mse - DOC by 4vs00M6

VIEWS: 0 PAGES: 86

									                                      ABET
                                Self-Study Report

                                                for the

               Materials Science and Engineering

                                              Program

                                                    at

                     Illinois Institute of Technology
                               Chicago, Illinois 60616, USA



                                            July 1, 2008


                                            CONFIDENTIAL
The information supplied in this Self-Study Report is for the confidential use of ABET and its authorized
agents, and will not be disclosed without authorization of the institution concerned, except for summary
data not identifiable to a specific institution.
                                                      Table of Contents

BACKGROUND INFORMATION .............................................................................................................. 3
CRITERION 1. STUDENTS ....................................................................................................................... 6
CRITERION 2. PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES ................................................................ 10
CRITERION 3. PROGRAM OUTCOMES ............................................................................................... 15
CRITERION 4. CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT ................................................................................. 19
CRITERION 5. CURRICULUM ............................................................................................................... 22
CRITERION 6. FACULTY ....................................................................................................................... 32
CRITERION 7. FACILITIES .................................................................................................................... 40
CRITERION 8. SUPPORT ........................................................................................................................ 43
CRITERION 9. PROGRAM CRITERIA................................................................................................... 47
GENERAL CRITERIA FOR ADVANCED-LEVEL PROGRAMS .......................................................... 48
APPENDIX A – COURSE SYLLABI ........................................................................................................ 49
APPENDIX B – FACULTY RESUMES .................................................................................................. 122
APPENDIX C – LABORATORY EQUIPMENT .................................................................................... 156
APPENDIX D – INSTITUTIONAL SUMMARY………………………………………....Appendix D-1




                                                                      2
                             Self-Study Report
                            Materials Science and Engineering
                                   Bachelor of Science
                             Illinois Institute of Technology

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

     Contact information
      Jamal Yagoobi – Department Chair
      MMAE Department, IIT, Chicago IL 60616
      (312) 567 3239        yagoobi@iit.edu


      John Kallend – Associate Chair
      MMAE Department, IIT, Chicago IL 60616
      (312) 567 3054        kallend@iit.edu

     Program History
      1947: Program implemented as Metallurgical Engineering

      1995: Program name changed to Metallurgical and Materials Engineering. This change
            reflected the increased interest in non-metallic materials in the profession and
            increasing emphasis in non-metals in the program content, and a decreased
            emphasis in extraction metallurgy , beneficiation, etc.

      2003: Name changed to Materials Science and Engineering. This change followed a
            major review and revision of the program by the faculty to give equal emphasis
            to metals, polymers, composites, ceramics and electronic materials; and a
            complete restructuring of the laboratory component. The change took place
            following the previous EAC of ABET visit and was discussed with the program
            visitor at the time of the visit. The current program emphasis is on structure-
            property relationships, laboratory techniques for investigating structure and
            properties, and materials applications. The number of required courses was
            reduced, and the number of technical electives increased while keeping the total
            credit hours constant

     Options
      None.


                                              3
   Organizational Structure
    The Materials Science and Engineering program is one of three undergraduate programs
    administered by the Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering.
    The other programs are Aerospace Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. The head
    of department, Dr. Jamal Yagoobi, reports to the Dean of the Armour College of
    Engineering (position vacant at the time of writing). The dean in turn reports to the
    Provost (Dr. Alan Cramb, effective August 1, 2008), who reports to the President.
   Program Delivery Modes
    The program is delivered in tradition lecture/laboratory format. Some lecture classes
    are available for concurrent remote viewing by 2-way interactive television. In general,
    internet delivery is not used for undergraduate classes except on a case-by-case basis
    approved by the departmental Undergraduate Studies Committee. A structured co-op is
    available as an optional activity for students, but co-op experience does not count for
    academic credit in the program.


    Deficiencies, Weaknesses or Concerns Documented in the Final Report from the
    Previous Evaluation(s) and the Actions taken to Address them

    No deficiencies or concerns were noted in the final report from the 2004 evaluation.
    The following weakness was reported:

    Criterion 2. The process has now completed one review cycle. Although there is no
    clear information regarding changes made to the various questionnaires, a review of
    these included in the documentation reveals that they are comprehensive and
    appropriate. However, there is no effective process for obtaining feedback from
    employers of materials science and engineering graduates who are one of the
    documented constituents. A four part mechanism has been established for the purpose
    of evaluating whether the stated objectives have been achieved. These include an
    alumni survey, results from the Engineering Intern Exam, anecdotal employment data
    and input from the Student Advisory Board and graduating seniors. These data were
    analyzed by the department undergraduate Studies Committee with recommendations
    presented to the faculty. Although the mechanism is in place, the ability to actually
    determine how well the program objectives have been achieved using the noted
    elements is questionable. There is now a feedback loop established that results in
    changes being made to program objectives. However, there is no indicaion that the
    curriculum itself was changed to improve graduates’ ability to achieve the documented
    objectives.

    Actions taken: Repeated attempts to obtain statistically relevant information from
    employers of graduates have been unsuccessful. Initial attempts conducted by the IIT
    Career Development Center (now Career Management Center) repeatedly received no
    response or negative response to requests, with employers citing privacy concerns (due
    to the small number of graduates in any given year, individuals would be easily


                                            4
identifiable). In 2005, 2006 and 2007 the college purchased the services of a
commercial survey company, Electronic Benchmarking Inc. (EBI) to perform surveys
both of alumni and of employers. The expectation was that since EBI reports only
statistical information, privacy concerns could be avoided. The alumni surveys have
been very successful with a response rate exceeding expectations. However, the
number of employer responses has not in any year reached EBI’s own threshold
for reporting results to us. EBI does not report the reasons for the disappointing
response. The EBI employer survey is being discontinued.

At the time of writing, IIT’s newly restructured Career Management Center (Appendix
D) is coordinating with the Office of Alumni Relations in a renewed attempt to obtain
information from employers of our graduates. However, at this time, based on these
experiences, current privacy law, and the small size of the program we have no reason
to expect statistically relevant outcomes of employer surveys, however performed, in
the future. We continue to rely on our External Advisory Board to represent this
constituency.

In 2006 a comprehensive review of program objectives resulted in significant changes
documented under Criterion 2.

We have contacted every graduate of the program between Spring 2004 and Fall 2007
with an 84% response rate. In every case the respondent was either in graduate school
(including medical school), a commissioned officer in the US Armed Services, or
currently employed as an engineer. This is very persuasive evidence that program
objectives are being achieved.

Curriculum changes since the previous EAC visit are documented under Criterion 4.




                                       5
CRITERION 1. STUDENTS

     Student Admissions
      Admissions procedures for freshman and transfer students are common to all
      engineering programs and are described in Appendix D.

     Evaluating Student Performance
      Each student's progress is monitored at mid semester (1st and 2nd year courses) by the
      advisor, and at the end of each semester by the associate chair of the department and the
      Associate Provost’s office. Students whose progress is unsatisfactory due to low grades
      or failing to maintain 12 credit hours/semester (6 CH/semester for part time students)
      towards their degree are placed on academic probation and notified by letter. Students
      on probation are limited to 15 hours/semester of coursework, and may not participate in
      varsity sports or take office in any student organization. IIT is classified as having
      “selective” admissions, and student academic problems are not usually associated with
      insufficient ability or preparation, but more commonly with difficulty adjusting to
      college, inappropriate choice of major, or financial/emotional stress, and the Student
      Counseling Center is equipped to help is such cases. If a student stays on academic
      probation for two (or more) consecutive semesters, the student may be dismissed.
      Students are evaluated using a traditional 4-point grading scale, with grades being
      assigned by the course instructor. All courses have stated learning objectives and
      instructors are expected to test achievement of those objectives and assign grades based
      on achievement of those objectives. Specific protocols have been developed for
      evaluating written and oral communication skills, and the several objectives of the
      IPRO program (see Appendix D). Thus a passing grade in a course implies
      achievement of the learning objectives at a minimum acceptable level.



     Advising Students
      All students are advised by full-time faculty in the department. New students are
      assigned to a faculty advisor on enrollment, and are advised either in person, by
      telephone, or by e-mail correspondence during the inter-semester break prior to
      matriculation. The advisor has access to the student’s high school record, standardized
      test scores and AP or IB credit prior to the advising session. Once advised, students
      may immediately register for courses using an online registration system. Incoming
      freshmen (and transfer students with less than 30 transferable credit hours) are required
      to take MMAE100 (Introduction to the Profession) in the Fall semester. Section sizes in
      this course sequence are nominally 30 students, and the course instructor is the
      students' academic advisor for the first year. This course meets twice per week,
      ensuring excellent contact between student and advisor. Following the freshman year,
      students are assigned a faculty advisor who will usually stay with them for the
      remainder of their undergraduate career. Advisor's permission is required before a
      student may register for the following semester or withdraw from any course.



                                              6
       Faculty advisors have the following tools available to ensure that the advising process is
       effective:
       SIS (Student Information System)™ and Web for Faculty™ : this software allows
       advisors to access the student's complete course schedule and official academic record
       from their office computer. This system is being phased out, and from Fall 2008 the
       BANNER TM system will be in use.
       Mid-term grades: mid-term grades are issued for all lower division courses. Advisors
       have access to these grades so that intervention can occur when necessary before the
       course is complete.
       Course attendance/performance reporting: instructors in lower level courses report on
       student absences from class and poor performance on tests and homeworks to a central
       contact (Director of Advising). This information is then sent electronically to the
       student’s advisor.
       Advising holds: students cannot register for any courses until their advisor releases a
       hold.
       MMAE Department Advising Guidelines: a comprehensive booklet describing how the
       course sequence fits together, graduation requirements, etc. is provided for students and
       faculty advisors. These guidelines are also available on the department's web site. The
       booklet is updated annually.

      Transfer Students and Transfer Courses
       The process for enrolling transfer students and giving transfer credit is common to all
       students in Armour College of Engineering, and is described in Appendix D.

      Graduation Requirements
       The process for ensuring that graduation requirements have been met is common to all
       students in Armour College of Engineering, and is described in Appendix D.

      Enrollment and Graduation Trends
       The MSE program continues to be very small. Details are given in Table 1-3.


    Table 1-1.     History of Admissions Standards for Freshmen Admissions
                                for Past Five Years
                              Materials Science and Engineering
 Fall of                                                   Percentile Rank in High    Number of
Academic        Composite ACT         Composite SAT                School            New Students
  Year          MIN.      AVG.        MIN.     AVG.           MIN.          AVG.       Enrolled
 2007-8             22        29       1020      1225                                     5
 2006-7             24        30       1020      1330                                     6
 2005-6             26        29       1100      1257
 2004-5             24        29       1180      1300                                      3
 2003-4



                                                7
          Table 1-2. Transfer Students for Past Five Academic Years
                                                          Number of
                    Fall of Academic Year         Transfer Students Enrolled
                             2007-8                           4
                             2006-7
                             2005-6                           3
                             2004-5                           1
                             2003-4


Table 1-3. Undergraduate Enrollment Trends for Past Five Academic Years

        Academic Year:      2003-4          2004-5       2005-6        2006-7       2007-8

Enrollment during Fall
    Full-time Students                              15        10            19            27
    Part-time Students                               2         1             1              2
                 1
    Student FTE                                   16.7      11.2          20.4          27.8
Completions between 7/1 and 6/30
    Graduates                                        6         8             7              1
1
  FTE = Full-Time Equivalent: 15 Credit hours = 1FTE
2007-8 Graduate value includes ONLY Summer and Fall, not Spring as those values are not yet
available.




                                              8
                         Table 1-4. Program Graduates


                                                                          Initial or Current
                                                  Certification/
  Numerical       Year             Year                                     Employment/
                                                    Licensure
  Identifier   Matriculated      Graduated                                     Job Title/
                                                 (If Applicable)
                                                                         Other Placement
                                                                   Materials Engineer,
                                                                   International Titanium Powder.
10389597           2004 Fall   2007 Fall                           Now deceased
                                                                   Graduate School, U. of Texas,
10214503           2003 Fall   2007 Spring                         Dallas
                                                                   Engineer, Winergy Drive
10251527           2003 Fall   2007 Spring                         Systems Corp
                                                                   Corporate Account Manager,
10268524           1997 Fall   2007 Spring                         CDW Inc.
10313863           2003 Fall   2007 Spring                         Graduate School (IIT)
10315079           2003 Fall   2007 Spring
10322983           2002 Fall   2007 Spring                         2nd Lt, US Air Force
                                                                   Graduate School, Carnegie-
10411104           2005 Fall   2007 Spring                         Mellon U.
10199809           2003 Fall   2006 Spring                         Medical School (Mayo Clinic)
10236273           2001 Fall   2006 Spring
10246336           2002 Fall   2006 Spring                         Engineer, Packer Engineering
                                                                   Graduate School,
10261768           2002 Fall   2006 Spring                         (Northwestern University)
                                                                   Materials Engineer, General
                                                                   Dynamics Electric Boat
10299896           2002 Fall   2006 Spring                         Division
                                                                   Materials Engineer, Buehler
10321257           2002 Fall   2006 Spring                         Inc.
                                                                   Graduate School, UC Santa
10327021           2002 Fall   2006 Spring                         Barbara
                                                                   Materials Engineer, HB
10231058        2003 Spring    2005 Fall                           Performance Systems Inc.
10261986          2000 Fall    2005 Summer
                                                                   Technical staff, Baxter
10234635           2000 Fall   2005 Spring                         Medical
                                                                   Graduate School (Cambridge,
10320318           2001 Fall   2005 Spring                         UK)
                                                                   Materials Engineer,
10323711           2001 Fall   2005 Spring                         Gulfstream Aerospace
10372371           2003 Fall   2005 Spring                         Graduate School (IIT)
10291113           2000 Fall   2004 Fall                           Design Engineer, Navistar Inc.
10332446           2000 Fall   2004 Fall                           Ensign , U.S. Navy
                                                                   Graduate School (Stanford
10325410           2000 Fall   2004 Spring                         University)
                                                                   Graduate School
102688673          2000 Fall   2004 Spring                         (Northwestern University)




                                             9
CRITERION 2. PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES


     Mission Statements
      IIT Mission Statement (from IIT web site http://www.iit.edu):

      To advance knowledge through research and scholarship, to cultivate invention
      improving the human condition, and to educate students from throughout the world for
      a life of professional achievement, service to society, and individual fulfillment.

      Armour College of Engineering Mission Statement (from Armour College web site
      http://www.iit.edu/engineering/about/mission.shtml):

      Provide state-of-the art education and research programs; educate a new breed of
      engineers with a strong fundamental knowledge of engineering principles, the
      capability to apply their knowledge to broad interdisciplinary areas, and an
      understanding and appreciation of the economic, environmental, and social forces that
      impact intellectual choices; and enhance Armour's reputation as an internationally
      recognized engineering school (Transforming Lives).

      Strengthen Armour's leadership role by focusing on the core research competencies and
      enhancing partnerships with industry, government laboratories and academic and
      research institutions (Inventing the Future).


     Program Educational Objectives
      The objectives of the MMAE undergraduate programs are to educate aerospace,
      mechanical and materials engineering students for a broad range of professional
      careers,
      provide the inspiration for lifelong learning, and prepare students for advanced studies
      at the graduate level.
      Recognizing the changing professional environment that MMAE graduates will
      encounter, the programs aim to develop graduates who:

      • Possess a strong foundation in mathematics, science and engineering and who are
      proficient in the engineering sciences on which the major discipline is based.
      • Are able to link science and engineering principles to identify, formulate and solve
      engineering problems in professional practice and research and development
      contexts.
      • Are able to design and conduct experiments, as well as analyze and interpret data.
      • Have experience working in multidisciplinary and interprofessional teams.
      • Utilize effective oral, written, graphical and computational communication skills.
      • Understand the economic, ethical, societal, environmental and global contexts of their
      professional activities.
      • Pursue lifelong learning.



                                             10
    • Translate knowledge of their respective disciplines to a broad spectrum of professions.

    The MSE program specific objectives are to develop graduates who understand the
    structure, properties, processing, performance, selection and service behavior of
    engineering materials, including metals, ceramics, polymeric and composite materials.
    This knowledge applies to design of new materials, improvement of existing materials,
    and optimization of methods of manufacture.

    These objectives are published in the IIT Undergraduate Bulletin, printed and online
    editions.

   Consistency of the Program Educational Objectives with the Mission of the
    Institution
    Both the general objectives and materials-specific objectives emphasize technical
    competence based on fundamental knowledge, and professional skills appropriate to the
    21st Century, in accordance with the mission of IIT and Armour College of Engineering.
    Graduates of the program come from many nations, and take up many careers upon
    graduation, including business, medicine, law, military service, attendance in graduate
    or medical school, as well as careers in engineering. The objectives are defined broadly
    enough to accommodate all such choices.

   Program Constituencies
    The faculty has determined the constituencies of the program to be: the public,
    students, alumni of the program, program faculty, and employers of our graduates.
    Formal communication with these constituencies has been established by means of:

    IIT Board of Trustees: The Board of Trustees represents the public interest and
    establishes the mission of the university. Its members are drawn primarily from
    community and industry leaders in the Chicago metropolitan area. The board is
    responsible for setting the overall mission and goals of the university. It meets twice
    each year.
    Armour College of Engineering Board of Overseers: The College overseers are drawn
    from industry and academia, and provide guidance to the dean on college wide issues.
    MMAE Student Advisory Board (SAB): This is a self-governing entity. It conducts its
    own elections of officers drawn from students enrolled in the three programs within the
    department, spread over all four years. Secretarial support is provided by the
    department. This board can act on its own initiative about any issue relevant to the
    undergraduate programs, or may be consulted by the department head or the department
    undergraduate studies committee. The student advisory board also conducts a survey of
    graduating seniors. The chair of the SAB is invited to meetings of the MMAE
    Undergraduate Studies Committee when issues relating to undergraduate programs are
    on the agenda.

    It should be emphasized that the low student/faculty ratio in the MSE program also
    results in excellent informal lines of communication between students and faculty.


                                            11
MMAE External Advisory Board: This board represents alumni, employers of our
graduates, and representatives of academia and the professions of mechanical, materials
and aerospace engineering. Members are appointed by the department head. This
board meets annually with the department faculty, and members may be consulted as
appropriate.

The current (2008) membership of the External Advisory Board is:

Prof. Huseyin Sehitoglu   Head, Dept. of ME, University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana
Prof. Ted Belytschko      Professor, Northwestern University
Mr. John Berninger        Principal, Advanced Analysis Engineering
Mr. James Butzen          Director, Advanced Feature Development, Zebra Technologies
Ms. Sherita Ceasar        Chief Executive Officer, CBA Solutions
Mr. Geoffrey Fear         President, CM Packaging
Prof. Skip Fletcher       Regents Professor, Texas A&M University
Mr. Robert Footlik        President, Footlik and Associates
Mr. Les Hardison          Senior Consultant, Wheelabrator Technologies
Prof. Yogesh Jaluria      Professor and Chairman, Mech. & Aero. Eng. - Rutgers University
Mr. James Korenchan       Manager, Air & Fuel Systems, International Truck and Engine Corporation
Mr. Bruce Liimatainen     President, A. Finkl & Sons Company
Mr. Paul Micheli          Manager, Automization Product Development, ITW Industrial Finishing
Mr. Ali Nassiri           Head of Radio Frequency Department, Argonne National Laboratory
Prof. Robert Page         Emeritus Professor. Texas A&M University
Dr. Richard Wlezien       Professor & Dept. Chairman, Mech. Eng. Dept., Tufts University


IIT Faculty meetings and IIT faculty committees: All new programs, significant
program revisions, and changes in the General Education requirements must be
approved by majority vote of the IIT Undergraduate Studies Committee and the IIT
Faculty Council. Proposed changes are then posted on the Faculty Council web site, and
if 10 or more faculty members object, a majority vote of the full IIT faculty is required.
Regular university faculty meetings are held biannually.

The IIT Undergraduate Studies Committee meets monthly through the academic year
and is charged with reviewing programs, monitoring and recommending changes to the
General Education Requirements, and approving significant changes in existing
programs. All departments with undergraduate programs are represented on this
committee.

MMAE Faculty meetings and MMAE faculty committees: Faculty meetings are held
monthly through the academic year. All program changes must be approved by
majority vote of the faculty. An annual 1-day retreat has been established for in-depth


                                            12
    discussion of programmatic issues. Faculty committees are appointed for various tasks:
    relevant to the undergraduate program are: MMAE Undergraduate Studies Committee:
    this has 7 members including the department chair ex-officio. It is tasked with
    evaluating data pertaining to the programs, making recommendations to the faculty
    concerning undergraduate program improvements, and approving student petitions for
    special projects, undergraduate research and course substitutions. This committee
    provides liaison with the Student Advisory Board. The committee meets monthly during
    the academic year or may be convened at any time if rapid response to an issue is
    required. MMAE Laboratory Committee: this committee is charged with maintaining
    the plan for upgrading and improving the departmental laboratory facilities based on
    needs.

   Process for Establishing Program Educational Objectives
    In 1994 the National Commission for IIT was established by the IIT Board of Trustees
    to chart a course for the following decade. The commission was chaired by Robert
    Galvin, Chairman Emeritus of Motorola, and its members were drawn from industry
    and academia and included members of the National Academy of Engineering, National
    Academy of Science, Nobel Laureates, and leaders of industry and colleges nationwide.
    There was also student and faculty representation. This commission recommended,
    inter alia, significant changes in IIT’s mission and objectives, including an increased
    emphasis on inter-professional studies, communication skills, and a more international
    outlook. The Board of Trustees accepted the report in 1995 and mandated its
    implementation. (This also coincided with the release of a draft of ABET EAC Criteria
    2000, which themselves indicated significant curricular revision). In order to facilitate
    the necessary changes the university announced a $250M development campaign. The
    campaign ended in 2001, having raised in excess of $258M.
    Extensive discussion within the faculty took place from 1995 – 97 to establish the basic
    framework for the necessary programmatic changes, and in 1997 the IIT faculty
    approved a major revision of the General Education Requirements of the university, to
    take effect with the entering class of 1999. Among the changes were a requirement for 6
    credit hours of work on “Interprofessional Projects” (IPRO) to develop skills working
    with individuals from other disciplines and professions on real-world technical projects
    involving economic, legal, ethical and social issues. Another new requirement was for
    each student to take 42 credit hours of courses designated as communications-intensive
    (indicated with a (C) in the Undergraduate Bulletin), split between courses in the major
    and in other areas. There must be significant writing, oral presentation or graphical
    components in these courses.
    The MMAE Department's undergraduate studies committee then drafted a proposed set
    of educational objectives for the department’s programs. These drafts were circulated
    for review and comment to the student advisory board and the external advisory board.
    The full MMAE faculty then considered the drafts and all comments received, before
    final approval of the program objectives.
    The educational objectives are published in the IIT Undergraduate Bulletin (print and
    on-line versions).



                                           13
   Achievement of Program Educational Objectives
    Data relating to achievement of the educational objectives have been obtained from:
          Annual surveys of graduates of the program 2 and 5 years after graduation. For
           the first review the survey was generated internally, but subsequent annual
           surveys have been performed by Educational Benchmarking Inc (EBI,
           http://www.webebi.com). The EBI alumni survey is a comprehensive instrument
           that evaluates multiple attributes of graduates including perceived achievement
           of educational objectives and program outcomes. Individual students are not
           identified to the program. A very large amount of information is generated by
           this survey, and will be available at the time of the visit.
          Surveys of employers: Attempts have been made to obtain statistical
           information about our graduates from employers. Initially this was done by the
           Career Management Center (see Appendix D) and received very poor response
           due to privacy concerns raised by employers. From 2004-2007 we have
           purchased the services of Educational Benchmarking Inc, which offers an
           employer survey, but in no case has the minimum response been received that
           allows them to report the results. We have now discontinued the use of this
           survey.
           Direct contact with graduates. In 2006 every graduate of the previous two years
           known to be enrolled in graduate school was contacted and asked to provide
           open-ended feedback on the preparation they received. 100% response was
           received. Every response indicated that the students were prepared at least as
           well as their peers, even at the most highly ranked universities. These will be
           available for inspection at the time of the visit.
          Employment data. Table 1-4 indicates that graduates are admitted to quality
           graduate schools and find employment in a wide range of careers.
          External Advisory Board members include members from companies and
           organizations that employ our graduates. Feedback is obtained from the EAB
           during its annual September meeting with the faculty.
    The process for evaluating and updating the educational objectives follows the same
    basic steps described in the previous section. The Undergraduate Studies Committee
    makes recommendations for revisions, which are reviewed by the Student Advisory
    Board and the External Advisory Board. The proposal with comments is then brought
    before the department faculty at its annual retreat, and a majority vote is required for
    approval.
    The objectives were reviewed and minor modifications were made in 2003, following
    this process. Details were provided in the 2004 interim report to the EAC. A more
    comprehensive change in objectives was approved by the faculty in 2006 to recognize
    the very diverse range of career paths that our graduates follow (see Table 1-4).
    The next review will be in 2009.


                                            14
CRITERION 3. PROGRAM OUTCOMES

     Process for Establishing and Revising Program Outcomes
      Program outcomes were established in the 1999 program review described in Criterion
      2. Outcomes are deliberately designed to be readily aligned with ABET prescribed
      outcomes 3a – 3k and the program specific criteria for materials and similarly named
      programs, and to be consistent with the educational objectives. Program outcomes have
      been reviewed in 2003 and 2006, but no change has been recommended.

     Program Outcomes
             In this section the concordance between program outcomes and EAC of ABET
             Criteria 3 and 4 are highlighted in [ ].
             Graduates of the MSE program:
             1.     possess a strong foundation in mathematics, science and engineering and
                    are proficient in the engineering sciences on which the major discipline
                    is based [3a, 4]
             2.     are able to link science and engineering principles to identify, formulate
                    and solve engineering problems in professional practice and research and
                    development contexts [3b, 3c, 3e, 4]
             3.     are able to design and conduct experiments, as well as analyze and
                    interpret data [3b]
             4.     have experience working in multidisciplinary and interprofessional
                    teams [3d]
             5.     utilize effective oral, written, graphical and computational
                    communication skills [3g, 3k]
             6.     understand the economic, ethical, societal, environmental and global
                    contexts of their professional activities [3f, 3h, 3j, 4]
             7.     have a recognition of the need to remain current in their chosen field and
                    are able to engage in lifelong, independent learning and professional
                    development, [3i], and
             8.     translate knowledge of their respective disciplines to a broad spectrum of
                    professions [3k]

             In addition, the program specific outcomes are:
                 An ability to describe and analyze materials structure
                 An ability to relate structure, processing and properties
                 An ability select materials for service based on performance
                 An ability to design compositions and processes to meet specifications




                                             15
   Relationship of Program Outcomes to Program Educational Objectives
    The outcomes described above are very tightly linked to the program educational
    objectives described in Criterion 2.

   Relationship of Courses in the Curriculum to the Program Outcomes
    The outcomes are produced by a curriculum comprising:
                21 credit hours of general education emphasizing breadth of knowledge of
                 society, human behavior and achievement.
                Required courses in calculus, differential equations, physics, chemistry and
                 computer science laying a sound foundation for engineering studies.
                A first-semester introductory engineering course emphasizing the nature of
                 engineering and the role of the engineer as an ethical professional.
                Basic engineering science courses encompassing knowledge of mechanics,
                 thermodynamics, materials and instrumentation.
                Advanced courses in the major discipline emphasizing structure, properties
                 and performance of modern materials in engineering applications.
                Interprofessional Projects (see Appendix D) in which students work in
                 interdisciplinary teams to design solutions to real-world, open-ended
                 problems, subject to realistic constraints. The program includes workshops
                 on team dynamics, professional ethics, and project management.
                Laboratory courses in which students learn to design experiments, analyze
                 data, and use modern tools of materials engineering practice.
                42 credit hours of courses designated as communication intensive,
                 distributed across the major and non-major areas in which writing, oral,
                 and graphical communication skills are developed.
                Technical elective courses enabling students to pursue technical studies
                 outside of their major area, including opportunities for undergraduate
                 participation in faculty research programs (undergraduate research is
                 optional).
    The effectiveness of the curriculum in achieving these outcomes is reinforced by well
    qualified faculty, academic advising conducted by full-time faculty, a low
    student/faculty ratio, well equipped laboratory facilities, academic support services, and
    co-curricular opportunities that emphasize professional development and life-long
    learning.

   Documentation
    The following sections are numbered according to the outcomes described above. The
    following materials will be available at the time of the visit:



                                            16
1.   Surveys of recent alumni conducted by Electronic Benchmarking Inc.
     Surveys of graduating seniors.
     Surveys of faculty teaching senior level classes.
     Most recent assessment of mathematics skills conducted by the Department of
     Applied mathematics
     Most recent assessment of physical science skills conducted by the Department
     of Biological, Chemical and Physical Sciences.
     Samples of graded student work from all engineering classes indicating
     achievement of the defined outcomes.
2.   Surveys of recent alumni conducted by Electronic Benchmarking Inc.
     Surveys of graduating seniors.
     Surveys of faculty teaching senior level classes.
     Assessment reports from the Interprofessional Projects program.
     Graded student coursework and project reports.

3.   Surveys of recent alumni conducted by Electronic Benchmarking Inc.
     Surveys of graduating seniors.
     Surveys of faculty teaching senior level classes.
     Graded laboratory reports.


4.   Assessment reports from the Interprofessional Projects program
     Surveys of recent alumni conducted by Electronic Benchmarking Inc.
     Surveys of graduating seniors.


5.   Graded project reports.
     Assessment report of the Writing Across the Curriculum program
     Assessment reports of the Interprofessional Projects program
     Surveys of recent alumni conducted by Electronic Benchmarking Inc.
     Surveys of graduating seniors
     Surveys of faculty teaching senior level classes


6.   Surveys of recent alumni conducted by Electronic Benchmarking Inc.
     Surveys of graduating seniors
     Surveys of faculty teaching senior level classes


                                      17
    7.     Assessment reports of the Interprofessional Projects program
           Admissions to graduate schools.
           Surveys of recent alumni conducted by Electronic Benchmarking Inc.
           Surveys of graduating seniors.


    8.     Data on employment of graduates
           Surveys of recent alumni conducted by Electronic Benchmarking Inc.
    In addition, detailed syllabi, handouts, homework sets, and examination papers from all
    engineering classes will be available, as will results of EI examinations for recent
    graduates, as reported by NCEES.
    As far as possible, all course materials including graded work will be made available
    electronically and indexed both by class and by outcome.


   Achievement of Program Outcomes
    Each engineering class has a statement of expected outcomes that is available to the
    students at the beginning of the course. Faculty are expected to structure assignments to
    test achievement of these outcomes. At the end of each semester faculty complete a
    short online report documenting the extent, in their professional opinion, to which the
    outcomes have been achieved, the distribution of grades, and any comments they may
    have on the preparation of students to succeed in the course. The form also allows
    faculty to make suggestions for course improvement.
    An annual survey is taken of faculty teaching senior level engineering classes to
    determine the extent to which, in their professional opinion, the program outcomes are
    being realized in our graduates
    An annual survey is taken of graduating seniors to determine the extent to which they
    believe they have achieved the program outcomes
    An annual survey of recent alumni is performed by Electronic Benchmarking Inc.;
    many of the questions on this survey relate to program outcomes.
    The Writing Across the Curriculum program assesses student communications skills
    and issues a regular report.
    The Interprofessional Projects program (see Appendix D) performs a very
    comprehensive assessment of student learning outcomes in many areas including:
    technical merit, ethics awareness, communications skills, recognition of the need for
    life-long learning, and ability to work in multidisciplinary teams.
    The Departments of Humanities and Social Sciences provide assessment of the general
    education program.




                                            18
CRITERION 4. CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT

     Information Used for Program Improvement
      Program improvement takes place at three levels – general education (including
      mathematics, basic science, computer science and Interprofessional Projects),
      evolutionary program specific changes, and comprehensive program reviews.
      The general education program is under the purview of the IIT Undergraduate Studies
      Committee which is responsible for all evaluation, review and changes. The IIT
      Undergraduate Studies Committee meets monthly throughout the academic year. Each
      academic unit offering undergraduate programs has representation on this committee
      determined by program size; MMAE has two voting members. Ex-officio (non voting)
      members include the provost, director of admissions, director of educational services,
      librarian, etc.
      The IIT Undergraduate Studies Committee receives all data from assessment of the
      programs under its control, and determines whether any program changes are
      warranted. Proposed changes must be approved by majority vote of the committee and
      are then considered by the IIT Faculty Council which must also approve by majority
      vote and post the proposal on its web site. If 10 or more faculty request, the proposed
      change must be brought before the full faculty for final approval. Minutes of
      Undergraduate Studies Committee meetings are available at http://www.iit.edu/~ugsc
      and Faculty Council minutes are available at http://www.iit.edu/~unifc.
      At the program level, data from annual alumni surveys, graduating senior surveys,
      faculty surveys, faculty course outcome reviews, NCEES data are collected and
      reviewed by the associate chair for undergraduate programs. The associate chair is
      responsible for liaison with the Student Advisory Board. When issues are identified
      that appear to merit a response, it is brought before the department undergraduate
      studies committee for review and possible action. The undergraduate studies committee
      recommends all modifications to the departmental undergraduate programs to the full-
      time faculty, who must approve any change by majority vote. Faculty meetings are held
      monthly through the academic year, and a one-day faculty retreat is held each May. The
      IIT Undergraduate Studies Committee must be notified of any proposed changes that
      affect programs in other departments or general education components, or changes to
      credit hour totals. Program improvements by this process are generally evolutionary in
      nature.

      Since the appointment of Professor J. Yagoobi as chair the faculty has undertaken
      periodic comprehensive reviews of its undergraduate programs. These are typically
      performed on a 5 – 6 year cycle and involve the creation of an ad-hoc review committee
      which is charged with evaluating all available data, identifying trends in the discipline
      and employment opportunities, comparison with programs in other universities, and
      consideration of the needs and resources of the department. The ad-hoc committee
      submits a report with recommendations to the MMAE Undergraduate Studies
      Committee, the advisory boards and the full faculty (which has final authority for
      approving program changes).



                                             19
    Minutes of MMAE Undergraduate Committee meetings, MMAE faculty meetings and
    retreats, and External Advisory Board meetings will be available at the time of the visit.

   Actions to Improve the Program
    General Education:
    The last comprehensive review and change to the general education requirements was in
    1999, and had been previously reported. The most significant changes were the
    introduction of 6 credit hours of Interprofessional Project experience in all majors, and
    a communications across the curriculum requirement. As a new, expensive and novel
    program, the Interprofessional Projects have been subject to ongoing scrutiny both the
    by Undergraduate Studies Committee and the Faculty Council. Subsequent
    improvements to the program include: establishment of a consistent funding level,
    appointment of a full-time faculty member (Senior Lecturer rank) to oversee the
    academic quality, introduction of structured workshops in ethics, team skills, and
    project management skills, a robust process for outcomes assessment involving both
    internal and external evaluators, a faculty oversight committee appointed by the Faculty
    Council, and the development of guidelines for the use of these projects as a capstone
    experience.

