Curriculum

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					James Russ

Professor Alison Matika

Educ 0300E, Curriculum Devlopment for Secondary School English

11 December 2003

             Hungry Minds: Challenging Literature for Freshman Balanced Literacy



Table of Contents:

1.1 Teaching Philosophy

1.2 Statement of Context

1.3 Descriptive Overview and Long Term Plan

Section Two: General Guide

2.1 Special Issues

2.2 Aims: Objectives and Goals

2.3 Performance Criteria: Abilities and Skills

Section Three: Unit Description

3.1 Outline: Texts and Methods

3.2 Details: Lesson Plans

Section Four: Assessment

4.1 Assessment: Outline, Details, and Criteria

4.2 Statement of Relationship

Section Five: Afterward

5.1 Analysis of Successes and Failures

5.2 Relationship of Curriculum to NCTE Standards
                                                        2


5.3 Relationship of Teaching Philosophy to Curriculum

5.4 Revised Teaching Philosophy

5.5 Statement of Valued Practices

Works Cited
                                                                                                     3


1.1 Teaching Philosophy

   I stepped into the role of a public school teacher for the first time this year. My initial

philosophy was just to learn something every day. This may sound simplistic or naïve, but it is a

survival strategy. I know that I have and will continue to make many tactical errors in the

classroom because of the newness of the situation. However, my only recourse is to continue

trying to improve, attempt new strategies, listen to others’ advice, and most importanltly learn

from my mistakes.

       Knowing next to nothing about the students I would encounter in the first semester I only

had a few sketchy ideas that accounted for my philosophy. I emphasize a close reading of literary

texts, as the most important goal for the English class. Comprehension is a big focus. I want kids

to understand what they are reading.

       Broad goals are that students should read challenging texts (at or above their grade level)

and be accountable for that material in their writing assignments. I also emphasize historical

context before I read a book with a class. I like to set books up in the time period and include

relevant information about the author.

       As far as classroom management goes, my guiding philosophy is to get through my

lesson plan regardless of classroom interruptions. In practice this means, work not finished in

class is often pushed over into homework. The only exception to this rule si when a legitimate

reason for deviating from the lesson plan arises (when I haven’t adequately prepared students for

the objective that day – i.e. it is too difficult or needs more scaffolding), or when a tangential

subject matter arises out of the lesson plan and is worth engaging. Compensations for these

revisions have been reflected in section 3.2
                                                                                                         4




1.2 Statement of Context

This curriculum is written for students at Louis D. Brandeis High School, located on the Upper

West Side of New York City. The course is called balanced literacy and it is a typical class

period divided into focused sections for reading aloud, a mini lesson, work period, and closing.

These sections are fairly common in a non-scritpted lesson plan, so the curriculum could be

easily transferred to a non-balanced literacy classroom.

        The students in the school are majority Hispanic (most of which are Dominican). A

minority are African American, but it is a sizeable minority (about forty percent). I would also

estimate that about fourty percent of the students speak fluent Spanish.

        My own classroom is a scaled reflection of the school population. However the academic

identity of the students is unique. All of the students are at grade level as far as their test scores

go (and a few are above). Most of the students enjoy reading in their spare time and most are

used to academic success (A&B students).
                                                                                                     5


       The curriculum is therefore designed for 9th grade students reading at grade level. Other

than talking at inapropriate times, discipline problems were no t really a consideration in the

lesson plans. Students are given a wide variety of tasks in class and assessments out of class.




1.3 Descriptive Overview & Long Term Plan

   My curriculum is focused primarily on reading challenging works of literature, with special

areas of concentration on essay writing and vocabulary. There are three main units in the

curriculum made up of three major literary works. These works will hopefully provoke students

higher cognitive abilities. One of my goals for the unit is for students to move beyond literal

minded analysis. The units are taught within a framework of the balanced literacy format. At my

school the framework isn’t strictly enforced and my lesson plans reflect only the loosest

adherence to this structure. The general foci of 9th grade balanced literacy is short story, essay

writing, note taking, regents prep, basic spelling and grammar, and fostering creativity whenever

possible.

       The first unit is centered around El Bronx Remembered. The book is treated more like a

collection of short stories and is not read in its entirety. This is to compensate for changing

schedules and the demands of introducing so many other concepts in this unit. This unit

introduces the student to the major components of literary analysis including plot elements and
                                                                                                    6


literary terms. The students will learn how to speak about a text in an informed and precise

manner. They will also become familiar with the short story as a genre unto itself. A few

supplementary short stories are also included in this unit during the read alouds as a launch off

for discussion (―Say Yes‖ by Tobias Wolff).

       The second unit focuses on myths and heros. The text is an adapted version of The

Odyssey which strikes a good balance between being accesible and challenging to the student.

During this unit, a truncated history of Greek mythology is given as well as a special emphasis

on Odysseus’ role in the Trojan War. This background information is intended to provide a

clearere understanding of the events leading up to The Odyssey. This unit culminates with a unit

test as well as a scaffolded essay on connections between events in The Odyssey and the modern

day.

       The third unit focuses on drama through Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. This unit is an

intensive immersion into Shakespeare’s language. A list of vocabulary words are introduced

every day, which preload the reading for that night. Performing and reading aloud scenes in class

are also emphasized. There are no formal lessons on performance in the classroom, so this aspect

greatly depends on the students’ and teacher’s own disposition towards performance. The class I

taught during the writing of this curriculum were energetic and rambunctious. Having them act

out scenes from the play aloud served to engage them and simultaneously release some of their

excess energy. This unit culminates with an essay and another cumulative test. These three large

comprehensive units were interrupted with small targeted unit plans. The main interruption was a

lesson on regents note taking.
                                                                                                      7




2.1 Special Issues

       I only taught this class once a day and the students were coming to me immediately from

gym. In addition to their excess energies, the announcements were given at the beginning of this

period and I found this time to be a distracting and confusing one. I could neither give direction,

nor simply allow them to do as they wished (because it inevitably led to students being out of

their seat and disrupting others from hearing the announcements). For this reason, I tried to make

the do now as specific and intensive as possible. Most often it involved writing down a list of

words and defining them. This list was subsequently quizzed on, but I found it nescessary to

harness the energy and chaos coming into the class.

       Issues for other teachers interested in this curriculum include:

   1) My students were very interested in the literature. Other students who might need a little

       more encouragement might do better with more student centered lesson plans

   2) Teachers with a firm grasp of their class’ behavior may also opt for more variation in the

       do nows. I was advised by my mentor to offer repetitive writing tasks during the do now.

       As cynical as it may have seemed to me at the time, it has worked.
                                                                                          8


3) Teachers should decide in advance how to handle the more explicit sexual references

   from Romeo and Juliet. I opted to explain these references as they came up in the

   reading, in order to pique student interest in the text.

4) Depending on what the teacher has planned for the other half of the year, more essay

   writing may want to be considered. As I was writing and teaching this curriculum I

   realized it was an area that some may consider needs more emphasis.
                                                                                                   9




2.2 Aims: Objectives & Goals

Students will be able to write a multi paragraph essay. Students will be able to comprehend

challenging works of literature including Shakespearean language. Students will be able to think

critically about works of literature and begin to think outside of the literal meaning of texts.

Students will also be able to have a rudimentary discussion on works of literature.

       Specific aims for units

   1. Mohr’s El Bronx Remembered

           a. Students will be able to identify the salient features of a short story. This includes

               diagramming a plot as well as the elements of a short story.

           b. Students will be able to compare and contrast characters in a story and put them in

               the context of the work at large.

           c. Students will be able to understand the term ―theme‖ and can reinforce their own

               interpretations of a theme with textual evidence.

   2. Regent’s task 1 and 2

           a. Students will be able to pick out the most important details of an oral presentation

           b. Students will be able to take notes on an oral presentation.

           c. Students will be able to answer multiple choice questions based on a presentation

           d. Students will be able to compose an essay that responds to one or more aspects of

               the oral reading

   3. Homer’s The Odyssey
                                                                                             10


      a. Students will be able to identify the major figures of Greek mythology and

          understand their relationship to the central figures in The Odyssey.

      b. Students will be able to make connections between the stories in The Odyssey and

          modern day life

      c. Students will be able to explain, using examples from the text why Odysseus was

          considered a hero.

4. Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet

      a. Students will be able to identify the plot structure of the play as it unfolds over the

          course of five acts

      b. Students will be able to identify and define a large group of Shakespearean words

      c. Students will be able to identify major themes from the play

      d. Students will be able to translate lines from the play into their modern day

          vernacular
                                                                                                    11




2.3 Performance Criteria: Abilities & Skills

        Students will produce several essays in class and they will be judged on their effective

utilization of the essay components we discussed in class. The main criterion will be supporting

opinions with strong examples. Adhering to the basic form of a five paragraph essay will also be

a major factor in their essays. This includes an introduction (with thesis statement), three body

paragraphs, and a conclusion paragraph. Students will also produce more creative products such

as a short story and their own poem or rap in iambic pentameter.

        The major ability and skill that is tested in this curriculum is their ability to read

challenging works, retain this information, and apply it to more broad based thinking. This broad

based thinking usually centers around a few major themes for each work.

Students ability to grasp vocabulary presented in lessons and do nows is also a major

performance criteria.




3.1 Outline: Texts & Methods

Units

1) Nicholasa Mohr’s El Bronx Remembered

   a. elements of a short story
                                                                                           12


   b. elements of a short story plot

   c. close textual readings

   d. emphasis on literary terms including theme and symbolism

2) Regents Preparatory Unit

   a. note taking

   b. essay writing

3) Homer’s The Odyssey

   a. Greek myths

   b. Background on the Trojan War

   c. Close reading of the text emphasizing Odysseus’ role as a hero

   d. Other themes explored: role of women in The Odyssey and relationship of the story to the

       modern day

4) Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet

   a. background information on time period and Shakespeare’s life

   b. translating Shakespeare into modern day language

   c. close reading, highlighting selected passages

   d. reading aloud and performing scenes from the play

   e. emphasis on Shakespearean vocabulary
                                                                                                                   13




3.2 Details: Lesson Plans

1

                                  Lesson Plan-9th graders – 9/8/03

1) Aim: What is this class all about? What is Brandeis all about? What is the teacher all about?

2) Do Now: Attendance , Delaney cards, and index cards



index card: Name, address, 2 people to call in case of emergency and their phone numbers,

favorite book, magazine or newspapers you get at home, hobby, and what you hope to get out of

this class



3) Activities:

Texts and materials needed:   index cards, Delaney cards, notebook paper, pens



Strategies and techniques – lectures, mini-lesson, group work, individual work, etc.:   1) lecture about myself,

purpose of course, etc.

Introduce theme of first semester is identity, we will start reading El Bronx Remembered, The

Odyssey, and Romeo and Juliet
                                                                                                        14


Course requirements: 8 1/2‖ x 11‖ 3 ring binder binder with separate section for English, must be

brought to class everyday, will be checked and graded



2) lecture about rules of Brandeis and classroom- no hats/doorags, bathroom policy, no food in

class (drinks if I don’t see it), sign latebook, no electronic devices permitted



Individual work- take writing sample: What was your experience coming to school today? What

do you think of Brandeis? How was your ride here this morning?




4) Closure (summary, ask questions – ―What did we learn about Hamlet today? or ―Name one thing you learned

today‖):




1) review classroom procedures (if time allows) by role playing, 2) ask students if they have any

questions




2

                               Lesson Plan – 9th Grade – 9/9/03
                                                                                                   15


1) Aim: What level are we at as writers?



2) Do Now: Writing Sample (30 minutes)- 1 page, What did you do during the blackout?



3) Activities:

Texts and materials needed:   notebook paper, class contract, Lucy Thomas short story (see appendix)



Strategies and techniques – lectures, mini-lesson, group work, individual work, etc.:

    1) lecture- a) go over class contract

    b) answer any questions about contract

         2) lecture- introduce format of balanced literacy lessons:

Read Aloud (5 minutes)



Lesson Plan 2

Lucy Thomas Short Story

           ―THIS STORY IS SMALL BECAUSE I AM NOT SURE IT IS GOOD
                                by Lucy Thomas




I was born when no one was paying attention. People were looking in another direction, at
fireworks, at airplanes crashing on TV.

My mother drove my sisters and I to Missouri to see the caves. On the way to the caves, in our
Gremlin on the highway, there was a sound, and then we stopped.

We had run over a turtle. The turtle, large, was still alive, and walked the rest of the way across
the highway, down the embankment and disappeared.
                                                                                                        16


We called a towtruck. The man who came with the towtruck had one arm. He asked what had
happened, and my mother told him that we had run over a turtle. His left arm was a nub
protruding from his shoulder.

The turtle’s shell had knocked off our muffler. The towtruck man drove away, leaving us on the
highway. My sisters and I went looking for the turtle—hoping to follow it and find its home, like
detectives. My mother smoked while sitting on the hood.

It seems silly to think love is sacred when it is so common.

The towtruck man brought back a muffler. Its shaft was bent like a corkscrew.

Driving again, we listened to Xanadu. The caves glowed orange, milky blue. They were
immaculate (Thomas, 65‖


Mini Lesson (15 minutes)

Work Period (15 minutes)

Closing (5-10 minutes)

    2) introduce 8 habits of effective readers

    3) demonstrate text to self connection with one of the effective habits with Lucy Thomas

           short story




*let students know this plan will be followed after today*

Opportunity for practice and reinforcement of new skills:




Lecture notes, discussion questions, etc.:

4) Closure (summary, ask questions – ―What did we learn about Hamlet today? or ―Name one thing you learned

today‖):   review eight habits of effective readers, ask students to give an example of a text to text

connection.
                                                                                                                17




5) Outcome (a. student project to show they know material, b. test, quiz, paper, chart, presentation, a poem,

project- not necessary every day):   homework- 1) get class contract signed, 2) make three text to self

connections to the short story



Hw for later in week: short story with elements of short story




3

                     Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balance literacy – 9/10/03



1) Aim: What is a short story?



2) Do Now: What makes up a story?



3) Procedures:

    a) assign seats as students enter, have Delany cards ready for new students or students

        without cards

    b) have students start on do now

c) Collect class contracts

d) follow lesson format



Lesson Format:
                                                                                                    18


Mini-Lesson (10 min.)- review 8 habits and go over text to self connections

Read Aloud (5 minutes)- read Lucy Thomas short story, modeling text to self connections

Lecture on five elements of a short story: 1) character –who the story is about

2) setting- where the story is taking place 3) plot- how story unfolds, 4) theme 5)conflict-

struggle or problem of story

Lecture on plot diagram:

1. Exposition = Introduction to characters, setting, etc.
2. Rising action = Suspense
3. Climax = Final battle
4. Falling action = Dramatic
5. Resolution = Aftermath

elicit from students what components fit each category

-let students know that the terms should go in their notebook and they will be responsible for

knowing these terms

Work Period (20-25 min.)-

Students will take the Lucy Thomas story and do three things:

    1) tell who are the characters, what is the plot, setting, conflict, and theme

    2) identify the exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution

-let students know that I will be mainly looking to see that they have tried to incorporate these

elements into their short story.



Closing (5 min.): review elements of short story, and a short story plot. Give homework

assignment due Friday- turn in a short, short story focusing mainly on the .

4

                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balance literacy – 9/11/03
                                                                                                  19




1) Aim: What is the importance of asking questions about literature?



2) Do Now: Ghandi quote, take attendance



3) Procedures:

   *make sure students have pencils to fill out book receipts

   1) Have a class discussion on why it is important to question life, and literature in particular.

   2) Have 1 or 2 students share their short story aloud

   3) Collect short story homework

   4) distribute ―El Bronx Remembered‖- give lesson on how to fill out book receipts, make

       sure students have pencils to fill in receipt, check if books are numbered, if not give them

       numbers, blank spaces should be filled with zeroes

Mini-Lesson (10 min.)- review elements of a short story and elements of short story plot

a) character –who the story is about, b) setting- where the story is taking place c) plot- how story

unfolds, d) theme e)conflict- struggle or problem of story

exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution



4) Read Aloud (5 minutes)- I will read aloud first two pages of ―Shoes for Hector‖ out of El

Bronx Remembered and I will model text to self connections



Mini-Lesson (10 min.)

none
                                                                                               20


Work Period (20-25 min.)- ask students to read the first short story from El Bronx remembered

and answer these questions, if they do not finish the questions it will be homework:

    1) Who are the main characters?

    2) What is the setting?

    3) What is the conflict(s)?Is there more than one?

    4) How is conflict resolved?



Closing (5 min.)

       If time allows, have students write about a time they were embarrassed by a parent-

emphasize it needs to be appropriate for class.



       Homework: El Bronx Remembered questions

5

Lesson Plan – 9th Grade – 9/9/03

Aim: How does context affect a short story?
Do Now: respond to this quote

Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.
Oscar Wilde

    1) Have discussion on quote


1) Tell students how good their short stories were – we will try to do more creative writing
assignments

For homework grade/quiz, have students suumarize the short story in one to two paragraphs.
Including the characters*, plot, setting, and conflict. Be specific.
                                                                                                  21



Mini Lesson: 1) Have students read introduction to El Bronx Remembered (might not be in their
edition) – ask them to think of the context of the stories.

Context- the circumstances of events from the environment within which something exists or
takes place

2) Ask students to summarize what Shoes for Hector is about – use setting, character, conflict,
plot

    3) Discuss the importance of the setting in Shoes for Hector – how would the story be
        different if it had taken place in Puerto Rico?
    4) Begin reading ―a very special pet‖ aloud with class. Stop and do summaries.

HW: Read rest of ―a very special pet‖ for Monday and keep in mind the context the story is
happening in.



6
                    Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Literacy- 9-15-2003

Aim: What is a theme? How does it appear in ―El Bronx Remembered‖?

Do Now: make a list of the five core values of Americans

1) hand back homework as students do their do now



Materials

―Bronx‖ books, homework to hand back



Homework

Quiz tomorrow to define five elements of a short story: 1) plot- all events of story,

setting-where/when, character-who, theme-message of story (not usually stated

explicitly), conflict- problem for characters to overcome (may be more than one)
                                                                                             22


2) And define elements of plot: exposition-sets up story, rising action-dramatic tension

increases, climax-height of drama, falling action-tension decreases, resolution-problem

resolved

Bonus is (day nue-mŠ ) spelled denouement- events following a climax where
story comes to resolution (can include falling action and resolution)




Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): I will read first 3 pages of ―A Very Special Pet‖ and model



Mini Lesson (10-15 min): 1) discuss theme- an implicit or recurring idea- connect it to

do now- a) usually we don’t say in America ―we love money and are materialists‖ but

you can tell by our credit card debt and our desire for more material goods.

b) we also don’t usually explicity say, ―we are religious‖ but we see examples of people’s

faith all over the place- churches, religious clothing, rituals like marriage

2) discuss the theme of culture clash in, ―A Very Special Pet‖

   a) Theme of culture clash- Joncrofo is a vestige from old world, but named for an

        American movie star (bottom of pg 1). Why does Graciela try to kill Joncrofo? To

        have food on the table-sacrificing old world connections.

   b)      Theme of loss- female cat Marialu forever looking for Raul. Fernandez working

        all the time to support his family and their material desires (television and a

        phone). There is a sense that although the family has moved from Puerto Rico for

        opportunities in America, something has been lost.
                                                                                              23


Work Period (20 min): 1) groups students in pairs and have them brainstorm a chart of

themes that occur in ―A Very Special Pet‖ and also in ―Shoes for Hector‖

2) Chart a list of similar and different themes that occur between both stories

3) Talk about concept of holistic collection of short stories – stories taken as whole unit



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): 1) Introduce quiz for homework




7
                      Lesson Plan – 9th grade balance literacy – 9/16/2003

Aim: What are some themes in El Bronx Remembered?

Do Now: write one theme down for ―A New Window Display‖ and say why




Materials

El Bronx books



Homework

Read ―A New Window Display‖ if you haven’t already



Development
                                                                                             24




Read Aloud (5-10 min):

Work Period (20 min):

   1) have students get in pairs and think of one theme for each short story we have

       read so far – students must be able to back up reason for themes with text page

       numbers




Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

   1) discuss themes from their short stories: a) love (lots of variations- lost love, new

       love, unrequited love)

           b) loss (loss of loved ones, shoes, love)

1) introduce concept of point of view- this is perspective from whom a story is being told

           a) first person- use of pronoun ―I‖

           b) third person- use of pronoun ―he‖, ―she‖, ―they‖ – can be omniscient-all

               knowing (god’s perspective), limited omniscient, or objective (no

               editorializing)

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):

No Homework – read ―A New Window Display‖ if you haven’t already
                                                                                          25


8
                        Lesson Plan – 9th grade Ramp Up – 9/17/2003

Aim: How do we start the writing process?

Do Now: 1) synonym- A word having the same or nearly the same meaning as another

word or other words in a language

2) Give me 8 synonyms for the word ―walk‖.

3) keyboard command is shift + F7



Homework

Freewrite ideas for a reflective essay on your earliest memories. What does this reveal

about the themes that are important to you.



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): no read aloud today



Mini Lesson (10-15 min): 1) planning- choose a topic- either given or one you chose-

you can freewrite about the subject to come up with idea

2) brainstorm

    a) lists

    b) charts

    c) ―webs‖

    d) cluster common ideas together
                                                                                      26


3) organize – charts/categories

4) develop a controlling idea- main idea or thesis



Work Period (20 min): model process for prewriting. brainstorm reasons LeBron James

should have stayed in school and also why he should have gone pro

    1) put on board first using a web

    2) for ideas that overlap put them into categories

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): have two topics and make webs- have students ―call

out‖ responses




9
                      Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced literacy – 9/18/03

Aim: How do we revise our freewriting?

Do Now: List your three favorite places and write three vivid adjectives for each



Materials

Comprehension questions



Comprehension questions for “Tell the Truth” (Homework #7)

On a separate sheet of paper answer the following questions. Please copy the
questions and answer in complete sentences.
                                                                                 27


*Be sure to include the standard heading on your paper.

   1) How old is Vickie? 13

   2) In the first couple of pages in the story, why does Vickie look for, ―a
      place to spit‖? she is nervous and it is a physical manifestation of her
      nerves and apprehension about speaking to Mr. Crane

   3) Why does Mr. Crane tell Vickie how beautiful her name is? He is
      trying to get her to confess what she knows about her mother’s illegal
      activity

   4) Why does Mr. Crane say to Vickie, ―I know many, many Puerto
      Ricans‖? To relate more to her and appear closer to being on her side

   5) In terms of their background, what would you say are the main
      differences between Vickie and Mr. Crane? Mr. Crane is wealthy, on
      the right side of the law, probably Caucasian. Vickie is Puerto Rican
      her mother is involved in drug trade. They are at the low end of the
      poverty scale.

   6) In light of the conversation Mr. Crane has with Vickie, why does he
      tell her mother, ―You have a fine girl there, Mrs. Vargas‖? Once he
      realized he could get no information out of Vickie he reverts back to
      being socially polite, as opposed to angry and accusatory.

   7) What is a theme for the story? Explain your answer. There is no one
      right answer for this, but you must be able to back up your choice.
      Use page numbers if necessary.

a) Divide between cultures b) protecting those you love




Homework

Read ―Tell the truth…‖ from ―El Bronx and do comprehension question worksheet
                                                                                           28


HW#7.



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): something about writing



Mini Lesson (10-15 min): 1) review theme/controlling idea (explain that this is regent’s

terminology, freewriting, graphical organizers)

2) Review rest of writing process. a) 2nd draft. Check for spelling, punctuation errors

     b) organize paragraphs by subject

     c) check for diction- word choice, use synonyms

3) tips for writing- include many sensory details. Make it interesting

4) make sure they have included who, what, where, when, how



Work Period (20 min):1) pair off, switch free writing with a partner and write

suggestions for their final paper

2) Revised version of reflective essay is due on Monday



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): a) read short story ―Tell the truth…‖

b) distribute comprehension questions – they are due Friday




10
                                                                                                29


                            Lesson Plan – 9th grade Ramp Up – 9/19/03

Aim: What should a reflective essay look like?

Do Now: Summarize ―Tell the truth…‖ is 20 words or less



Homework




Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): Tobias Wolff story – point out concrete details- point out its

similarities to a reflective essay



Mini Lesson (10-15 min): 1) review expectations for reflective essay

    a) paragraphs organized by subject

    b) sparkling adjectives, no good or ―bad‖ synonyms for good- great, brilliant,

        ecstatic, fine, lovely, pleasant, fair etc.

    c) an A paper will have a theme to it- there is no thesis in a self reflective essay- you

        aren’t trying to prove something to me, you are telling me about an experience in

        the most interesting and engaging way you know how- your theme should be

        implicit (review this term) paper should not have sentence that says my first

        memory was of swimming in a pool My theme is my willingness to dive into life.

        Just write about the experience and the theme will come naturally

    d) Should have no major spelling, grammar errors
                                                                                         30


   e) Should be at least one page

2) review answers to comprehension questions




Work Period (20 min): 1) In class have students write about a time when they disagreed

with or had to protect someone they loved – emphasize unified paragraphs



2) If there is additional time students may work on their essay which is due Monday



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




11



                       Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – 9/22/03

Aim: What is a theme continued?

Do Now: 1) Have students finish two paragraphs reflecting on a time when you had to a

disagreement with someone you cared about or had to lie to protect someone you cared

about.

   2) return homework
                                                                                             31


   3) in your own words write what the difference is between subject and theme



Homework

El Bronx texts



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): 1) I will start reading aloud from new short story, ―Once Upon

a time…‖ – have students pick up and read some aloud



Mini Lesson (10-15 min): 1) go over the difference between subject and theme

2) subject- matter or substance being discussed or written about, what literally happens

   4) theme- message from work of literature, not necessarily subject, what action

       implies

   5) theme is established by actions of characters, tone of author

   6) Have students think about Brandeis High school – what is the subject of the

       school?

   7) Theme? what is the message you get when you walk through the doors and get in

       line to get scanned? What is the message you get when you tell people you go

       Brandeis?

   8) subject is learning/school, theme could be- children are criminals (metal detectors,

       security guards), children aren’t trustworthy (bathroom passes), children are

       dangerous, children aren’t worth the money (school is falling apart, roaches, no

       airconditioning)
                                                                                           32


   9)    Realistically think of what Brandeis would have to do to send a positive theme

        or message out? What I could do? Teachers? Administrators? Students?

Work Period (20 min):

1) Write a letter to me for homework, describing three things Brandeis could do to

improve it’s theme, salutation, closing, proper heading. Explain how these changes would

send out a positive message or theme.



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):

   1) Homework – read rest of ―Once Upon a Time…‖

   2) Come in prepared to discuss theme(s) of ―Once Upon a Time…‖




12
                        Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – 9/23/03

Aim: How to details in story reveal the theme?

Do Now: Summarize ―Once Upon a time…‖ in 20 words or less.

My summary: ―Girls find a corpse, no one is around to tell. They keep it a secret.‖ (15)



Materials

El Bronx text



Homework

Read ―Mr. Mendolsohn‖ pg. 68
                                                                                             33




Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): read aloud from story with students pages 58-61



Mini Lesson (10-15 min): highlight important details, ask questions put major heading

on the board

1) Character: Who are the main characters? (three girls) How old are they approximately?

What are their names? Why do you think they refer to them only as first girl and second

girl? Perhaps Mohr is trying to make a general statement about girls/children in the Bronx

and uses these girls as a representative.

2) Exposition (review this term): How does the story begin? What are the children doing?

Examine the nursery rhyme they are saying. What is the song like? Is it a nice song?

Point out ominous ending on page 59. –introduce concept of foreshadowing- hints or

clues that suggest what will happen later

3) Conflict- girls are presented with dead body and they are unsure what to do.

4) back to Character- what are the girls like? How do girls react to the body? Read their

reaction on page 64. They don’t seem shocked. Should they tell someone? Who? Should

they keep it to themselves?



What do girls decide to do after they identify body and realize he is dead? What does this

say about them? How do they handle going to gang headquarters? (Page 65)



Why do girls decide not to tell anyone? They are afraid they might get in trouble (Page
                                                                                         34


66). What does this say about them? They are in between adulthood and childhood, both

daring enough to approach a sleeping/dead body and to enter a gang hideout



What do girls begin doing again after they decide not to tell anyone?



Work Period (20 min): 1) Have students in their groups take remaining time and come

up with a theme based on the details we have discussed so far. Share out before end of

class

2) Present these two themes: a) childhood without innocence – dead bodies, gangs, even

their nursery rhymes hint at death

b) in between children – stuck between childhood and adulthood




Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):

HW Read ―Mr. Mendolsohn‖ pg. 68- 84




13
                        Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – 9/24/03

Aim: How can comparing & contrasting details about a character help us better

understand a story? –it clarifies characters’ relationships

Do Now: finish groupwork come up with some themes for ―Once Upon a time…‖
                                                                                              35


Homework

Read ―Mr. Mendolsohn‖ 85-100



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): Read Joe Lieberman article aloud


ÒWho is Joe Lieberman? - Kathy Kiely,
USA Today 8/8/00

Who is Joe Lieberman?
By Kathy Kiely, USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — It was a Friday night in 1989, and the Senate was working late. For
first-year member Joe Lieberman, D-Conn., that presented a problem. An Orthodox Jew
who follows his religion's prohibitions against operating machinery on the Sabbath, he
had to either walk the four miles from the Capitol to his home in Georgetown or sleep
on a cot in his office. Until a Southern Baptist intervened.

''My parents keep an apartment across the street in the Methodist Building,'' then-Sen.
Al Gore, D-Tenn., told Lieberman. ''Would you like to use it?'' When Lieberman said he
would, Gore escorted him across the street, turning the lights on as he entered and off
when he left, another task Orthodox Jews are not permitted to perform on their
Sabbath, from sundown Friday through sundown Saturday.

Today, Lieberman loves telling friends about how the vice president of the United States
once served as his ''Shabbos goy,'' an old-fashioned term that strictly observant Jews
used for a non-Jew (''goy'') whom they would hire to do chores for them on the Sabbath
(''Shabbos'').

The story, and the fact that its Yiddish punch line will be unintelligible to most
Americans, speaks volumes about the significance of Gore's choice of a running mate. In
naming Joseph Isadore Lieberman, 58, to be the Democratic vice presidential candidate,
Gore has shattered one of the last remaining cultural barriers in American politics,
putting a Jew on a major party's national political ticket for the first time.

''My faith is part of me. It's been at the center of who I've been all my life,'' Lieberman
told reporters gathered in front of his Connecticut home on Monday…. (Kiely, unknown)
                                                                                           36




Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

1) Tell students to keep theme in mind, but we will concentrate on character

Go through story and ask important questions 68-84

   1) What initial details are revealed on page 68 that tell us about Mr. Mendolsohn’s

       character?

   2) Setting: A) Where and when does the first scene take place? Ms. Suarez’s

       apartment

       B) Where and when does the second scene take place? Next morning at Ms.

       Suarez’s apartment

       What does this setup establish? Routine of Mendolsohn’s life.

        3) What is herring? A fat rich fish, usually served salted

       Characters: Yvonne- Suarez’s daughter, Ms. Suarez, Mr. Mendolsohn-jewish

       neighbor

   3) What is the clinic Marta is going to? What are the clues that tell us where she ig

       going? ―this is a very delicate time‖? Page 74 How does Mr. Mendolsohn’s

       reaction to Marta’s trip to the clinic reveal his character? What is the clinic?

   4) Why does mr. Mendolsohn say he has no time to visit his sisters? Page 75

   5) How long has Mr. Mendolsohn been visiting the Suarez household? two years

       page 82. Why do you think he has such a strong relationship with the family?

   Where is his family?

   6) Mendolsohn’s religion. Orthodox jewish- ―High holy day‖ pg. 86
                                                                                     37


Theme could be old Bronx vs. the new. (pages 79-80)



Work Period (20 min):

   1) Have students make a chart comparing and contrasting The Suarez household to

       Mr. Mendolsohn. What are the similarities and differences between them-

       religious, economic, ethnically, age, culture

   2) Make a prediction for what conflict will appear.

   3) Can have groups share their predictions



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): quiz

                                       3rd Period quiz



instruct students to skip lines so they have room to right definitions

Number paper 1-10

1-5 are elements of a short story

6-10 are elements of a short story plot



   1) Plot-all the events that happen in the story

   2) Setting- where/when story takes place

   3) Character- who in story

   4) theme- implicit message

   5) conflict- problem in story, what character is trying to overcome
                                                                                    38


   6) exposition-introduces character, starts elements in motion

   7) rising action- dramatic tension increase

   8) climax- height of dramatic tension

   9) falling action- decreasing dramatic tension

   10) resolution- problem is dealt with, not nescessarily solved



Extra Credit- (day nue-mŠ   ) spelled denouement- events following a climax where

story comes to resolution (can include falling action and resolution)




14
                        Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – 9/25/03

Aim: What details in ―Mr. Mendolsohn‖ reveal his character?

Do Now: Write one paragraph on who are the most important characters in ―Mr.

Medolsohn‖ and why?



Materials

El Bronx text, group work question slips
                                                                                  39


Homework

Make sure you have finished Mr. Mendolsohn



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): Have students read aloud from the first 3-4 pages of Mr.

Mendolsohn.

Work Period (20 min): 1) distribute slips of paper with questions about ―mr.

Mendolsohn

2) groups will record answers and report back to class

3) write responses on board clarifying details



                              Wrong Lunch Line Worksheet



   1) How are Mildred and Yvette alike?




   2) How are they different?




   3) Do they have a good friendship? Provide details to show its strengths or

       weaknesses.
                                                                                              40


   4) Why is Yvette worried about being caught in the wrong line?



   5) What does Yvette’s fear foreshadow?



   6) What could being in the wrong line be a metaphor for?




   7) Is Mildred’s and Yvette’s reaction to the lunch line situation realistic, considering

       their age?

Mini Lesson (10-15 min): Point out the contrast between mr. Mendolsohn, ms. Suarez,

and mr. Mendolsohn’s family. Point out that even though on the surface Mr. Mendolsohn

has more in common with his own family, he has a better relationship with his next door

neighbors.

2) Also point out the fact that Mr. Mendolsohn is Mohr’s way of showing that the

diversity in El Bronx extended beyond just Puerto Ricans, many other ethnic groups were

represented as well

3) Trauma mr. Mendelsohn feels about the Suarez’s moving was a common experience in

El Bronx where people were transitory- they migrated from place to place




Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):

Give Homework to read ―The Wrong Lunch Line‖ (page 101-110)
                                                                                        41


15
                          Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – 9/26/03

Aim: What are the important details from Wrong lunch line?

Do Now: What do you think would have happened if Julie had met ms. Suarez and the

rest of the family? What would that meeting have been like? Would she have been

surprised?



Materials

Bronx text



Homework

1) Finish ―Wrong lunch line‖ if you hadn’t read it.

2) Read next story from El Bronx – there will be a quiz on Monday

3) Also announce that the first major test will be sometime next week



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): 1) read first page of ―The Wrong Lunch Line‖

2) Go around the room and have students read the story occasionally stopping to point

out important features.



Work Period (20 min): 1) finish sharing answers from yesterday’s group work, wrap up

story about Mr. Mendolsohn
                                                                                               42




2) Introduce concept of think-pair-share: give students 60 seconds to answer question,

one student talks the other writes, they must talk for the full 60 seconds. I will then call

on students to share their answers

Questions:

   a) how does the first couple of pages set up the characters of Yvette and Mildred?

   b) How does Yvette feel about being in the wrong line? How does Mohr let you

       know about it? (102)

   c) Yvette realizes the line she is in is unacceptable. Is her reaction out of line with

       what actually happened?(105)

   d) (109) How do the two friends feel after the incident in the line happens?



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

Theme could be old Bronx vs. the new. (pages 79-80)

There is also a theme of change throughout – emphasizing death (mr. Mendolsohn and

youth Tato), cycle of life

Another theme could be tolerance and friendship (Giving relationship ms. Suarez has

with mr. Mendolsohn

   1) Remind students when mr. Mendolsohn talked about streets not being paved and

       dirt roads

   2) Also the neighborhood gradually changes

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): review the important character details- description
                                                                                           43


Group Mr. M questions

   Group work- nominate one person from group to record answers, another person to be

   the group’s spokesperson. Give page numbers and details to support your answers.




   3) Setting: A) Where and when does the first scene take place? Where and when

      does the second scene take place? What does this setup establish? What does it

      reveal about the relationship between Mr. Mendolsohn and Ms. Suarez?




   4) What is the clinic Marta is going to? What are the clues that tell us where she is

      going? What does Mr. Mendolsohn’s reaction to Marta’s trip reveal about his

      character?



   6) Why does Mr. Mendolsohn say he has no time to visit his sisters? How long has

      Mr. Mendolsohn been visiting the Suarez household? Why do you think he has

      such a strong relationship with the family? Where is his family?



   7) What happens in the space break on page 89? What is the difference in time and

      setting between the two scenes? How does Mr. Mendolsohn feel about the change

      of scene? Why did he leave?



   8) Who are Jennie and Sara? How did they treat Mr. Mendolsohn? How did their
                                                                                        44


       relationship with Mr. Mendolsohn differ from his relationship with Ms. Suarez?




16
                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Monday - 9/29/03

Aim: How does the characterization in ―The Wrong Lunch Line‖ shape the story?

Do Now: ―Friends have all things in common‖ – Plato 427-347 BC

Respond to this quote. How does it apply to ―The Wrong Lunch Line‖?




Materials

El Bronx texts



Homework

1) read ―A Lesson in Fortune Telling‖ pg. 111-131 (consider only assigning half of

reading)



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): Quick quiz on ―Wrong Lunch Line‖. Flip papers over when

finished.
                                                                                             45


   1) Who are the two main characters?

   2) What are the two lunch lines?

   3) Who is in the wrong lunch line?

   4) Who catches the character in the wrong line?

   5) How is the character punished for being in the wrong line?

*ask students to pass up their homework on their planners

Mini Lesson (10-15 min): 1) Do a Venn Diagram on board about Yvette and Mildred’s

character – similarities and contrasts?

Similarities: both have strong religious identity, both seem open to differences between

people (both explain some of the jewish rituals to others), both like the radio, both feel

strange about incident, both end up channeling their feelings into thinking teacher is

stupid



Differences: jewish/catholic, only child/large family, okay with line/more uncomfortable

with being in wrong line



Work Period (20 min): 1) assign groups questions from worksheet. – ask groups to

select someone to write responses on board.

2) give groups five minutes to finish their questions.

3) Have group members put their answers on the board when they are finished.

4) Take 5 minutes to share responses.



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): 1) review usefulness of comparing and contrasting
                                                                                             46


characters.

2) give students time in class to read ―a lesson in fortune telling‖




17
                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Tuesday – 9/30/03

Aim: How does the conflict characterize the characters in ―A Lesson in Fortune

Telling‖?

Do Now: Write one paragraph about a time when someone appeared to be one thing and

was actually another? Did it surprise you?



Homework

   1) read ―Uncle Claudio‖ (132-142)

   2) write a one page ending to ―A Lesson in Fortune Telling‖ imagining what would

       happen if Hannibal could meet up with jasmine. What would he say or do? Don’t

       just tell the story, write it as if you were Nicholasa Mohr narrating what happened

       with dialogue.

   3) Finish homework questions



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): read with students from 111-114
                                                                                               47


Mini Lesson (10-15 min): 1) Have students summarize story

1) review elements of plot and elicit the elements of ―A Lesson in Fortune Telling‖ plot

   a) exposition-sets up Jasmine as gypsy

   b) rising action- Jasmine begins to read palms, anticipation created- (What will

       happen next?)

   c) climax-happens off the page, where Hannibal tells story about being ripped off (

   d) falling action- Hannibal looking for a way to find Jasmine

   e) resolution- Kids will ask Janitor if he/she know where Jasmine’s family has

       moved and they will wait for her to write them a letter with the address on it



Work Period (20 min):

Have students write down questions from board

Questions for students:

   1) How does Hannibal’s initial impression of Jasmine (pg. 115-116) change after the

       climax(pg.129)?

   2) Why did many of the students say they never thought her fortune telling was real,

       despite the fact that they gave her money? (pg.128)

   3) A foil in literature is a character who contrasts with and brings out certain features

       of another character. How is Ramona a foil for Jasmine? Think about how

       Hannibal compared them both (on pg.115-116). How did Ramona turn out

       different than Jasmine in the end?

   4) Why does the author have Hannibal narrate the scene with the old fortune teller in

       dialogue? (pg.123-126) – to make story about Hannibal’s reaction rather than
                                                                                             48


       jasmine



   1) characters Ramona- girl who is jealous of Jasmine, wants to have palm read,

   2) Jasmine- gypsy girl who comes to school, teachers are shocked by her call her

       palm reading hocus pocus (pg. 119), tricks Ramona into giving her something

       (pear 120), tells everyone similar fortune

   3) Joey- friends with hannibal

   4) Hannibal- bold student, thinks Jasmine is pretty, well developed, gives his father’s

       five dollars to gypsy who will read his palm better than Jasmine

*top of 123 jumps to Hannibal and Joey telling about being ripped off

*pg. 128 everyone says they never believed in Jasmine’s powers even though they all

gave her money and had her read their palms – why do they say they never believed if

they gave her money?

Story ends with children looking for Janitor to find a way to get money back and where

jasmine has gone

*Did Hannibal set himself up for a fall by focusing on jasmine’s beauty so much?

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




18
                 Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Wednesday – 10/1/03
                                                                                          49


Aim: How does p.o.v. and symbolism affect the theme of ―Uncle Claudio‖?

Do Now: Write the beginning of your school day from the perspective of yourself and

from the perspective of a teacher?



Materials

Worksheet:

Lesson Plan 18

   ―Uncle Claudio‖ Worksheet for group work




   1) Why is the story told from Jaime’s and Charlie’s p.o.v.? How does this

       perspective influence the story?



   2) How would the story have been different if it were told from Claudio’s or Jaime’s

       father’s p.o.v.?



   3) What did Jaime’s father mean when he said on pg. 139 ―…Uncle Claudio lives in

       another time and is dreaming instead of facing life‖? Do you think this is true?



   4) Mohr devotes a lot of attention to Uncle Claudio’s suit on pg. 141. What do you

       think it is a symbol of?



   5) If the story had been written from Uncle Claudio’s p.o.v., how would he have
                                                                                              50


       judged Jaime and Charlie? Why didn’t he want his kids raised in ―El Bronx‖?




   6) Just on the basis of the story ―Uncle Claudio‖ how is ―El Bronx‖ different from

       Puerto Rico?




Homework

1) read first half of ―Princess‖ 142-154



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

1) have students share their ―do now‖.

1) have students read pages 132-134, get different people to read than normal

2) Have someone summarize the story



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

   1) point of view- review this term, perspective that a story is told from, narrators can

       be reliable or unreliable

   2) Ask class what kind of narrator’s they think Jaime is. Does he have all the facts?

       Where does Jaime get the story from?
                                                                                          51




1) Introduce term symbolism- something in a story that stands for something else, ex.-

sunshine suggesting happiness

2) major symbol in story is Uncle Claudio’s white suit on pg. 141 – suggests purity

(almost all white suit suggests purity of Puerto Rico and his pure ideals), suggests

stagnation (it is the same suit he wore when he came)



Work Period (20 min):

   4) Why is the story told from Jaime’s and Charlie’s p.o.v.? How does this

       perspective influence the story?

   5) How would the story have been different if it were told from Claudio’s or Jaime’s

       father’s p.o.v.?

   6) What did Jaime’s father mean when he said on pg. 139 ―…Uncle Claudio lives in

       another time and is dreaming instead of facing life‖? Do you think this is true?

   4) Mohr devotes a lot of attention to Uncle Claudio’s suit on pg. 141. What do you

think it is a symbol of?

   7) If the story had been written from Uncle Claudio’s p.o.v., how would he have

       judged Jaime and Charlie? Why didn’t he want his kids raised in ―El Bronx‖?

   8) Just on the basis of the story ―Uncle Claudio‖ how is ―El Bronx‖ different from

       Puerto Rico?



Jaime- cousins w/Charlie

Charlie-cousins w/Jaime
                                                                                             52


Uncle Claudio- has good job and pay and is going to Puerto Rico, Jaime’s father got in

argument w/ Claudio about him going to back to PR b/c of all they had done for him,

Claudio started to cry, reasons he is leaving 1) no one knows him in New York (pg. 136)

and 2) b/c of the subway ride when he finds out from the son of someone who used to

work for him that Piedad (a maid) is glad he fired her b/c she is doing so well in America



Aunt Chela-

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): review p.o.v. and symbolism




19
                 Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Thursday – 10/2/03

Aim: How does tension build in ―Princess‖?

Do Now: Write three adjectives to describe Don Osvaldo and three to describe Judy’s

mother.

An adjective is a descriptive word.



Homework

1) read rest of ―Princess‖ story pg.155-169



Development
                                                                                              53


Read Aloud (5-10 min): 1) finish questions on ―Uncle Claudio‖

1) read aloud first four pages of story with students

   1) quiz on story

           a) Name one of the main character?

           b) Who owns the dog?

           c) What is the problem in the story?

           d) Who owns the store?



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

One way story is set up is with opposing (foil) characters

1) compare and contrast character of store owners and Judy’s mother- review concept of

a foil- do another Venn diagram

Mother-protective, frugal (thinks Osvaldo is ripping her off), loves her child, raises Judy

sternly, suspicious of Don Osvaldo, suspicious, forced to buy on credit (pg. 146),

husband has died, has many responsibilities taking care of asthmatic Angel, cunning

(places lid back on cover of beans to return them pg. 152)

Don Osvaldo- wealthy, prosperous, cunning- short changes people on their meat,

meticulous record keeper (pg. 143), no hobbies other than store, loves dog, spoils dog




   1) could continue discussion of symbolism, how rotten can of beans is a symbol of

       the store owner

   2) review elements of short story for a review before test on Monday plot, setting
                                                                                         54


       character, theme, elements of a plot

Work Period (20 min):

In groups have students describe the 1) exposition, 2) rising action, 3) setting,

4)characters and 5) conflict in the story. Take 5-10 minutes.

*Why does Judy like the dog so much? Because she has control over the dog and the

school children treat her like she owns the dog (pg.149)




Have groups define these elements of plot and put them on the board

   1) Exposition- introduced to Judy, Princess (the dog), and Don Osvaldo the store

       owner

   2) Rising action- learn information about Don Osvaldo and the way he runs his store




Judy- little girl who loves ―Princess‖

Don Osvaldo- owner of store

Nereida- wife of Don Osvaldo



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): review literary terms, give homework




20
                   Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Friday – 10/3/03
                                                                                              55


Aim: How does tension build in ―Princess‖?

Do Now: Write three adjectives to describe Don Osvaldo and three to describe Judy’s

mother.

An adjective is a descriptive word.



Homework

1) read rest of ―Princess‖ story pg.155-169



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): 1) finish questions on ―Uncle Claudio‖

1) read aloud first four pages of story with students

   2) quiz on story

           a) Name one of the main character?

           b) Who owns the dog?

           c) What is the problem in the story?

           d) Who owns the store?



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

One way story is set up is with opposing (foil) characters

1) compare and contrast character of store owners and Judy’s mother- review concept of

a foil- do another Venn diagram

Mother-protective, frugal (thinks Osvaldo is ripping her off), loves her child, raises Judy

sternly, suspicious of Don Osvaldo, suspicious, forced to buy on credit (pg. 146),
                                                                                         56


husband has died, has many responsibilities taking care of asthmatic Angel, cunning

(places lid back on cover of beans to return them pg. 152)

Don Osvaldo- wealthy, prosperous, cunning- short changes people on their meat,

meticulous record keeper (pg. 143), no hobbies other than store, loves dog, spoils dog




   3) could continue discussion of symbolism, how rotten can of beans is a symbol of

       the store owner

   4) review elements of short story for a review before test on Monday plot, setting

       character, theme, elements of a plot

Work Period (20 min):

In groups have students describe the 1) exposition, 2) rising action, 3) setting,

4)characters and 5) conflict in the story. Take 5-10 minutes.

*Why does Judy like the dog so much? Because she has control over the dog and the

school children treat her like she owns the dog (pg.149)




Have groups define these elements of plot and put them on the board

   3) Exposition- introduced to Judy, Princess (the dog), and Don Osvaldo the store

       owner

   4) Rising action- learn information about Don Osvaldo and the way he runs his store
                                                                                          57


Judy- little girl who loves ―Princess‖

Don Osvaldo- owner of store

Nereida- wife of Don Osvaldo



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): review literary terms, give homework




21 10/6/03 Yom Kippur – no school

22
                 Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Tuesday – 10/7/2003

Aim: What literary elements help us understand ―Princess‖?

Do Now: spelling list- academic, accept, ache, aisle, allergies

   1) Because of all my after school activities, I haven’t been able to focus on my

       ____________.

   2) Her hunger started to turn into a painful __________.

   3) Every spring, my nose starts running and my ___________ start acting up.

   4) ―Just ___________ it,‖ she told her dull friend. ―you will never get into Harvard

       Medical School.‖

   5) I practically died laughing when the bride tripped on her dress and fell in the

       ____________________.
                                                                                            58




Students should have homework out so I can check it.



Homework

   1) read 1st half of ―Love with Aleluya‖ from pg. 238-252

   questions

   1) What do the other girls think of Serafina?

   2) What is Hannibal’s plan to get Joey closer to Serafina?

   3) What are the main differences between Serafina and the other girls in the story?



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): 1) review homework that was due on Friday

2) review work sheet on literary terms

Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

   1) answer homework questions aloud

   2) fill out literary analysis chart for ―princess‖ have students fill out with me

Work Period (20 min):

1) students should finish literary analysis chart

2) students should begin work on next story and comprehension questions

Joey- in love with Serafina

Hannibal- tries to help Joey out by asking other girls about Serafina

Serafina-goes to Pentecostal church, different than other girls, older (18) speaks little

English
                                                                                        59


-Dead green rattlesnake in mural outside of church- depicts garden scene from Bible

pg.245

-woman speaks in tongues in church (p.250)

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




23
                    Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Wednesday – 10/8/2003

Aim: How does characterization enhance the plot of ―Love with Aleluya‖?

Do Now: spelling list: amateur, analysis, anniversary, appearance, ascent

   1) In order to really understand a work of literature, you must conduct a thorough

         _____________.

   2) The ____________ to the top floor of Brandeis seems to get tougher every day.

   3) Unless you are LeBron James, you will probably only be an ____________

         athlete.

   4) On the _____________ of September 11th there was a moment of silence and

         many memorials.

   5) In ―A Lesson in Fortune Telling‖, Hannibal learned that __________ can be

         deceiving.
                                                                                         60




Homework

   1) read rest of ―Love with Aleluya‖ 252-263

   comp questions

   1) What happens to Joey and Hannibal in the church?

   2) Why do Serafina and the others ―shriek‖ in the church?

   3) At the end of the story why does Hannibal ask Ramona to the dance instead of

      one of the ―greenhorn‖ girls?



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

   1) quiz on ―Love with Aleluya‖.

          a) what church does Serafina go to?

          b) Who has a crush on Serafina?

          c) Who has a plan to win Serafina’s affection?

          d) How old is Serafina?

          e) Who is the ―greenhorn‖ in the story?



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

   1) define term enhance- improve or add strength to

   2) make up a web of the four main characters: Joey, Hannibal, Serafina, other girls

          a) what are their relationships to each other? Do this on web

          b) How does Hannibal push Joey forward? P.238 shoving Joey toward her
                                                                                              61


           p.239 urges joey to ―ask her out‖, 242- Hannibal says he will talk to other

           girls

           c) How do Hannibal’s efforts get more dramatic? Church idea

   3) Does Joey want Hannibal’s help? P. 241 ―awww…‖ asks for help

   4) What is hannibal’s relationship to the girls like?

           a) wants joey to have conquest, doesn’t care about relationships

           b) puts down Ramona for not being as physically developed as Serafina - 244



Emphasize point that different characters naturally create conflict with each other.

Tension is between old girls and greenhorns and boys and old girls and boys and

―greenhorns‖

Work Period (20 min):

   1) Write a two paragraph response:

   Is Hannibal looking out for himself or his friend in this story? Use evidence from first

   half of text to back this idea up.



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): review way character drives plot




24
                   Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Thursday – 10/9/2003

Aim: How do the characters change in ―Love with Aleluya‖?
                                                                                           62


Do Now: word list: athletic, attendance, awkward, balloon, barrel

   1) The newborn child’s steps were clumsy and _________.

   2) In 1911, Bobby Leach went over Niagara Falls in a _________.

   3) Doing well in Mr. Russ’ class goes beyond having good __________.

   4) He sucked the helium gas out of the ________ and talked like a chipmunk.

   5) Participating in ________ when you are young, generally leads to better health as

       an adult.



Homework




Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

   1) wrap up lesson on ―Love with Aleluya‖ have students summarize ending of the

       story

   2) Explain concept of static character vs. dynamic character

   3) Ask class what kind of character they find more interesting?

   4) Explain that stories usually have both types, so there is something to compare the

       dynamic character to.

   5) Have students on their own decide which characters are static or dynamic and

       why. They must explain why/where they changed.
                                                                                          63


   Joey-undergoes change- forgets about Serafina, because Hannibal’s church plan is too

   involved (longs for Serafina, but , Hannibal-dynamic,(goes from disrespecting

   Ramona to asking her out) Serafina-static (doesn’t get any more interested in Joey

   and keeps up with her religion)

   6) Go over answers on board

   7) Read section of story at end where Hannibal changes his mind about Ramona

   Pg.252 – Hannibal tries to sweet talk girls in Church

   Have students read from 258-261- where change starts to take place

   Pg. 258- Serafina approaches boys- but Joey still needs help

   8) What causes Hannibal to change?

   -seeing how much is involved in dating the beautiful green horn girls-pg.260 service

   three days a week – some service go longer than three hours

   pg.261- Joey tells H. he will forget about Serafina

   Pg. 262-263 – Hannibal jokingly takes Ramona back – asks her to the dance

   9) Ask students whether change is good for a character



Work Period (20 min): where students are brainstorming whether the characters in the

story or dynamic or not and why




Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): Tell students what will be expected on test- advise

students get notes from other students from when they were absent:
                                                                                      64


Students should be familiar with all terms we discussed in class and on worksheet

Students should be familiar with vocabulary from stories

Students should know main characters from all stories we have read

Students should be able to summarize plots of all stories to help them review

SWBAT compare and contrast characters

Know major themes from stories that I put on board- theme is not a moral

*Test is fill in the blank, multiple choice, and short answer




25
Give Test #1 Friday 10/10/03

Name_________________________                                              Mr. Russ

Date ________________



Balanced Literacy Test #1


I. Multiple choice (2 points each)

Write the letter of the best answer in the blank

_____ 1) Joncrofo is…

a) a dog        b) a rooster

c) a hen        d) a poodle

_____ 2) Who is Mr. Mendolsohn’s neighbor?
                                                                                                                  65

a) Ms. Suarez               b) Mr. Carson

c) Ms. Lopez                d) Ms. Nereida

______ 3) In ―The Wrong Lunch Line‖ the religions of the main characters are:

a) Catholic and Buddhist b) Muslim and Protestant

c) Jewish and Hindu         d) Jewish and Catholic

______ 4) What is a theme for ―Once Upon a Time‖?

a) everlasting love                 b) ―bling-bling‖

c) loss of innocence                d) nursery ryhmes

_______ 5) Other than the U.S., from what country do most of the characters in El Bronx Remembered come from?

a) the Dominican Republic           b) Cuba

c) Mexico                           d) Puerto Rico

_______ 6) Who is the new student in ―A Lesson in Fortune-Telling‖?

a) Jeralyn                          b) Jasmine

c) Jenny Soto                       d) Jamala

_______ 7) Who tries to set Joey up in ―Love with Aleluya‖?

a) Harrison                         b) Henriquez

c) Hannibal                         d) Jairo

_______ 8) Who tells most of the story in ―Uncle Claudio‖?

a) Charles                          b) Hannibal

c) Claudio                          d) Jaime

_______ 9) What does Uncle Claudio’s suit symbolize?

a) rebirth                          b) money

c) heaven                           d) racial inequality

_______ 10) Who is the boy who dies in ―A New Window Display‖

a) Ray                              b) Terry

c) Joey                             d) Jaime

_______ 11) In ―Tell the Truth‖, what is the real reason Mr. Crane tell Vickie that he knows ―many, many Puerto

Ricans‖?
                                                                                          66

a) He wants to relate to her.                 b) He wants to share his life experience.

c) He loves all Puerto Ricans.                d) He is lonely.

_______ 12) What color are Hector’s shoes in ―Shoes for hector‖?

a) brown                           b) green

c) orange                          d) pink

_______ 13) The slang term ―greenhorn‖ refers to:

a) a newcomer                                 b) a gardener

c) someone who is arrogant                    d) any Spanish person

_______ 14) Serafina is what religion in ―Love with Aleluya‖?

a) Presbyterian                    b) Methodist

c) Branch Dividian                 d) Pentecostal

_______ 15) What is the term for a character who undergoes a change in a story?

a) divisive                        b) dynamic

c) static                          d) discordant




II. Fill in the blank (3 points each)
     1) _______________________ is a term for a character that contrasts with another.

     2) _______________________ is hints or clues that describe what will happen next

     3) _______________________ is a comparison using like or as

     4) _______________________ is an object that represents a greater idea.

     5) ________________________ is the author of El Bronx Remembered




III. Plot Elements (2 points each)

In the space below, list the elements of a short story plot and define them

1)

2)
                                                                                                                    67


3)

4)

5)



IV. Essay (30 points)

Choose one short answer essay. Write on the back of this sheet. Write in paragraphs (at least four sentences) and

complete sentences.

     1) In two paragraphs, compare and contrast Mr. Mendelsohn and Ms. Suarez from ―Mr. Mendelsohn‖. Be sure

          to give at least three similarities and three differences.

     2) In two paragraphs, compare and contrast Mildred and Yvette from ―The Wrong Lunch Line‖. Be sure to

          give at least three similarities and three differences

     3)   In two paragraphs explain how ―Shoes for Hector‖ would be different if it were set

          in Puerto Rico instead of the United States. Give at least three differences and explain.




26 Monday – 10/13/03 Columbus Day No school




27
                     Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Tuesday – 10/14/2003
                                                                                                68


Aim: How should we take notes from a read aloud and what information should we focus

on?

Do Now: spelling list:




Materials

      1) crate for collecting books

      2) book receipts



Homework

None



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

1) distribute book receipts

2) collect ―El Bronx‖ books

3) return Tests

Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

      1) elicit note taking tips from students

      2) should include these: a) abbreviate words: abbr. Suppl., b) use symbols ex: &, @,

         etc., c) leave out little words: the, a, and, if, d) listen attentively and focus on

         speaker’s voice, e) skip lines to fill in later, f) use folded paper method, g) take
                                                                                               69


       notes during both readings, h) take down facts, main ideas, the speakers’ feelings,

       impressions, thoughts, I) know what to look for in situation, J) write quickly

Work Period (20 min):

1) Tell students they should take notes on sentence I will read- reduce it to it’s main idea

– only allowed 2-3 words

   2) read first sentence of article have students share what they summarized it to

BAGHDAD, Iraq (CNN) -- Military intelligence has reported recent,
"credible" sightings of former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein in a large
area north of Baghdad, a U.S. Army spokeswoman said Monday.

If "there is credible information on Saddam, obviously we're going to take action," said
Maj. Josslyn Aberle of the Army's 4th Infantry Division .

Amid the fighting, there were United Nations efforts Monday to create a deadline
eventually aimed at holding Iraqi elections and drafting a constitution.

Intelligence on the toppled Iraqi dictator comes from various sources, Aberle said,
including the kind of "human intelligence" that led U.S. forces to Saddam's missing sons,
Uday and Qusay Hussein, in July.

The sons were killed in the northern town of Mosul during a July 22 firefight with the
U.S. military.

The 4th Division's area of operations includes a region about 185 miles by 250 miles (300

kilometers by 400 kilometers), ranging from Baghdad's northern suburbs to the northern

oil fields of Kirkuk. Saddam's ancestral homeland of Tikrit lies in that area.



   3) Read second sentence and repeat

   4) Read third sentence

   5) Read fourth sentence

   6) Tell students you will read entire article and they should take notes on it
                                                                                            70


   7) Read entire article and ask students to summarize




Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




28
              Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Wednesday – 10/15/2003

Aim: How can understanding the main idea of the reading help us take notes?

Do Now: next day from spelling list



Homework




Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

   1) Students should look at situation of task and evaluate what type of information

       they are supposed to look for and write it out in a sentence

   2) read next three paragraphs of Regent’s task article on race to students, after each

       paragraph they should share notes and identify the main idea

   Format of notes: Main idea         What makes it so?               How does it fit?
                                                                               71




   These questions allow them to reflect on what we do when we take notes.

Work Period (20 min):

1) Students share notes in their groups and identify the main ideas

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):

1) review what we learned today in class

29
               Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Thursday – 10/16/2003

Aim: How can we evaluate our own note-taking skills?

Do Now: spelling list



Materials

Copies of prompt



Homework

Review note taking tips for test on Monday



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

   1) read next three paragraphs of prompt to students
                                                                                          72


   2) Students take notes

   3) Students exchange notes

   4) Hand out hard copy of reading passage

   5) Students will evaluate their peers

   6) Afterwards they will evaluate their own work and give themselves a note taking

       grade.

   7) Collect copies of prompt

   8) Discussion: What are our weaknesses?

   Where did we do especially well?



Work Period (20 min):




Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):

Tell students they will be given the same prompt and I will evaluate them that they are

using note taking tips.




30
                 Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Friday – 10/17/2003

Aim: How can we evaluate our own note-taking skills? (continued)
                                                                                        73


Do Now: brainstorm 10 important strategies for note taking



Bloom’s Taxonomy Higher Order Questions:

Analysis

Synthesis

Evaluation



Materials




Homework




Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

   9) read next three paragraphs of prompt to students

   10) Students take notes

   11) Students exchange notes

   12) Hand out hard copy of reading passage

   13) Students will evaluate their peers

   14) Afterwards they will evaluate their own work and give themselves a note taking
                                                                                            74


       grade.

   15) Collect copies of prompt

   16) Discussion: What are our weaknesses?

Where did we do especially well?

Work Period (20 min):

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




31
                Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Monday – 10/20/2003

Aim: How can we evaluate our own note taking skills? (continued)

Do Now: spelling list (quiz Friday on list) chrome, commercial, conscience (let your

conscience be your guide), conscious (the patient remained fully conscious-awake).



Materials

Newspaper article



Homework

1) a) Get an article from internet, magazine, or newspaper on an appropriate topic of use

your choice and b) take notes on it using model we mentioned. Article should have at

least five paragraphs.



Development
                                                                                            75


Read Aloud (5-10 min): article will make up the bulk of the read aloud



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

   1) NEW goal is to reduce a paragraph to 2-3 words.

   2) Read three paragraphs to students

   3) Students will take notes

4) students will grade each other on: 1) brevity (short), 2) gets main idea- discuss this

with group so you all agree, 3) uses abbreviations and leaves out unimportant words 4)

Work Period (20 min):

1) article given to students so they can critique each other’s notes

2) Have a closing sharing session- what do we need to work on? What do we do well?



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




32
                Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Tuesday – 10/21/2003
                                                                                              76


Aim: Who are Odysseus and Homer?

Do Now: spelling list- criticize, courtesy, criminal, cruelty, daughter



Homework

Read prologue and first book of the Odyssey (page 1 to 8) and answer the following

questions:

1) To whom and where is Odysseus returning to? P.1

   2) Who is Ino and how does she help Odysseus? P.3

   3) Who is the god who is angry at Odysseus and how does he punish him?




Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): Read aloud from Beowulf in the Old English and in the

traditional English- tell students this is an example of an Epic poem- it is an old english

version of the Greek epic



Mini Lesson (10-15 min): Give mini-lecture to set up Odyssey:

1) a)What is the Odyssey? What does the word sound like? It means a journey.

b) The Odyssey tells the story of the hero Odysseus trying to return home.

c) Odyssey is an epic poem. It is written in a rhymed meter- it is a long poem that tells a

long story about a great hero.

d) it is also a myth- An   ancient story dealing with supernatural beings,
                                                                                          77


ancestors, or heroes that serves as a fundamental type in the

worldview of a people, and explains aspects of the natural world,

psychology, and customs.


2) a) Odyssey was recorded by Homer who was supposedly a blind poet living around the

8th century B.C.

b) it is considered by many to be the first novel.

c) Homer used memory tricks to remember the tale

d) the story begins in media res- latin for ―in the middle of things‖, in the middle of

action, make comparison to movies that begin with action scene



3) Background of the story:

a) There was a mythical war between the Trojans and the Greeks. Odysseus is a greek

soldier trying to return home

Work Period (20 min):

   1) Distribute books- class needs to bring books every day

   2) Do book receipts



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




33
               Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Wednesday – 10/22/2003
                                                                                             78


Aim: Who are the Greek Gods?

Do Now: spelling list: deceive, decision, defendant, descent, describe

Homework

Finish your three drawings and explanations



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): none

1) quiz on lecture from yesterday and reading

Mini Lesson (10-15 min): mini lesson on the Greek Gods students will take notes on my

descriptions


Gods:
1) Take notes on descriptions. Get name of character, what they are the god of, what their
symbol is, and who they are related to.


2) Students should pick three Gods to illustrate and explain why you drew them that way


ÒBackground- Gods were invented by the Greeks as a way of explaining the world
around them. Ask students to imagine there was no science to explain why the earth
turns. Why the sun comes up. Gods answered all the big questions in life: a) why do we
have war? B) why do people fall in love? C) How do we explain nature?


APHRODITE (a-fro-DYE-tee; Roman name Venus ) was the
goddess of love, beauty and fertility. She was also a protectress of
sailors.

The poet Hesiod said that Aphrodite was born from sea-foam. Homer, on the other

hand, said that she was the daughter of Zeus and Dione.
                                                                       79



Apollo –, was the god of prophesy, music and healing.

Like most of his fellow Olympians, Apollo did not hesitate to
intervene in human affairs. It was he who brought about the demise
of the mighty Achilles. Of all the heroes besieging the city of Troy
in the Trojan War, Achilles was the best fighter by far. He had
easily defeated the Trojan captain Hector in single combat. But
Apollo helped Hector's brother Paris slay Achilles with an arrow.

Ares – god of war, often shown with a bloody spear, handsome,
was the god of war, or more precisely of warlike frenzy. Though
an immortal deity, he was bested by Heracles in battle and was
almost killed when stuffed into a jar by two giants. When another
hero wounded him during the Trojan War, he received scant
sympathy from his father Zeus.

In appearance, Ares was handsome and cruel. He is often depicted
carrying a bloodstained spear. His throne on Mount Olympus was
said to be covered in human skin.

Artemis – wasthe virgin goddess of the hunt. She helped women in
childbirth but also brought sudden death with her arrows.

Artemis and her brother Apollo were the children of Zeus and
Leto. In some versions of their myth, Artemis was born first and
helped her mother to deliver Apollo.

Athena – goddess of war, goddess of wisdom, sprang forth from
Zeus’ head, was the goddess of crafts and the domestic arts and
also those of war. She was the patron goddess of Athens. Her
symbol was the owl. She was originally the Great Goddess in the
form of a bird. By the late Classic, she had come to be regarded as
a goddess of wisdom
                                                                        80


Demeter – was the goddess of agriculture. Demeter as the sister of
Zeus and the mother of Persephone, When depicted in art, Demeter
is often shown carrying a sheaf of grain

Dionysus – was the god of wine. Dionysus was the son of Zeus
and the mortal heroine Semele.

Hephaestus – was the lame god of fire and crafts or the two
together, hence of blacksmiths. Hephaestus was the son of Zeus
and Hera or, in some accounts, of Hera alone. He limped because
he was born lame, which caused his mother to throw him off
Mount Olympus.

Hera – mother god, wife of zeus, was the goddess of marriage.
Hera was the wife of Zeus and Queen of the Olympians.

Hera hated the great hero Heracles since he was the son of her
husband Zeus and a mortal woman. When he was still an infant,
she sent snakes to attack him in his crib. Later she stirred up the
Amazons against him when he was on one of his quests.

Hermes – god of speed, HERMES (HUR-meez; Roman name
Mercury ) was the messenger of the gods and guide of dead souls
to the Underworld. A prankster and inventive genius from birth,
Hermes aided the heroes Odysseus and Perseus in their quests.

Hermes was the son Zeus and a mountain nymph. As a newborn he
was remarkably precocious. On his very first day of life, he found
the empty shell of a tortoise and perceived its utility as a sounding
chamber. Stringing sinews across it, he created the first lyre.

Poseidon – god of the sea, was the god of the sea, earthquakes and
horses. Although he was officially one of the supreme gods of
Mount Olympus, he spent most of his time in his watery domain.
                                                                                        81


Poseidon was brother to Zeus and Hades. These three gods divided
up creation. Zeus was ruler of the sky, Hades had dominion of the
Underworld and Poseidon was given all water, both fresh and salt.

Zeus- supreme god, ruler of Mt. Olympus, was the supreme god of
the Olympians. He was the father of the heroes Perseus and
Heracles, the latter of whom once wrestled him to a draw.

Zeus was the youngest son of the Titans Cronus and Rhea. When
he was born, his father Cronus intended to swallow him as he had
all of Zeus's siblings: Poseidon, Hades, Hestia, Demeter and Hera.
But Rhea hid the newborn in a cave on Mount Dicte in Crete. (To
this day, the guides at the "cave of Zeus" use their flashlights to
cast shadow puppets in the cave, creating images of baby Zeus
from the myth.)Ó (Skidmore).

Work Period (20 min): Students can answer comprehension questions from the back

pages of the book

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




34
              Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Thursday – 10/23/2003

Aim: Who are the Greek Gods? Continued

Do Now: despair, dining, disappear, eighth, electrical (check homework during do now)



Homework

   1) make sure you bring notes for the week, spelling quiz is on Friday
                                                                                          82


   2) finish paragraphs about what God you would be



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):



Mini Lesson (10-15 min): continue lesson from yesterday describing the Olympians



Work Period (20 min): Students may write a two paragraph response about what God

they would most like to be and why and what you would do with your power.




Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): have students share responses and why




35
                 Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Friday – 10/24/2003

Aim: What was the Trojan War?

Do Now: spelling list- electrician, eligible, emergency, English, envelope



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): quiz on spelling list, also include contradict, juncture, finite
                                                                      83


Mini Lesson (10-15 min): wrap up discussion on Zeus:

ÒZeus- supreme god, ruler of Mt. Olympus, was the supreme god
of the Olympians. He was the father of the heroes Perseus and
Heracles, the latter of whom once wrestled him to a draw.

Zeus was the youngest son of the Titans Cronus and Rhea. When
he was born, his father Cronus intended to swallow him as he had
all of Zeus's siblings: Poseidon, Hades, Hestia, Demeter and Hera.
But Rhea hid the newborn in a cave on Mount Dicte in Crete. (To
this day, the guides at the "cave of Zeus" use their flashlights to
cast shadow puppets in the cave, creating images of baby Zeus
from the myth.)




Trojan War Notes

The Apple of Discord

Marriage: The Trojan War has its roots in the marriage between
Peleus and Thetis, a sea-goddess. Peleus and Thetis had not invited
Eris, the goddess of discord, to their marriage and the outraged
goddess stormed into the wedding banquet and threw a golden
apple onto the table. The apple belonged to, Eris said, whomever
was the fairest.

Hera, Athena, and Aphrodite each reached for the apple. Zeus
proclaimed that Paris, prince of Troy and thought to be the most
beautiful man alive, would act as the judge.

Hermes went to Paris, and Paris agreed to act as the judge. Hera
promised him power, Athena promised him wealth, and Aphrodite
                                                                        84


promised the most beautiful woman in the world.

Paris chose Aphrodite, and in return she promised him that Helen,
wife of Menelaus, would be his wife. Paris then prepared to set off
for Sparta to capture Helen. Twin prophets Cassandra and Helenus
tried to persuade him against such action, as did his mother,
Hecuba. But Paris would not listen and he set off for Sparta.

In Sparta, Menelaus, husband of Helen, treated Paris as a royal
guest. However, when Menelaus left Sparta to go to a funeral,
Paris abducted Helen (who perhaps went willingly), married her,
and also carried off much of Menelaus' wealth.

Greek Armament

Menelaus, however, was outraged to find that Paris had taken
Helen. Menelaus then called upon all of Helen's old suitors, as all
of the suitors had made an oath long ago that they would all back
Helen's husband to defend her honor.

Many of the suitors did not wish to go to war. Odysseus pretended
to be insane but this trick was uncovered by Palamedes. Achilles,
though not one of the previous suitors, was sought after because
the seer Calchas had stated that Troy would not be taken unless
Achilles would fight.

One of the most interesting stories is of Cinyras, king of Paphos, in
Cyprus, who had been a suitor of Helen. He did not wish to go to
war, but promised Agamemnon fifty ships for the Greek fleet. True
to his word, Cinyras did send fifty ships. The first ship was
commanded by his son. The other forty-nine, however, were toy
clay ships, with tiny clay sailors. They dissembled soon after being
placed in the ocean (Tripp, 584-584).
                                                                       85


The Greek fleet assembled, under Agamemnon's inspection, in
Aulis. However, Agamemnon either killed one of Diana's sacred
stags or made a careless boast. Either way, Diana was outraged and
she calmed the seas so that the fleet could not take off.

The seer Calchas proclaimed that Iphigenia, daughter of
Agamemnon, must be sacrificed before the fleet could set sail. This
was done, and the Greek ships set off in search of Troy.

Finding Troy

Finding Troy proved difficult, however, and the Greek fleet at first
landed in Mysia. According to Herodotus, the Greeks were under
the impression that Helen had been taken by the Teuthranians
(Teucrians), and though the Teuthranians denied such allegations,
the Greeks layed siege to the city (Herodotus, Bk. II.118). The
Greeks ultimately prevailed, but suffered heavy casualties at the
hands of Telephus, king of the Teuthranians, and, at the end, were
still without Helen. Telephus, in the course of the war, was
wounded by Achilles.

With no where else to turn, the Greeks returned home.

The Trojan War might not have happened had not Telephus gone
to Greece in the hopes of having his wound cured. Telephus had
been told by an oracle that only the person who wounded him (in
this case, Achilles) could cure him. Achilles assented and Telephus
told the Greeks how to get to Troy.

Embassy to Priam

Odysseus, known for his eloquence, and Menelaus were sent as
ambassadors to Priam. They demanded Helen and the stolen
                                                                      86


treasure be returned. Priam refused, and Odysseus and Menelaus
returned to the Greek ships with the announcement that war was
inevitable.

The War

The first nine years of the war consisted of both war in Troy and
war against the neighboring regions. The Greeks realized that Troy
was being supplied by its neighboring kingdoms, so Greeks were
sent to defeat these areas.

As well as destroying Trojan economy, these battles let the Greeks
gather a large amount of resources and other spoils of war,
including women (e.g., Briseis, Tecmessa and Chryseis).

The Greeks won many important battles and the Trojan hero
Hector fell, as did the Trojan ally Penthesilea. However, the
Greeks could not break down the walls of Troy.

Patroclus was killed and, soonafter, Achilles was felled by Paris.

Helenus, son of Priam, had been captured by Odysseus. A prophet,
Helenus told the Greeks that Troy would not fall unless:

a) Pyrrhus, Achilles' son, fought in the war,
b) The bow and arrows of Hercules were used by the Greeks
against the Trojans,
c) The remains of Pelops, the famous Eleian hero, were brought to
Troy, and
d) The Palladium, a statue of Athena, was stolen from Troy (Tripp,
587).

Phoenix persuaded Pyrrhus to join the war. Philoctetes had the
bow and arrows of Hercules, but had been left by the Greek fleet in
                                                                       87


Lemnos because he had been bitten by a snake and his wound had
a horrendous smell. Philoctetes was bitter, but was finally
persuaded to join the Greeks. The remains of Pelops were gotten,
and Odysseus infiltrated Trojan defenses and stole the Palladium.

The Trojan Horse

Still seeking to gain entrance into Troy, clever Odysseus (some say
with the aid of Athena) ordered a large wooden horse to be built.
Its insides were to be hollow so that soldiers could hide within it.

Once the statue had been built by the artist Epeius, a number of the
Greek warriors, along with Odysseus, climbed inside. The rest of
the Greek fleet sailed away, so as to deceive the Trojans.

One man, Sinon, was left behind. When the Trojans came to
marvel at the huge creation, Sinon pretended to be angry with the
Greeks, stating that they had deserted him. He assured the Trojans
that the wooden horse was safe and would bring luck to the
Trojans.

Only two people, Laocoon and Cassandra, spoke out against the
horse, but they were ignored. The Trojans celebrated what they
thought was their victory, and dragged the wooden horse into Troy.

That night, after most of Troy was asleep or in a drunken stupor,
Sinon let the Greek warriors out from the horse, and they
slaughtered the Trojans. Priam was killed as he huddled by Zeus'
altar and Cassandra was pulled from the statue of Athena and
raped.

After the War
                                                                                        88


After the war, Polyxena, daughter of Priam, was sacrificed at the
tomb of Achilles and Astyanax, son of Hector, was also sacrificed,
signifying the end of the war.

Aeneas, a Trojan prince, managed to escape the destruction of
Troy, and Virgil's Aeneid tells of his flight from Troy. Many
sources say that Aeneas was the only Trojan prince to survive, but
this statement contradicts the common story that Andromache was
married to Helenus, twin of Cassandra, after the war.

Menelaus, who had been determined to kill his faithless wife, was
soon taken by Helen's beauty and seductiveness that he allowed
her to live.

The surviving Trojan women were divided among the Greek men

along with the other plunder. The Greeks then set sail for home,

which, for some, proved as difficult and took as much time as the

Trojan War itselfÓ (Skidmore).

Work Period (20 min): Freewrite

1) If you could have supernatural powers similar to the Greek Gods what would they be

and how would you use them?

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




36
                                                                                   89


                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Monday 10/27/03

Aim: How do we start writing an essay?

Do Now: spelling list: environment, escape, exercise, existence, explanation



Homework

Complete outline for regent’s essay



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): next story about what led to the trojan war, which is the

background to Odysseus’ story



Mini Lesson (10-15 min): 1) continue discussing regent’s task 1

2) focus today is on essay outline

3) students will take notes on the following components- a) thesis sentence

b) inroductory paragraph c) body paragraphs 1-3 d) conclusion



Work Period (20 min): 1) Have students read goldfish prompt and do worksheet

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




37
                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Tuesday 10/28/03
                                                                                             90


Aim: What textual evidence is there in chapter two that Odysseus is a hero?

Do Now: spelling list- familiar, February, further, glimpse, independence



Homework

1) Pg.277-278, chapter two questions:1,3,5,6

2) read chapter three



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): 1) continue read aloud from yesterday on the Trojan War

2) quiz – 5 questions 1) What awakend O. from his sleep?

2) Who did Athena pretend to be to get close to Nausicaa?

3) What did Nausicaa ask her father for?

4) Why does Nausicaa make Odysseus wait at the grove?

5) What did Nausicaa advise Odysseus to do once he gets to the city?



Mini Lesson (10-15 min): 1) Athena- bends over backwards to help O. –pg.9- changes

shape to a friend of nausicaa’s, makes up elaborate story about Nausicaa’s need for a cart

for her clothes, sets up a cart for O

2) Nausicaa- a) is undeterred by O’s appearance p. 13

b) convinces her friends to help him out p. 14

c) sees how attractive O. is p. 14-15

d) comes up with a plan, p.15 for O to meet her father and get help
                                                                                           91


Work Period (20 min):

Questions from 277-278#1,3,5,6 – will be collected



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




38
                 Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Wednesday 10/29/03

Aim: How does Odysseus act like a hero in Chapter 3?

Do Now: list: innocent, illegal, insistence, interfere, journey



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

   1) Wrap up read aloud on the end of the Trojan War

   2) Student may read aloud p.17 on Odysseus

Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

-P.17 Athena protects O. with mist, but she also plays trick

-Discussion: Why doesn’t Athena just appear as herself?

-add Arete and Alcinous to character chart

p.21- Alcinous wary of Gods and their tricks- Gods have a bad reputation for messing in

human lives

p.21 (bottom)-O. is a good speaker, they ―approve his words‖, but Arete is suspicious of
                                                                              92


his clothes

p.22- O. tells his amazing tale, he is good story teller

p.23- O. defends nausicaa

in return, O. is treated like a hero and Alcinous promises to take him home




Work Period (20 min):

Questions from page 278#1-6 (complete for homework)

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




39
                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Thursday 10/30/03

Aim: What is Homer’s role in The Odyssey? What happens in chapter 4?

Do Now: junior, knowledge, laboratory, license, lawyer



Homework

No Homework – students should come for candy/fun lesson



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

Quiz: 1) Name one of the two people athena changes into.
                                                                                        93


2) Who tells the story that makes Odysseus cry?

3) What does O. do to answer the challenge of Euryalus and Laodamas?

4) What does Euryalus give to Odysseus and why does he give it to him?

5) what does Alcinous ask Odysseus about at the end of the chapter?



students may read aloud from first two pages of chapter 4



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

Define narrator-someone telling a story

Can they be involved in the story?

p.24- Athena helping out Odysseus- announces him, makes him look taller and more

powerful. Why does she do this? Does she love him?

p.26- Euryalus and Laodamus decide to challenge Odysseus. If O. s so tough and strong

looking, why do they challenge him? B/c he is weakend

P.27- O. shows off his power

p.25- Is Demodocus Homer? He is blind, tells stories, other people brag about him

Why does Odysseus cry when the story is told?

p.33- Alcinous asks Odysseus about his past. Will he tell him or not?



Work Period (20 min):

Page 279, questions 6,7,&8

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):
                                                                            94


40

Halloween Lesson plan
                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Friday 10/31/03

Aim: How do we write scary stories?

Do Now: lengthen, loneliness, luckily, material, mathematics



Bloom’s Taxonomy Higher Order Questions:

Analysis

Synthesis

Evaluation



Materials




Homework




Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):
                                                                                              95


Explain the key elements of a scary story.

Foreshadowing- scary music in movies

Strong details- the blood oozed from the womans gaping head wounds

Work Period (20 min):

Incorporate elements of a scary story into a story you write. Story will be collected for a

quiz grade

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




41 11/3/03

Workshop/sick day attach dictionary quiz activity




42

11/4/04 Veteran’s Day no school – teacher work day



43
                                                                                        96


                 Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Wednesday 11/5/03

Aim: What are our strengths and weaknesses in our essay writing?

Do Now: spelling list: lengthen, loneliness, luckily, material, mathematics



Homework

Read chapter 5 of the Odyssey pg.34-48, questions 3,5,7,10,11



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): langston hughes poem, ―Theme for English B‖



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

Review components of a five paragraph essay

   1) Intro- thesis statement, should present argument

   2) Body paragraphs/topic sentence/three supporting ideas

   3) Conclusion- restates thesis statement and summarizes reasons for argument

   4) Should have transitions between paragraphs

   -each paragraph counts twenty points-paragraphs should be at least four sentences.

Work Period (20 min):

*QUIZ GRADE!

Students will outline and then compose a five paragraph essay

Prompt: Is Odysseus a hero? Why or why not?

*Feel free to use your notes on essay writing

*You may also use information from your notes on the Trojan War and the chapters we
                                                                                           97


have read so far in the Odyssey.



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): give homework



*bring in a good five paragraph essay for next time




44
                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Thursday 11/6/03

Aim: How can we aid our understanding of The Odyssey?

Do Now: spelling list: misspell, murmur, nonsense, neighbor, necessary



Materials

Collect in class essays



Homework

Do storyboard for chapter 5



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):



Mini Lesson (10-15 min): timeline of events: in groups students will take 5-7 minutes to
                                                                                              98


pick out major events of chapter 1-4, everyone writes events, one member shares to class

CHP 1

-O. fights in the Trojan War (before story begins) Greeks win (before the Odyssey)

-Zeus sinks O’s ship on his way back home to Ithaca (pg. 22)

-O. shipwrecks on Calypso’s island, where she holds him there (chp. 1)

-O. leaves island on raft – which Poseidon destroys (cnp.1)- O sails for 18 days (pg.22)

CHP.2

-With Athena’s help, O. lands at the mouth of the river into the city of the Phaeacians

(chp. 2)

-Athena convinces princess Nausicaa to ready wagons for Odysseus (chp.2)

-Nausicaa is attracted to Odysseus (p.15)

-Nausicaa’s plan is to take O. into city- where he will go to her father on his own (chp.2)

CHP 3

-Athena covers O. in mist as he walks to house of Alcinous and Arete (parents of

Nausicaa)

-O. asks for pity and assistance from Alcinous and Arete, Arete is initially suspicious of

O. because he is wearing familiar clothes Nausicaa gave him

-Alcinous agrees to help O. home by loaning him ships and some of his men (p.23)

CHP 4

-next morning Athena takes form of messenger and starts bragging about the stranger

(O.) (p. 24) – Alcinous shows up and puts on celebration for the stranger (O.)

– they sing songs, Demodocus sings songs about Trojan War (p.25) and O. cries

-Alcinous’ son Laodamas and his friend Euryaluschallenge O.- O. proves his strength by
                                                                                   99


throwing weight far (pg. 27)

-Euryalus apologizes for his rudeness and gives O. a sword

-O. begins crying again at Demodocus’ story and finally Alcinous asks who he is



Work Period (20 min): HW: students should go back through chapter 5 and find the

three main events of the chapter- we will share this on the board



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




45
                   Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Friday 11/7/03

Aim: What main events happened in chapters 4 and 5 of the Odyssey?

Do Now: spelling list: ninety, noticeable, occasion, occur, occurred



Homework




Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):
                                                                                           100




Mini Lesson (10-15 min): continue from yesterday’s lesson summarizing major events

of chapter four-put these on board




Work Period (20 min): do a shared reading of chapter five, highlighting the key sections

read from 34-38:

Chp. 5 Timeline: 1) O. begins in present telling story to Alcinous

O then recounts what happened before chapter 1

   1) After leaving Troy, O & Men kill Ciconians for their supplies

   2) O’s men get drunk in celebration, neighboring tribe attacks them in the morning-

       they barely escape

   3) Zeus stirrs up a freitening storm and a wind steers them off course

   4) On tenth day they end up at land of the Lotus eaters

   5) O. sends men to explore they eat Lotus (which is a drug) and they forget where

       they were- O gets them back into the ship and they leave

   6) They cross harbor to the land of the Cyclops

   *explain what a cyclops is – one eyed monster

   eat goats from one of the islands and O. goes to mainland to meet the cyclops

   O meets Ployphemus

Students will take notes on major events for rest of the chapter

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):

Quiz Monday on Chapter 5
                                                                                       101




46
                 Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Monday – 11/10/03

Aim: what happens in chapter five and six of The Odyssey?

Do Now: opposite, optical, orator, parallel, patient



Homework




Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): quiz chapter five The Odyssey

1) who is Odysseus telling his story to at the beginning of chapter 5?

2) What happens to them when Odysseus’ men ate the lotus flower?

3) How does O. wound the Cyclops?

4) How does O. escape from the Cyclops?

5) Who is Polyphemus’ father?



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

1) quick review of the events from chapter 5 of The Odyssey- Polyphemus

Conversation: was it right for Odysseus to stab the cyclops in the eye? Was this too

cruel?
                                                                                         102


2) review material that will be on the midterm



Do a shared reading on chapter 6

Students can do questions in groups

   -   O. is still telling story to Alcinous

- he spends time with God of the Winds on the island of Aeolia for a month – god gives

him a bag of fierce winds



Work Period (20 min):




Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




47

Tuesday 11/11/03 Veteran’s day – no school
                                                                                        103




48
                Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Wednesday – 11/12/03

Aim: Give midterm – see appendix for midterm – day 1 students take notes during 2

readings. After readings, students take multiple choice test.

Do Now:




49
                 Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Thursday – 11/13/03

Aim: day 2 of midterm exam – students use notes to write short story from a different

point of view – see appendix

Do Now:




50
                   Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Friday – 11/14/03

Aim: What happens in chapter 6 of Ulysses?
                                                                                         104


Do Now: spelling list- personally, private, privilege, preferable, probably



Homework

Chapter 7 + questions



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

Check homework while students are doing their do now

Mini Lesson (10-15 min): is it okay to hurt someone else to save yourself?

Conversation: Was Odysseus right to stab the cyclops in the eye? Could he have escaped

without hurting the cyclops?

-students should draw a picture of a scene that happens in chapter 6 of The Odyssey

Work Period (20 min): shared reading of chapter 6




Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




51
                 Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Monday – 11/17/03

Aim: What are the major events of chapters 5,6, and 7?

Do Now: spelling list: repetition, restaurant, rhythm, ridiculous, sergeant
                                                                                           105




Materials




Homework

Read Chapter 8



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): none



Mini Lesson (10-15 min): students will be put in groups and asked to record the

following information about either chapters 5, 6, or 7 of The Odyssey:

-at least 4 major events from the chapter

-the major characters in the chapter and what their role is

-a drawing illustrating a major scene from the book

*each group should have someone to write words, someone to draw, someone to present

out to class and someone to take notes (while groups are presenting everyone should take

notes)

*also remind students everyone should copy information into their notes



Work Period (20 min): students will share their summaries out to the class



Chapter six events:
                                                                                           106


-god of winds bag is taken and accidently opened by O’s men

-some of O’s men trapped in inner harbor- Laestrygonian giants threw stones at ships and

killed many – O escapes

-Aeaea- Circe’s home – Eurylochus’ crew is tricked by Circe’s singing into going inside

her house- they are turned into pigs

-with help of Hermes’ drug, O. is invincible to Circe’s power – he threatens to kill her

and she eventually turns his men back into humans

-most of men go back to Circe’s house with O. and feast for one year

-Circe tells O. he must consult Tiresias, a blind prophet in Hades (land of the dead,

underworld) who will tell him how to get home

-Elpenor is drunk at Circe’s – he falls off of the roof and dies



Chapter seven events: 64-70, 71-76

-O. digs trench (hole), makes sacrifices and awaits Tiresias

-while waiting Elpenor asks O. to build a monument to him

-T. says O’s journey will be hard- Poseidon is mad at his treatment of Polyphemus

(cyclops and P’s son)

-T. says not to touch cattle of the son and he will return home and avenge his wife’s

suitors (vocab word)

-O. has conversation with his mother- tells about Penelope’s suffering and Telemachus

-O. pauses in telling his story to Alcinous and the Phaecians

-O. tells about seeing Agamemnon- Leader of Greeks against Troy – reveals his wife

Cltemnestra killed him – his advice is to not trust women or tell them your business
                                                                                           107


-spirit of Achilles asks about his son and father- O. tells him about his Neoptolemus’

bravery- also sees Ajax, Minors, Orion, and others

-dead Sisyphus’ torture is to roll up an enormous stone to top of hill and it rolls down

when it is close to the top

-ghosts of dead swirl around O. and his men – he flees to ship



Characters:

Tiresias



characters Eurylochus- commander of one groups of O’s men

Circe




Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




52
                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Tuesday – 11/18/03

Aim: What happened in chapters 5-8?

Do Now: grammar exercises: write the past tense of these irregular verbs: dive, draw,

hurt, freeze, read, shake, and hit.

Optional: use all of the words in a paragraph
                                                                                              108


Homework




Development



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):        Students will present their posters summarizing chapters 5-

7 from yesterday

Read Aloud (5-10 min): summarize section about challenges O. has to face:

1) Oxen of the sun god, 2) scylla and charibdys, 3) The sirens



read section about the Sirens conversation

   1) Why does Odysseus have to be tied to the mast?

   2) What powers do the Sirens have?

   3) What do you think Homer’s relationship to women was?

   4) What is the real life equivalent of the Sirens?

Work Period (20 min):

Students will write a response in class to what is the real life equivalent of the Sirens.




Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): HW: read chapter 9




53
                Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Wednesday – 11/19/03
                                                                                   109


Aim: How is the movie of The Odyssey different than the book?

Do Now: copy questions for Odyssey movie



Homework

Read chapter 9



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

none

Mini Lesson (10-15 min): quiz covering chapters 8-9

   1) Who warns Odysseus about what he will face in chapter 8?

   2) Name two of the three challenges Odysseus faces in chapter 8.




Work Period (20 min): show beginning of Odyssey movie – questions from worksheet

Questions for movie:

   1) How is Poseidon presented in the movie? Why is he angry at O.?

   2) Why do Odysseus stop on Cyclo9ps island?

   3) What are O’s men like?

   4) Find two examples that foreshadow trouble on the island.

   5) How does O. try to talk his way out of trouble w/ Polyphemus?

   6) How does Aeolus reveal himself to O.? Who is he related to?
                                                                               110


   7) Why does Aeolus say he is helping O?

   8) Name 2 differences between the book and the movie?

   9) Who do O. and his men almost eat?

   10) How is hermes advice different in the movie?

   11) Hoe is Circe’s spell on O’s men different in the movie?




Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):

Conversation on major differences between the book and the movie.




54
               Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Thursday – 11/20/03

                 Sexual education lecture given by teen schoice spokesperson



55
                 Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Friday – 11/21/03

Aim: How is Aeolus and Circe depicted in The Odyssey movie?

Do Now: questions for movie

   12) How is hermes advice different in the movie?

   2) How is Circe’s spell on O’s men different in the movie?
                                                                                        111


Homework

Read chapter 10



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): quiz on chapters 8-9 of the Odyssey, which were not done

yesterday due to a firedrill

   1-3: name three of the challenges Odysseus faces in chapter 8?

   Hint: these are the challenges Circe warned him about: Oxen of the Sun, Scylla and

   Charybdis, and

   4) In chapter nine how did Poseidon get reveange against the Phaecians for taking

       Odysseus home?

   5) What does Athena disguise Odysseus as before he goes into Ithaca?




Mini Lesson (10-15 min): finish questions from Thursday on The Odyssey

Could do a shared reading of chapter 9-10



Work Period (20 min):
                                                                                            112


Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):

HW: chapter nine questions pages 283-284 #1,4,5,6




56
                             Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. –

Aim: How do legends and myths connect to our lives?

Do Now: spelling list: sieve- n

a utensil consisting of a round frame surrounding a mesh and used to separate solids from

liquids, large particles from small particles, or to purée foods



Solicit- v

1.      vti to try to get something by making insistent requests or pleas



Sufficient- adj

as much as is needed




Materials

Worksheet (see appendix)

Globe Fearon Teacher’s manual for The Odyssey (pg.1-5)

Copyright 1996 by Globe Fearon Inc. One Lake Street, Upper Saddle River, new Jersey
                                                                                                   113


075458




Homework




Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): have a student read the model from the worksheet about King

Arthur’s Round Table



Mini Lesson (10-15 min): 1) Students will fill out the understand section and we will

review it

*emphasize how writer uses examples to support their claims



Work Period (20 min): students will fill out the section on choosing a topic and

audience

2) if there is time students will begin outlining their essay – if they do not finish it will be

homework




Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): assign homework to finish outline – if students are not

going to be in school on Wednesday, then essay is due Tuesday
                                                                                          114




57
                             Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. –

Aim: How do we transition from an outline to an essay?

Do Now: spelling list: scissors, signature, similar, sincerely, spaghetti



Materials




Homework




Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): p.227 read the wooden horse and make connection to

contemporary times



Mini Lesson (10-15 min): model how to turn trojan horse example into an example for

their essay

Greeks fooled Trojans by sending in a wooden horse as a gift, but it was a trick to get

inside the city walls. Once inside the Greeks sacked the city and the Trojan Horse
                                                                                         115


represented the turning point in the war. The legend is important today, because it

reminds us appearances can be decieving. An example of this are the computer viruses

we get through email. Although the emails are supposedly harmless, they often carry

viruses (sometimes known as Trojans) which may inadvertently debilitate your computer.




Work Period (20 min): students will complete the back half of the worksheet –

transferring their outlines to the worksheet – go around checking outlines




Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): We will finish essay in class on Wednesday




58
               Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Wednseday – 11/26/03

Aim: How do we begin the revision process?
                                                                                              116


Do Now: spelling list: summons, suspense, suspicious, syllable, telephone



Materials




Homework

No homework over the T-day weekend!



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): read beginning of worksheet (The Odyssey 5) section 3 on

revising




Work Period (20 min): 1) students will read their papers two times out loud to their

partner

2) after the second reading students will answer questions from the worksheet on a

separater sheet of paper – then switch papers

Mini Lesson (10-15 min): introduce the concept of transition words read the bottom half

of the worksheet. Students should fill in worksheet and then go over as a class.



If time allows students will go back over their essay and see if there are transition words

they may be added. Students should add them to paper, before they turn it in to me.

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):
                                                                                         117




59
                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Monday- 12/1/03

Aim: What is the role of women in the Odyssey?

Do Now: make a graphic organizer comparing Penelope, The Sirens, and Athena

Athena- loyal to Odysseus, powerful, proves her allegiance to Odysseus by warning him,

disguising him,



Penelope- loyal to Odysseus, weak, waits for Odysseus, proves her love by staying

faithful



Sirens-temptress’, symbol of power and destruction



Discussion- how does Homer view women in the story? He presents a complex portrait

of powerful women, weak women, and manipulative women. All of the women in the

story, though are secondary to Odysseus




Homework
                                                                                               118


Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

Read section on 164-165 where Penelope speaks to Odysseus and he learns how she has

managed to remain faithful.



Mini Lesson (10-15 min): quick summary of what happens before chapter 18.

Main events:

Odyssey summary- characters Telemachus, Eumaeus, Laertes

Chapter 10

Odysseus is taken in by Eumaeus who is an old employee of O’s (takes care of O’s pigs).
He doesn’t recognize O as the old man and tells O. that Odysseus is dead and the suitors
are ruining his home and trying to take Penelope. O. responds by telling E. a slightly
fictionalized version of his story. O. is pleased by E’s allegiance to him.

Chapter 11
Cuts to Telemachus with menelaus. Athena tells T. about the suitors who are preparing to
kill him. She tells him to go home via a different route and go to the swine herds. T. sails
off.

Eumaeus reveals that O’s father Laertes is still alive.

Telemachus goes to hut of Eumaeus


Chapter 12
Telemachus informs O. about what is happening at his house. A

Athena turns O. back into his old form and tells O. to reveal his identity to Telemachus.

At first T. doesn’t believe it is him, but eventually he concedes. O. is anxious to attack

the suitors, but T. tells him there are 111 of them and they will need help.



Chapter 13-16- tension heats up between Odysseus and the suitors
                                                                                         119


Chapter 17- Penelope announces that whoever can bend Odysseus’ bow will be able to

marry her, p.185

Chapter 18- reveange

Have students think about role of women- do a graphic organizer comparing Athena to

Penelope to the Sirens

Work Period (20 min): Have students read chapter 18 and do questions on

Pg. 287-288 1-3,6&8




Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): classwork will be homework - Test Wednesday




60

Lesson plan from yesterday was incomplete. Continue

Today.
                   Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Tuesday- 12/2/03

Aim: What is the role of women in the Odyssey?

Do Now: make a graphic organizer comparing Penelope, The Sirens, and Athena

Athena- loyal to Odysseus, powerful, proves her allegiance to Odysseus by warning him,

disguising him,
                                                                                      120




Penelope- loyal to Odysseus, weak, waits for Odysseus, proves her love by staying

faithful



Sirens-temptress’, symbol of power and destruction



Discussion- how does Homer view women in the story? He presents a complex portrait

of powerful women, weak women, and manipulative women. All of the women in the

story, though are secondary to Odysseus




Materials




Homework




Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

Read section on 164-165 where Penelope speaks to Odysseus and he learns how she has

managed to remain faithful.
                                                                                               121


Mini Lesson (10-15 min): quick summary of what happens before chapter 18.

Main events:

Odyssey summary- characters Telemachus, Eumaeus, Laertes

Chapter 10

Odysseus is taken in by Eumaeus who is an old employee of O’s (takes care of O’s pigs).
He doesn’t recognize O as the old man and tells O. that Odysseus is dead and the suitors
are ruining his home and trying to take Penelope. O. responds by telling E. a slightly
fictionalized version of his story. O. is pleased by E’s allegiance to him.

Chapter 11
Cuts to Telemachus with menelaus. Athena tells T. about the suitors who are preparing to
kill him. She tells him to go home via a different route and go to the swine herds. T. sails
off.

Eumaeus reveals that O’s father Laertes is still alive.

Telemachus goes to hut of Eumaeus


Chapter 12
Telemachus informs O. about what is happening at his house. A

Athena turns O. back into his old form and tells O. to reveal his identity to Telemachus.

At first T. doesn’t believe it is him, but eventually he concedes. O. is anxious to attack

the suitors, but T. tells him there are 111 of them and they will need help.



Chapter 13-16- tension heats up between Odysseus and the suitors

Chapter 17- Penelope announces that whoever can bend Odysseus’ bow will be able to

marry her, p.185

Chapter 18- reveange

Have students think about role of women- do a graphic organizer comparing Athena to

Penelope to the Sirens
                                                                              122


Work Period (20 min): Have students read chapter 18 and do questions on

Pg. 287-288 1-3,6&8

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min): classwork will be homework - Test Wednesday




61
                Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Wednesday – 12/3/03

Aim: Is Odysseus’ reveange justified?

Do Now: choose 4 quotes and have students write the significance

open your book to page 198



Homework




Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): pages 198-199



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

-choose five quotes write on board and have students write the significance

198 O. kills Anitnuous

199 – O. explains his rage

199- ―Even if you gave me…‖ Odysseus wants to fight all the suitors.
                                                                                   123


203- Athena encourages bloodshed

204-205 cuts off hesiodes head after he asked to be pitied



207 top O. explains that the sisters deaths were a product of fate

208- Melanthius is tortured and killed



summarize rest of story:

Penelope & Odysseus are reunited at last

Laertes and Odysseus are reunited

Discuss whether Odysseus’ reveange is justified



Work Period (20 min):

Students may study for test – quickly review what students need to know for test



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




62
                 Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Thursday – 12/4/03

Aim: Give Odyssey test (see next page)

Do Now: students should turn in books with test
                                                                         124




Name_________________________                                 Mr. Russ

Date ________________

Balanced Literacy Test #2


I. Multiple choice (2 points each)

Write the letter of the best answer in the blank

_____ 1) The Odyssey is…

a) a novel        b) a sonnet

c) a triptych     d) an epic poem

_____ 2) What challenge does Circe not warn Odysseus about

a) Polyphemus               b) the Sirens

c) The Oxen of the Sun      d) Scylla and Charybdis

______ 3) Odysseus is trying to return to

a) Nausicaa       b) Greece

c) Ithaca         d) Troy

______ 4) Who is the ―face that launched a thousand ships‖?

a) Athena                   b) Aphrodite

c) Nausicaa                 d) Helen

_______ 5) The original language of The Odyssey is…

a) Greek                    b) English

c) Latin                    d) Old English

_______ 6) Who gives Odysseus the bag of wind?

a) Menelaus                          b) Zeus

c) Aeolus                            d) Poseidon

_______ 7) What started the Trojan War?

a) a competition at a wedding        b) a wooden horse
                                                                                                       125

c) Hera’s anger at Zeus           d) a poison apple

_______ 8) Why don’t Odysseus’ men untie him as they pass by the Sirens?

a) the Lotus flower hypnotized them        b) they want the bag of wind

c) they are drunk                          d) Circe turned them into pigs

_______ 9) What does Penelope do to delay the suitors?

a) unravels her knitting          b) tells them Odysseus will be ―right back‖

c) pretends to be someone else    d) burns part of the house down

_______ 10) What competition determines who will win Penelope?

a) hand to hand combat                                b) stringing a bow

c) writing the best love poem                         d) throwing a disc


II. Fill in the blank (2 points each)
    5) _______________________ is the six headed monster who terrorizes Odysseus and his men

    6) _______________________ is the blind poet who many say wrote The Odyssey

    7) _______________________ kidnapped Helen and took Menelaus’ wealth

    8) _______________________ makes Odysseus’ men forgetful and want to stay away from home

     5) ________________________ is the King who Odysseus tells his story to for much of The Odyssey

    6) ________________________ is the Cyclops who eats some of Odysseus’ men




III. Short Answer (10 points each) Answers should be at least 3 sentences

1) Give two examples of episodes from the Odyssey that have lessons from the modern day- ex.

In class we discussed the Trojan Horse’s connection to September 11th. Be sure to use specific

examples.
                                                                                                                    126


2) Contrast two female figures from The Odyssey. Give at least two similarities and two

differences.




3) Name two Gods and/or Goddesses we have discussed in class. A) Give their power (i.e. He is

the God of wisdom) and B) one other fact about them (symbol, who they are related to, story

about them).




IV. Essay (40 points)

Choose one short answer essay. Write on the back of this sheet. Write in paragraphs (at least four sentences) and

complete sentences.

    3) In 2-3 paragraphs give specific examples from The Odyssey that support the idea that Odysseus is a hero.

    4) In 2-3 paragraphs explain what you think the role of women in the Odyssey is. Use examples from the

         book. You should use at least two different female figures in your essay.



V. Extra Credit (2 points each)

1) Name two reasons that Poseidon was angry with Odysseus.

    3) What do you think the following quote means? How does it connect to The Odyssey? ―Beware of Greeks
         bearing gifts‖


63
                                                                                            127


                   Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Friday – 12/5/03

Aim: What was Shakespeare’s life and times like?

Do Now: define words from prologue

Civil

Grudge

Naught



Materials

Romeo and juliet teacher guide book



Homework

Translation of prologue into modern day language



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min): read aloud back ground information on shakespeare’s life and

the theater during Shakespeare’s time.



Mini Lesson (10-15 min): 1) students will take notes during the lecture and read aloud

portion

2) Discussion: elicit responses from students about modern day versions of Romeo and

Juliet. Ask students what the play offers to modern readers.

3) Ask for volunteeers to read through the prologue

Work Period (20 min): students will begin to translate the prologue on their own. It will
                                                                            128


be due at the beginning of class on Monday.

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




64

Monday 12/8/2003
                 Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Monday – 12/8/03

Aim: What role does meter play in Shakerspeare’s work?

Do Now: vocabulary: ―adversary- (noun) opponent

Ambling: noun walking

An- conjunction if

Augment- verb to increase‖

(Tragedy, 36)



Materials




Homework

Read Act 1 scene 1



Development
                                                                                    129


Read Aloud (5-10 min): read aloud some of the first act with students



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

Discuss meter: iambic pentameter- Describes the meter of poetry written in lines

consisting of five groups (pentameter) of two syllables each, the second syllable

stressed more than the first (iambic foot)

Each foot is made up of two syllables (five total feet)

Iamb- unstressed stress foot

Pentameter- five feet




Example:

If music be the food of love, play on.              (Twelfth Night, Act I
Scene 1 Line 1)

If we wanted to make the rhythm grotesquely obvious, we could
say the line and punch the stressed syllables:

        if MU- | sic BE | the FOOD | of LOVE, | play ON.

Use u for unstressed and marks for stressed



Work Period (20 min):

-Create your own four line poem/rap in iambic pentameter

-I will ask for volunteers to present in class
                                                                              130




Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




65
                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Tuesday – 12/9/03

Aim: How are Shakespeare’s plots structured?

Do Now: act I vocabulary words

―Beget- (verb) give life

Beseech- (verb) beg

Chastity- (noun) abstaining from sex

Courtier- (noun) an attendant at a royal court‖

(Tragedy, 36)



Homework

Read act 1 sc.2&3

Questions:

   1) Who wants to marry Juliet?

   2) What does Capulet tell him?

   3) Who is Romeo going to meet at the party?

   4) What is Juliet’s opinion of marriage?
                                                                                          131


Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

Plot structure:

Review exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution

Each term corresponds with the five acts of the play




Work Period (20 min): have students make a chart with the five acts of the play and the

five plot elements- using the prologue and previous information students can go ahead

and begin filling in the chart

Summarize: point out importance of servants fighting in beginning of act 1 scene 1




Read through key passages from scene 1 aloud and point out important plot elements:

1) have students read aloud scene between Romeo and his cousin Benvolio

questions:

1) what is importance of Rosaline? She establishes Romeo’s fickle nature in love or

Romeo’s passionate nature or Romeo’s love for whatever woman comes along.

Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):
                                                                                    132


66
                Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Wednesday – 12/10/03

Aim: Who is Juliet and what are her views on marriage?

Do Now: ―flourish- v. to swing brandish

Forfeit- n. a penalty

Humor- n. a mood, a whim

Kinsmen- n. a relative‖



(Tragedy, 36)



Materials




Homework

Read Act I scene 4




Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

-Summarize conversation between Capulet and Paris. Basically Paris wants to marry

Juliet, but Capulet thinks he should take more time to decide.

-Romeo is going to the party because he thinks Rosaline will be there
                                                                                         133


1) Read act II scene III lines 49-106 (Lady Capulet, Nurse, Juliet)

discussion questions: What is Juliet’s attitude towards love?



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

What are Juliet’s reasons for not getting married?

How old is she?

Do any of those reasons still hold true today?




Work Period (20 min):

1) Describe in your own words (in a sentence or two what Juliet is like and what Romeo

is like.



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




67
                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Thursday – 12/11/03

Aim:

Do Now: ―nuptial- n. wedding

Pernicious- adj. destructive

Portentous- adj. foreboding

Profaner- n. one who openly shows disrespect
                                                                                              134


Scathe- v. to harm‖

(Tragedy, 36)




Materials




Homework

Read act 1 scene 5



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):      read Mercutio’s speech about Queen Mab.

Highlight Mercutio’s fanciful language

2) Also highlight Romeo’s foreshadowing and the way he predicts that the wheels have

been set in motion to doom his fate.




Mini Lesson (10-15 min):



Work Period (20 min):

1) Students should fill in plot chart for Act 1 (exposition) What are the major events that
                                                                                    135


have been set in motion in this act?



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




68
                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Friday – 12/12/03

Aim: : How can we compare and contrast two different interpretations of Romeo and

Juliet?

Do Now: ―afeard- adj. afraid

Badest- v. past tense of to bid ( to come); suggested

Baptize- v. to name, or to give an identity

Conceive- v. to imagine‖

(Tragedy, 36)




Materials




Homework

Act II prologue 1&2



Development
                                                                                       136


Read Aloud (5-10 min):



Do Now: Choose Romeo or Juliet. What do you think he/she looks like? What do you
think he/she is wearing?


Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

Mini Lesson: Putting Romeo and Juliet in other contexts
   1. Romeo and Juliet was written in Elizabethean England, but can we imagine it in
      other circumstances? Ask the students to look back at their prologue homeworks
      and think about how the story works in other situations.
Compare and Contrasting – when we watch two different versions of the same scene,

what we looking for? Set up categories on boards for students to take notes.



Work Period (20 min):

Show the party scene from Luhrmann and Zeferelli movie and have students look for

similarities and differences.




Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):

Put similarities and differences on the board.

69

Monday 12/15/2003
                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Monday – 12/15/03

Aim: What types of love are present in Romeo and Juliet?

Do Now: ―cunning- n. skill in deception
                                                                                          137


Divers- adj. Diverse, various

Enmity- n. hatred

Feign- v. to act as if‖

(Tragedy, 36)



Homework

Act II scene 3



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):


“

“1. In a large group discussion, students will brainstorm the types of love they
see represented by characters in the first two acts of the play. These should
include:

        a. unrequited love: Romeo for Rosaline, Paris for Juliet
        b. romantic love: Romeo and Juliet
        c. parental love: Lord and Lady Capulet for Juliet, Lord and Lady
        Montague for Romeo, Nurse for Juliet
        d. friendship: Romeo and Benvolio, Romeo and Mercutio, Romeo and
        Friar Laurence, Nurse and Juliet
        e. love of family honor: Tybalt, Mercutio, Romeo

2. Assign students in pairs or small groups and direct them to the text of the play
to find and cite examples that illustrate each of these types of love; review proper
citation form. For example, Romeo's crush on Rosaline could be illustrated by the
lines, "She has forsworn to love, and in that vow / Do I live dead that live to tell it
now" (1.1.231-2).

3. When they have found a number of examples from acts one and two, have the
                                                                                            138


students share their findings with the class by reading them aloud and providing
line citations for each category of love.

4. At the end of the lesson, it is important to emphasize what is coming in the
play. Six characters will die; all will die from love. The Prince states at the end of
the play: "See, what a scourge is laid upon your hate, / that Heaven finds means
to kill your joys with love," (5.3.302-3). As the students complete the play, they
should continue to add any other types of love they discover. For example, love
of self becomes very important for both Tybalt and Mercutio in 3.1; it may also
motivate the fears behind Juliet's soliloquy in 4.3.

EXTENSIONS / RELATED ACTIVITIES

WRITING: The information gathered from the text could be used as the basis for
a composition. For example, students could compare and contrast two types of
love, citing lines from the text to support their ideas.

PERFORMANCE: Class discussion about types of love could serve as the basis
for improvised scenes where the students act out different love relationships in
the play or in "real life."

VISUAL ARTS: The students' discoveries could also spark an art project for which they
create collages or mobiles representing different characters and different types of love”
(Petersohn).




70
                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Tuesday – 12/16/03

Aim: What types of love are present in Romeo and Juliet?

Do Now: ―homely- adj. Plain, ordinary

Idolatry- n. worship

Impute- v. to attribute

Inconstant- adj. changeable

Invocation- n. prayer
                                                                                          139


Salutation- n. a greeting‖

(Tragedy, 36)




Homework

Act II scene 4



Development

Continue lesson from yesterday

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

Act II scene 4

Mini Lesson (10-15 min):



“1. In a large group discussion, students will brainstorm the types of love they
see represented by characters in the first two acts of the play. These should
include:

       a. unrequited love: Romeo for Rosaline, Paris for Juliet
       b. romantic love: Romeo and Juliet
       c. parental love: Lord and Lady Capulet for Juliet, Lord and Lady
       Montague for Romeo, Nurse for Juliet
       d. friendship: Romeo and Benvolio, Romeo and Mercutio, Romeo and
       Friar Laurence, Nurse and Juliet
       e. love of family honor: Tybalt, Mercutio, Romeo

2. Assign students in pairs or small groups and direct them to the text of the play
to find and cite examples that illustrate each of these types of love; review proper
citation form. For example, Romeo's crush on Rosaline could be illustrated by the
lines, "She has forsworn to love, and in that vow / Do I live dead that live to tell it
now" (1.1.231-2).
                                                                                            140


3. When they have found a number of examples from acts one and two, have the
students share their findings with the class by reading them aloud and providing
line citations for each category of love.

4. At the end of the lesson, it is important to emphasize what is coming in the
play. Six characters will die; all will die from love. The Prince states at the end of
the play: "See, what a scourge is laid upon your hate, / that Heaven finds means
to kill your joys with love," (5.3.302-3). As the students complete the play, they
should continue to add any other types of love they discover. For example, love
of self becomes very important for both Tybalt and Mercutio in 3.1; it may also
motivate the fears behind Juliet's soliloquy in 4.3.

EXTENSIONS / RELATED ACTIVITIES

WRITING: The information gathered from the text could be used as the basis for
a composition. For example, students could compare and contrast two types of
love, citing lines from the text to support their ideas.

PERFORMANCE: Class discussion about types of love could serve as the basis
for improvised scenes where the students act out different love relationships in
the play or in "real life."

VISUAL ARTS: The students' discoveries could also spark an art project for which they
create collages or mobiles representing different characters and different types of love”
(Petersohn).




71

Wednesday 12/17/2003
                 Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Wednseday – 12/17/03

Aim: What are the major events of Act II scene 5?

Do Now:

―Livery- n. a clothing that identifies the wearer by occupation or rank

Perchance- adv. perhaps

Perjuries- n. lies
                                                                                      141


Purblind- adj. Completely blind

Rancor- noun hatred

Utterance- noun speech‖

(Tragedy, 36)



Homework

Act II scene 5&6



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

Read act 5 aloud

Mini Lesson (10-15 min): students will view Act II scene 5 from the movie and begin

answering questions from the following worksheet
                                              142




                 QuickTime™ and a
             TIFF (LZW) decompressor
           are neede d to see this picture.




(Folger)
                                                                                143


72

Thursday 12/18/2003
                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Thursday – 12/18/03

Aim: What are the major evens in Act II scene 5? (continued)

Do Now:

―Amerce- v. to penalize

Array- n. clothing

Bedeck- v. to adorn, to clothe

Chide- v. to scold‖



(Tragedy, 37)



Homework

Act III scene 1



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

Read aloud act II scene 5

Mini Lesson (10-15 min): students will complete attached worksheet
                                              144




                 QuickTime™ and a
             TIFF (LZW) decompressor
           are neede d to see this picture.




(Folger)
                                                                                             145


73

Friday 12/19/2003
                    Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Friday – 12/19/03

Aim: How can we rewrite Shakespeare in our own words?

Do Now: ―consort- v. to accompany

Counterfeit- v. to imitate

Devise- v. to figure out

Effeminate- adj. Womanly‖



(Tragedy, 37)



Homework

Act III scene 2&3



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

Act 3: Scene 1


Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

Discuss rewriting Shakespeare. Explain to students that there is a difference between
translating and really rewriting it in a way that sounds right to them. Stress to students
that they should rewrite Romeo and Juliet in their own vernacular.
Rewrite lines 1 – 15 together as a class
                                                                              146


Work Period (20 min):

In groups students will rewrite Act 3: Scene 1. Split up scene 1 like this:
Lines 15 – 59 (until Enter Romeo)
Lines 60 – 99 (until Courage man the hurt cannot be much)
Lines 100 – 125 (Enter Tybalt)
Lines 126 – 155 (O cousin cousin)
Lines 156 – 180 (End of Benvolio’s speech)
Lines 181 - 200




Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




74
                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Monday – 12/22/03

Aim: How does Shakespeare relate to our own life?

Do Now:

―Forbear- v. to give up, to halt

Jocund- adj. cheerful

Martial- adj. military

Outrage- n. a shocking event‖



(Tragedy, 36)



Materials
                                                                                         147




Homework

Act III scene 4&5



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

none

Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

Give students basic performance instructions

   1) speak loudly and articulately

   2) emphasize certain words or phrases by lowering or raising tone of voice- you may

       also lower or raise the volume of your voice

   3) gesturing with your hands (occasionally) can also add emphasis to certain words

Work Period (20 min):

Students will perform the scenes they have written for class

In groups students will rewrite Act 3: Scene 1. Split up scene 1 like this:
Lines 15 – 59 (until Enter Romeo)
Lines 60 – 99 (until Courage man the hurt cannot be much)
Lines 100 – 125 (Enter Tybalt)
Lines 126 – 155 (O cousin cousin)
Lines 156 – 180 (End of Benvolio’s speech)
Lines 181 - 200



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):




75
                                                                                      148


                      Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Tuesday – 12/23/03

Aim: What are the major events of Act III scene 4 and 5?

Do Now:

―Purgatory- n. a place of temporary punishment

Sojourn- v. to stay temporarily

Tributary- adj. Contributing, adding to

Vile- adj. Evil

Without- prep. Outside‖

(Tragedy, 37)




Homework

Continue act III scene 4&5



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):



Mini Lesson (10-15 min):



Work Period (20 min):

Begin viewing video of act I scenes 4 and 5.

(Zefferelli, I:4-5)

Students should write a two paragraph response comparing video to the play. Are the
                                                                                            149


actors performing the roles as you imagined? How do they look similar or different to the

way you imagined them?




76
                    Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Monday – 1/5/04

Aim: What role does foreshadowing and fate play in Romeo and Juliet?

Do Now:

―Attires- n. clothes

Bier- n. a funeral bed

Cope- v. to rival

Dirge- n. a funeral hymn or lament

Twixt- prep. Betwixt, between‖

(Tragedy, 37)



Materials

Chart paper, markes, pens



Homework

Act IV scene 1-3



Development
                                                                                             150


Read Aloud (5-10 min):

Act III sc. 4

Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

-Define foreshadowing, give examples of foreshadowing from the first two acts

-discuss fate. Make connection to fate’s role in The Odyssey.



Work Period (20 min):

Students will find examples of foreshadowing the dire fates of Romeo & Juliet in this act.

Students will record their examples of foreshadowing on chart paper and illustrate the

scene with one drawing.

Students will present their examples at the end of the period



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):

Point out the most salient examples of foreshadowing from their posters



77
                   Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Tuesday – 1/6/04

Aim: How does plot structure anticipate act 4?

Do Now: ―distraught- adj. Driven crazy

Environ- v. to surround

Forsooth- adv. Truthfully, in truth

Inundation- n. a flood

Pensive- adj. Reflective, thoughtful
                                                                                         151


Redress- reflective, thoughtful‖



(Tragedy, 37)



Homework

Act IV scene 4&5



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

Review definitions of Rising Action, Climax and Falling Action

Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

Define Rising Action, Climax and Falling Action. Discuss different examples from the
text of these parts of the plot.
Discuss Falling Action to anticipate Act IV

Work Period (20 min):

Making predictions. What do we think will happen in Act IV to fit into Falling Action?
Then listen to Act IV on the CD. List Falling Actions.


Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):

Review predictions and connect them to the term falling action.




78
                 Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Wednesday – 1/7/04

Aim: Is Romeo and Juliet a realistic look at suicide? (Nelson, 477)
                                                                                           152


Do Now:

―Abhor- v. to hate

Aloof- adv. Apart, away

Conduct- v. guide, usher

Contagion- n. disease

Discern- v. to see, perceive‖

(Tragedy, 37)



Homework

Act V scene 1&2



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

Act IV scene iii- summarize the major events of the chapter- Juliet commits suicide full

well knowing the pain it will cause her. The decision shows both her strength to inflict

pain upon herself and her weaknesses for love and Romeo.

Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

Distribute the following handout to students

   ―Common signs:
   1. Persistent morbid thoughts, dreams, or talk about death or suicide.
   2. Changes in grades, appetite or sleep patterns.
   3. Threats of suicide, implied or direct.
   4. Isolation, where a formerly active and social person now spends much time alone.
   5. Inability or reluctance to express anger or rage, particularly when you would
      expect such an expression.
   6. Giving way of valued possessions.
   7. Drug and alcohol addiction or abuse.
   8. Severe guilt and shame before the attempt.
                                                                                            153


   9. Helpless or hopeless feelings.
   10. Severe depression or despondence.


Any of these signs following a serious disruption in the family, school, or social group,

especially the loss of a significant person, thing or condition‖ (Nelson, 477)



Work Period (20 min):

Students will write a two paragraph response using the attributes from the attached chart

(Nelson, 477). Their response paper should provide textual evidence of at least three

examples that supports the common signs of suicide. This response will be collected and

graded.



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):

Discuss reponse papers aloud




79
                  Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Thursday – 1/8/04

Aim: Is Romeo and Juliet a realistic look at suicide? (Nelson, 477) continued…

Do Now:

―Disperse- v. to spread

Fare- v. to get along

Inexorable- adj. unstoppable
                                                                                             154


Lamentable- adj. Sad, sorrowful

Meager- adj. Starved‖

(Tragedy, 37)




Homework

Act V scene 3 lines 1-159



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

Act 5 scene 2

Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

Allow students to share some of their textual examples of real life suicide signs in Romeo

and Juliet (Nelson, 477). Have an in class discussion on whether or not Romeo and

Juliet’s situation is a realistic one (Nelson, 477).

Work Period (20 min):

Students may continue working on their essays. Students who finish early should go

ahead and begin reading the homework.



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):
                                                                                           155


80
                       Lesson Plan – 9th grade Balanced Lit. – Friday – 1/9/04

Aim: Should Romeo and Juliet have betrayed their families for love? Was their marriage

worth their early death?

Do Now: ―piteous- adj. Arousing pity, sad

Prefix- v. to arrange in advance

Rigor- n. strictness

Scourge- n. punishment

Unaccustomed- past part, strange‖

(Tragedy, 37)



Homework

Act V scene 3 lines 160-310



Development

Read Aloud (5-10 min):

The end of Act 5.

Mini Lesson (10-15 min):

Having a touchstone discussion

Discussion questions: why does Romeo and Juliet end in tragedy?
Why do their families learn their lesson after Romeo and Juliet die?
Who was to blame – Romeo and Juliet for breaking the rules, or the families for making
the rules?
Go back to the theme of family love – what is the final message about family love in the
play?
                                                                                            156




Work Period (20 min):

Write how the story could have turned out differently if one or both Romeo and Juliet had

not killed themselves. What else could have happened? Would they have run away

together? Would they ever come back to Verona?



Closing Meeting (up to 5 min):

Review key components of lesson




81



ÒName _________________________________ Room ________

Romeo and Juliet Test



MATCHING Match each character with the proper description.



_____1. Tybalt a. fights to preserve Capulet name



_____2. Mercutio b. banishes Romeo from Verona



_____3. Romeo c. carries messages between lovers
                                                                                                157


_____4. the nurse d. receives confessions of lovers



_____5. Paris e. apologizes to parents for disobedience



_____6. Juliet f. promises to erect a statue of Juliet



_____7. Friar John g. dies by Tybalt's sword



_____8. Friar Laurence h. fails to reach Romeo with message



_____9. Montague i. seeks parental consent to marry



_____10. Escalus j. dies from drinking poison



TRUE-FALSE Mark each statement either true or false.



_____ 11. The Montague's and Capulet's hatred is ended by Romeo and Juliet's deaths.



_____ 12. Romeo goes to the Capulet's party because he wants to see Juliet.



_____ 13. Juliet agrees with her mother and plans to marry Paris.



_____ 14. Romeo's desire to be with Juliet causes him to go to the Capulet's garden after the
party.
                                                                                                158




_____ 15. Friar Laurence agrees to marry Romeo & Juliet because he thinks the marriage will
bring peace.



_____ 16. In the second fight with Tybalt, Benvolio kills Tybalt while Romeo runs for safety.



_____ 17. When Juliet discovers that Romeo is dead, she kisses Romeo & dies from the poison
on his lips.




MULTIPLE CHOICE Choose the best answer.



18.) After stopping the fight, the Prince says that if a Capulet or a

Montague disturbs the peace again, the punishment will be

A.) death C.) imprisonment

B.) banishment D.) enslavement



19.) At the beginning of the play, Romeo is sad because

A.) his love is not returned by Juliet.

B.) he is upset about his family's feud with the Capulets

C.) Rosaileen does not love him.

D.) his friend Mercutio has to leave Verona.



20.) When Paris first asks Capulet for Juliet's hand in marriage,
                                                                      159



Capulet tells him that Juliet is

A.) too young for marriage.

B.) his only hope.

C.) to agree to marry him.

21.) During the Capulet feast, Tybalt becomes upset when he

A.) realizes that Romeo is at the party & Romeo is a Montague.

B.) learns of Paris' intention to marry Juliet.

C.) realizes that Capulet forgot to invite the Prince.



22.) If Romeo is serious about marrying Juliet, Juliet wants him to

A.) ask her father for permission to date her.

B.) send her a message about the time & place for the wedding.

C.) challenge Paris to a fight.



23.) Romeo tells Juliet's nurse that Juliet should

A.) meet him at Friar Laurence's cell in the afternoon.

B.) be patient because they have been rushing things.

C.) trust him to arrange a marrying time and place.

D.) pray for him because he has accepted a duel with Tybalt.



24.) Upon hearing the Prince's sentence Romeo is

A.) greatly relieved and anxious to meet with Juliet.

B.) surprised that he was not killed.
                                                                160



C.) grateful and vows his loyalty to the prince.

D.) upset since banishment/exile is the same as death to him.



25.) When Juliet discovers that Romeo is dead, she

A.) drinks the poison that remains in the bottle.

B.) leaves with Friar Laurence.

C.) stabs herself with Romeo's dagger..

D.) kisses Romeo and dies from the poison on his lips.Ó
                                                                                                  161




4.1 Assessment: Outline, Details, & Criteria

I have several methods of assessment I used in this curriculum. End of the unit assessment was

done by way of cumulative tests at the end of each book. These tests covered comprehension,

synthesis of major concepts, and essay writing. Other methods of assessment include quizzes

throughout the units to check for reading comprehension. In class assessment includes random

book checks and a general assessment of the participation level. The unit on The Odyssey also

includes a major essay. Informal assessments also include class discussions.




4.2 Statement of Relationship

In general, I tried to make sure there is a strong relationship between my objectives, my

performance criteria, and my goals. One of my main goals was reading comprehension. I found

the best way to test this was to do reading quizzes. Sometimes these were pop quizzes on the

spot if it seemed to me that the class had not done their reading. Other times these quizzes were

announced and the kids could prepare for the quizzes. I also recognize that some students may

have trouble understanding a text, even if they did do the reading. For this reason, part of my

assesment is on in class participation in discussions. This way I can gage the students’ reading in

a less formal fashion, by their participation in discussions.
                                                                                                162


       Another one of my goals was understanding the literary components of a story,

specifically a short story. In class I defined the key terms. I had students participate in

scaffodling exercises (specifically looking for theme), and then these terms were tested on during

the end of unit tests. I also frequently collect homework and grade their comprehension questions

or other germane assignments, which may provide a level assesment that is more relaxed than the

testing environment.

       Whenever there was a specific writing assignment to be done, that was also graded in the

same was I assessed it. When I asked for a three paragraph essay that uses examples to back up

each point, that was what I looked for during my grading. Overall, I feel there is a very natural

relationship between my objectives, performance criteria, and my assessment.



5.1 Analysis of Successes and Failures in Practice

       Considering my newness to the teaching profession, I was pleasantly surprised with the

number of successes I had this semester. The main one is that there was always a writing

intensive ―do now‖ for students to get started on when they entered the classroom. This time

served as an effective transition from the students’ gym class and the morning announcments

into the classroom.

       Another success was that most of the students did the work I asked of them. Along with

this, most were able to utilize the information in class in a demonstrable way. Occasionally in a

class discussion, for example, they would bring up the theme of a particular story and it pleased

me to see them incorporating some of this terminology into their own approaches to literature.

There were, however, some aspects of the curriculum that I was not as happy with.
                                                                                                   163


       In hindsight, I would have included more essay writing in the class. I think part of the

reason I shied away from this material was my own uncomfortableness with essay writing. I

haven’t fully been able to articulate my own essay writing process, and it shows in my reluctance

to teach essay writing in my class. I think the writing we did in class was the bare minimum and

ninth graders need to work very intensively on their writing skills. Along with this, I would have

liked to have seen more writing in general. In some ways I feel like I achieve the goal of having

them read challenging literature, but perhaps it came at the expense of a more in depth study of

writing. Overall, I would have liked to have had more balance between writing and reading in

my curriculum.




5.2 Analysis of Curriculum’s Relationship to NCTE Standards

       The curriculum certainly exposes students to a wide range of print texts (including

nonfiction done occasionally during the read aloud portion of class). Non print texts are also

included, such as movies, audio recordings, oral reading, etc. The literature read in class also

covered a wide range of time periods ranging from the modern day to the ancient Greeks.

Students were also taught a wide range of strategies for dissecting the salient features of

literature and they were encouraged to utilize these strategies in their writing and during

assessment. There was some level of adjusting their language to suit their audience (translating

Shakespeare for instance), but this was not emphasized as much as the other standards. Students

also used their newly acquired knowledge of litereary techniques in order to create their own

print texts (iambic pentameter poem/raps) and to discuss texts.
                                                                                                      164


        The research standard was another area perhaps not best served by this curriculum. This

shortcoming reflects my newness to the school and my reluctance to throw something new at the

kids (library field trip). I do however fell that the curriculum has met the standard regarding

diversity and exposing students to new cultures. The Puerto Rican history from El Bronx

Remembered was new information to most of my students. Likewise the read aloud on Orthodox

Jews. It may not have been a self contained unit, but their was certainly an effort made to expose

the students to other cultures. I also feel that the students participated in a variety of literary

communities and used their writing for their own purposes as well.




5.3 Analysis of Relationship of Teaching Philosophy to Curriculum

        There is a very strong correlation between my teaching philosophy and my curriculum. I

think my newness to the whole situation is a little bit evident in my approach to this curriculum.

As I have stated in earlier sections, I would have liked to include more essay writing (perhaps a

unit on this) in this curriculum. However, I was unsure how to go about it so I focused on my

strength, which I believe is teaching literature.

        My strong desire to improve student vocabulary is also evident in my curriculum. From

the daily do nows to the spelling and vocabulary test. I feel that vocabulary is the building blocks

to a quality education and I emphasized this at every oppurtunity. Another relationship between

the philsophy and the curriculum is my emphasis on comprehension and understanding of the

literature. I think this curriculum reflects my early belief that understanding the text is the first

step to being able to discuss or write intelligently about a particular work.
                                                                                                   165




5.4 Revised Teaching Philosophy

       After writing my curriculum, my teaching philosophy has changed in some significant

ways. For one, I really recognize the need for emphasizing good writing as much as the need for

emphasizing reading comprehension and vocabulary. I also think that I am more willing to try

new things.

       During my first couple of months I had several very, very bad classes. No doubt these

classes were partially my own doing, for not planning the best lesson or utilizing the best

classroom management. However, what happen to me as a new teacher, was I wanted to solve

the classroom management issue. I used almost exclusively vocabulary focused do nows to

achieve this end, but in hindsight I would mix it up a little bit more.

       Overall, I think my philosophy has just become more responsive to students actual need

as opposed to my preconcieved notion (reading comprehension and vocabulary are the most

important aspects of a ninth grade education). I am also a more confident teacher. I would be

more willing to do student centered activities (as opposed to lecturing) and risk the associated

classroom management problems.




5.5 Statement of Valued Practices

       Although it might be an unpopular viewpoint, my most valued practice is lecturing. It is

hard to succesfully pull off all the time, because of student behavior problems, but it is where I

am most comfotable and I believe most effective. I enjoy the stage like feeling of being in front
                                                                                                  166


of an audience. I had a good repoir with the class I taught during this curriculum and it was an

efficient way to deliver information to them.

       I have also discovered (by accident in the course of the semester) that I really love it

when students read aloud. Maybe it was just the particular character of this class, but they were

probably most engaged during a student run read aloud. Perhaps it was because they weren’t

doing their reading outside of the class, or because it was a break from the teacher centered

classroom. Whatever the case was, it is something I want to emphasize in future classes.

       I also kind of learned the hard way that I really value scaffolding. The first time I

attempted to do an essay with the class I very quickly ran down the components of the essay on

the board and then turned to them to produce the same essay. I think one person out of the whole

class actually gave me what I wanted. My newness to teaching is reflected in the way that I

sometimes assume my students are able to do much more than they are really ready for. The

second time we did an essay I used a worksheet which scaffolds each step of the writing. I also

have subsequently given examples of what I expect on the board for future projects. So although,

I might not have known it at first, scaffolding is something I have come to value.

       I also really appreciate students doing individual work. A particular favorite is directed

questions that go along with a reading. I guess comign into teaching I thought I was a big

proponent of students working in groups and the student centered classroom, but that has

changed. Maybe once my classroom management is a lot better I will encourage more

groupwork, but during this curriculum the class did a lot of individual work.
                                                                                         167




                                        Works Cited



Homer. The Odyssey of Homer. Adptd. Henry I. Christ. New Jersey: Globe Fearon,

       1992.

Kiely, Kathy. ―Who is Joe Lieberman?‖ USA today 8 August 2000. natl ed. n.pg.

Mohr, