencies including CPS, Spirit of Woman, Comprehensive
     Alcohol Program, and ASI-Professional & Counseling Services.

Further, in order to raise resources that are unavailable from FUSD, FFCC has embarked on a
number of ventures to offer services to other helping agencies. Many families in the community
are strained due to lack of resources resulting in symptomatic behavior ending in removal of
children from the care of parents. While many children are placed in foster care, many parents
are placed in drug and alcohol treatment. The court mandates that in order for these families to
be reunited, parent must complete a variety of treatments including but not limited to drug
treatment, parenting classes, anger management, and domestic violence. Fresno Family
Counseling Center is in a position to provide some of these services.


Sources of Funding

As stated elsewhere the FUSD administrative support was not forthcoming this past year. The
Director, students, faculty, have had to rely on overload hours, student volunteers, and other help
to keep the operation running. FUSD does provided the lease and janitorial support estimated at
$9,600. Client fees are estimated at $8,500.

Funding for On-Going Counseling Program
FUSD Contract                                                     0
FUSD Building and Maintenance Support                        $9,600
FFCC Client Fees                                             $8,500
Homan Contract                                             $12,000
Prop 10 Preschool Homan                                      $2,700
Subtotal                                                $32,800.00
*Estimated for fiscal year through June 30, 2004.
# Divided into thirds given the 18 month contract. To date there have been no referrals, thus the
     amount shown is a shadow.
Space and Equipment Utilization

Fresno Family Counseling Center is located at 1580 N. Millbrook in a building provided by
Fresno Unified School District. The space is approximately 1100 square feet. With the increase
of utilization over the past two years, the Center has outgrown this small space. Group
counseling space and administrative space is particularly insufficient. The Center is working
with the School District and University to locate new space that will allow the Center to compete
for larger grants.

Over the years the Center purchased 3 computers, 5 audio-visual observation/recording stations,
and basic office equipment and is currently able to maintain this equipment. Computers are out
of date and should be replaced. The other electronic equipment needs replacement as well. The
hallmark of out nationally accredited CACREP Program is supervision. The foundation of our
supervision is the ability to observe counseling sessions in vivo via video and audio equipment.
That ability has been seriously hampered due to the failure of several pieces of equipment.
Liability issues are stake here as the ability to supervise intensively via audio and video puts the
supervision at risk.


Risk Management

The Center consults with the university‘s legal advisors with all contracts; each faculty member
and student carries professional liability insurance.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

    Identify possibilities for relocation; we cannot expand our services without additional
     space. This goal was proposed last year and is still valid. The director has met with FUSD
     staff to discuss the matter and they are looking for a solution. Other possibilities include
     exploring other school district sites for expansion. Another idea is to explore with input
     from the school of business with the idea of spinning out of the university to start an
     independent 501c3 entity.
    Renew Fresno Unified School District contract during difficult budget situation. This goal
     was not accomplished. The FUSD administrative budget was pulled as of July 2003. This
     has been a major burden, as students have had to cover the telephones. This is a crucial
     issue as the contact with the public is first made via the telephone. Many times the callers
     are in crisis and we have established procedures to assess and evaluate callers for potential
     harm. There are many times when there is no phone coverage. We have to use an
     answering machine and reply to messages sometimes a day after the message has posted.
    Renew contract Homan Elementary School and Sanctuary Youth Shelter. The Homan
     School contract is in the process of being renewed. We have already developed a contract
     for about $8,000 for a special preschool project, which is being funded to the school
     through Prop 10, the Tobacco tax fund. The Sanctuary Youth Shelter contract is
     nonexistent as of this moment however an effort is being made to reestablish a relationship.
    Continue to work with School District on joint grant projects and possible MediCal
     funding. We have been looking forward to working with FUSD personnel to collaborate
     on potential funding sources. We did find a potential federal grant source for funding but it
     turned out that FUSD already has several of these grants, but none of the monies are
     earmarked for FFCC use. Formerly, MediCal reimbursement was being used within the
     FUSD system to generate funds to use for administrative overhead at FFCC, but the
     practice was halted for unknown reason.
    Seek additional grant opportunities. Recently a dialogue was initiated with the California
     Endowment Foundation, which is seeking to fund collaborative projects, which are aimed
     at resolving problems in health care delivery at the systemic level.
    Provide anger management and domestic violence services for treatment facilities in Fresno
     County, which target CPS, referred parents. FFCC provides the services and bills the
     county for the services. At this time the billing process is just being initiated. The
     potential source of monies available is estimated at about $1000 per month.
    Obtain a grant to update client record data set. Crucial information in the data set is
     missing or inputted incorrectly. We will begin to clean up the records starting this summer
     with student help, but to do an efficient job, dedicated time is necessary. This would form
     the basis for seeking out grants and awards for proving this low cost counseling service.
    Explore the possibility of expanding services to the community at large through evolving
     into an independent business. We will seek out consultation from the school of business
     and explore the organizational and liability issues by undertaking such a venture.
    Develop an advisory board specifically for FFCC. At this time advisory input is accepted
     from students and faculty. It would worth it to explore formalizing this input by
     developing an advisory board made up of faculty and alumni.


Request for Renewal of the Unit

We are requesting that the ancillary unit be renewed.
                                Ancillary Unit Annual Report
                          Joyce M. Huggins Early Education Center
                                 July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Ancillary Unit

The Joyce M. Huggins Early Education Center (Huggins Center) in the School of Education and
Human Development at California State University, Fresno is a regional model for best practices
in early childhood education (ECE). The Huggins Center includes the Marlene M. Fansler Infant
and Toddler Program, the D. Paul Fansler Preschool and Fansler Institute for Leadership in ECE.
The Huggins Center provides training, demonstration and research opportunities for
undergraduate and graduate students in education, child development, marriage, child and family
therapy and other related areas as well as for professionals in the field. It is the mission of the
Huggins Center to 1) offer training consistent with local and state educational reform efforts
aimed at improving early childhood education, curriculum, interprofessional collaboration and
services to children and families; 2) be an exemplary model for innovative programs for young
children and 3) to offer the highest quality of early education and care to children of low income
student families.


Administrative Housing of Ancillary Unit

The Huggins Early Education Center is part of the ECE Program in the Department of Literacy
and Early Education in the Kremen School of Education and Human Development. The Director
of the Huggins Center is Shareen Abramson, Fansler Chair for Leadership in ECE, a tenured
faculty member in the ECE Program. Because children are enrolled in the Huggins Center
through Fresno State Programs for Children, oversight and coordination for this aspect of the
program and the terms, conditions and technical requirements for early education contracts are
provided by the Program Director for Fresno State Programs for Children, Catherine Mathis.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

More than 500 students, teachers and other visitors utilize the Huggins Center annually for
observation, course assignments, fieldwork and class assignments.

The Huggins Center and its staff are featured frequently on Under Five in 30 Minutes, a weekly
program on ECE produced by public television.

The Huggins Center was selected as a model of quality for a regional conference on the
importance of preschool organized by Preschool California, an initiative sponsored by the
Hewlett Packard Foundation. As a result, an article on the center appeared in the Fresno Bee as
well as being featured on the evening news broadcasts by many Fresno television stations.
Publications and Materials Produced:

Abramson, S. & Atwal, K. 2003. Teachers as co-inquirers. In J. Hendricks (Ed.), Next steps in
teaching the Reggio way. (Book Chapter)

Abramson, S. One, two . . . a hundred languages: Semiotic competence and the Reggio Emilia
approach. Submitted for publication.

Rogers, G., Abramson, S. & Taintor, A. Documenting learner to understand the learning: The co-
inquiry process. (instructional video).

Grants and Awards:

D. Paul Fansler Institute for Leadership in ECE and Marlene M. Fansler Infant and Toddler
Program $150,000.

Tour of Reggio Inspired School, First Five, $3,500.

Leadership in Action, First Five, $9,700.

D. Paul Fansler Chair for Leadership in Early Childhood Education (became official)

Regional Presentations:

Organized ―Tour of a Reggio Inspired Preschool,‖ Santa Monica, CA., 9/5-6/03

More than 50 early childhood educators attended the two-day program that also included a tour
of the Huggins Center. The program was co-coordinated with Fresno City College. Written
student evaluations rated the program as good to excellent.

Sponsored ―Leadership in Action, a two-part professional development program for ECE
administrators and teachers.

Part I: Presentation by Paula Jorde Bloom, National Louis University, Chicago

Outstanding presentation by this national authority on ECE leadership received highest ratings
possible from 50 ECE administrators who attended this one-day intensive workshop.

Part II: ECE Leaders for Quality Programs

This professional development program was co-coordinated with Fresno City College faculty.
More than 75 early childhood educators attended this program that examined leadership in
multicultural settings and included a tour of the Huggins Center. Written evaluations by students
rated the program good to excellent.
State Presentations:

Presentation by Fansler Chair, ―Documenting, Reflecting, Planning, Adapting,‖ PITC Advanced
Graduate Conference, Berkeley, 10/29/03

National Presentations:

Creating a Culture of Childhood in the Center. NAEYC Annual Conference, Chicago. 11/05/ 03

This presentation on the Huggins Center was made by three Huggins Center teachers, Fansler
Chair and Program Director. More than 250 attendees at our session.

Tour of Chicago Commons, Reggio Inspired Head Start, Chicago, 11/03/ 03

Staff attending the national conference were able to participate in this all-day intensive training.


Sources of Funding

Sources of funding for the Huggins Early Education Center include: California State Department
of Education grants (continuing), tuition fees, general fund (student referendum), private
foundation support and other development initiatives.


Space and Equipment Utilization

The Huggins Center is located on the Atrium Level of the Education Building and also includes
the adjacent ―Environments Playground.‖ The Huggins Center is responsible for the purchase of
equipment for the program.


Risk Management

The Huggins Center conforms to system-wide and university policies and procedures related to
risk management. Examples include having a safety plan and safety team that meets regularly,
annual unannounced inspections from state authorities, posted emergency plans and monthly fire
drills. The Huggins Center also meets all safety standards specified in Title XXII.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

Goals and objectives for the next year include:
    Continue to assess and improve the quality of the Marlene M. Fansler Infant and Toddler
     Program and D. Paul Fansler Preschool as regional models for other ECE programs and as
     a professional development resource.
     Continue to develop the Fansler Institute for Leadership in ECE and form a council of ECE
      experts who are graduates of the ECE program as a community resource for professional
      development and consultation services.

    Sponsor a major professional development institute: Responsive Early Education for Young
      Children: A Resource for Growth, Change and Transformation. This program involves
      more than 10 ECE agencies and organizations and co-coordination with faculty from
      Fresno City College. Two weekend programs and a major conference for 300 will be held.
      Presenters will include nationally and internationally recognized authorities in ECE.


Request for Renewal of the Unit

Given the consistent record of continuing accomplishments for the Huggins Early Education
Center as a demonstration model for early education and its functions in the preparation and
professional development of student, teachers and others and as an educational service to
children, families and the community, renewal of the ancillary unit is requested.


APPENDICES

A.    The financial statement prepared by the California State University, Fresno Foundation for
      Fresno State Programs for Children.

B.    Copies of each of the preceding three annual reports for the Huggins Center.

C.    A copy of the preceding three year‘s final budgets for Fresno State Programs for Children.
                                Ancillary Unit Annual Report
                                National Center of Excellence
                                 July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Ancillary Unit

The primary purpose of the National Center of Excellence (NCE) is to provide meaningful
assistance to rural communities in a manner that fosters a sustainable approach to community
development. Its mission is to build community capacity to ensure continued economic vitality
in the San Joaquin Valley. The NCE is committed to facilitating economic opportunity,
supporting community development, establishing and maintaining community-based
partnerships, and participating in strategic rural community visions for change.


Administrative Housing of Ancillary Unit

The NCE is currently housed in the Kremen School of Education and Human Development. Dr.
Basurto, Assistant Professor and the Executive Director of the NCE, reports directly to Dr. Paul
Beare, Dean of the Kremen School of Education and Human Development. The Executive
Director of the NCE works with various individuals within the school and local community
leaders to provide economic development, education, and technical assistance to rural
communities. The Executive Director also assigns project responsibility to its consultants,
administrative staff, and volunteers, and manages the budget.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

The major accomplishment for this fiscal year was to work with SBC, Southern Bell Company,
who contributed foundational money to deliver broadband service to neighboring rural
communities from the City of Parlier. In addition, the NCE worked closely with Cruz Ramos,
City Manager for the City of San Joaquin, to attract foundation resources for both the city and
NCE.

Other accomplishments included the following:

    NCE partnered with the National Hispanic University and supported that submittal of a
     grant proposal in the amount of $199,500.00 to the Verizon Foundation. The purpose of
     this grant was to provide technology training via broadband service.

    NCE Consultant, Julian Chapa worked with the communities of Sanger, Fowler, Selma,
     Orange Cove and Reedley to provide technical assistance on economic development
     planning. On behalf of the NCE, he prepared a Strategic Economic Development Plan
     (SEDP) for each of the above communities. The SEDP document addressed key
     community development goals and objectives, provided a community economic analysis
     and an implementation plan component for community projects.
Sources of Funding

Funding for the National Centers of Excellence (ten in all) was originally provided by the United
States Department of Agriculture – Office of Community Development (USDA-OCD) in 1998
for a period of five years. Since then, federal appropriations for all ten NCE‘s were
discontinued. However, the NCE is in the process of submitting proposals for federal and non-
federal funding to renew the NCE with appropriate funding.


Space and Equipment Utilization

Per the in-kind requirements set by the USDA-OCD, the Kremen School of Education and
Human Development has provided a one-person office with a telephone and computer line.
NCE archives, current files, office furniture and equipment are housed there.


Risk Management

The NCE is in compliance with California State University‘s Risk Management policies and
procedures.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

The goals and objectives for the upcoming year area as follows:

1.   To provide educational and technical assistance to rural communities in the areas of
     economic development, technology, literacy and business training, project evaluation, and
     infrastructures.

2.   To seek funding from federal and non-federal sources.

3.   To procure assistance from the USDA field office in Washington, D. C.


Request for Renewal of the Unit

The National Center of Excellence is requesting renewal for another year. Only with the in-kind
assistance from California State University, Fresno can the NCE meet its goals and objectives.
This assistance also allows the NCE to maintain its current liaison with its neighboring rural
communities.
Appendices

A.   California State University, Fresno Foundation Financial Statements – Not required.

B.   NCE‘s annual reports are on file at the Office of the Provost.

C.   NCE‘s final budgets are filed with the California State University, Fresno Foundation.
                               Ancillary Unit Annual Report
                          San Joaquin Valley Mathematics Project
                                July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Ancillary Unit

The San Joaquin Valley Mathematics Project (SVJMP) is in its 15th year of providing teachers
throughout the Central Valley with a variety of high quality professional development and
leadership opportunities designed to increase their knowledge of mathematics and their
effectiveness in teaching mathematics.


Administrative Housing of Ancillary Unit

CSUF is the fiscal agent for the SJVMP. The Principal Investigator and Faculty Advisors for the
SJVMP are faculty at Fresno State. There are no special facilities for the SJVMP other than the
faculty members' offices. The current Acting Director of the SJVMP is the mathematics
coordinator for Fresno County Office of Education. There is a strong collaboration between the
County Office and CSUF.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

More than 500 educators from 150 schools in our region have received professional development
through the SJVMP over the past year, and we foresee this increasing number by over 100
through the end of June 2004. Details follow below:

     * 2004 Summer Leadership Institute: The SJVMP Leadership Institute will be held on
     June 21 – July 2, 2004. The institute will begin with five 8-hour days in Fresno, followed
     by a residential week in Oakhurst. This year, the K-8 Summer Institute will have two
     primary foci for the 40 teachers involved: Cognitive Guided Instruction and Algebra for
     English Language Learners.

     Dr. Jeannie Behrend will facilitate the Cognitive Guided Instruction strand, providing close
     to 40 hours of intensive instruction for up to 20 K-8 teachers, usually as a morning session
     during the two-week institute. Dr. Rajee Amarasinghe will provide another 30-40 hours of
     intensive mathematics instruction for these same teachers, usually as afternoon sessions.

     A team of three SJVMP alumni, Lori Hamada, Nanette Mattos and Diana Ruiz, will deliver
     the Algebra for English Language Learners strand, utilizing the CMP developed curriculum
     from UCLA. This 80-hour curriculum includes intensive mathematics instruction
     embedded in the ELD instruction. These 20 teachers will remain in this strand for most of
     their 8-hours of morning and afternoon instruction each day.
Evening sessions will be devoted to research and leadership issues, facilitated by different
people throughout the institute, involving all 40 participants working together. These
participants will then continue their mathematics instruction by participating in the
requisite Super Saturdays that will be offered throughout the 2004-05 school year.

* SJVMP "Super Saturdays": Although the primary intent of the Super Saturdays is to
provide follow-up to the summer Leadership Institute, registration is open to all interested
educators. Topics this year have included the following: Literacy Through Mathematics,
Cognitively Guided Instruction, Technology in the Mathematics Classroom, and an In-
Depth Look at the TIMSS Video Study with Dr. James Hiebert, director of the study.

Dr. Carol Fry Bohlin coordinated the latter event, which received financial support from six
districts and county offices of education. The Friday evening session, entitled, ―Improving
Mathematics Classroom Teaching: Lessons from the TIMSS Video Studies‖ was attended
by almost 200 teachers, administrators, and professors from throughout the Central San
Joaquin Valley and included opening remarks from President John Welty. All participants
at the Friday evening session received Helping Children Learn Mathematics and a recent
issue of Educational Leadership, which featured articles on mathematics. On Saturday,
approximately 100 participants returned for ―Exploring Ways to Enrich Classroom
Mathematics Teaching‖ where Dr. Hiebert led a discussion forum around the latest
research on teaching K-12 mathematics. Those who returned for the Saturday session also
received a copy of Dr. Hiebert's book, The Teaching Gap. Evaluations from participants
were extremely positive; a compiled copy of these evaluations is available from Dr. Bohlin.

* SJVMP Leadership Development: On January 30-February 1, 2004 the SJVMP 3rd
Annual Tier II Leadership Winter Retreat was held in Three Rivers. Staff and alumni from
both the San Joaquin Valley and the San Luis Obispo/Bakersfield Projects were invited,
along with others in leadership roles in our service area districts and county offices. 50
participants delved deeply into the research on adult learning, the national standards for
staff development, design and implementation of teacher workshops, and a mathematics
session led by Dr. Gwen Fisher from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo. On the second day, these
participants had the unique opportunity to spend an entire morning and afternoon with Dr.
Dennis Sparks, Executive Director of the National Staff Development Council. As leaders
in their districts, counties and universities, the participants then had an in-depth update on
the No Child Left Behind legislation and its implications to schools by the Region VII
Executive Director of S4, who provided resources to assist these leaders in their local work.

* CPDI (California Professional Development Institute) Activities: During 2003-2004,
the SJVMP has had the opportunity to work with hundreds of teachers in the Valley using
the LUCI professional development materials developed out of UCLA. As an Article II
approved AB 466 provider, the SJVMP has had the opportunity to meet the needs of many
High Priority districts in our service region. Our Coordinator of Professional Learning,
Lisa Portela, continues to work closely with districts, helping them to understand the need
to move to Article III approved AB 466 providers.
     * Partnership Activities: (1) The SJVMP worked in depth with both teachers and para-
     professionals from Madera Unified School District using the LUCI curriculum as the initial
     institute and then facilitating the development of professional portfolios documenting their
     80 hours of follow-up. With the pending identification as School Assistance and
     Intervention Team (SAIT) schools, Madera Unified will no longer be able to use the
     SJVMP as its AB 466 provider. Those participants who have worked with us in the past
     will be encouraged to continue on into the SJVMP Leadership Institute and become leaders
     within their district. We will continue to provide services to the district as needed.


Sources of Funding

Base funds received from the state serve to support the infrastructure of the SJVMP. Additional
income generated from school districts to support SJVMP activities are deposited to the SJVMP
income account at the Foundation. Monies have been received from sponsoring districts (e.g.,
Clovis Unified, Fresno Unified, Central Unified, Visalia Unified, and Hanford Elementary). All
monies are expended on Project-related activities.


Space and Equipment Utilization

As stated above, there are no special facilities for the SJVMP other than the faculty members'
offices. The Project does have a mailbox in the Education Building, Room 252, and occasionally
makes use of the copier in that room.


Risk Management

We conform to systemwide and university policies and procedures related to risk management.
We also fill make sure to list our retreat centers as an additional insured on CSUF policies.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

1.   The 4th Annual Tier II Leadership Winter Retreat is in the planning stages for January
     2005.
2.   Hanford Elementary School District has contracted with the SJVMP to provide the 120-
     hour LUCI-based Professional Development Institute for to up to 90 of their teachers
     beginning in June 2004.
3.   Working collaboratively with the Fresno County Office of Education (which is applying to
     be an Article III approved AB 466 Provider), SJVMP hopes to provide much of the needed
     80-hours of follow-up training for participating teachers throughout the Valley in the years
     to come. These will be mostly through the use of LUCI or ELD (English Language
     Development) curriculum, but SJVMP will also develop tailor-made standards-based
     workshops when requested to do so. We will also continue to offer facilitation for Lesson
     Study groups throughout the region.
Request for Renewal of the Unit

We do not believe that the SJVMP fits the criteria for an ancillary unit.
                                        APPENDIX

A financial statement for Accounts 33870 (SJVMP) and 32696 (SJVMP activities) is available
from our grant accountant at the CSUF Foundation (278-0851, Wilma Satterberg).

Name of Project: San Joaquin Valley Mathematics Project
BUDGET--SJVMP 2003-2004                                                 CSMP Funds
PERSONNEL
1a. SALARIES
                               Rajee Amarasinghe (2003-2004 AY)                  $9,000
                     Carol Fry Bohlin (Summer 03/winter break 04)                $5,000
                           Rajee Amarasinghe (Summer Inst. 2004)                 $3,000
                               Jeanie Behrend (Summer Inst. 2004)                $3,000
                   Nanette Mattos, Diana Ruiz (Summer Inst. 2004)                $5,500
                            Summer Institute 2004 Guest Speakers                 $1,000
                               Winter Retreat 2003 Guest Speakers                $1,500

1a. CONTRACT BUYOUT
                   Carol Fry Bohlin (1 course/sem.-backfill)                     $9,000

1b. OFFICE ASSISTANCE
                                     Office Assistant (April-SI 2004)            $7,500

Total Salaries                                                                  $44,500

2. BENEFITS
                                          Project Leadership @ 29 %              $7,540
                            Other Staff (& Summer Faculty) @ 16 %                $1,760

Total Benefits                                                                   $9,300

3. SUPPLIES & EXPENSE
Reproduction/Printing                                                            $2,500
Mailing                                                                          $1,000
Supplies                                                                         $2,700
Events and Refreshments
  Summer Institute (ECCO)                                                       $15,000
  Other                                                                          $3,000

4. Travel
  Summer Institute, meetings, etc.                                               $2,000

Indirect (5%) [non-UC sites only]                                                $4,000
GRAND TOTAL                                                                     $84,000
                               Ancillary Unit Annual Report
                             San Joaquin Valley Writing Project
                                July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Ancillary Unit

Since 1979, the San Joaquin Valley Writing Project (SJVWP) has been dedicated to improving
the quality of writing instruction in grades K-college in Fresno, Kings, Tulare, Madera, and
Mariposa Counties. Each year a cadre of exceptional classroom teachers is selected through an
interview process to participate in the Summer Invitational Institute at CSUF. Then these
teachers become Teacher Consultants in the SJVWP and continue to work with the writing
project in a variety of ways. They continue their own learning about writing instruction and they
provide staff development and other types of mentoring in area schools.

The SJVWP supports four types of programs for teachers:
    Invitational programs to train exemplary teachers to become Teacher Consultants and work
     with the SJVWP throughout their professor careers.
    Continuity programs to provide additional training for Teacher Consultants
    Open programs for preservice and inservice teachers to provide training on how to teach
     writing more effectively. Types of programs include staff development programs in
     schools, district- and county-wide programs, courses taught at CSUF.
    Partnerships with low-achieving schools to solve identified instructional problems.
In addition, the SJVWP runs school-year and summer writing programs for children and
adolescents in area schools.

The SJVWP provides these services that directly contribute to and support CSU Fresno Teacher
Education programs:
    A Teacher Pathways program to provide training for college students studying to become
     elementary and secondary teachers, including the West Hills College-CSU Fresno
     Partnership.
    Collaboration with the RIAP program to provide inservice training for teachers in targeted
     high schools.
    Recruitment of teachers for master‘s degree programs and advanced certificate programs
     through the Summer Invitational Institute, and open programs.
    Many of the SJVWP programs are offered for academic credit through the Division of
     Extended Education.
    Collaboration with the other California Subject Matter Projects housed at CSU Fresno
     through the Teacher Leadership Collaborative of Central California (TLC3)


Administrative Housing of Ancillary Unit

Dr. Tompkins is a tenured professor in the Department of Literacy and Early Education, Kremen
School of Education and Human Development, and the SJVWP is housed administratively in Dr.
Tompkins‘ unit.
Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

During the Summer 2003, the SJVWP sponsored the following programs:
    An invitational institute at CSUF
    Advanced institutes for Teacher Consultants
    Institute for teachers at McLane High School
    Young author programs at Sequoia Middle School, Manchester Gate Elementary School,
     and McLane High School

The San Joaquin Valley Writing Project has developed partnerships (long-term contracts) to
provide teacher leadership with schools and school districts in our service area. The partnerships
for 2003-2004 are:
     Sequoia Middle School
     McLane High School
     Roosevelt High School
     Edison High School
     Washington Union High School
     American Union Elementary SD
     Orange Center Elementary SD
     Cutler-Orosi USD
     Kings Canyon USD

Other SJVWP-sponsored programs during the 2003-2004 academic year included:
    Our 25th anniversary celebration for Teacher Consultants
    Individual presentations by SJVWP Teacher-Consultants at schools across our service area
    Study group on the qualities of good writing
    Study group of the EL students‘ grammar errors
    Book club
    Writing group to produce 50 Ways to Develop Strategic Writers (to be published by
     Prentice Hall, in press)
    SJVWP-sponsored presentations at the CWP Conference and CATE

Other achievements during 2003-2004 include:
    SJVWP infrastructure strengthened with the appointment of two inservice directors with
     specific duties and responsibilities.
    The SJVWP was selected as one of 9 NWP sites to participate in a three-year National
     Reading Initiative.
    The SJVWP website is operational at.
    Gail Tompkins serves on the California Writing Project Leadership Team.
Sources of Funding

The SJVWP is affiliated with the California Writing Project and the National Writing Project; we
receive funding from both organizations. During 2003-2004, the San Joaquin Valley Writing
Project received $57,000 from the California Writing Project (CSMP-state funds) and $43,000
from the National Writing Project (federal funds). The grand total was $100,000. In addition,
the SJVWP receives royalities from two books published by Prentice Hall.

These funds are used to support SJVWP programs for teachers, including the Summer
Invitational Institute, advanced programs, continuity programs, and to pay for staff positions. In
addition, the SJVWP receives monies for staff development programs and partnerships from
schools, school districts, and other educational agencies which is used to pay Teacher
Consultants for developing their presentations, to pay for substitute teachers, and for supplies
and other materials.


Space and Equipment Utilization

The SJVWP is housed in Dr. Tompkins‘ office in the Department of Literacy and Early
Education, and Sharron Smith, the SJVWP Administrative Assistant also works out of this
office. Books, equipment, and other supplies are stored in a large closet in ED 153.


Risk Management

The SJVWP conforms to university policies and procedures related to risk management.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

Our plans and priorities for 2004-2005 include:
    Expand our partnership programs in low-achieving school districts, including FUSD.
    Conduct the Summer Invitational Institute to train 20 additional Teacher Consultants
    Conduct open summer programs and programs for young writers
    Develop new continuity programs to develop teacher leaders


Request for Renewal of the Unit

I request that the San Joaquin Valley Writing Project be renewed for the 2004-2005 academic
year and that I, Gail Tompkins, continue as site director. The SJVWP continues to be actively
involved in developing teacher leadership and working with schools across our service area, and
funding has been received to support our activities over the next year.
                                Ancillary Unit Annual Report
                Strategies for Teacher Excellence Promoting Student Success
                                 July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Ancillary Unit

Strategies for Teacher Excellence Promoting Student Success (STEPSS) is a 5-year National
Science Foundation Local Systemic Change (LSC) project that received official funding
($3,850,000) in August, 1998. It is primarily based at the Visalia Unified School District offices.
The goal of the project is to improve and support change of elementary teachers' knowledge and
confidence in mathematics content, learning theory, assessment and instructional strategies.
STEPSS is currently in its final extension year.


Administrative Housing of Ancillary Unit

CSUF has a subcontract from the Visalia Unified School District (VUSD)--the STEPSS fiscal
agent--to provide support for our off-campus MA in Education program. The Co-Principal
Investigator for STEPSS is Dr. Carol Fry Bohlin. There are no special facilities for STEPSS
other than Dr. Bohlin's office. The current Director of STEPSS is a mathematics curriculum
consultant for the Visalia Unified School district. This has facilitated a strong collaboration
between VUSD and CSUF.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

It has been a significant accomplishment for VUSD to have had approximately 750 VUSD
teachers and administrators, 11 preservice teachers, and 10-out-of-district teachers participate in
STEPSS training over the past 6 years. This does not include the "mini-STEPSS" experience
received by over 40 preservice teachers enrolled in CSUF's Elementary Mathematics Methods
courses taught by STEPSS coaches/evaluators in Visalia over the past year.

Students in the third and final STEPSS-supported master's cohort which began in January 2003
continued making significant progress through their program. Because of the relatively low
numbers in the cohort and the serious budget situation at Fresno State, the program was forced to
move from stateside to the Division of Continuing and Global Education. This necessitated the
writing of a proposal for an Off-Campus MA in Education (Curriculum and Instruction option)
degree program. The proposal wove its way through the campus approval process from October
2003 through May 2004, finally receiving official approval from the Senate on 3 May 2004. (A
copy of the proposal is available from Dr. Carol Fry Bohlin, 278-0237.)

Dr. Carol Fry Bohlin coordinated the analysis of attitudinal and achievement data for students
whose teachers had participated in the STEPSS program for varying numbers of years. She
submitted the findings in a proposal to the American Educational Research Association (AERA)
for possible presentation at the 2004 AERA annual meeting in San Diego. The paper was
accepted for presentation and was delivered by Dr. Bohlin on 13 April 2004 (title: "Mathematics
Attitudes and Achievement Among Students in Grades 3-6: Impact of the Duration of
Teacher Participation in an NSF-Funded Professional Development Project").


Sources of Funding

Base funds received from the state serve to support the infrastructure of the SJVMP. Additional
income generated from school districts to support SJVMP activities are deposited to the SJVMP
income account at the Foundation. Monies have been received from sponsoring districts (e.g.,
Clovis Unified, Fresno Unified, Central Unified, Visalia Unified, and Hanford Elementary). All
monies are expended on Project-related activities.


Space and Equipment Utilization

As stated above, there are no special facilities for STEPSS at CSUF other than Dr. Bohlin's
offices.


Risk Management

We conform to systemwide and university policies and procedures related to risk management
for graduate students taking courses from CSUF professors.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

    Most of the members of the third STEPSS master's cohort should write their projects or
     theses in Spring 2005 and graduate that same semester.
    We plan to continue researching student performance and attitudes related to the level of
     teachers' participation in STEPSS professional development activities. We also plan to
     submit articles based on the research for publication and for presentation at various
     conferences.


Request for Renewal of the Unit

We do not believe that the STEPSS fits the criteria for an ancillary unit.
                                         APPENDIX

A financial statement for Account 33948 (STEPSS) is available from the project's grant
accountant at the CSUF Foundation (278-0851, Wilma Satterberg).
            STRATEGIES FOR TEACHER EXCELLENCE PROMOTING STUDENT SUCCESS
                                   2002-2003 Annual Report

[Note: In this report, new information pertaining to the current year is designated with "*2002-
2003." A day-by-day summary of major Project-related activities is included in chart form
within the first section of this report.]

Project Director:     Samantha Tate, Visalia Unified School District

Co-PIs:               Dr. Carol Fry Bohlin, California State University, Fresno
                      Dr. Richard Thiessen, Fresno Pacific University
                      Carlyn Lambert, Visalia Unified School District

Strategies for Teacher Excellence Promoting Student Success (STEPSS) is a five-year, $3.9
million project that received initial funding in August 1998. STEPSS was designed to strengthen
and enhance the mathematics content knowledge and instructional expertise of over 900 K-6
teachers, administrators, and preservice teachers in the Visalia Unified School District (VUSD).
The district is located in the heart of California's agriculturally rich San Joaquin Valley and
serves 25,000 ethnically- and linguistically-diverse students in grades K-12. California State
University, Fresno (CSUF) and Fresno Pacific University (FPU) are the major graduate
universities in the region and are active partners in the STEPSS project. Faculty members from
each campus coordinate the STEPSS master's cohorts and provide mathematics content classes
for Project participants. The Project Director, Samantha Tate, coordinates grant activities within
the District and oversees six full-time teachers on special assignment who serve as grade-level
Math Coaches for the Project.

Project Goals – The STEPSS Project consists of a number of elements that are carefully
designed and interwoven to produce systemic, long-term change at each school site and to
achieve the project's major goals: (a) to increase and support elementary teachers' knowledge and
confidence in mathematical content, learning theory, assessment techniques, and instructional
strategies; (b) to develop administrators and teachers to serve as mathematics curricular leaders
and peer coaches at their respective sites, and (c) to increase the mathematics achievement of all
of the district's students.

Teacher Institute – Each year, the entire faculty from four to five K-6 schools participate in
STEPSS-related experiences. This model (as opposed to a cross-district, grade-level-span model)
is quite effective in developing a community of learners within each school. The initial
experience in STEPSS is an intensive one-week Institute, 'Teaching and Assessing for
Understanding," led by Kathy Richardson and consultants from Mathematical Perspectives.
During the Institute (which is typically held at twice a year to accommodate various year-round
teaching schedules), teachers learn ways to search for evidence that each student is effectively
developing the capacity for independent mathematical thinking. Attention is given to creating a
learning environment that allows teachers to assess individual children and meet the range of
instructional needs in their classrooms. This Institute is credited with challenging and changing
teachers' perceptions of the nature of mathematics and what it means to be an effective teacher of
mathematics. During 1998-1999, 229 preservice teachers, administrators, and teachers from nine
schools participated in one of these Institutes. During 1999-2000, four new schools were added
to the Project. That year, a total of 118 preservice teachers, teachers, and site administrators
participated in the Teacher Institutes. Four new schools were added to the project during 2000-
2001, bringing the total number of Project schools to seventeen. Four new schools were added to
the project during the 2001-2002 school year. That year, a total of 213 preservice teachers,
teachers, and site administrators participated in the Teacher Institutes
*2002-2003–In 2002-2003, the final three school sites in Visalia Unified were involved in the
project. A total of 129 preservice teachers, teachers, and site administrators participated in the
Teacher Institutes during the year. It has been a significant accomplishment for VUSD to have
had approximately 750 VUSD teachers and administrators, 11 preservice teachers, and 10-out-
of-district teachers participate in STEPSS training over the past 5 years. This does not include
the "mini-STEPSS" experience received by over 200 preservice teachers enrolled in CSUF and
FPU Elementary Mathematics Methods courses taught by STEPSS coaches in Visalia.

Teacher Leader Institute – In addition to the Teacher Institute, a weeklong "Institute for
Teacher Leaders in Mathematics" is provided for administrators and for teachers desiring a
greater leadership role at their school site. The institute provides an in-depth look into the theory
of how children learn mathematics, effective instructional practices, and ways to provide peer
support. The Teacher Leaders are viewed as key mathematics resource teachers by others at their
school site and supplement the support provided by the STEPSS Coaches.

Each year, the Project modifies and enhances the format of the Leadership Institute for the next
cohort of leaders based on feedback from the current teacher leaders. During 2000-2001, the
five-day Teacher Leadership Institute was expanded to seven days–three days in early fall for the
initial Leadership Institute, followed by two days in January and another two days in May. This
format allows leaders to have yearlong support from Kathy Richardson.

Teachers and site administrators participated in the Teacher Leadership Institute in the spring of
2002. The teachers identified the need for quality mathematics materials to aid in implementing a
solid mathematics program for students. Investigations in Number, Data, and Space (TERC)
units were shared and discussed with the teachers.

*2002-2003–In addition to the Teacher Institutes offered to teachers, Investigations in Number,
Data, and Space training was offered throughout the year to 3rd-6th grade teachers who
recognized the need for quality mathematics resources in the upper grades. Gail Lowe –Parrino,
educational consultant, provided the training for teachers. Her extensive knowledge of the
California state standards and of the Investigations materials gave teachers the opportunity to
engage in meaningful mathematics.

Cognitive Peer Coaching – Another important element of the STEPSS training is a seven-hour
workshop in Cognitive Peer Coaching (CPC), provided by Bill Baker of the Institute for
Intelligent Behavior. Teachers learn how to assist a partner in critically assessing and reassessing
his or her lessons. "Planning" and "reflective" conversations are discussed and practiced during
the CPC sessions.
*2002-2003 – This year, a goal of the Project was for the Math Coaches to have extensive
training in the Cognitive Peer Coaching model and in turn be able to become coaching trainers
within the district. Bill Baker worked exclusively with the Math Coaches to help them transition
to this new role. Cognitive Coaching training for other district teachers was ongoing throughout
the year at each school site. This model became a necessity due to the shortage of substitute
teachers in Visalia Unified. This model has been quite effective in meeting the needs of teachers.

Behind the Glass – The Cognitive Peer Coaching Training is followed by a half-day 'Behind the
Glass' (BG) demonstration and a Practicum experience (two half-days). The BG classroom is a
large room that has been divided into an observation room and a classroom by a wall containing
a one-way window. A sound system allows observers to easily hear what is being said in the
classroom. During the BG demonstration, a Math Coach provides facilitation of a math lesson
for the teachers in the observation room while the lesson is taught in the classroom by another
Math Coach. Teachers are free to ask questions or dialogue with the Coach while the lesson is in
progress. (Preservice elementary teachers from CSUF and FPU also participate in a BG
experiences as part of their math methods classes.) At the conclusion of the demonstration, the
two Math Coaches model a 'reflective' conversation about the lesson. The teachers are then
allowed time for collaboration on a lesson that one will present the next day in the Practicum.

Practicum – During the Practicum, peer partners take turns observing and coaching each other.
Following a lesson, the observing teacher leads a reflective conversation with the teacher who
taught the lesson. The following day, the partners switch roles and repeat the process. The
teachers are provided approximately two hours each day for collaboration and planning for
future mathematics lessons. The Math Coaches are available for support as needed during these
two days.

University Courses/Workshops – Each teacher in the STEPSS program is required to
participate in at least 30 hours of mathematics content courses, which many teachers satisfy by
attending two series of five monthly half-day workshops offered by mathematics educators from
the partnership universities. This requirement is waived for teachers who elect to pursue a
master's degree with an emphasis in elementary mathematics education from either Fresno
Pacific University or California State University, Fresno. During the first year of the grant
(1998), over 80 teachers enrolled in one of these master's programs, their tuition and fees
supported in part by grant monies. A second cadre of 74 master's students began their graduate
studies at one of the two universities two years later.

*2002-2003 – In the spring of 2003, a cohort of 20 teachers began the journey to earn their
master's degree with a focus in K-6 mathematics curriculum and instruction from California
State University, Fresno. This is the third and final cohort to be supported by the STEPSS grant.

One of the most successful components of the STEPSS grant has been the surprising number of
teachers who accepted the challenge of earning a master's degree with a focus in K-6
mathematics–nearly 25% of the district's teachers now have their master's degree (and enhanced
knowledge of how to teach mathematics) as a result of the STEPSS grant.
On-site Coaching – During the year following a school's initial STEPSS experience, the Math
Coaches make monthly visits to the school for two days of coaching, support, collaborative
lesson planning, and/or demonstration lessons. Half of the members of the Coaching team
support grades K-2 teachers and the other half support grades 3-6 teachers. The first day, each
Coach brings a substitute teacher with a prepared math lesson who provides thirty minutes of
release time for each teacher so they can hold an individual planning session with their
respective Coach. The Coach uses the planning map from cognitive coaching to clarify a
teacher's needs. The support provided to the teachers during the second day is based on the
needs identified during the first day coaching session. Support can take many forms but
typically is modeling of teaching strategies, performing individual student assessment, and side-
by-side teaching and assessing with the teacher. During subsequent years, Coaches visit school
sites once a month, and the site Teacher Leaders assume more responsibility for site leadership
and support.

Six Math Coaches served STEPSS teachers at their school sites during 2001-2002. Three
Coaches supported K-2 teachers and three support the grades 3-6 teachers. During the Spring of
2002, one of the primary coaches left the team to become a full-time math coach at Goshen
Elementary School. This school was one of the first schools identified by the State Department
of Education as a Scholastic Audit School. (This is a term used by California to identity schools
where student performance on the SAT 9 over a 3-year period is unacceptably low; these schools
receive 4 visits a year from a state review team that identifies areas that need to be improved.)
The Scholastic Audit identified that the school site needed support in mathematics. The Math
Coaches were enlisted by the District to answer this call. Another elementary school, Houston,
was also designated by the State as a Scholastic Audit school. Instead of committing to the
school full-time for assistance, the Math Coaches arranged their schedules to coach teachers at
their school sites each week to provide additional support.

*2002-2003 – Five Math Coaches provided on site coaching support to the school sites during
2002-2003. The coaches focused on the Scholastic Audit Schools as well as the three schools
participating in their first year of STEPSS.

Ongoing Support – Opportunities are also provided during the year for teachers to visit any of
the dozen Demonstration Classrooms (classes of Teacher Leaders who invite observers to drop
in and observe lessons). In addition, teachers are invited to participate in a variety of after-school
mini-institutes on topics ranging from developing number concepts to effective assessment
strategies. Many schools hold Family Math Night events and host mini-workshops with math
consultants.
To facilitate communication and information distribution, Co-PI Bohlin maintains an online
listserv, COMET (California Online Mathematics Education Times), that keeps STEPSS staff
and interested teachers and administrators on the cutting edge of news, opportunities, and
information related to mathematics education (see http://csmp.ucop.edu/cmp/comet/).

*2002-2003 – Plans are in place to support math teacher leaders at each elementary school for
the 2003-2004 school year. The teacher leaders will act as curriculum liaisons between the
district office and site. These teachers will be supported with resources and materials to share
with the teachers at their site. In addition, the teacher leaders will use COMET as one resource to
report and share with teachers regarding local, state, and national news in mathematics
education. STEPSS will also continue financially supporting the teachers enrolled in the CSUF
master's program.


The sections below provide more details about the professional development opportunities
provided by STEPSS for teachers and administrators from every elementary school in Visalia
Unified School District over the 5-year period of the grant.


                 <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

To help the reader gain an overview of the Project, the outline below summarizes the
"STEPSS Experience" of a typical school.

Year 1:
All Teachers
• 'Teaching and Assessing for Understanding' workshop with Kathy Richardson or Deborah
Kitchens (5 days)
• Two days of Cognitive Coaching Training with Bill Baker
• Behind the Glass and Cognitive Coaching Observation; Collaborative planning for lesson to be
taught the next day
• Two half-day Practicum experience: One member of pair teaches, the other observes and uses
cognitive peer coaching techniques; the next day, the process is reversed
• Two days of Coaching per month (half-hour conversation with coach on the first day to identify
teachers' needs; coach support for teacher occurs during the second day (model lessons, student
assessment, team teaching/assessing)
• Monthly half-day Math Content Classes 5-6 times a year or participation in master's classes
• One day of grade-level conversations with Kathy Richardson (during one week in January,
Kathy meets with K-2 teachers on Monday night; with Gr. 3-4 teachers on Tuesday night; and
with Gr. 5-6 teachers on Wednesday night)
• Periodic observations of teachers who teach in Lab Classrooms during off-track time or sub-
covered time (There are 14 of these K-6 demonstration classrooms throughout the district. This
feature of the program was added at the request of participating teachers who wanted the chance
to see the strategies in action in classes with skilled teacher.)
• Leadership and participation in Family Math Nights, book chats, etc.

Additional Training for Grade-level Teacher Leaders and Administrators
• 'Institute for Teacher Leaders in Mathematics K-6' with Kathy Richardson or Deborah Kitchens
(5 days)
• Kathy meets with TLs for 2 days during January (mid-year) (Kathy meets with coaches for 2
days as well.)

Years 2+
All Teachers
• One day of coaching support per month (2000/2001Changed to two days of coaching support
per month)
• Continuation of mathematics content classes and support from district to attend mathematics
conferences/workshops
• Principals are encouraged to give TLs release time to peer coach or model a lesson for a
colleague.
• Leadership and participation in Family Math Nights, book chats, etc.

                 <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>


The charts below summarize teacher involvement in the various components of the
STEPSS program:


     STEPSS YEAR ONE COHORT

Teacher Institutes (35 hours per teacher)


        School                      Number of Participating Teachers                      Total # of
                                                                                          Teachers
                           Year 1        Year 2       Year 3       Year 4       Year 5
Goshen                       31            5            4            5            0              45
Highland                     31            4            1            3            2              41
Hurley                       28            4            1            2            2              37
Royal Oaks                   30            6            3            4            2              45
Union                        22            3            3            0            1              29
   Total # Teachers         142           22           12           14            7             197
   Total # Hours            4,970         770           420          490         231            6,881


Practicum (9 hours per teacher)


        School                      Number of Participating Teachers                       Total # of
                                                                                           Teachers
                           Year 1        Year 2       Year 3       Year 4       Year 5
Goshen                       31            0            1            0            0              32
Highland                     31            1            0            0            0              32
Hurley                       28            0            0            0            0              28
Royal Oaks                   30            0            0            2            0              32
Union                        22            2            0            0            0              24
   Total # Teachers         142            3            1            2            0             148
   Total # Hours            1,278           27           9            18           0            1,332
Cognitive Coaching (7 hours per teacher)


        School                      Number of Participating Teachers                  Total # of
                                                                                      Teachers
                          Year 1       Year 2       Year 3       Year 4      Year 5
Goshen                      30           9            1            0           0          40
Highland                    26           1            0            0           0          27
Hurley                      28           0            0            0           0          28
Royal Oaks                  27           9            2            0           0          38
Union                       17           2            0            0           0          19
   Total # Teachers        128          21            3            0           0         152
   Total # Hours            896          147          21            0          0        1,064


Content Classes (15 hours per teacher)


        School                      Number of Participating Teachers                  Total #of
                                                                                      Teachers
                          Year 1       Year 2       Year 3       Year 4      Year 5
Goshen                     11            0            1            4           4          20
Highland                   23            3            7            2           2          37
Hurley                     17            4            2            2           3          28
Royal Oaks                 23            6            4            8           9          50
Union                      13            1            0            2           2          18
   Total # Teachers        87           14           14           18          20         153
   Total # Hours           1,305         210          165          66         152       1,898


Leadership Institutes (35 hours per teacher for first training; 14 hours for second
training)


        School                      Number of Participating Teachers                  Total # of
                                                                                      Teachers
                          Year 1       Year 2       Year 3       Year 4      Year 5
Goshen                     4/8           3           1/1           0           0         8/9
Highland                   6/5           0           1/1           0           0         7/6
Hurley                     6/6           0            0            0           0         6/6
Royal Oaks                 5/8           2           3/2           0           0        10/10
Union                      5/7           0            0            0           0         5/7
   Total # Teachers       26/34          5           5/4           0           0        36/38
   Total # Hours          910/476        168        161/42          0          0      1,239/518
     STEPSS YEAR TWO COHORT


Teacher Institutes (35 hours per teacher)


         School                       Number of Participating Teachers            Total # of
                                                                                  Teachers
                              Year 2          Year 3       Year 4        Year 5
Elbow Creek                     22              2            1             3            28
Golden Oak                      31              6            3             2            42
Mineral King                    39              7            0             3            49
Mountain View                   35              4            2             1            42
   Total # Teachers            127             19            6             9           161
   Total # Hours               4,445           665          210           283.5      5,603.5


Practicum (9 hours per teacher)


         School                    Number of Participating Teachers               Total # of
                                                                                  Teachers
                              Year 2          Year 3       Year 4        Year 5
Elbow Creek                     22              0            0             0            22
Golden Oak                      31              0            0             0            31
Mineral King                    44              0            0             0            44
Mountain View                   33              0            0             0            33
   Total # Teachers            130              0            0             0           130
   Total # Hours               1,170            0            0             0          1,170


Cognitive Coaching (7 hours per teacher)


         School                       Number of Participating Teachers            Total # of
                                                                                  Teachers
                              Year 2          Year 3       Year 4        Year 5
Elbow Creek                     20              2            0             0            22
Golden Oak                      26              0            0             0            26
Mineral King                    34              5            0             0            39
Mountain View                   37              0            0             0            37
   Total # Teachers            117              7            0             0           124
   Total # Hours                819             49           0             0           868
Content Classes (15 hours per teacher)


         School                       Number of Participating Teachers                Total # of
                                                                                      Teachers
                               Year 2         Year 3       Year 4        Year 5
Elbow Creek                      2              9            1             0               12
Golden Oak                       2              0            0             0                2
Mineral King                     5             16            6             4               31
Mountain View                    0              7            2             0                9
   Total # Teachers              9             32            9             4               54
   Total # Hours                135            327           45            27              534


Leadership Institutes (35 hours per teacher for first training; 14 hours for second
training)


         School                       Number of Participating Teachers                Total # of
                                                                                      Teachers
                               Year 2         Year 3       Year 4        Year 5
Elbow Creek                      4             3/3           0             0               7/3
Golden Oak                       5             0/0           0             0               5/0
Mineral King                     5             2/2           0             0               7/2
Mountain View                    4             3/3           0             0               7/3
   Total # Teachers             18             8/8           0             0              26/8
   Total # Hours                595          245/112          0             0           840/112
Lab Classroom Teachers (Half-day planning - 1st; half-day – 2nd, 3rd, 4th)


        School                    Number of Participating Teachers                  Total #
                                                                                    of
                                                                                    Teachers
                         10/22/99       12/9/99    1/4, 5/00     1/19, 20, 21/00
Goshen                       2             1           2                 2               7
Highland                     3             3           3                 3              12
Hurley                       3             4           4                 4              15
Royal Oaks                   2             2           2                 2               8
Union                        0             0           0                 0               0
Elbow Creek                  2             2           3                 3              10
Golden Oak                   2             2           2                 2               8
Mineral King                 1             1           1                 1               4
Mountain View                0             0           0                 0               0
Crowley                      0             0           0                 0               0
Linwood                      0             0           0                 0               0
Veva Blunt                   0             0           0                 0               0
Washington                   0             0           0                 0               0
Conyer                       0             0           0                 0               0
Crestwood                    0             0           0                 0               0
Ivanhoe                      0             0           0                 0               0
   Total # Teachers         15            15          17                17              64
   Total # Hours           52.5             52.5     59.5                59.5          224


     STEPSS YEAR THREE COHORT


Teacher Institutes (35 hours per teacher)


          School                      Number of Participating Teachers             Total # of
                                                                                   Teachers
                                   Year 3           Year 4           Year 5
Crowley                              32               4                1               37
Linwood                              26               5                3               34
Veva Blunt                           40               6                2               48
Washington                           11               8                1               20
   Total # Teachers                 109              23                7              139
   Total # Hours                    3,815            805                 210         4,830
Practicum (9 hours per teacher)


         School                     Number of Participating Teachers         Total # of
                                                                             Teachers
                                  Year 3         Year 4            Year 5
Crowley                             32             0                 0           32
Linwood                             29             1                 0           30
Veva Blunt                          38             0                 0           38
Washington                          15             0                 0           15
   Total # Teachers                114             1                 0          115
   Total # Hours                  1,026             9                   0      1,035


Cognitive Coaching (7 hours per teacher)


         School                     Number of Participating Teachers         Total # of
                                                                             Teachers
                                  Year 3         Year 4            Year 5
Crowley                            32              0                 0           32
Linwood                            24              0                 0           24
Veva Blunt                         38              0                 0           38
Washington                          5              0                 0            5
   Total # Teachers                99              0                 0           99
   Total # Hours                   693              0                   0       693


Content Classes (15 hours per teacher)


         School                     Number of Participating Teachers         Total # of
                                                                             Teachers
                                  Year 3         Year 4            Year 5
Crowley                            28              2                 4           34
Linwood                            14              1                 4           19
Veva Blunt                         30             11                 9           50
Washington                         14              0                 0           14
   Total # Teachers                86             14                17          117
   Total # Hours                   975             60                  126     1,161
Leadership Institutes (35 hours per teacher for first training; 14 hours for second
training)


          School                     Number of Participating Teachers                 Total # of
                                                                                      Teachers
                                  Year 3             Year 4           Year 5
Crowley                            4/3                 0                0                 4/3
Linwood                            4/4                 0                0                 4/4
Veva Blunt                         3/2                 0                0                 3/2
Washington                         3/3                 0                0                 3/3
   Total # Teachers               14/12                0                0                14/12
   Total # Hours                 455/168               0                   0            455/168



     STEPSS YEAR FOUR COHORT


Teacher Institutes (35 hours per teacher)


             School                     Number of Participating Teachers              Total # of
                                                                                      Teachers
                                            Year 4                 Year 5
Fairview                                      37                     1                     38
Houston                                       39                     3                     42
Pinkham                                       33                     0                     33
Willow Glen                                   38                     0                     38
   Total # Teachers                          147                     4                    151
   Total # Hours                             5,145                   140                 5,285
Practicum (9 hours per teacher)


            School                       Number of Participating Teachers   Total # of
                                                                            Teachers
                                            Year 4                Year 5
Fairview                                      37                    0            37
Houston                                       39                    0            39
Pinkham                                       32                    0            32
Willow Glen                                   35                    0            35
   Total # Teachers                          143                    0           143
   Total # Hours                             1,287                  0          1,287


Cognitive Coaching (7 hours per teacher)


            School                       Number of Participating Teachers   Total # of
                                                                            Teachers
                                            Year 4                Year 5
Fairview                                      37                    0            37
Houston                                       39                    0            39
Pinkham                                       32                    0            32
Willow Glen                                   35                    0            35
   Total # Teachers                          143                    0           143
   Total # Hours                             1,001                  0          1,001


Content Classes (15 hours per teacher)


            School                       Number of Participating Teachers   Total # of
                                                                            Teachers
                                            Year 4                Year 5
Fairview                                      4                    10            14
Houston                                       6                    14            20
Pinkham                                      17                    15            32
Willow Glen                                  23                    16            39
   Total # Teachers                          50                    55           105
   Total # Hours                              324                  400          724
Leadership Institutes (35 hours per teacher for first training; 14 hours for second training)


             School                      Number of Participating Teachers            Total # of
                                                                                     Teachers
                                             Year 4                 Year 5
Fairview                                       5                      5                   10
Houston                                        8                      8                   16
Pinkham                                        3                      3                    6
Willow Glen                                    6                      6                   12
   Total # Teachers                           22                     22                   44
   Total # Hours                              770                     308               1,078



     STEPSS YEAR FIVE COHORT

Teacher Institutes (35 hours per teacher)


             School                      Number of Participating Teachers            Total # of
                                                                                     Teachers
                                             Year 5
Conyer                                        22                                          22
Crestwood                                     41                                          41
Ivanhoe                                       35                                          35
   Total # Teachers                           98                                          98
   Total # Hours                             3,339                                      3,339


Practicum (9 hours per teacher)


             School                      Number of Participating Teachers            Total # of
                                                                                     Teachers
                                             Year 5
Conyer                                         26                                         26
Crestwood                                      46                                         46
Ivanhoe                                        35                                         35
   Total # Teachers                           107                                        107
   Total # Hours                              963                                        963
Cognitive Coaching (7 hours per teacher)


             School                      Number of Participating Teachers             Total # of
                                                                                      Teachers
                                            Year 5
Conyer                                        26                                           26
Crestwood                                     46                                           46
Ivanhoe                                       35                                           35
   Total # Teachers                          107                                          107
   Total # Hours                              749                                         749


Content Classes (15 hours per teacher)


             School                      Number of Participating Teachers             Total # of
                                                                                      Teachers
                                            Year 5
Conyer                                        0                                            0
Crestwood                                     3                                            3
Ivanhoe                                       0                                            0
   Total # Teachers                           3                                            3
   Total # Hours                              21                                          21


Leadership Institutes (35 hours per teacher for first training; 14 hours for second
training)


             School                      Number of Participating Teachers             Total # of
                                                                                      Teachers
                                            Year 5
Conyer                                        0                                            0
Crestwood                                     0                                            0
Ivanhoe                                       0                                            0
   Total # Teachers                           0                                            0
   Total # Hours                               0                                           0
               <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

                STEPSS SCHEDULE OF EVENTS (through November 2002)

          Dates                    Location         Event (FPU=Fresno Pacific University,
                                                   C2=Cohort 2, B/R/G/N=Blue/Red/Green/
                                                               Traditional tracks)
May-Aug., 1998                VUSD; Highland      Master‘s info sessions (CSUF, FPU);
                                                  Cohorts begin 8/99
June 15-19, 1998 (8-4)        VUSD Board          Leadership Institute with Kathy Richardson
                              Room
July 20-24, 1998 (8-3)        Hurley Elementary   Teacher Institute with K. Richardson &
                                                  Deborah Kitchens.
Aug.18, 1998 (half-day)       Highland            Behind the Glass lesson; planning maps for
                              Elementary          Practicum
Aug. 19-20, 98 (half-days)    Highland            Practicum (lesson, peer coaching,
                              Elementary          collaborate; assess kids)
Aug. 24, 1998 (8-3)           Hurley Cafeteria    Cognitive Peer Coaching (Bill Baker)
Sept. 28-Oct. 2, 1998         VUSD Board          Teacher Institute with Kathy and Deborah (5
                              Room                schools)
Oct. 13, 1998 (half-day)      Hurley              Behind the Glass lesson; planning maps for
                                                  Practicum
Oct. 15-16, ‘98 (half-days)   Hurley or Royal     Practicum (lesson, peer coaching,
                              Oaks                collaborate; assess kids)
Oct. 19, 1998 (half-day)      Highland            Behind the Glass lesson; planning maps for
                                                  Practicum
Oct. 21-22, ‘98 (half-days)   Highland or Union   Practicum (lesson, peer coaching,
                                                  collaborate; assess kids)
Oct. 26, 1998 (half-day)      Goshen Elementary   Behind the Glass lesson; planning maps for
                                                  Practicum
Oct. 28-29, ‘98 (half-days)   Goshen Elementary   Practicum (lesson, peer coaching,
                                                  collaborate; assess kids)
December 3, 1998 (3:30)       Goshen Elementary   Meeting for STEPSS Teacher Leaders
Dec.-April (half-day)         VUSD Facilities     Four Content Classes (5 half-days are
                                                  required) for Yr. 1
January 4-5, 6-7 (8-3)        Goshen              Coaches/Site Leadership Teams-work with
                                                  K. Richardson
Jan. 14-15, 1999 (all day)    Highland            Coaching for Cohort 1 schools; 2 days
Jan. 19-20, 1999 (all day)    Royal Oaks          Coaching for Cohort 1 schools; 2 days
Jan. 21-22, 1999 (all day)    Union               Coaching for Cohort 1 schools; 2 days
Jan. 25-26, 1999 (all day)    Hurley              Coaching for Cohort 1 schools; 2 days
Jan. 27-28, 1999 (all day)    Goshen              Coaching for Cohort 1 schools; 2 days
Feb. 3,17; Mar 10 (3:30-5)    Goshen              After-school Institute—KR book: Dev.
                                                  Number Concepts
Feb. 9-10, 1999 (all day)     Highland            Coaching for Cohort 1 schools; 2 days (also
                                                    March-May)
Feb. 11-12, 1999 (all day)     Hurley               Coaching for Cohort 1 schools; 2 days (also
                                                    Mar-May)
Feb. 17-18, 1999 (all day)     Union                Coaching for Cohort 1 schools; 2 days (also
                                                    March-May)
Feb. 22-23, 1999 (all day)     Royal Oaks           Coaching for Cohort 1 schools; 2 days
                                                    (also March-May)
Feb. 24-25, 1999 (all day)     Goshen               Coaching for Cohort 1 schools; 2 days (also
                                                    March-May)
Mar. 10-12, 1999 (8-3:30)      Visalia Conv. Ctr.   Cognitive Peer Coaching (Bill Baker)
May 24, 1999 (4:30-6)          Lori Goebel‘s home   Teacher Leader Reception—informal
                                                    celebration of Yr.1
May 24-28, 1999 (8-3)          VUSD Board           Teacher Institute with Kathy and Deborah (4
                               Room                 schools)
June 14-18, 1999 (8-3)         Convention Center    Leadership Institute w/KR and DK
July 13, 1999 (half-day)       Goshen               ―Starting the Year…K-6‖ (for Year 1/2
                                                    teachers)
July 14, 1999 (half-day)       Goshen               Book 1, 2, 3 (Develop. Number Concepts)
                                                    Workshop K-6
July 19-23, 1999 (8-3:30)      Linwood Elem.        Teacher Institute Training w/ KR and DK (4
                                                    schools)
Aug. 26, 1999 (all day)        Royal Oak            Coaching for Cohort 1 schools (1
                                                    day/month)
Aug. 27, 1999 (all day)        Hurley               Coaching for Cohort 1 schools (1
                                                    day/month)
Sept. 8, 1999 (all day)        Highland             Coaching for Cohort 1 schools (1
                                                    day/month)
Sept. 8, 1999 (3:30)           Mineral King         Yr. 2 Teacher Leadership Planning Mtg.
                               Lounge
Sept. 9, 1999 (8-3:30)         Goshen               Assessment
Sept. 10, 1999 (all day)       Royal Oak            Coaching for Cohort 1 schools (1
                                                    day/month)
Sept. 14, 1999 (half-day)      Goshen               Behind the Glass lesson; planning maps for
                                                    Practicum
Sept. 15-16, ‘99 (half-days)   Min. King or Mt.     Practicum (lesson, peer coach, collab.)-
                               View                 Green/yellow track
Sept. 21, 1999 (half-day)      Goshen               Behind the Glass lesson; planning maps for
                                                    Practicum
Sept. 22-23, ‘99 (half-days)   Elbow Creek          Practicum (lesson, peer coaching,
                                                    collaboration)
Sept. 24, 1999 (all day)       Union                Coaching for Cohort 1 schools (1
                                                    day/month)
Sept. 27, 1999 (3:30-4:30)     Royal Oak            After-school Institute; Focus: Assessment
Sept. 28, 1999 (half-day)      Goshen               Behind the Glass lesson; planning maps for
                                                    Practicum
Sept. 29-30, ‘99 (half-days)   Golden Oak          Practicum (lesson, peer coaching, collab.,
                                                   assess kids)
October 4-8, 1999 (8-3)        Convention Center   Teacher Institute Training w/ KR and DK for
                                                   green track
Oct. 4, ’99 (all day)          Elbow Creek          Coaching--Day 1: Coaches meet 1/2 hr with
                                                                               each tchr-needs?
Oct. 5, ’99 (all day)          Elbow Creek         Day 2 for Cohort 2: Coaches observe/coach,
                                                   model, support
Oct. 6, ’99 (all day)          Golden Oak          Coaching--Day 1: Coaches meet 1/2 hr with
                                                   each tchr-needs?
Oct. 7, ’99 (all day)          Golden Oak          Day 2 , Cohort 2:: Coaches observe/coach,
                                                   model, support
Oct. 12 1999 (half-days)       Goshen              Behind the Glass lesson; planning for
                                                   Practicum (K-2; 3-6)
Oct. 13-14, ‘99 (half-days)    Min.King or Mt.     Practicum (lesson, peer coach, collab.)-
                               View                Red/blue track
Oct. 18, 1999 (all day)        Hurley              Coaching for Cohort 1 schools (1
                                                   day/month)
Oct. 19, 1999 (all day)        Union               Coaching for Cohort 1 schools (1
                                                   day/month)
Oct. 20, 1999 (all day)        Highland            Coaching for Cohort 1 schools (1
                                                   day/month)
Oct. 21, 1999 (all day)        Royal Oak           Coaching for Cohort 1 schools (1
                                                   day/month)
Oct. 26, 1999 (all day)        Goshen              K.R & D.K. met with lab classroom tchrs.-
                                                   common vision
Nov.99-Apr ‗00 (half-day)      Hurley              Five Content Classes (each a series of 5 half-
                                                   days)
Nov. 1-2, 1999 (all day)       Elbow Creek         Coaching for Cohort 2 schools; 2 days (see
                                                   above)
Nov. 3-4, 1999 (all day)       Mountain View       Coaching for Cohort 2 schools; 2 days
Nov. 6, 1999 (12-1:15)         Palm Springs        STEPSS Panel Presentation at CMC-CS
                                                   Conf.
Nov. 8, 10 (all day)           Mineral King        Coaching for Cohort 2 schools; 2 days
Nov. 16, 1999 (all day)        Hurley              Coaching for Cohort 1 schools (1
                                                   day/month)
Nov. 17, 1999 (all day)        Highland            Coaching for Cohort 1 schools (1
                                                   day/month)
Nov. 18, 1999 (all day)        Goshen              Coaching for Cohort 1 schools (1
                                                   day/month)
Nov. 19, 1999 (all day)        Royal Oak           Coaching for Cohort 1 schools (1
                                                   day/month)
Nov. 29; Dec. 1 (all day)      Golden Oak          Coaching for Cohort 2 schools; 2 days
Dec. 2-3, 1999 (all day)       Mountain View       Coaching for Cohort 2 schools; 2 days
Dec. 6-7, 1999 (all day)       Elbow Creek         Coaching for Cohort 2 schools; 2 days
Dec. 8-9, 1999 (all day)       Mineral King        Coaching for Cohort 2 schools; 2 days
Jan. 6 & 7, 2000 (all day)     Mt. View School     Coaching for C2 school
Jan. 10, 2000 (after-school)   Hurley School       FPU Content Class - Year 2, Geometry and
                                                   Measurement
Jan. 10 & 11, '00 (all day)    Mineral King        Coaching for C2 school
                               School
Jan. 12, 2000                  Highland School     Coaching for Cohort 1 school
Jan. 13, 2000                  Hurley School       Grade Level Planning
Jan. 20, 2000                  Royal Oaks School   Teacher Rounds
Jan. 20, 2000 (evening)        Royal Oaks          Parent Ed. Night
Jan. 24, 2000 (after-school)   Hurley School       FPU Content Class - Year 2 (Geometry and
                                                   Measurement)
Jan. 24 & 25, '00 (all day)    Elbow Creek         Coaching for C2 school
Jan. 26 & 27, '00 (all day)    Golden Oak          Coaching for C2 school
Feb. 2, 2000                   Highland            Grade Level Planning
Feb. 2, 2000 (after-school)    Mineral King        FPU Content Class - Year 2, Number Sense
Feb. 3, 2000                   Goshen              Number Talks Demonstrations
Feb. 7, 2000 (after-school)    Hurley School       FPU Content Class
Feb. 7 & 8, 2000 (all day)     Mineral King        Coaching for C2 schools
Feb. 9 & 10, 2000 (all day)    Mountain View       Coaching for C2 school
Feb. 15 & 16, 2000 (all        Golden Oak          Coaching for C2 school
day)
Feb. 17, 2000 (all day)        Royal Oaks          Focus Day
Feb. 22 & 23, '00 (all day)    Elbow Creek         Coaching for C2 school
Feb. 24, 2000 (all day)        Union               Grade Level Planning
Feb. 29, 2000                  Hurley              Site Coaching and leadership planning
Mar. 1 & 2, 2000 (all day)     Golden Oak          Coaching for C2 school
Mar. 6 & 7 (all day)           Elbow Creek         Coaching for C2 school
Mar. 8, 2000                   Highland            Grade Level Planning and Reflecting
Mar. 9, 2000                   Goshen              Teacher Demonstration Rounds – Number
                                                   Talks
Mar. 13 & 14, '00 (all day)    Mineral King        Coaching for C2 school
Mar. 20 & 22, '00 (all day)    Mountain View       Coaching for C2 school
Mar. 23, 2000                  Royal Oaks          Primary Demonstration Day
Mar. 29, 2000 (after           Mineral King        FPU Content Class - Year 2
school)
Apr. 3 & 4, 2000 (all day)     Mineral King        Coaching for C2 school
Apr. 6 & 7, 2000 (all day)     Mountain View       Coaching for C2 school
Apr. 7, 2000 (after-school)    Royal Oaks          Number Talk Institute
May 1 & 2, 2000 (all day)      Golden Oak          Coaching for C2 school
May 3, 2000 (all day)          Royal Oaks          Primary Grade Level Planning
May 3 & 4, 2000 (all day)      Elbow Creek         Coaching for C2 school
May 9, 2000                    Union               Staff Development Planning
May 9, 2000                    CSU-Fresno          Graduate Reception for Master's Students
May 10, 2000                   Highland            Grade Level Planning
May 11, 2000                   Goshen                 Teacher Rounds
May 12, 2000 (all day)         Royal Oaks             Intermediate Grade Level Planning
May 15, 2000 (after-           Mineral King           FPU Content Class - Year 2, Number Sense
school)
May 19, 2000                   CSU-Fresno             Graduate Hooding Ceremony
May 22, 2000 (after-           Mineral King           FPU Content Class - Year 2, Number Sense
school)
May 22 & 23, '00 (all day)     Mineral King           Coaching for C2 school
May 24 & 25, '00 (all day)     Mountain View          Coaching for C2 school
May 30, 2000 (all day)         Goshen                 Teacher Rounds
May 31, 2000 (all day)         Royal Oaks             Primary Planning Day
May 31, 2000 (evening)         Lori Goebel‘s home     Teacher Leader Reception – informal
                               Celebration of Yr. 2
June 1, 2000 (all day)         Royal Oaks             Grades 3-6 Planning Day
June 12-16, 2000 (all day)     Linwood School         Teacher Institute w/Kathy Richardson &
                                                      Marilynn Magnani (Cohort schools Yr 2)
                                                      (Blue, Yellow, Traditional)
July 24-28, 2000 (all day)     Linwood School         Teacher Institute w/ Kathy Richardson &
                                                      Marilynn Magnani (Cohort schools Yr 2)
                                                      (Red, Green, Traditional)
Aug. 17 & 18, '00 (all day)    District Office – C4   Cognitive Peer Coaching – Day 1 Bill Baker
Aug. 23, 2000 (half-day)       Crowley & Veva         Demonstration Lessons/planning maps for
                               Blunt                  Practicum - R/G
Aug. 24 & 25, 2000             (half-days)            Crowley & Veva Blunt- collaborate; assess
                                                      kids - R/G
Sept. 7, 2000 (half-day)       District Office        FPU Content Class - Year 3, B/R/N, C4
Sept. 11, 2000 (half-day)      District Office        FPU Content Class, C4
Sept. 11 & 12, '0 (all day)    Golden Oak             Coaching for C2 schools
Sept. 13, 2000 (half-day)      Mountain View          Number Talk Content Course – Grades 1-2
Sept. 13 & 14, '00 (all day)   Mountain View          Coaching for C2 school
Sept. 14, 2000 (half-day)      Mountain View          Number Talk Content Course – Grades 3-5
Sept. 15, 2000 (all day)       Sierra B               Cognitive Peer Coaching – Day 1 (Bill
                                                      Baker), (Traditional)
Sept. 18, 2000                 Linwood &              Practice Number Talks
                               Washington
Sept. 19, 2000 (half-day)      Linwood &              Demonstration Lessons/planning maps for
                               Washington             Practicum
Sept. 20-21, '00 (half-days)   Linwood &              Practicum (lessons, peer coaching,
                               Washington
Sept. 22, 2000 (all day)       Sierra B               Cognitive Peer Coaching – Day 1
Sept. 25, 2000 (half-day)      District Office        FPU Content Class - Year 3, C4
Sept. 25, 2000 (all day)       Highland               Teacher Leader Cognitive Coaching Review
Sept. 26, 2000 (half-day)      Mountain View          Number Talk Content Course–K
Sept. 27, 2000 (half-day)      Crowley & Veva         Demonstration Lessons/planning maps for
                               Blunt
Sept. 28-29, '00 (half-days)    Crowley & Veva      Practicum (lessons, peer coaching,
                                Blunt
Oct. 2, 2000 (all day)          Hurley              Leadership Coaching for Hurley & Royal
                                                    Oaks
Oct. 2 & 3, 2000 (all day)      Linwood             Coaching for Cohort 3 school
Oct. 3 & 4, 2000 (all day)      Golden Oak          Practicum/Assessment
Oct. 4, 5, & 6, '00 (all day)   Willow Glen, Rm     Leadership Institute w/ Kathy Richardson
                                21                  (Cohort 3 schools)
Oct. 9, 2000 (all day)          Veva Blunt          Coaching for Cohort 3 school
Oct. 16, 2000 (half-day)        District Office     FPU Content Class, C4
Oct. 16 & 17,'000 (all day)     Washington          Coaching for Cohort 3
Oct. 18 & 19, 2000 (all         Goshen              Grade Level Planning
day)
Oct. 19, 2000 (half-day)        Mountain View       Number Talks, Grades 1-2 & 3-6
Oct. 23, 2000 (half-day)        District Office     FPU Content Classes - Year 3 (BRN), C2
Oct. 23 & 24,'000 (all day)     Crowley             Coaching for Cohort 3 school
Oct. 24, 2000 (after-           Royal Oaks          PM Grade Level Focus Group - Grades K-6
school)
Oct. 25 & 26, 2000 (all         Royal Oaks          Leader Planning and Coaching Peers
day)
Oct. 26, 2000 (half-day)        Mountain View       Number Talk Content Course–K
Oct. 30, 2000 (half-day)        District Office     FPU Content Classes (BRN, C2)
Oct. 30 & 31, 2000 (all         Elbow Creek         Classroom Demonstrations
day)
Nov. 1 & 2, 2000 (all day)      Mountain View       Lesson Demonstrations & Cognitive
                                                    Coaching Refresher
Nov. 6, 2000 (half-day)         District Office     FPU Content Class, C4
Nov. 6 & 7, 2000 (all day)      Linwood             Coaching for Cohort 3 school
Nov. 7, 2000 (half-day)         Mountain View       Number Talks Content Course –
                                                    Kindergarten & Gr. 3-6
Nov. 7, 2000 (evening)          Linwood             Parent Education Night
Nov. 8, 2000 (half-day)         Mountain View       Number Talk Content Course – Grades 1-2
Nov. 8 & 9, '00 (all day)       Mineral King        Training
Nov. 9, 2000 (half-day)         District Office     FPU Content Classes - Year 3 (BRN, C2)
Nov. 15 & 16, '00 (all day)     Washington          Coaching for Cohort 3 school
Nov. 27 & 28, '00 (all day)     Crowley             Coaching for Cohort 3 School; 2 days
Nov. 28, '00 (after-school)     Linwood             Grade Level Focus Group
Nov. 28, 2000 (half-day)        Mt. View            Assessment
Nov. 29, 2000                   Linwood             Lab Classroom Observation
Nov. 29 & 30, '00 (all day)     Golden Oak          Grade Level Mathematics Articulation
Nov. 30, 2000 (evening)         Royal Oaks          Math Night
Dec. 1, 2000 (full day)         Royal Oaks          Grade Level Planning
Dec. 4, 2000 (half-day)         Education Complex   Fresno Pacific-Content Class    Number
                                                    Sense
Dec. 4 & 5, 2000 (all day)      Linwood             Coaching for Cohort 3 School; 2 days
Dec. 6 & 7, 2000 (all day)     Mineral King        Coaching for Cohort 2 School; 2 days
Dec. 6, 7 & 8, '00 (all day)   Royal Oaks          Grade Level Planning/Assessment
Dec. 7, 2000 (half-day)        Education Complex   Fresno Pacific-Content Class-
                                                   Fractions/Decimals &
                                                   Measurement/Geometry
Dec. 11, 2000 (half-day)       Hurley              Demonstration Visit
Dec. 11 & 12, '00 (all day)    Crowley             Coaching for Cohort 3 School; 2 days
Dec. 12, 2000 (all day)        Royal Oaks          Grade Level Planning/Assessment
Dec. 13, 2000 (evening)        Crowley             Migrant Parent Night
Dec. 13 & 14, '00 (all day)    Washington          Grade Level Planning
Dec. 14, 2000 (all day)        Royal Oaks          Grade Level Planning/Assessment
Dec. 14, 2000 (half-day)       Highland            Grade Level Planning w/Standards
Dec. 14, 2000 (half-day)       Education Complex   CSU Fresno-Content Class-Perspectives on
                                                   Elementary Arithmetic
Jan. 10, 2001 (half-days)      Mt. View            Number Talk Content courses-Grades 1-2 &
                                                   Grades 3-6
Jan. 10 & 11, 2001 (all        Union               Benchmark Assessment
day)
Jan. 11, 2001 (half-day)       Mountain View       Number Talk Content Course – Year 3
                                                   Kindergarten
Jan. 16, 2001 (half-day)       Educ. Complex       CSU Fresno Content Class – Year 3
                                  Conf. Room 2        Discovering Geometry
Jan. 16 & 17, '01 (all day)    Veva Blunt          Coaching for Cohort 3 School; 2 days
Jan. 18 & 19, 2001 (all        Highland/Hurley     Grade Level Planning
day)
Jan. 19, 2001 (all day)        Golden Oak          Grade Level Focus Groups/Planning

Jan. 22 & 23, '01 (all day)    Washington          Coaching for Cohort 3 School; 2 days

Jan. 23, 2001 and              Goshen              Grade Level Planning
Jan. 25, 2001 (all day)
Jan. 25, 2001 (all day)        Mineral King        Coaching for Cohort 2 School; 1 day
Jan. 25 & 26, 2001 (all        Willow Glen         Teacher Leaders Institute w/ Kathy
day)                                               Richardson
Jan. 29 & 30, '01 (all day)    Linwood             Coaching for Cohort 3 School; 2 days
Jan. 30, 2001 (half-day)       Educ. Complex       CSU Fresno Content Class – Year 3
                                  Conf. Room 2        Discovering Geometry
Jan. 31, 2001 and              Elbow Creek         Grade Level Planning/Math Intervention
Feb. 1, 2001 (all day)
Feb. 1, 2001 (half-day)        Educ. Complex       CSU Fresno Content Class – year 3
                                 Conf. Room 4        Perspectives to Elementary Arithmetic
Feb. 2, 2001 and               Washington          Coaching for Cohort 3 School; 2 days
Feb. 9, 2001 (all day)

Feb. 5 & 6, 2001 (all day)     Golden Oak          Grade Level Collaboration
Feb. 6, 2001 (half-days)      Mountain View      Number Talk Content Courses – Year 3
                                                    Grades 1-2 & Grades 3-6
Feb. 7 & 8, 2001 (all day)    Mountain View      Coaching for Cohort 2 School; 2 days
Feb. 8, 2001 (half-day)       Mountain View      Number Talk Content Course – Year 3
                                                 Kindergarten
Feb. 13, 2001 (half-day)      Educ. Complex      CSU Fresno Content Class – Year 3
                                Conf. Room 4        Discovering Geometry
Feb. 13 & 14, '01 (all day)   Mineral King       Coaching for Cohort 2 School; 2 days
Feb. 15, 2001 (all day)       Royal Oaks         Teacher Rounds & Planning – Grades K-2
Feb. 20 & 21, '01 (all day)   Crowley        Coaching for Cohort 3 School; 2 days
Feb. 22, 2001 (all day)       Royal Oaks         Teacher Rounds
Feb. 22, 2001 (after-         Goshen             Behind the Glass Demonstration
school)
Feb. 26, 2001 (all day)       Mineral King        Math Planning
Feb. 26 & 27, '01 (all day)   Washington          Coaching for Cohort 2 School; 2 days
Feb. 27, 2001 (half-day)      Edu. Complex        CSU Fresno Content Class – Year 3
                                Conf. Room 4        Discovering Geometry
Feb. 27, 2001 (after-                             Grade Level Focus Groups
school)                                             Primary/Upper Grades
Feb. 28, 2001 (all day)       Golden Oak          Coaching for Cohort 2 School; 1 day
Feb. 28, 2001 (all day)       Veva blunt          Coaching for Cohort 3 school; 1 day
Feb. 28, 2001 and             Linwood             Coaching for Cohort 3 school; 2 days
Mar. 1, 2001 (all day)
Mar. 1, 2001 (half-day)       Educ. Complex       CSU Fresno Content Class – Year 3
                                 Conf. Room 4       Perspectives to Elementary Arithmetic
Mar. 6, 2001 (half-day)       Royal               Lab Classroom Visit
                              Oaks/Mineral King
Mar. 5 & 6, 2001 (all day)    Veva Blunt          Coaching for Cohort 3 School; 2 days
Mar. 7 & 8, 2001 (all day)    Crowley             Coaching for Cohort 3 school; 2 days
Mar. 12 & 13, '01 (all day)   Washington          Coaching for Cohort 3 school; 2 days
Mar. 13, 2001 (afternoon)     Goshen              Lab Classroom Teachers – BTG
Mar. 14, 2001 (all day)       Mountain View       Lab Classroom Visit
Mar. 19, 2001                 Linwood             First Grade Visit
Mar. 19, 2001 (half-day)      Veva Blunt          Training
Mar. 19, 2001 (all day)       Golden Oak          Planning Day
Mar. 19-20, 2001 (all day)    Elbow Creek         Coaching for Cohort 2 school; 2 days
Mar. 21, 2001                 Royal Oaks          Teacher Rounds/Planning Day
Mar. 21, 2001                 Golden Oak          Visitation
Mar. 21, 2001                 Linwood             Lab Classroom Observation
Mar. 22, 2001 (half-day)      Elbow Creek         Grade Level Planning
Mar. 22, 2001 (evening)       Royal Oaks          Parent Math Night
Mar. 27, 2001 (half-day)      Educ. Complex       CSU Fresno Content Class – Year 3
                                 Conf. Room 4        Discovering Geometry
Mar. 27, 2001 (half-day)      Mineral King        Math Planning
Mar. 29, 2001 (half-day)      Educ. Complex     CSU Fresno Content Class – Year 3
                                Conf. Room 4      Perspectives to Elementary Arithmetic
Mar. 29, & 30, '01 (all       Mineral King      Coaching for Cohort 2 School; 2 days
day)
Apr. 23 & 24, '01 (all day)   Veva Blunt        Coaching for Cohort 3 school; 2 days
Apr. 25-26, 2001 (all day)    Mountain View     Coaching for Cohort 2 school; 2 days
Apr. 30, 2001 and             Mineral King      Coaching for Cohort 2 school; 2 days
May 1, 2001 (all day)
May 2 & 3, 2001 (all day)     Crowley           Coaching for Cohort 3 school; 2 days
May 3, 2001 (all day)         Royal Oaks        Planning/Coaching/Reflection – Leadership

May 7, 2001 (all day)         Mineral King      Leadership

May 7 & 8, 2001 (all day)     Washington        Coaching for Cohort 3 school; 2 days
May 8, 2001                                     Grade Level Focus Groups
May 9 & 10, 2001 (all day)    Golden Oak        Coaching for Cohort 2 school; 2 days
May 11, 2001 (half-day)       Mineral King      Training
May 14 & 15, 2001 (all        Linwood           Coaching for Cohort 3 school; 2 days
day)
May 16, 2001 (all day)        Hurley            Grade Level Planning
May 16-17, 2001 (all day)     Highland/Union    Grade Level Planning
May 17, 2001 (half-day)       Educ. Complex     CSU Fresno Content Class – Year 3
                                 Conf. Room 4     Perspectives to Elementary Arithmetic
May 17, 2001 (afternoon)      Goshen            Behind the Glass
May 18, 2001                                    Lab Classroom Visits

May 21, 2001 (all day)        Goshen            Grade Level Planning
May 21, 2001 (all day)        Mineral King      Math Planning/Grade Level
May 22, 2001 (all day)        Royal Oaks        Planning/Coaching/Reflection – Leadership
May 22, 2001                                    Grade Level Focus Groups

May 23, 2001 (all day)        Mountain view     Math Support Team/Planning
May 23, 2001 (half-day)       Veva Blunt        Collaboration
May 24 & 25 2001 (all         Mineral King      Coaching for Cohort 2 School; 2 days
day)
May 29, 2001                  Elbow Creek       Coaching for Cohort 2 school; 1 day

May 30, 2001 (half-day)       Golden Oak        Site Support Team Meeting
May 31, 2001 and              Willow Glen       Teacher Leaders Institute w/ Kathy
June 1, 2001 (all day)                          Richardson – Year 4
June 6, 2001 (all day)        Mountain View     Cognitive Coaching

June 7, 2001 (all day)        Mountain View     Grade Level Number Talks

June 11-15, 2001 (all         Educ. Complex     Teacher Institute w/ Kathy Richardson and
week)                          Conf. Rooms 4/9     Marilynn Magnani – Year 4
June 19, 2001 (all day)        Mineral King        Math Grade Level Planning – Grades 1-2
June 20, 2001 (all day)        Mineral King        Math Grade Level Planning – Grades 3-5
June 21, 2001 (all day)        Mineral King        Math Grade Level Planning – Grades 5-6
June 21, 2001 (all day)        Mountain View       Grade Level Planning
July 17, 2001 (all day)        Mineral King        Math Planning – Red & Green Tracks
July 23-27, 2001 (all          Educ. Complex       Teacher Institute w/ Kathy Richardson and
day/week)                         Conf Rooms 4/9   Marilynn Magnani – Year 4
Aug. 7, 8 & 9, 2001            Fairview            Practicum – Green & Red Tracks
Aug. 14, 2001 (all day)        Mineral King        Math Planning – Green & Yellow Tracks
Aug. 14-16, 2001 (all day)     Houston/Willow      Practicum‘s – Green & Red Tracks
                               Glen
Aug. 20, 2001 (all day)        Mineral King        Math Planning – 1st Grade

Aug. 22, 2001 (half-day)       Golden Oak          Staff Development – Math Content

Sept. 6 & 7, 2001 (all day)    Educ. Complex       Leadership – Cognitive Coaching w/ Bill
                               Board Room North    Baker, Days 2/3
Sept. 10 & 11, '01 (all day)   Crowley             Coaching for Cohort 3 School; 2 days
Sept. 10 & 11, '01 (all day)   Mountain View       Grade Level Planning
Sept. 12-14, 2001 (all day)    Houston/Willow      Practicum‘s – Blue & Yellow Tracks
                               Glen
Sept. 17, 2001 (half-day)      Mountain View       Staff Development

Sept. 19 & 20, 2001 (all       Golden Oak          Standards Articulation
day)
Sept. 24, 2001 (half-day)      Mountain View       Number Talk Content Courses – Year 4
                                                      Kindergarten and Grades 3-6
Sept. 25, 2001 (half-day)      Mountain View       Number Talk Content Course – Year 4
                                                   Grades 1-2
Sept. 26, 27 & 28, 2001        Pinkham             Practicum
Sept. 26 & 27, '01 (all day)   Mineral King        Coaching for Cohort 2 School; 2 days
Oct. 1 & 2, 2001 (all day)     Washington          Coaching for Cohort 3 School; 2 days
Oct. 2, 2001 (half-day)        Mountain view       Number Talk Content Courses – Year 4
                                                      Kindergarten and Grades 3-6
Oct. 3, 4 & 5, 2001            Willow Glen         Coaching Visit
Oct. 3, 4 & 5, 2001            Fairview            Practicum – Blue & Yellow Tracks
Oct. 4 & 5, 2001 (all day)     Linwood             Coaching for Cohort 3 school; 2 days
Oct. 8, 2001 (half-day)        Elbow Creek         Collaboration
Oct. 8-12, 2001 (all week)     Educ. Complex       Teacher Institute w/ Kathy Richardson, K-3
                                  Conf. Room 4     – Year 4
Oct. 8, 2001 (afternoon)       Pinkham             Staff Development – Math Content
Oct. 10, 2001 (all day)        Pinkham             Coaching
Oct. 11 & 12, 2001             Pinkham             Practicum Make-up – 6th Grade
Oct. 15 & 16, 2001            Veva Blunt          Coaching for Cohort 3 School; 2 days
Oct. 16, 2001 (half-day)      Mountain View       Number Talk Content Course – Year 4
                                                  Grades 1-2
Oct. 17, 2001                 Golden Oak          Coaching
Oct. 17, 18, & 19, 2001       Fairview            Cognitive Coaching
Oct. 19, 2001 (all day)       Highland            Grade Level Planning
Oct. 23, 24, 2001 (all day)   Golden Oak          Math Vocabulary
Oct. 22, 23 & 24, 2001        Houston             Coaching
Oct. 25, 2001                 Mountain View       Number Talk Content Course – Year 4
                                                  Grades 1-2
Oct. 29, 2001                 Mountain View       Number Talk Content Courses – Year 4
                                                     Kindergarten & Grades 3-6
Oct. 29 & 30, '01 (all day)   Union               Grade Level Planning
Oct. 30, 2001                 Royal Oaks          Training
Nov. 7, 8 & 9 '01 (all day)   Willow Glen         Coaching Visit
Nov. 6-9, 2001 (all week)     Mountain View       Teacher Institute w/ Marilyn Magnani, Gr. 4-
                                                  6 – Yr. 4
Nov. 13, 2001 (half-day)      Mountain View       Number Talk Content Course – Year 4
                                                  Kindergarten
Nov. 14, 15, & 16, 2001       Houston             Coaching
Nov. 15 & 16, 2001            Golden Oak          Math Observations
November 6-9, 2001 (all       Mountain View       Teacher Institute – Marilynn Magnani
day)                          School                 Cohort 4 schools, Grades 3-6
November 7 & 8, 2001 (all     Willow Glen           Coaching for Cohort 4 School; 2 days
day)                          School
                              Mountain View       Half-Day Content Course – Number Talks
November 13, 2001 (AM)
                              School                Kindergarten
November 14 & 15, 2001
                              Houston School      Coaching for Cohort 4 school; 2 days
(all day)
November 15 & 16, 2001
                              Golden Oak School   Math Observations
(AM)
                                                  Content Materials – Alignment Essential
November 26, 2001 (PM)        Royal Oaks School
                                                    Standards
November 26 & 27, 2002
                              Fairview School     Coaching for Cohort 4 school; 2 days
(all day)
November 27, 2001 (all        Willow Glen
                                                  Staff Articulation – 3rd Grade
day)                          School
                              Mountain View       Half-Day Content Course – Number Talks
November 28, 2001 (AM)
                              School                 Kindergarten
                              Mountain View       Half-Day Content Course – Number Talks
November 28, 2001 (PM)
                              School                 Grades 3-6
                              Mountain View       Half-Day Content Course – Number Talks
November 29, 2001 (AM)
                              School                 Grades 1-2
November 29, 2002 (PM)        Pinkham School      Grade Level Planning – K-6
November 30, 2001 (full       Elbow Creek         Coaching Visit
day)                         School
                             Mountain View       Half-Day Content Course – Number Talks
December 3, 2001 (AM)
                             School--               Grades 1-2
                             Mountain View       Half-Day Content Course – Number Talks
December 3, 2001 (PM)
                             School                 Grades 3-6
December 3 & 4, 2001 (all
                             Washington School   Coaching Visit
day)
December 5 & 6, 2001 (all
                             Pinkham School      Coaching for Cohort 4 school; 2 days
day)
December 10 & 11, 2001
                             Veva Blunt School   Coaching Visit
(AM)
January 7 & 8, 2002 (all     Mountain View       Cognitive Coaching (Bill Baker)
day)                         School                STEPSS Team
January 9, 2002 (all day)    Pinkham School      Grade Level Planning – 3rd Grade
January 9 & 10, 2002 (all    Willow Glen            Coaching for Cohort 4 School; 2 days
day)                         School
January 10, 2002 (all day)   Washington School   Grade Level Planning – 3rd grade
January 14 & 15, 2002
                             Crowley School      Coaching Visit
(AM)
January 14 & 15, 2002 (all   Mountain View
                                                 Grade Level Planning – K-6
day)                         School
January 15, 2002 (AM)        Golden Oak School   Coaching Visit
January 15, 2002 (PM)        Goshen School       Teacher Leaders Mtg.
January 16 & 17, 2002 (all
                             Houston School      Coaching for Cohort 4 school; 2 days
day)
                                                    AIMS Content Workshop – Fractions
January 22, 2002 (all day)   VLC Conf. Room 7           Cohort 4 schools, Grades 3-6
                             Willow Glen              Grade Level Planning – 2nd grade
January 23, 2002 (AM)
                             School
January 23 & 24, 2002 (all                          Coaching for Cohort 4 School; 2 days
                             Fairview School
day)
January 24, 2002 (all day)   Golden Oak School   On Going Coaching Support
                                                 CSUF Half-Day Content Class
January 28, 2002 (AM)        EOC Conf. Room 4
                                                   Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI)
January 28 & 29, 2002 (all                       Kathy Richardson – Cohort 1 schools
                             VLC Conf. Room 9
day)                                               K-3 teachers
January 29, 2002 (AM)        Golden Oak School   Math Collaboration
January 30 & 31, 2002 (all   Mineral King                 Coaching Visit - Content
day)                         School
January 30 & 31, 2002 (all                               On Going Coaching Support
                             Pinkham School
day)
February 4 & 5, 2002 (all    Elbow Creek
                                                 On Going Coaching Support
day)                         School
February 4 & 5, 2002 (all
                             Linwood School      Grade Level Planning – K-6
day)
February 6 & 7, 2002 (all     Willow Glen
                                                  Coaching Visit
day)                          School
February 7, 2002 (all day)    Goshen School       Grade Level Planning – K-6
February 8, 2002 (AM)         Goshen School       Grade Level Planning - K-3
February 12, 2002 (all day)   Washington School   Grade Level Planning – K-6
February 12 & 13, 2002                                    On Going Coaching Support
                              Washington School
(all day)
February 13 & 14, 2002                               Coaching for Cohort 4 School; 2 days
                              Houston School
(AM)
February 14, 2002 (AM)        Hurley School       Coaching Visit
                                                  Investigations Training – Gail Parrino
February 15, 2002 (AM)        STEPSS Office
                                                     STEPSS Coaches
                                                  Investigations Training - Gail Parrino
February 15, 2002 (PM)        Royal Oaks School
                                                     Grades 3-6
                                                  Textbook Model - Teaching for
February 15, 2002 (all day)   Royal Oaks School
                                                     Understanding
February 19, 2002 (all day)   Veva Blunt School   On Going Coaching Support
February 20, 2002 (all day)   Washington School   Grade Level Planning – 4-6
February 20 & 21, 2002
                              Fairview School     Coaching for Cohort 4 school; 2 days
(full day)
February 21, 2002 (all day)   Union School        Coaching Visit
                                                  CSUF Half-Day Content Class
February 25, 2002 (AM)        EOC Conf. Room 4
                                                    Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI)
                                                  Half-Day Content Class - Algebraic
February 25, 2002 (PM)        EOC Conf. Room 4
                                                    Thinking
February 26, 2002 (all day)   Highland School     Coaching Visit
                                                  AIMS Content Workshop – Geometry
February 26, 2002 (all day)   VLC Conf. Room 9
                                                    Cohort 4 schools, Grades 3-6
February 27, 2002 (AM)        Houston School      Coaching Visit
February 27 & 28, 2002                                    On Going Coaching Support
                              Pinkham School
(all day)
                                                  Half-Day Content Class - Algebraic
March 4, 2002 (PM)            EOC Conf. Room 4
                                                    Thinking
March 6 & 7, 2002 (all        Willow Glen
                                                  Coaching Visit
day)                          School
March 7 & 8, 2002 (all
                              Golden Oak School   Coaching Visit - Teaching Rounds
day)
March 11 & 12, 2002 (all
                              Linwood School      Grade Level Planning – K-6
day)
March 13 & 14, 2002 (all
                              Houston School      Coaching for Cohort 4 school; 2 days
day)
March 20 & 21, 2002 (all
                              Fairview School     Coaching for Cohort 4 school; 2 days
day)
March 21, 2002 (evening)      Royal Oaks School   Parent Education Night
March 21, 2002 (evening)      Veva Blunt School   Math Night
April 8 & 9, 2002 (all day)   Golden Oak School   Coaching Visit - Team Coaching
                                                  Half-Day Content Class - Algebraic
April 10, 2002 (PM)           EOC Conf. Room 4
                                                    Thinking
April 10 & 11, 2002 (all      Willow Glen
                                                  Coaching Visit
day)                          School
                              Elbow Creek
April 11, 2002 (all day)                          Staff Development
                              School
                                                  CSUF Half-Day Content Class
April 15, 2002 (AM)           EOC Conf. Room 4
                                                    Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI)
                              Elbow Creek                          Coaching Visit
April 29, 2002 (AM)
                              School
                              Mineral King                Grade Level Planning – K-6
May 1 & 2, 2002 (all day)
                              School
May 1 & 2, 2002 (all day)     Pinkham School              On Going Coaching Support
May 2, 2002 (all day)         Royal Oaks School   Revisit Benchmarks/Essential Standards
May 7, 2002 (all day)         Linwood School      Grade Level Planning – K-6
                              Willow Glen
May 8 & 9, 2002 (all day)                         Coaching Visit
                              School
                                                  CSUF Half-Day Content Class
May 13, 2002 (AM)             EOC Conf. Room 4
                                                    Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI)
                                                  Half-Day Content Class - Algebraic
May 13, 2002 (PM)             EOC Conf. Room 4
                                                    Thinking
May 13 & 14, 2002 (all                                    On Going Coaching Support
                              Washington School
day)
May 14, 2002 (AM)             Royal Oaks School                   Coaching Visit
                                                      Investigations Training - Gail Parrino
May 15, 2002 (all day)        EOC Conf. Room 2
                                                     3rd Grade
May 15 & 16, 2002 (all                               Coaching for Cohort 4 School; 2 days
                              Houston School
day)
May 16, 2002 (AM)             Hurley School       Coaching Visit
                                                     Investigations Training - Gail Parrino
May 16, 2002 (all day)        EOC Conf. Room 2
                                                    4th Grade
                                                     Investigations Training - Gail Parrino
May 17, 2002 (all day)        EOC Conf. Room 2
                                                    5th & 6th Grades
May 20, 21, & 22, 2002        Mountain View       Leadership Training - Kathy Richardson
(all day)                     School                Cohort 4 schools
May 23, 2002 (all day)        Union School        Grade Level Planning – K-6
May 28, 2002 (all day)        Highland School     Grade Level Planning – K-4
May 29 & 30, 2002 (all                                    On Going Coaching Support
                              Pinkham School
day)
                              Mountain View                        Coaching Visit
June 4 & 5, 2002 (all day)
                              School
                              EOC Conf. Room 4         Teacher Institute Training – Kathy
June 10-14, 2002 (all day)
                              VLC Conf. Room 9      Richardson/Marilynn Magnani, Cohort 5
                                                               schools
                             Conyer/Ivanhoe          Teacher Planning Workshop
July 8, 2002 (all day)
                             School
                                                   Teacher Institute Training – Kathy
August 12-16, 2002 (all      EOC Conf. Room 4   Richardson/Marilynn Magnani, Cohort 5
day)                         VLC Conf Room 9                     schools
August 20, 21, & 22, 2002                           Practicum – Red/Green Tracks
                             Crestwood School
(all day)
September 4 & 5, 2002        Willow Glen                    Coaching Visit
(AM)                         School
September 9 & 10, 2002                                      Coaching Visit
                             Houston School
(AM)
September 11, 2002 (all                           Grade Level Planning – Grades K-2
                             Fairview School
day)
September 12, 2002 (all                           Grade Level Planning – Grades K-2
                             Pinkham School
day)
September 16, 17 & 18,                              Practicum – Yellow/Blue Tracks
                             Crestwood School
2002 (all day)
September 19, 2002 (all                           Grade Level Planning – Grades 3-6
                             Pinkham School
day)
September 23, 24, & 25,                                       Practicum
                             Conyer School
2002 (all day)
September 26, 2002 (all                           Grade Level Planning – Grades 3-6
                             Fairview School
day)
September 30, October 1 &                                     Practicum
                             Ivanhoe School
2, 2002 (AM)
                             Willow Glen                    Coaching Visit
October 3, 2002 (AM)
                             School
October 7 & 8, 2002 (AM)     Houston School                 Coaching Visit
October 9 & 10, 2002 (all                        Coaching for Cohort 5 School; 2 days
                             Conyer School
day)
October 14 & 15, 2002 (all                       Coaching for Cohort 5 School; 2 days
                             Crestwood School
day)
October 16 & 17, 2002                                       Coaching Visit
                             Pinkham School
(AM)
                                                   Teacher Institute Training – Kathy
October 21-25, 2002 (all     EOC Conf. Room 4   Richardson/Marilynn Magnani, Cohort 5
day)                         VLC Conf Room 9                     schools
October 28 & 29, 2002 (all                       Coaching for Cohort 5 School; 2 days
                             Ivanhoe School
day)
October 30, 2002                                   Content Class – AIMS (Geometry)
                             EOC
(AM/PM)
November 4 & 5, 2002 (all                        Coaching for Cohort 5 School; 2 days
                             Conyer School
day)
  November 6 & 7, 2002 (all                                Coaching for Cohort 5 School; 2 days
                                  Crestwood School
  day)
  November 12, 13 & 14,
  2002 (all                       EOC                      Investigations Training – Gail Parrino
      day)
  November 18 & 19, 2002                                              Coaching Visit
                                  Houston School
  (AM)
  November 21, 2002 (all                                    Grade Level Planning – Grades K-2
                                  Pinkham School
  day)
  November 21, 2002 (all                                    Grade Level Planning – Grades 3-6
                                  Fairview School
  day)
  November 25 & 26, 2002                                   Coaching for Cohort 5 School; 2 days
                                  Ivanhoe School
  (all day)