    Major Program Review:
    The MSE program was reviewed and radically changed during the 2002-2003 academic
    year. The proposed changes were reported in the 2002 EAC of ABET self study, and in
    the 2004 Interim Report. In summary, the entire junior and senior years were changed
    to provide a better distribution of topics among metals and alloys, ceramics, polymers,
    composites, and electronic materials. This was done in response to the changing nature
    of the discipline and particularly the changing job market in the mid-west, with decline
    in traditional heavy industry, closure of steel mills and foundries, etc. The structure of
    the laboratory experience was also changed, and a course on instrumentation (Physics
    300) added. The program was reviewed again after the first cohort had graduated, and
    no significant changes were recommended. Table 1-4 indicates that graduates of the
    revised program have no difficulty in finding employment in a wide range of careers, or
    admission to graduate schools.

    Evolutionary improvements:
    2008. Change of text book in MS201 (Materials Science). New book is Fundamentals
    of Materials Science and Engineering, W.D. Callister and D.G. Rethwisch, 3rd Edition
    (Wiley). This change resulted from reported dissatisfaction with the previous book in
    evaluations both by students and the instructor.

    2006-2007. Survey results of both alumni and graduating seniors indicated that “ability
    to design experiments” needed attention. In consequence, a section on experiment
    design was added to the MMAE370/476 laboratory sequence and students are required
    to design an experiment. To further reinforce this, in 2007 a programs change was
    proposed and approved to make MMAE430 (Engineering Measurements) or
    MMAE491 (Undergraduate Research, topic to be approved by the advisor), a required
    course in the program in place of a technical elective.


                                            20
2007. Introduction of rapid prototyping (with hands-on experience) in MMAE485
Manufacturing Processes.

2006. Significantly increased emphasis on piezo-electric and ferroelectric ceramics in
MMAE465 (Electrical, Magnetic and Optical Materials) in recognition of the increasing
use of high performance piezo materials in sensors and actuators.

2004. Explicit coverage of professional ethics in MMAE371 (Engineering Materials
and Design) and in Interprofessional Projects. This followed survey responses
indicating that students’ awareness of professional and ethical issues required attention.

2004. Engineering Materials and Design moved from 2nd year to 3rd year. Data obtained
both from students and instructor indicated that student success in this course would be
facilitated by moving it later in the curriculum, and making MMAE202 (Mechanics of
Solids II) a prerequisite.

Laboratories:

MMAE has made a major investment in undergraduate materials laboratories since the
2002 visit. These are documented in Criterion 7. Improvements in the MMAE370,
371, and 476 courses include:

Replacement of the bending fatigue experiments with tension/tension ones done in the
new closed-loop frames in the fatigue lab. In these labs the "R" ratio can be varied to
study the effect of mean stress on fatigue life.

Torsion tests done with a digital troptometer using a high resolution encoder and
Labview software to determine torque - twist curves to high accuracy.

 Impact tests done on both metal and plastic specimens using the new impact machine
designed for plastic impact studies.

New INSTRON controllers with software to perform a range of tensile/compression
tests on solids. Tests including true stress-true strain and are now done automatically.
These improvements allow all ASTM tests to be done to the specifics in the standards.

Hands-on experience with a wide variety of modern tools for materials structure and
property investigation.

Co-curricular activities:

Significant effort has been made to revitalize the materials related professional society
activities, and the Material Advantage student chapter is very active. Efforts are also
underway to increase student participation in faculty research programs.




                                        21
CRITERION 5. CURRICULUM

     Program Curriculum
      In recognition of the evolving professional environment in which IIT’s graduates will
      work, and in line with the mission and goals of the university, the program has evolved as
      described above with the objective of placing emphasis on:

            Teaching students to understand the economic, ethical, societal, environmental and
             international context of their professional activities.
            Improving oral and written communication skills
            Training students to work in multidisciplinary teams
            Preparing students for the interprofessional work force of the 21st century
            Developing sound, fundamental knowledge of materials science, technical
             competence in techniques for determining the structure, properties and service
             behavior of materials, and preparation for a career or further study in the
             profession.

      To obtain the BS in Materials Science and Engineering at IIT a student must satisfactorily
      complete 127 credit hours. The courses can be broken down into the categories: general
      education (includes basic math and science, humanities and social or behavioral sciences,
      Interprofessional Projects), engineering topics, and technical electives.

      In the following descriptions, 32 credits is equivalent to 1 year of study.

      General Education Requirements

      Humanities and Social Science (21 credits)

               7 (21 credits) courses in the humanities and social or behavioral sciences (with a
      minimum of nine credit hours in each) are required provided the student takes and
      satisfies the IIT English Proficiency exam. (Students who do not satisfy the IIT English
      proficiency exam must take an English composition course at IIT in addition to the 21
      credit hours in humanities and social sciences.) Courses satisfying the 21 credit hours are
      listed in the bulletin with either an (H) or (S) for humanities and social sciences
      respectively. Two courses at the 300 level or above are required in both humanities and
      social science. In addition, two but not all of the courses a student takes in social science
      must be in the same field to provide some depth in a selected area.

      This meets the requirement of Criterion 5 and contributes substantially to the outcomes
      3(g), 3(h), 3(i), and 3(j).

      Basic Math and Science (35 credits):

             4 (18 credits) calculus courses including one course each in “multivariate and
               vector calculus” and “differential equations”


                                               22
       1 (4 credits) Chemistry course which includes a laboratory
       3 (11 credits) Physics courses, two of which include a laboratory. The courses are
         calculus based and cover mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and thermal and
         modern physics.
       1 (2 credits) course in Computer Science (programming), including laboratory

These courses provide the mathematical and scientific foundation for the engineering
science courses that follow, and meet the requirement of Criterion 5

Interprofessional Projects (IPRO’s) (6 credits)*

6 credits of IPRO courses are required. Students work in small multidisciplinary groups.
Often the students take one of their IPRO’s outside of the Department where the faculty
member in charge is from outside of the Department. Projects submitted for consideration
for IPROs typically include most of the following considerations in addition to technical
content: economic; environmental; sustainability; manufacturability; ethical; health and
safety; social; and political. IPRO selections must be approved by the student's academic
advisor to ensure compliance with the design requirement. IPROs also strongly
emphasize the need for lifelong learning. The IPRO support infrastructure is described in
Appendix D.

The general education requirement specifies six credit-hours of Interprofessional
Project courses. The MSE program, in common with most others, achieves the
requirement through two three-hour courses. The two IPRO courses are taken in the
Junior and Senior years. These projects involve teams of (nominally) 10 students drawn
from two or more different disciplines who work under faculty guidance on open ended
projects created by the faculty or submitted by external organizations (companies,
National Laboratories, hospitals, not-for-profit organizations, etc.). Projects must include
a technical component and real-world constraints (economic, ethical, environmental)
before being approved. The IPRO program is coordinated by a full-time professional staff
member, Thomas Jacobius. Details of the services performed by his office may be found
in Appendix D. In the MSE program there is no constraint on project choice for the first
IPRO experience, but the second (senior year) IPRO must be confirmed by the student’s
academic advisor as qualifying as a major design experience for the student unless such
an experience has been or will be obtained in an alternative elective course. A project
often runs for multiple semesters. Some recent projects include:

     Paper Shedder (Manhattan Group) Sound, gear analysis, fracture analysis, motor
     characteristics and power usage as a function of amount of paper shredded. (3 semesters).

     Espresso Maker Analysis. Fluid flow, analysis of quality and durability

     Machine Control (A. Finkl) Control of equipment and noise in a large forging shop (3
     semesters)

     Analysis of Stainless Steel Sink Surfaces (Elkay) to determine surface profiles that
     resulted in superior scratch resistance. Developmemnt of real time acceptance/rejection
     of polished sinks on the production floor.


                                         23
     Oven Load Analysis (A. Finkl) software development and furnace temperature
     distribution for integration with forging company data base. (3 semesters)

     Garage Door Opener to Fit in Environmental Chamber (Chamberlain) computer
     controlled electronic brake, data analysis from load cell and laptop with NI DAC.
     Simulated service test cycles to determine errors.

     Chrysler brake pedal friction analysis (Chrysler), force and motion analysis of interaction
     between shoe and brake pedal.

     Quiet railroad wheels (Penn Machine), Noise level on the “EL” Wheel/rail interactions.

* Completion of the 8 semester ROTC program that includes leadership laboratories,
command experience and summer camp in a branch of the US military service is
considered equivalent in experience to one IPRO course for the purposes of team skills,
ethics awareness, professional development and lifelong learning. It does not substitute for
the design experience requirement of the second IPRO.

This meets the requirement of Criterion 5

Communications Intensive (C) Courses

In addition to the General Education Requirements and MSE requirements, there are
Special Academic Requirements concerning Writing and Communications. These
requirements are the following:
 “Students must satisfy the Basic Writing Proficiency Requirements as set forth in the
General Education Requirements. Students much complete a minimum of 42 credit hours
of courses with a significant written and oral communication component, identified with a
(C) in the catalog, with a minimum distribution as follows:
15 hours in major courses
15 hours in non-major courses"

The fifteen credit hour minimum of communications intensive (C) courses in the major is
achieved through required courses as follows: MMAE100 (3), MMAE371 (3),
MMAE370 (3), MMAE 365 (3) MMAE465 (3) and MMAE474 (3). Additional (C)
courses in the major may be taken as electives. Courses outside the major that qualify as
(C) courses include most humanities, social and behavioral science electives, IPRO
courses, and the required courses CHEM124, PHYS123, PHYS221 and PHYS300.

Introduction to the Profession

The general education requirement specifies two credit hours (minimum) in the first year
for all majors, introducing students to their chosen profession. In the MSE program 3 this
is considered a very important aspect of the program, and three credit hours of MMAE100
are specified. This course includes: hands-on projects involving application of math and
science concepts to simple design problems, extensive use of computer tools, report



                                          24
writing, oral presentations, and familiarization with the facitlties of the department and
university.


Engineering Topics (51 credits)

Required courses

       1 (3 credits) introductory engineering courses: MMAE 100
       1 (3 credits) course in Materials Science
       1 (3 credits) course in Statics
       1 (3 credits) course in Strength of Materials
       1 (3 credits) courses in Thermodynamics
       1 (2 credits) course in Engineering Graphics
       1 (3 credits) course in Engineering Materials and Design with a laboratory
       2 (6 credits) courses in Materials Laboratory
       2 (6 credits) courses in Structure and Properties of Materials
       1 (3 credits) course in Ceramics
       1 (3 credits) course in Polymers
       1 (3 credits) course in Composite Materials
       1 (3 credits) course in Electrical, Magnetic and Optical Materials
       1 (3 credits) course in Manufacturing Processes
       1 (3 credits) course in Instrumentation, with a laboratory
       1 (3 credits) IPRO course must be selected to satisfy the major design experience
       requirement (see next section).

       Effective with the senior class of 2008-9, the program will require 1 (4 credit)
       class in Engineering Measurements, or an approved undergraduate research
       experience.


This meets the requirement of EAC of ABET Criterion 5


Technical and Free Electives (15 credits)

4 (12 credits) Technical Elective courses. These courses are any 300 level or greater,
math, physics, computer science, or engineering course approved by the advisor. In
addition, ECON 423 (Economic Analysis) and Electrical and Computer Engineering 218
are permitted, as is MMAE491undergraduate research or MMAE497 Undergraduate
Special Topics. Technical electives partially satisfy the objectives of ABET Criteria 3(h),
3(i) and 3(j).

There is one free elective in the program.




                                        25
    Starting with the senior cohort of 2008-9, one technical elective will be replaced with a
    required course, either MMAE430 (Engineering Measurements), or MMAE491
    (Undergraduate Research), see Criterion 4 for further explanation.

    Minors

    Minors are available to MSE majors who wish to broaden their knowledge. A minimum
    of five courses is required for a minor and there are several minors approved and listed in
    the undergraduate bulletin. Those students wishing to minor in a different area can do so
    with the approval of the MMAE department undergraduate studies committee and the
    Department through which the minor is offered. Two of the required minor courses will
    substitute for the two required technical electives and therefore additional courses beyond
    the 127 credit hours will be required. In the event a required course for the minor is also
    required for the major, an approved substitution must be made. The Air Force, Army and
    Navy ROTC programs qualify as minors.

    Co-Curricular Opportunities

    The MMAE Department hosts a chapter of Material Advantage, a joint student program of
    the American Ceramic Society (ACERS), the Association for Iron & Steel Technology
    (AIST), ASM International and The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS). The
    society holds events throughout the academic year. In addition, students are invited to
    attend at no cost all meetings of the Chicago Joint Chapter of TMS/ASM, and to
    participate in its annual poster contest. Other professional society student chapters hosted
    by the department are: AIAA, ASME and SAE.

    Students are invited to a weekly seminar hosted by our Center for Materials Processing
    and Technology.

    The MMAE department hosts an annual poster contest highlighting student research, with
    an undergraduate research award category.

    Assurance That Requirements Are Met

    The Office of Educational Services is charged with providing academic audits to all
    students, and certifying that graduation requirements are met. Details of the process are
    provided in Appendix D.

   Prerequisite Flow Chart
    Please see next page.

   Course Syllabi
           See Appendix A




                                            26
FLOW CHART PLACE HOLDER




            27
                                         Table 5-1 Curriculum
                                   Materials Science and Engineering

                                                                              Category (Credit Hours)
                                                                                Engineering
                                                                                   Topics
                                                                                  Check if
 Year;                                                                Math &      Contains
Sem or                             Course                              Basic     Significant General
Quarter                   (Department, Number, Title)                 Sciences Design () Education Other
          Engineering Requirements (42 cr. hours)                                        ( )
          MMAE 100 Introduction to the Profession (1-4-3)                            3 ( )
          MMAE 201 Mechanics of Solids I (3-0-3)                                     3 ( )
          MMAE 202 Mechanics of Solids II (3-0-3)                                    3 ( )
          MMAE 363 Metallurgical and Materials Thermodynamics
          (3-0-3)                                                                  3 (     )
            OR MMAE 320 Thermodynamics (3-0-3)
          MMAE 365 Structure and Properties of Materials I (3-0-3)                 3   ( )
          MMAE 370 Materials Laboratory I (1-6-3)                                  3   ( )
          MMAE 371 Engineering Materials and Design (2-3-3)                        3   ( )
          MMAE 463 Structure and Properties of Materials II (3-0-3)                3   ( )
          MMAE 465 Electrical, Magnetic and Optical Properties of
                                                                                   3 (     )
          Materials (3-0-3)
          MMAE 467
                                                                                   3 (     )
            OR MMAE 470 Introduction to Polymer Science (3-0-3)
          MMAE 468Introduction to Ceramic Materials (3-0-3)
                                                                                    3 ( )
            OR MMAE 486 Properties of Ceramics (3-0-3)
          MMAE 476 Materials Laboratory II (1-6-3)                                  3 ( )
          MMAE 482 Composites (3-0-3)                                               3 ()
          MMAE 485 Manufacturing Processes (3-0-3)                                  3 ( )
          Mathematics Requirements (18 cr. hours)                                     ( )
          MATH 151 Calculus I (4-1-5)                                    5            ( )
          MATH 152 Calculus II (4-1-5)                                   5            ( )
          MATH 251 Multivariate and Vector Calculus (4-0-4)              4            ( )
          MATH 252 Introduction to Differential Equations (4-0-4)        4            ( )
          Physics Requirements (14 cr. hours)                                         ( )
          PHYS 123 General Physics I: Mechanics (3-3-4)                  4            ( )
          PHYS 221 General Physics II: Electromagnetism and Optics
                                                                         4             (   )
          (3-3-4)
          PHYS 224 General Physics III Lecture: Thermal and
                                                                         3             (   )
          Modern Physics (3-0-3)
          PHYS 300 Instrumentation Laboratory (2-3-3)                               3( )
          Chemistry Requirements (4 cr. hours)                                       ( )
          CHEM 124 Principles of Chemistry I (3-3-4)                     4           ( )
          Computer Science Requirement (2 cr. hours)                                 ( )
          CS 105 Introduction to Computer Programming I (2-1-2)          2           ( )
          Engineering Graphics Requirements (2 cr. hours)                            ( )
          EG 105 Engineering Graphics and Design (1-2-2)                            2( )
          Materials Science Requirement (3 cr. hours)                                ( )
          MS 201 Materials Science (3-0-3)                               2         1 ( )




                                                     28
                                 Table 5-1 Curriculum (cont.)




        Humanities and Social Science Requirements (21 credit
                                                                             (    )   21
        hours of general education requirements)
        IPRO Electives (6 cr. hours)                                       3 ( )          3
        Technical Electives (12 cr. hours)                                   ( )           12
        Free Elective (3 cr. hours)                                          ( )           3
TOTALS-ABET BASIC-LEVEL REQUIREMENTS                             37       51          21   18
OVERALL TOTAL
FOR DEGREE
PERCENT OF TOTAL                                                 30       39          17   14
 Totals Minimum semester credit hours                           32 hrs   48 hrs
  must
satisfy Minimum percentage                                      25%      37.5 %
one set




                                                  29
                                           Table 5-2. Course and Section Size Summary

                                                                    No. of
                                                   Responsible    Sections
                                                      Faculty     Offered in    Avg. Section
                                                                                                         1            1           1
Course No.                   Title                   Member      Current Year    Enrollment    Lecture       Laboratory   Other
MMAE 100     Introduction to the Profession (1-   Kallend             3              35          20%            80%
             4-3)
MMAE 201     Mechanics of Solids I (3-0-3)        Wu                  4             43          100%
MMAE 202     Mechanics of Solids II (3-0-3)       Lisowski            3             45          100%
MMAE 363     Metallurgical and materials          Clack (320)         3             43          100%
  OR MMAE    Thermodynamics (3-0-3)
320            OR Thermodynamics (3-0-3)
MMAE 365     Structure and Properties of          Nash                1              9          100%
             Materials I (3-0-3)
MMAE 370     Materials Laboratory I (1-6-3)       Chen                1              4          14%             86%
MMAE 371     Engineering Materials and Design     Mostovoy            7             12          40%             60%
             (2-3-3)
MMAE 463     Structure and Properties of          Nash                1              9          100%
             Materials II (3-0-3)
MMAE 465     Electrical, Magnetic and Optical     Kallend             1              5          100%
             Properties of Materials (3-0-3)
MMAE 467                                          Duvall (470)        1             14          100%
  OR MMAE     OR Introduction to Polymer
470          Science (3-0-3)
MMAE 468     Introduction to Ceramic Materials    Gonczy (468)        1             17          100%
  OR MMAE    (3-0-3)
486            OR Properties of Ceramics (3-0-
             3)
MMAE 476     Materials Laboratory II (1-6-3)      Mostovoy            1              6           14%            86%
MMAE 482     Composites (3-0-3)                   Nash                1             14          100%
MMAE 485     Manufacturing Processes (3-0-3)      Tin                 1             38          100%
MATH 151                                          Applied  Mat        9             30           80%            20%
             Calculus I (4-1-5)
                                                  Dept.
MATH 152                                          Applied  Mat       11             25          80%             20%
             Calculus II (4-1-5)
                                                  Dept.
MATH 251     Multivariate and Vector Calculus     Applied  Mat       12             29          100%
             (4-0-4)                              Dept.




                                                                      30
                                     Table 5-2. Course and Section Size Summary (cont.)

MATH 252   Introduction to Differential         Applied  Mat   10      30       100%
           Equations (4-0-4)                    Dept.
PHYS 123   General Physics I: Mechanics (3-     BCPS Dept.     20      17        50%      50%
           3-4)
PHYS 221   General Physics II:                  BCPS Dept      17      16        50%      50%
           Electromagnetism and Optics (3-
           3-4)
PHYS 224   General Physics III Lecture:         BCPS Dept      5       43       100%
           Thermal and Modern Physics (3-
           0-3)
PHYS 300   Instrumentation Laboratory (2-3-     BCPS Dept      6       19        40%      60%
           3)
CHEM 124   Principles of Chemistry I (3-3-4)    BCPS Dept       7      59        50%      50%
CS 105     Introduction to Computer             CS Dept        16      19        67%      33%
           Programming I (2-1-2)
EG 105     Engineering Graphics and Design      CAEE Dept.     8       15        33%      67%
           (1-2-2)
MS 201     Materials Science (3-0-3)            Kallend        2       101      100%
           Humanities and Social Science
           Requirements (21 credit hours of
           general education requirements)
           IPRO Electives (6 cr. hours)
           Technical Electives (12 cr. hours)
           Free Elective (3 cr. hours)




                                                               31
CRITERION 6. FACULTY

     Leadership Responsibilities
      Dr. Jamal Yagoobi is chair of the Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace
      Engineering. He is responsible for all programs offered in the department, has
      budgetary authority with respect to programs and teaching laboratories, assigns teaching
      loads, assigns faculty to specific classes, monitors course evaluations and receives and
      acts on student concerns. The chair reports to the dean of Armour College of
      Engineering. Dr. Yagoobi is assisted by two associate chairs, Dr. John Kallend
      (undergraduate programs) and Dr. Kevin Cassel (graduate programs).

     Authority and Responsibility of Faculty
      Full-time faculty are responsible for the creation and modification of courses, the
      structure of the program, and the laboratory experience of the students. Proposals to
      create new courses are reviewed by the MMAE Undergraduate Studies Committee and
      approved by the faculty of the department and the associate dean of Armour College of
      Engineering. In general only minor modifications to existing courses are approved.
      Major changes are usually handled by canceling the existing course and creating a new
      course following the process described above, to satisfy the changed objectives or
      outcomes. Changes to courses used to satisfy the general education requirements of the
      university must be approved by the IIT Undergraduate Studies Committee. Proposals
      requiring significant investment in laboratory equipment are reviewed by the MMAE
      Laboratory Committee. Faculty are also responsible for academic advising; the average
      number of advisees per faculty member is 23.

     Faculty
      Engineering science components of the program (mechanics, thermodynamics,
      engineering graphics) may be taught by qualified faculty who are not “materials”
      faculty per se. Materials specific classes and laboratories are taught by faculty with
      academic credentials in materials science and engineering. IIT is located in a major
      metropolitan area with significant materials related industries, and the program benefits
      from the availability of highly qualified adjunct faculty with professional expertise in
      specific areas of materials engineering and design.

     Faculty Competencies
      All full-time MMAE faculty have earned doctorates in their disciplines. Faculty with
      specific materials program responsibilities, and their areas of research expertise, are:

      Dr. John Kallend – polycrystalline materials. Professor Kallend’s research has been in
      the areas of polycrystal characterization, structure/property/processing relationships for
      metals and ceramics, magnetic materials, and ceramic superconductors.
      Dr. Sheldon Mostovoy – mechanical behavior and failure of materials, materials testing
      and design. Professor Mostovoy’s research has emphasized development of mechanical
      testing methodologies for many types of materials applications.


                                              32
    Dr. Philip Nash – alloy design and materials processing. Professor Nash has conducted
    extensive research on the design of nickel-based alloys, powder processing, and has
    established the Thermal Processing Technology Center.
    Dr. Sammy Tin – high temperature materials and materials manufacturing. Professor
    Tin has extensive experience in high temperature materials processing, and in aerospace
    applications of materials.
    Other MMAE faculty and staff who participate in the materials instructional program:
    Dr. Herek Clack – associate professor, heat and mass transfer
    Dr. Michael Gosz – associate professor, solid mechanics
    Dr. Sudharkar Nair – professor, solid mechanics
    Dr. Francisco Ruiz – associate professor, thermodynamics
    Dr. Dajun Chen, research assistant professor, optical and electron microscopy and
    diffraction, microstructural characterization.
    Dr. Joseph Benedyk – research professor. Professor Benedyk joined IIT in 2001
    following a career in the aluminum industry. He is an expert on non-ferrous alloy
    design and processing and composite materials.
    The following adjunct faculty teach undergraduate materials courses:
    Dr. Donald Duvall – Dr. Duvall is a senior consulting engineer at Engineering Systems
    Inc., and is an expert in polymer processing and properties. He has been teaching since
    1993
    Dr. Stephen Gonczy, Brigadier General (retired) USAR – Dr. Gonczy has 30 years of
    industrial research experience in metals and ceramics, and holds 23 US patents.


   Faculty Development

    The MMAE Department supports its faculty members’ development as summarized
    below.
     Selected senior MMAE faculty members attend junior faculty’s lectures and provide
    constructive input to improve their teaching skills.
    During a given semester, the department chair seeks direct input from students of
    courses taught by those faculty members who are in need of improving their teaching
    skills. The chair then gives constructive inputs to the corresponding faculty members.
    The MMAE Department provides teaching assistants for classes with laboratories as
    well as for classes with over 20 registered students.
    Both the department and the college financially support faculty attendance at teaching
    workshops either offered on campus or off campus. Tenure-track faculty in particular
    are encouraged to participate.



                                           33
The MMAE Department provides about $3,000 yearly for the assistant and associate
(research active) professors toward their professional development activities. These
activities include, for example, attending educational conferences or membership fees in
societies such as ASME and ASEE.
The department purchases commercial software packages (or pays for their yearly
licensing fees) for the faculty who require them in their courses. This is in addition to
those software packages provided by the university (Appendix D).
It is a departmental policy to yearly review all the tenure-track faculty members’
dossiers. This applies to tenured associate professors per their requests. The review
process includes the teaching activities of the faculty.
The MMAE Department’s machine shop (see Criterion 7) provides support for faculty
teaching laboratory courses which require such assistance (MMAE100, MMAE 371,
MMAE370 and MMAE 476).
The department provides clerical services for teaching activities of its faculty members.
In addition, a staff member is dedicated to process the purchases of all the equipment
and supplies for the teaching laboratories and select courses.




                                        34
Table 6-1. Faculty Workload Summary
Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering – MSE Program

                                                                                                                               2
   Faculty Member    FT or                Classes Taught (Course No./Credit Hrs.)                   Total Activity Distribution
                                                                                                       Research/
                                                                                                       Scholarly
                           4                                        1                                                            3
       (name)         PT                               Term and Year                          Teaching Activity            Other
Chen, Dajun         FT         Materials Laboratory I        (MMAE 370 / 3 / Fall 2007)         40%        60%
                               Materials Laboratory II       (MMAE 476 / 3 / Fall 2007)
                               Trans Electron Micros         (MMAE 573 / 3 / Fall 2007)
                               Dislocations and Strength
                               Mechanisms                    (MMAE 564 / 3 / Spring 2008)
                                                                                                                     10% (Director
                                                                                                                     of Retention
Clack, Herek L.     FT         Advanced Topics               (MMAE 597 / 2 / Fall 2007)         30%         60%      Programs)
                               Heat and Mass Transfer        (MMAE 322 / 4 / Fall 2007)
                               Intro to the Profession       (MMAE 100 / 3 / Fall 2007)
                               Research and Thesis MS        (MMAE 591 / 1-3 / Fall 2007)
                               Research and Thesis PHD       (MMAE 691 / 2 / Fall 2007)
                               Undergrad Special Topics      (MMAE 497 / 1 / Fall 2007)
                               Research and Thesis MS        (MMAE 591 / 1-3 / Spring 2008)
                               Research and Thesis PHD       (MMAE 691 / 2 / Spring 2008)
                                                                                                                     60% (Associate
Gosz, Michael R.    FT         Education Strategies I        (PSYC 227 / 3 / Fall 2007)         30%         10%      Provost)
                               Project for Prof Master       (MMAE 594 / 2 / Fall 2007)
                               Research and Thesis MS        (MMAE 591 / 1 / Fall 2007)
                               Finite Element Methods in
                               Engineering                   (MMAE 451 / 3 / Spring 2008)
                               Research and Thesis MS        (MMAE 591 / 1 / Spring 2008)
                               Research and Thesis PHD       (MMAE 691 / 1 / Spring 2008)




                                                             35
Table 6-1. Faculty Workload Summary (Cont.)
Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering – MSE Program


                                                                                                         Research/
   Faculty Member    FT or               Classes Taught (Course No./Credit Hrs.)                         Scholarly
                         4                                        1                                                           3
       (name)         PT                            Term and Year                             Teaching    Activity        Other
                                                                                                                     50% (Associate
Kallend, John S.             Materials Science                (MS 201 / 3 / Fall 2007)          50%                  Chair)
                             Electrical, Magnetic &
                             Optical Properties               (MMAE 465 / 3 / Spring 2008)
                             Electrical, Magnetic &
                             Optical Properties               (MMAE 554 / 3 / Spring 2008)
                             Materials Science                (MS 201 / 3 / Spring 2008)
Mostovoy, Sheldon   FT       Adv Mech Metallurgy              (MMAE 563 / 3 / Fall 2007)        90%        10%
                             Engr Materials and Dsgn          (MMAE 371 / 3 / Fall 2007)
                             Fundamntl of Power
                             Generation                       (MMAE 523 / 3 / Fall 2007)
                             Interprofessional Project        (IPRO 497 / 3 / Fall 2007)
                             Interprofessional Project        (IPRO 597 / 3 / Fall 2007)
                             Materials Laboratory I           (MMAE 370 / 3 / Fall 2007)
                             Materials Laboratory II          (MMAE 476 / 3 / Fall 2007)
                             Project for Prof Master          (MMAE 594 / 1 / Fall 2007)
                             Interprofessional Project        (IPRO 497 / 3 / Spring 2008)
                             Engr Materials and Dsgn          (MMAE 371 / 3 / Spring 2008)
                             Research and Thesis PHD          (MMAE 691 / 3 / Spring 2008)
Nash, Philip G.     FT       Research and Thesis MS           (MMAE 591 / 2 / Fall 2007)        40%        60%
                             Research and Thesis PHD          (MMAE 691 / 1-8 / Fall 2007)
                             Struc and Prop of Materials I    (MMAE 365 / 3 / Fall 2007)
                             Struc and Prop of Materials II   (MMAE 463 / 3 / Spring 2008)
                             Composites                       (MMAE 482 / 3 / Spring 2008)
                             Research and Thesis MS           (MMAE 591 / 15 / Spring 2008)
                             Project for Prof Master          (MMAE 597 / 2 / Spring 2008)
                             Research and Thesis PHD          (MMAE 691 / 28 / Spring 2008)



                                                              36
Table 6-1. Faculty Workload Summary (Cont.)
Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering – MSE Program

                                                                                                                               2
   Faculty Member    FT or                 Classes Taught (Course No./Credit Hrs.)                  Total Activity Distribution
                                                                                                       Research/
                                                                                                       Scholarly
                           4                                         1                                                           3
       (name)         PT                                 Term and Year                        Teaching Activity            Other
Meade, Kevin P.     FT         Computational Mechanics         (MMAE 350 / 3 / Fall 2007)         90%           10%
                               Dynamics                        (MMAE 305 / 3 / Fall 2007)
                               Interprofessional Project       (IPRO 497 / 3 / Fall 2007)
                               Computational Mechanics         (MMAE 350 / 3 / Spring 2008)
                               Dynamics                        (MMAE 305 / 3 / Spring 2008)
                               Interprofessional Project       (IPRO 497 / 3 / Spring 2008)
                               Undergraduate Research          (MMAE 491 / 3 / Spring 2008)
Ruiz, Francisco     FT         Adv Thermodynamics              (MMAE 520 / 3 / Fall 2007)       80%         20%
                               Research and Thesis MS          (MMAE 591 / 2-3 / Fall 2007)
                               Applied Thermodynamics          (MMAE 321 / 3 / Spring 2008)
                               Undergraduate Research          (MMAE 491 / 3 / Spring 2008)
                               Fundamentals of Combustion (MMAE 524 / 3 / Spring 2008)
                               Research and Thesis MS          (MMAE 591 / 3 / Spring 2008)
                               Research and Thesis PHD         (MMAE 691 / 4 / Spring 2008)
                               Interprofessional Project       (IPRO 497 / 3 / Spring 2008)
Tin, Sammy          FT         Manufacturing Processes         (MMAE 485 / 3 / Fall 2007)       30%         70%
                               Research and Thesis MS          (MMAE 591 / 1 / Fall 2007)
                               Undergraduate Research          (MMAE 491 / 1 / Spring 2008)
                               Material Process Selection      (MMAE 576 / 3 / Spring 2008)
                               Research and Thesis MS          (MMAE 591 / 8 / Spring 2008)
Vural, Murat        FT         Mechanics of Solids II          (MMAE 202 / 3 / Fall 2007)       40%         60%
                               Research and Thesis MS          (MMAE 591 / 1-3 / Fall 2007)
                               Research and Thesis PHD         (MMAE 691 / 1 / Fall 2007)
                               Research and Thesis MS          (MMAE 591 / 1 / Spring 2008)
                               Research and Thesis PHD         (MMAE 691 / 1 / Spring 2008)



                                                             37
Table 6-1. Faculty Workload Summary (Cont.)
Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering – MSE Program
                                                                                                                               2
   Faculty Member     FT or              Classes Taught (Course No./Credit Hrs.)                    Total Activity Distribution
                                                                                                       Research/
                                                                                                       Scholarly
                         4                                         1                                                             3
       (name)         PT                               Term and Year                          Teaching Activity            Other
Wu, Benxin            FT      Adv Manufacture Engrng         (MMAE 546 / 3 /   Fall 2007)       40%        60%
                              Mechanics of Solids I          (MMAE 201 / 3 /   Spring 2008)
                              Research and Thesis MS         (MMAE 591 / 6 /   Spring 2008)
Benedyk, Joseph        PT     Composites                     (MMAE 482 / 3 /   Fall 2007)       20%         80%
Cammino, Roberto A.    PT     Intro to Mechanics             (MMAE 200 / 3 /   Fall 2007)      100%
Gonczy, Stephen        PT     Intro to Ceramic Materials     (MMAE 468 / 3 /   Fall 2007)      100%
Lisowski, Ronald       PT     Mechanics of Solids I          (MMAE 201 / 3 /   Fall 2007)      100%
                              Mechanics of Solids II         (MMAE 202 / 3 /   Spring 2008)
                              Design of Aerospace
                              Vehicles II                    (MMAE 437 / 3 /   Spring 2008)
Payvar, Parviz         PT     Thermodynamics                 (MMAE 320 / 3 /   Fall 2007)      100%
                              Thermodynamics                 (MMAE 320 / 3 /   Spring 2008)
Thakkar, Bharat        PT     Mechanics of Solids II         (MMAE 202 / 3 /   Spring 2008)    100%

Note: Faculty included in this table are those who have taught a required MMAE/MS course in the MSE program in the
previous two years although the courses listed are only for the 2007-8 academic year.




                                                            38
Table 6-2. Faculty Analysis
Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering

                                            Type of
                                           Academic                 Highest
                                          Appointment               Degree
       Name                 Rank           TT, T, NTT   FT or PT   and Field      Institution from which Highest Degree Earned and Year
Benedyk, Joseph     Adjunct Faculty       NTT           P          PHD         Case Western Reserve: 1969
Chen, Dajun         Research Assistant    NTT           F          PHD         South Dakota School of Mines and Technology: 1997
Clack, Herek L.     Associate Professor   T             F          PHD         University of California - Berkeley: 1998
Duvall, Donald      Adjunct Faculty       NTT           P          PHD         IIT: 1993
Gonczy, Stephen     Adjunct Faculty       NTT           P          PHD         Northwestern University: 1978
Kallend, John S.    Professor             T             F          PHD         University of Cambridge - UK: 1971
Lisowski, Ronald    Adjunct Faculty       NTT           P          PHD         University of Illinois: 1984
Meade, Kevin P.     Professor             T             F          PHD         Northwestern University: 1982
Mostovoy, Sheldon   Associate Professor   T             F          PHD         IIT: 1968
Nash, Philip G.     Professor             T             F          PHD         University of London - Queen Mary College: 1978
Payvar, Parviz      Visiting Professor    NTT           P          PHD         University of California - Berkeley: 1967
Ruiz, Francisco     Associate Professor   T             F          PHD         Carnegie Mellon: 1987
Tin, Sammy          Associate Professor   TT            F          PHD         University of Michigan: 2001
Vural, Murat        Assistant Professor   TT            F          PHD         Istanbul Technical University: 1998




                                                                   39
CRITERION 7. FACILITIES

     Space
      The MMAE department is housed in Engineering 1 Building, which contains
      faculty offices, conventional classrooms, a large auditorium complete with
      multimedia capability, computer laboratories, teaching and research laboratories
      and the department’s machine shop. Other departments in this building are
      Applied Mathematics and Biomedical Engineering, More than 50% of the
      building’s space is occupied by MMAE. The materials faculty have a set of
      adjacent offices at the south end of the second floor of the building, along with a
      secretarial office serving the materials programs. All faculty offices are connected
      by Ethernet to the university network (see Appendix D for details). The entire
      building has wireless internet access.
      Classroom space is adequate for the program. Classrooms are equipped with
      audio/visual equipment with ceiling mounted LCD projectors.. The department
      has two portable LCD projectors and a laptop computer, and a TV/VCR on a
      rollaround cart that faculty may use for special needs.


      Laboratories
      See Appendix C for equipment details. Materials laboratory facilities are mostly
      shared between teaching and research use; the only significant item of equipment
      that is dedicated solely to research is the JEOL Transmission Electron
      Microscope. The materials laboratories are located in the basement of the
      Engineering 1 Building.
      Laboratory facilities

      Instructional laboratory classes as listed in the current MSE Curricula:

                       Course Number               Course Title
                       MMAE 100                    Intro. To the
                                                   Profession
                       MMAE 371                    Engineering
                                                   Materials & Design
                       MMAE 370                    Materials
                                                   Laboratory I
                       MMAE 476                    Materials
                                                   Laboratory II




                                           40
Current Instructional Laboratory Facilities
Materials Science and Engineering Program

Physical Facility   Course                Condition of Facility   Adequacy for Instruction
Building/Rm
   E1 Rm. 018       MMAE 370/371/476            Adequate                  Adequate
   E1 Rm. 141       MMAE 100                    Adequate                  Adequate
   E1 Rm. 017       MMAE 370/476                Adequate                  Adequate
   E1 Rm. 040       MMAE 370/476                Adequate                  Adequate
   E1 Rm. 053       MMAE 370/476                Adequate                  Adequate


Updating and Development of Laboratories
The MMAE Undergraduate Laboratory Committee is responsible for developing
and implementing a comprehensive plan for providing adequate facilities for
undergraduate courses. The committee works to reconcile the changing needs of
the mechanical, materials, and aerospace engineering curricula with the available
resources. The tasks of the committee include:

      Distribution and reassignment of laboratory space, as necessary
      Periodic review and updating of laboratory-related curricula
      Maintenance and modernization of laboratory equipment and facilities

The primary determinant of the pace and scope of laboratory improvements is
financial resources. Within the past three years, the MMAE Department raised
about $1.2M (this included the matching funds by IIT) toward improving all its
undergraduate laboratories. These improvements included, for example,
renovation of the laboratory rooms and purchasing of new equipment. Therefore,
the MMAE Department undergraduate laboratories are currently in excellent
shape and all are recently updated. The yearly funds to maintain, operate, and
further improve the undergraduate laboratories now come from the fees paid by
the students who are registered in these laboratories. The MMAE department has
been receiving approximately $40,000 per year for its laboratories in the last two
years. This policy of student fee for the undergraduate teaching laboratories was
introduced and implemented by the dean of the college of engineering three years
ago.

Maintenance and Servicing of Laboratory Equipment
Support for the upkeep, maintenance, and repair of equipment is provided by
the MMAE Machine Shop staff (Craig Johnson and John Swartz), and the
director of the MMAE research labs (Russ Janota).

Computer Support

MMAE computer laboratories are well equipped. The main computer laboratory
is home to 21 Dell OptiPlex GX 400 units. Each unit is a Pentium 4 1.4 GHz,
with 256 MB ECC/PC800 memory, 20 GB hard disks, and 8X/4X/32X CD-RW

                                    41
with 8XDVD. In addition, there is also a restricted-access Windows NT Domain
that consists of 12 PCs that are 166MHz w/ 64MB of memory, 2 PCs which are
266 MHz with 64 MB of memory, and 4 PCs which are 500MHz with 128 MB of
memory. This restricted-access lab is often used as overflow for MMAE students
when the main computer laboratory is full. Another computer laboratory consists
of 8 SunRay terminals. These terminals are Unix displays which allow students
to login to any of the Unix servers with a graphical interface. The main Unix
servers for students are:

 Hawk - Sun Enterprise - 8 400 MHz with 8192 MB of Memory
 Charlie - SGI ChallengeL - 12 200 MHz with 512 MB of Memory
 Count - SGI Origin 2000 - 4 250 MHz with 1024 MB of Memory
 Wayang - SGI Origin 200 - 2 270 MHz with 1024 MB of Memory

A technician, Mr. Scott Bachmann, provides support for departmental computer
and networking needs.

In addition to departmental computer resources, IIT provides computer and
network resources to the campus as documented in Appendix D.

MMAE Machine Shop
The MMAE machine shop plays an important role in all three MMAE
undergraduate programs, especially with regards to the laboratory courses. The
machine shop staff consists of three technicians. The shop is very well equipped.
The following major equipment is available in the MMAE machine shop.
SLS rapid prototyping machine.
Lathes: HAAS SL20 10 x 20'' CNC lathe, TOS SN40A 24 x 48'' gap bed lathe,
Monarch 16 x 54'' lathe, three LeBlond 14 x 36'' lathes, Jet 13 x 36'' lathe, and two
Cincinnati 12 x 36'' lathes

Milling Machines: HAAS VF2 Vertical CNC mill and four Bridgeport vertical
mills

Drilling Machines: MAS 30''radial drill, Cincinnati 12'' gearhead drill, and two
Craftsman 8'' drill presses

Metal Saws: DoAll 15'' band saw, Powermatic 19'' band saw, and Kalamazoo cut
off band saw

Sheet metal equipment: Wysong 52'' power sheer, and Pexto 6' brake 36'' slip roll

Grinders: Brown & Sharp No. 5 18 x 6'' surface grinder, five pedestal grinders,
and Roskwell 6'' belt sander



                                     42
    Woodworking equipment: Delta Uni-Saw 10'', Grizzly 20''wood planer, and
    Grizzly wood shaper

    Measurement and inspection equipment: Mitutoyo Quickscope CCD microscope,
    Mitutoyo PJ3000 optical comparator, Mitutoyo BH303 Coordinate measuring
    machine, Mitutoyo CBH400 Contracer, and Mitutoyo toolmakers microscope

    Library
    The book and journal collections for the MMAE programs are limited; however,
    IIT Libraries (Appendix D) offer adequate internet services with links to various
    journals, indexing services, etc. Furthermore, the internet services at the library
    provide faculty and students with resources of other universities. Through the
    internet loan services, the faculty and students can borrow journals and books that
    are available in other libraries in the state of Illinois. These services have been
    generally adequate and improved over the last five years.




   Major Instructional and Laboratory Equipment
    See Appendix C




                                        43
CRITERION 8. SUPPORT
   Program Budget Process and Sources of Financial Support
    The AE/MSE/ME programs do not have budgets independent of the other
    programs, graduate and undergraduate, in the MMAE Department. The budget
    for the Armour College of Engineering is negotiated between the Dean of the
    Armour College of Engineering and the Provost. The MMAE Chair and the other
    Armour Chairs meet regularly every two weeks with the Dean of Engineering to
    discuss the state of the college and various initiatives which are ongoing. The
    Chair is asked to develop a strategy for the upcoming years consonant with the 5
    year plan of the college. This strategy may include various items, such as faculty
    and staff salaries and raises, additional faculty positions, new initiatives, resources
    for labs, etc. From this strategy the Dean develops the department budget for the
    following year. Modifications to this strategy, based on overall university needs
    and availability of funds, are discussed with the Chair and the yearly budget is
    determined. Budgets run from June 1st to May 31st.

   Sources of Financial Support
    The budget for the MMAE programs is described below in the Adequacy of
    Budget sub-section. The institute provides the budget for wages, supplies, travel,
    communications, building maintenance, and others. Student laboratory fees are
    utilized for maintaining the teaching laboratories of the department. Additional
    funds are generated from activities such as fund raising, donations from MMAE
    alums, and faculty research. Faculty members who are very active in research
    provide academic charge offs to the department (typically equivalent to a faculty
    member's one month academic year salary). These charge offs are primarily used
    to support additional TAs and/or part-time lecturers.

   Adequacy of Budget
    The budget for the MMAE Programs is provided in the overall MMAE
    Department budget given in Table D-3. The department receives the budget
    allocation for the fiscal year in June. Major budget items include:

    . Wages (full-time faculty and staff, full-time and part-time lecturers, staff,
      teaching assistants, and part-time student workers)
    . Supplies (office supplies, expendable supplies, computers, etc)
    . Travel
    . Communications
    . Equipment (purchases and maintenance)
    . Building maintenance
    . Others (e.g. funds for faculty development, other operational expenses)

    With the exception of full-time faculty/staff wages and communications, the
    department has full discretion over all remaining items. Overall the budget is
    adequate; however, the expenses for the TA budget and part-time lecturers as well
    as travel, equipment, and building maintenance always exceed the available
                                          44
    budget from IIT. The institutional support in such areas will need to be increased.
     The budget for TA typically covers 15 half-time positions. The department
    definitely needs an increase of at least 30 percent in the TA budget to increase the
    number of TAs to accommodate the current needs due to significant enrollment
    increase within the past five years. Note that the current TA stipend level is very
    comparable with that of most other peer institutions. The part-time lecturers
    budget will need to increase by at least 40 percent for the reason stated above as
    well as to maintain classes with less than 40 students. The recent major
    undergraduate renovations and upgrade of the undergraduate laboratories were
    made possible due to $1.25M fund raising. This included IIT's one-to-one
    matching.

    The institutional support in maintaining the staff positions has been generally
    adequate. However, due to the increase in the enrollment and external research
    funding, the MMAE Department has a need for one additional administrative
    assistant. The budget allotted to the department has been sufficient for hiring part
    time student workers to help with the daily office work.

   Support of Faculty Professional Development
    Faculty professional development takes place in various ways, such as: research
    activities, professional society activities, journal and book publications,
    conference paper presentations and conference participations, invited lectures,
    visits of other institutes (nationally and internationally), journal editorial and
    review activities, proposal review activities, consulting, patent activities, summer
    employment, sabbatical leave, short course offering, and other professional
    outreach activities. The majority of the budget for such activities is provided
    through the individual faculty member's research funds. For faculty with start-up
    packages (provided by IIT), such funds are used for their professional
    development. In addition, IIT's research and educational incentives as well as
    limited MMAE Department discretionary funds are utilized for such activities,
    especially for faculty in the early stage of their career. The start-up packages
    offered within the last five years to the new faculty have been very comparable to
    most other peer institutions.

   Support of Facilities and Equipment
    Resources to acquire, maintain, and operate facilities and equipment include the
    university support, MMAE Department budget, MMAE Department in-house
    technical support, MMAE endowments and fund raising, student undergraduate
    laboratory fees, and occasional equipment donations.

   Adequacy of Support Personnel and Institutional Services
    The institutional support for support personnel and institutional services has
    been generally adequate. Two such examples are provided here. IIT
    provides a dedicated staff member (not an MMAE staff member) for
    maintaining and operating the internet services and the computer facility
                                         45
room housed in E1 Building, which is primarily for the MMAE Department
and Applied Mathematics students and faculty use. The IIT Communications
Office provides valuable help to the department in publishing Vectors, the
MMAE magazine published yearly with a circulation of over 8,000. The
department can benefit significantly from additional institutional support
especially in areas such as faculty seeking external research funds for which
institutional matching funds are required. This is also true with respect to
departmental initiatives for which institutional support is necessary.




                                    46
CRITERION 9. PROGRAM CRITERIA

The program must demonstrate that graduates have: the ability to apply advanced science (such as
chemistry and physics) and engineering principles to materials systems implied by the program
modifier, e.g., ceramics, metals, polymers, composite materials, etc.; an integrated understanding of
the scientific and engineering principles underlying the four major elements of the field: structure,
properties, processing, and performance related to material systems appropriate to the field; the
ability to apply and integrate knowledge from each of the above four elements of the field to solve
materials selection and design problems; the ability to utilize experimental, statistical and
computational methods consistent with the program educational objectives.

    The program satisfies the program criteria through a curriculum that is underpinned
    by courses in calculus, differential equations and the basic sciences of physics,
    chemistry and materials science (taught as a science course) in the first and second
    years. These form the foundation for engineering science courses in solid
    mechanics, and thermodynamics taken in the second and third years.

    A third year course, Engineering Materials and Design (with laboratory), builds on
    these concepts, introduces mechanical behavior of real materials, materials testing,
    statistical methods of data analysis, materials selection, and concepts of materials
    failures and professional responsibility. A two course sequence in structure and
    properties of materials emphasizes the importance of materials structure at all levels
    in determining properties, and the relation of processing and composition to
    structure and properties. The first course emphasizes general concepts; the second
    course in the sequence emphasizes structure/process/property relations in metals and
    alloys.

    Specialized courses in polymers, composites and ceramics apply basic knowledge to
    understanding these materials and their applications. A course on electrical,
    magnetic and optical materials relates quantum mechanics and classical physics
    concepts to the behavior and applications of materials used for their physical
    properties, such as conductors, semiconductors, dielectrics, piezoelectrics,
    superconductors, and magnetic materials used in power and memory applications.

    A three credit course on manufacturing processes develops a sound understanding of
    contemporary materials process design.
    Two laboratory courses (6 credit hours) introduce students to the techniques of
    metallography, optical microscopy, SEM, X-ray diffraction, alloy preparation, and a
    variety of mechanical testing techniques.

    Computational methods are emphasized throughout the curriculum both in
    coursework and laboratories for data acquisition, analysis and presentation.

    Student work demonstrating achievement of the course objectives will be
    available.



                                               47
GENERAL CRITERIA FOR ADVANCED-LEVEL PROGRAMS

  Not Applicable




                           48
                          APPENDIX A – COURSE SYLLABI


Course descriptions follow for required courses in mathematics, basic science, computer
science, engineering graphics, and all undergraduate courses taught in the previous 2 years
by the MMAE department.

Courses designated “REQUIRED” are required of students in Aerospace Engineering (AE),
Mechanical Engineering (ME) and Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) programs.

Courses designated “REQUIRED AE” are required of students in Aerospace Engineering,
and elective for students in ME and MSE programs.

Courses designated “REQUIRED MSE” are required of students in the MSE program, and
elective for students in ME and AE programs.

Courses designated “REQUIRED ME” are required of students in the ME program, and
elective for students in MSE and AE programs.




                                            49
50
APPENDIX B – FACULTY RESUMES




            122
Name and academic rank: Joseph C. Benedyk; Research Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
B.S. (1959) and M.S (1962). in Metallurgical Engineering (Illinois Institute of Technology); Ph.D. in
Metallurgy/Materials Science (Case Western Reserve University) 1968

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates
of advancement in rank:
Research Professor since 2000

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
Over 30 years in materials science research & development for various Fortune 100 companies

Consulting, patents, etc.:
Over 20 patents on products and processes resulting from R & D activities. Consultant to many companies
in aluminum and automotive industries.


States in which professionally licensed or certified, if applicable:
N/A

Principal publications of the last five years:
He has published over 100 papers and reports and received over 20 patents relating to many research
projects. Recent publications and patents include
1.       “Retrogression Heat Treatment as a Means of Improving Formability of Aluminum Extrusions,”
to be presented at Extrusion Technology ’08 and published in the proceedings.
2.       DOE AUTOMOTIVE LIGHTWEIGHTING MATERIALS PEER REVIEW PANEL, 2007 –
FINAL REPORT, August, 2007, USAMP/USCAR/DOE.
3.       In the last 5 years published over 20 articles relating to the light metals industry as editor of “light
Metal Age” magazine.
4.       U.S. 5,911,844, Method for forming a metallic material.
5.       U.S. 5,720,511, Frame apparatus and process for the manufacture of same.
6.       U.S. 5,458,393, Space frame apparatus and process for the manufacture of same.
7.       U.S. 4,766,664, Process for the formation of high strength aluminum ladder structures.
Note: the above patents have been critical to the acceptance of aluminum by the automotive industry in
“light-weighting” vehicles.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
TMS, ASM International

Honors and awards:
Recognition awards from NADCA, ASM International, and SAE

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
Served on several PhD committees
Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities: 80%

Percentage of time committed to the (AE/MSE/ME) program: 20%




                                                       123
Name and academic rank: Roberto Cammino, Part Time Instructor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
PhD, Mechanical Engineering, IIT, May 2001
M.S. Mechanical Engineering, IIT, Dec. 1997
B.S. Chemical Engineering, IIT, May 1995

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates
of advancement in rank:
1 year

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
8 years at Motorola. Currently Principal Staff Engineer.

