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					                                      ABET
                                Self-Study Report

                                                for the

                            Aerospace Engineering

                                              Program

                                                    at

                     Illinois Institute of Technology
                               Chicago, Illinois 60616, USA



                                            July 1, 2008


                                            CONFIDENTIAL
The information supplied in this Self-Study Report is for the confidential use of ABET and its authorized
agents, and will not be disclosed without authorization of the institution concerned, except for summary
data not identifiable to a specific institution.




                                                                                                       1
                                                      Table of Contents

BACKGROUND INFORMATION .............................................................................................................. 3
CRITERION 1. STUDENTS ....................................................................................................................... 7
CRITERION 2. PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES ................................................................ 11
CRITERION 3. PROGRAM OUTCOMES ............................................................................................... 16
CRITERION 4. CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT ................................................................................. 20
CRITERION 5. CURRICULUM ............................................................................................................... 30
CRITERION 6. FACULTY ....................................................................................................................... 42
CRITERION 7. FACILITIES .................................................................................................................... 53
CRITERION 8. SUPPORT ........................................................................................................................ 57
CRITERION 9. PROGRAM CRITERIA................................................................................................... 59
APPENDIX A – COURSE SYLLABI ........................................................................................................ 64
APPENDIX B – FACULTY RESUMES .................................................................................................. 137
APPENDIX C – LABORATORY EQUIPMENT .................................................................................... 173
APPENDIX D – INSTITUTIONAL SUMMARY………………………………….…..Appendix D-1




                                                                                                                                            2
                             Self-Study Report
                                 Aerospace Engineering
                                   Bachelor of Science
                             Illinois Institute of Technology

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

     Contact information
      Jamal Yagoobi – Department Chair
      MMAE Department, IIT, Chicago IL 60616
      (312) 567 3239        yagoobi@iit.edu


      John Kallend – Associate Chair
      MMAE Department, IIT, Chicago IL 60616
      (312) 567 3054        kallend@iit.edu

     Program History (The AE program grew out of the ME program. The history
      includes a commingled ME and AE program)
      1893: Mechanical Engineering offered upon the founding of the Armour Institute,
            which is a predecessor of the Illinois Institute of Technology.

      1901: Mechanical Engineering offered by the Lewis Institute, which is a predecessor of
            the Illinois Institute of Technology.

      1940: The Illinois Institute of Technology is formed by the merger of the Armour
            Institute and the Lewis Institute.

      1950-1980: The AE history at IIT starts in the mid to late 1950's around the time
            Andrew Fejer arrived as department chair. The ME program had existed as an
            accredited program for many decades and since the start of ABET and the
            commission that preceded it.

            An MAE (AE as a specialization within ME) was introduced and accredited
            during the late 1960's and grew to be comparable in strength to the ME when the
            aerospace industry decline gradually affected it towards the late 1970.




                                                                                              3
    1984: The Mechanical Engineering Department becomes the Mechanical and
          Aerospace Engineering (MAE) Department with degrees offered in Mechanical
          and Aerospace Engineering.

    1990: Mechanical Engineering once again becomes a standalone degree as the MAE
          Department begins to offer separate degrees in Mechanical Engineering and
          Aerospace Engineering.

    1995: The Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Materials and Metallurgical
          Engineering Departments merge to form the Mechanical, Materials and
          Aerospace Engineering (MMAE) Department in its current form. The MMAE
          Department currently offers Bachelor of Science degrees in Mechanical
          Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Aerospace Engineering.


   Options
    None.

   Organizational Structure
    The Aerospace Engineering program is one of three undergraduate programs
    administered by the Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering.
    The other programs are Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and
    Engineering. The head of department, Dr. Jamal Yagoobi, reports to the Dean of the
    Armour College of Engineering (position vacant at the time of writing). The dean in
    turn reports to the Provost (Dr. Alan Cramb, effective August 1, 2008), who reports to
    the President of IIT.
   Program Delivery Modes
    The program is delivered in traditional lecture/laboratory format. Some lecture classes
    are available for concurrent remote viewing by 2-way interactive television. In general,
    internet delivery is not used for undergraduate classes except on a case-by-case basis
    approved by the departmental Undergraduate Studies Committee. A structured co-op is
    available as an optional activity for students, but co-op experience does not count for
    academic credit in the program.

   Deficiencies, Weaknesses or Concerns Documented in the Final Report from the
    Previous Evaluation(s) and the Actions taken to Address them
    No deficiencies were noted in the final report from the 2004 evaluation.
    The following weakness was reported:

    Criterion 2. A process for evaluating objectives has been established and documented
    by the program. The process includes the use of senior and alumni surveys, results
    from the Engineering Intern Exam, employment data and input from the Student
    Advisory Board. These data were analyzed by the department Undergraduate Studies
    Committee with recommendations presented to the faculty. Program educational


                                                                                             4
objectives were subsequently revised. However, there is no indication that the program
curriculum itself was changed to improve graduates’ ability to achieve the documented
objectives. Further, the employment data gathered was anecdotal, reflecting the percent
of graduates employed in their field or in graduate school and the fact that many
employers continue to hire graduates of the program. The program has not been able
to obtain feedback from employers indicating their level of satisfaction with graduates’
ability to achieve program objectives.

Actions taken: Repeated attempts to obtain statistically relevant information from
employers of graduates have been unsuccessful. Initial attempts conducted by the IIT
Career Development Center (now Career Management Center) repeatedly received no
response or negative response to requests, with employers citing privacy concerns (due
to the small number of graduates in any given year, individuals would be easily
identifiable). In 2005, 2006 and 2007 the college purchased the services of a
commercial survey company, Electronic Benchmarking Inc. (EBI) to perform surveys
both of alumni and of employers. The expectation was that since EBI reports only
statistical information, privacy concerns could be avoided. The alumni surveys have
been very successful with a response rate exceeding expectations. However, the
number of employer responses has not in any year reached EBI’s own threshold
for reporting results to us. EBI does not report the reasons for the disappointing
response. At this time, based on these experiences, current privacy law, and the small
size of the program we have no reason to expect improved outcomes of employer
surveys, however performed, in the future. The EBI employer survey is being
discontinued. We continue to rely on our External Advisory Board to represent this
constituency.

In 2006 a comprehensive review of program objectives resulted in significant changes
documented under Criterion 2.

We have contacted every 2007 graduate of the program. 76% of the graduates
responded. In every case the respondent was either in graduate school, serving as a
commissioned officer in the US armed services, or currently employed as an engineer.
This is very persuasive evidence that program objectives are being achieved.

Curriculum changes since the previous EAC visit are documented under Criterion 4,
and include a major revision of the program’s curriculum approved by the department
faculty in 2007 and by the full faculty of the university in 2008.

One concern was reported in the 2004 evaluation:

Criterion 4. The report provided extensive information relative to the Interprofessional
Team Project (IPRO) course, including an excellent assessment of the course as a
whole. However, there was no information regarding how aerospace engineering
students’ participation in the course satisfies the specific requirement to culminate their
MMAE 436 experience with an aeronautical or astronautical synthesized design.




                                                                                          5
This reported concern appears to result from a misconception by the EAC reviewer.
The Interprofession Project courses are not the culminating aeronautical or
astronautical design experience in the Aerospace Engineering program. The
culminating design experiences are contained in the 3 credit hour course MMAE436
(Aerospace Design I), which emphasizes aircraft or aircraft systems design, and the 3
credit hour course MMAE437 (Aerospace Design II) which emphasizes spacecraft or
space mission design. Neither of these courses forms part of the Interprofessional
Projects program.




                                                                                        6
CRITERION                           1.                                               STUDENTS

     Student Admissions
      Admissions procedures for freshman and transfer students are common to all
      engineering programs and are described in Appendix D.

     Evaluating Student Performance
      Each student's progress is monitored at mid semester (1st and 2nd year courses) by the
      advisor, and at the end of each semester by the associate chair of the department and the
      Associate Provost’s office. Students whose progress is unsatisfactory due to low grades
      or failing to maintain 12 credit hours/semester (6 CH/semester for part time students)
      towards their degree are placed on academic probation and notified by letter. Students
      on probation are limited to 15 hours/semester of coursework, and may not participate in
      varsity sports or take office in any student organization. IIT is classified as having
      “selective” admissions, and student academic problems are not usually associated with
      insufficient ability or preparation, but more commonly with difficulty adjusting to
      college, inappropriate choice of major, or financial/emotional stress, and the Student
      Counseling Center is equipped to help is such cases. If a student stays on academic
      probation for two (or more) consecutive semesters, the student may be dismissed.
      Students are evaluated using a traditional 4-point grading scale, with grades being
      assigned by the course instructor. All courses have stated learning objectives and
      instructors are expected to test achievement of those objectives and assign grades based
      on achievement of those objectives. Specific protocols have been developed for
      evaluating written and oral communication skills, and the several objectives of the
      IPRO program (see Appendix D). Thus a passing grade in a course implies
      achievement of the learning objectives at a minimum acceptable level.

     Advising Students
      All students are advised by full-time faculty in the department. New students are
      assigned to a faculty advisor on enrollment, and are advised either in person, by
      telephone, or by e-mail correspondence during the inter-semester break prior to
      matriculation. The advisor has access to the student’s high school record, standardized
      test scores and AP or IB credit prior to the advising session. Once advised, students
      may immediately register for courses using an online registration system. Incoming
      freshmen (and transfer students with less than 30 transferable credit hours) are required
      to take MMAE100 (Introduction to the Profession) in the Fall semester. Section sizes in
      this course sequence are nominally 30 students, and the course instructor is the
      students' academic advisor for the first year. This course meets twice per week,
      ensuring excellent contact between student and advisor. Following the freshman year,
      students are assigned a faculty advisor who will usually stay with them for the
      remainder of their undergraduate career. Advisor's permission is required before a
      student may register for the following semester or withdraw from any course.
      Faculty advisors have the following tools available to ensure that the advising process is
      effective:


                                                                                               7
    SIS (Student Information System)™ and Web for Faculty™ : this software allows
    advisors to access the student's complete course schedule and official academic record
    from their office computer. This system is being phased out, and from Fall 2008 the
    BANNER TM system will be in use.
    Mid-term grades: mid-term grades are issued for all lower division courses. Advisors
    have access to these grades so that intervention can occur when necessary before the
    course is complete.
    Course attendance/performance reporting: instructors in lower level courses report on
    student absences from class and poor performance on tests and homework to a central
    contact (Director of Advising). This information is then sent electronically to the
    student’s advisor.
    Advising holds: students cannot register for any courses until their advisor releases a
    hold.
    MMAE Department Advising Guidelines: a comprehensive booklet describing how the
    course sequence fits together, graduation requirements, etc. is provided for students and
    faculty advisors. These guidelines are also available on the department's web site. The
    booklet is updated annually.

   Transfer Students and Transfer Courses
    The process for enrolling transfer students and giving transfer credit is common to all
    students in Armour College of Engineering, and is described in Appendix D.

   Graduation Requirements
    The process for ensuring that graduation requirements have been met is common to all
    students in Armour College of Engineering, and is described in Appendix D.

   Enrollment and Graduation Trends
    Details are given in Table 1-1 through 1-4.




                                                                                              8
     Table 1-1. History of Admissions Standards for Freshmen Admissions
                             for the Past Five Years
                                    Aerospace Engineering
 Fall of                                                   Percentile Rank in High     Number of
Academic        Composite ACT          Composite SAT               School             New Students
  Year          MIN.      AVG.         MIN.     AVG.          MIN.          AVG.        Enrolled
 2007-8             20        28         960      1272                                    36
 2006-7             21        28        1020      1295                                    47
 2005-6             21        27         710      1243                                    36
 2004-5             23        29        1070      1291                                    41
 2003-4             21        28         990      1280                                    37




             Table 1-2. Transfer Students for Past Five Academic Years
                                                           Number of
                      Fall of Academic Year        Transfer Students Enrolled
                               2007-8                          5
                               2006-7                          3
                               2005-6                          5
                               2004-5                          2
                               2003-4                          8




   Table 1-3. Undergraduate Enrollment Trends for Past Five Academic Years

           Academic Year:     2003-4          2004-5      2005-6        2006-7        2007-8

  Enrollment during Fall
      Full-time Students              113            122       131           145           139
      Part-time Students                4              7         5             5              5
                   1
      Student FTE                   117.2          130.5    137.4          155.8         148.3
  Completions between 7/1 and 6/30
      Graduates                        16             17        16            26              4
  1
    FTE = Full-Time Equivalent: 15 Credit hours = 1FTE
  2007-8 Graduate value includes ONLY Summer and Fall, not Spring as those values are not yet
  available.




                                                                                                  9
                            Table 1-4. Program Graduates
               (For Past Five Years or last 25 graduates, whichever is smaller)

                                         Certification/        Initial or Current Employment/
Numerical     Year          Year
                                           Licensure                       Job Title/
Identifier Matriculated   Graduated
                                        (If Applicable)                Other Placement
10209325 Fall 2003        Spring 2007
10219274 Fall 2003        Spring 2007                     High school teacher, Seattle
10224866 Fall 2003        Spring 2007                     Design Engineer, Dietrich Design Group
10251759 Fall 2003        Spring 2007                     Systems Engineer, Navistar
10254978 Fall 2003        Spring 2007                     Graduate School, IIT
10265829 Fall 2001        Spring 2007
10273753 Spring 2004       Fall 2007                      Associate, Sargent & Lundy
10282353 Fall 2002        Spring 2007                     Manufacturing Engineer, eServe
10289339 Fall 2003        Spring 2007                     Graduate School, U. of Illinois
10292737 Fall 2003        Spring 2007
10293133 Fall 2002        Spring 2007                     Graduate School, IIT
10300564 Fall 2003        Spring 2007                     Graduate School (IIT, BME program)
10309111 Fall 2003        Spring 2007
10317207 Fall 2003        Spring 2007                     Graduate School, IIT
10320834 Fall 2001        Spring 2007
10321082 Fall 2003         Fall 2007
10321277 Fall 2003        Spring 2007                     Product Engineer, MPC Inc
10321436 Fall 2003        Spring 2007
10327803 Fall 2002        Spring 2007                     2nd Lt. US Air Force
10329741 Fall 2003        Spring 2007                     Spacecraft Engineer, Lockheed-Martin
10333276 Fall 2003        Spring 2007
10333844 Fall 2003         Fall 2007                      Flight Test Engineer, Boeing
10370740 Fall 2003         Fall 2007                      Engineer, Boeing
10370989 Fall 2003        Spring 2007
10392460 Fall 2004        Spring 2007                     Engineer, BSA Lifestructures




                                                                                                   10
CRITERION 2. PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES


     Mission Statements
      IIT Mission Statement (from IIT web site http://www.iit.edu):

      To advance knowledge through research and scholarship, to cultivate invention
      improving the human condition, and to educate students from throughout the world for
      a life of professional achievement, service to society, and individual fulfillment.

      Armour College of Engineering Mission Statement (from Armour College web site
      http://www.iit.edu/engineering/about/mission.shtml):

      Provide state-of-the art education and research programs; educate a new breed of
      engineers with a strong fundamental knowledge of engineering principles, the
      capability to apply their knowledge to broad interdisciplinary areas, and an
      understanding and appreciation of the economic, environmental, and social forces that
      impact intellectual choices; and enhance Armour's reputation as an internationally
      recognized engineering school (Transforming Lives).

      Strengthen Armour's leadership role by focusing on the core research competencies and
      enhancing partnerships with industry, government laboratories and academic and
      research institutions (Inventing the Future).


     Program Educational Objectives
      The objectives of the MMAE undergraduate programs are to educate aerospace,
      mechanical and materials engineering students for a broad range of professional careers,
      provide the inspiration for lifelong learning, and prepare students for advanced studies
      at the graduate level. Recognizing the changing professional environment that MMAE
      graduates will encounter, the programs aim to develop graduates who:

      • Possess a strong foundation in mathematics, science and engineering and who are
      proficient in the engineering sciences on which the major discipline is based.
      • Are able to link science and engineering principles to identify, formulate and solve
      engineering problems in professional practice and research and development
      contexts.
      • Are able to design and conduct experiments, as well as analyze and interpret data.
      • Have experience working in multidisciplinary and interprofessional teams.
      • Utilize effective oral, written, graphical and computational communication skills.
      • Understand the economic, ethical, societal, environmental and global contexts of their
      professional activities.
      • Pursue lifelong learning.
      • Translate knowledge of their respective disciplines to a broad spectrum of professions.



                                                                                            11
    In addition, the AE program specific outcomes are to develop graduates who have the
    ability to perform engineering design and analysis of tasks using the principles of solid
    and fluid mechanics; aerodynamics; compressible flow; aircraft propulsion and control
    systems. These objectives are published in the IIT Undergraduate Bulletin, printed and
    online editions.

   Consistency of the Program Educational Objectives with the Mission of the
    Institution
    Both the general objectives and AE-specific objectives emphasize technical competence
    based on fundamental knowledge, and professional skills appropriate to the 21st
    Century, in accordance with the mission of IIT and Armour College of Engineering.
    Graduates of the program come from many nations, and take up many careers upon
    graduation, including business, medicine, law, military service, attendance in graduate
    school, as well as careers in engineering. The objectives are defined broadly enough to
    accommodate all such choices.

   Program Constituencies
    The faculty has determined the constituencies of the program to be: the public,
    students, alumni of the program, program faculty, and employers of our graduates.
    Formal communication with these constituencies has been established by means of:

    IIT Board of Trustees: The Board of Trustees represents the public interest and
    establishes the mission of the university. Its members are drawn primarily from
    community and industry leaders in the Chicago metropolitan area. The board is
    responsible for setting the overall mission and goals of the university. It meets twice
    each year.
    Armour College of Engineering Board of Overseers: The College overseers are drawn
    from industry and academia, and provide guidance to the dean on college wide issues.
    MMAE Student Advisory Board (SAB): This is a self-governing entity. It conducts its
    own elections of officers drawn from students enrolled in the three programs within the
    department, spread over all four years. Secretarial support is provided by the
    department. This board can act on its own initiative about any issue relevant to the
    undergraduate programs, or may be consulted by the department head or the department
    undergraduate studies committee. The student advisory board also conducts a survey of
    graduating seniors. The chair of the SAB is invited to meetings of the MMAE
    Undergraduate Studies Committee when issues relating to undergraduate programs are
    on the agenda.

    MMAE External Advisory Board: This board represents alumni, employers of our
    graduates, and representatives of academia and the professions of mechanical, materials
    and aerospace engineering. Members are appointed by the department head. This
    board meets annually with the department faculty, and members may be consulted as
    appropriate.

    The current (2008) membership of the External Advisory Board is:


                                                                                              12
Prof. Huseyin Sehitoglu   Department Head, Professor, Mech. Eng. Dept., UIUC
Prof. Ted Belytschko      Professor, Northwestern University
Mr. John Berninger        Principal, Advanced Analysis Engineering
Mr. James Butzen          Director, Advanced Feature Development, Zebra Technologies
Ms. Sherita Ceasar        Chief Executive Officer, CBA Solutions
Mr. Geoffrey Fear         President, CM Packaging
Prof. Skip Fletcher       Regents Professor, Texas A&M University
Mr. Robert Footlik        President, Footlik and Associates
Mr. Les Hardison          Senior Consultant, Wheelabrator Technologies
Prof. Yogesh Jaluria      Professor and Chairman, Mech. & Aero. Eng. - Rutgers University
Mr. James Korenchan       Manager, Air & Fuel Systems, International Truck and Engine Corporation
Mr. Bruce Liimatainen     President, A. Finkl & Sons Company
Mr. Paul Micheli          Manager, Automization Product Development, ITW Industrial Finishing
Mr. Ali Nassiri           Head of Radio Frequency Department, Argonne National Laboratory
Prof. Robert Page         Emeritus Professor. Texas A&M University
Dr. Richard Wlezien       Professor & Dept. Chairman, Mech. Eng. Dept., Tufts University

IIT Faculty meetings and faculty committees: All new programs, significant program
revisions, and changes in the General Education requirements must be approved by
majority vote of the IIT Undergraduate Studies Committee and the IIT Faculty Council.
Proposed changes are then posted on the Faculty Council web site, and if 10 or more
faculty members object, a majority vote of the full IIT faculty is required. Regular
university faculty meetings are held biannually.

The IIT Undergraduate Studies Committee meets monthly through the academic year
and is charged with reviewing programs, monitoring and recommending changes to the
General Education Requirements, and approving significant changes in existing
programs. All departments with undergraduate programs are represented on this
committee.

MMAE Faculty meetings and faculty committees: Faculty meetings are held monthly
through the academic year. All program changes must be approved by majority vote of
the faculty. An annual 1-day retreat has been established for in-depth discussion of
programmatic issues. Faculty committees are appointed for various tasks: relevant to
the undergraduate program are MMAE Undergraduate Studies Committee: this has 7
members including the department chair ex-officio. It is tasked with evaluating data
pertaining to the programs, making recommendations to the faculty concerning
undergraduate program improvements, and approving student petitions for special
projects, undergraduate research and course substitutions. This committee provides
liaison with the Student Advisory Board. The committee meets monthly during the
academic year or may be convened at any time if rapid response to an issue is required.
MMAE Laboratory Committee: this committee is charged with maintaining the plan for
upgrading and improving the departmental laboratory facilities based on needs.




                                                                                                    13
   Process for Establishing Program Educational Objectives
    In 1994 the National Commission for IIT was established by the IIT Board of Trustees
    to chart a course for the following decade. The commission was chaired by Robert
    Galvin, Chairman Emeritus of Motorola, and its members were drawn from industry
    and academia and included members of the National Academy of Engineering, National
    Academy of Science, Nobel Laureates, and leaders of industry and colleges nationwide.
    There was also student and faculty representation. This commission recommended,
    inter alia, significant changes in IIT’s mission and objectives, including an increased
    emphasis on inter-professional studies, communication skills, and a more international
    outlook. The Board of Trustees accepted the report in 1995 and mandated its
    implementation. (This also coincided with the release of a draft of ABET EAC Criteria
    2000, which themselves indicated significant curricular revision). In order to facilitate
    the necessary changes the university announced a $250M development campaign. The
    campaign ended in 2001, having raised in excess of $258M.
    Extensive discussion within the faculty took place from 1995 – 97 to establish the basic
    framework for the necessary programmatic changes, and in 1997 the IIT faculty
    approved a major revision of the General Education Requirements of the university, to
    take effect with the entering class of 1999. Among the changes were a requirement for 6
    credit hours of work on “Interprofessional Projects” (IPRO) to develop skills working
    with individuals from other disciplines and professions on real-world technical projects
    involving economic, legal, ethical and social issues. Another new requirement was for
    each student to take 42 credit hours of courses designated as communications-intensive
    (indicated with a (C) in the Undergraduate Bulletin), split between courses in the major
    and in other areas. There must be significant writing, oral presentation or graphical
    components in these courses.
    The MMAE Department's undergraduate studies committee then drafted a proposed set
    of educational objectives for the department’s programs. These drafts were circulated
    for review and comment to the student advisory board and the external advisory board.
    The full MMAE faculty then considered the drafts and all comments received, before
    final approval of the program objectives.
    The educational objectives are published in the IIT Undergraduate Bulletin (print and
    on-line versions).

   Achievement of Program Educational Objectives
    Data relating to achievement of the educational objectives have been obtained from:
          Annual surveys of graduates of the program 2 and 5 years after graduation. For
           the first review the survey was generated internally, but subsequent annual
           surveys have been performed by Educational Benchmarking Inc (EBI,
           http://www.webebi.com). The EBI alumni survey is a comprehensive instrument
           that evaluates multiple attributes of graduates including perceived achievement
           of educational objectives and program outcomes. Individual students are not
           identified to the program. A very large amount of information is generated by
           this survey, and will be available at the time of the visit.


                                                                                            14
      Surveys of employers: Attempts have been made to obtain statistical
       information about our graduates from employers. Initially this was done by the
       Career Management Center (see Appendix D) and received very poor response
       due to privacy concerns raised by employers. From 2004-2007 we have
       purchased the services of Educational Benchmarking Inc, which offers an
       employer survey, but in no case has the minimum response been received that
       allows them to report the results. We have now discontinued the use of this
       survey.
      External Advisory Board members include members from companies and
       organizations that employ our graduates. Feedback is obtained from the EAB
       during its annual September meeting with the faculty.
The process for evaluating and updating the educational objectives follows the same
basic steps described in the previous section. The Undergraduate Studies Committee
makes recommendations for revisions, which are reviewed by the Student Advisory
Board and the External Advisory Board. The proposal with comments is then brought
before the department faculty at its annual retreat, and a majority vote is required for
approval.
The objectives were reviewed and minor modifications were made in 2003, following
this process. Details were provided in the 2004 interim report to the EAC. A more
comprehensive change in objectives was approved by the faculty in 2006 to recognize
the very diverse range of career paths that our graduates follow (see Table 1-4).
The next review will be in 2009.




                                                                                           15
CRITERION 3. PROGRAM OUTCOMES

   Process for Establishing and Revising Program Outcomes
       Program outcomes were established in the 1999 program review described in Criterion
       2. Outcomes are deliberately designed to be readily aligned with ABET prescribed
       outcomes 3a – 3k and the program specific criteria for materials and similarly named
       programs, and to be consistent with the educational objectives. Program outcomes have
       been reviewed in 2003 and 2006, but no change has been recommended.

   Program Outcomes
       In this section the concordance between program outcomes and EAC of ABET Criteria
       3 and 4 are highlighted in [ ].
    In accordance with the general MMAE program outcomes, graduates of the AE program:
       1. possess a strong foundation in mathematics, science and engineering and are
          proficient in the engineering sciences on which the major discipline is based [3a, 4]
       2. are able to link science and engineering principles to identify, formulate and solve
          engineering problems in professional practice and research and development contexts
          [3b, 3c, 3e, 4]
       3. are able to design and conduct experiments, as well as analyze and interpret data [3b]
       4. have experience working in multidisciplinary and interprofessional teams [3d]
       5. utilize effective oral, written, graphical and computational communication skills [3g,
          3k]
       6. understand the economic, ethical, societal, environmental and global contexts of their
          professional activities [3f, 3h, 3j, 4]
       7. have a recognition of the need to remain current in their chosen field and are able to
          engage in lifelong, independent learning and professional development, [3i], and
       8. translate knowledge of their respective disciplines to a broad spectrum of professions
          [3k]
       In addition, the AE program specific outcomes are to develop graduates who
       9. have the ability to perform engineering design and analysis of tasks using the
          principles of solid and fluid mechanics; manufacturing; and thermal, structural and
          control systems.

   Relationship of Program Outcomes to Program Educational Objectives
       The outcomes described above are very tightly linked to the program educational
       objectives described in Criterion 2. Although not all of the program outcomes are
       necessary for success in every career open to Aerospace Engineering graduates, they
       provide the broad background to assist in choosing one’s career and the foundation on
       which to build that career. As described below, the focal point of our assessment
       process is to determine whether our curriculum is fulfilling the program outcomes and
       ultimately the educational objectives.




                                                                                                16
   Relationship of Courses in the Curriculum to the Program Outcomes
    The outcomes are produced by a curriculum comprising (the numbers in [] correspond to
the numbered outcomes above):
       21 credit hours of general education emphasizing breadth of knowledge of society,
        human behavior and achievement [6,8].
       Required courses in calculus, differential equations, physics, chemistry and computer
        science laying a sound foundation for engineering studies [1,3,5].
       A first-semester introductory engineering course emphasizing the nature of engineering
        and the role of the engineer as an ethical professional [1,2,5,6].
       Basic engineering science courses encompassing knowledge of mechanics,
        thermodynamics, materials, controls, and instrumentation [1,2,7].
       Laboratory courses in which students learn to design experiments, analyze data, and use
        modern tools of materials engineering practice [3,5,7].
       Design courses in the major discipline emphasizing design of thermal-fluid and
        mechanical systems [2,5,6,7,9].
       Interprofessional Projects (see Appendix D) in which students work in interdisciplinary
        teams to design solutions to real-world, open-ended problems, subject to realistic
        constraints. The program includes workshops on team dynamics, professional ethics,
        and project management [2,4,5,6,7,8,9].
       42 credit hours of courses designated as communication intensive, distributed across the
        major and non-major areas in which writing, oral, and graphical communication skills
        are developed [5].
       Technical elective courses enabling students to pursue technical studies outside of their
        major area, including opportunities for undergraduate participation in faculty research
        programs (undergraduate research is optional) [2,7].
        The effectiveness of the curriculum in achieving these outcomes is reinforced by well
        qualified faculty, academic advising conducted by full-time faculty, a low
        student/faculty ratio, well equipped laboratory facilities, and academic support services.

   Documentation
        The following sections are numbered according to the outcomes described above. The
        following materials will be available at the time of the visit:
        1. Surveys of recent alumni conducted by Electronic Benchmarking Inc.
        Surveys of graduating seniors.
        Surveys of faculty teaching senior level classes.
        Most recent assessment of mathematics skills conducted by the Department of Applied
          mathematics
        Most recent assessment of physical science skills conducted by the Department of
          Biological, Chemical and Physical Sciences.


                                                                                                17
Samples of graded student work from all engineering classes indicating achievement of
   the defined outcomes.


2. Surveys of recent alumni conducted by Electronic Benchmarking Inc.
Surveys of graduating seniors.
Surveys of faculty teaching senior level classes.
Assessment reports from the Interprofessional Projects program.
Graded student coursework and project reports.


3. Surveys of recent alumni conducted by Electronic Benchmarking Inc.
Surveys of graduating seniors.
Surveys of faculty teaching senior level classes.
Graded laboratory reports.


4. Assessment reports from the Interprofessional Projects program
Surveys of recent alumni conducted by Electronic Benchmarking Inc.
Surveys of graduating seniors.


5. Graded project reports.
Assessment report of the Writing Across the Curriculum program
Assessment reports of the Interprofessional Projects program
Surveys of recent alumni conducted by Electronic Benchmarking Inc.
Surveys of graduating seniors
Surveys of faculty teaching senior level classes


6. Surveys of recent alumni conducted by Electronic Benchmarking Inc.
Surveys of graduating seniors
Surveys of faculty teaching senior level classes


7. Assessment reports of the Interprofessional Projects program
Admissions to graduate schools.
Surveys of recent alumni conducted by Electronic Benchmarking Inc.
Surveys of graduating seniors.


                                                                                    18
       8. Data on employment of graduates
       Surveys of recent alumni conducted by Electronic Benchmarking Inc.


       In addition, detailed syllabi, handouts, homework sets, and examination papers from all
       engineering classes will be available, as will results of EI examinations for recent
       graduates, as reported by NCEES.
       As far as possible, all course materials including graded work will be made available
       electronically and indexed both by class and by outcome demonstrated.


   Achievement of Program Outcomes
       Each engineering class has a statement of expected outcomes that is available to the
       students at the beginning of the course. Faculty are expected to structure assignments to
       test achievement of these outcomes. At the end of each semester faculty complete a
       short online report documenting the extent, in their professional opinion, to which the
       outcomes have been achieved, the distribution of grades, and any comments they may
       have on the preparation of students to succeed in the course. The form also allows
       faculty to make suggestions for course improvement.
       An annual survey is taken of faculty teaching senior level engineering classes to
       determine the extent to which, in their professional opinion, the program outcomes are
       being realized in our graduates
       An annual survey is taken of graduating seniors to determine the extent to which they
       believe they have achieved the program outcomes
       An annual survey of recent alumni is performed by Electronic Benchmarking Inc. many
       of the questions on this survey relate to program outcomes.
       The Writing Across the Curriculum program assesses student communications skills
       and issues a regular report.
       The Interprofessional Projects program (see Appendix D) performs a very
       comprehensive assessment of student learning outcomes in many areas including:
       technical merit, ethics awareness, communications skills, recognition of the need for
       life-long learning, and ability to work in multidisciplinary teams.
The Departments of Humanities and Social Sciences provide assessment of the general
education program.




                                                                                               19
CRITERION 4. CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT

   Information Used for Program Improvement
       Program improvement takes place at three levels – general education (including
       mathematics, basic science, computer science and Interprofessional Projects),
       evolutionary program specific changes, and comprehensive program reviews.
       The general education program is under the purview of the IIT Undergraduate Studies
       Committee which is responsible for all evaluation, review and changes. The IIT
       Undergraduate Studies Committee meets monthly throughout the academic year. Each
       academic unit offering undergraduate programs has representation on this committee
       determined by program size; MMAE has two voting members. Ex-officio (non voting)
       members include the provost, director of admissions, director of educational services,
       librarian, etc.
       The IIT Undergraduate Studies Committee receives all data from assessment of the
       programs under its control, and determines whether any program changes are
       warranted. Proposed changes must be approved by majority vote of the committee and
       are then considered by the IIT Faculty Council which must also approve by majority
       vote and post the proposal on its web site. If 10 or more faculty request, the proposed
       change must be brought before the full faculty for final approval. Minutes of
       Undergraduate Studies Committee meetings are available at http://www.iit.edu/~ugsc
       and Faculty Council minutes are available at http://www.iit.edu/~unifc.
       At the program level, data from annual alumni surveys, graduating senior surveys,
       faculty surveys, faculty course outcome reviews, NCEES data are collected and
       reviewed by the associate chair for undergraduate programs. The associate chair is
       responsible for liaison with the Student Advisory Board. When issues are identified
       that appear to merit a response, it is brought before the department undergraduate
       studies committee for review and possible action. The undergraduate studies committee
       recommends all modifications to the departmental undergraduate programs to the full-
       time faculty, who must approve any change by majority vote. Faculty meetings are held
       monthly through the academic year, and a one-day faculty retreat is held each May. The
       IIT Undergraduate Studies Committee must be notified of any proposed changes that
       affect programs in other departments or general education components, or changes to
       credit hour totals. Program improvements by this process are generally evolutionary in
       nature.

       Since the appointment of Professor J. Yagoobi as chair the faculty has undertaken
       periodic comprehensive reviews of its undergraduate programs. These are typically
       performed on a 5 – 6 year cycle and involve the creation of an ad-hoc review committee
       which is charged with evaluating all available data, identifying trends in the discipline
       and employment opportunities, comparison with programs in other universities, and
       consideration of the needs and resources of the department. The ad-hoc committee
       submits a report with recommendations to the MMAE Undergraduate Studies
       Committee, the advisory boards and the full faculty (which has final authority for
       approving program changes).



                                                                                              20
       Minutes of MMAE Undergraduate Committee meetings, MMAE faculty meetings and
       retreats, and External Advisory Board meetings will be available at the time of the visit.

   Actions to Improve the Program
       General Education:

       The last comprehensive review and change to the general education requirements was in
       1999, and had been previously reported. The most significant changes were the
       introduction of 6 credit hours of Interprofessional Project experience in all majors, and
       a communications across the curriculum requirement. As a new, expensive and novel
       program, the Interprofessional Projects have been subject to ongoing scrutiny both the
       by Undergraduate Studies Committee and the Faculty Council. Subsequent
       improvements to the program include: establishment of a consistent funding level,
       appointment of a full-time faculty member (Senior Lecturer rank) to oversee the
       academic quality, introduction of structured workshops in ethics, team skills, and
       project management skills, a robust process for outcomes assessment involving both
       internal and external evaluators, a faculty oversight committee appointed by the Faculty
       Council, and the development of guidelines for the use of these projects as a capstone
       experience.

       Major Program:

       Internal review of the Aerospace Engineering program including a blueprint for
       the new program

       During 2007 the MMAE Department began discussing a major overhaul of the AE
       curriculum. The effort was led by Professor David Williams. The need for such an
       overhaul was critical because the existing curriculum was designed in 1988 to be a
       modification of the Mechanical Engineering program. At that time there were
       approximately 30 - 40 students in the program, and we did not have sufficient resources
       to support a completely independent Aerospace Engineering degree. Over the last 10
       years the number of Aerospace Engineering students has tripled, bringing the total to
       about 150 students. Although the number of students has grown, we are not ranked in
       the top 20 undergraduate programs by U.S. News. Concerns raised by previous ABET
       evaluators about the lack of Aerospace specific laboratories and weaknesses in capstone
       design courses needed more than just changes on paper.

       A committee of MMAE faculty met over the summer of 2007 to see what changes
       should be made in the Aero-curriculum to make it consistent with the top 10 degree
       programs in the country. We studied schools like Georgia Tech, U. Michigan, M.I.T.,
       The US Air Force Academy and Embry Riddle to name a few. It was obvious from the
       comparison that some fundamental courses were missing, some courses we teach are
       not necessary, and we have strengths in certain areas that could be used to make our
       program unique. In the end, nine new or substantially modified courses were added to
       the curriculum, which includes the addition of two new Aerospace laboratory courses.



                                                                                               21
The details of the changes are described in the following pages. The total number of
credit hours decreases by one, from 130 to 129 with the new program.

Our hope is to bring the program in line with the top programs in the country. The
updated curriculum can be marketed to other schools and to industry to begin the
process of improving our rankings. These changes are necessary first step toward
becoming ranked in the top 20 programs in the country, which we believe is an
achievable goal within the next five years.




                                                                                       22
Current Curriculum:




                      23
Proposed Curriculum:




                       24
Key Elements of Proposed Changes

New Courses (to be created)

   1)   Computational Mechanics II – applied finite element methods
   2)   Aero Lab I – aerostatics, static forces, moments, etc.
   3)   Aero Lab II – dynamic forces and signal acquisition and processing
   4)   Aerospace Dynamics and Flight Mechanics
   5)   Spacecraft Dynamics
   6)   Aero-design II – hands on experience
   7)   Space design II – hands on experience
   8)   Advanced Aero Course – unsteady aerodynamics, stall, flutter, and the use of
        computational methods to predict the loads


Existing courses to be modified

   1) Introduction to the Profession with an Aerospace focus
   2) Introduction to Computing (CS dept) teaches Matlab
   3) Fluid Mechanics drops the lab and teaches potential flow
   4) Aerospace Materials course created from a modified version of MMAE 371 (no lab)
   5) Aero Design I MAE 436 and Space Design I – MAE 437 focus on conceptual design
      only, providing input for the Design II courses.
   6) Solid Mech 201/202 sequence is replaced by existing MMAE 200 course (no changes
      needed)




                                                                                        25
                Aerospace Engineering: Semesters Three through Eight
                              COURSE SEQUENCE
Semester 3
MMAE 200                           Introduction to Mechanics                        3   0    3
Physics 221                        Electricity and Magnetism                        3   3    4
Math 251                           Multivariate and Vector Calculus                 4   0    4
Humanities or Social Science Elective                                               3   0    3
Humanities or Social Science Elective                                               3   0    3
                                                                                   16   3    17
Semester 4
MMAE 202                          Mechanics of Solids II                            3   0    3
MMAE 320                          Thermodynamics                                    3   0    3
MMAE 313                          Fluid Mechanics without Laboratory                3   0    3
Physics 224                       Thermal and Modern Physics                        3   0    3
Math 252                          Introduction to Differential Equations            4   0    4
                                                                                   16   0    16
Semester 5
MMAE 315                           Aero Lab I                                       2   6    4
MMAE 350                           Computational Mechanics                          3   0    3
MMAE 311                           Compressible Flow                                3   0    3
MMAE 312                           Aerodynamics of Aerospace Vehicles               3   0    3
Humanities or Social Science Elective                                               3   0    3
                                                                                   14   6    16
Semester 6
Interprofessional Project I                                                         1   6    3
MMAE 304                          Mechanics of Aerostructures                       3   0    3
MMAE 450                          Computational Mechanics II                        3   0    3
MMAE 452                          Aerospace Propulsion                              3   0    3
MMAE 372                          Aerospace Materials                               2   3    3
                                                                                   12   9    15
Semester 7
MMAE 414                           Aircraft Design I*                               2   3    3
or MMAE 412                        Spacecraft Design I*
MMAE 410                           Aircraft Flight Mechanics                        3   0    3
MMAE 411                           Spacecraft Dynamics                              3   0    3
MMAE 443                           Systems Analysis and Control                     3   0    3
Humanities or Social Science Elective                                               3   0    3
                                                                                   14   3    15
Semester 8
IPRO–MMAE 416                      Aircraft Design II*                              1   6    3
or IPRO–MMAE 413                   Spacecraft Design II*
MMAE 415                           Aero Lab II                                      2   6    4
Aerospace Elective**                                                                3   0    3
General Elective                                                                    3   0    3
Humanities or Social Science Elective                                               3   0    3
                                                                                   12   12   16
                                                                                    Total: 129
* Students must choose either the MMAE 414 and MMAE 416 sequence or the MMAE 412 and MMAE 413
sequence
** Students must choose either MMAE 417 or MMAE 472 or MMAE 418




                                                                                                  26
The following course descriptions are for new courses or courses whose descriptions will
be modified to be consistent with the new Aerospace Engineering Curriculum.

MMAE 200 — Introduction to Mechanics
Equilibrium concepts. Statics of a particle. Statics of a system of particles and rigid bodies.
Distributed forces, centroids and center of gravity. Friction. Kinetics of particles: Newton’s
Laws of motion, energy and momentum. Kinematics of particles. Dynamics of rotating bodies.
Credit for this course is not applicable to BSME or BSMSE programs. Prerequisites: MATH
152, PHYS 123, CS 105. (3-0-3)

MMAE 202 — Mechanics of Solids II
Stress and strain relations, mechanical properties. Axially loaded members. Torsion of circular
shafts. Plane stress and strain, Mohr’s circle, stress transformation. Elementary bending theory,
normal and shear stresses in beams, beam deflection. Combined loading. Prerequisite: MMAE
201 or MMAE 200. (3-0-3)

MMAE 316 — Aero Lab I
Basic skills for engineering research are taught, which include: analog electronic circuit
analysis, fundamentals of digital data acquisition, measurements of pressure, temperature, flow
rate, heat transfer, and static forces and moments; statistical data analysis.   Prerequisites:
MMAE 310 or MMAE 313, PHYS 221. (2-6-4)

MMAE 372 — Aerospace Materials Lab
Mechanical behavior and microstructural characterization of aerospace materials including:
advanced metal alloys, polymers, ceramics and composites. Introduction to mechanical testing
techniques for assessing the properties and performance of aerospace materials. Evaluation of
structural performance in terms of materials selection, processing, service conditions and
design. Prerequisites: MS 201, MMAE 202. (2-3-3)

MMAE 410 - Aircraft Flight Mechanics
Airplane performance: takeoff, rate of climb, time to climb, ceilings, range and endurance,
operating limitations, descent and landing. Helicopters and V/STOL aircraft.
Airplane static stability and control: longitudinal stability, directional stability, and roll
stability. Airplane equations of motion: kinematics and dynamics of airplanes, and stability
derivatives. Dynamic response: longitudinal modes of motion, lateral modes of motion.
Introduction to aircraft control. Prerequisite: MMAE 312. (3-0-3)

MMAE 411 - Spacecraft Dynamics
Orbital mechanics: two-body problem, Kepler’s equation, classical orbital elements, and
introduction to orbit perturbations. Spacecraft mission analysis: orbital maneuvers and
stationkeeping, earth orbiting, lunar, and interplanetary missions, introduction to orbit
determination. Spacecraft attitude dynamics: three-dimensional kinematics and dynamics of
spacecraft, rotating reference frames and orientation angles, and spacecraft equations of
motion. Spacecraft attitude stability and control: dual-spin platforms, momentum wheels,
control-moment gyros, gravity gradient stabilization, introduction to spacecraft attitude




                                                                                                 27
determination and control. Prerequisites: MMAE 200 or (MMAE 201 and MMAE 305),
MATH 252. (3-0-3)

MMAE 412 - Spacecraft Design I
Launch vehicle design including system engineering, payload mission definition, propulsion
and staging, structural design, trajectory analysis and guidance, launch window considerations,
navigation and attitude determination, booster re-entry, range safety, and reliability. Semester-
long project is focused on the integration of multiple systems into a coherent launch vehicle
design to achieve specific mission requirements. Prerequisite: MMAE 304, MMAE 452.
Concurrent requisite: MMAE 411. (2-3-3)

MMAE 413/IPRO - Spacecraft Design II
Spacecraft systems design including real world mission analysis and orbit design, launch
vehicle requirements, attitude determination and control, propulsion, structural design, power
systems thermal management, and telecommunications. Semester-long project is focused on the
integration of multiple systems into a coherent spacecraft design to achieve specific mission
requirements. Non-Aerospace engineering majors may enroll in this course with the permission
of the course instructor and the IPRO office. Prerequisites for Aerospace Engineering students:
MMAE 411 and MMAE 412. (1-6-3)

MMAE 414 – Aircraft Design I
Aircraft design including aerodynamic, structural and powerplant characteristics to achieve
performance goals. Focus on applications ranging from commercial to military and from
manpowered to high-speed to long-duration aircraft. Semester project is a collaborative effort
in which small design groups complete the preliminary design cycle of an aircraft to achieve
specific design requirements. Prerequisites: MMAE 304, MMAE 312, MMAE 452.
Concurrent requisite: MMAE 410. (2-3-3)(C)

MMAE 415/IPRO - Aircraft Design II
Team project that includes conceptual design, detail design, prototyping and testing (or
simulation) of an aircraft model or aircraft subsystem to meet performance specifications. Non-
Aerospace engineering majors may enroll in this course with the permission of the course
instructor and the IPRO office. Prerequisites for Aerospace Engineering students: MMAE 410
and MMAE 414. (1-6-3)

MMAE 416 — Aero Lab II
Advanced skills for engineering research are taught, which include experiments with digital
electronic circuit analysis, dynamic data acquisition techniques, fundamentals of fluid power
system design, GPS and inertial guidance systems, air-breathing propulsion, and fly-by-wire
control. Prerequisites: MMAE 316. (2-6-4)

MMAE 417 – Advanced Aerodynamics
Unsteady aerodynamics, nonlinear flight regimes at high angle of attack, missile aerodynamics,
hypersonic flight, and other topics relevant to the aerospace industry. Concurrent requisite:
MMAE 410. (3-0-3)




                                                                                               28
MMAE 418 – Fluid Power for Aerospace Applications
Basic principles and concepts needed for the design of fluid power systems. Emphasis is
placed on flight control hardware for aircraft and launch vehicle applications.
Concurrent requisites: MMAE 443, MMAE 416. (3-0-3)

MMAE 450 — Computational Mechanics II
Explores the use of numerical methods to solve engineering problems in continuum mechanics,
fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Topics include partial differential equations and differential
and integral eigenvalue problems. As tools for the solution of such equations we discuss
methods of linear algebra, finite difference and finite volume methods, spectral methods, and
finite element methods. The course contains an introduction to the use of a commercial finite
element package for the solution of complex partial differential equations. Prerequisites:
MMAE 350 or MATH 350. (3-0-3)

MMAE 472 — Advanced Aerospace Materials
Principles of materials and process selection for minimum weight design in aerospace
applications. Advanced structural materials for aircraft fuselage and propulsion applications.
Materials for space vehicles and satellites. Environmental degradation in aerospace materials.
Prerequisites: MMAE 372 or MMAE 371. (3-0-3)

Laboratories:

MMAE has made a major investment in undergraduate laboratories since the 2002 visit. These
are documented in Criterion 7.




                                                                                              29
CRITERION 5. CURRICULUM

   Program Curriculum
      In recognition of the evolving professional environment in which IIT’s graduates will
      work, and in line with the mission and goals of the university, the program has evolved as
      described above with the objective of placing emphasis on:

            Teaching students to understand the economic, ethical, societal, environmental and
             international context of their professional activities.
            Improving oral and written communication skills
            Training students to work in multidisciplinary teams
            Preparing students for the interprofessional work force of the 21st century
            Developing sound, fundamental knowledge of materials science, technical
             competence in techniques for determining the structure, properties and service
             behavior of materials, and preparation for a career or further study in the
             profession.

      To obtain the BS in Aerospace Engineering at IIT a student must satisfactorily complete
      130 credit hours. The courses can be broken down into the categories: general education
      (includes basic math and science, humanities and social or behavioral sciences,
      Interprofessional Projects), engineering topics, and technical electives.

      In the following descriptions, 32 credits is equivalent to 1 year of study.

      General Education Requirements

      Humanities and Social Science (21 credits)

               7 (21 credits) courses in the humanities and social or behavioral sciences (with a
      minimum of nine credit hours in each) are required provided the student takes and
      satisfies the IIT English Proficiency exam. (Students who do not satisfy the IIT English
      proficiency exam must take an English composition course at IIT in addition to the 21
      credit hours in humanities and social sciences.) Courses satisfying the 21 credit hours are
      listed in the bulletin with either an (H) or (S) for humanities and social sciences
      respectively. Two courses at the 300 level or above are required in both humanities and
      social science. In addition, two but not all of the courses a student takes in social science
      must be in the same field to provide some depth in a selected area.

      This meets the requirement of Criterion 5 and contributes substantially to the outcomes
      3(g), 3(h), 3(i), and 3(j).




                                                                                                30
Basic Math and Science (35 credits):

       4 (18 credits) calculus courses including one course each in “multivariate and
         vector calculus” and “differential equations” (MATH 151, 152, 251 & 252)
       1 (4 credits) Chemistry course which includes a laboratory (CHEM 124)
       3 (11 credits) Physics courses, two of which include a laboratory. The courses are
         calculus based and cover mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and thermal and
         modern physics (PHYS 123, 221 & 224).
       1 (2 credits) course in Computer Science (programming), including laboratory (CS
         105).

These courses provide the mathematical and scientific foundation for the engineering
science courses that follow, and meet the requirement of Criterion 5

Interprofessional Projects (IPRO’s) (6 credits)*

6 credits of IPRO courses are required. Students work in small multidisciplinary groups.
Often the students take one of their IPRO’s outside of the Department where the faculty
member in charge is from outside of the Department. Projects submitted for consideration
for IPROs typically include most of the following considerations in addition to technical
content: economic; environmental; sustainability; manufacturability; ethical; health and
safety; social; and political. IPRO selections must be approved by the student's academic
advisor to ensure compliance with the design requirement. IPROs also strongly
emphasize the need for lifelong learning. The IPRO support infrastructure is described in
Appendix D.

The general education requirement specifies six credit-hours of Interprofessional Project
courses. The AE program, in common with most others, achieves the requirement
through two three-hour courses. The two IPRO courses are taken in the Junior and Senior
years. These projects involve teams of (nominally) 10 students drawn from two or more
different disciplines who work under faculty guidance on open ended projects created by
the faculty or submitted by external organizations (companies, National Laboratories,
hospitals, not-for-profit organizations, etc.). Projects must include a technical component
and real-world constraints (economic, ethical, environmental) before being approved. The
IPRO program is coordinated by a full-time professional staff member, Thomas Jacobius.
Details of the services performed by his office may be found in Appendix D. A project
often runs for multiple semesters. Some recent projects include:

Paper Shedder (Manhattan Group) Sound, gear analysis, fracture analysis, motor
characteristics and power usage as a function of amount of paper shredded. (3 semesters).

Espresso Maker Analysis. Fluid flow, analysis of quality and durability

Machine Control (A. Finkl) Control of equipment and noise in a large forging shop (3
semesters)




                                                                                       31
Analysis of Stainless Steel Sink Surfaces (Elkay) to determine surface profiles that
resulted in superior scratch resistance. Developmemnt of real time acceptance/rejection of
polished sinks on the production floor.

Oven Load Analysis (A. Finkl) software development and furnace temperature
distribution for integration with forging company data base. (3 semesters)

Garage Door Opener to Fit in Environmental Chamber (Chamberlain) computer
controlled electronic brake, data analysis from load cell and laptop with NI DAC.
Simulated service test cycles to determine errors.

Chrysler brake pedal friction analysis (Chrysler), force and motion analysis of interaction
between shoe and brake pedal.

Quiet railroad wheels (Penn Machine), Noise level on the “EL” Wheel/rail interactions.

* Completion of the 8 semester ROTC program that includes leadership laboratories,
command experience and summer camp in a branch of the US military service is
considered equivalent in experience to one IPRO course for the purposes of team skills,
ethics awareness, professional development and lifelong learning. It does not substitute for
the design experience requirement of the second IPRO.

This meets the requirement of Criterion 5

Communications Intensive (C) Courses

In addition to the General Education Requirements and MSE requirements, there are
Special Academic Requirements concerning Writing and Communications. These
requirements are the following:
 “Students must satisfy the Basic Writing Proficiency Requirements as set forth in the
General Education Requirements. Students much complete a minimum of 42 credit hours
of courses with a significant written and oral communication component, identified with a
(C) in the catalog, with a minimum distribution as follows:
15 hours in major courses
15 hours in non-major courses"

The fifteen credit hour minimum of communications intensive (C) courses in the major is
achieved through required courses as follows: MMAE100 (3), MMAE371 (3),
MMAE310 (4), MMAE 322 (4) MMAE430 (4) and MMAE436 (3) and MMAE437 (3).
Additional (C) courses in the major may be taken as electives. Courses outside the major
that qualify as (C) courses include most humanities, social and behavioral science
electives, IPRO courses, and the required courses CHEM124, PHYS123, PHYS221 and
PHYS300.




                                                                                        32
Introduction to the Profession

The general education requirement specifies two credit hours (minimum) in the first year
for all majors, introducing students to their chosen profession. In the AE program this is
considered a very important aspect of the program, and three credit hours of MMAE100
are specified. This course includes: hands-on projects involving application of math and
science concepts to simple design problems, extensive use of computer tools, report
writing, oral presentations, and familiarization with the facilities of the department and
university.

Engineering Topics (51 credits)

Required courses

       1 (3 credits) introductory engineering courses: MMAE 100
       1 (2 credits) course in Engineering Graphics: EG 105
       1 (3 credits) course in Materials Science: MS 201
       1 (3 credits) course in Statics: MMAE 201
       1 (3 credits) course in Strength of Materials: MMAE 202
       2 (6 credits) courses in Thermodynamics: MMAE 320, MMAE 321
       1 (3 credits) course in Engineering Materials and Design with laboratory:
               MMAE 371
       1 (3 credits) course in Dynamics: MMAE 305
       1 (3 credits) course in Fluid Mechanics with laboratory: MMAE 310
       1 (3 credits) course in Heat and Mass Transfer with laboratory: MMAE 322
       1 (3 credits) course in Computational Mechanics: MMAE 350
       1 (3 credits) laboratory course in Instrumentation: PHYS 300
       1 (3 credits) course in Measurement Systems with laboratory: MMAE 430
       1 (3 credits) course in Analysis and Design of Machine Elements: MMAE 306
       2 (6 credits) courses in Design of Mechanical and Thermal Systems: MMAE 432,
               MMAE 433
       1 (3 credits) course in Systems Analysis and Control: MMAE 443
       1 (3 credits) course in Manufacturing Processes: MMAE 485

This meets the requirement of EAC of ABET Criterion 5

Design (13 credits) (satisfies part of ABET EAC criterion 4b)
1 (3 credits) course in Analysis and Design of Machine Elements (MMAE 306)
1 (4 credits) course in Measurement Systems which includes the design and realization
of an experimental project (MMAE 430)
2 (6 credits) courses in Design of Aerospace Vehicles – I (MMAE 436) and Design of
Aerospace Vehicles – II (MMAE 437). MMAE 436 covers aircraft design whereas
MMAE 437 covers spacecraft design.
By the time the student enters the senior year, he/she will be well prepared to take both
Design of Aerospace Vehicles (MMAE 436 and 437) of Thermal Systems as their


                                                                                        33
senior year capstone design courses. The courses listed under engineering topics above
serve as prerequisites for these capstone design courses and provide the students with
the ability to perform design and analysis of aerospace vehicles. The members of the
faculty teaching the design courses are surveyed to determine if the preparation level of
the students is adequate for the capstone design course.
The design component in the AE program begins with the MMAE 100 – Introduction to
the Professions class in the freshman year. Several engineering science courses in the
sophomore, junior and senior years have open-ended design-type problems that are
assigned. These are intended to prepare the student for the senior level capstone design
courses.

For the design of Aerospace Vehicles the student should have completed the following
directly related courses in engineering topics (in addition to the basic science and
mathematics courses) relevant to Aerospace Systems
     Three courses in Mechanics of Solids: MMAE 201, MMAE 202 and MMAE
        304
     One course in Dynamics: MMAE 305,
     One course in Material Science: MS 201
     One course in Engineering Materials and Design: MMAE 371
     One course in Compressible flow: MMAE 311
     One course in Aerodynamics: MMAE 312
     One course in Computational Mechanics: MMAE 350
     One course in Spacecraft and Aircraft Dynamics: MMAE 441
     One course in Propulsion: MMAE 452

Laboratory Experience

The laboratory experience for Aerospace Engineering students combines both the
theoretical and practical aspects of the basic sciences and engineering. In the first
semester, students take CHEM 124 – Principles of Chemistry I. This course covers
stoichiometry of chemical reactions, thermochemistry, properties of gases, states of
matter, chemical solutions, chemical reactions and kinetics. The course is 4 credit
hours, 3 of which are lecture material and one credit hour is devoted to a 3 hour
laboratory experience per week.
Several laboratory experiences are incorporated into MMAE 100 during the Freshman
year. These experiences are intended to introduce the student to engineering
experimental and design methods, engineering report writing and engineering
presentation techniques.
The two credit hour EG 105 – Engineering Graphics course includes a two hour lab per
week and the computer science course includes a one hour laboratory session per week.
Two of the Physics courses taken during the Freshman and Sophomore year have one
credit hour each devoted to a laboratory experience. PHYS 124 – General Physics I:
Mechanics is a four credit hour course and covers vectors and motion in 1, 2 and 3
dimensions, Newton’s laws, particle dynamics, work and energy principles,


                                                                                        34
conservation laws, kinematics, dynamics, angular momentum and equilibrium
principles of rigid bodies, harmonic motion, gravitation and basic fluid mechanics.
PHYS 221 – General Physics II: Electromagnetism and Optics is also a four credit hour
course and is taken during the first semester Sophomore year covers charge, electric
field, Gauss’ law, potential, capacitance, resistance, simple a/c and d/c circuits,
magnetic field, ampere’s law, Faraday’s law, induction, Maxwell’s equations,
electromagnetic waves and light, reflection, refraction, lenses, interference and
diffraction.
During the Junior year students take MMAE 371 – Engineering Materials and Design
which is a three credit hour course. One credit hour is devoted to experiments covering
laboratory testing methods including tension, torsion, hardness, impact, toughness,
fatigue and creep.
MMAE 310 – Fluid Mechanics is typically taken first semester Junior year. One credit
hour of the four credit hour course is dedicated to the following laboratory components:
introduction to measurements of fluid properties, conservation of mass and momentum,
flow through pipes and channels, flow-induced forces on bodies, orifice flow and
boundary layer flow.
Also, during the first semester Junior year students take Physics 300 – Instrumentation
Laboratory. This course covers basic electronic skills for scientific research and
includes electrical measurements, basic circuit analysis, diode and transistor circuits,
transistor and integrated amplifiers, filters and power circuits and basics of digital
circuits.
During the first semester Senior year, a typical Aerospace engineering student will take
MMAE 322 – Heat and Mass Transfer. One credit hour is devoted to experiments
covering an introduction to thermal science measurements, combustion, thermodynamic
cycles, conduction, convection and radiation heat transfer.
During the senior year students take MMAE 430 – Engineering Measurements. Two of
the four credit hours are assigned to advanced laboratory experiments and a team based
project addressing the application of engineering measurements to a variety of
engineering problems. The course covers measurement principles and instrumentation,
data acquisition, processing and presentation. Topics covered include measurement
techniques for temperature, motion, forces, fluid flow, heat flux, strain and
displacement. Modern analog and digital signal acquisition and processing techniques
are discussed in the lectures and incorporated in the laboratory exercises. Statistical
tools used in the analysis of the experimental data are covered including mean, standard
deviation and probability density functions. A team based project spanning one half of
the semester is also required which emphasizes the design and implementation of
experiments addressing a variety of engineering problems. Although MMAE 430 is
taken by both AE and ME students, the AE students select Aerospace Engineering
projects for the semester term projects. For such project Aerospace facilities such as
wind tunnels and jet flow facilities are made available to the students.




                                                                                       35
Technical and Free Electives (6 credits)
2 (6 credits) Technical Elective courses. These courses are any 300 level or greater, math,
physics, computer science, or engineering course approved by the advisor. In addition,
ECON 423 (Economic Analysis) and Electrical and Computer Engineering 218 are
permitted, as is MMAE491undergraduate research or MMAE497 Undergraduate Special
Topics. Technical electives partially satisfy the objectives of ABET Criteria 3(h), 3(i) and
3(j).
1 (3 credits) free elective course, which has no restrictions.

Minors
Minors are available to AE majors who wish to broaden their knowledge. A minimum of
five courses is required for a minor and there are several minors approved and listed in the
undergraduate bulletin. Those students wishing to minor in a different area can do so with
the approval of the MMAE department undergraduate studies committee and the
Department through which the minor is offered. Two of the required minor courses will
substitute for the required technical and free elective and therefore additional courses
beyond the 130 credit hours will be required. In the event a required course for the minor
is also required for the major, an approved substitution must be made. The Air Force,
Army and Navy ROTC programs qualify as minors.




                                                                                       36
   Prerequisite Flow Chart for the AE program




                                                 37
         Course Syllabi
          See Appendix A for course syllabi of each course used to satisfy the mathematics,
          science, and discipline-specific requirements.


                                         Table 5-1 Curriculum
                                          Aerospace Engineering

                                                                                Category (Credit Hours)
                                                                                  Engineering
                                                                                     Topics
                                                                                    Check if
 Year;                                                                  Math &      Contains
Sem or                             Course                                Basic     Significant General
Quarter                  (Department, Number, Title)                    Sciences Design () Education Other
          Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Requirements
                                                                                        (   )
          (54 cr. hours)
          MMAE 100 Introduction to the Profession (1-4-3)                              1( )           2
          MMAE 201 Mechanics of Solids I (3-0-3)                                       3( )
          MMAE 202 Mechanics of Solids II (3-0-3)                                      3( )
          MMAE 304 Mechanics of Aerostructures (3-0-3)                                 3( )
          MMAE 305 Dynamics (3-0-3)                                                    3( )
          MMAE 310 Fluid Mechanics with Laboratory (3-3-4)                             4( )
          MMAE 311 Compressible Flow (3-0-3)                                           3( )
          MMAE 320 Thermodynamics (3-0-3)                                              3( )
          MMAE 322 Heat and Mass Transfer (3-3-4)                                      4( )
          MMAE 350 Computational Mechanics (3-0-3)                                     3( )
          MMAE 371 Engineering Materials and Design (2-3-3)                            3( )
          MMAE 430 Engineering Measurements (2-6-4)                                    4(x)
          MMAE 436 Design of Aerospace Vehicles (2-3-3)                                3 (x )
          MMAE 437 Design of Aerospace Vehicles II (2-3-3)                             3 (x )
          MMAE 441 Spacecraft and Aircraft Dynamics (3-0-3)                            3( )
          MMAE 452 Aerospace Propulsion (3-0-3)                                        3( )
          Mathematics Requirements (18 cr. hours)                                        ( )
          MATH 151 Calculus I (4-1-5)                               5                    ( )
          MATH 152 Calculus II (4-1-5)                              5                    ( )
          MATH 251 Multivariate and Vector Calculus (4-0-4)         4                    ( )
          MATH 252 Introduction to Differential Equations (4-0-4)   4                    ( )
          Physics Requirements (14 cr. hours)                                            ( )
          PHYS 123 General Physics I: Mechanics (3-3-4)             4                    ( )
          PHYS 221 General Physics II: Electromagnetism and
                                                                    4                   (   )
          Optics (3-3-4)
          PHYS 224 General Physics III Lecture: Thermal and
                                                                    3                   (   )
          Modern Physics (3-0-3)
          PHYS 300 Instrumentation Laboratory (2-3-3)                                 3 (   )
          Chemistry Requirements (4 cr. hours)                                          (   )
          CHEM 124 Principles of Chemistry I (3-3-4)                4                   (   )
          Computer Science Requirement (2 cr. hours)                                    (   )
          CS 105 Introduction to Computer Programming I (2-1-2)     2                   (   )
          Engineering Graphics Requirements (2 cr. hours)                               (   )
          EG 105 Engineering Graphics and Design (1-2-2)                              2 (   )



                                                                                                          38
          Materials Science Requirement (3 cr. hours)                                      ( )
          MS 201 Materials Science (3-0-3)                                              3 ( )
          Humanities and Social Science Requirements (21 credit
                                                                                           ( ) 21
          hours of general education requirements)
          IPRO Electives (6 cr. hours)                                                     ( ) 6
          Technical Electives (6 cr. hours)                                                ( )             6
TOTALS-ABET BASIC-LEVEL REQUIREMENTS                                  35                    57 27          11
OVERALL TOTAL
FOR DEGREE
PERCENT OF TOTAL                                                      27%                 44% 21%          8%
 Totals Minimum semester credit hours                                    32 hrs      48 hrs
  must
satisfy Minimum percentage                                                27%       37.5 %
one set
Note that instructional material and student work verifying course compliance with ABET criteria for the
categories indicated above will be required during the campus visit.




                                                                                                                39
                                            Table 5-2. Course and Section Size Summary
                                                              Aerospace Engineering

                                                                     No. of
                                                    Responsible    Sections
                                                       Faculty     Offered in    Avg. Section
 Course No.                  Title                    Member      Current Year    Enrollment    Lecture1   Laboratory1   Other1
MMAE 100      Introduction to the Profession (1-   Kallend             3              35          50%         50%
              4-3)
MMAE 201      Mechanics of Solids I (3-0-3)        Wu                  4              43         100%
MMAE 202      Mechanics of Solids II (3-0-3)       Lisowski            3              45         100%
MMAE 304      Mechanics of Aerostructures (3-0-    Nair                1              32         100%
              3)
MMAE 305      Dynamics (3-0-3)                     Meade               4              29         100%
MMAE 310      Fluid Mechanics with Laboratory      Wark                6              13          75%         25%
              (3-3-4)
MMAE 311      Compressible Flow (3-0-3)            Nagib               1              37         100%
MMAE 320      Thermodynamics (3-0-3)               Ruiz                3              43         100%
MMAE 322      Heat and Mass Transfer (3-3-4)       Clack               5              15          75%         25%
MMAE 350      Computational Mechanics (3-0-3)      Meade               3              36         100%
MMAE 371      Engineering Materials and Design     Mostovoy            7              12          67%         33%
              (2-3-3)
MMAE 430      Engineering Measurements (2-6-       Mansy               4              16         50%          50%
              4)
MMAE 436      Design of Aerospace Vehicles (2-     Raman               1              25         40%          60%
              3-3)
MMAE 437      Design of Aerospace Vehicles II      Lisowski            1              31         40%          60%
              (2-3-3)
MMAE 441      Spacecraft and Aircraft Dynamics     Pervan              1              35         100%
              (3-0-3)
MMAE 452      Aerospace Propulsion (3-0-3)         Williams            1              32         100%
MATH 151      Calculus I (4-1-5)                   AM Dept.            9              30          80%         20%
MATH 152      Calculus II (4-1-5)                  AM Dept.           11              25          80%         20%
MATH 251      Multivariate and Vector Calculus     AM Dept.           12              29         100%



                                                                                                                                  40
                (4-0-4)
MATH 252        Introduction to Differential      AM Dept.              10              30          100%
                Equations (4-0-4)
PHYS 123        General Physics I: Mechanics (3- BCPS Dept.             20              17           75%          25%
                3-4)
PHYS 221        General Physics II:               BCPS Dept.            17              16           75%          25%
                Electromagnetism and Optics (3-
                3-4)
PHYS 224        General Physics III Lecture:      BCPS Dept.             5              43          100%
                Thermal and Modern Physics (3-
                0-3)
PHYS 300        Instrumentation Laboratory (2-3- BCPS Dept.              6              19           33%          67%
                3)
CHEM 124        Principles of Chemistry I (3-3-4) BCPS Dept.             7              59           75%          25%
CS 105          Introduction to Computer          CS Dept.              16              19           67%          33%
                Programming I (2-1-2)
EG 105          Engineering Graphics and Design CAEE Dept.               8              15           50%          50%
                (1-2-2)
MS 201          Materials Science (3-0-3)         Kallend                2             101          100%
                Humanities and Social Science
                Requirements (21 credit hours of
                general education requirements)
                IPRO Electives (6 cr. hours)
                Technical Electives (6 cr. hours)
       1
         Enter the appropriate percent for each type of class for each course (e.g., 75% lecture, 25% laboratory).




                                                                                                                        41
CRITERION 6. FACULTY

     Leadership Responsibilities
      Dr. Jamal Yagoobi is chair of the Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace
      Engineering. He is responsible for all programs offered in the department, has
      budgetary authority with respect to programs and teaching laboratrories, assigns
      teaching loads, assigns faculty to specific classes, monitors course evaluations and
      receives and acts on student concerns. The chair reports to the Dean of Armour College
      of Engineering. Dr. Yagoobi is assisted by two associate chairs, Dr. John Kallend
      (undergraduate programs) and Dr. Kevin Cassel (graduate programs).

     Authority and Responsibility of Faculty
      Full-time faculty are responsible for the creation and modification of courses, the
      structure of the program, and the laboratory experience of the students. Proposals to
      create new courses are reviewed by the MMAE Undergraduate Studies Committee and
      approved by the faculty of the department and the associate dean of Armour College of
      Engineering. In general only minor modifications to existing courses are approved.
      Major changes are usually handled by canceling the existing course and creating a new
      course to satisfy the changed objectives or outcomes. Changes to courses used to
      satisfy the general education requirements of the university must be approved by the IIT
      Undergraduate Studies Committee.

     Faculty
      Of the 23 full-time faculty in the MMAE Department, 18 are actively involved in the
      AE program and regularly teach required courses in the AE curriculum. In addition, a
      highly qualified group of part-time instructors contribute to the curriculum by bringing
      their industrial experience to the classroom, enriching the educational experience of our
      students. The full-time and part-time members of the MMAE faculty who contribute to
      the AE program are listed in Tables 6-1 and 6-2, and their vitae are provided in
      Appendix B. All full-time and part-time faculty/instructors who regularly teach
      required undergraduate Aerospace engineering courses have Ph.D.’s or the equivalent.
      Graduate students are used as teaching assistants for laboratory sessions and homework
      grading. Table 6-2 provides the teaching loads for the faculty for the Fall 2007 and
      Spring 2008 semesters and these loads are typical of other semesters as well. Typically,
      full-time faculty with moderate research involvement and nominal administrative
      responsibilities teach four courses per year. Those with additional administrative
      responsibilities and/or significant research involvement teach two to three courses per
      year, and those who are only involved with teaching and have little or no research or
      committee work assigned to them are typically assigned six courses per year. In
      addition to the regular course offerings, several MMAE faculty regularly offer IPROs
      that are available to all IIT students.


      In addition to their involvement in the educational programs of the department, many of
      the AE faculty are actively involved in research, industrial consulting, professional


                                                                                             42
       societies, graduate education, and academic administration. Five faculty are fellows of
       national societies, three are editors of international journals, four are licensed engineers,
       and four have received institutional teaching awards in recent years. A summary of their
       level of activity in these various endeavors can be found in Tables 6-1 and 6-2, and
       more detailed information is provided in the vitae included in Appendix B.

      Faculty Competencies
       The MMAE department is a truly multidisciplinary department, with the majority of
       full-time faculty teaching courses in more than one of the department’s three
       undergraduate majors. The faculty have expertise and teach in areas that cover all of
       the courses in solid mechanics, dynamics, strength of materials, material science,
       thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, systems and controls, manufacturing,
       computational mechanics and design. In addition we regularly offer technical elective
       courses in Finite Element Methods, CAD/CAM, Mechanical Vibrations and Internal
       Combustion Engines.

       The members of the faculty who teach the upper-level required Aerospace Engineering
       courses are listed below under their respective research areas. Their level of activity in
       research and/or consulting and industry is also noted. The AE courses taught by these
       faculty during the 2007-2008 academic year are shown in Table 6-1.

Program Faculty
       The areas of expertise of key members of the Aerospace faculty are given below:
       Dr. Kevin Cassel – Analytical and Computational Sciences
       Dr. Cassel’s research is in the application of analytical and computational methods to
       engineering problems in the area of fluid and thermal sciences. Professor Cassel’s
       research area is in computational fluid mechanics applied to unsteady flows. He is
       currently a Visiting Researcher at the University of Manchester, UK, where he spent his
       recent sabbatical, and he is a recent recipient of the IIT Excellence in Teaching Award.
       He also serves the department as the Associate Chair for Graduate Programs.

       Dr. Hassan Nagib – Fluid Mechanics and Turbulence, Flow Management and Control
       Dr. Nagib’s research includes the areas of hydrodynamic stability, applied turbulence,
       and convective heat transfer augmentation. Professor Nagib is internationally
       recognized for his research in turbulent boundary layers and flow control. He is a
       fellow of ASME, APS, AIAA and AAAS, and has recently been a visiting professor at
       the Federal Technical Institute in Switzerland and the Royal Technical Institute in
       Sweden.

       Dr. Sudhakar Nair – Solid Mechanics
       Dr Nair’s research has focused on the elastic and inelastic behavior of materials, applied
       mathematics, moving boundary problems, and wave propagation in anisotropic media.




                                                                                                  43
      Dr. Boris Pervan – Dynamics, Guidance Control and Aviation
      Dr. Pervan’s research includes local area augmentation of the Global Positioning
      System (GPS) and differential satellite based navigation systems for precision approach
      and landing of aircraft.

      Dr. Dietmar Rempfer – Theoretical Fluid Mechanics
      Dr. Rempfer’s research includes Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of spatial
      transition to turbulence in a boundary layer, and the development of Large Eddy
      Simulations (LES) sub-grid models based on low dimensional approximations.
      Professor Rempfer conducts research in computational fluid dynamics related to
      turbulence and environmental flows, including contaminant dispersion.

      Dr. Ganesh Raman – Aeroacoustics and Active Flow Control
      Dr. Raman’s research is the area of aeroacoustics including aircraft noise problems such
      as jet noise, supersonic jet screech, weapons bay noise suppression, and actuator
      development for active flow and noise control. He is a fellow of ASME, editor of the
      International Journal of Aeroacoustics and serves as Associate Dean for research in the
      Graduate College.

      Dr. David Williams - Director of Fluid Dynamics Research Center
      Dr. Williams’s research includes flow control, flow metering, fluidic oscillators, linear
      and nonlinear wave interactions in transitioning flows, and acoustic measurement
      techniques. Dr. Williams serves as the director of the Fluid Dynamics Research Center.
      He is a fellow of APS, recipient of the Sigma Xi Award and Honeywell Advance
      Technology Achievement Award.

      Dr. Candace Wark – Experimental Fluid Mechanics
      Professor Wark’s area of research is in turbulence and experimental fluid dynamics, and
      she is currently serving as the Associate Dean of Armour College of Engineering.



Other faculty teaching required courses for AE students include:
Professors: Herek Clack, Francisco Ruiz (Thermal Sciences)

      Professor Clack is active in research in the areas of atomization and combustion, an he
      has recently been awarded an NSF CAREER award. Professor Ruiz’s research area is
      in atomization, combustion, and pollution control in engines. In addition he is a very
      strong proponent of the IPRO program and offers many IPRO courses and has recently
      received the IIT Excellence in Teaching Award.


Professors: Michael Gosz, Kevin Meade, Sheldon Mostovoy, Sudhakar Nair, Murat
       Vural (Solid Mechanics/Mechanical Systems)

      Professor Gosz’s research is in the area of computational solid mechanics, and he
      recently published a textbook on finite-element methods. He is currently the Associate


                                                                                            44
      Provost and is a recent recipient of the IIT Excellence in Teaching Award. Professor
      Meade conducts research in the biomechanics of the spine and is active in clinical work
      internationally. Professor Mostovoy’s expertise is in the mechanics of materials and
      actively consults with industry on a wide variety of issues. Professor Nair is an active
      researcher in continuum mechanics and is a fellow of ASME. He is currently serving as
      the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the Graduate College. Professor Vural’s
      research is in experimental solid mechanics including composites.

Professors: Xiaoping Qian, Sammy Tin, Benxin Wu (Manufacturing)

      Professors Qian, Tin and Wu have all joined the IIT faculty since 2004 and have
      dramatically increased the level of activity in manufacturing-related areas. Professor
      Qian actively conducts research in digital manufacturing and is an ASME technical
      chair. Professor Tin has recently won the IOM3 Cook Ablett and ASM Marcus A.
      Grossman awards for his work in manufacturing of materials for high-temperature
      applications. Professor Wu’s expertise is in laser-based manufacturing and joined the
      department in 2007.
                           *
Professors: Matthew Peet , Boris Pervan, Matthew Spenko (Dynamics and Controls)

      Professor Pervan has an active research group in the area of guidance and navigation.
      He is an Associate Editor for the Journal of the Institute of Navigation, and has recently
      been awarded the IIT Excellence in Teaching Award and the IIT Sigma Xi Award for
      Excellence in Research. Professor Spenko joined IIT in 2007 and is an expert in
      robotics. Professor Peet will join the faculty in fall 2008 and is active in control theory.

Faculty Size
      The MMAE Department is comprised of 23 full-time faculty, of which 18 are actively
      involved in the AE program and regularly teach required courses or technical electives
      in the AE curriculum. The full-time faculty is complemented with a group of part-time
      instructors who typically have significant industrial experience. Recent hires in
      manufacturing and dynamics and controls have significantly enhanced our faculty
      resources and reduced our reliance on part-time faculty in these critical areas. Each area
      encompassed by the Aerospace Engineering program now has a critical mass of full-
      time faculty to offer the full complement of courses in addition to ongoing research
      activities in each area.

      Although the absolute size of the faculty has grown over the last five years, the number
      of students in the department has grown even faster in the same period of time.
      Therefore, while all the curricular areas of the AE program are sufficiently represented,
      the current student to faculty ratio in the department is approximately 15:1, which is
      slightly higher than historical levels. This has resulted in the average section size for
      required AE courses rising to 30 students. Historically, we have prided ourselves on


      *
          will join the Department during Fall 2008


                                                                                               45
       offering small class sizes with abundant student-faculty interaction; therefore, additional
       faculty are required to keep pace with the increase in student enrollment. Every student
       has a faculty advisor from amongst the full-time faculty, each of whom monitor and
       advise approximately 23 students.

Faculty Development
       The MMAE Department supports its faculty members’ development as summarized
       below.

       - Select senior MMAE faculty members attend junior faculty’s lectures and provide
         constructive input to improve their teaching skills.
       - During a given semester, the department chair seeks direct input from students of
         courses taught by those faculty members who are in need of improving their teaching
         skills. The chair then gives constructive inputs to the corresponding faculty
         members.
       - Department provides TAs for classes with laboratories as well as for classes with
         over 20 registered students.
       - Department and the engineering college both financially support the faculty members
         to attend teaching workshops either offered on campus or off campus. This is
         especially true for tenure-track faculty.
       - Department provides about $3,000 yearly for the assistant and associate (research
         active) professors toward their professional development activities. These activities
         include, for example, attending educational conferences or membership fees in
         societies such as ASME and ASEE.
       - Department purchases commercial software packages (or pays for their yearly
         licensing fees) for the faculty who require them in their courses. This is in addition
         to those software packages provided by the institute.
       - It is a departmental policy to yearly review all the tenure-track faculty members’
         dossiers. This applies to tenured associate professors per their requests. This review
         process includes teaching activities of the faculty.
       - The well equipped machine shop located in the MMAE Department provides support
         for all teaching laboratories and courses which require such assistance.
       - Department provides clerical services for teaching activities of its faculty members.
         In addition, a staff member is dedicated to process the purchases of all the equipment
         and supplies for the teaching laboratories and select courses.

Examples of AE faculty developing new technology for aircraft
Many members of the Aerospace Engineering faculty are actively working with industry and
Government agencies on developing new technology for future aircraft and spacecraft. A non-
exhaustive list of examples appears below: Dr. Williams has worked cooperatively with NASA
Glenn on a multi-year program funded by DARPA/Honeywell that focuses on using Active
Flow Control technology to favorably alter compressor performance. His students have
designed the compressor in Room 142 of building E1. Dr. Raman and Williams have jointly
been involved in an AFOSR (Air Force Office of Scientific Research) program to study the
coupling of twin jets nozzles of complex geometry. Dr. Raman has also worked on a


                                                                                               46
DARPA/Boeing program to develop actuators for use on future supersonic aircraft. Dr. Nagib
has worked on a variety of projects for the Boeing Company that are related to Active Flow
Control of tilt-rotor aircraft. Dr. Pervan is active in navigation, guidance, and control research.
He is a currently principal investigator for research projects sponsored by the Federal Aviation
Administration and The Boeing Co. focused on the development of satellite-based navigation
systems for the automatic precision approach and landing of civil and military aircraft. Dr.
Pervan is also a technical advisor to the FAA, and editor of the journal "Navigation," and
serves on the executive council of the Satellite Division of the Institute of Navigation.

Undergraduate Research Participation:
Our undergraduate students have benefited immensely from ongoing research projects and
from the NASA space grant. Many undergraduates work as research participants in funded
projects that relate directly to technology development for future aircraft. In the course of their
participation they are exposed to the application of advanced measurement and analysis
techniques to solve engineering problems. In addition they interact with other researchers in
the field and present papers at National Conferences such as the AIAA Fluid Dynamics,
Aerospace Sciences, and Flow Control Conferences.




                                                                                                 47
                                                      Table 6-1. Faculty Workload Summary
                                                                   Aerospace Engineering

                                                                                                                                    2
                           FT                                                                         Total Activity Distribution
    Faculty Member         or      Classes Taught (Course No./Credit Hrs.)                               Research/Scholarly
                              4                             1                                                                                      3
        (name)             PT                 Term and Year                                Teaching             Activity                     Other
    Anderson, Scott        PT                F07: MMAE 305 (3)                               100%
Cammino, Roberto           PT                  F07: MMAE 200 (3)                             100%
     Cassel, Kevin         FT                  S08: MMAE 350 (3)                             40%                 40%                    20% (Assoc. Chair)
      Clack, Herek         FT          F07: MMAE 100 (3), MMAE 322 (4)                       50%                 50%
     Gosz, Michael         FT                  S08: MMAE 451 (3)                             30%                 20%                50% (Assoc. Provost)
     Kallend, John         FT           F07: MMAE 100 (3), MS 201 (3)                        60%                 10%                30% (Assoc. Chair &
                                              S08: MS 201 (3)                                                                          Assoc. Dean)
    Lisowski, Ronald       PT                F07: MMAE 201 (3)                               100%
                                       S08: MMAE 202 (3), MMAE 437 (3)
    Mansy, Hansen          PT                  F07: MMAE 430 (4)                             100%
                                               S08: MMAE 430 (4)
     Meade, Kevin          FT     F07: MMAE 305 (3), MMAE 350 (3), IPRO (3)                  80%                 20%
                                  S08: MMAE 305 (3), MMAE 350 (3), IPRO (3)
Mostovoy, Sheldon          FT      F07: MMAE 371 (3), MMAE 370 (3), MMAE                     80%                 20%
                                               476 (3), IPRO (3)
                                         S08: MMAE 371 (3), IPRO (3)
     Nagib, Hassan         FT                  F07: MMAE 491 (4)                             50%                 50%
                                               S08: MMAE 311 (3)
     Nair, Sudhakar        FT                    S08: MMAE 304                               30%                 20%                    50% (Assoc. Dean)


1
    Indicate Term and Year for which data apply (the academic year preceding the visit).
2
    Activity distribution should be in percent of effort. Members' activities should total 100%.
3
    Indicate sabbatical leave, etc., under "Other."
4
    FT = Full Time Faculty        PT = Part Time Faculty




                                                                               48
                                                Table 6-1. Faculty Workload Summary (cont’d)
                                                                   Aerospace Engineering

                                                                                                                                    2
                           FT                                                                         Total Activity Distribution
    Faculty Member         or      Classes Taught (Course No./Credit Hrs.)                               Research/Scholarly
                              4                             1                                                                                     3
        (name)             PT                 Term and Year                                Teaching             Activity                     Other
     Pervan, Boris         FT         F07: MMAE 441 (3), MMAE 497 (4)                        30%                  70%
     Qian, Xiaoping        FT                  F07: MMAE 445 (3)                             50%                 50%
                                               S08: MMAE 306 (3)
    Raman, Ganesh          FT                  S08: MMAE 436 (3)                             30%                 30%                    40% (Assoc. Dean)
    Rempfer, Dietmar       FT                                                                50%                 50%
     Ruiz, Francisco       FT     S08: MMAE 321 (3), MMAE 491 (3), IPRO (3)                  80%                 20%
    Spenko, Matthew        FT          S08: MMAE 432 (3), MMAE 491 (1)                       30%                 70%
      Vural, Murat         FT                                                                40%                 60%                    On leave F07, S08
     Wark, Candace         FT                  F07: MMAE 310 (4)                             30%                 30%                    40% (Assoc. Dean)
                                               S08: MMAE 310 (4)
     Williams, David       FT                  F07: MMAE 452 (3)                             50%                 50%
                                               S08: MMAE 312 (3)
      Wu, Benxin           FT                  S08: MMAE 201 (3)                             30%                 70%
1
    Indicate Term and Year for which data apply (the academic year preceding the visit).
2
    Activity distribution should be in percent of effort. Members' activities should total 100%.
3
    Indicate sabbatical leave, etc., under "Other."
4
    FT = Full Time Faculty        PT = Part Time Faculty




                                                                               49
                                                                  Table 6-2. Faculty Analysis
                                                                          Aerospace Engineering

                                                                                                                                                  Level of Activity (high, med, low,




                                          Highest Degree
                                                                                        Years of Experience                                                   none) in:




                                                                                                                                  Registration/
                                                                                                                                  Professional

                                                                                                                                  Certification
                                             and Field




                                                                                    Govt./Industr




                                                                                                    Total Faculty




                                                                                                                                                    Professional




                                                                                                                                                                               Consulting
                 Rank




                                                                                                                    Institution
                                                                                     y Practice




                                                                                                                                                                    Research



                                                                                                                                                                                /Summer

                                                                                                                                                                                 Industry
                                                                                                                                                                                  Work in
                                                                                                                                                      Society
                        Type of




                                                                                                                       This
                       Academic                             Institution from
                      Appointmen    FT                       which Highest
                            t       or                     Degree Earned &
   Name                TT, T, NTT   PT                            Year
 Anderson,      Inst.     NTT       PT    PhD                   IIT 1992              19            17                17                            Low            None          High
   Scott
 Cammino,     Inst.      NTT        PT    PhD                  IIT 2001                 8            1                 1                            Low            None          High
  Roberto
Cassel, Kevin AP           T        FT    PHD                Lehigh 1993                4           12                12                            Med            Med           Low

Clack, Herek    AP         T        FT    PhD                Berkeley 1998              6            9                 9                            Med            Med           Med

Gosz, Michael   AP         T        FT    PhD              Northwestern 1993            2           15                12                            Low            Med           Low

Kallend, John    P         T        FT    PhD               Cambridge 1971              1           36                30             UK             Low            Low           Low

 Lisowski,   Inst.       NTT        PT    PhD               University of IL            9           31                 1                            High           None          Low
  Ronald
  Mansy,     Inst.       NTT        PT    PhD                  IIT 1990               11            18                18                            Low            High          Low
  Hansen
Meade, Kevin   P           T        FT    PhD              Northwestern 1982            8           25                25                            Med            Med           Med

Instructions: Complete table for each member of the faculty of the program. Use additional sheets if necessary. Updated information is to be provided at
the time of the visit. The level of activity should reflect an average over the year prior to visit plus the two previous years.
Column 2 Code: aP = Assistant Professor    AP = Associate Professor  P = Professor
Column 3 Code: TT = Tenure Track     T = Tenured    NTT = Non Tenure Track




                                                                                   50
                                                            Table 6-2. Faculty Analysis (cont’d)
                                                                         Aerospace Engineering

                                                                                                                                                 Level of Activity (high, med, low,




                                          Highest Degree
                                                                                       Years of Experience                                                   none) in:




                                                                                                                                 Registration/
                                                                                                                                 Professional

                                                                                                                                 Certification
                                             and Field




                                                                                   Govt./Industr




                                                                                                   Total Faculty




                                                                                                                                                   Professional




                                                                                                                                                                              Consulting
                 Rank




                                                                                                                   Institution
                                                                                    y Practice




                                                                                                                                                                   Research



                                                                                                                                                                               /Summer

                                                                                                                                                                                Industry
                                                                                                                                                                                 Work in
                                                                                                                                                     Society
                      Type of




                                                                                                                      This
                     Academic                               Institution from
                    Appointmen     FT                        which Highest
                          t        or                      Degree Earned &
    Name             TT, T, NTT    PT                             Year
  Mostovoy,      AP       T        FT     PhD                   IIT 1968             17            31                31                            Low            Low           Med
   Sheldon
Nagib, Hassan    P         T       FT     PhD                  IIT1972                 2           37                37                            High           High          High

Nair, Sudhakar   P         T       FT     PhD                UCSD 1974                 0           31                31                            Low            Med           Med

Pervan, Boris    AP        T       FT     PhD               Stanford 1996              6            9                 9                            High           High          Low

Qian, Xiaoping   aP       TT       FT     PhD               Michigan 2001              3            4                 4                            High           High          Med

   Raman,         AP          T        FT      PhD         Case Western            14            9           9                   High Med       Med
   Ganesh                                                   Reserve 1991
  Rempfer,        AP          T        FT      PhD           University of          0           13           7                   Low  High      Low
   Dietmar                                                  Stuttgart 1991
     Ruiz,        AP          T        FT      PhD        Carnegie Mellon           0           21          21         IL        Low  Low       Low
  Francisco                                                      1987
   Spenko,        aP         TT        FT      PhD            MIT 2005              2            1           1                   Low  High      Med
   Matthew
Instructions: Complete table for each member of the faculty of the program. Use additional sheets if necessary. Updated information is to be provided at
the time of the visit. The level of activity should reflect an average over the year prior to visit plus the two previous years.
Column 2 Code: aP = Assistant Professor   AP = Associate Professor P = Professor
Column 3 Code: TT = Tenure Track     T = Tenured   NTT = Non Tenure Track




                                                                                  51
                                                            Table 6-2. Faculty Analysis (cont’d)
                                                                        Aerospace Engineering

                                                                                                                                                Level of Activity (high, med, low,




                                          Highest Degree
                                                                                      Years of Experience                                                   none) in:




                                                                                                                                Registration/
                                                                                                                                Professional

                                                                                                                                Certification
                                             and Field




                                                                                  Govt./Industr




                                                                                                  Total Faculty




                                                                                                                                                  Professional




                                                                                                                                                                             Consulting
                Rank




                                                                                                                  Institution
                                                                                   y Practice




                                                                                                                                                                  Research



                                                                                                                                                                              /Summer

                                                                                                                                                                               Industry
                                                                                                                                                                                Work in
                                                                                                                                                    Society
                     Type of




                                                                                                                     This
                    Academic                                Institution from
                   Appointmen      FT                        which Highest
                         t         or                      Degree Earned &
  Name              TT, T, NTT     PT                              Year
Vural, Murat    aP      TT         FT     PhD              Istanbul Technical         3            5                 5                            Med            High          Low
                                                             University 1998
   Wark,        P          T       FT     PhD                    IIT1988              4           20                20                            Med            Med           Low
  Candace
  Williams,     P          T       FT     PhD               Princeton 1982            2           24                24                            Med            High          Med
   David
 Wu, Benxin     aP        TT       FT     PhD                Purdue 2007              0            1                 1                            Low            High          Med

Instructions: Complete table for each member of the faculty of the program. Use additional sheets if necessary. Updated information is to be provided at
the time of the visit. The level of activity should reflect an average over the year prior to visit plus the two previous years.
Column 2 Code: aP = Assistant Professor   AP = Associate Professor P = Professor
Column 3 Code: TT = Tenure Track     T = Tenured   NTT = Non Tenure Track




                                                                                 52
CRITERION 7. FACILITIES

        Space
         Office and Instructional Facilities

         The MMAE department is housed in the Engineering 1 (E1) Building on IIT’s main
         campus, which contains faculty offices, conventional classrooms, a large auditorium
         complete with multimedia capability, computer laboratories and teaching and research
         laboratories and the department’s machine shop. Other departments in this building are
         Applied Mathematics and Biomedical Engineering (to be moved during the next year).
         The offices of the Dean of Armour College of Engineering as well as the Dean of College
         of Science and Letters are both located in E1 Building as well. More than 50% of the
         building’s space is occupied by MMAE, which is adequate to house the administrative,
         faculty, staff, and laboratory needs of the department.
         Classroom space within E1 has been adequate for the program in the past. However,
         with the recent increase in the MMAE enrollment, the majority of classrooms in E1 do
         not accommodate classes with over 27 students. Therefore, some of the MMAE classes
         are held in other main campus buildings. All classrooms in E1 (with the exception of one
         classroom in the basement) have been recently renovated and are now equipped with the
         state-of-the art projection system/digital media which allow for offering the lectures on
         internet. The department has several portable LCD projectors and laptop computers, and
         web-based Blackboard software is available for all IIT course, which offers web posting
         of course lectures, supplemental material, and homework assignments and solutions.
         Laboratory Facilities

         Instructional Laboratories supporting AE Curricula

                      Course Number                    Course Title

                         MMAE 371            Engineering Materials and Design

                         MMAE 310                     Fluid Mechanics

                         MMAE 322                 Heat and Mass Transfer

                         MMAE 430               Engineering Measurements

                         MMAE 445*          CAD/CAM with Numerical Control

*
    Course not required for AE graduates but laboratory facilities are available to AE students for
                                      independent projects.




                                                 53
                         Current Instructional Laboratory Facilities
                             Aerospace Engineering Program

Physical         Course            Condition of       Adequacy for        Number of      Area
Facility                           Facility           Instruction         Student        (sq. ft.)
Building/Rm                                                               Stations
E1 Rm. 018       MMAE 371          Adequate           Adequate               3 to 5         1127
E1 Rm. 019       MMAE 445*         Adequate           Adequate               3 to 6         1250
E1 Rm. 028       MMAE 310          Adequate           Adequate               4 to 6         1200
E1 Rm. 022       MMAE 322          Adequate           Adequate               3 to 5         1150
E1 Rm. 141
E1 Rm. 141       MMAE 310          Adequate           Adequate               3 to 4       2500
E1 Rm. 135       MMAE 430          Adequate           Adequate               4 to 5        500
                                                                                         TOTAL
                                                                                         AREA
                                                                                          7727
*
  Course not required for AE graduates but laboratory facilities are available to AE students for
independent projects.

       Library Facilities

       The book and journal collections for the MMAE programs are limited and generally
       focused on specific research areas. However, the IIT library offers adequate internet
       services with links to various resources (e.g., ASME, Academic Press journals).
       Furthermore, the internet services at the library provide faculty and students with
       resources of other universities. Through the interlibrary loan services, the faculty and
       students can borrow journals and books that are available in other libraries in the state of
       Illinois. These services have been generally adequate and continue to improve.

      Resources and Support

       Computing Resources

       The computing needs of the faculty, staff, and students within the MMAE department are
       met by a combination of departmental and IIT computing resources. In addition to the
       IIT hardware, software and support services provided by the Office of Technology
       Services (OTS) (see Appendix D), the department maintains numerous personal
       computers and laptops for individual use by faculty and staff and group use by students.
       Students have access to a computer laboratory with approximately 20 personal computers
       that have a standard suite of software. This is in addition to the computer laboratories
       found throughout the campus that are maintained by OTS, for example, a computer
       laboratory containing approximately 30 personal computers is located in the basement of
       the Engineering 1 Building.



                                                54
The departmental computing resources, including personal computers, printers,
networking infrastructure, etc., are maintained by a dedicated OTS staff member (Scott
Bachman) whose office is in the E1 building, providing easily accessible and timely
support. The hardware, software, networking, and support needs of the department have
been well maintained and have been adequate to support the administrative, instructional,
and research needs of the department

Laboratory Equipment Acquisition and Maintenance

The MMAE Undergraduate Laboratory Committee is responsible for developing and
implementing a comprehensive plan for providing adequate facilities for undergraduate
courses. The committee works to reconcile the changing needs of the mechanical,
materials, and aerospace engineering curricula with the available resources. The tasks of
the committee include:

  Distribution and reassignment of laboratory space, as necessary.
  Periodic review and updating of laboratory-related curricula.
  Maintenance and modernization of laboratory equipment and facilities.

The members of the MMAE Undergraduate Laboratory Committee, and the laboratory
courses for which they are responsible, are:

  Herek Clack, Chair         MMAE 322 Heat and Mass Transfer
  Sheldon Mostovoy           MMAE 371 Engineering Materials and Design
  Candace Wark               MMAE 310 Fluid Mechanics
  Xiaoping Qian              MMAE 445 CAD/CAM with Numerical Control
  Ganesh Raman               MMAE 430 Engineering Measurements

Each member of the MMAE Undergraduate Laboratory Committee is responsible for
monitoring the operation and currency of at least one laboratory course. As the need for
repair and replacement of equipment, software upgrades, and other infrastructure
improvements are identified, the responsible committee member will convey those needs
to the Undergraduate Laboratory Committee. The Undergraduate Laboratory Committee
then prioritizes the requests and makes annual purchases of laboratory equipment based
on the prioritized requests.

The primary determinant of the pace and scope of laboratory improvements is financial
resources. Within the past three years, the MMAE Department raised about $1.2M
(including matching funds from IIT) toward improving all its undergraduate laboratories.
These improvements included, for example, renovation of the laboratory rooms and
purchasing of new equipment. Therefore, the MMAE Department undergraduate
laboratories are currently in excellent shape and are all updated. The yearly funds to
maintain, operate, and further improve the undergraduate laboratories now come from the
fees paid by the students who are registered in these laboratories. The MMAE
department has been receiving approximately $40,000 per year for its laboratories in the
last two years. This policy of student fee for the undergraduate teaching laboratories was
                                        55
    introduced and implemented by the Dean of Armour College of Engineering three years
    ago.

    Support for the upkeep, maintenance, and repair of laboratory equipment is provided
    by the MMAE Machine Shop staff (Craig Johnson, Ron Mashek, John Swartz), and
    the director of the materials research labs (Russ Janota).

    MMAE Machine Shop

    The MMAE machine shop plays an important role in all three MMAE B.S. programs,
    especially with regards to the laboratory courses. The machine shop staff consists of
    three technicians. The shop is very well equipped. The following lists the major
    equipment available in the MMAE machine shop.

    Lathes: HAAS SL20 10 x 20'' CNC lathe, TOS SN40A 24 x 48'' gap bed lathe, Monarch
    16 x 54'' lathe, three LeBlond 14 x 36'' lathes, Jet 13 x 36'' lathe, and two Cincinnati 12 x
    36'' lathes

    Milling Machines: HAAS VF2 Vertical CNC mill and four Bridgeport vertical mills

    Drilling Machines: MAS 30’’radial drill, Cincinnati 12'' gearhead drill, and two
    Craftsman 8'' drill presses

    Metal Saws: DoAll 15'' band saw, Powermatic 19'' band saw, and Kalamazoo cut off
    band saw

    Sheet metal equipment: Wysong 52'' power sheer, and Pexto 6' brake 36'' slip roll

    Grinders: Brown & Sharp No. 5, 18 x 6'' surface grinder, five pedestal grinders, and
    Roskwell 6'' belt sander

    Woodworking equipment: Delta Uni-Saw 10'', Grizzly 20''wood planer, and Grizzly
    wood shaper

    Measurement and inspection equipment: Mitutoyo Quickscope CCD microscope,
    Mitutoyo PJ3000 optical comparator, Mitutoyo BH303 Coordinate measuring machine,
    Mitutoyo CBH400 Contracer, and Mitutoyo toolmakers microscope


   Major Instructional and Laboratory Equipment
    See Appendix C.




                                              56
CRITERION 8. SUPPORT

     Program Budget Process and Sources of Financial Support
      The AE/MSE/ME programs do not have budgets independent of the other programs,
      graduate and undergraduate, in the MMAE Department. The budget for the Armour
      College of Engineering is negotiated between the Dean of Armour College of
      Engineering and the Provost. The MMAE Chair and the other Armour Chairs meet
      regularly every two weeks with the Dean of Engineering to discuss the state of the
      college and various initiatives which are ongoing. The Chair is asked to develop a
      strategy for the upcoming years consonant with the 5 year plan of the college. This
      strategy may include various items, such as faculty and staff salaries and raises,
      additional faculty positions, new initiatives, resources for labs, etc. From this strategy the
      Dean develops the department budget for the following year. Modifications to this
      strategy, based on overall university needs and availability of funds, are discussed with
      the Chair and the yearly budget is determined. Budgets run from June 1st to May 31st.


     Adequacy of Budget
      The budget for the MMAE Programs is provided in the overall MMAE Department
      budget given in Table D-3. The department receives the budget allocation for the fiscal
      year in June. Major budget items include:

      . Wages (full-time faculty and staff, full-time and part-time lecturers, staff, teaching
      asistants, and part-time student workers)
      . Supplies (office supplies, expendable supplies, computers, etc)
      . Travel
      . Communications
      . Equipment (purchases and maintenance)
      . Building maintenance
      . Others (e.g. funds for faculty development, other operational expenses)

      With the exception of full-time faculty/staff wages and communications, the department
      has full discretion over all remaining items. Overall the budget is adequate; however, the
      expenses for the TA budget and part-time lecturers as well as travel, equipment, and
      building maintenance always exceed the available budget from IIT. The institutional
      support in such areas will need to be increased. The budget for TA typically covers 15
      half-time positions. The department definitely needs an increase of at least 30 percent in
      the TA budget to increase the number of TAs to accommodate the current needs due to
      significant enrollment increase within the past five years. Note that the current TA
      stipend level is very comparable with that of most other peer institutions. The part-time
      lecturers budget will need to increase by at least 40 percent for the reason stated above as
      well as to maintain classes with less than 40 students. The recent major undergraduate
      renovations and upgrade of the undergraduate laboratories were made possible due to
      $1.25M fund raising. This included IIT's one-to-one matching.


                                                57
    The institutional support in maintaining the staff positions has been generally adequate.
    However, due to the increase in the enrollment and external research funding, the MMAE
    Department has a need for one additional administrative assistant. The budget allotted to
    the department has been sufficient for hiring part time student workers to help with the
    daily office work.

   Support of Faculty Professional Development
    Faculty professional development takes place in various ways, such as: research
    activities, professional society activities, journal and book publications, conference paper
    presentations and conference participations, invited lectures, visits of other institutes
    (nationally and internationally), journal editorial and review activities, proposal review
    activities, consulting, patent activities, summer employment, sabbatical leave, short
    course offering, and other professional outreach activities. The majority of the budget for
    such activities is provided through the individual faculty member's research funds. For
    faculty with start-up packages (provided by IIT), such funds are used for their
    professional development. In addition, IIT's research and educational incentives as well
    as limited MMAE Department discretionary funds are utilized for such activities,
    especially for faculty in the early stage of their career. The start-up packages offered
    within the last five years to the new faculty have been very comparable to most other peer
    institutions.

   Support of Facilities and Equipment
    Resources to acquire, maintain, and operate facilities and equipment include the
    university support, MMAE Department budget, MMAE Department in-house technical
    support, MMAE endowments and fund raising, student undergraduate laboratory fees,
    and occasional equipment donations.

   Adequacy of Support Personnel and Institutional Services
    The institutional support for support personnel and institutional services has been
    generally adequate. Two such examples are provided here. IIT provides a dedicated staff
    member (not an MMAE staff member) for maintaining and operating the internet services
    and the computer facility room housed in E1 Building which is primarily for the MMAE
    Department and Applied Mathematics students and faculty use. The IIT
    Communications Office provides valuable help to the department in publishing Vectors,
    the MMAE magazine published yearly with a circulation of over 8,000.




                                             58
CRITERION 9. PROGRAM CRITERIA

        The AE program is rigorous and demanding, and emphasizes both the science and art of
Aerospace Engineering. All students graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace
Engineering must complete one, four credit hour, college-level course in Chemistry which
includes a three hour weekly laboratory, four college-level Physics courses for a total of 15 credit
hours, 3 credit hours of which are devoted to experimental laboratories and four college-level
Calculus courses (18 credit hours) including one course in Multivariate and Vector Calculus and
one course in Differential Equations.

        Linear algebra topics are covered in MATH 252: Introduction to Differential Equations.
Concepts in statistics are introduced to the students in the MMAE 100 and 111 Introduction to
the Professions and Design courses, reinforced in the laboratory components of MMAE 371:
Engineering Materials and Design, MMAE 310: Fluid Mechanics and MMAE 322: Heat and
Mass Transfer with the final exposure being in MMAE 430: Measurement systems. In this class
the students use statistical tools in the interpretation of experimental data for not only their core
laboratories but also their “team-based design and realization of an experiment” project.

        The design component in the AE program begins with the MMAE 100: Introduction to
Design class in the freshman year. Several courses in the Sophomore, Junior and Senior years
have open-ended design type problems that are assigned to each student. These are intended to
prepare the student for the senior level capstone design course. The curriculum provides a very
strong foundation in the mathematics, basic sciences and engineering topics such that the student
is well prepared for the capstone design courses MMAE 436: Design of Aerospace Vehicles I
and MMAE 437: Design of Aerospace Vehicles II.
        Students graduating from the Aerospace Engineering Program at IIT have a primary
knowledge of Aeronautics with some elements of Spacecraft Engineering. The detailed
description given below demonstrates knowledge in Aerodynamics, Aerospace Materials,
Structures, Propulsion, Flight Mechanics and Stability and Control.

Knowledge of Aerodynamics
In MMAE 312 (Aerodynamics of Aerospace Vehicles) the students learn about the fundamental
forces of flight, and how to predict these forces. The goal is prepare the students with the
analytic tools required in the senior level aircraft dynamics and controls class and design class.
The students learn to predict lift on 2-D and 3-D airfoils at subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic
conditions. Drag and flow separation prediction methods are studied. According to Professor
Williams many students entering this course in the junior year do not know the difference
between ailerons and elevators. To solve this problem, the students are required to visit a nearby
airport with the instructor where they obtain hands-on experience with general aviation aircraft.
All flight controls and instruments are reviewed with the students. The students have the
opportunity to pilot a Cessna 172 for ½ hour with a certified flight instructor. The students
perform basic flight maneuvers: straight-level, steep turns, climbs, descents, and stalls. In
general the student response has been favorable to the field trip, although not all of the students
choose to fly.

Knowledge of Aerospace Materials
In MMAE 371 students learn about material properties with respect to resistance to stress, strain,
                                                 59
deformation and temperature. Extensive emphasis is placed on materials testing, states of stress,
and strength of materials, fatigue, creep and fracture from the materials viewpoint. Subtopics
include: Structure of materials as related to mechanical properties and structural design concepts
for isotropic and anisotropic materials. Definition of "Mechanical Properties of Materials" and
the conditions that constitute failure. Examination of the spectrum of materials and possible
uses in service. Design criteria used to select materials. Isotropy and anisotropy in service and
design of material response. Measurement of mechanical properties. Tensile and hardness tests.
Determination of elastic properties, yield strength, ultimate strength, ductility, engineering
stress and strain, measurement of anisotropy. Hardness-tensile property relationships as used in
design. Review of strength of materials definitions for uniaxial stress and strain. Tensile test
parameters for different classes of materials. Effect of isotropy and anisotropy on design.
Hardness testing. Use in design. Relationship to tensile data. Elements of elasticity. Stress
strain, displacement and equilibrium. Analysis of complex stress states and stress-strain
relationships for isotropic and anisotropic materials. 2-D and 3-D states of stress and strain
(isotropic). Effect of anisotropy. Determination of anisotropic material properties and the
effect of these properties on design. Methods of experimental stress analysis. Mohr's circle
Yielding and failure mechanisms. Ductile and brittle failure. Yield criteria for isotropic and
anisotropic material as related to design. Design requirements to avoid fracture/failure as
related to service and material properties. Yield criteria in 2-D and 3-D. Comparison of metals,
polymers, ceramics and composites for selected service conditions.

Knowledge of Aircraft Structures
In MMAE 304 students learn about loads on aircraft and flight envelope. Stress, strain, and
constitutive relations. Torsion of open, closed, and multi-cell tubes. Bending of multi-cell tubes.
Energy methods. Castigliano’s theorems. Structural instability. Through this course students
become familiar with basic ideas and learn to apply relationships of the theory of elasticity that
are necessary for the development of the basic tools for structural analysis and energy methods
to solve statically indeterminate problems. In addition students develop a working knowledge of
Castigliano’s Theroems and apply them to find strains and displacement. Other topics include
the understanding of shear flow in thin-walled structures the calculation of shear flow
distribution in open and closed thin-walled structures due to torsion. By the end of the course
students are able to to compute normal and shear stresses in thin-walled structures due to
bending, understand effects of structural idealization on the stress distribution in reinforced thin-
walled structures, understand the concept of structural stability and be able to compute critical
forces in columns and beams, and finally understand the concept of fatigue, prediction of fatigue
life and crack propagation.


Knowledge of Flight Mechanics
In MMAE 441 (Spacecraft and Aircraft Dynamics) AE seniors are introduced to the fundamental
principles of motion of aircraft and spacecraft. Students entering the course typically have a
basic knowledge of aerodynamics, particle mechanics, and two-dimensional rigid body
dynamics. However, these students have relatively little experience in dealing with the dynamics
of three dimensional bodies (such as aircraft) undergoing simultaneous translation and rotation.
For this reason, the first third of the course covers essential kinematics and dynamics (translating
and rotating reference frames, Euler angles, Inertia matrix) needed to construct equations of
motion for aircraft and spacecraft. In the second part of the course, the students are introduced to
                                                 60
aircraft longitudinal and lateral static stability. Here the students learn how to design aircraft
control surfaces to ensure stable flight. Finally, the full equations of motion for an aircraft are
derived and linearized.


Knowledge of Stability and Control
MMAE 443 “Systems Analysis and Control” introduces senior-level students to the methods of
classical control system design for single-input single-output systems. The course begins with a
review of mathematical modeling of dynamic systems (mechanical, thermal, fluid, and electrical)
with ordinary differential equations. Linearization of the differential equations, the Laplace
Transform, and transient response are covered in detail early on. The students are then
introduced to the concept of feedback control and its general advantages (disturbance rejection
and robustness to model errors) over open-loop control, and in the process learn basic concepts
and tools such as transfer functions, the Final Value Theorem, and the Routh Stability Criterion.
With this base of knowledge, the fundamental methods of classical control system design, Root
Locus and Frequency Response design methods, are carefully introduced. The students gain a
working knowledge of how to construct Root Locus, Bode, and Nyquist Plots. Most
importantly, by the end of the course, they are able to design basic compensators (lead, lag, PI,
PD, and PID), to achieve design goals on overall system dynamic response and steady-state
error. The classical control techniques covered in this course are used to design the large
majority of industrial control systems. The course also provides that necessary foundation for
continued study modern control methods at the graduate level.


Knowledge of Aerospace Propulsion
In MMAE 452 (Aerospace Propulsion) both air-breathing and rocket propulsion systems are
studied in this course. The students are taught how to determine the propulsion requirements for
a given aircraft mission. The ability to analyze the performance of the engine components is a
high priority in this course. Through the efforts of the AIAA student organization, the
department recently acquired a GE-J78 engine for hands-on experience. Some of the engine
casing has been removed to expose the components, which makes it much easier to teach the
concepts of blade twist and relative velocity.

Knowledge of Topics in Spacecraft Engineering
A portion of MMAE 441 deals with spacecraft orbital dynamics. Here the two-body problem is
covered in detail, Kepler’s Equation is derived and solved, and the classical orbital elements are
introduced. In addition, the students are introduced to basic elements of spacecraft mission
design, including orbit-raising and plane-change maneuvers. In addition, a significant part of
MMAE 452 deals with Rocket Propulsion where concepts such static performance, vehicle
acceleration, single and multi-stage rockets and rocket nozzles are covered. The Design of
Aerospace Vehicles course includes the design of spacecraft and space missions. In the past
students have designed manned spacecraft for long range missions to Jupiter and Saturn.




                                                  61
The Design Experience
The design experience integrates knowledge of the principles of aerodynamics, controls,
stability, materials, structures, and propulsion and introduces realistic economic and design, and
time constraints in a team setting. preparatory courses that are particularly relevant for the
capstone design course are MMAE 312, MMAE 441 and MMAE 452. The AE program does
not allow students to take the capstone design courses without completing the aforementioned
courses that can impact the design experience.

During the senior year students also take MMAE 430 “Measurement systems”. Two of the four
credit hours are assigned to advanced laboratory experiments and a team based project
addressing the application of engineering measurements to a variety of engineering problems.
The course covers measurement principles and instrumentation, data acquisition, processing and
presentation. Topics covered include measurement techniques for temperature, motion, forces,
fluid flow, heat flux, strain and displacement. Both analog and digital signal acquisition and
processing techniques are discussed in the lectures and incorporated in the laboratory exercises.
Statistical tools used in the analysis of the experimental data are covered including mean,
standard deviation and probability density functions. Core labs include experiments on jet
mixing enhancement and gyroscope principles. A team based project spanning one half of the
semester is also required in which the student team selects an experimental topic and conducts a
comprehensive investigation under the guidance of a participating faculty member specializing
in that particular field of study. This team exercise requires presentation of project proposals,
progress reports, and final results that emphasize the design and implementation of experiments
addressing a variety of engineering problems.


During the final semester AE seniors take MMAE 436 (Design of Aerospace Vehicles). This
capstone design class is divided into groups and works on separate projects relating to the
conceptual design of either aircraft or manned spacecraft. The projects are monitored on a
weekly basis by the instructor. Factors such as cost of research and design, production,
manufacturing, reliability, maintainability, assembly are considerations taken into account by the
groups. The groups give oral presentations at various stages of their design with a final
presentation required at the end of the semester. Throughout the design process, students gain
experience working in groups, formalizing ideas, merging theory with practice, and forming a
design which would compete in a global market. In the process of developing their conceptual
designs, the students often find that compromises in the initial system requirements have to be
made as a result of unforeseen constraints imposed at later stages. The students learn that several
iterations are required before a complete synthesized design emerges. The final presentations are
advertised and open to the public.


In accordance with the general MMAE program outcomes, graduates of the AE program:
   1. Possess a strong foundation in mathematics, science and engineering and are proficient in
      the engineering sciences on which the major discipline is based,
   2. Are able to link science and engineering principles to identify, formulate and solve
      engineering problems in professional practice and research and development contexts,

                                                62
   3. Are able to design and conduct experiments, as well as analyze and interpret data,
   4. Have experience working in multidisciplinary and interprofessional teams,
   5. Utilize effective oral, written, graphical and computational communication skills,
   6. Understand the economic, ethical, societal, environmental and global contexts of their
      professional activities,
   7. Have a recognition of the need to remain current in their chosen field and are able to
      engage in lifelong, independent learning and professional development, and
   8. Translate knowledge of their respective disciplines to a broad spectrum of professions.
In addition, the AE program specific outcomes are to develop graduates who
   9. Have the ability to perform engineering design and analysis of tasks using the principles
      of solid and fluid mechanics; compressible flows, aerodynamics, aircraft propulsion and
      control systems.




                                               63
APPENDIX A – COURSE SYLLABI


Course descriptions follow for required courses in mathematics, basic science, computer science,
engineering graphics, and all undergraduate courses taught in the previous 2 years by the MMAE
department.

Courses designated “REQUIRED” are required of students in Aerospace Engineering (AE),
Mechanical Engineering (ME) and Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) programs.

Courses designated “REQUIRED AE” are required of students in Aerospace Engineering, and
elective for students in ME and MSE programs.

Courses designated “REQUIRED MSE” are required of students in the MSE program, and elective
for students in ME and AE programs.

Courses designated “REQUIRED ME” are required of students in the ME program, and elective
for students in MSE and AE programs.




                                               64
APPENDIX B – FACULTY RESUMES




                               137
Name and academic rank: Scott Anderson - Part Time Instructor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Ph.D., Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, 1992
M.S, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, 1983
B.S, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, 1978

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
17 years service
2007 - Present     Instructor
1994 - 2003        Instructor
1992 - 1993        Visiting Assistant Professor
1987 - 1992        Instructor

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
Chief Engineer, Ricardo, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL 1994-Present Independent Consultant, 1989-1994. Principal clients
include:
Borg-Warner Corporation, Chicago, IL and Ithaca, NY
DAI Technologies, Lisle, IL
Ricardo, Burr Ridge, IL
Wojcik and Associates, Chicago, IL
Senior Engineer, Borg-Warner Corporation, Chicago, IL. 1978-1989

Consulting, patents, etc.:
Chief Engineer, Ricardo, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL 1994-Present Independent Consultant, 1989-1994. Principal clients
include:
Borg-Warner Corporation, Chicago, IL and Ithaca, NY
DAI Technologies, Lisle, IL
Ricardo, Burr Ridge, IL
Wojcik and Associates, Chicago, IL
Senior Engineer, Borg-Warner Corporation, Chicago, IL. 1978-1989

Principal publications of the last five years:
SAE 2005-01-0281 - An Electro-Mechanical Infinitely Variable Transmission for Hybrid Electric Vehicles
SAE 2005-01-1164 - Hybrid Route Vehicle Fuel Economy
SAE 2004-01-0354 - An Electro-Mechanical Infinitely Variable Speed Transmission

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
Society of Automotive Engineers

Percentage of time committed to the (AE/MSE/ME) program:
Part time commitment to teach one 3-hour class per semester




                                                      138
Name and academic rank: Roberto Cammino, Part Time Instructor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
PhD. Mechanical Engineering, IIT, May 2001
M.S. Mechanical Engineering, IIT, Dec. 1997
B.S. Chemical Engineering, IIT, May 1995

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
1 year

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
8 years at Motorola. Currently Principal Staff Engineer.

States in which professionally licensed or certified, if applicable:
EIT, Illinois

Principal publications of the last five years:
N/A. Mostly internal at Motorola.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
ASME, Programs Chair.

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
Minimal

Percentage of time committed to the (AE/MSE/ME) program:
Part time instructor




                                                           139
Name and academic rank: Kevin W. Cassel, Associate Chair for Graduate Programs and Associate Professor of
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, Lehigh University, 1993
M.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Lehigh University, 1990
B.S. in Engineering, Messiah College, 1988

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
12 years; appointed August 1996; promoted to Associate Professor August 2002

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
Visiting Researcher, School of Mathematics, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK 2006-2008.
Research Fellow, Department of Mathematics, University College London, London, UK 2003.
National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD
1993-1996.

Consulting, patents, etc.:
Chugach and McKinley, Inc, Arlington, Virginia (2004).
Rockey, Milnamow and Katz, Chicago, Illinois (2000).
Belofsky and Belofsky, Chicago, Illinois (1999).
Becker Precision Equipment, Inc., Elk Grove Village, Illinois (1999).

Principal publications of the last five years:
       K.W. Cassel (Guest Editor), “23rd Annual Gallery of Fluid Motion”, Physics of Fluids (2006), Vol. 18,
        No. 9, pp. 091101–091114.
       A.V. Obabko and K.W. Cassel, “On the Ejection-Induced Instability in Navier-Stokes Solutions of
        Unsteady Separation”, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London A, (2005), Vol. 363,
        pp. 1189–1198.
       S. Ishimoto, et al., “Convection-Type LH2 Absorber R&D for Muon Ionization Cooling”, Nuclear
        Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A, (2003) Vol. 503, pp. 396–400.
       D.M. Kaplan, et al., “Progress in Absorber R&D for Muon Cooling”, Nuclear Instruments and Methods in
        Physics Research Section A, (2003) Vol. 503, pp. 392–395.
       M.A. Cummings, et al., “Current LH2-Absorber R&D in MuCool”, Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and
        Particle Physics, (2003) Vol. 29, pp. 1689–1692.
       M.M. Alsharo’a, et al., “Recent Progress in Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Research within the Muon
        Collaboration”, Physical Review Special Topics – Accelerators and Beams, (2003) Vol. 6, pp. 22–73.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
       American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
       American Physical Society
       American Society of Mechanical Engineers

Honors and awards:
       IIT Excellence in Teaching Award, Illinois Institute of Technology (2008).
       Ralph L. Barnett Excellence in Teaching Award, Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering
        Department, Illinois Institute of Technology (2007).
       Essential Foreign Participant, London Mathematical Society Workshop on New Developments and
        Applications of Rapid Fluid Flows (2003).
       Alfred Noble Prize, for outstanding contribution to engineering literature (2002).
       Ralph L. Barnett Excellence in Teaching Award, Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering
        Department, Illinois Institute of Technology (2001).
       Army Research Office Young Investigator Award (1998 – 2001).
                                                        140
       Philip Thomas Medal of Excellence - for best paper presented at the Fifth International Symposium on Fire
        Safety Science, Melbourne, Australia, March 1997.
       National Research Council Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, National Institute of Standards and
        Technology (December 1993 - July 1996).
       National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship (September 1991 - December 1993).
       Baldwin Fellowship, Lehigh University (September 1989 - May 1990).

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
       Co-chair of the pre-nominated session in Boundary Layers at the 22nd International Congress of
        Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Adelaide, Australia, August 24–30, 2008.
       Member of the AIAA Discussion Group on Modern Mathematical Techniques for Fluid Mechanics and
        Aerodynamics (2005–Present).
       Member of the Local Organizing Committee, 58th Annual Meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics of
        the American Physical Society, Chicago, Illinois, November 20–22, 2005. Chair, Gallery of Fluid Motion
        Committee.
       Lead Organizer and Chair, Memorial Session for Professor J. David A. Walker, 4th AIAA Theoretical
        Fluid Mechanics Conference, Toronto, Ontario Canada, June 6–9, 2005.
       IIT Graduate Student Life Task Force (1/07–Present).
       University Faculty Council Sabbatical Leave Subcommittee (2/06).
       Chair, University Faculty Council Academic Computing Subcommittee (9/04–5/05).
       Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate Program Review Committee (10/03–5/05).
       MMAE Representative, University Faculty Council (9/03–5/06).
       University Graduate Studies Committee (9/06–Present).
       MMAE Associate Chair for Graduate Programs (2006–Present).
       Chair, MMAE Graduate Studies Committee (2006–Present).

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities: 50%

Percentage of time committed to the program: 50%




                                                      141
Name and academic rank: Herek L. Clack, Associate Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, 1998
M.S., Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, 1997
S.B., Aeronautical & Astronautical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1987

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates
of advancement in rank:
Assistant Professor, 1999-2006
Associate Professor, 2006-Present

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (1998-1999)
NRC Postdoctoral Fellow
Rockwell International, Rocketdyne Division, Canoga Park, CA (1987-1992)
Member of the Technical Staff

Consulting, patents, etc.:
Invention Disclosure (w/ Eric Monsu Lee): “Powder Agglomeration Sensor” (2008)
Patent application: “Virtual Sorbent Beds” (2005)
Consultant, Mobotec Inc. (2004-2005)
Consultant, Heatron Corp. (2006)

Principal publications of the last five years:
Ammigan, K. and H.L. Clack (2008). “Spatial Vapor Distribution Around a Monodisperse Acetone
Droplet Stream Exposed to Asymmetric Radiant Heating”. Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, in
press.
Scala, F. and H.L. Clack (2008). “Mercury Emissions from Coal Combustion: Modeling and Comparison
of Hg Capture in a Fabric Filter versus an Electrostatic Precipitator”. Journal of Hazardous Materials 152,
616-623
Clack, H.L. (2006). “Bimodal Fly Ash Distributions and Their Influence on Gas-Particle Mass Transfer
During Electrostatic Precipitation”. Fuel Processing Technology 87, 987-996.
Clack, H.L. (2006). “Particle Size Distribution Effects on Gas-Particle Mass Transfer within Electrostatic
Precipitators”. Environmental Science and Technology 40, 3929-3933.
Clack, H.L. and M.A. Ahmed (2006). “Mass Transfer Coefficients Associated with the Mixing of a
Confined Gas Volume by the Random Motion of Loose Spheres”. International Journal of Heat and Mass
Transfer 49, 2931-2938.
Clack, H.L. (2006). “Mass Transfer within Electrostatic Precipitators: In-flight Adsorption of Mercury by
Charged Suspended Particulates”. Environmental Science and Technology 40, 3617-3622.
Clack, H.L. (2006). “Mass Transfer within Electrostatic Precipitators: Trace Gas Adsorption by Sorbent-
covered Plate Electrodes”. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association, 56 pp. 759-766.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
The Combustion Institute, Air and Waste Management Association, American Association for Aerosol
Research, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, National Society of Black Engineers

Honors and awards:
National Science Foundation, CAREER Award recipient (2004-2009)
National Academies/Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, German-American Frontiers of Engineering,
invited topical review (2004)
National Academies, National Research Council, Committee Member: Committee on Changes in New
Source Review Programs for Stationary Sources of Air Pollutants (2004-2006)



                                                    142
National Academies, National Research Council, Committee Member: Committee to Examine the
Disposal of Activated Carbon from the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Systems at Chemical
Agent Disposal Facilities (2008-2009)

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
Panel reviewer, National Science Foundation
Peer reviewer, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Peer reviewer, ASME Journal of Fluids Engineering, Journal of the Air and Waste Management
Association, Journal of Hazardous Materials, Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Clean Air Journal,
Journal of Heat Transfer, European Aerospace Science and Technology
Member, United Nations Environment Programme, Global Mercury Partnership, Reduction of Mercury
Releases from Coal Combustion Partnership Area
Chairperson, MMAE Departmental Lab Committee
MMAE Department Lab Safety Officer
Chairperson, MMAE Departmental Thermal/Fluids faculty search
Departmental Program Coordinator, E3 Graduate Studies program
Faculty Director, Academic Retention Programs, Office of Multicultural Student Services
Member, Student Life and Retention Committee
Member and Chairperson, Minority Retention Sub-committee
Member, Campus Review Committee, Chemical Engineering Graduate Program
Faculty Advisor, National Society of Black Engineers, IIT student chapter
Faculty Advisor, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, IIT student chapter
Member, Lew Collens Scholars advisory committee
Member, Campus Lab Safety Committee
Member, MMAE Qualifying Exam Committee

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
50%

Percentage of time committed to the (AE/MSE/ME) program:
50%




                                                  143
Name and academic rank: Michael R. Gosz, Associate Professor, Associate Provost

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Northwestern University Ph.D. 1993 Theoretical and Applied Mechanics
Northwestern University M.S. 1989 Theoretical and Applied Mechanics
Marquette University B.S. 1988 Mechanical Engineering (summa cum laude)

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
       Associate Provost for Undergraduate Affairs (September 2006-Present)
       Associate Chair for Graduate Programs, Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering
        (September 2003-August 2006)
       Associate Professor of Mechanical and Materials Engineering (September 2002 - Present)
       Assistant Professor (September 1996-August 2002)

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
University of New Hampshire Durham, NH
     Assistant Professor (September 1993-July 1996)
Northwestern University Evanston, IL
     Post-Doctoral Research Associate (June-August 1993)
General Motors Janesville, WI
     Manufacturing Engineer, 1985-1988

Consulting, patents, etc.:

States in which professionally licensed or certified, if applicable:

Principal publications of the last five years:
Computational fracture mechanics, constitutive modeling of composite materials, nonlinear finite element methods,
fluid/structure interaction.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:

Honors and awards:

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:

Percentage of time committed to the program:
12%




                                                       144
Name and academic rank: John S. Kallend, Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
BA (1967), MA (1970), PhD (1971), Natural Sciences, University of Cambridge (England).

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
Professor of Materials Engineering (1984) /Professor of Physics
Associate Chair, MMAE Department
Associate Dean

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
Affiliate, Los Alamos National Laboratory 1987-1994
Affiliate, Argonne National laboratory, 1990-92

Consulting, patents, etc.:
None

States in which professionally licensed or certified, if applicable:
None

Principal publications of the last five years:
75 total, none in last 5 years

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
ASM International

Honors and awards:
Amoco Award for Excellence in Teaching, 1991
Bauer Family Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, 1994, 2004, 2007
Ralph L. Barnett Award for Excellence in Teaching, 2003
Bronze Medal, US National Skydiving Championships, 2002
Holder of three world records in formation skydiving

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
Chair, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering 1991-95
Dean, Undergraduate College 1995-99
Chair, IIT Radiation Safety Committee 1986 –
IIT Undergraduate Studies Committee 1982 –
University Grand Marshal, 1988 –
Chairman, Chicago/Chicago Northern Joint Chapter of TMS/ASM, 1994
Gil Speich Memorial Lecturer, ASM, 1998

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
10%

Percentage of time committed to the program:
60%




                                                       145
Name and academic rank: Ronald J. Lisowski, Lecturer

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
PhD, Aeronautics and Astronautics (University of Illinois) 1984
MS, Electrical Engineering (New Mexico State University)1975
MS, Aeronautics and Astronautics (Purdue University)1970
BS, Engineering Science (USAF Academy, Colorado)1969

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
1-1/2 Yr

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
24 years commissioned service and 10 years civil service in the USAF
2001-2007: Civilian Associate Professor and Director of Curriculum, Department of Astronautics, US Air Force
Academy, Colorado Springs, CO.
1996-2001: Civilian Associate Professor and Director of Curriculum Technology, Department of Astronautics, US
Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO.
1993-1996: Visiting Professor & Researcher, Department of Astronautics, US Air Force Academy, Colorado
Springs, CO. & Adjunct Professor, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs.
1991-1993: Chief Scientist, European Office of Aerospace Research and Development (EOARD), Detachment 1,
Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), London, England. (USAFA Sabbatical Assignment)
1987-1991: Tenure Professor of Astronautical Engineering and Deputy Department Head, Department of
Astronautics, US Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO.
1984-1987: Associate Professor of Astronautical Engineering and Deputy Department Head for Labs and Research,
Department of Astronautics, US Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO.
1977-1981: Assistant Professor of Astronautical Engineering and Research Director, Department of Astronautics,
US Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO.
1975-1977: Trajectory Engineer and Applications Analyst, 554th Aerospace Reconnaissance Technical Wing, HQ
Strategic Air Command (SAC), Offutt AFB, NE.
1970-1975: Guidance Systems Test Analyst, Central Inertial Guidance Test Facility, 6585th Test Group, Holloman
AFB, NM.

Consulting, patents, etc.:
1993-1996: USAF Academy Visiting Professor & Researcher. Conducted a funded research project to integrate the
Ada programming language into the Academy’s astronautics courses.

States in which professionally licensed or certified, if applicable:
None

Principal publications of the last five years:
None

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics - 1967-Present
       Member, Senior Member, Associate Fellow
American Society of Engineering Educators - 1989-Present
       Member




                                                       146
Honors and awards:
Educator of the Year, AIAA Rocky Mountain Region, 2005-06
Nominated by students for Outstanding Senior Faculty Award, Academic Year 2005-2006
Nominated by students for Outstanding Senior Faculty Award, Academic Year 1999-2000
Outstanding Honoraria Adjunct Faculty Member of the Master of Engineering Program Office, University of
Colorado at Colorado Springs, Academic Year 1995-96
International “Odyssey of the Mind” Competition Coach
               Coached a 5th grade team to DODDS Atlantic Region Championships
               & World Finals at University of Maryland – 1993
Outstanding Military Educator in Astronautics and Computer Science, USAF Academy, Academic Year 1979-80 (A
one-time award for Academy faculty)
Junior Officer of the Year in Astronautics and Computer Science, USAF Academy, Academic Year 1978-79
Member, Tau Beta Pi - National Engineering Honor Society
Member, Phi Kappa Phi - National Academic Honor Society

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
AIAA Astrodynamics Technical Committee - 1999-Present
      Education Subcommittee Chair
AIAA/AAS Astrodynamics Specialist Conference Session Chairman – Aug 2003
ASEE Aerospace Division Board of Directors – 2000-Present
      Vice Chair – 2006-07
      Secretary/Treasurer – 2005-06
      Annual Conference Program Chair – 2005

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
Zero

Percentage of time committed to the (AE/MSE/ME) program:
Part time lecturer




                                                   147
Name and academic rank: Hansen A. Mansy, Adjunct Associate Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
PhD, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois, (1990)
MS, Mechanical Engineering, Cairo University, Egypt, (1985)
BS, Mechanical Engineering, Cairo University, Egypt, (1981)

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
19, Appointments on this faculty, 8/1989-8/98,
Part-time Instructor, 8/1998-present
Adjunct Associate Professor

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
       Senior Research Scientist and Associate Director, Bioacoustics Research Group, Rush Medical College,
        Chicago, Illinois (2/1996 to present)
       Vice President and Director of Engineering Research, Biomedical Acoustics Research Co, Evanston IL
        (1997 to present)
       Adjunct Associate Professor in Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago (8/1999 to present)

Consulting, patents, etc.:
    Patents
     Mansy HA, Sandler RH. Acoustic Detection of Endotracheal Tube Location, (US Patent pending).
     Mansy HA, Sandler RH. Sensor and Sensor Assemblies for Monitoring Biological Sounds and Electric
        Potentials, (US Patent pending).
     Williams DR, Meade K, Wilson N, and Mansy HA. Spirometer. US Patent 7094208, 2006.
     Mansy HA, Sandler RH. Acoustic Detection of Gastric Motility Dysfunction. US Patent 6840913, 2005.
     Sandler RH, Mansy HA. Acoustic detection of vascular conditions. US Patent 6780159, 2004.
     Sandler RH, Mansy HA. Methods and apparatus for detection of gastrointestinal conditions utilizing
        computerized analysis of gastrointestinal sounds. US Patent 6776766, 2004.
     Mansy HA, Sandler RH. A method and apparatus for detection of air cavities in a body. US Patent 6595928
        B2, issued 2003.
     Sandler RH, Mansy HA. Human controlled towable device for water surface and subsurface operation. US
        Patent 6575114 B2, 2003.
     Mansy HA, Sandler RH. Acoustic Detection of Respiratory Conditions. US Patent 6443907, 2002.
     Sandler RH, Mansy HA. Methods and apparatus for detection of gastrointestinal conditions utilizing
        computerized analysis of gastrointestinal sounds. US Patent 6425874, issued 2002.
     Sandler RH, Mansy HA. Methods and apparatus for characterizing gastrointestinal sounds. US Patent
        6287266, 2001.
     Sandler RH, Mansy HA. Methods and apparatus for characterizing gastrointestinal sounds. US Patent
        6056703, 2000.
     Mansy HA and Williams DR. The trapped vortex pair fluidic oscillator. US Patent 4843889, 1989.

Principal publications of the last five years:
Acikgoz S, Ozer MB, Royston TJ, Mansy HA, Sandler RH. Experimental and computational models for simulating
sound propagation within the lungs. ASME J vibration and acoustics, (in press)
Mansy HA, Grahe JR, Sandler RH. Elastic properties of synthetic materials for soft tissue modeling. Phys Med Biol
53: 2115-30 2008
Ozer MB, Acikgoz S, Royston TJ, Mansy HA, Sandler RH. Boundary element model for simulating sound
propagation and source localization within the lungs. J Acoustical Soc Am 122(1):657-61;2007.




                                                       148
Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
Acoustical Society of America (ASA), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Engineering in
Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS), American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), American Physical
Society (APS)

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
     Thesis Supervision at University of Illinois at Chicago:
    Acikgoz S, New Paradigms in Pulmonary Acoustics with Application to Diagnostics. May 2007. (Thesis
    Committee: Royston TJ, Mansy HA, Fisher P, Loth F, Shabana A )
    Yazicioglu, Y, Vibro-Acoustic Radiation into Air, Water, and Viscoelastic Material from a Fluid-Filled
    Viscoelastic Cylindrical Shell with Internal Turbulent Flow due to Constriction. May 2005 (Thesis Committee:
    Royston TJ, Loth F, Shabana A, Fisher P, Mansy HA)
    Zhang, XL, Modeling sound transmission through the pulmonary system and chest with application to diagnosis
    of a collapsed lung. University of Illinois PhD Thesis, August 2002 (Thesis Committee: Royston TJ, Shabana
    A, Loth F, Mansy HA, and Sandler RH)
     Article review
    Annals of Biomedical Engineering, Europea1n Journal of Mechanics B / Fluids, IEEE Transactions on
    Biomedical Engineering, Journal of the Acoustic Society of America, Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, Journal of
    Fluids Engineering , Latin American Applied Research, Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing,
    Medical Engineering and Physics
     Research proposals review
    National Science Foundation, Michigan Tri-Corridor Technology Grants /American, Association for the
    Advancement of Science, Israel Science Foundation
     Text Books review
    McGraw Hill Mechanics Series, John Wiley & Sons, Science Series
     Patents review
    Grossman and Flight, Attorneys at Law, Chicago, IL
     Ongoing Research Support
    R03 EB008373-01A1                  Royston(PI)                   9/07-8/09                   $300,000
    NIH/NIBIB , The Audible Human Project, A study to develop an acoustic model of the human torso, Role: Co-I
    R44 DK59685-01                     Mansy (PI)                   5/06-5/09                   $1,200,000
    NIH/NIDDKD, Rapid assessment of vascular grafts patency, A study to develop an acoustic methodology and
    device for rapid assessment of blood vessels., Role: Co-PI
    R21/33 EB03286-01                  Mansy (PI)                   8/03-7/08                    $1,400,000
    NIH/NIBIB, Device for pneumothorax diagnosis using breath sounds, This is a study to develop an acoustic
    methodology for detection of pneumothorax using computerized analysis of breath sounds, Role: PI

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:


Percentage of time committed to the program:
Part time lecturer




                                                       149
Name and academic rank: Kevin P. Meade, Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Ph.D. Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Northwestern University - 1982
M.S. Applied Mathematics, Illinois Institute of Technology - 1978
B.S. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology – 1974

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
25 years of service on this faculty
Assistant Professor – 1982
Associate Professor – 1987
Professor – 1999

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
Taught a graduate course on "Biomechanics of the Spine" at Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia during
the summer of 2007
Taught "Spine Orthotics I and II” as part of "Prosthetics/Orthotics 725 Upper/Lower-Limb Prosthetics and Orthotics
For Physicians, Surgeons and Therapists" at Northwestern University Prosthetics and Orthotics Center – twice each
year 2005 to present
Sabbatical leave – 2003-2004 academic year – Earned a Certificate in Orthotics from Northwestern University
Prosthetics and Orthotics Center and spent five months in Bogotá, Colombia for additional training
Eight years of industrial experience in nuclear power with Sargent & Lundy Engineers (1973-1981)

Consulting, patents, etc.:
U.S. Patent – Spirometer – with Professor David Williams – 2006
Various consulting assignments related to medical products

Principal publications of the last five years:
Orthoses for Osteoporosis. K. Meade, B. Malas, A. Patwardhan, T. Gavin. Atlas of Orthotics and Assistive Devices,
4th Edition, 2008.
Orthoses for Spinal Trauma and Postoperative Care. B. Malas, K. Meade, A. Patwardhan, T. Gavin. Atlas of
Orthotics and Assistive Devices, 4th Edition, 2008.
Biomechanics of the Spine. A. Patwardhan, K. Meade, T. Gavin. Atlas of Orthotics and Assistive Devices, 4 th
Edition, 2008.
Orthoses for Non-Pharmacological Treatment of Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures. K. Meade, B.
Malas, A. Patwardhan, T. Gavin. 12th world Congress of the International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics,
Vancouver, Canada, 2007.
International Interprofessional Service Learning Projects – Chicago to Bogotá and Back. K. Meade, M. Gomez. 5 th
Latin American and Caribbean Conference for Engineering and Technology, Tampico, Mexico, 2007.
Orthotic Treatment of Degenerative Disk Disease with Degenerative Spondylolisthesis. P. Flanagan, M. Gomez, and
K. Meade. Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics, January 2006.
Effect of compressive follower preload on the flexion-extension response of the human lumbar spine. A.
Patwardhan, R. Havey, G. Carandang, J. Simonds, L. Voronov, A. Ghanayem, K. Meade, T. Gavin, O. Paxinos.
Journal of Orthopaedic Research, v 21, n 3, 2003, p 540-546.
No-slip crack model for damaged bone/cement interface. R. Rizza and K. Meade. Engineering Fracture Mechanics,
v 70, n 6, April, 2003, p 757-773.




                                                       150
Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics (ISPO)
American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists
American Society of Mechanical Engineers
American Society for Engineering Education
American Society of Biomechanics

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
MMAE Undergraduate Studies Committee
University Interprofessional Studies Committee
American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists - Served as a member of the Research Education Committee
National Commission on Orthotics and Prosthetics Education (NCOPE) - Served on the NCOPE Residency
Outcomes Committee
ASME: Reviewer for the Journal of Biomechanical Engineering
MRC: Reviewer for Mechanics Research Communications

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
20%

Percentage of time committed to the (AE/MSE/ME) program:
80%




                                                        151
Name and academic rank: Sheldon Mostovoy; Associate Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Ph.D., Metallurgical Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois, 1968
B.S., Mechanical Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois. 1958

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
30 years. Appointed August 1978 as Associate Professor. Tenure granted in 1980.

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
Developed & taught MMAE 326 & 371 (Eng. Mat’ls & Design) with mechanical testing labs. Taught MMAE 563
and 536 (Advanced Mechanical Metallurgy I & II), MMAE 306 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory, MMAE 306
Mechanical Engineering Laboratory, MMAE 308 Mechanics of Solids and Design, METM 494 Design Project.
Senior Research Engineer at The Materials Research Laboratory of Glenwood Illinois
Visiting Scientist, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington D.C.

Consulting, patents, etc.:
Patent: 1973; 3,726,669 Elimination of Lead Embrittlement in Steel,
Consulted for Inland Steel Bar Co, Victor Products Division, DANA Corporation, Aircraft Gear Corp. Alumax
Extrusions, CBS Television News

Principal publications of the last five years:
R. Camino, M. Gosz and S. Mostovoy: “An Optimized Fracture Mechanics Specimen for Fatigue Crack Growth
Studies in a Constant K Environment”. Int’l Jour. of Fatigue ; 2003

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
Iron and Steel Society (AIME)
ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals)
The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum
Engineers (TMS-AIME)
American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM)

Honors and awards:
1998; Excellence in Teaching Award, Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering.

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
Faculty counsel rep from MMAE, Laboratory committee, Promotion & Tenure committee. Attended professional
society Conferences. Participated in "Ethics Across the Curriculum", IIT/NSF
Workshop, 1994,. Member of monthly ethics topics discussion group
 "Ethics Across the Curriculum" IIT/NSF Workshop, 1994.Member of monthly ethics topics discussion group

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
20%

Percentage of time committed to the program:
80%




                                                         152
Name and academic rank: Hassan Nagib, John T. Rettaliata Distinguished Professor of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
PhD: Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Illinois Institute of Technology, 1972
M.S.: Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Illinois Institute of Technology, 1969
B.S.: Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Illinois Institute of Technology, 1968

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
January 1970 – December 1972
Instructor: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department
Illinois Institute of Technology
January 1973 - August 1975
Assistant Professor: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department
Illinois Institute of Technology
August 1975 – August 1979
Associate Professor: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department Illinois Institute of Technology
August 1979 – May 1981
Professor: Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering Department
Illinois Institute of Technology
May 1981 – Present
John T. Rettaliata Distinguished Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering: Mechanical, Materials and
Aerospace Engineering Department
Illinois Institute of Technology

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
1978-1999: Founding Director of Fluid Dynamics Research Center, IIT
1981: Visiting Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University
1982: Visiting Professor, Graduate Aeronautical Lab, California Institute of Technology
1985- 1995: Chairman of MAE Department, IIT
1995- 1998: Vice President of Main Campus and Dean of Armour College, IIT
1998- 2001: Chief Scientist for IIT Research Institute (IITRI)
1999: Visiting Professor, Dept. of Mech., KTH (Royal Tech. Inst.), Stockholm, Sweden
1999-2000: Visiting Professor, LSTM, Friedrich-Alexander University, Erlangen, Germany
2000-2007: Visiting Professor, LMF, EPFL (Federal Tech. Inst.), Lausanne, Switzerland
2002: Visiting Fellow, Graduate Aeronautical Lab, California Institute of Technology
2008-2010: Affiliated Professor, Dept. of Mech., KTH (Royal Tech. Inst.), Stockholm, Sweden

Consulting, patents, etc.:
The Boeing Company. No patents

Principal publications of the last five years:
Nagib, H. and Chauhan, K., “Variations of von Karman Coefficient in Canonical Flows”, In final revisions for Phys.
Fluids 2008.
Monkewitz, P. A., Chauhan, K. A., and Nagib, H. M., “Comparison of mean flow similarity laws in zero pressure
gradient turbulent boundary Layers” In final revisions for Phys. Fluids 2008.
Jammalamadaka, A., and Nagib, H., “Evaluation of Turbulence Models for Boundary Layers Subjected to
Streamwise and Spanwise Pressure Gradients”, Paper Number : AIAA Paper No. 2008-0643, 46th AIAA Aerospace
Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, January 2008.
Madugundi, D., Kiedaisch, J. and Nagib, H., “Prediction of Separated Flows with and without Flow Control and
Circulation Effects”, Paper Number : AIAA Paper No. 2008-0567, 46th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and
Exhibit, January 2008.
Zanoun, E-S, Nagib, H., and Durst, F., “Refined Skin-Friction Relation for Turbulent Channel Flows and Need for a
Larger Channel Facility” Fluid Dynamics Research, Accepted for publication, 2008.
                                                       153
Talamelli, A., F. Persiani, F., Fransson, J., Alfredsson, P. H., Johansson, A., Nagib, H.M. Rüedi, J-D, Sreenivasan,
K.R., and Monkewitz, P. A., “CICLoPE - a Response to the Need for High Reynolds Number Experiments” Fluid
Dynamics Research , Accepted for publication, 2008.
Chauhan, K. A., Monkewitz, P. A., and Nagib, H. M., “Criteria for Assessing Experiments in Zero Pressure
Gradient Boundary Layers” Fluid Dynamics Research, Accepted for publication, 2008.
Krechetnikov, R., Marsden, J., and Nagib, H., “A Mechanistic Model of Separation Bubble”, Physica D and
Archive, Submitted for publication, 2007.
Monkewitz, P. A., Chauhan, K. A., and Nagib, H. M., “Self-consistent High-Reynolds Number Asymptotics for
ZPG Turbulent Boundary Layers” Phys. Fluids, 19, 115101, 2007.
Chauhan, K. A., Monkewitz, P. A., and Nagib, H. M. “Flow Development in Boundary Layers with Pressure
Gradient”, Proceeding of 11th EOROMECH European Turbulence Conference, 2007.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS)
Fellow of the American Association of Advancement of Science (AAAS)
Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA)
Fellow American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)

Honors and awards:
Received the year’s “Excellence in Teaching Award” of I.I.T., 1973-74.
In 1977, received the Robert T. Knapp award, given for an outstanding original paper by the Fluids Engineering
Division of ASME, for a publication entitled “Control of Free Stream Turbulence by Means of Honeycombs: A
Balance Between Suppression and Generation”, which was co-authored with Professor Richard I. Loehrke of
Colorado State University.
Received 1982 NASA Langley Achievement Award for “Outstanding research contributions in the area of
turbulence control and viscous drag reduction”.
Charter Member of the Illinois Governor’s Science Advisory Committee.
Received IIT’s Alumni Professional Achievement Award 1995, and IIT’s Alumni Service Award in 2006.
Best Paper Award from AIAA Ground Test Technical Committee in 1997 for “Flow Quality Issues for Large Wind
Tunnels”, co-authored with E. Reshotko, and W. Saric.
Recipient of the Gold Medal for Achievement in Science and Technology from the Technical University of Crete,
1997.
Member of the Illinois Science Council, 2008-2009.

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
Reviewer for numerous journals and funding organization in the US & Internationally: e.g., Journal of Fluid
Mechanics and Physics of Fluids

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
50%

Percentage of time committed to the program:
50%




                                                        154
Name and academic rank: Sudhakar E. Nair, Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Doctor of Philosophy, Applied Mechanics, University of California at San Diego, 1974
Master of Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, 1969
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering, Kerala University, 1967

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
Thirty-one years of service to IIT
Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Professor of Applied Mathematics (1995- ), Professor of
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (1992- ),
Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (1982-1992),
Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (1977-1982),
Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL.

Postdoctoral Research Engineer, (1974-1977)
University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA

Consulting, patents, etc.:
Bud Engrng., Chicago, IL (Feb. 1978)
Evaluated stresses and deflections of a curved panel used in cryogenic containers.
Broutman and Associates, Chicago, IL (Mar. 1978)
Performed a literature review of the “peel test” for adhesively bonded metal strips.
Slow Fly Aviation, Chicago, IL (Jan. 1979)
Designed added winglets for an ultra-light airplane to remedy nose-down tendency.
Deere and Co. Moline, IL (Mar. 1980)
Computed vortex shedding frequencies of a twin column sculpture to avoid coupled oscillations and failure.
Smalley Ring Co., Wheeling, IL (Jan. 1987-88 and 2008)
Computed failure loads for helical springs of various sizes and angles.
Web Printing Controls Co. Barrington, IL (July 1992)
Work not recorded
Patrick Engineering, Glen Ellyn, IL (Nov. 1992)
Computed deflections and stresses in certain frames.
Finkl and Sons Co., Chicago, IL. (Nov. 1992-93)
Evaluated residual stresses and distortion in steel ingots after quenching, using finite elements.
Pioneer Technologies, South Barrington, IL (Oct. 1993)
Crack propagation studies.
Portec Engrng. Chicago, IL (Feb. 1994)
Evaluated stability of cranes.
Stimsonite Co., Chicago, IL (Feb. 1996-99)
Studied frictional forces in plastic sheets used in optical reflectors.

Principal publications of the last five years:
52 Al-Qassab, M. and Nair, S., Wavelet-Galerkin Method for the Free Vibrations of an Elastic Cable, ASCE J.
Engineering Mechanics. Vol. 129, No.3, pp. 350-357, 2003.
53. Gosz, M., Okyar, A. F., and Nair, S. A Crack Driving Force Criterion for the Prediction of Interface Crack
Kinking in Thin-film Composites, J. Interface Science, Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 329-338 , 2003
54. Dursunkaya, Z. and Nair, S., Solidification of a Finite Medium Subject to a Periodic Variation of Boundary
Temperature, J. Appl. Mech., Vol. 70, No. 5, pp. 633-637, 2003.
55. Al-Qassab, M., Nair, S. and O’Leary J., Dynamics of an Elastic Cable carrying a moving Mass Particle,
Nonlinear Dynamics, Vol. 33 No. 1, pp. 11-32, 2003.
56. Al-Qassab, M. and Nair, S., Wavelet-Galerkin Method for the Free Vibrations of an Elastic Cable Carrying an
Attached Mass, J. Sound and Vibration, Vol. 270, pp. 191-206, 2004.


                                                       155
57. Li, Yaming, A. Khounsary, and S. Nair, “How and why side cooling of high-heat-load optics works”, SPIE
Proceedings, Vol. 5533, pp. 157-162, 2004.
58. Li, Yaming, A. Khounsary, and S. Nair, “Cooled mirror for double undulator beamline”, SPIE Proceedings, Vol.
5193, pp. 204-210, 2004.
59. Li, Yaming, F. M. Sciammarella, C. A. Sciammarella and S. Nair, “A micromechanical model of the damage of
particulate composites with rubber matrix”, 12th International Conference on Experimental Mechanics, Bari, Italy,
Sept. 2004.
60. Dursunkaya, Z. and S. Nair, “Accuracy of the two iteration spectral method for phase change problems”,
Applied Mathematical Modeling, 30, pp. 1515-1524, 2006

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
American Society of Mechanical Engineers
American Society for Engineering Education
American Academy of Mechanics

Honors and awards:
Fellow, American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Associate Fellow, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
IIT Ralph L. Barnett Excellence in Teaching Award, 1998
Junior Fellow, National Aeronautical Laboratory, India, 1968
Listed in Who is Who in Aviation and Aerospace

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Graduate College, IIT (2003,--)

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
30% Administration
20% Research and Scholarly activities
20% Graduate Teaching
20% Department and IIT service

Percentage of time committed to the program:
10%




                                                      156
Name and academic rank: Dr. Boris S. Pervan, Associate Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Astronautics, Stanford University, May 1996
M.S. in Aeronautics, California Institute of Technology, June 1987
B.S. in Aerospace Engineering, University of Notre Dame, May 1986

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, May 2005 - present
Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Sep 1999 - Apr 2005

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
Stanford University, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
Post-Doctoral Research Associate, 1996-1999; Research Assistant, 1992-1996; Teaching Assistant, 1991
Hughes Aircraft Company-Space and Communications Group
Mission Analyst and Systems Engineer, 1987-1990
Argonne National Laboratory, Summer Research Intern, 1986

Principal publications of the last five years:
Khanafseh, S. and Pervan, B., “A New Approach for Calculating Position Domain Integrity Risk for Cycle
Resolution in Carrier Phase Navigation Systems”, Proceedings of the IEEE Position Location, and Navigation
Symposium (PLANS 2008)”, Monterey, CA, May 5-8, 2008.
Khanafseh, S. and Pervan, B. “Autonomous Airborne Refueling of Unmanned Air Vehicles Using the Global
Positioning System”, Journal of Aircraft, Vol. 44, No. 5, Sep.-Oct. 2007.
Rife, J., Pullen, S., Enge, P., and Pervan, B., “Paired Overbounding for Nonideal LAAS and WAAS Error
Distributions, IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems, Vol. 42, No.4, October 2006.
Khanafseh, S., Kempny, B., and Pervan, B., “New Applications of Measurement Redundancy in High Performance
Relative Navigation Systems for Aviation”, Proceedings of the 19th International Technical Meeting of the Satellite
Division of the Institute of Navigation (ION GNSS-2006), Fort Worth, TX, September 26-29, 2006.
Lee, J., Pullen, S., Enge, P., Pervan, B., and Gratton, L., “Monitoring GPS Satellite Orbit Errors for Aircraft Landing
Systems”, Journal of Aircraft, Vol. 43, No.3, May-June 2006.
Heo, M., and Pervan, B., “Robust Carrier Phase Navigation Architecture for Shipboard Relative GPS”, IEEE
Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems, Vol. 42, No.2, April 2006.
Joerger, M., Christ, J., Duncan, R., and Pervan, B., “Integrated Design of an AGV for Improved GPS-Based Path
Following Performance”, International Journal of Vehicle Design, Vol. 42, Nos. 3/4, 2006.
Joerger, M., and Pervan, B., 2006, “Autonomous Ground Vehicle Navigation Using Integrated GPS and Laser-
scanner Measurements”, Proceedings of the IEEE Position, Location, and Navigation Symposium (PLANS 2006),
San Diego, CA, April 24-27, 2006.
Gebre-Egziabher, D., Razavi, A., Enge, P., Gautier, J., Akos, D., Pullen, S., and Pervan, B., “Sensitivity and
Performance Analysis of Doppler-Aided GPS Tracking Loops”, Navigation, Vol. 52, No. 2, Summer 2005.
Pervan, B., Sayim, I., and Khanafseh, S., “Synthesis of Empirical and Theoretical Approaches Toward the
                             pr_gnd”, Journal of Navigation, Royal Institute of Navigation, Vol. 58, No. 2, May 2005.
Pervan, B., and Gratton, L., “Orbit Ephemeris Monitors for Local Area Differential GPS”, IEEE Transactions on
Aerospace and Electronic Systems, Vol. 41, No.2, April 2005.
Heo, M., Pervan, B., Pullen, S., Gautier, J., Enge, P., Gebre-Egziabher, D., “Autonomous Fault Detection with
Carrier Phase DGPS for Shipboard Landing Navigation”, Navigation, Vol. 51, No. 3, Fall 2004.
Pervan, B., Chan, F., Gebre-Egziabher, D., Pullen, S., Enge, P., and Colby, G., “Performance Analysis of Carrier
Phase DGPS Navigation for Shipboard Landing of Aircraft”, Navigation, Vol. 50, No. 3, Fall 2003.
Pervan, B., and Chan, F., “Detecting Global Positioning Satellite Orbit Errors Using Short-Baseline Carrier Phase
Measurements”, Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics, Vol. 26, No. 1, Jan.-Feb., 2003.




                                                         157
Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA)
Institute of Navigation (ION)
Sigma Xi, Tau Beta Pi, Sigma Gamma Tau

Honors and awards:
MMAE Department Award for Excellence in Research, 2007
University Excellence in Teaching Award, 2005
University Sigma Xi Award for Excellence in Research, 2005
Ralph Barnett MMAE Outstanding Graduate Teaching Award, 2002
IEEE M. Barry Carlton Award, 1999
RTCA William E. Jackson Award, 1996
ION Best-of-Session Paper Awards, 1992, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2006, 2007
Guggenheim Fellowship, California Institute of Technology, 1986-87
Albert J. Zahm Prize in Aeronautics (1986)

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
University Faculty Council, MMAE Representative, 2006-present
Faculty Advisor to IIT Student Chapter of AIAA, 2000-present
MMAE Graduate Studies Committee, 2006-present
MMAE Ph.D. Qualifying Examination Subcommittee, 2001-present
MMAE Faculty Search Committee, 2000-present
MMAE Laboratory Committee, 2005-2007
University Sabbatical Leaves Committee, 2007; Chair, 2008
University Teaching Award Committee Chair, 2006 and 2007
University Review Committee for Director of IIT Institute of Design, 2007
MMAE Academic Unit Committee on Promotion and Tenure, 2006-present

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
70%

Percentage of time committed to the program:
30%




                                                      158
Name and academic rank: Xiaoping Qian, Assistant Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, August 2001.

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
4 years as an assistant professor since August 2004

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
3 years of industrial experience at GE Global Research Center

Consulting, patents, etc.:
3 patents

Principal publications of the last five years:
1. Huang, Y. and Qian, X., “An efficient sensing localization algorithm for free-form surface digitization”, ASME
Transactions Journal of Computing and Information Science in Engineering, Vol. 8, No. 2, June 2008.
2. Qian, X. and Villarrubia, J. S., “General Three-Dimensional Image Simulation and Surface Reconstruction in
Scanning Probe Microscopy using a Dexel Representation”, Ultramicroscopy, Vol. 107, No. 13, pp. 29 - 42, Dec
2007.
3. Huang, Y. and Qian, X., “Dynamic B-spline Surface Reconstruction: Closing the Sensing-and-Modeling Loop in
3D Digitization”, Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 39, No. 11, pp. 987-1002, Nov 2007.
4. Huang, Y. and Qian, X., “A dynamic sensing-and-modeling approach to 3D point- and area-sensor integration”,
ASME Transactions Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering, Vol. 129, pp. 623- 635, June 2007.
5. Yang, P. and Qian, X., “A B-spline based Approach to Heterogeneous Object Design and Analysis”, Computer-
Aided Design, Vol. 34, No. 2, pp. 95 -111, Feb 2007.
6. Qian, X., Robinson, D. M., and Ross, J., “Admissible Transformation Volume for Part Dimensional Quality
Gauging”, Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 37, No. 13, pp. 1335 - 1352, Nov 2005.
7. Qian, X. and Dutta, D., “Feature based design for heterogeneous objects”, Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 36, No.
12, pp. 1263-1278, Oct 2004.
8. Qian, X. and Dutta, D., “Direct Face Neighborhood Alteration for Heterogeneous Object Modeling”, Computers
and Graphics, Vol. 27, No. 6, pp. 943-961, Dec 2003.
9. Qian, X. and Harding, K. G., “A Computational Approach for Optimal Sensor Setup”, SPIE Journal Optical
Engineering, Vol. 42, No. 5, pp. 1238-1248, May 2003.
10. Qian, X. and Dutta, D., “Physics-based Modeling for Heterogeneous Objects”, ASME Transactions Journal of
Mechanical Design, Vol. 125, pp. 416-427, Sep 2003.
11. Qian, X. and Dutta, D., “Design of Heterogeneous Turbine Blade”, Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 35, No. 3, pp.
319-329, March 2003.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
IEEE, ASME, SAE

Honors and awards:
2008 Excellence in Research Award, Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering Department award, IIT
2007 Campus Greatest Number of Research Awards for an Individual Principal Investigator, IIT
2007 SME (Society of Manufacturing Engineers) Research Initiation Award
2007 NSF Fellowship for Summer Institute on Inspiring the Coalescence of Fundamental and Application Specific
Functional Nanomaterial Development Materials at Northwestern University
2006 NSF Fellowship for Summer Institute on Nano Mechanics and Materials at Northwestern University
2005 ASEE/AFOSR Summer Faculty Fellow at Air Force Wright-Patterson Research Lab
Selected Nationally to attend NSF Mathematical Modeling in Engineering Education, Purdue University, Feb 28-
Mar 2, 2005
2004 Young Innovator Award, Inspection and Manufacturing Technologies at GE Global Research

                                                       159
Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
Technical committee chair, Computer-Aided Product Development, ASME/CIE Division
Guest Editor, Special Issue in journal Computer-Aided Design

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
50%

Percentage of time committed to the program:
50%




                                                   160
Name and academic rank: Ganesh G. Raman, Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
and Associate Dean for Research, Graduate College

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Ph.D. in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, May 1991
M.S. in Fluid Dynamics, Chemical Engineering Dept. Cleveland State University, May 1986
B.Tech. in Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, India, July 1983

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
Associate Dean for Research, Graduate College, (2006 – present)
Associate Chair for Aerospace Engineering (2001-2002)
Associate Professor (1999 – present)

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
       June 1998 – August 1999: Senior Research Engineer, Dynacs Inc., Propulsion Analysis Section, NASA
        Glenn Research Center Group, Cleveland, OH 44135.
       January 1994 to May 1998: Senior Research Engineer, NYMA Inc., Experimental Fluid Dynamics Section,
        NASA Glenn Research Center Group, Cleveland, OH 44135.
       May 1986 to December 1993: Research Engineer, Sverdrup Technology Inc., Experimental Fluid
        Dynamics Section, NASA Glenn Research Center Group, Cleveland, OH 44135.

Consulting, patents, etc.:
US Patent: High frequency excitation apparatus and method for reducing jet and cavity noise, US Patent No. 6,375,
118 B1, April 2002 (jointly with V. Kibens of Boeing).

States in which professionally licensed or certified, if applicable:
None

Principal publications of the last five years:
       Tarau, C., Ötügen, V., Sheverev, V., Vradis, G., and Raman, G., The effect of thermal barriers on sound
        wave propagation, International Journal of Aeroacoustics, Vol. 6, No. 3 (2007) pp. 287–308.
       Gregory, J.W., Sullivan, J.P., Raman, G., and Raghu, S., Characterization of the microfluidic oscillator,
        AIAA Journal, Vol. 45, No. 3 (2007) pp. 568–576.
       Panickar, P., and Raman, G., Criteria for the existence of helical instabilities in subsonic impinging jets,
        Physics of Fluids, Vol. 19, No. 10 (2007), 106103
       Sarpotdar, S., Raman, G., Sharma, S., and Cain, A.B., Jet impingement tone suppression using powered
        resonance tubes, AIAA Journal, Vol. 45, No. 5 (2007) pp. 972–979.
       Schmit, R.F. and Raman, G., High and low frequency actuation comparison for weapons bay cavity,
        International Journal of Aeroacoustics, Vol. 5, No. 4 (2006) pp. 395–414.
       Panickar, P., Srinivasan, K. and Raman, G., Aeroacoustic features of coupled twin jets with spanwise
        oblique shock cells, Journal of Sound and Vibration, Vol. 278, pp. 155-179, 2004.
       Joshi, R., Panickar, P., Srinivasan, K. and Raman, G., Nozzle orientation effects and non-linear interactions
        between twin jets of complex geometry,” Journal of Aircraft, Vol. 43(2), pp. 336-345, (2006).
       Panickar, P., Srinivasan, K., and Raman, G., Non-linear interactions as precursors to mode jumps in
        resonant acoustics, Physics of Fluids, Vol. 17(9), 2005.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
       Associate Fellow, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
       Fellow, American Society of Mechanical Engineers
       Fellow, Royal Aeronautical Society, UK
       Member, American Society for Engineering Education



                                                        161
Honors and awards:

       2005, Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society
       2003, Fellow of ASME
       2002 ASME Lewis F, Moody best paper award.
       Cited in 2001 Boeing Special Invention Awards for invention disclosure 00-032 (US Patent application
        09/651,515). Citation title: High Frequency Excitation Apparatus and Method for Reducing Jet Cavity
        Noise (Co-Inventor: Dr. Valdis Kibens of Boeing).
       Best paper award, 1999, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA regional) for a paper
        entitled “Coupling of twin supersonic jets of complex geometry” by Raman G. and Taghavi R.
       Aeromechanics department best paper of the year at NYMA Inc., NASA Glenn Research Center Group,
        Cleveland, OH, 1996 for the following paper (Submitted to J. Fluid Mechanics): Raman, G., “Screech tones
        from rectangular jets with spanwise oblique shock-cell structures”, Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 330,
        pp. 141–168, 1997.
       NYMA/SETAR company best paper of the year at NYMA inc., NASA Glenn Research Center Group for
        the following paper: Raman, G., “Cessation of screech in underexpanded jets”, Journal of Fluid Mechanics,
        Vol. 336, pp. 69–90, 1997.
       NASA certificate of recognition for the creative development of a technical innovation entitled “Multiple
        fluidic devices that provide flow mixing control”, 1996.

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
       Chair, Research Marketing Committee, Graduate College
       Chair, Federal Opportunities Committee, Graduate College
       Chair, Research Council
       Member, IIT Faculty Council
       Member, MMAE Undergraduate Studies Committee
       Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Aeroacoustics, Multi Science Publishing Company, UK
       Reviewer: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Journal,
        American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Journal of Fluids Engineering, Physics of Fluids, Experiments
        in Fluids, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and
        Space Administration (NRA proposals)

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
50%

Percentage of time committed to the (AE/MSE/ME) program:
50%




                                                      162
Name and academic rank: Francisco Ruiz, Associate Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, 1987
M.E., Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie-Mellon University, 1985
Dipl. Ing., Aerospace Engineering, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 1983

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
20 years of service
Appointed: 1987
Tenured: 1992

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
2006-2007: Coleman Faculty Fellow: Illinois Institute of Technology Entrepreneurship Center
1998-1999: Visiting Associate Professor (sabbatical leave), Kellogg Graduate School of Management, Northwestern
                University
1994-present: Director, IIT Invention Center
Fall 1993: Ricardo North America (sabbatical leave)

Consulting, patents, etc.:
F. Ruiz, "Generation of Flat Liquid Sheet And Sprays by Means of Simple Cylindrical Orifices". U.S. Patent No.
4,893,754. Jan. 16, 1990.
Short consulting jobs in the area of energy, combustion, and heat transfer.

States in which professionally licensed or certified, if applicable:
Licensed Professional Engineer, State of Illinois.

Principal publications of the last five years:
Nonfiction:
W. De Ojeda and F. Ruiz, “Hydraulic Flow Compensator for fast Switch Device” ASME Journal of Dynamics &
Sys. Measurements and Controls, vol. 125, pp. 509-514. 2003.
F. Ruiz, “Learning Engineering as Art: an Invention Center”, International Journal of Engineering Education, vol.
20, No. 5, pp. 809-819. 2004.
F. Ruiz. “Analysis of the 3rd generation IC-Stirling Engine”, SAE Paper 2005-01-3462, SAE Future Transportation
Technology Conference. Chicago, IL, 2005.
F. Ruiz, R. Sabbah. “Gas-Fired Oscillating-Flow Superadiabatic Radiant Emitters”. A report to the Gas Technology
Institute (still unpublished outside GTI), 2005.
Berzosa, A, Lastra, D., Sabbah, R. Ruiz, F. “External Pulsed Combustion by Acoustic Forcing”, 31st International
Combustion Symposium, 2008
Fiction:
“Ad Alienos” (SF short story). IsFic, 2006.
“Los guardianes del pasado” (young adult science-fiction novel). Planeta, 2008.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
Combustion Institute, ILASS-Americas (founding member), NCIIA(founding member), S.A.E.(local advisor), Tau-
Beta-Pi (chief advisor), Pi-Tau-Sigma(local advisor), Sigma-Xi.




                                                       163
Honors and awards:
Tanasawa Award, International Conference on Liquid Atomization and Spray Systems (ICLASS). Japan, 1988.
Teetor Educational Award, Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). 1990.
Science and Engineering All-Professor Team 1992. Chicago Tribune.
Faculty Advisor of the Year, Illinois Institute of Technology, 1992.
Two-time winner: University Excellence in Teaching Award, Illinois Institute of Technology, 1995, 2007.
BF.Goodrich Invention Award, National Inventors’ Hall of Fame, 1996.
“Who's Who in American Education”, “Who's Who in Hispanic Professionals”, “Who's Who in Science and
Engineering.”
Grand Prize: IIT’s Alma Mater Contest. 1999 (musical composition)
Among the forty-one IIT Persons of the Millenium, chosen by the IIT students,1999.
MMAE Excellence in Teaching Award. Illinois Institute of Technology, 2006.
IsFic grand prize for short fiction, 2006.

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
Reviewer for:
Atomization and Sprays, Begell House
Journal of Propulsion and Power, AIAA
Experiments in Fluids, Springer-Verlag
National Science Foundation (several directorates)
Chief advisor of several student groups and honor societies: Tau Beta Pi, SAE, Pi Tau Sigma
Chair, NCA Review Board of IIT Humanities department, 2006-2008
Chair, IIT-wide teaching award commitee, 2008
Asst. Chair, ASME symposium on engineering education, ASME international congress, 2007
Member, IIT Entrepreneurial Studies Committee, 2007-2008
Member, MMAE Undergraduate Studies Committee, 2004-2008
Numerous lesser committees

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
20%

Percentage of time committed to the program:
80%




                                                      164
Name and academic rank: Murat Vural, Assistant Professor of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:

1998, Ph.D. in Aeronautical Engineering (Minor in Materials Science), Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul,
Turkey
1991, M.S. in Aeronautical Engineering, Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey
1989, B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering, Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
2003  present (5 years), Assistant Professor, Mechanical, Materials & Aerospace Eng. Dept., Illinois Institute of
Technology

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
2000  2003, Visiting Associate, Graduate Aeronautical Laboratories, California Institute of Technology

Consulting, patents, etc.:
None

States in which professionally licensed or certified, if applicable:
None

Principal publications of the last five years:
        M. Alkhader and M. Vural, “Mechanical response of cellular solids: Role of cellular topology and
         microstructural irregularity”, accepted, International Journal of Engineering Sciences (2008)
        M. Kotche, J.L. Drummond, K. Sun, M. Vural, F. DeCarlo, “Multiaxial Analysis of Dental Composite
         Materials”, accepted, Journal of Biomedical Materials Research: Part B - Applied Biomaterials (2008)
        M. Vural and G. Ravichandran, “Failure mode transition and energy dissipation in naturally occurring
         composites”, Composites Part B - Eng, 35(6-8): 639-646, (2004).
        M. Vural and G. Ravichandran, “Transverse failure in thick S2-glass/epoxy fiber reinforced composites”,
         Journal of Composite Materials, 38(7): 609-623, (2004).
        M. Vural and G. Ravichandran, “Dynamic response and energy dissipation characteristics of balsa wood:
         experiment and analysis”, International Journal of Solids and Structures, 40(9): 2147-2170, (2003).
        M. Vural and D. Rittel, “An educational visualization technique for Kolsky (split Hopkinson) bar”,
         Experimental Techniques, 27(6): 35-39, (2003).
        M. Vural, D. Rittel and G. Ravichandran, “Large strain mechanical behavior of 1018 steel over a wide
         range of strain rates”, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A, 34A(12): 2873-2885, (2003).

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
        Society for Experimental Mechanics (SEM)
        American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
        Dynamic Response of Materials Technical Committee of the ASME Applied Mechanics Division
        Dynamic Behavior of Materials Technical Division of the SEM

Honors and awards:
        NSF Fellowship to the NSF Summer Institute on Surface Engineering & Coatings (July, 2004).
        NSF Fellowship to the NSF Summer Institute on Nano Mechanics and Materials (August, 2003).
        NATO Advanced Science Fellowship, for 6 months (20002001).
        Department of Defense (Turkey) Practical Training Fellowship, for 6 months (19921993).


Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
                                                        165
      Reviewed Journal Papers for Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids, International Journal of
       Solids and Structures, Experimental Mechanics, Journal of Materials Science, Journal of Applied
       Mechanics, Journal of Heat Transfer, Applied Physics Letters, Composites Science and Technology,
       Materials Letters, Composites Part B – Engineering, Holzforschung
      Reviewed Research Proposals for Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada (NSERC-CA), U.S.
       Army Research Office (ARO), U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR)
      Organized Special Sessions on (1)“Dynamic Response of Cellular Solids and Soft Tissues” in ASME
       International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition (IMECE’06), Chicago, IL, November 5-10,
       2006, (2) “High-Strain-Rate Testing of Biological and Soft Materials” in SEM Annual Conference and
       Exposition on Experimental & Applied Mechanics (SEM’07), Springfield, MA, June 4-6, 2007, (3)
       “Aerospace Materials and Characterization” in the 3rd International Conference on Recent Advances in
       Space Technologies (RAST’07), Istanbul, Turkey, June 14-16, 2007.
      Served as a Member in MMAE Undergraduate Studies Committee (Fall 2003 – Spring 2006), MMAE Lab
       Committee (Fall 2003 – present), IIT Undergraduate Studies Committee (Fall 2004 – Spring 2006),
      Mentored High School Students (Hemal Patel) from Illinois Mathematics & Science Academy (IMSA)
       between Sep 05 – Mar 06 on a project entitled “Laser-Based Velocity Measurement System for Direct
       Impact Experiments”, and between Sep 06 – Mar 07 on a project entitled “Low Temperature High-Strain-
       Rate Experiments”.

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
60%

Percentage of time committed to the (AE/MSE/ME) program:
40%




                                                   166
Name and academic rank: Candace Wark, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Associate
Dean of Armour College of Engineering

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
PhD: Mechanical Engineering Illinois Institute of Technology, 1988
M.S.: Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, 1984
B.S.: Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, 1981

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
June 1988 - August 1989
          Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department
          Illinois Institute of Technology
          Visiting Assistant Professor
August 1989 - August 1993
          Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department
          Illinois Institute of Technology
          Assistant Professor
August 1993 – August 1998
          Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering Department
          Illinois Institute of Technology
          Associate Professor with tenure
August 1998-Present
          Professor: Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering Department
          Illinois Institute of Technology
August 2003 - Present
          Associate Dean of Armour College of Engineering
          Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
          Illinois Institute of Technology

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
May 1998 - August 2000
         IPA assignment: Program Manager for Turbulence at the Office of Naval Research, Arlington, VA
January 1990 - February 1990
         Center for Turbulence Research
         NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA
         Visiting Scientist
March 1990 - June 1990
         Visiting Scientist
Theoretical and Applied Mechanics Department
         University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign

Principal publications of the last five years:
“Mean and Fluctuating Velocity Characteristics of a Separated Shear Layer Past a Surface Mounted Block”, U.
Ozkol, C. Wark and D. Fabris, Journal of Fluids Engineering, Vol. 129, Feb. 2007, pp. 200-208.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
American Physical Society
American Society of Mechanical Engineers
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
American Society for Engineering Education

Honors and awards:
NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, 1990 - 1995
IIT Ralph Barnett Teaching award, 2004
                                                      167
Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
2008: Chair, Search Committee for Armour College of Engineering Dean
2003-2008: Associate Dean of Armour College of Engineering
Several IIT MS and PhD thesis exam committees
2006-2008: IIT Laboratory Safety committee
2005-2008: MMAE search committee
Several years on MMAE undergraduate studies committee
2005: IIT alcohol awareness committee
2007-2008: Member of NSF workshop on Fluid Mechanics Education
Reviewer for: Journal of Fluid Mechanics and Physics of Fluids

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
50%

Percentage of time committed to the program:
50%




                                                    168
Name and academic rank: David R. Williams, Professor, Department of Mechanical, Materials and
Aerospace Engineering. Director, Fluid Dynamics Research Center
Armour College of Engineering and Sciences

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Ph.D., Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Princeton University, 1982
M.S.E., Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Princeton University, 1978
B.S.E., Mechanical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology, 1976

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
1999 - Present                           Director, Fluid Dynamics Research Center
1992 - Present                           Professor, Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace
                                         Engineering Dept., Illinois Institute of Technology
1988 - 1992                              Associate Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace
                                         Engineering Dept., Illinois Institute of Technology
1983 - 1988                              Assistant Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace
                                         Engineering Dept., Illinois Institute of Technology

Other related experience, i.e., teaching, industrial, etc.:
1982 - 1983                              Visiting Scientist, Institut fur Aerodynamik und
                                         Gasdynamik,
                                         Universitaet Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany
                                         Alexander von Humboldt Foundation
1976 - 1982                              Graduate Research Assistant, Moody Hydrodynamics
                                         Laboratory and Gas Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton
                                         University, Princeton, New Jersey
1976 (summer)                            Intern Engineer, Harbor Branch Foundation,
                                         Ft. Pierce, Florida
1974, 1975 (summers)                     Undergraduate Research Assistant, Newark College
                                         Medicine and Dentistry, Newark, New Jersey

Consulting, patents, etc.:
CONSULTING
Brookfield Zoo, Brookfield IL
Designed and supervised construction of a new fountain for the zoo.
Transco Products, Inc.- Chicago, 55 E. Jackson Blvd. Chicago, IL 60604
Measurements of the flow characteristics on insulating materials for use in nuclear power plants.
Alnor Instrument Co., 7555 N. Linder Ave., Skokie, IL 60077
Developing new concepts in flow metering.
Chicago Dryer Co., 2200 N. Pulaski, Chicago, IL 60639
Heat transfer analysis of industrial ironers.
Perseco Company, Oakmont Center, Westmont, IL 60559-1270
Volumetric flow rate analysis of flow through McDonald's drinking straws.
Roger Machin, Sculptor, 1436 West Randolph St., Chicago, IL 60607
Estimates of wind loading on large sculpture projects.
Ketron, lnc., Hickory Hill Plaza, 151 W. Warner Rd., Wayne, PA 19087
Advisor on flow measurement techniques in coal mines to determine the effectiveness of ventilation systems.
PATENTS
“Spirometer” with N. Wilson, K. Meade, H. Mansy. U.S. Patent No. 10,115,263
“Large Amplitude Pneumatic Oscillator” with B.-H. Kim, 2002, U.S. Patent No. 6,390,116
“Trapped Vortex Pair Flow Meter”, with H. Mansy, 1989, U.S. Patent No. 4,843,889



                                                       169
Principal publications of the last five years:
“Supersonic Cavity Response to Open-Loop Forcing”, with C. Cornelius and C. Rowley, in Active Flow Control, R.
King (Editor), Notes on Numerical Fluid Mechanics and Multidisciplinary Design, Vol. 95, 2007, pp. 230-243.
 “Nonlinear coupling of fluctuating drag and lift on cylinders undergoing forced oscillations”, with B.-H. Kim. J.
Fluid Mech. Vol. 559, 2006, pp.335-353.
“Linear models for control of cavity flow oscillations”, with C. Rowley, T. Colonius, R. Murray, D. MacMartin. J.
Fluid Mech. Vol. 547, 2006, pp. 317-330.
“Dynamics and Control of High-Reynolds-Number Flow over Open Cavities”, with C. Rowley, Annual Review of
Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 38, 2006 pp.251-276.

Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
Member of American Physical Society, American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics, American Society of
Mechanical Engineers, Sigma Xi

Recent Professional Society Activities
Organizer and Lecturer of AIAA Professional Short Course – “Flow Control for Specialists”, San Francisco, CA,
June 2006, and Reno, NV, January 2008.
Organizer and Chair of “1st International Workshop on Closed-Loop Flow Control”, Jackson Hole, WY, July 2005.
Co-organizer and Lecturer for the AIAA Professional Short Course – “Modern Flow Control”, Portland, OR June
2004, Reno, NV, January 2006 and 2007.
Member of AIAA Fluid Dynamics Technical Committee, 2002 – 2006
Member of AIAA Flow Control Subcommittee, 2002 - 2006
Organizer and Chair of AIAA Architectures and Algorithms for Flow Control Working Group, 2002 – 2004.
Associate Editor, ASME Journal of Fluids Engineering, 1997-2000

Honors and awards:
Fellow, American Physical Society, 2006
Honeywell Advanced Technology Achievement Award, 2006
IIT Sigma Xi Award for Excellence in Research, 2006
IITRI Fellow, 1998
Associate Fellow of AIAA, 1995
Received the first Stryker (IIT) Outstanding Student Organization Advisor Award,1990.The award was given for
work as the faculty advisor to the IIT Sailing Club and the AIAA student organization.
Excellence in Teaching Award, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, 1988
Galvin Venture Fund Award, 1985
Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship, Stuttgart, Germany 1982
Princeton University Guggenheim Fellowship, 1978
Stevens Book Award for activity in Fluid Mechanics, 1976

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
Aerospace Engineering Curriculum Revision Committee (chair) 2007
Aerospace Engineering Curriculum Implementation Committee (chair) 2008
MMAE AUCOPT (chair) 2002-2008

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
10 %

Percentage of time committed to the program:
90 %




                                                       170
Name and academic rank: Benxin Wu, Assistant Professor

Degrees with fields, institution, and date:
Doctor of Philosophy, Mechanical Engineering, 2007
Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
Master of Science, Electrical Engineering, 2003
University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR), Rolla, MO
Master of Science, Mechanical Engineering, 2003
University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR), Rolla, MO
Bachelor of Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, 2001
Tsinghua University, Beijing, China

Number of years of service on this faculty, including date of original appointment and dates of
advancement in rank:
Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering,
Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL,
August 2007 – present

Principal publications of the last five years:
Yinggang Tian, Benxin Wu, Mark Anderson, Yung C. Shin, “Laser-assisted milling of silicon nitride ceramics and
inconel 718”, Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering, Transactions of the ASME, accepted.
Benxin Wu, Yung C. Shin, Harshavardhan R. Pakhal, Normand M. Laurendeau, and Robert P. Lucht, “Modeling
and experimental verification of plasmas induced by high-power nanosecond laser-aluminum interactions in air”,
Physical Review E, 2007; 76: 026405.
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “Two dimensional hydrodynamic simulation of high pressures induced by high
power nanosecond laser-matter interactions under water”, Journal of Applied Physics, 101 (10), 103514, 2007
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “A simple two-stage model for the formation and expansion of the plasma induced
by high intensity nanosecond laser metal ablation in vacuum”, Physics Letters A, 371, 128-134, 2007.
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “From incident laser pulse to residual stress: A complete and self-closed model for
laser shock peening”, Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering, Transactions of the ASME, 129, 117-125,
2007.
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “A one-dimensional hydrodynamic model for pressures induced near the coating-
water interface during laser shock peening”, Journal of Applied Physics, 101, 023510, 2007.
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “A simple model for high fluence ultra-short pulsed laser metal ablation”, Applied
Surface Science, 253, 4079-4084, 2007.
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “Absorption coefficient of aluminum near the critical point and the consequences on
high-power nanosecond laser ablation”, Applied Physics Letters, 89(11), 111902, 2006.
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “Modeling of nanosecond laser ablation with vapor plasma formation”, Journal of
Applied Physics, 99(8), 084310, 2006.
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “Laser pulse transmission through the water breakdown plasma in laser shock
peening”, Applied Physics Letters, 88(4), 041116, 2006.
Benxin Wu and Yung C. Shin, “A self-closed thermal model for laser shock peening under the water confinement
regime configuration and comparisons to experiments”, Journal of Applied Physics, 97(11), 113517, 2005.




                                                        171
Scientific and professional societies of which a member:
ASME
Tau Beta Pi-The Engineering Honor Society

Institutional and professional service in the last five years:
MMAE Lab Committee

Percentage of time available for research or scholarly activities:
70%

Percentage of time committed to the program:
30%




                                                   172
APPENDIX C – LABORATORY EQUIPMENT


    Major laboratory equipment is listed in connection with the courses in which they are
    utilized:

    MMAE 310 – Fluid Mechanics:

    •      Cussons P6100 Hydraulic Bench with various modules for investigating:

                  -       Rotameter calibration
                  -       Venturi meter
                  -       Impact of jets
                  -       Losses in pipes and fittings

    •      MMAE’s Room 141 Undergraduate Wind Tunnel plus associated instrumentation
    for:

                  -       Lift and drag characteristics of an airfoil
                  -       Calibration of a pitot-static tube

    •      Center of pressure experiment apparatus.


    MMAE 322 – Heat and Mass Transfer:

    •      Steady-state conduction experiment apparatus

    •      Armfield unsteady heat transfer experiment apparatus

    •      External convection experiment apparatus

    •      Binary diffusion experiment apparatus

    •      Armfield radiant heat transfer experiment apparatus

    •      Mixed mode radiant-convective heat transfer experiment apparatus

    •      Extended surface (fin) heat transfer experiment apparatus




                                            173
MMAE 371 – Engineering Materials and Design:

•       Two Instron static mechanical test frames with computer control and advanced data
collection and analysis software.

•       Bend tester using strain gaged bending frames and Micro Measurement strain
indicator, switch and balance box and Omega panel meter for load readings converted from
strain.

•        Metrology lab including micrometers, calipers, CCD microscope, CMM, Contour
tracer, surface roughness analyzer and toolmakers microscope.

•       Fatigue test equipment (closed loop servo hydraulic systems for pre-cracking and
testing).

•      Fracture mechanics testing measuring strain, stroke and load simultaneously for
toughness analysis.

•      Tinius Olson impact test frame (for metals and alloys).

•      TMI table top impact tester (for polymers).

•      A range of hardness testing machines capable of all Rockwell scales plus macro and
micro Vickers, Brinell and Meyer.

•      Rebound hardness testers (Shore Schleroscope and Webster).

•      Shore A hardness tester for rubber.

•      Torsion test frame for aluminum, copper and two types of steel.


MMAE 430 – Engineering Measurements:

•      Tecquipment mechanical property test stand including vibration, torsion pendulum,
etc.

•      Ultrasonic measurement of defect position and modulus of elasticity.

•      Creep of material (polymers) using compression rig and LVDT’s and dial gages
with Labview recording.

•      Evaluation of DC motor characteristics using electronic brake, DC high wattage
power supply and Labview program to put motor through duty cycles.

•      Evaluation of gyroscope characteristics.

                                       174
•     Determination of fluid flow using an air jet with side interrupters. Uses a pitot tube
mounted on a computer driven stage and controlled with Labview.

MMAE 445 – CAD/CAM with Numerical Control:

•      Hass 3-axis CNC machine.

•      Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) machine.




                                        175

				
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