                STEPSS SCHEDULE OF EVENTS (December 2002-May 2003)

           DATE                          SITE                          EVENT

December 2, 2002 (all day)       Conyer School          Coaching for Cohort 5 School; 1 day

December 4, 2002 (all day)       Pinkham School               Grade Level Planning - 6
December 4 & 5, 2002 (all
                                 Houston School         Coaching Visit; 2 days
day)
December 10, 2002 (all day)      Crestwood School       Coaching for Cohort 5 School; 1 day
                                 Educational Complex,
December 11, 2002 (all day)                             Content Class – AIMS (Geometry)
                                 Board Room North
                                 Educational Complex,
Jan. 7, 8, & 9, 2003 (all day)                          Investigations Training – Gail Parrino
                                 Conf. Room 4
January 9-10, 2003 (all day)     Willow Glen School            Coaching Visit; 2 days

January 13, 2003 (all day)       Crestwood School       Coaching for Cohort 5 school; 1 day

January 13, 2003 (all day)       Elbow Creek School     Grade Level Planning – 1st & 2nd

January 14, 2003 (all day)       Elbow Creek School     Grade Level Planning - Kindergarten
                                                        Grade Level Planning – Kindergarten
January 15, 2003 (all day)       Pinkham School                        & 1st

January 21, 2003 (all day)       Elbow Creek School     Grade Level Planning – 5th & 6th
January 22 & 24, 2003 (all
                                 Ivanhoe School         Coaching for Cohort 5 school; 2 days)
day)
January 23, 2003 (all day)     Elbow Creek School    Grade Level Planning – 3rd & 4th
January 27 & 28, 2003 (all
                               Conyer School         Coaching for Cohort 5 school; 2 days
day)
January 29, 2003 (all day)     Pinkham School        Grade Level Planning – 1st & 2nd
January 29 & 30, 2003 (all
                               Fairview School       Grade Level Planning – K-6
day)
February 3 & 4, 2003 (all
                               Conyer School         Coaching for Cohort 5 school; 2 days
day)
February 5 & 6, 2003 (all
                               Houston School        Coaching Visit; 2 days
day)
Feb. 11 & 12, 2003 (all day)   Crestwood School      Coaching for Cohort 5 school; 2 days

February 12, 2003 (all day)    Elbow Creek School    Grade Level Planning – 5th & 6th

February 13, 2003 (all day)    Elbow Creek School    Grade Level Planning – 3rd & 4th

Feb. 18 & 21, 2003 (all day)   Ivanhoe School        Coaching for Cohort 5 school; 2 days

February 19, 2003 (all day)    Elbow Creek School    Grade Level Planning – 1st & 2nd

February 19, 2003 (al day)     Pinkham School         Grade Level Planning – 2nd & 3rd

February 20, 2003 (all day)    Elbow Creek School    Grade Level Planning - Kindergarten

March 3, 2003 (all day)        Conyer School         Coaching for Cohort 5 school; 1 day
March 10 & 12, 2003 (all
                               Crestwood School      Coaching for Cohort 5 school; 2 days
day)
March 12, 2003 (all day)       Pinkham School        Grade Level Planning – 3rd & 4th
March 12 & 13, 2003 (all
                               Fairview School       Grade Level Planning – K-6
day)
March 17 & 18, 2003 (all
                               Houston School        Coaching Visit; 2 days
day)
March 19 & 20, 2003 (all
                               Ivanhoe School        Coaching for Cohort 5 school; 2 days
day)
March 25, 2003 (all day)       Willow Glen School    Coaching Visit; 1 day

March 26, 2003 (half day)      Educational Complex   Content Class - (CSUF)

March 31, 2003 (all day)       Willow Glen School    Grade Level Planning – K-6
April 2, 2003 (all day)         Pinkham School           Grade Level Planning – 4th & 5th

April 2 & 3, 2003 (all day)     Houston School           Coaching Visit; 2 days

April 4, 2003 (all day)         Elbow Creek School       Grade Level Planning – 1st & 2nd

April 9, 2003 (all day)         Elbow Creek School       Grade Level Planning - Kindergarten

April 22 & 23, 2003 (all day)   Fairview School          Grade Level Planning – K-6

April 23, 2003 (half day)       Educational Complex      Content Class (CSUF)

April 28 & 29, 2003 (all day)   Ivanhoe School           Coaching for Cohort 5 school; 2 days

April 30, 2003 (all day)        Pinkham School           Grade Level Planning – 6th

May 5 & 6, 2003 (all day)       Conyer School            Coaching for Cohort 5 school; 2 days

May 7, 2003 (all day)           Pinkham School           Grade Level Planning – 5th & 6th

May 14 & 15, 2003 (all day)     Crestwood School         Coaching for Cohort 5 school; 2 days

May 19 & 20, 2003 (all day)     Ivanhoe School           Coaching for Cohort 5 school; 2 days

May 20, 2003 (all day)          Elbow Creek School       Grade Level Planning – 5th & 6th

May 21, 2003 (half day)         Educational Complex      Content Class (CSUF)

May 22, 2003 (all day)          Elbow Creek School       Grade Level Planning – 3rd & 4th

May 22 & 23, 2003 (all day)     Willow Glen School       Grade Level Planning – K-6
May 27, 28, & 29, 2003 (all     Educational Complex,
                                                         Investigations Training – Gail Parrino
day)                            Conference Room 4



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Mathematics Content Workshops

All STEPSS teachers who are not enrolled in a master's program must attend five half-day math
content classes that are held approximately once a month as part of the required 100+ hours of
professional development. When the workshops are delivered after school or on weekends,
teachers receive a $50 stipend. Faculty members from Fresno Pacific University or California
State University, Fresno deliver all courses.

Sample content course titles include the following:

–Elementary Arithmetic From an Advanced Viewpoint
–Pattern Searching in Geometry
–Fraction and Decimal Workshop
–Geometry and Measurement
–Just for the Fun of It—Puzzles and Problem Solving in Recreational Mathematics
–Number Sense
–Number Concepts/Operations


                  <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

Master's Degree Courses

STEPSS has provided a significant level of financial support for over 150 teachers desiring a
master's degree with K-6 mathematics as their area of focus. The two participating campuses are
California State University, Fresno and Fresno Pacific University. The courses taken by students
at each campus provide them with numerous opportunities to strengthen their understanding of
mathematics content and pedagogy and to develop their research and leadership skills in the area
of mathematics education. The University-based Project Co-PIs, Dr. Carol Fry Bohlin and Dr.
Richard Thiessen, serve as coordinators of the STEPSS master's cohorts at their respective
campuses–California State University, Fresno and Fresno Pacific University. The following are
some of the courses that have been taken by the master's students at each campus between Fall
Semester, 1998, and Fall Semester, 2003:

• California State University, Fresno (Master of Arts in Education: Curriculum and Instruction
Emphasis–K-6 Mathematics Focus)

Mathematics Education in the Primary Grades–This course explores the mathematics content and
methods appropriate for grades K-3, including methods for assessing and building on children's
natural strategies for problem solving, developing mathematical communication skills, and
strengthening connections between conceptual and procedural knowledge.

Statistics for K-8 Teachers–Students learn the purposes and applications of descriptive and
inferential statistics (e.g., measures of central tendency and variation, correlation, regression, t-
tests, ANOVA, chi-square) and develop the skills to present these concepts to K-8 students.

Problem Solving for K-8 Teachers–A cornucopia of classic problems, new problems, and
problem solving strategies that serve to enhance the mathematical skills and reasoning abilities
for elementary school teachers.
Infusing Technology in the Elementary School Curriculum–Identification and evaluation of
computers, instructional video, laser disc, digital cameras, and telecommunications for
developing teaching materials and strategies appropriate for the mathematics classroom.

Curriculum Development and Evaluation–This course presents the theory and practice of
curriculum development, evaluation and revision, especially as it relates to mathematics
education.

Instructional Development and Evaluation–This course focuses on effective instructional models
and examines in depth the TIMSS findings, CGI models, and theory-based models of
mathematics instruction.

Seminar in Advanced Educational Psychology–This is a seminar on the psychological
foundation of education, focusing on the nature and characteristics of development and learning
processes.

Research in Education–This is a course on research methodology, including identification of
research problems, use of library and internet resources, data gathering and processing,
conducting research, and writing a research report (lays groundwork for the thesis or project).

Current Issues and Trends in Mathematics Education–This course provides students with a solid
base of knowledge for the understanding and analysis of national and statewide issues related to
mathematics curriculum, instruction, and assessment. [This course was developed especially for
the NSF-sponsored master's cohort at Fresno State and was approved at the university level in
Fall 2000 for inclusion in the university catalog.]

Project or Thesis–Independent, creative scholarly work on a significant issue. Theses must
include a significant research component. Projects and theses are all 5-chapter volumes.

• Fresno Pacific University (Master of Arts in Education with a K-6 Mathematics Emphasis)

Arithmetic of the Rational Numbers–Using manipulatives and problem-solving strategies within
a context, this course develops the underlying concepts and structure of the natural numbers,
integers, and rational numbers.

Informal Geometry–Beginning with the geometric gifts of Froebel, this course explores the
concepts and relationships of elementary geometry.

Math Perspectives–A math content course that integrates number, geometry, and data sense
through problem solving.

Concepts of Algebra–This course provides a bridge between arithmetic to algebra. Looking
forward from arithmetic to algebra and backward from algebra to arithmetic, students find
themselves engaged in algebraic thinking and acquisition of the language of algebra.
Technology in Math Education–This course explores ways to use technology to enhance the
teaching of mathematics in the elementary school.

Festival of Mathematics–This is a one-week institute setting with grade level strands in which
teachers explore innovative ways to teach mathematics in the elementary classroom.

Integration of Mathematics and Science: Math Connections –This course focuses on the
integration of math and science primarily from the content of mathematics. Science
investigations provide the arena for the application of some of the big ideas of elementary
mathematics.
                                    PROJECT FINDINGS

Lessons Learned and Unanticipated Effects

Communities of Learners – Our decision to take whole schools into the project instead of grade
level spans has proved to be very beneficial. We have witnessed the development of
communities of learners to an extent that we had not anticipated. The dialogue about
mathematics has significantly changed on each of the respective campuses. Administrators have
been impressed with their staff's new discussions and emphasis on mathematics instruction and
meeting children's individual needs.

Another important factor in this building of communities of learners is the master's programs
with a K-6 mathematics emphasis offered by our university partners (California State University,
Fresno and Fresno Pacific University). Teachers from all 21 elementary schools in Visalia
Unified School District have enrolled in one of the specially designed master's cohorts at these
two campuses. An outcome of this broad participation is that other teachers see the their peers
discussing and working on homework related to mathematics in the teachers' lounges. It has
created an interest among other teachers to be enrolled in the same programs.

2000-2001 – Twenty students in the CSU, Fresno master's cohort graduated in May, 2000.
STEPSS (NSF) sponsored a reception celebrating the accomplishments of these students. They
presented a synopsis of their master's projects/theses at this event. One student was honored by
being the CSUF School of Education and Human Development's nominee for the Graduate
Dean's Medal Award. In May 2001, 49 students graduated from Fresno Pacific University with
their master's degrees. All master's degree recipients and the former Director of STEPSS, Darryl
Medders, were formally recognized and honored on 22 May 2001 during a meeting of the Visalia
Unified School Board.

2001-2002 - Fourteen students in the CSU-Fresno master's cohort graduated in May, 2002.
STEPSS (NSF) sponsored a reception and program on May 17, 2002 honoring the
accomplishments of these students. Their advisors presented a synopsis of the master's
project/thesis of each graduating student. A third master's cohort from CSU-Fresno matriculated
in Spring 2003, with STEPSS sponsoring another reception and recognition ceremony in honor
of the graduates. In May 2003, approximately 30 students graduated from Fresno Pacific
University with their master's degrees. Master's degree recipients from CSU-Fresno, master's
program coordinator Dr. Jeanie Behrend, and master's cohort coordinator Dr. Carol Fry Bohlin,
were formally recognized on 21 May 2002 during a meeting of the Visalia Unified School
Board.

2002-2003 – As mentioned earlier, 20 teachers matriculated into the graduate program at CSUF
during January 2003, all supported by STEPSS. These teachers have currently taken five
graduate courses (including 3 mathematics education courses) and are anticipated to graduate in
May 2005.
Attacking "Illusions of Learning" – We have found that project teachers are focusing on each
individual student's knowledge of mathematical concepts as a result of the Teacher Institutes
provided by our consultants Kathy Richardson and Deborah Kitchens. This has created
disequilibrium for many teachers because of their assumptions of what they thought children
knew by the time they enter their classrooms. There have been many aha's from teachers across
the grade levels about children's understanding of mathematics concepts. Kathy Richardson talks
about a dangerous 'illusion of learning' that teachers can help dissipate through careful and
skillful assessment. The Project Director and Math Coaches have said, "Together we will replace
'illusions of learning' with conceptual understanding built upon real experiences." The STEPSS
project has been a powerful factor in helping teachers to look at children in a different way and
challenging them to provide meaningful instruction in their classrooms. Important components
in supporting that change are the Math Coaches and the site Teacher Leaders and administrators.
The Math Coaches have become active partners in the teachers' classrooms.

Teacher Comments Concerning the Teacher Institutes

The 'Teaching and Assessing for Understanding' week-long workshops provided by Kathy
Richardson and Deborah Kitchens have been extremely powerful in effecting change in teachers'
attitudes about mathematics and teaching mathematics. They have provided teachers with
theoretical and practical ideas for restructuring their mathematics classes for effective
instruction. For those teachers desiring University Extension credit for actively participating in
these workshops, a detailed analysis of their experience is required. The following passages from
some of the submitted papers provide evidence of the positive impact of these workshops:

"As a result of the Teacher Institute, my views of mathematics and teaching mathematics have
grown extensively. I will never have the same opinions and viewpoints I had previous to going to
both this Teacher Institute and the Leadership Institute. In my own teaching, I realized that my
own students were not 'getting' Math. In other words, they were not making sense of Math. The
Teacher Institute has taught me several things that have made me question the ways in which I
am currently teaching Mathematics to my students. First and foremost, children must be learning
in an environment that supports the development of understanding. This idea is a must if we
want our students to be successful in mathematics. This particular learning environment does the
following things: encourages thoughtfulness, encourages children's thinking, provokes questions,
stimulates a search for meaning, encourages children to look for connections and relationships,
and helps children make sense of and understand the mathematics in which they are engaged.
Although I tried my best as a teacher to get my students to make sense of mathematics, I learned
that I was actually teaching them mathematics in ways that would only hinder them from making
their own sense of mathematics. I was demonstrating to my students my own way of solving
problems and therefore, was astounded when they were having difficulty solving the problems
the same way. Second, I learned how to better assess my students on what they know and
understand about certain mathematical concepts. I always knew that there was a better way of
teaching my students mathematics, but I wasn't sure on how to go about assessing what my
students really understood in mathematics and where to go from there. The Teacher Institute has
helped me tremendously in the area of assessment."
'The video clips of students participating in number talks convinced me that students are able to
grasp conceptual knowledge of math and manipulate numbers at a very young age. This proved
to me that allowing students to think outside the lines of traditional algorithms and to share their
thoughts with others is beneficial in becoming successful at solving math problems."

"I am happy to report that I was very impressed with Kathy Richardson and in awe of her ability
to gently communicate number sense to students of all ages. I was from the old school where
you listened to the lecture, worked a few problems, and took a test. I always seemed to be able
to make sense of the algorithms, so I thought that I understood math and relationships between
numbers. After watching Kathy, I realized that I did not really have number sense, but rather a
set of rules to manipulate numbers so that I could get the right answers. I was never good at
mental math and now I realize why. I found myself wanting to get down on the rug with the kids
and explain to Kathy how I had mentally figured out the answer."

"As a result of this Leadership Institute, I am filled with a fresh outlook towards math. I always
enjoyed math, but now I think that I can help better develop that enjoyment in my students. I can
see that letting the students take ownership of their learning is really powerful! When these kids
demonstrated their ability to mentally maneuver around numbers, there was real pride in their
faces. They also learned from each other…. Kathy Richardson's approach to math and the
excitement that it caused within the Mineral King Master's Cohort made the greatest impression
on me."

"As I have already stated, I am really anxious to get started with my new class to use her
approach. The fact that I will have the luxury of bouncing ideas off my peers and them meeting
back with Kathy to discuss our successes or concerns, is a rare opportunity."

'The STEPSS Leadership Institute (LI) helped me develop a clearer view of math teaching and
assessment. As a new teacher, my math program has been a series of trials, mostly followed by
error. The master's program has challenged my thinking and caused me to be more reflective in
my planning. The Institute was a continuation of this education. It is a product of great planning
that the master's program and STEPPS flow so seamlessly together."

"Kathy Richardson presented a wonderful comprehensive seminar that focused mainly on
assessment. Because of her research and resources I have developed a better understanding of
assessment and its importance in teaching math. I have always known that a teacher must assess
student learning, but what the LI did for my viewpoint is show me the importance of assessing
more frequently, and more meaningfully. Where a quiz or paper pencil test is inadequate, one-
to-one interviews and simple questions using manipulatives fill in the gaps and give a clear
picture of where student understanding lies….One thing about LI that made an impression on me
was the leader, Kathy Richardson. I enjoyed her easy manner coupled with her drilling insight.
She seemed so unassuming, yet offered us so much that helped to really understand student
thinking."

"Teaching mathematics to twenty first graders has taken on a new meaning for me after attending
the Teacher Institute with Kathy Richardson...I now realize that as a teacher I need to present
meaningful activities that will engage each student to explore, discover and interact with
mathematical concepts that will get them to think critically. I need to first assess each student to
find out what they know before I can present any concepts with numbers. I need to have them
show me and tell me what they know about numbers. As the teacher I thought it was my duty to
show them what they needed to know and after a time of memorizing and practicing let them
show me they could copy the steps and resolve math problems with a pencil and paper. My
approach to math will be totally different as I prepare to use these new strategies and provide a
variety of problem situations and let the students engage themselves and express an
understanding of numbers. I also learned that each student may internalize varied concepts of
math at different times and stages, therefore I need to allow the time for all to experience and
show competence. I also sensed a whole new math terminology to use as the teacher poses
questions to find out what each student has learned. I feel if I implement these strategies that I
have learned I will enable my students to be more powerful in math.

"As a result of attending the Teaching for Understanding workshop my views regarding teaching
mathematics have changed significantly. I am now convinced that students need to do more than
just compute math problems, they also need to understand how numbers are related and why
traditional algorithms work. I agree that students must be challenged to think and reason when
attempting to solve just as they will be expected to do in the real world. This workshop has
revealed many worthwhile strategies for teaching math, including math talks, manipulatives,
cooperative groups and providing challenging real world problems to motivate students to use
critical thinking skills."

"In my classroom this year I plan to implement Math Talks. Also, I will use more restraint
within myself so as not to give students the answers for everything. Lastly, I plan to think with
more depth about my curriculum to be aware of why I am doing what I'm doing and determine if
it moves my students toward mathematical thinking or farther away."

"In many ways this course helped me to feel more confident, but in others it made me even more
aware of how lacking my mathematical skills are and how much more I need to learn. I feel
much better about teaching math because I now feel I have a method that will help my kids to
understand and to help them become much more mathematically powerful. I have purchased the
complete set of Kathy Richardson's books and I'm reading everything I can find that Kathy
recommended. I'm very excited about this method that helps my students to become
mathematical powerful and myself along with them."

"My experiences at the Teacher Institute significantly changed my views about teaching math
and math in general. I have always felt very inept at math because I didn't get many of the
concepts, formulas, and procedures my teachers were trying to drill into my head. I did not
know why I had to know them anyway. I was never taught any real life applications in which to
apply the math that I was learning. After taking this class, I now understand why the lessons
weren't sticking in my head. My knowledge of why concepts worked the way they did, why
formulas worked, and how procedures were even developed was sadly lacking. I now believe
we, as teachers, can change this for our students because of the great things we were taught in
this course. I just wish everyone could have this great opportunity."
Administrator Comments Regarding the STEPSS Project

The significant impact that STEPSS has had on teachers and students is reflected in the words of
one of the principals of a STEPSS Cohort II school:

"It's gratifying and encouraging to see teachers so excited and enthusiastic about teaching math.
This is what this program has done in just five months. I have found that the more teachers learn
math, the more they'll love to teach it and that love for math transfers over to the students. When
I went to the five-day training last month with Kathy Richardson, I heard the 'a-ha's' and 'oh
yeah's' coming from teachers as they experienced some revelations about their teaching or about
their students' learning. They realized that to make students become problem solvers and
independent thinkers, they had to move away from teaching the standards algorithms as they had
been taught or they learned themselves as students. The teachers learned strategies during the
training they could put to use when they went back to the classroom, such as number talks, etc.
It's exciting to hear teachers have discussions in the Staff Lounge that are STEPSS- or math-
related. But most of all, it's awesome to observe students in the classrooms I visited becoming
problem solvers and loving math."

Research Findings

Attitudinal and mathematics performance data were collected by the Project and analyzed by
Carol Fry Bohlin. Approximately 2000 students from Cohorts 1 (1998-1999), 3 (2000-2001), and
5 (2002-2003: control group) submitted complete attitudinal surveys. An analysis of scale score
means for students of teachers who participated in these three cohorts revealed significantly
higher scale scores (indicating more positive attitudes toward mathematics) for students whose
teachers had participated in STEPSS for the longest period of time (Cohort 1) compared with
students whose teachers were members of Cohort 3 or Cohort 5. Further, scale scores were
significantly different between Grades 3 and 5 and between grades 3 and 6, with scale scores of
3rd graders higher than scale scores of 5th and 6th graders. 4th grade scale scores were
significantly higher than scale scores for 6th graders. These findings demonstrate a significant
slide in positive feelings toward mathematics as measured by the scale as a whole among
students in grades 3-6, a finding that was independent of cohort membership.

Differences in the SAT 9-Math means for the 2000 and 2002 administrations of the test were
examined by cohort membership (1, 3, 5) for 1363 students. For students whose teachers were
members of Cohorts 1 or 3, SAT 9 means rose over the 2-year period. The most dramatic
positive growth in SAT 9 math scores was shown among the students of teachers in Cohort 3,
who started STEPSS during 2000-2001. Negative growth is evident overall for students in
Cohort 5 (control group) over the same 2-year period of time.

Therefore, participation in STEPSS activities by teachers is positively related to (a) their
students' performance on standardized mathematics tests and (b) student attitudes toward
mathematics. A proposal presenting these findings has been submitted to the American
Educational Research Association (AERA) for possible presentation at AERA's 2004 annual
conference. The title of the proposed presentation by Carol Fry Bohlin, Naomi Kent, and
Samantha Tate is "Mathematics Attitudes and Achievement Among Students in Grades 3-6:
Impact of the Duration of Teacher Participation in an NSF-Funded Professional Development
Project." A manuscript based upon these findings will be submitted for publication
consideration.


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TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

This information was included in the "Project Activities" section above.

OUTREACH ACTIVITIES

Since the first year of the Project, the STEPSS Project Director and Mathematics Coaches have
made numerous presentations to school administrators, teachers, district school board members
and administrators. Project components and progress have been shared at the monthly Central
Valley Math Network meetings. One of the PIs, Dr. Carol Fry Bohlin, gave an invited
presentation on STEPSS to the President's Commission on Teacher Education at California State
University, Fresno, in December, 1998. In June 2000, Dr. Bohlin was again invited to address
the President's Commission to provide an update about STEPSS.

The STEPSS staff helped organize and facilitate several Family Math nights at Project schools.
In addition, Family Math activities have been facilitated at four evening Migrant Family
meetings for Project and non-Project schools in Visalia Unified School District. Several
educators from neighboring districts have expressed interest in the Project and have participated
in a variety of Project events, including the Institutes.

On November 6, 1999, a 14-person panel delivered a presentation accompanied by PowerPoint
slides at the California Mathematics Council's Southern Section conference in Palm Springs.
(Attendance at this popular conference typically exceeds 4500.) The university Co-PI's, the
Project Director, the four STEPSS coaches, two principals, and five Teacher Leaders participated
in this panel presentation.

A half-day STEPSS workshop was presented at the National Council of Supervisors of
Mathematics' conference held in Chicago during April 2000. In January 2001, then-Project
Director Darryl Medders, Co-PI Carol Fry Bohlin, and one of Dr. Bolin‘s graduate students, Judy
Russ, gave a presentation on STEPSS at the Association of Mathematics Teachers Educators
(AMTE) annual conference, held in Orange County, California.
Two STEPSS coaches (Lori Goebel and Dana Hight) and Project Director Samantha Tate gave a
presentation at the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' 2002 conference in Las Vegas
(topic: "Building Sense with Numbers"). Project Co-PI, Dr. Carol Fry Bohlin, moderated a
session on NSF Local Systemic Change (LSC) projects during the 2002 NCTM conference.
Lucy West, F. Joseph Merlino, and Dianne Spresser participated in this session. Dr. Bohlin, Bill
Frascela, and F. Joseph Merlino also received funding from NSF/Horizon Research to Co-Direct
a one-day conference for LSC Project Directors: "How to Win Friends and Influence the Public
in the LSC Mathematics Reform Movement." The three also participated in the Second Virtual
Conference on Local Systemic Change (TERC) on May 1-May 8. Their topic was "Public
Engagement: Addressing the Political, Cultural and Constraining Factors Influencing Math
Reform" (available online at http://sustainability2002.terc.edu/invoke.cfm/page/13). Samantha
Tate, Lori Goebel, and Dana Hight presented "Building Sense with Numbers" at the 2003
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' Annual Conference in San Antonio.

The STEPSS program and activities have been profiled in District publications, which increased
further the profile of the Project in the district:
(1) "STEPSS–Empowering Children to Think Mathematically!' Visalia Reader. July/August,
1998, 1(3), p. 6.
(2) "Family Math Night at Mineral King Elementary," Visalia Reader. September, 1999, 1(4), p.
2.
(3) "STEPSS Lead to Math Mastery," Special Delivery: Spotlighting Special People, Programs,
and Schools. Winter, 1999, 3(1), pp. 4-5, 8.

Finally, the STEPSS Project was highlighted in a California Department of Education study
published in June 2000. The "Mathematics Implementation Study" was funded by the California
Department of Education and conducted by WestEd in partnership with RAND and
Management, Analysis and Planning, Inc. In Chapter 7: Professional Development, pages 93-95,
the study highlights the STEPSS project - "District Spotlight: A Professional Development
Program that is Making a Difference." This recognition of the STEPSS Project came about
because virtually every fourth grade teacher in Visalia Unified who was interviewed by the
researchers voluntarily mentioned the impact that STEPSS was having on them and their school.
The 'Mathematics Implementation Study' report can be accessed at
http://www.edgateway.net/mis/

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Changes in Policies or Supporting Agencies Throughout the Life of the Grant

During the fall of 1998, the Project's Lead Evaluator accepted a lucrative job offer outside the
area and severed ties with the project; the Project Director stepped in and wrote the initial
Evaluator's Report. The Project hired Phil White as Lead Evaluator in 1999; he has served ably
in this capacity since that time. His insights on staff development and classroom instruction have
been valuable assets to the project.

During 1999-2000, John Stockton served as a Project Co-PI, but then he accepted a Curriculum
position in a Northern California district in July 2000. In August 2000, the NSF Program Officer
for STEPSS left the Foundation and a new program officer was assigned. The Visalia Unified
School District superintendent left the district in September 2000.

Carlyn Lambert, Assistant Superintendent Curriculum/Educational Services, Visalia Unified,
was added as a Project Co-PI to replace John Stockton during 2000-2001. She brought a
dedication for learning and a commitment to the project for Visalia Unified. Samantha Tate, a
STEPSS Math Coach and member of the San Joaquin Valley Mathematics Project, transitioned
into the role of Project Director, taking the place of founding director Darryl Medders in August,
2001. In July 2001, the district hired a new superintendent, Stan Carrizosa, who has been very
supportive of the STEPSS Project.

During the first two years of the grant, the District supplied many elementary schools with low
SAT 9 scores with Saxon mathematics books with the expectation that some of the schools
would serve as pilots for this program. Many teachers who had been through the STEPSS
training were resistant to this development, preferring to continue using the district-adopted
MathLand curriculum and replacement units. Since the STEPSS program is curriculum-
independent, however, these teachers were empowered to make decisions based upon the needs
of their children and viewed any textbook as just another tool, not the determining factor of the
mathematics curriculum. Therefore, the impact of the Saxon program was relatively small.

During the California mathematics textbook adoption process that was completed in January
2001, Saxon Mathematics was not recommended by the Instructional Materials Advisory Panel
because it was not aligned with California state mathematics content standards and did not
provide universal access. The state's Content Review Panel was split on a Saxon
recommendation (2 no, 2 yes) for upper elementary. This lukewarm endorsement by the state,
coupled with many teachers' lack of enthusiasm for the program, further weakened the influence
of Saxon within the district. During February, 2001, the District Textbook Adoption Committee
began meeting, and after months of study, made the decision to adopt California Mathematics
(Scott-Foresman) as the district's mathematics textbook series.

During the summer of 2001, an exciting opportunity was made available to the district. Scott-
Foresman generously committed to donate one Investigations in Number, Data, and Space unit
for every unit that the district purchased. Two STEPSS schools volunteered to pilot the
Investigations program in grades 3-5. Teachers at these school sites have been involved in
continual and intensive staff development with Gail Parrino. Parrino connected the
Investigations units with the state adopted text, with the Mathematics Framework for California
Public Schools, and with the California Mathematics Content Standards for mathematics.
                                  Unit Annual Report
                Beginning Teacher Support & Assessment (BTSA) Program
                              July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Unit

The BTSA programs serve as induction programs for most of the school districts within the
Central Valley and the State of California. Two of our faculty are State Senior CFASST
(California Formative Assessment Support System for Teachers) Trainers who provide training
for support providers and have helped to re-design the training over the past four years. One
person serves as the KSOEHD Induction Coordinator who works closely with various districts as
they write to meet new standards. We want to ensure that our teacher education program is
aligned with the induction programs to provide a seamless web for teachers. Several faculty also
serve on various advisory committees and the Central Valley Regional Network committee.

Several faculty have sponsored a support effort for beginning teachers and support providers by
offering low-cost units of credit through Fresno State office of Global and Continuing Education.
This effort, coordinated with the BTSA Directors in the Central Valley area, is way of supporting
and validating the important functions performed by beginning teachers and their support
providers through their induction program. Through this effort, faculty also gain valuable
feedback from participants regarding their experiences in the BTSA program, their challenges,
their successes, and suggestions for change. They also provided us with their recommendations
for what preservice programs could do differently that might have helped them be a more
effective beginning teacher. Additionally, information is shared with BTSA Directors and
teacher education faculty as outcome assessment data. This information is particularly important
to the Teacher Education programs as faculty are redesigning the entire program to meet new
CCTC standards.


Administrative Housing of Unit

This is a coordinated effort with Central Valley BTSA programs and KSOEHD faculty. These
courses, offered through Extended Education, are C & I courses for beginning teachers and
support providers. Meetings are held on campus once a year whereby participants can share their
experiences with persons from other districts and learn new ways to support each other. There is
a BTSA office in the C & I Department that houses records. Students and staff assist in the
dissemination and collection of paperwork and provide information to participants. They are
reimbursed for their time through the funds collected to support the classes.


Major Accomplishments 2003 – 2004

    The KSOEHD Induction Coordinator spent many hours working with BTSA directors and
     their writing Committee to ensure KSOEHD‘s inductive courses were submitted as part of
     their induction plan.
    One BTSA Director serves in as a voting member of KSOEHD Multiple Subjects Review
     Committee.
    Approximately 12 faculty and staff serve as advisory board members and/or attend other
     committee meetings with out BTSA colleagues.
    Approximately 450 participants (beginning teachers and support providers) enrolled in the
     Fresno State Extended Education classes this past academic year. In addition a faculty
     sabbatical has been granted for Spring 2005 to update collected and to engage in individual
     interaction with BTSA directors to extend the depth of data collected.
    Feedback from participants and BTSA Directors is overwhelming positive related to our
     school‘s participation with their induction efforts.


Sources of Funding

The only funds received to support these efforts are a portion of the fees paid by participants for
the units of credit. These funds are used to pay for supplies associated with the participant
meetings, consultant fees for faculty to conduct sessions, travel costs connected with
disseminating information related to the project, conference/workshop fees for faculty associated
with projects, and students/staff assistance in paperwork and preparation of meetings. The
endeavor for this year was collected at a total of $14,400.


Space and Equipment Utilization

File cabinets in the CI Department office houses paperwork and materials connected with this
effort.


Risk Management

All systemwide and university policies and procedures associated with risk management are
adhered to.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

    Continue efforts with BTSA programs and participants such as developing classes to
     support new induction standards, assistance in writing to the new CTC standards, serving
     on advisory committees and network consortium, providing workshops and/or CFASST
     training, and general consultation regarding our teacher education program and district
     induction efforts.
    Continue special classes for beginning teachers and support providers.
Request for Renewal of the Program:

We would life to continue our current efforts with the BTSA Induction programs and find new
ways to more effectively collaborate with our school district partners.
                                      Unit Annual Report
                                            Block A
                                  July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Unit

Block A is a school-based teacher education cohort which provides a one year credential
program from the summer to end of spring semester. The purpose of the program is to prepare a
cohort of student teachers in practical as well as theoretical aspects of teaching by closely
coordinating coursework with classroom practice and providing additional training and support.
All classes are held in a university-owned, portable classroom on the Nelson Elementary School
campus, Clovis Unified School District. This is a Blue Ribbon School with a diverse population
of students and outstanding faculty, some who are graduates of Block A. Being on a school site,
Block A students are able to observe exemplary classrooms as well as have resource teachers and
administrators discuss with them important educational issues such as assessment, school-wide
management systems , district standards and special education needs.

A team of six professors and a supervisor teach all of the courses in the program and supervise
both initial and final student teaching. Three of the professors also supervisor student teachers.
The team meets on a regular basis to plan and coordinate coursework with field experience, to
avoid overlap of course topics and to schedule papers and exams to be more workable for
students. Also discussed are any student or organizational problems. Block A begins in the
summer with one reading course, LEE 146(K-3). The fall semester includes reading, LEE
149(4-8), curriculum, CI 150, psychological foundations, C & I 130, social foundations, C & I
140 and initial student teaching, EHD 110. Teaching math, C&I 121, is offered during winter
break and teaching science, C&I 125, takes place during the spring semester along with final
student teaching, EHD 160. By spreading out the coursework, the heavy load is more easily
managed by the students. All coursework and field experience in the fall takes place between 8
am and 3 pm, Monday through Thursday. To provide continuity students are in their initial
student teaching placements every day from 8 to 11 and have a class on Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday afternoons from 12 to 3. The portable is always available for working
on assignments or for group preparation as well as for eating lunch, socializing and parties.
Fridays are reserved for field trips, classroom observations or free time to study. Final student
teaching in the spring is an all day, Monday through Friday experience with science class on
Thursday afternoon. Block A students have the option to do part of their student teaching in
middle school. Those students who choose this option usually teach half of their initial and final
student teaching in middle school, 7th and 8th grades and half in elementary grades, K-6.

Block A is designed to enrich and enhance teacher preparation. Special seminars, workshops,
school visits, classroom observations of demonstration lessons and speakers are scheduled.
Students not only have frequent opportunities to visit a variety of classrooms and schools but
they have teachers, administrators and specialists come to speak to them and demonstrate
teaching techniques and practices and address important issues in education. Bridging the gap
from theory to practice helps students become more professional, knowledgeable and competent
teachers. Block A teachers develop exceptional skills and receive special consideration when
interviewed for teaching positions. Many Block A graduates currently occupy leadership
positions in school districts as principals, learning directors and resource teachers. Another
advantage of the program is the close-knit cohort. Students not only take all classes together,
they work with partners during initial student teaching and do many of their class assignments in
groups or pairs. These practices encourage mutual support and assistance and strong friendships
which continue into their first years of teaching and beyond. Block A buddies become an
important source of both personal and professional support during their teaching career.


Administrative Housing of Unit

Block A is part of the Option 1 Multiple Subject teacher credential program of the Kremen
School of Education and Human Development. It is housed in the Curriculum and Instruction
Department. Coordinator is part of the CI department as well as most of the professors and
supervisors. Reading professors are part of the LEE department. Since the Portable classroom
which is owned by the University is situated on the Nelson school campus, part of Clovis
Unified School District, we have an informal relationship with the district. The district provides
janitorial service, a TV/Video player and phone. In exchange, the school uses the portable
occasionally for meetings and some student projects. The coordinator is responsible for
monitoring the upkeep of the portable and maintaining the relationship with the principal of the
school and the district.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

Twenty five students completed their Multiple Subject credentials this spring and are currently
employed or seeking employment. The Coordinator attended all the Multiple Subject
Orientations held during the Fall, 03 and Spring, 04 semesters to recruit students for the program.
Forty students were interviewed for the 2004-2005 program and 30 were accepted . An
orientation was held on May 13 at the Portable at Nelson School so students could meet the
professors and be prepared for the summer and fall semesters. Students are encouraged to
complete some of their reading requirements for the fall. A LEE 146 class will be held with Dr.
Judith Neal, June 1 through July 9 in the Portable and students will also complete the field
experience with the course in order to fulfill their reading competencies.

Program Assessment: Students complete a written evaluation of Block A every year. They
evaluate various aspects of the program and the faculty read the comments and make changes
from student suggestions. Although they complain about the amount of work and time required,
on the whole students like their Block A experience and particularly enjoy being in a cohort with
the supportive, family atmosphere and the opportunity to learn from their peers, a very powerful
instructional strategy. In addition, they like being on a public school campus among children.
Many of the students take this opportunity to participate in coaching sports, cheer-leading, drama
multi-cultural day , carnival and other activities. This is beneficial for the students as well as for
the school. The most valuable assessment of this program is the fact that the majority of Block
A graduates become highly successful teachers and strong contributing members of the school
districts where they are employed. Another important assessment is that every year students
apply to the Block A program because their friends recommend it. They want their friends to
share their positive experience.


Sources of Funding

As part of the Multiple Subject Program and the Curriculum and Instruction Department, funding
is provided by the budget of that department and the Kremen School of Education and Human
Development.


Space and Equipment Utilization

The program is housed in a portable classroom paid for by the University on the campus of
Nelson School, Clovis Unified School District. Furniture and equipment is supplied by the
School of Education.

Clovis Unified supplies janitorial services, a phone and a TV/Video Player. The university has
supplied computers and an overhead. The school district occasionally uses the classroom for
meetings. Former students have donated a refrigerator and microwave. The Coordinator
supplies a coffee maker and coffee as well as snack food. The Coordinator also supplies magic
markers and other materials as needed.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005
    Our major goal is to prepare our students as excellent teachers.
    A goal we hope to accomplish this year is to improve our program by doing the following:
     1. Improve the teaching of classroom management by setting up a check list of skills
          needed and using peer as well as supervisor evaluation of these skills. Supervisors
          are currently meeting to set up this checklist.
     2. Supervisors will also develop a better method for insuring that all requirements and
          competencies for student teaching are completed in a timely manner.
          c. Both professors and supervisors will meet this summer to develop some ideas for
          integrating the required coursework and eliminate some of the overlap as well
          improve areas of weakness in addition to preparing for the newly developed Course
          Syllabi for the Multiple Subject program.
                                     Unit Annual Report
                                CalStateTEACH at CSU Fresno
                                 July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Unit

CalStateTEACH at CSU Fresno is a fully accredited, CSU Teacher Education Program for
prospective teachers needing to complete a multiple subject credential. Using the latest
technology, including the Internet, CD-ROM, video and print materials, CalStateTEACH at CSU
Fresno de-livers high quality education to individuals across California (e.g., San Joaquin Valley,
the Central Coast, Northern California, Eastern California).

As is clear from the following description, CST contributes to the purposes and functions of the
University and the Kremen School of Education and Human Development in a variety of ways.
Prospective teachers (interns, pre-interns, or field study/student teachers) work in a small cohort
guided by a CSU faculty mentor whose responsibility is to serve each individual as a coach,
advisor, and evaluator in school and program web site. The faculty mentor visits classrooms to
observe teacher apprentices in action and provides facilitation for completion of course
assignments and instruction. The program is integrated and completely school-based; it does not
consist of separate courses taken on campus. Rather, the coursework and content is ―distributed‖
to students via study guides and textbooks (both in print and online), CD-ROM, video, online
discussion threads, and in-school and ―virtual‖ supervision.


Administrative Housing of Unit

CSU Fresno is one of four regional centers in CalStateTEACH. The program is housed
administratively within the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Kremen School of
Education and Human Development. The Regional Center Academic Director of
CalStateTEACH is Dr. Walter J. Ullrich. Faculty in CST are called Learning Support Faculty
(LSF) and are either full- or part-time lecturers. In 2003-04, there were 18 LSFs at the Fresno
Regional Center, 9 full-time and 9 part-time.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

Below I highlight the administrative and scholarly accomplishments of the CalStateTEACH at
CSU Fresno for 2003-04:

    Again this past year, student enrollment at the Fresno Regional Center enrollment (and
     FTE) was the highest of the four regional centers and exceeded our target by 42 students
     (or 7% over the target). Headcounts for each regional center follow: Fresno, 594;
     Fullerton, 424; Los Angeles, 488; and Monterey Bay, 467.
   Enrollment of new students in the Fresno Regional Center surpassed last year‘s new
    student enrollment. This 13% increase exceeded our target of 10%, an important indicator
    of program quality, regional center marketing and recruiting efforts, and continuing
    integration of CalStateTEACH program within Fresno State and the Kremen School of
    Education and Human Development.

   CalStateTEACH at CSU Fresno implemented its revised curriculum, designed to meet the
    new California Senate Bill 2042 Standards of Quality and Effectiveness for Professional
    Preparation Programs. The revised program has strengthened its content and its strategies
    for teaching English learners, as well as adaptations for effective teaching to students with
    special needs.

   CalStateTEACH ranked near the top in the Chancellor‘s Annual Report on Teacher
    Education in the California State University for 2003-04. The Professional Development
    School model of CST designed and implemented by Dr. Adrienne Herrell, Dr. Michael
    Jordan and me at Greenberg Elementary School in Fresno was highlighted in the
    Chancellor‘s Annual Report.

   CalStateTEACH expanded the productivity tools available to all candidates and faculty. In
    addition to the lesson planning tool, an electronic web-based unit builder was added this
    year, using the same website and format as the lesson planning tool. Another productivity
    tool added this year is the Directed Response Folio (DRF). The DRF allows candidates to
    submit their assignments electronically so the Learning Support Faculty can provide
    immediate feedback and assessment. This tool provides teacher candidates a means of
    organizing their work throughout the program. At the conclusion of the program, all
    teacher candidates can download a complete electronic portfolio of their work.

   CalStateTEACH piloted Task One, Two and Three of the Teaching Performance
    Assessment (TPA). The TPA is embedded in the new curriculum and serves as a formative
    assessment of student and program quality.

   The field study/student teaching option of CalStateTEACH continues to attract prospective
    teachers to the Fresno Regional Center. During 2003-04, , field study/student teachers
    comprised 43% of the candidates at the Fresno Regional Center. Fresno currently has the
    largest number of field study/student teachers of the four regional centers.

   The quality of the Learning Support Faculty (LSF) at the Fresno Regional Center is
    indicated by the following statistics. First, Fresno continues to have the highest student
    retention rate of the four regional centers, despite the difficulties associated with serving a
    geographic area over 100,000 square miles. Second, the retention rate of LSFs continues to
    be 100%, despite the geographic spread of our center and the implementation of the new
    2042 program this past year. Third, with the exception of one, new part-time LSF, all
    LSFs at the Fresno Regional Center have at least three years of experience in CST. Such
    continuity and increasing expertise is crucial to the success of a alternative program like
    CST.
    To ensure continuing administrative efficiency in the Fresno Regional Center, staff was
     increased by one program assistant (full-time Administrative Support Assistant II) this past
     year. Office staff now ―independently process‖ student applications, admissions and
     enrollment. The statistics identified above (e.g., increased student enrollment, high student
     and LSF retention rate, high number of field study/student teachers, etc.) are strong
     indicators of successful administrative coordination in the Fresno Regional Center Office.

    I submitted a proposal to develop a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) for CalStateTEACH
     graduates.

    I helped organize and coordinate the Fifth Annual Conference of the Alliance of
     Progressive Educators for August, 2003;

    I designed LSF Workshops last summer, last fall, and this spring. Currently, I am also
     designing a 3-day LSF Workshop for late August, 2004, merging it with the 6th Annual
     Conference of the Alliance of Progressive Educators. Finally, I continue working with
     other RCADs and our LSFs in planning the statewide LSF Workshop, August, 2004.


Sources of Funding

CalStateTEACH at CSU Fresno is funded through student fees, student materials fees, the CSU
general fund, and grants. According to Fresno Regional Center records, the budget will balance
again this year.


Space and Equipment Utilization

The Regional Center Office is currently housed in room 210, KOESD. This office consists of a
full-time RCAD, a full-time administrative coordinator, and a full-time program assistant. Five
Saturday Seminars are held for students in CST; currently, we use rooms 140, 54, and 10 for
these face-to-face seminars, as well as the computer laboratories.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

Next year‘s goals and objectives follow:

    Throughout the summer and next year, coordinate the administrative responsibilities of the
     Regional Center Office (application/admission of pre-interns, interns, and student teaching
     ―volunteers‖) so that enrollment continues to increase and CST continues remains a viable
     teacher education program at CSU Fresno, despite projections of a significant budget crisis
     in the CSU next year.

    Throughout the summer and next year, coordinate the administrative responsibilities of the
     Fresno Regional Center Office with administrative offices in the Kremen School of
    Education and Human Development and on-campus to ensure retention of continuing
    students at the Fresno Regional Center.

   Continue to successfully implement the CST program curriculum to be consistent with the
    adoption of Senate Bill 2042.

   Assume complete control of the budget and continue to balance it, despite the shortfall in
    the CSU statewide and at Fresno State.

   Continue to successfully implement the Professional Development School at Greenberg
    Elementary School in Fresno and present design and research findings on this collaboration
    at a professional conference.

   Develop the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program for CalStateTEACH graduates
    and begin the approval process at CSU Fresno.
                                    Unit Annual Report
                Central Valley Educational Research Consortium (CVERC)
                                July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Note: CVERC is a program within CREAD and is not an ancillary unit.


Purpose of Unit

CVERC exists to conduct research and to promote its dissemination for the improvement of
educational praxis in the San Joaquin Valley.


Administrative Housing of the Unit

CVERC is housed within CREAD.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

1.   CVERC completed the research for and wrote the third monograph entitled: Specific
     Strategies from Schools Showing Consistent Gains in Student Achievement in the Central
     Valley.

2.   The HE branch of CVERC (HE-CVERC) completed a study for the Higher Education
     Consortium. This study will become part of the Higher Education Consortium‘s report to
     the Irvine Foundation. In addition, the study will be submitted to a refereed journal for
     publication.


Sources of Funding

CREAD/JDPEL


Space and Equipment Utilization

CVERC meets in Room 300 (JDPEL room) or at the University House.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

CVERC‘s goal is to complete two new research projects in the next academic year, one for each
of the branches of CVERC.
                                      Unit Annual Report
                                   Education Career Services
                                  July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Unit

Education Career Services works in partnership with the Kremen School of Education and
Human Development to assist students in the job search process and to supply school districts
with qualified candidates. The services provided include: maintenance of professional
placement files, mailing of files upon request, conducting candidate workshops on subjects such
as resume writing, interviewing, and placement files, organizing and hosting of two Teacher
Recruitment Fairs each year, posting of current job announcements and one-on-one counseling
with students regarding career related issues.


Administrative Housing of Unit

Education Career Services falls under the umbrella of the Division of Student Affairs. It is a part
of the Career Services Department and is under the leadership of the Interim Director Robert
Hernandez. The Education Career Counselor, while having the School of Education and Human
Development as a specific responsibility, receives assignments from and reports to the Director
of Career Services, is a member of the Career Services staff and attends all regular Career
Services staff meetings.

While there are no official lines of responsibility between Education Career Services and the
School of Education and Human Development, a strong spirit of appreciation, support and
cooperation exists. Requests have been made by both groups of the other and those requests
have been honored. Requests are made through the Dean of the School of Education to the
Director of Career Services and then are communicated to the Education Career Counselor. The
Education Career Counselor participates in many of the functions of the school and does, at
times, accept responsibilities connected with the school. An example of this type of cooperative
arrangement is the fact that the Education Career Counselor serves as an advisor for the Liberal
Studies Club and as a member of the President‘s Commission on Teacher Education at the
request of the Dean.

The Education Career Services office is a satellite office of the main Career Services office and
is housed on the Atrium level of the Kremen School of Education and Human Development.
The office currently consists of rooms 18 and 20 with an adjoining door. All placement file
records are housed in these offices.
Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

Major Project
The major project for Education Career Services this year has been to convert from a hard copy
system for storing placement files to an electronic system. After researching the few existing
businesses that handle electronic files, it was decided, for several reasons, that it would be wise
to develop and maintain our own system at Fresno State.

Work began on this project in February 2004 and it is hoped that the system will be up and
available to students by summer 2004. Students and alumni will be able to submit their
placement files on line to the Education Career Services office rather than having to turn in a
hard copy in person or by mail. When students request that files be sent to districts, the
Education Career Services office will be able to send the file electronically to those districts set
up to handle that type of information. Files can still be printed and hard copies mailed when
necessary. The development of the system has been a time consuming undertaking but it is in
the final stages at this time.

Job Bulletin
The Education Career Services Coordinator established a Job Bulletin that is sent to students and
alumni on a weekly or as needed basis via the MonsterTrak e-mail capability. Thirty-two Job
Bulletins have been sent since this service was established earlier this year.

Placement File Database
All data regarding placement files currently maintained by the Education Career Services office
is now set up on a database per established goal for 2002-2003. In last years report it was
indicated that 2,500 files had been listed. Currently, information on over 4,500 hard copy files
has been entered and is being maintained on the data base. This project has been completed.

Purging Files
Every two to three years the placement files are purged. Letters are sent to individuals who have
files that are ten years old or older stating that their files will be destroyed unless the Education
Career Services office is notified that they wish to continue with this service. Some files were
renewed but 1064 files were destroyed. This purging process is a major undertaking.

Pathways to Careers in Education Brochure
The small group, on which the Career Counselor served, which worked on the Pathways to
Education Brochure completed its work this year and the brochure is available for use.


Teacher Recruitment Fairs Spring 2004
The Spring 2004 Teacher Recruitment Fair was held on March 25th at the Fresno Convention
Center, New Exhibit Hall. Once again districts face uncertainties in regard to Budget and the
limits it will place on the hiring of new teachers. In spite of these uncertain times, 69 districts
registered to attend this year‘s recruitment fair. Between 480 and 500 candidates attended the
fair for the purpose of interviewing. There were 20 or more student volunteers, who plan to go
into the teaching profession, at the fair to assist.
Summer 2003
The Summer 2003 Teacher Recruitment Fair was cancelled due to lack of participation on the
part of the districts. Fewer than ten districts registered to come.

On Campus Interviewing opportunities were provided to those districts that wished to interview
with Fresno State candidates in the summer. Fresno Unified School district and Hanford
Elementary School District took advantage of that opportunity.

Advising
Over 187 individual office appointments were held with students. Over 911 students visited the
Education Career Services office in the last year on a walk-in basis. (These are the ones that we
remembered to have sign in when they stopped by).

Class Presentations, Seminars and Workshops
32 Seminars centering on the Job Search Process were offered throughout the year. Some of the
seminars were scheduled as a part of the student teaching experience and others were scheduled
through the Education Career Services office. Presentations were made at 7 Orientations, 2
Career Day events, and in 13 classes (I did not present in University 1 classes this year). The
number of students attending these events is as follows:

Class Presentations: 517 students
Seminars: 1,405 students
Orientations- over 1,200 students attending
Career Days on campus- approximately 1,000 students attending
Students pre-registering for Teacher Recruitment Fair – 321
Dog Daze- 375 students
Ambassador Training- 23 students
Cambodian Conference- 25 students

MonsterTrak Registration
More than 1500 students and alumni are registered under Education on the MonsterTrak job
listing service and through this service receive the Fresno Stare Education Career Services Job
Bulletin.

Placement File Service
The Education Career Services office maintains over 5,000 placement files for education
students and alumni. Students completing the Teacher Education program established over 149
new placement files this year. Over 105 placement files were mailed out to districts during the
year.

Liberal Studies Club
The Education Coordinator once again served as the Advisor for the Liberal Studies Club. The
club functioned with a full set of officers (12 students) and the students took full responsibility
for programs and activities. The average attendance was about 30 to 35 per meeting.
Career Services Responsibilities
Please note that the items included in this report reflect only the responsibilities that are directly
connected to the Kremen School of Education and Human Development. As a member of the
Career Services team, the Education Career Counselor has additional responsibilities that support
the efforts of that office. An example of these additional responsibilities would be participation
in eight additional recruitment fairs that the Career Services office hosts each year.

Special Engagements
-Workshop session, Civic Education Conference- 80 student
-Speaker/Storyteller, Kids Day, 50 students
-Career Day -Valley State Prison for Women –spoke to over 1000 women
-Career Day –Ahwahnee Middle School
-American Association for Employment in Education – (AAEE) National Conference
Planning Committee
-Prime Time Family Reading Program – Trained in New Orleans in order to be qualified to lead
a Prime Time Program in cooperation with the Madera County Library.
-Presented Resume Writing and Interviewing Seminars to the Pre-Release Classes at Valley State
Prison for Women every six weeks.

Teaching Assignments:
LEE 120 ST Storytelling: Taught one three-unit class in the Fall
Extended Education: Taught one weekend course in Spring and Summer.

Professional Organizations:

Leadership – California Association for Employment in Education – President Elect
              American Association for Employment in Education – Conference
              Teacher Recruitment Center – Advisory Board

Membership – Credential Counselors and Analysts of California
             Presidents Commission on Teacher Education, Fresno State


Sources of Funding

The expense for the operation of the Education Career Services office and all services and/or
sponsored events is covered by the Career Services/ Student Affairs budget.


Space and Equipment Utilization
The space currently occupied by the Education Career Services office, Atrium Rooms 18 and 20,
is made available by the Kremen School of Education.

All necessary equipment and supplies are provided by the Career Services Department.
Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

The primary goal for the year 2004-2005 is to complete the development of the On-Line
Placement File service and to make it available to students. A data base will be developed, as
well, which will record information regarding how many files have been requested, where the
files were sent etc.

New presentation materials will be developed for use in Career Services seminars for training on
the procedures for developing an electronic placement file. Handout materials which support the
information presented in the seminars will be developed for student use also.

The summer will be used to set up a data base of district email addresses in order to facilitate the
sending of files. Each district, with which we work on a regular basis, will be contacted in order
to determine who should receive the Placement File information and the address where it should
be sent. Having that data base in place will facilitate the timely response to student requests to
have files sent.


Request for Renewal of the Unit

The partnership between The Kremen School of Education and Human Development and the
Career Services Department at California State University, Fresno has worked to the advantage
of both parties and has been of great benefit to the student population. It is hoped that the
partnership will continue to function in the future as it has in the past, in order to provide
students with the support necessary to secure employment upon completion of their credential
courses. The fact that the Career office is actually located within the Kremen School of
Education and Human Development has served to increase student awareness of services
available and their ultimate use of these services.
                                     Unit Annual Report
                                   INTERESC/NASA ERC
                                  July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Unit

Mission: The Instructional Technology and Resource Center supports University faculty, staff,
and students in the use of technology including but not limited to: The use of audio, visual,
computers and video equipment. INTERESC reserves classrooms, laboratories, consultation
rooms, conference and meeting rooms and the TV Studio. This unit also reserves and supports
equipment for the preparation for the use of instructional materials such as a laminator, a letter
cutter machine, binding equipment and other audio-visual support equipment. The Resource
Center catalogues and maintains collections of reference books, professional journals and
publications, curriculum materials, manipulative, testing materials, video/audio tapes and
equipment and supply catalogues. Also, it supports the NASA San Joaquin Valley Teacher
Resource Center and the Bonner Civic Education Collection. The Resource Center is available to
the University community as a study and meeting facility and provides faculty a place to leave
reserved materials for student use. The Web Administration and Computer Technology Support
makes a continual effort to enhance the availability and awareness of the utilization in the use
and integration of technology for the Kremen School of Education and Human Development
(KSOEHD) faculty, staff and students. The network administration and computer support area
provides complete support for the installation of new computers, servers and software used in the
school.

INTERESC Vision is to provide a technological environment giving students, faculty and
administration a ubiquitous access to communications and knowledge resource linkages to the
local, regional, national and international communities within the framework of teaching,
research and service.


Administrative Housing of Unit

INTERESC operates with a Director who reports to the Associate Dean of the Kremen School of
Education and Human Development. The Instructional Technology and Resource Center
functions under an administrative model following Deming‘s management principles. The
director works a leader of the team. Three other staff members have responsibilities within each
of the following areas: Learning Resource Center, Web Design and Technology Support and
Computer Network and Support. Although each area has unique responsibilities, the INTERESC
team manages the unit collaboratively. There is an overlap of functions and support among the
three areas to satisfy KSOEHD clients‘ needs at all times
Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

New Equipment Procedure
All Faculty who wish to use INTERESC equipment are to fill out a form indicating the
equipment they need and when they are to return the equipment.

Equipment Reservations/Deliveries
A total of over 800 reservations and deliveries of equipment were performed. Reservations were
expected to decrease with the permanent installation of equipment in the ―smart classrooms‖.

Laminating
Approximately 500 feet each roll for a total of 8,000 feet. Lamination requires pre-warm-up of
the laminator and laminating film replacement every 500 feet.

Copy Machine
The job of making copies for faculty and staff was assigned to the LRC. Fabricio and student
assistants make hundreds of copies on a daily basis.

Maintenance and Repair
Learning Resource Center staff/students perform minor equipment repairs and perform
maintenance routines on daily basis.

Bonner Project
The Learning Resource Center holds a collection of materials used by faculty and students. The
area was redecorated and furnished with Bonner funds.

Reserved Materials
Faculty place reservation materials for students to use in room 420. Students check out these
materials on daily basis. Materials include VHS tapes and publications.

Room 409-Tape Dubbing
The Learning Resource Center dubs tapes for faculty, staff, and students on a daily basis. The
person wishing to have a tape dubbed must bring in a videotape to dub onto.

Faculty Assistance
Aided faculty with on-campus (not ED Building) and off-campus technical assistance,

Conferences
Fabricio attended the AECT conference in Anaheim with Otto Benavides to provide support and
to view other reservation procedures. Fabricio also attended the MacWorld Conference in San
Francisco.

NASA
The Learning Resource Center maintains a collection of 400 NASA videotapes, a large
collection of posters, brochures, lesson guides, instructional activities and other instructional
materials. The NASA collection is open to the K-12 community. We filed a separate NASA
report.

Mobile Lab Units
The two mobile iBook labs were checked out for faculty use, the Mass Communications and
Journalism Department and University High School students.

Computer Classrooms
Fabricio Arredondo and his student assistants provided technical support to the classes that were
held in the Computer Classrooms. Numerous workshops were also held in the computer
classrooms. The workshops that were held were on EZEDIA software, iMovie, VR Worx, and
Apple OSX.

Web Administration and Technology Support
Web Administration and Computer Technology Support provided support in the design,
development and integration of technology use for the Kremen School of Education and Human
Development (KSOEHD) faculty, staff and students.

Forms Designed
Advanced Credentials Application Forms, Certificate of Advanced Studies in Technology, Early
Childhood Education Specialist, Preliminary Administrative Services, Pupil Personnel Services,
Reading and Language Arts Specialist, Administrative Services, Cross-Cultural Language &
Academic Development (CLAD), Clinical Rehabilitation Services, School Nurse Services &
School Psychologist. Pupil Personnel Services (PPS) -- Counseling, Social Work, Child Welfare
& Attendance, Education Specialist -- Mild/Moderate, Moderate/Severe & Deaf and Hard of
Hearing, Internship, Multiple Subject, Single Subject, Credentials -- Agriculture, Reading &
Early Childhood Specialist, Multiple Subject, Single Subject, Counseling Applications, Marriage
and Family, Rehabilitation, Counseling and Preliminary Level II Education Specialist.

Technology Support
This area supported 63 classes, 29 workshops and seminars. Henry Placenti was invited to speak
to 34 other classes.

Computer and Network Support
The Computer and Network Support Unit Accomplished and handled 2,480 service calls from
May 1, 2003 to February 29, 2004. These services were provided to Faculty, Staff, and Students
for The School of Education and Human Development, The Division of Continuing and Global
Education, and The Joint Doctoral Program. The unit provides support in four areas, hardware,
and network and printing and server maintenance.

Television Production Center
The TV Production Center provided support to faculty who needed video productions. The
Early Education Center requested various digital video productions during the year. Mass
Communications Student Assistants assisted with the productions. The TV production Center
established satellite downlinks for faculty and the Division of Extended Education. K-12
students attended video production sessions. The Television Production area had a great deal of
activity during this fiscal year. Examples of activities include remote broadcast and production
for a counseling class, support for a student‘s Master‘s project, classes for University High
School students, Ahwahnee Middle School students, Migrant Scholars, video production for the
Development Office, satellite downlinks for the Early Education, support for production of
students in CI 225 classes and taping of the National Youth Storytelling Olympics.


Sources of Funding

For the first time INTERESC was allocated a budget, however, at a time of financial
shortcomings the budget was immediately reduced by 33 percent. The Joint Doctoral Program
allocated $3,000.00 to cover partial expenditures for student assistants in the Computer and
Network Support Unit. Another $ 3,000.00 is expected from the Early Education Center. The
Center has not been invoiced. In both cases the funding goes to pay for services received.


Space and Equipment Utilization

The Instructional Technology and Resource Center operates The Learning Resource housed in
room ED 420. The LRC also manages the Preparation Room 404, Rooms 405, 407, 409 and
454. Four computer classrooms with 24 student stations and a teaching station are part of the
Learning Resource Center. In addition, the LRC supports the TV Studio located in room 415 and
the Counseling Clinics located in the Atrium. The Web Administration and Computer
Technology Support consist of a single office large enough for at least two individuals.
Equipment is needed for use of an assistant to meet the high requests submitted to the office.
Computer Support operates in one room large enough to house four support personnel. We need
to make some changes to our room such as adding more power outlets. The additional outlets
will allow us to move servers currently located in different rooms in the building. The
INTERESC Director has an office with enough space for the Director and a student assistant.
INTERESC lost access to room 499 and part of room ED 420 which was converted into a copy
center.


Risk Management

INTERESC staff and student assistants are trained on handling hazardous materials, handling
electricity and electronic equipment. All staff observes fire drills and is required to observe
storage rules as indicated by risk management procedures.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

The goals for the upcoming year are to:
1.   Continue to streamline the operations of the LRC
2.   Maintain a schedule of operations reflecting clientele needs.
3.   Upgrade computer operating systems as they become available.
4.    Continue supporting technology integration needs and classroom support for faculty, staff
      and students.
5.    Support various conferences and in-service sessions.
6.    Provide a friendly and efficient support in all areas to faculty, staff and students.
7.    Develop a schedule of in-service training offerings for faculty, staff, and students in the
      Kremen School of Education and Human Development. Provide computer training for
      faculty and staff including lab utilization, software applications, Blackboard and others.
8.    Coordinate training with AIC and Digital Campus
9.    Provide Computer support services in a timely manner within two hours of a service
      request, and maintain a turn around time of 24 hours to re-install or repair broken
      equipment.
10.   Provide support for satellite downlinks and teleconferencing as requested by faculty and
      staff.
11.   Provide TV and digital video production workshops to faculty, staff and K-12 clients.
12.   Produce video projects as required.
13.   Maintain KSOEHD clientele informed about technological changes and implementations.
14.   Maintain INTERESC administrative structure following Deming‘s management principles.


Request for Renewal of the Unit

All services INTERESC provides are essential to the delivery of instruction and therefore they
affect faculty and students. A timely and appropriate response to faculty and students requests to
satisfy their technological needs is fundamental for instruction. Support for staff technological
needs is also imperative in the administrative operation of KSOEHD and interface with faculty
and students. The Technological infrastructure and technological daily operations must exist less
than one umbrella with daily coordination of activities, equipment and materials distribution and
effort administration. The Instructional Technology and Resource responds to all needs
efficiently and inexpensively. In order to maintain the services and support needed by our
diverse clientele, it is crucial we maintain the INTERESC structure and level of support. In
order to continue the Kremen School of Education and Human Development must renew the
operation and structure of the unit.
                                      Unit Annual Report
                              International Education Committee
                                  July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Unit

The committee is set up to provide international assistance to faculty in the School of Education.
Funds are provided to support faculty on international academic projects such as exchange
programs and international conferences as well as events that promote an international
perspective.


Administrative Housing of Unit

The committee consists of one member from each department and one representative from the
Faculty Assembly. The Chair of the committee is also a member of the University International
Advisory Council. The committee meets when called but for the most part, communication
occurs via email. This academic year, due to scheduling conflicts, the committee met once to
elect a chair and set the goals for the academic year (2003-2004). Information from the
University International Advisory Council was also disseminated at this meeting and this
information was used to guide the goals set for the KSOEHD International Education
Committee.

Members of the committee are the liaison persons for their department. They bring issues of
international concern to the department. One issue regarding Student and Visitor Information
System requirements (SEVIS) was shared with all departments this academic year. Members of
the committee also support colleagues in their departments who are involved in international
projects. This academic year the committee also collaborated on the Spring Festival, a
subcommittee of the International Education committee. The committee was involved in the
decision to grant funds to the subcommittee.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

Goal:  One memorandum of understanding with another country
      This was not accomplished
Goal: At least one international academic event in the KSOEHD
      Various programs in the KSOEHD participated in International Education Week
Goal: At least three (3) academic personnel (professors, associated or assistants) traveling
      abroad for academic activities.
      Dr. Alfredo Cuellar continues his assignment (setting up a doctoral program) in Tampico,
      Mexico
Goal: The Chinese New Year (Spring Festival)
      The committee assisted with the funding for this event which took place in February
Goal: International Holiday Event
       This did not take place
Goal; A graduate program targeting international students
       This was not accomplished
Goal: At least two (2) international exchange scholars
       This was not accomplished


Sources of Funding

The major source of funding is through the University International Education program. The
amount available for this year was $2597.82, and the Division of Extended Education donated an
additional $100. The Spring Festival Committee was awarded $500 towards costs for the
festival.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

The committee will continue to pursue the goals set for this past academic year
    One memorandum of understanding with another country
    At least one international academic event in the KSOEHD
    At least three academic personnel (professors associates, or assistants) traveling abroad for
     academic activities
    The Chinese New Year (Spring festival)
    A graduate program targeting international students
    At least two (2) international exchange scholars
                                      Unit Annual Report
                                   Liberal Studies Program
                                  July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Unit

The mission of the Liberal Studies Program is to provide a strong knowledge-based education in
the liberal arts that will provide subject matter preparation for elementary teaching or foundation
preparation for other professions. Providing academic preparation for the single largest major
with 2700+ students on campus, the Liberal Studies degree program is represented by a broad
cross-section of academic disciplines and faculty.


Administrative Housing of Unit

The Liberal Studies Program is the undergraduate degree program in the Kremen School of
Education and Human Development. The program office is housed in the Education Student
Services Center, located in the Education Building, Room 100. The Liberal Studies Program
provides comprehensive services for identifying and advising prospective Multiple Subject and
Special Education teachers. There is a half-time program coordinator, three full-time academic
advisors, a full-time secretary and two half-time student assistant positions. The staff members
provide advisement for resident and transfer students, potential applicants, applicants and
program enrollees.

The Program has two lines of reporting; one for administrative purposes and one academically.
For administrative purposes, the Program office reports to the Associate Dean of the school. The
program is supported by a modest budget, which is monitored by the Office Coordinator. The
Liberal Studies Review Committee, made up of various faculty representing the academic areas,
reviews the major and academic structure of the program. Their purpose is to review subject
matter assessment processes and procedures for the program, address special program-related
issues and/or problems identified by subject matter faculty and to make recommendations to the
Director of Teacher Education.

The Liberal Studies Program coordinator, advisors and faculty work diligently in promoting
various collaboratives with community colleges so that prospective Multiple Subject and Special
Education teachers can transfer to the University in a seamless manner. In order to promote an
ongoing effort to communicate and share information about the program, the staff has constant
communication with other advisors throughout the university and to all of the feeder community
colleges


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

The Liberal Studies Program continues to make great strides and uphold its mission to be a
leading subject matter preparation program for elementary and special education teachers. The
following is a list of accomplishments, on and off campus outreach activities and a summary of
the effectiveness of the program:

•    The Liberal Studies Blended Major continues to grow in numbers. With over 50% of
     our Liberal Studies students following this academic plan, the program is still the single
     largest major in the university and in the CSU system.

•    The Liberal Studies Review Committee – The faculty representatives are very dedicated
     to their work in supporting a quality academic program for future teachers. The committee
     met on a regular basis throughout the year and had a retreat in May 2003.

•    Multiple Subject Integrated Teacher Preparation Program Statewide Meeting –
     Liberal Studies Coordinator, Dr. Robert Monke, and Liberal Studies Review Committee
     Chair, Don Leet, served as the campus representatives for these meetings. The
     Chancellor‘s Task Force on Integrated Teacher Preparation Programs appointed this Sub-
     Task Force. The Chancellor‘s Office coordinated two meetings in Spring 2004 with the
     charge to develop a CSU Statewide Agreement for Multiple Subject Integrated Teacher
     Preparation Programs. SB 81 requires that the agreement be in place by January 2005 with
     implementation by January 2006.

•    Community College Articulation Conference on Teacher Education – There is
     continued commitment to work on articulating our courses with the community colleges.
     The Provost supported and funded our 4th annual Community College Articulation
     Conference in March 2004. The faculty and advisors met to focus and share information
     about the program courses and particularly to discuss the Chancellor‘s Task Force on the
     development of a statewide agreement for Multiple Subject Integrated Teacher Preparation
     Programs.

•    Community College Advisory Board – The board met in December 2003 to provide
     assistance in planning the articulation conference and improve linkages between the
     community colleges and the university.

•    Assessment Plan – The assessment plan for the program is in full swing. In the 2003 – 04
     academic year, the following assessments took place:
         Six Blended Major courses (N SCI 1A, N SCI 1B, Math 10A, Math 10B, Math 100
          and Ling 11) will have been evaluated by the students.
         On April 22, 2004, a focus group was conducted. The students were given an
          opportunity to share any comments or concerns that they have in relation to the
          program.
         A Blended Program Questionnaire was administered by the program advisors to all
          graduating seniors.

•    Student Clubs – The Liberal Studies Club and the Southeast Asian Teachers Club
     continue to grow in numbers. Both groups work actively to provide support to students
     through guest speakers, presentations and conferences. Two Liberal Studies Advisors,
     Esther Rodriguez and Janell Tatsumura, serve as the club advisors.
•    Outreach Counselor – The Kremen School of Education and Human Development has
     provided office space for the half-time University Outreach Counselor, assigned to the
     school. Located in the Education Student Services Center, Room 100, the counselor meets
     with prospective students on a weekly basis. The office space has also given the counselor
     better access to the Liberal Studies staff, creating a collaborative working environment.

•    Outreach Activities – Liberal Studies Advisors list a total of 22 recruitment-related
     contacts during 2003-04. Among others, they include Liberal Studies orientations &
     workshops (12); community college outreach (5); on-campus outreach (3); and high school
     outreach (2). Following is a list of the outreach activities supported by the Liberal Studies
     staff since July 1, 2003:

      DOG DAYS                                                       7-08-03
      DOG DAYS                                                       7-10-03
      DOG DAYS                                                       7-16-03
      DOG DAYS                                                       7-30-03
      Summer Bridge Super Saturday                                   7-12-03
      DOG DAYS                                                       8-05-03
      Weekend Transfer Program Workshop @ FCC                        8-29-03
      Fresno Area College Night                                      9-10-03
      Smittcamp Honors Info. Day                                     9-13-03
      Smittcamp Honors Info. Day                                     9-20-03
      Counselors Conference @ CSUF                                   10-8-03
      Admissions Day @ CSUF                                          10-18-03
      Meeting w/C.O.S. Counselors                                    11-13-03
      DOG DAYS                                                       11-25-03
      DOG DAYS                                                       12-1-03
      LS Advising Appts. W/WHCC satellite students                   12-11-03
      LS Advising Appts. W/COS satellite students                    12-12-03
      Community College Articulation Conference                      3-24-04
      Preview Day @ CSUF                                             3-27-04
      DOG DAYS                                                       6-4-04
      DOG DAYS                                                       6-17-04
      DOG DAYS                                                       6-25-04

     It is important to note that there are many other outreach activities that the Liberal Studies
     Program has been involved with. Fortunately, with the services of the KSOEHD Outreach
     Counselor, our school programs have been well represented for such events.


Sources of Funding

The Liberal Studies Program is supported by a modest state budget, which covers the program
staff, office equipment, supplies and general office needs (phone, paper, etc…).
                         State Account #          Funds for 2003 - 04
                              29216                   $201,586


There is one existing foundation account, which was created this past year in order to secure
funds donated through development efforts.

                      Foundation Account #        Funds as of 2/28/03
                             32638                     $921.55


Space and Equipment Utilization

All of the program staff are located in the Education Student Services Center, Education
Building Room 100. This arrangement has suited the program well, giving students a central
location for advising and information. It also brings a sense of belonging to the majority of our
students that are planning for careers in education.