States in which professionally licensed or certified, if applicable:
EIT, Illinois

Principal publications of the last five years:
N/A. Mostly internal at Motorola.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
ASME, Programs Chair.

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
Minimal
Percentage of time committed to the (AE/MSE/ME) program:
Part time instructor




                                                    124
   Name and academic rank: Dajun Chen, Assistant Research Professor

   Degrees with fields, institution, and date:

   Ph. D. in Materials Science and Engineering, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology,
   Dec., 1997.

   Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates
   of advancement in rank:
   Total 6 years since 2002.
   April 2002, Senior Research Associate and Manager of Electron Microscopy Lab;
   Sept. 2004, Assistant Research Professor.

   Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
   Staff Engineer in Materials and Heat Treatment, Interparts Industry, Inc. Mar., 2001 - April , 2002
   Director of Electron Microscope Analysis, Davis Environmental Labs, Inc., Nov. 2000 - Mar., 2001, (Part-
   time)
   Post-Doctoral Research Associate in Fracture Mechanics & Material Durability Laboratory, Department of
   Civil and Materials Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Dec., 1997 - Mar. 2001
   Assistant Professor; Lecturer in Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong
   University, Jan., 1986- Jan., 1992

   Principal publications of the last five years:
   2004 China Aluminum Forum Conference Review
   Light Metal Age, January/February 2005, Volume 63, No.1, pp32-42
   Kinetics of Bainite Transformation in Carburized 4317 M2
   TMS 2005 (134th Annual Meeting & Exhibition), February, 2005, San Francisco, CA
   Microstructural Characterization of Laser cladding of Cu-30Ni
   Journal of Materials Science, Volume 40 (2005), pp2051-2054,
   2004 China Aluminum Forum Conference Review
   Light Metal Age, Volume 63, No. 1 (2005), pp32-42
   Chinese Aluminum Industry: 2005 China Aluminum Forum Conference Review
   Light Metal Age, Volume 64, No. 1 (2006), pp50-47
   Kam Kiu Aluminum Group: Largest Global Exporter of Aluminum Extrusions in China
   Light Metal Age, Volume 63, No. 2 (2005), pp6-16
   Fatigue Properties of AA6061 and AA7075 Extruded Rod after Retrogression Heat Treatment and Thermo-
   mechanical Treatment
   Light Metal Age, Volume 64, No. 5 (2006), pp6-8
   Kinetics of Bainite Transformation in 4317 Type Steels
   METALS AND MATERIALS International, (published by Korean Institute of Metals and Materials),
   Volume 12, No. 6 (2006), pp453-458
   Sustainable Development of China’s Al Industry
   Light Metal Age, Volume 65, No. 1 (2007), pp32-43
   Shanghai Sigma Metals Inc.: China’s Leading Secondary Aluminum Producer
   Light Metal Age, Volume 65, No. 4 (2007), pp24-32
   2007 China Mg & Automotive Conference, Part I
   Light Metal Age, Volume 65, No. 5 (2007), pp34-40
   2007 China Mg & Automotive Conference, Part II
   Light Metal Age, Volume 65, No. 6 (2007), pp36-41

   Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
ASM International
International Metallographic Society
   Microscopy Society of America
                                                     125
   Midwest Microscopy & Microanalysis Society
Executive Committee member (Education Committee Chair)
ASM International Chicago Regional Chapter
Contributing Editor
Light Metal Age

   Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
   Microstructure Characterization of Materials (MMAE 571)
   Ferrous Transformation (MMAE 574)
   Dislocation Theory and Strengthening Mechanisms (MMAE 564)
   Gas Metal Reaction in Surface Treatment of Steel (MMAE 572)
   Manufacturing Processing (for undergraduate students) (MMAE 485)
   Materials Laboratory I (MMAE 370), Materials Laboratory II (MMAE 476), Advanced Materials
   Laboratory (MMAE 565)
   Transmission Electron Microscopy (MMAE 573)

   Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
   50%

   Percentage of time committed to the MSE program:
   50%




                                                  126
Name and academic rank: Herek L. Clack, Associate Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, 1998
M.S., Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, 1997
S.B., Aeronautical & Astronautical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1987

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and
dates of advancement in rank:
Assistant Professor, 1999-2006
Associate Professor, 2006-Present

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (1998-1999)
NRC Postdoctoral Fellow
Rockwell International, Rocketdyne Division, Canoga Park, CA (1987-1992)
Member of the Technical Staff

Consulting, patents, etc.:
Invention Disclosure (w/ Eric Monsu Lee): “Powder Agglomeration Sensor” (2008)
Patent application: “Virtual Sorbent Beds” (2005)
Consultant, Mobotec Inc. (2004-2005)
Consultant, Heatron Corp. (2006)

Principal publications of the last five years:
Ammigan, K. and H.L. Clack (2008). “Spatial Vapor Distribution Around a Monodisperse Acetone
Droplet Stream Exposed to Asymmetric Radiant Heating.” Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, in
press.
Scala, F. and H.L. Clack (2008). “Mercury Emissions from Coal Combustion: Modeling and Comparison
of Hg Capture in a Fabric Filter versus an Electrostatic Precipitator.” Journal of Hazardous Materials 152,
616-623
Clack, H.L. (2006). “Bimodal Fly Ash Distributions and Their Influence on Gas-Particle Mass Transfer
During Electrostatic Precipitation.” Fuel Processing Technology 87, 987-996.
Clack, H.L. (2006). “Particle Size Distribution Effects on Gas-Particle Mass Transfer within Electrostatic
Precipitators.” Environmental Science and Technology 40, 3929-3933.
Clack, H.L. and M.A. Ahmed (2006). “Mass Transfer Coefficients Associated with the Mixing of a
Confined Gas Volume by the Random Motion of Loose Spheres.” International Journal of Heat and Mass
Transfer 49, 2931-2938.
Clack, H.L. (2006). “Mass Transfer within Electrostatic Precipitators: In-flight Adsorption of Mercury by
Charged Suspended Particulates.” Environmental Science and Technology 40, 3617-3622.
Clack, H.L. (2006). “Mass Transfer within Electrostatic Precipitators: Trace Gas Adsorption by Sorbent-
covered Plate Electrodes.” Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association, 56 pp. 759-766.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
The Combustion Institute, Air and Waste Management Association, American Association for Aerosol
Research, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, National Society of Black Engineers

Honors and awards:
National Science Foundation, CAREER Award recipient (2004-2009)
National Academies/Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, German-American Frontiers of Engineering,
invited topical review (2004)
National Academies, National Research Council, Committee Member: Committee on Changes in New
Source Review Programs for Stationary Sources of Air Pollutants (2004-2006)
National Academies, National Research Council, Committee Member: Committee to Examine the
Disposal of Activated Carbon from the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Systems at Chemical
Agent Disposal Facilities (2008-2009)
                                                    127
Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
Panel reviewer, National Science Foundation
Peer reviewer, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Peer reviewer, ASME Journal of Fluids Engineering, Journal of the Air and Waste Management
Association, Journal of Hazardous Materials, Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Clean Air Journal,
Journal of Heat Transfer, European Aerospace Science and Technology
Member, United Nations Environment Programme, Global Mercury Partnership, Reduction of Mercury
Releases from Coal Combustion Partnership Area
Chairperson, MMAE Departmental Lab Committee
MMAE Department Lab Safety Officer
Chairperson, MMAE Departmental Thermal/Fluids faculty search
Departmental Program Coordinator, E3 Graduate Studies program
Faculty Director, Academic Retention Programs, Office of Multicultural Student Services
Member, Student Life and Retention Committee
Member and Chairperson, Minority Retention Sub-committee
Member, Campus Review Committee, Chemical Engineering Graduate Program
Faculty Advisor, National Society of Black Engineers, IIT student chapter
Faculty Advisor, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, IIT student chapter
Member, Lew Collens Scholars advisory committee
Member, Campus Lab Safety Committee
Member, MMAE Qualifying Exam Committee

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
50%

Percentage of time committed to the program:
50%




                                                  128
Name and academic rank: Donald E. Duvall, Lecturer

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Illinois Institute of Technology             Chemistry                                    BS        1971
Northwestern University                      Materials Science & Engineering              MS        1981
Illinois Institute of Technology             Metallurgical & Materials Engineering        Ph.D.     1993

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates
of advancement in rank:
2003-present               Lecturer, Mechanical Materials & Aerospace Engineering
1998-2003                  Adjunct Assoc. Professor, Mechanical Materials & Aerospace
                           Engineering
1996-1998                  Part-time Instructor, Materials & Aerospace Engineering
1989-1996                  Part-time Instructor, Metallurgical & Materials Engineering


Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
         Engineering Systems Inc., Aurora, Illinois
                 Senior Consultant
                 1995 to Present

         L.J. Broutman & Associates, Chicago, Illinois
                  Vice President, Plastics Technology, 1990-1995
                  Manager, Piping Products Section, 1984-1990

         Plexco Division, Amsted Industries, Franklin Park, Illinois
                 Manager, Technical Services, 1981-1983

         Gould Incorporated, Rolling Meadows, Illinois
                 Research Scientist, 1978-1981

         The Richardson Company, Melrose Park, Illinois
                 Research Chemist, 1973-1978

Consulting, patents, etc.:

States in which professionally licensed or certified, if applicable:
Professional Engineer (Illinois) – License No. 062-050452

Principal publications of the last five years:
         “Failure Analysis of a Large Diameter, Heat-Fusible PVC Pipe in a Horizontal Directional
         Drilling Installation,” Proceedings of the Society of Plastic Engineers 66 th Annual Technical
         Conference, pp. 2458-2462, May 2008, with D. B. Edwards.

         “Failure Investigation of Cross-linked Polyethylene Chemical Storage Tanks,” ANTEC 2008 –
         Proceedings of the Society of Plastic Engineers 66 th Annual Technical Conference, pp. 1758-1762,
         May 2008, with D. B. Edwards.

         “Analysis of Heating by Friction in Plastic Clothes Dryer Components”, Journal of Failure
         Analysis & Prevention 7(6), pp. 400-406 (2007), with T.J. Bajzek and R.N. Koopman.

         “Investigation of Failures in Polypropylene Water Piping System”, ANTEC 2007 – Proceedings of
         the Society of Plastic Engineers 65th Annual Technical Conference, pp. 2909-15, May 2007

         “Observations on Field Fusion Joining of Large Diameter HDPE Pipe,” ANTEC 2005 –
                                                      129
        Proceedings of the Society of Plastics Engineers 63 rd Annual Technical Conference, pgs. 3533-7,
        May 2005

        "Effect of Environment on Plastics Performance," ASM Handbook, Volume 11: Failure Analysis
        & Prevention, 796-799, ASM International, Materials Park, OH (2002)

        "Analysis of Large Diameter Polyethylene Piping Failures," Proceedings of the Society of Plastics
        Engineers 60th Annual Technical Conference, Volume 48, (2002)

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
        Society of Plastics Engineers - Senior Member
        American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM)
        American Chemical Society
        American Water Works Association (AWWA)

Honors and awards:
        Listed in Who’s Who in Plastic & Polymers, Technomic Publishing Co. (2000)

        Listed in Marquis' Who's Who in Science and Engineering: Premier Edition (1992-1993)

        Dow Chemical Company Best Paper Award – Case Studies Category, Society of Plastics
        Engineers Annual Technical Conference, Failure Analysis and Prevention Special Interest Group,
        May 2002

        Recognized for "Continued Superior Performance" by the U.S. Department of Transportation's
        Transportation Safety Institute (1989 and 1992)

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
        Society of Plastics Engineers - Senior Member
                 Engineering Properties & Structure Division Board of Directors, 1998-2004;
                 Engineering Properties & Structure Division Chair-Elect, 2001-2002; Chair 2002-
                    2003, Past Chair 2003-2004;
                 Failure Analysis & Prevention Special Interest Group Technical Program Chair, 2004-
                    2005, Chair 2005-2007;
                 Plastic Pipe & Fittings Special Interest Group Chair 2004-2006

        American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM)
               Member of Committees D20 on Plastics, D35 on Geosynthetics, G03 on Durability of
               Nonmetallic Materials, and F17 on Plastic Piping Systems; Chairman of Subcommittee
               F17.26 on Polyolefin Pipe (1986-1989)

        American Water Works Association (AWWA)
               Member, Polyolefin Pressure Pipe Committee
               Chairman, Subcommittee to Revise AWWA Standard C901 (1994-2000)

Percentage of time committed to program:
                Part time lecturer position




                                                  130
Name and academic rank: Stephen T. Gonczy, PhD, Lecturer

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
PhD, Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 1978
BS, Mechanical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 1969

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates
of advancement in rank:
2 Years of part-time lecturing, beginning in 2006.

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
30 years of industrial research experience in metals and ceramics. (17 Years with Honeywell Corporate
Research; 13 Years as an Independent industrial consultant with Gateway Materials Technology.) His
research and development experience has focused on advanced materials for aerospace, automotive, and
industrial power applications. Principal investigator in many projects, including standardized tests for
ceramic coatings and porous ceramics; processing and application of polymer-derived ceramics; import-
export regulations for ceramic composites; materials database development for ceramic composites and
cast metals; low-cost coatings for ceramic fibers; processing, properties, and stability of ceramic
composites; and material design studies for WEB publication.
 30 Years executive experience in the US Army Reserve retiring in the grade of Brigadier General in 2004
with 25+ years of experience and responsibility in defense systems development and military logistics.

Consulting, patents, etc.:
13 years of consulting in metals and ceramics for government agencies and private companies.
 23 US Patents in ceramics and metals.
States in which professionally licensed or certified, if applicable:
None

Principal publications of the last five years:
S. T. Gonczy and N. Randall, "An ASTM Standard For Quantitative Scratch Adhesion Testing Of Thin,
Hard Ceramic Coatings," Int. Jour. of Applied Ceramic Technology, Vol. 2, #5 (2005), pp. 422-428.
S. T. Gonczy and N. Randall, ASTM Standard C1624 "Standard Test Method for Adhesion Strength and
Mechanical Failure Modes of Ceramic Coatings by Quantitative Single Point Scratch Testing," 2005
ASTM Standards Vol 15.01.
S. T. Gonczy, "A CMC Handbook with a Focus on Design, Testing, and Data -- Mil Handbook 17 Vol 5,"
Proceedings of GT2005 ASME Turbo Expo 2005, Power for Land, Sea and Air, Paper # GT2005-68472.
S. T. Gonczy, J. G. Sikonia, "Nextel™ 312/Silicon Oxycarbide Ceramic Composites," Handbook of
Ceramic Composites, Editor: N.P. Bansal, (Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston, 2005), pp-347-374.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
Fellow, American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM)
Member, ASM International
Member, American Ceramic Society (ACerS)

Honors and awards:
Award of Merit, 1999 American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM)
R&D 100 Award for "Blackglas Technology for Ceramic Matrix Composites" 1994

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
Chairman of the ASTM C28 Advanced Ceramics Committee (2006 to present)
Chairman of the ASTM C28 Mechanical Properties Subcommittee (2000-2005)
 Chairman of the ceramic composite working group for the Composite Materials Handbook 17 committee
(2005 to present)
 Member of the 2007 National Committee on "Assessing the Need for a Defense Stockpile" for the
National Research Council
                                                     131
Percentage of time committed to the program:
Part-time lecturer position.




                                         132
Name and academic rank: Michael R. Gosz, Associate Professor, Associate Provost

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Northwestern University Ph.D. 1993 Theoretical and Applied Mechanics
Northwestern University M.S. 1989 Theoretical and Applied Mechanics
Marquette University B.S. 1988 Mechanical Engineering (summa cum laude)

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates
of advancement in rank:
Associate Provost for Undergraduate Affairs (September 2006-Present)
• Associate Chair for Graduate Programs, Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace
Engineering (September 2003-August 2006)
• Associate Professor of Mechanical and Materials Engineering (September 2002 - Present)
• Assistant Professor (September 1996-August 2002)

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
University of New Hampshire Durham, NH
• Assistant Professor (September 1993-July 1996)
Northwestern University Evanston, IL
• Post-Doctoral Research Associate (June-August 1993)
General Motors Janesville, WI
• Manufacturing Engineer, 1985-1988

Consulting, patents, etc.:

States in which professionally licensed or certified, if applicable:


Principal publications of the last five years:
Computational fracture mechanics, constitutive modeling of composite materials, nonlinear finite element
methods, fluid/structure interaction.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:

Honors and awards:

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:

Percentage of time committed to the program: 12%




                                                   133
Name and academic rank: John S. Kallend, Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
BA (1967), MA (1970), PhD (1971), Natural Sciences, University of Cambridge (England).

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates
of advancement in rank:
Professor of Materials Engineering (1984) /Professor of Physics
Associate Chair, MMAE Department
Associate Dean


Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
Affiliate, Los Alamos National Laboratory 1987-1994
Affiliate, Argonne National laboratory, 1990-92

Consulting, patents, etc.:
None

States in which professionally licensed or certified, if applicable:
None

Principal publications of the last five years:
75 total, none in last 5 years

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
ASM International

Honors and awards:
Amoco Award for Excellence in Teaching 1991
Bauer Family Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching 1994, 2004, 2007
Ralph L. Barnett Award for Excellence in Teaching 2003
Bronze Medal, US National Skydiving Championships, 2002
Holder of three world records in formation skydiving

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
Chair, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering 1991-95
Dean, Undergraduate College 1995-99
Chair, IIT Radiation Safety Committee 1986 –
IIT Undergraduate Studies Committee 1982 –
University Grand Marshal, 1988 –
Chairman, Chicago/Chicago Northern Joint Chapter of TMS/ASM, 1994
Gil Speich Memorial Lecturer, ASM, 1998

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
10%

Percentage of time committed to the program:
60%




                                                   134
Name and academic rank: Ronald J. Lisowski, Lecturer

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
PhD, Aeronautics and Astronautics (University of Illinois) 1984
MS, Electrical Engineering (New Mexico State University)1975
MS, Aeronautics and Astronautics (Purdue University)1970
BS, Engineering Science (USAF Academy, Colorado)1969


Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment
and dates of advancement in rank:
1-1/2 Yr

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
24 years commissioned service and 10 years civil service in the USAF
2001-2007: Civilian Associate Professor and Director of Curriculum, Department of
Astronautics, US Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO.
1996-2001: Civilian Associate Professor and Director of Curriculum Technology,
Department of Astronautics, US Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO.
1993-1996: Visiting Professor & Researcher, Department of Astronautics, US Air
Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO. & Adjunct Professor, University of Colorado at
Colorado Springs.
1991-1993: Chief Scientist, European Office of Aerospace Research and Development
(EOARD), Detachment 1, Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), London,
England. (USAFA Sabbatical Assignment)
1987-1991: Tenure Professor of Astronautical Engineering and Deputy Department
Head, Department of Astronautics, US Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO.
1984-1987: Associate Professor of Astronautical Engineering and Deputy Department
Head for Labs and Research, Department of Astronautics, US Air Force Academy,
Colorado Springs, CO.
1977-1981: Assistant Professor of Astronautical Engineering and Research Director,
Department of Astronautics, US Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO.
1975-1977: Trajectory Engineer and Applications Analyst, 554th Aerospace
Reconnaissance Technical Wing, HQ Strategic Air Command (SAC), Offutt AFB, NE.
1970-1975: Guidance Systems Test Analyst, Central Inertial Guidance Test Facility,
6585th Test Group, Holloman AFB, NM.

Consulting, patents, etc.:
1993-1996: USAF Academy Visiting Professor & Researcher. Conducted a funded
research project to integrate the Ada programming language into the Academy’s
astronautics courses.


States in which professionally licensed or certified, if applicable:



                                           135
None


Principal publications of the last five years:
None

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics - 1967-Present
Member, Senior Member, Associate Fellow
American Society of Engineering Educators - 1989-Present
Member

Honors and awards:
Educator of the Year, AIAA Rocky Mountain Region, 2005-06
Nominated by students for Outstanding Senior Faculty Award, Academic Year 2005-
2006
Nominated by students for Outstanding Senior Faculty Award, Academic Year 1999-
2000
Outstanding Honoraria Adjunct Faculty Member of the Master of Engineering Program
Office, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, Academic Year 1995-96
International “Odyssey of the Mind” Competition Coach
        Coached a 5th grade team to DODDS Atlantic Region Championships
        & World Finals at University of Maryland – 1993
Outstanding Military Educator in Astronautics and Computer Science, USAF Academy,
Academic Year 1979-80 (A one-time award for Academy faculty)
Junior Officer of the Year in Astronautics and Computer Science, USAF Academy,
Academic Year 1978-79
Member, Tau Beta Pi - National Engineering Honor Society
Member, Phi Kappa Phi - National Academic Honor Society

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
AIAA Astrodynamics Technical Committee - 1999-Present
       Education Subcommittee Chair
AIAA/AAS Astrodynamics Specialist Conference Session Chairman – Aug 2003
ASEE Aerospace Division Board of Directors – 2000-Present
       Vice Chair – 2006-07
       Secretary/Treasurer – 2005-06
       Annual Conference Program Chair – 2005

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
Zero

Percentage of time committed to the (AE/MSE/ME) program:
Part time lecturer



                                           136
Name and academic rank: Sheldon Mostovoy; Associate Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Ph.D. Metallugical Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois, 1968
B.S. Mechanical Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois. 1958

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment
and dates of advancement in rank:
30 years. Appointed August 1978 as Associate Professor. Tenure granted in 1980.

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
Developed & taught MMAE 326 & 371 (Eng. Mat’ls & Design) with mechanical
testing labs. Taught MMAE 563 and 536 (Advanced Mechanical Metallurgy I & II),
MMAE 306 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory, MMAE 306 Mechanical Engineering
Laboratory, MMAE 308 Mechanics of Solids and Design, METM 494 Design Project.
Senior Research Engineer at The Materials Research Laboratory of Glenwood Illinois
Visiting Scientist, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington D.C.

Consulting, patents, etc.:
Patent: 1973; 3,726,669 Elimination of Lead Embrittlement in Steel,
Consulted for Inland Steel Bar Co, Victor Products Division, DANA Corporation,
Aircraft Gear Corp. Alumax Extrusions, CBS Television News

Principal publications of the last five years:
R. Camino, M. Gosz and S. Mostovoy: “An Optimized Fracture Mechanics Specimen for
Fatigue Crack Growth Studies in a Constant K Environment. Int’l Jour. of Fatigue ; 2003

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
Iron and Steel Society (AIME)
ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals)
The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society of the American Institute of Mining,
Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers (TMS-AIME)
American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM)

Honors and awards:
1998; Excellence in Teaching Award, Department of Mechanical, Materials and
Aerospace Engineering.




                                           137
Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
Faculty counsel rep from MMAE, Laboratory committee, Promotion & Tenure
committee. Attended professional society Conferences.
Participated in "Ethics Across the Curriculum", IIT/NSF Workshop, 1994,.
Member of monthly ethics topics discussion group

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
20%

Percentage of time committed to the program:
80%




                                          138
Name and academic rank: Philip Nash, Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
PhD Materials Science, London University 1978
BS Metallurgy, City of London Polytechnic, 1973,

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment
and dates of advancement in rank:
27 years on faculty of IIT. Appointed Visiting Assistant Professor 1/1/1981, Associate
Professor 1987, Professor 1991.

Principal publications of the last five years:
"Thermoelectric properties of Zn"4Sb"3 processed by sinter-forging", S.-C. Ur, P. Nash,
I.-H. Kim, Materials Letters, 58 (22-23), pp 2937-2941, (2004).
"The Enthalpy of Formation of NiAl", Rongxiang Hu and Philip Nash, J. Mats. Sci.
Letts. 40 (5) pp 1067-1069, (2005).
"Microstructural Characterization of Laser Cladding of Cu-30Ni", Bijaya Adak, Philip
Nash, Dajun Chen and, Alan Swiglo, J. Mats. Sci. Letts. 40(8) pp 2051-2054 (2005).
"Enthalpies of Formation in the Al-Ni-Ru System by Direct Reaction Synthesis
Calorimetry", Hsin-Ning Su and Philip Nash, J. Alloys and Compounds, 403, pp 217-
222 (2005).
"An Optical Technique to Measure Distortion in Heat-Treated Parts In-Situ", Federico
Sciammarella, Phillip Nash, JOM, Volume 57, Number 5, pp. 67-70(4) 2(005,)
"Graphitization and microstructure transformation of nanodiamond to onion-like carbon "
Zhijun Qiao, Jiajun Li, Naiqin Zhao, Chunsheng Shi, Philip Nash, Scripta Mat., 54, 225-
229 (2005).
"Review: Experimental Enthalpies of Formation of Compounds in Al-Ni-X systems",
Rongxiang Hu and Philip Nash, J. Mats. Sci., 41, 631-641 (2006)
"The Effect of Mechanical Alloying on SiC Distribution and the Properties of 6061
Aluminum Composite", Naiqin Zhao, Philip Nash and Xianjin Yang, J. Mats. Process.
Techn., in press (2006).
"Carbon Partitioning During Bainite Transformation in 4317 Type Steels", Smati
Chupatanakul, Philip Nash and Dajun Chen, Metals & Materials International, 12 (6), pp
453-458 (2006).
"Dilatometric Measurement of Carbon Enrichment in Austenite During Bainite
Transformation", Smati Chupatanakul and Philip Nash, J. Materials Sci. Letters, 41, (15
) 4965 - 4969 (2006).
" Structural evolution and Raman study of nanocarbons from diamond nanoparticles",
ZhijunQiao, Jiajun Li, Naiqin Zhao, Chunsheng Shi, Philip Nash, Chemical Physics Let.,
429 pp.479–482 (2006).
"Enthalpies of formation and lattice parameters of B2 phases in Al–Ni–X systems"
Rongxiang Hu, Hsin-Ning Su, and Philip Nash, Pure Appl.Chem., Vol.79, No.10,
pp.1653–1673, (2007).
"Accelerated bainitic transformation during cyclic austempering", Vivekanand Sista,
Philip Nash and Satyam S. Sahay, J. Materials Sci. Letters, 42, (2007).


                                           139
"Bainitic Transformation in Carburized 4317 M2 Steels", S. Chupatanakul and P. Nash,
in MS&T'07 conference proceedings, "STEEL: Steel Product Metallurgy and
Applications", pp 403-422, (2007).
"A thermodynamic description of the Al-Fe-Si system over the whole composition and
temperature ranges via a hybrid approach of CALPHAD and key experiments", Yong
Du, Julius Clemens Schuster, Zi-Kui Liu, Rongxiang Hu, Philip Nash, Weihua Sun,
Weiwei Zhang, Jiong Wang, Lijun Zhang, Chengying Tang, Zhijun Zhu, Shuhong Liu,
Yifang Ouyang, Wenqing Zhang, Nataliya Krendelsberger, Intermetallics 16, 554-570,
(2008).

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
ASM Int., AISI, ACERS, MRS

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
Editor –Journal of Materials Science
IIT Materials Advantage Chapter Faculty Advisor

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
50%

Percentage of time committed to the program:
50%




                                           140
Name and academic rank: Xiaoping Qian, Assistant Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, August 2001.

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment
and dates of advancement in rank:
4 years as an assistant professor since August 2004

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
3 years of industrial experience at GE Global Research Center

Consulting, patents, etc.:
3 patents

Principal publications of the last five years:
1. Huang, Y. and Qian, X., "An efficient sensing localization algorithm for free-form
surface digitization," ASME Transactions Journal of Computing and Information Science
in Engineering, Vol. 8, No. 2, June 2008.
2. Qian, X. and Villarrubia, J. S., "General Three-Dimensional Image Simulation and
Surface Reconstruction in Scanning Probe Microscopy using a Dexel Representation,"
Ultramicroscopy, Vol. 107, No. 13, pp. 29 - 42, Dec 2007.
3. Huang, Y. and Qian, X., "Dynamic B-spline Surface Reconstruction: Closing the
Sensing-and-Modeling Loop in 3D Digitization," Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 39, No.
11, pp. 987-1002, Nov 2007.
4. Huang, Y. and Qian, X., "A dynamic sensing-and-modeling approach to 3D point- and
area-sensor integration," ASME Transactions Journal of Manufacturing Science and
Engineering, Vol. 129, pp. 623- 635, June 2007.
5. Yang, P. and Qian, X., "A B-spline based Approach to Heterogeneous Object Design
and Analysis," Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 34, No. 2, pp. 95 -111, Feb 2007.
6. Qian, X., Robinson, D. M., and Ross, J., "Admissible Transformation Volume for Part
Dimensional Quality Gauging," Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 37, No. 13, pp. 1335 -
1352, Nov 2005.
7. Qian, X. and Dutta, D., "Feature based design for heterogeneous objects," Computer-
Aided Design, Vol. 36, No. 12, pp. 1263-1278, Oct 2004.
8. Qian, X. and Dutta, D., "Direct Face Neighborhood Alteration for Heterogeneous
Object Modeling," Computers and Graphics, Vol. 27, No. 6, pp. 943-961, Dec 2003.
9. Qian, X. and Harding, K. G., "A Computational Approach for Optimal Sensor Setup,"
SPIE Journal Optical Engineering, Vol. 42, No. 5, pp. 1238-1248, May 2003.

                                          141
10. Qian, X. and Dutta, D., "Physics-based Modeling for Heterogeneous Objects," ASME
Transactions Journal of Mechanical Design, Vol. 125, pp. 416-427, Sep 2003.
11. Qian, X. and Dutta, D., "Design of Heterogeneous Turbine Blade," Computer-Aided
Design, Vol. 35, No. 3, pp. 319-329, March 2003.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
IEEE, ASME, SAE

Honors and awards:
 2008 Excellence in Research Award, Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering
Department award, IIT
2007 Campus Greatest Number of Research Awards for an Individual Principal
Investigator, IIT
2007 SME (Society of Manufacturing Engineers) Research Initiation Award
 2007 NSF Fellowship for Summer Institute on Inspiring the Coalescence of Fundamental
and Application Specific Functional Nanomaterial Development Materials at
Northwestern University
2006 NSF Fellowship for Summer Institute on Nano Mechanics and Materials at
Northwestern University
 2005 ASEE/AFOSR Summer Faculty Fellow at Air Force Wright-Patterson Research
Lab
 Selected Nationally to attend NSF Mathematical Modeling in Engineering Education,
Purdue University, Feb 28- Mar 2, 2005
 2004 Young Innovator Award, Inspection and Manufacturing Technologies at GE
Global Research

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
Technical committe chair, Computer-Aided Product Development, ASME/CIE Division
Guest Editor, Speical Issue in journal Computer-Aided Design

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
50%

Percentage of time committed to the program:
50%




                                          142
Name and academic rank: Francisco Ruiz, Associate Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh,1987
M.E., Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie-Mellon University, 1985
Dipl. Ing., Aerospace Engineering, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid,1983

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment
and dates of advancement in rank:
20 years of service
Appointed: 1987
Tenured: 1992

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
2006-2007    Coleman Faculty Fellow: Illinois Institute of Technology Entrepreneurship
Center
1998-1999      Visiting Associate Professor (sabbatical leave), Kellogg Graduate School
            of Management, Northwestern University
1994-present Director, IIT Invention Center
Fall 1993: Ricardo North America (sabbatical leave)

Consulting, patents, etc.:
F. Ruiz, "Generation of Flat Liquid Sheet And Sprays by Means of Simple Cylindrical
Orifices". U.S. Patent No. 4,893,754. Jan. 16, 1990.
Short consulting jobs in the area of energy, combustion, and heat transfer.

States in which professionally licensed or certified, if applicable:
Licensed Professional Engineer, State of Illinois.

Principal publications of the last five years:
Nonfiction:
W. De Ojeda and F. Ruiz, “Hydraulic Flow Compensator for fast Switch Device” ASME
Journal of Dynamics & Sys. Measurements and Controls, vol. 125, pp. 509-514. 2003.
F. Ruiz, “Learning Engineering as Art: an Invention Center,” International Journal of
Engineering Education, vol. 20, No. 5, pp. 809-819. 2004.
F. Ruiz. “Analysis of the 3rd generation IC-Stirling Engine,” SAE Paper 2005-01-3462,
SAE Future Transportation Technology Conference. Chicago, IL, 2005.

                                           143
F. Ruiz, R. Sabbah. “Gas-Fired Oscillating-Flow Superadiabatic Radiant Emitters.” A
report to the Gas Technology Institute (still unpublished outside GTI), 2005.
Berzosa, A, Lastra, D., Sabbah, R. Ruiz, F. “External Pulsed Combustion by Acoustic
Forcing,” 31st International Combustion Symposium, 2008
Fiction:
“Ad Alienos” (SF short story). IsFic, 2006.
“Los guardianes del pasado” (young adult science-fiction novel). Planeta, 2008.



Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
Combustion Institute, ILASS-Americas (founding member), NCIIA(founding member),
S.A.E.(local advisor), Tau-Beta-Pi (chief advisor), Pi-Tau-Sigma(local advisor), Sigma-
Xi.

Honors and awards:
Tanasawa Award, International Conference on Liquid Atomization and Spray Systems
(ICLASS). Japan, 1988.
Teetor Educational Award, Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). 1990.
Science and Engineering All-Professor Team 1992. Chicago Tribune.
Faculty Advisor of the Year, Illinois Institute of Technology, 1992.
Two-time winner: University Excellence in Teaching Award, Illinois Institute of
Technology, 1995, 2007.
BF.Goodrich Invention Award, National Inventors’ Hall of Fame, 1996.
"Who's Who in American Education," "Who's Who in Hispanic Professionals," "Who's
Who in Science and Engineering."
Grand Prize: IIT’s Alma Mater Contest. 1999 (musical composition)
Among the forty-one IIT Persons of the Millenium, chosen by the IIT students,1999.
MMAE Excellence in Teaching Award. Illinois Institute of Technology, 2006.
IsFic grand prize for short fiction, 2006.

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
Reviewer for:
Atomization and Sprays, Begell House
Journal of Propulsion and Power, AIAA
Experiments in Fluids, Springer-Verlag
National Science Foundation (several directorates)
Chief advisor of several student groups and honor societies: Tau Beta Pi, SAE, Pi Tau
Sigma
Chair, NCA Review Board of IIT Humanities department, 2006-2008
Chair, IIT-wide teaching award commitee, 2008
Asst. Chair, ASME symposium on engineering education, ASME international congress,
2007
Member, IIT Entrepreneurial Studies Committee, 2007-2008
Member, MMAE Undergraduate Studies Committee, 2004-2008
Numerous lesser committees

                                          144
Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
20%

Percentage of time committed to the program:
80%




                                          145
Name and academic rank: Bharat S. Thakkar, Adjunct Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
   M. S., MMAE Dept., Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616. Year of
       Grduation 1967
   Ph. D., MMAE Dept., Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616. Year of
       Grduation 1976

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates
of advancement in rank:
1978 – Present, part time instructor
Visiting Professor, 2000 -2001

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
   26 Years, Full Time Engineering Managemen Position, Lucent Technologies, Naperville,
       Illinois 60556.
   6 years, National Can Corporation, Chicago, Illinois.

Consulting, patents, etc.:
   Two patents. Consultant in local area industry in Chicago Heights, Milwaukee, Joliet, etc.

States in which professionally licensed or certified, if applicable:
Not Applicable

Principal publications of the last five years:
20+ Publications prior to last 5 years. Confidential publications with Argonne National Labs for last four
years.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
ASME

Honors and awards:
        Indian Hill Affirmative Action Advisory Committee Certificate, Distinguished Service as
         IHAAAC Member, AT&T Bell Labs, 5/87. Managed diversity projects.

        Alva C. Todd Professorship, Illinois Institute of Technology, 1997. Honored as outstanding
         lecturer.

        "Outstanding Contribution Award" from the Asian Americans for Affirmative Action, AT&T
         Bell Labs, May 1987.
        A plaque for making a presentation on "Role Models and Networking" at Dept 55136/55146
         AA Meeting, November 1987.

        A plaque for community service presented by Federation of Indian Assoc. (FIA), 1988


Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
Not Applicable.
Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities: N/A

Percentage of time committed to the program: Part time instructor


                                                    146
147
Name and academic rank: Sammy Tin, Associate Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, 2001
M.S. in Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 1998
B.S. in Materials Engineering, California Polytechnic State University, 1996

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment
and dates of advancement in rank:
Associate Professor (01/06 to present)

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
Assistant Director of Research, Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Univ. of
Cambridge (09/01 – 12/05)
Deputy Director of the Rolls-Royce/Cambridge University Technology Partnership
(09/01 – 12/05)
Materials Engineer, General Electric Corporate Research and Development (06/06 –
12/06)

Consulting, patents, etc.:
Rolls-Royce plc.
Air Force Research Laboratory/General Dynamics
Cindas Publishing

Principal publications of the last five years:
21. The influence of cooling rate from temperatures above the g’ solvus on morphology, mismatch and
hardness in advanced polycrystalline nickel-base superalloys, R.J. Mitchell, M. Preuss, S. Tin and M.C.
Hardy, Mater. Sci. Eng. A, Vol. 473, pp. 158-165, 2008
20. The Validation of Microstructure! Prediction in Nickel Superalloys, J.W. Brooks, S. Tin and R.P.
Guest, Materials Science Forum, Vol. 539-543, pp.3064-3069. 2007.
19. High Temperature NanoIndentation of Single Crystal Superalloy CMSX-4, A. Sawant and S. Tin,
Scripta Mat., Vol. 58, No.4, pp. 275-278. 2007.
18. Atomic Partitioning of Platinum in Single Crystal Ni-Base Superalloys, L. Zhang, M.K. Miller and S.
Tin, Materials Science Forum, Vol 546-549, pp. 1187-1194. 2007.
17. Characteristics of TCP Growth in Ru-Bearing Ni-Base Superalloys, R.A. Hobbs, L. Zhang, C.M.F. Rae
and S. Tin, Materials and Metallurgical Transactions A (in press)
16. Uphill diffusion in ternary Ni-Re-Ru alloys at 1000 and 1100˚C, R.A. Hobbs, M.S.A. Kurunarantne, S.
Tin, R.C. Reed and C.M.F. Rae, Materials Science and Engineering A, Vol 460-461, pp. 587-594, 2007.
15. Influence of Composition and Cooling Rate on Constrained and Unconstrained Lattice Parameters in
Advanced Polycrystalline Nickel-Base Superalloys, R.J. Mitchell, M Preuss, M.C. Hardy and S. Tin,
Materials Science and Engineering A, Vol. 423, pp. 282-291, 2006.
14. Nickel-Based Superalloys for Advanced Turbine Engines: Chemistry, Microstructure and Properties,
T.M. Pollock and S. Tin, Journal of Power and Propulsion, Vol 22, No.2, pp. 361-375, 2006.
13. Influence of Composition and Cooling Rate on Constrained and Unconstrained Lattice Parameters in
Advanced Polycrystalline Nickel-Base Superalloys, R.J. Mitchell, M. Preuss, M.C. Hardy and S. Tin,
Mater. Sci. and Eng. A, Vol. 423, pp. 282-291, 2006.
12. Investigation of Oxidation Characteristics and Atomic Partitioning in Platinum and Ruthenium Bearing
Single Crystal Ni-Based Superalloys, S. Tin, L. Zhang, G. Brewster and M.K. Miller, Metallurgical and
Materials Transactions A, Vol. 37A, pp. 1389-1396, 2006.



                                                  148
11. A Castability Model Based on Elemental Solid-Liquid Partitioning in Advanced Nickel-Base Single
Crystal Superalloys, R.A. Hobbs and S. Tin, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A, Vol. 36A, pp.
2761-2773, 2005.
10. Residual stresses in a quenched superalloy turbine disc: measurements and modeling, M.A. Rist, S. Tin,
B.A. Roder, J.A. James and M.R. Daymond, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A Vol. 37A, pp.
459-467, 2006.
9. Integrated Modeling for the Manufacture of Ni-Based Superalloy Discs from Solidification to Final Heat
Treatment, S. Tin, A. Kermanapur, P.D. Lee and M. McLean, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A,
Vol. 36A, pp. 2493-2504, 2005.
8. Effects of Ru and Re Additions on the High Temperature Flow Stresses of Ni-Base Single Crystal
Superalloys, A.C. Yeh and S. Tin, Scripta Mater. 52 (6), pp. 519-524 MAR 2005
7. Grain boundary transformations during isothermal exposure of powder metallurgy nickel base
superalloys for turbine disc applications, R.J. Mitchell, C.M.F. Rae and S. Tin, Mater. Sci. and Tech. 21
(1), pp. 125-132, 2005
6. Identification of the Partitioning Characteristics of Ruthenium in Single Crystal Ni-Base Superalloys
with Atom Probe Tomography, R. C. Reed, A. C. Yeh, S. Tin, S. S. Babu and M. K. Miller, Scripta. Mat.
Vol. 51, pp. 327-331.
5. State Variable Modeling of IN718 during Hot Deformation, S. Tin, X. Zhao and R. P. Guest, Mater. Sci,
and Tech. Vol. 21 (4), pp. 437-444
4. Directional Solidification of Large Superalloy Castings with Radiation and Liquid Metal (LMC)
Cooling: a Comparative Assessment A.J. Elliott, S. Tin, W.T. King, S.-C. Huang, M.F.X. Gigliotti, and
T.M. Pollock, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A, Vol. 35A (10) pp. 3221-3231
3. Through Process Defect Tracking During Manufacture of Aerospace Gas Turbine Discs, A. Kermanpur,
S. Tin, P. D. Lee and M. McLean, Mater. Sci, and Tech Vol. 21 (4), pp. 437-444
2. Measurements of Residual Strains in Laser Formed Plates of Ti-6Al-4V by Synchotron X-Ray
Diffraction, J. R. Cho, S. Tin and R. C. Reed, Materials Science and Technology, vol. 20, pp.465-472.
1. Integrated Modeling for the Manufacture of Aerospace Discs (IMMAD): Grain Structure Evolution A.
Kermanpur, S. Tin, P.D. Lee and M. McLean, JOM, vol. 56, no. 3, pp. 72-78

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
TMS, Chair High Temperature Materials Committee
ASM, Member College Education Committee
IOM3, Member
MRS, Member

Honors and awards:
2004 Rolls-Royce Mark Shipton Patent Award
2006 IOM3 Cook Ablett Award
2007 ASM Marcus A. Grossmann Award

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
IIT MMAE Graduate Studies Committee

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
70%

Percentage of time committed to the program:
30%




                                                   149
150
Name and academic rank:
Murat Vural, Assistant Professor of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:

1998, Ph.D. in Aeronautical Engineering (Minor in Materials Science), Istanbul
Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey
1991, M.S. in Aeronautical Engineering, Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey
1989, B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering, Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment
and dates of advancement in rank:
2003  present (5 years), Assistant Professor, Mechanical, Materials & Aerospace Eng.
Dept., Illinois Institute of Technology

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
2000  2003, Visiting Associate, Graduate Aeronautical Laboratories, California Institute
of Technology

Consulting, patents, etc.:
None

States in which professionally licensed or certified, if applicable:
None

Principal publications of the last five years:
    M. Alkhader and M. Vural, “Mechanical response of cellular solids: Role of
       cellular topology and microstructural irregularity”, accepted, International Journal
       of Engineering Sciences (2008)
    M. Kotche, J.L. Drummond, K. Sun, M. Vural, F. DeCarlo, “Multiaxial Analysis
       of Dental Composite Materials”, accepted, Journal of Biomedical Materials
       Research: Part B - Applied Biomaterials (2008)
    M. Vural and G. Ravichandran, “Failure mode transition and energy dissipation in
       naturally occurring composites”, Composites Part B - Eng, 35(6-8): 639-646,
       (2004).
    M. Vural and G. Ravichandran, “Transverse failure in thick S2-glass/epoxy fiber
       reinforced composites”, Journal of Composite Materials, 38(7): 609-623, (2004).
    M. Vural and G. Ravichandran, “Dynamic response and energy dissipation
       characteristics of balsa wood: experiment and analysis”, International Journal of
       Solids and Structures, 40(9): 2147-2170, (2003).
    M. Vural and D. Rittel, “An educational visualization technique for Kolsky (split
       Hopkinson) bar”, Experimental Techniques, 27(6): 35-39, (2003).
    M. Vural, D. Rittel and G. Ravichandran, “Large strain mechanical behavior of
       1018 steel over a wide range of strain rates”, Metallurgical and Materials
       Transactions A, 34A(12): 2873-2885, (2003).

                                           151
Scientific and professional societies of which a member:

      Society for Experimental Mechanics (SEM)
      American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
      Dynamic Response of Materials Technical Committee of the ASME Applied
       Mechanics Division
      Dynamic Behavior of Materials Technical Division of the SEM

Honors and awards:
   NSF Fellowship to the NSF Summer Institute on Surface Engineering & Coatings
      (July, 2004).
   NSF Fellowship to the NSF Summer Institute on Nano Mechanics and Materials
      (August, 2003).
   NATO Advanced Science Fellowship, for 6 months (20002001).
   Department of Defense (Turkey) Practical Training Fellowship, for 6 months
      (19921993).

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
    Reviewed Journal Papers for Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids,
       International Journal of Solids and Structures, Experimental Mechanics, Journal
       of Materials Science, Journal of Applied Mechanics, Journal of Heat Transfer,
       Applied Physics Letters, Composites Science and Technology, Materials Letters,
       Composites Part B – Engineering, Holzforschung
    Reviewed Research Proposals for Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of
       Canada (NSERC-CA), U.S. Army Research Office (ARO), U.S. Air Force Office
       of Scientific Research (AFOSR)
    Organized Special Sessions on (1)“Dynamic Response of Cellular Solids and Soft
       Tissues” in ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition
       (IMECE’06), Chicago, IL, November 5-10, 2006, (2) “High-Strain-Rate Testing
       of Biological and Soft Materials” in SEM Annual Conference and Exposition on
       Experimental & Applied Mechanics (SEM’07), Springfield, MA, June 4-6, 2007,
       (3) “Aerospace Materials and Characterization” in the 3rd International
       Conference on Recent Advances in Space Technologies (RAST’07), Istanbul,
       Turkey, June 14-16, 2007.
    Served as a Member in MMAE Undergraduate Studies Committee (Fall 2003 –
       Spring 2006), MMAE Lab Committee (Fall 2003 – present), IIT Undergraduate
       Studies Committee (Fall 2004 – Spring 2006),
    Mentored High School Students (Hemal Patel) from Illinois Mathematics &
       Science Academy (IMSA) between Sep 05 – Mar 06 on a project entitled “Laser-
       Based Velocity Measurement System for Direct Impact Experiments”, and
       between Sep 06 – Mar 07 on a project entitled “Low Temperature High-Strain-
       Rate Experiments”.

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
                                          152
      60%

Percentage of time committed to the (AE/MSE/ME) program:
      40%




                                    153
Name and academic rank: Benxin Wu, Assistant Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Doctor of Philosophy, Mechanical Engineering, 2007
Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
Master of Science, Electrical Engineering, 2003
University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR), Rolla, MO
Master of Science, Mechanical Engineering, 2003
University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR), Rolla, MO
Bachelor of Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, 2001
Tsinghua University, Beijing, China

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment
and dates of advancement in rank:
Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering,
Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL,
August 2007 – present

Principal publications of the last five years:
Yinggang Tian, Benxin Wu, Mark Anderson, Yung C. Shin, “Laser-assisted milling of
silicon nitride ceramics and inconel 718”, Journal of Manufacturing Science and
Engineering, Transactions of the ASME, accepted.
Benxin Wu, Yung C. Shin, Harshavardhan R. Pakhal, Normand M. Laurendeau, and
Robert P. Lucht, “Modeling and experimental verification of plasmas induced by high-
power nanosecond laser-aluminum interactions in air”, Physical Review E, 2007; 76:
026405.
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “Two dimensional hydrodynamic simulation of high
pressures induced by high power nanosecond laser-matter interactions under water”,
Journal of Applied Physics, 101 (10), 103514, 2007
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “A simple two-stage model for the formation and
expansion of the plasma induced by high intensity nanosecond laser metal ablation in
vacuum”, Physics Letters A, 371, 128-134, 2007.
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “From incident laser pulse to residual stress: A complete
and self-closed model for laser shock peening”, Journal of Manufacturing Science and
Engineering, Transactions of the ASME, 129, 117-125, 2007.
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “A one-dimensional hydrodynamic model for pressures
induced near the coating-water interface during laser shock peening”, Journal of Applied
Physics, 101, 023510, 2007.
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “A simple model for high fluence ultra-short pulsed laser
metal ablation”, Applied Surface Science, 253, 4079-4084, 2007.
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “Absorption coefficient of aluminum near the critical
point and the consequences on high-power nanosecond laser ablation”, Applied Physics
Letters, 89(11), 111902, 2006.
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “Modeling of nanosecond laser ablation with vapor
plasma formation”, Journal of Applied Physics, 99(8), 084310, 2006.
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “Laser pulse transmission through the water breakdown

                                          154
plasma in laser shock peening”, Applied Physics Letters, 88(4), 041116, 2006.
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “A self-closed thermal model for laser shock peening
under the water confinement regime configuration and comparisons to experiments”,
Journal of Applied Physics, 97(11), 113517, 2005.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
ASME
Tau Beta Pi-The Engineering Honor Society

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
MMAE Lab Committee

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
70%

Percentage of time committed to the program:
30%




                                           155
                  APPENDIX C – LABORATORY EQUIPMENT


   Equipment available for the laboratory classes MMAE371, MMAE370,
MMAE476

    Argon arc melter for alloy preparation.
    Syntag/ARL X-ray diffractometer with JCPDS software, texture goniometer.
    Buehler metallographic preparation equipment (mounting presses, grinders and
    polishers).
     Nikon & Leitz optical microscopes. with digital camera and software for image
    analysis.
    Nikon binocular low power microscope with camera attachment.
    DTE & DSC for analysis of phase diagram kinetics.
    Satek creep machines for determination of the creep properties of high temperature
    materials.
    Furnaces for heat treatment of metal specimens.
    JEOL Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with energy and wavelength
    dispersive analysis capability.
    Two Instron static mechanical test frames with computer control and advanced data
    collection and analysis software.
    Bend tester using strain gaged bending frames and Micro Measurement strain
    indicator, switch and balance box and Omega panel meter for load readings
    converted from strain.
    Metrology lab including micrometers, calipers, CCD microscope, CMM, Contour
    tracer, surface roughness analyzer and toolmakers microscope..
    Fatigue test equipment (closed loop servo hydraulic systems for pre-cracking and
    testing).
    Fracture mechanics testing measuring strain, stroke and load simultaneously for
    toughness analysis
    Tinius Olson impact test frame (Metals)
    TMI table top impact tester for polymers.
    A range of hardness test machines capable of all Rockwell scales plus macro and
    micro Vickers, Brinell and Meyer.
    Rebound hardness testers (Shore Schleroscope and Webster).
    Shore A hardness tester for rubber.

                                          156
 Torsion test frame for aluminum, copper and two types of steel.
 Rapid prototyping SLS machine (3D Systems)



 In addition, many of the open-ended Interprofessional Projects run by MMAE
 faculty make use of equipment available in the department – most notably the well
 equipped machine shop. Hand tools and small machinery for assembly of projects
 are always available to students in these projects. Miscellaneous electronic
 measurement equipment including oscilloscopes, multimeters, digital data
 collection hardware and software; wireless sensor hardware and analysis software,
 sound level and audio frequency distribution using a calibrated microphone.


 Investment in equipment for the undergraduate materials program since 2002 is as
 follows:


1.    Upgrades to (2) tensile machines (Instron) $40,929
2.    Rapid prototyping SLS machine (3D Systems) $182,237
3.    3-D camera strain analyzer (Trilion Quality Systems) $85,000
4.    Data acquisition cards (National Instruments) $15,748 + $1,308 + $1,195
5.    Heat treatment furnace (MHI) $6,590
6.    Upgrade for closed loop frames (MTS Systems) $135,500
7.    Oven and extensometer (MTS Systems) $13,065
8.    Bend fixture (MTS Systems) $19,651
9.    High-temperature extensometer (Epsilon Tech.) $3,787
10.   Linear variable displacement transducers (Omega) $6,447
11.   Cantilever beam high-speed fatigue machine $5,000
12.   Rotating beam fatigue machine $12,500
13.   Upgrades and calibration of hardness machine $2,000
14.   Argon arc melter $75,000
15.   Large box furnace $11,000
16.   Small box furnace $9,000
17.   Air torch $5,000
18.   Potentiostat for corrosion experiments $2,000
19.   Diamond sectioning saw $3,000




                                      157

								
To top