Risk Management

The Liberal Studies Program staff abide by all system-wide and university policies and
procedures related to risk management. Some examples include: 1) The staff has all been
evaluated to make sure that their office space meets ergonomic standards, and 2) for staff that
must drive their vehicles for any university functions, each have attended a defensive driving
course and registered with the university.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

The Liberal Studies Program will continue to strengthen the academic program and support for
the students and staff. The following goals and objectives will be the focus for the 2004 – 2005
academic year:

•    Collaboration with community colleges and university staff and faculty is essential to the
     success of our program, particularly for our large number of transfer students. We will need
     to work closely with our regional feeder community colleges in order to articulate the 45
     units required by the CSU for the Integrated Program, plus an additional 15 units will need
     to be identified with each feeder institution.
•    Advising remains a top priority. In order to meet the demands of this growing program,
     we will implement an integrated advising system, so there will be more counselors trained
     and available for students in our undergraduate and credential programs.
•    Restructuring of the Integrated Major Program (formerly the Blended Major Program)
     will be a major priority for the next academic year, with a goal of implementation by Fall
     2005.
•   Liberal Studies Web site will be utilized to provide more information to students, such as
    advising forms, credential program admission applications, student teaching applications
    and any other pertinent information in order to allow greater access to students.
•   Student Clubs will continue to focus on recruitment and development in order to provide
    students with more opportunities/information related to the field of education.
•   Promote better communication with our regional community colleges in the following
    ways:
         Annual Community College Articulation Conference on Teacher Education
         Community College Advisory Board
         Continued outreach
                                      Unit Annual Report
                                  Option IV Reentry Program
                                  July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Unit

The Option IV program is designed for reentry students. These are students who have completed
a Bachelors degree in a field other than education and are returning to the university to complete
requirements leading to a credential in elementary education. Students entering the Option IV
program usually have work and life experiences that serve as an asset to their work as classroom
teachers. This is a cohort or block program. The use of the cohort fosters close professional
relationships among students and faculty and is recognized as one of the most positive aspects of
the program. The intent of the program is to bridge theory and practice through an integrated
approach which combines lecture, discussion, group work, and strong emphasis on related
classroom activities.


Administrative Housing of Unit

The Option IV cohort is a unit within the Kremen School Education. The instructors and the
coordinator are all part of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. A portable classroom
at Lincoln Elementary is provided by the university and maintained by the Clovis Unified School
District. Because classes are held there and many students are placed there for student teaching, a
close relationship has formed with the Lincoln staff. Positive relationships have also been
formed with other schools in Clovis, Central, and Fresno where students have been placed for
initial and final student teaching.


Major Accomplishments of 2003-2004

Goal #1 Enroll 25 students who will successfully complete the preparation and training
        program and apply for a multiple subjects credential.

         A total of 28 students were admitted to the OptionIV Program in the fall of 2003.
         Twenty four students successfully completed the program and will receive their
         multiple subjects credential in May 2004. Two students did not pass the CBEST and
         were unable to enroll in student teaching in spring of 2004. One student withdrew due
         to increasing responsibilities at home and another decided that teaching was not for her.

Goal #2 All students who successfully complete the program will either work as a teacher or
        continue graduate work.

         All students eligible to receive a credential have interviewed with districts and twenty
         two have been called back for second interviews; however, due to the budget crisis no
         one has signed a contract. Two have been hired to teach summer school in Clovis.
Goal #3 All students will experience teaching in a cross-cultural classroom with students
        from different ethnic, cultural and/socio-economic backgrounds. All students will be
        assigned two student teaching placements at two different grade levels (K-6).

         We have continued to provide rich, culturally and linguistically diverse teaching
         experiences in various settings. Most student teaching placements were in Clovis,
         Fresno, and Central Unified Districts. One student was placed in Visalia Unified and
         another in Hanford Unified. In Clovis Unified, students completed student teaching
         assignments at Cedarwood, Freedom, Jefferson, Liberty, and Sierra Vista. In Central
         Unified, students completed assignments at McKinley and at Saroyan. Every effort
         was made to fins effective teachers who use strategies that are taught in CSUF classes
         and consistent with California State standards. One placement was unsatisfactory and
         had to be changed but we were able to place students with may outstanding mentors.

Goal #4 All students will be trained in an integrated curriculum approach which combines
        lecture, discussion, group work, and related classroom activities in public school
        settings.

         CSUF faculty worked as a team in planning and coordinating course work in the Option
         IV Program. Regular meetings were held to coordinate these efforts. All program
         faculty used a variety of instructional modalities such as small group activities, direct
         instruction, discussions, research papers, and projects. A real strength of the program
         was the emphasis on making connections with the elementary classrooms. Instructors
         taught demonstration lessons to elementary students, had elementary teachers
         demonstrate lessons, arranged for observations, and gave feedback to the student
         teachers as they were practicing the lessons being taught.

Goal #5 All classes will be held on a public school site in order to foster a close working
        relationship with school district personnel.

         All classes were taught at the Greenberg campus in Fresno Unified and the Lincoln
         campus in Clovis Unified with the exception of CI 125 (science) which was taught at
         CSUF.

Goal #6 Collaborate and work closely with the school sites to provide optional training for the
        Option IV students.

         The Option IV Program is a joint effort between the CSUF faculty and the school site
         staffs. The Option IV students participated in seminars, inservices and demonstrations
         provided by staff on elementary school sites. Many students attended seminars on
         Grading/Discipline, Diversity, Classroom Management and Interviewing Techniques
         provided by Clovis Unified. Close collaboration between school site principals and the
         Option IV coordinator was necessary in order to identify the best master teachers.
        LEE 146 Teaching Reading K-3
        Reading began August 8 and was taught at Greenberg Elementary in Fresno. Dr.
        Herrell taught a strategy and the students would then observe it being demonstrated in a
        first grade classroom. The Option IV students then practiced the strategy with a small
        group of students under the guidance of Dr. Herrell. This proved to be an excellent
        way for the students to internalize the concepts being taught.
        CI 121 Elementary School Math
        Dr. Behrend discussed a particular strategy and taught demonstration lessons in one
        through 6 grade classrooms. The Option IV students observed and then worked in pairs
        with these same students. Dr. Behrend circulated, gave feedback and then followed up
        with reflection and discussion. It was very effective.
        CI Psychological Foundations
        Dr. Henderson-Sparks brought in a speaker from Clovis Unified to talk about
        assessments. The Option IV students also visited Valley Oak where a third grade
        teacher discussed authentic assessments. The students found both these activities
        useful and informative.
        CI Curriculum
        Dr. Chiero assigned an observation activity to be completed the first day of school. The
        student chose a grade level to observe and upon completing their observations returned
        to the classroom to discuss and share observations.

Goal #7 All students will complete a portfolio based on the California Standards for the
        teaching profession.
        This goal was accomplished. All students presented evidence documenting the
        California Standards for the Teaching Profession and completed a self-evaluation that
        was discussed with their supervisor.

Goal #8 All students will complete a Teacher Work Sample in their final student teaching.
        This goal was accomplished.

Goal #9 Increase the availability of technology in the Lincoln portable classroom.
        This has not been accomplished. There is capability of internet access but the
        computers provided by the university are to0 outdated to be compatible with access.


Goals and Objectives for 2004-2005

The strengths and weaknesses of the 2003-2004 program were determined by student
program evaluation and end of year faculty discussion.

Goal #1 Provide a minimum of two inservices per semester on classroom management.
Goal #2 Provide a minimum of one inservice per semester on developing a portfolio.
Goal #3 Continue to identify ways to integrate performance assessments, both
        summative and formative, into instruction.
Request for Renewal of the Unit

This is a request to continue to offer the Option IV Reentry Program as a pathway to obtain a
Multiple Subjects Teaching Credential.
                                    Unit Annual Report
                           PreTeacher Assessment Center (PTAC)
                                July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Program Description

The PreTeacher Assessment Center (PTAC) in the Kremen School of Education and Human
Development (KSOEHD) is a unique program that helps individuals who aspire to become K-12
teachers learn about their potential as teachers. The set of two assessments identify potential
strengths along with areas needing improvement in nine dimensions critical for successful
teaching.

The current assessment consists of two vignettes that require the intern to think through a
problem, develop a plan, and then share that plan in writing, and in one of the vignettes through
an oral presentation. Both are completed in a single day, usually a Saturday during the summer
and academic year. Eligible students receive one academic credit for participation in the
assessment and creating a preprofessional development plan.

To obtain a score for the assessment, a trained evaluator rates the participants on each of nine
dimensions. The dimensions rated include planning and organization, leadership, sensitivity,
decision making, oral communication and presentation, written communication, innovation, and
tolerance for stress. All of the work the preprofessional does on each vignette, including notes
written on documents, highlighted sections of the packet, prepared charts, graphs and
presentation materials, the oral presentation, and final written report is evaluated. A detailed
scoring rubric for each dimension is used by the trained evaluator to ensure valid and reliable
results.

The PTAC assessment is available to all current and potential credential candidates. Currently,
the bulk of the participants in the assessment are applicants to the internship program. Each
intern completes a development plan that identifies two of the dimensions for improvement. The
self improvement plan usually includes techniques like coaching by peers or the supervisor,
independent study and self reflection. The intern and supervisor also identify the specific
evidence that indicates successful completion of the proposed plan of action. This document
becomes part of the intern‘s records.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

This academic year, the PreTeacher Assessment Center completed revising the testing
procedures, and integrating a technology dimension into the professional planning Education
Fair and communicating ideas Teaching Unit . A study of the reliability and validity of the
assessment was started during this academic year. The internship program now requires the
completion of the professional development plan as part of the final requirement for the field
experience. These activities helped make the assessment more user friendly and fit better with
the KSOEHD program.
Preparation to use technology as a integral part of instruction is a continuing concern within the
credential program. The State of California Commission on Teacher Credentialing has the
expectation that prospective teachers will have the skills and interest to use technology in
teaching and learning. A technology dimension was added to the Education Fair and Teaching
Unit. This addition included extensive modification of the prompts and supporting materials in
both of the simulated activities. A set of rubrics to evaluate the performance of participants was
also developed. The level of potential inclusion of technology in teaching practices is now
reported along with the other previously measured dimensions.

The results of the assessment are reported to the individual completing the simulations and the
field experience supervisor. They then collaborate on a professional development plan to be
completed during the internship program. Up until this year the plan was a volunteer project by
the intern and supervisor. This is now a requirement for the successful completion of the field
experience. Each of the participants in the internship program must have the supervisor verify
competency in the dimensions within the plan before a recommendation for credential is issued.

The Teaching and Leading for Educational Needs with Technology (TALENT) project funded
the development of a new technology assessment. This assessment gauges a preservice teacher‘s
interest in using technology as part of normal classroom activities and their personal skill in
using technology for professional purposes.

This set of assessment activities is designed to be flexible enough for the evaluation of
individuals at different points in their professional career. Results of the evaluation identify areas
of improvement and can be used for personal growth, to develop a professional plan, or
supplement credential completion. Students in a professional preparation program, interns in
their field experience, teachers new to the classroom, and practicing teachers all can benefit from
the assessment.

Five different dimensions critical for the productive use of technology are assessed: Information
gathering; instructional media; communication tools; presentation aids, and organization and
productivity resources. These broad categories represent the most typical uses of a wide range of
technology in schools. Technology illustrated in the simulation includes such things as
computers, audio and video recorders, copy machines, projectors, telephones and other
commonly used devices.

Indicators of technological expertise and interest are imbedded in a series of performance tasks
that simulate decision making activities that teachers are expected to undertake. Each
performance task requires an individual to use common types of computer software while
making judgments about professional use of technology. The combination of activities
completed by the participating preservice or inservice teacher gives a rich picture of the teacher‘s
likelihood to use technology for professional purposes and engage students in using technology
as an aid to learning.

The Technology Task simulation places the participant in the role of a new teacher in a charter
school. The first section requires an analysis of photographs showing various uses of technology
in actual instructional settings. This gives the respondent an opportunity to speculate about good
and poor implementation of technology for instructional purposes. The next two sections require
the selection of equipment and media for their classroom. This section requires making
judgments about the appropriate use of technology within the constraints of a physical facility
and fixed dollar allocation. The final activity requires the respondent to prepare a presentation
justifying expenditures and defending their proposed use of technology. The audience for this
presentation is colleagues, administrators and parents.

Plans and Priorities 2004-2005

Support of internship program assessment and professional development planning will remain an
important part of PTAC activities. Continuation of PTAC assessment will take place starting in
the summer of 2004. There are seven assessment days scheduled during the summer. These
accommodate students starting in the internship program or student teaching the fall semester.
Additional assessment will be scheduled throughout the academic year.

The Technology Task will become a requirement for all individuals applying for the internship
program. The participant‘s responses on the assessment will be scored by a trained evaluator.
The results are given to the participant and shared with the university supervisor, advisor or
coach. A personal development plan will be created by the participant in collaboration with the
mentor. Competency in technology education will be a exit requirement for participants in the
internship program.

Grant proposals for the continuation development and refinement of the technology assessment
will be completed. The proposals will include funding for modifications to the assessment
simulation, additional pilot studies with preservice and experienced teachers and development of
supplemental materials. A set of resource manuals and guides for study in each of the technology
dimensions to help with the creation of the development plan will be written. A group of
volunteer students will be paid to participate in a pilot study of the Teaching Learning Center
(TLC) model of support and development.


Summary

The progress that was made during this year helped strengthen the existing PTAC assessment
simulations. The new technology dimension adds another element to result matrix. Funding from
the TALENT grant allowed the development of the technology assessment. The internship
program institutionalized the competency in the assessment. Additional progress next year will
both refine and broaden the services to the KSOEHD though the inclusion of the technology
assessment into the internship program. The PTAC will continue to lead the way in performance
assessment as a tool for improving the competency of credential candidates.
                                  Unit Annual Report
     Project Teaching and Leading for Educational Needs with Technology (TALENT)
                              July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Unit

Teaching And Leading for Education Needs with Technology (TALENT) fosters systematic
changes that transform the preparation of teachers to use technology to meet the digital needs of
all students.


Administrative Housing of Unit

TALENT is housed administratively within the Kremen School of Education and Human
Development.
Project Director and Principal Investigator: Roy Bohlin;
Co-Directors: Robin Chiero & Susan Harris;
Coordinator of PTAC: Bernie Arenz;
Administrative Assistant: Michelle Giddens.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

A description of the accomplishments of the unit this year including a list of related
achievements, scholarly works, or other results of the unit. These descriptions should include:

a.   Numbers of on and off campus participants:
       e-Portfolio- Fall 2003- 2 classes of single subject pre-service teachers created digital
        portfolios which were evaluated on a scoring rubric developed by Dr. Susan Harris
        and Dr. Robin Chiero. The evaluators were secondary teachers trained by Drs. Harris
        and Chiero. In Spring 2004, Dr. Susan Harris and Dr. Robin Chiero presented a pre-
        conference workshop at the Annual American Association of Colleges of Teacher
        Education (AACTE) held in Chicago. A sold out workshop of 40 AACTE members
        attended.
       Learning Communities – Fall 2003- Learning Communities- consisted of master
        teachers, student teachers and university supervisors who collaborated to plan and
        implement effective technology use in K-12 classrooms. 13 Learning Communities
        at eight schools participated including 35 master teachers, student teachers and
        university supervisors combined.
       Dr. Robin Chiero, TALENT co-director and Lorraine Sherry, outside evaluator from
        RMC Research Corporation published Project TALENT: Infusing Technology in K-12
        Field Placements Through a Learning Community Model in the Journal of
        Technology and Teacher Education (2004) 12(2), 165-297.
       Multiple and Single Subject Master Teacher Professional Development Workshops –
        Fall 2003- Single Subject Workshops provided the opportunity to attend 1 of 3
            technology workshops: Using WebQuest in Your Classroom, Using Digital Cameras
            in the Core Curriculum and Assistive Technology to Access the Curriculum. 72
            single subject teachers participated. Multiple Subject Workshop provided the
            opportunity to attend 1 of 4 technology workshops: Resource on the World Wide
            Web: WebQuest, Reading With Technology, Writing With Technology and Facilitating
            Student Created Presentations. 151 multiple subject teachers participated.
           Pre-Teacher Assessment Center (PTAC) – Fall 2003 and Spring 2004- PTAC is a
            scenario-based assessment with a format similar to a comprehensive examination.
            Entering students are presented with a vignette and are expected to write a response,
            that is rubric scored by a committee of PTAC evaluators. Through PTAC, students
            who enter the teacher preparation program are assessed on the knowledge and skills
            they must possess in order to be successful teaching in local schools. PTAC
            addressed two goals of TALENT‘s PT3 grant; to prepare educators who know how to
            meet the digital learning needs of low income, rural, minority and limited English
            proficient students, and to create a process by which California State University can
            better assess the readiness of its students to be technology using educators.
            Approximately 200 students participated.

b.    Evaluation of the effectiveness of these activities:
      Based upon the report of the external evaluator our program during this past year and for
      the period of the grant has been very effective in helping faculty infuse effective
      technology into their courses and into the credential program.


Sources of Funding

The U.S. Department of Education‘s Preparing Tomorrows Teachers to use Technology
(PT3) funding provides support for faculty development in the applications of technology in
teaching.


Space and Equipment Utilization

TALENT‘s office and equipment has been housed in ED 496.


Risk Management

Project TALENT follows all California State University, Fresno policies and procedures related
to risk management.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

This is the final year of the Project.
                                   Unit Annual Report
              Renaissance Partnership for Improving Teacher Quality Project
                               July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Unit

The Renaissance Partnership for Improving Teacher Quality Project is in its final year of a five
year initiative. Ten institutions — including California State University, Fresno — in nine states
have designed and engaged in a system to advance the quality of their teaching credential
graduates and the teachers in their respective partner schools by focusing attention on P-12
student learning. The ten institutions have identified six teacher performance areas that if
improved will significantly increase learning of P-12 students, and have designed an
accountability system to provide evidence of impact on student learning. Preparing teachers to
fully implement these six performance areas has required a paradigm shift from teaching to
learning, new organizational structures, and new systems of accountability. The cornerstone of
the project is the Teacher Work Sample, a documentation of student learning completed by
teacher candidates in final student teaching. Data (including scores on Samples, candidate
surveys and post-graduate questionnaires) from all ten institutions are gathered, shared and
evaluated by the member institutions at meetings twice a year. Validity and reliability studies at
the national level are on-going.

In its fifth year of implementation, Multiple Subject Credential Program Options II and IV
continue to pilot the Teacher Work Sample. In addition, approximately sixty Option I students
and eleven Single Subject Credential students have piloted the Teacher Work Sample during the
2003-2004 school year. Local validity and reliability studies are on-going in anticipation of
establishing a revised version of the Teacher Work Sample as one of three instruments used to
assess students' master of the Teacher Performance Expectations (CCTC mandated pre-service
teacher standards). Involvement in the Renaissance Project has necessitated major curricular
changes and the establishment of an accountability system which includes an advisory committee
of Central San Joaquin Valley BTSA Directors, and the fieldwork and mentoring support of
partner school district, Central Unified School District.


Administrative Housing of Unit

Locally the Renaissance Project is directed by Susan R. Macy, Ed.D., Coordinator of the Early
Childhood Education Program. Jean Behrend, Ph.D. coordinates the Mentoring and Teacher
Work Sample responsibilities and Robin Chiero, Ph.D. acts as the Coordinator of Assessment for
the Project. This administrative group answers directly to the Associate Dean at the local level
and to the national project administrator Roger Pankratz at Western Kentucky University. All
financial matters are handled by the California State University, Fresno Foundation.
Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

    Expansion of Pilot Study. Over 100 Multiple Subject Credential Program pre-service
     students have successfully completed the Teacher Work Sample in final student teaching
     during the 2003-04 school year. Additionally eleven Single Subject Credential Students
     have completed the Sample in the area of foreign language as part of the expanded pilot
     study.
    The Teacher Work Sample prompt and rubric are being revised to include local priorities
     that reflect CCTC and NCATE requirements.
    The Multiple Subject Credential Review Committee and the Single Subject Credential
     Program have approved the use of the revised Sample as one of the assessment instruments
     to be used as a summative measurement of candidate performance.
    Validity and reliability data is being collected and analyzed.
    Dr. Jeanie Behrend provided significant input into the Mentoring Manual produced by the
     national Renaissance Project.
    Five CSUF faculty and a representative of our partner-district, Central Unified, have
     actively participated in two national Renaissance meetings


Sources of Funding

The Renaissance Partnership for Improving Teacher Quality Project is funded by the Teacher
Quality Enhancement Grant Programs Title II Higher Education Act and is the sole funding
source for the project. Funding at the national level is managed by Western Kentucky University;
the California State University, Fresno Foundation manages funding at the local level.


Risk Management

The Renaissance Partnership for Improving Teacher Quality Project conforms to system-wide
and university policies and procedures related to risk management.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005
    Full implementation of the Teacher Work Sample in both Multiple and Single Subject
     Credential Programs as one of several tools for summative assessment of pre-service
     candidates.
    Apply for a No-Cost Extension to continue to fund Project for full implementation of the
     Teacher Work Sample.
                                     Unit Annual Report
                                 Teacher Internship Program
                                 July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004


Purpose of Unit

The Teacher Internship Program (TIP) is an Alternative Certification Program authorized by the
California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) and ―No Child Left Behind‖ (NCLB)
legislation. The alternative certification program authorizes qualified individuals to complete
final student teaching with a Teacher Internship Credential. This program enables students
completing their credential program to experience a real world school setting, earn salary and
health benefits, while being supported by university faculty. The program also allows districts to
meet the requirements of the CCTC and NCLB by employing teachers working with an
authorized credential as opposed to an ―emergency permit.‖ The Teacher Internship Program
enables the university to shape productive partnerships with 98 schools districts in the Central
Valley.


Administrative Housing of Unit

The Teacher Internship Program is housed within the Curriculum and Instruction (C&I)
Department. The TIP employs one full-time faculty member who is the Director of the program,
one full-time administrative assignment, and five part-time faculty members. The program also
employs one 20-hour student assistant. The TIP enrolled 106 teacher interns during the 2003-
2004 academic year. The program is composed of multiple subject, single subject, and special
education credential candidates. The TIP is organized into five grade level clusters. These
clusters include primary (K-3), upper grade (4-6), middle school, high school, and special
education clusters. There are two entry points into the program, August and January. The five
part-time faculty members noted above serve as the cluster leaders for the program.

The Teacher Internship Program‘s service area includes Madera, Mariposa, Fresno, Kings, and
Tulare Counties. The TIP partners with 98 school districts in this service area.


Major Accomplishments 2003-2004

The Teacher Internship Program (TIP) concluded the 2003-04 academic year with 106 interns
completing the program. Of these interns 34 were multiple subject interns, 27 single subject
interns, and 25 were special education interns. The TIP had partnership agreements with 98
school districts in the five county service area that included Madera, Mariposa Fresno, Kings,
and Tulare Counties. Of special note in the area of diversity, 36 interns of Hispanic ethnicity
enrolled in the TIP.

In addition to these counties, the TIP concluded a three-year outreach partnership agreement with
Yuba and Sutter Counties in northern California. Nine interns participated in this area. Thirty-
two school districts were actively involved with the Teacher Internship Program during this
reporting period.

The Teacher Internship Program received $255,000 from the California Commission on Teacher
Credentialing. This money was awarded from a grant application written by the TIP to operate
the program.

The TIP continued its recruiting program in the five county service area through the use of
orientation programs at various districts as well as at the university. Media announcements were
also used to communicate information regarding the TIP. The TIP focused recruiting efforts on
paraprofessionals working in classrooms in the service area.

The Director of the TIP participates in the Central Valley BITSA Consortium meetings, the
Fresno County BITSA Advisory Board, and the California Teacher Internship Study Advisory
Committee.

Teacher Internship Program candidates participated in the PreTeacher Assessment Program
(PTAP). Intern graduates have participated in a technology assessment program being piloted by
the PTAP.

Teacher interns evaluate each of the monthly weekend seminars held during the academic year.
Interns also complete a summary evaluation of the program at the end of the spring semester.
Evaluations are housed in the internship office. The TIP will employ an external evaluator
during the 2004-2005 academic year.


Sources of Funding

The TIP operates from two funding sources. One source is an alternative certification grant
awarded by the CCTC. A grant application is written for a two-year period. The grant award is
for $2500 per students. The program director must update the grant application at the end of the
first year of the grant award.

The second funding source is a six percent (6%) fee that is paid by each intern. The fee is
calculated from the intern‘s base salary. The intern participates in a monthly salary deduction
with his/her respective school district. The TIP invoices participating school districts in the fall
and spring semesters of the academic year.


Space and Equipment Utilization

The TIP operates from the Education Building, room‘s 220A, 220E, 220F.
Risk Management

The TIP conforms to the systemwide and university policies and procedures related to risk
management.


Goals and Objectives 2004-2005

The Teacher Internship Program will continue to provide a quality program of support to interns
completing final student teaching. In spite of school district budget reductions the TIP will
continue active recruiting in the service area. The Teacher Internship Program will focus
recruiting efforts to increase diversity of participants of African American and Asian ethnicities.

				
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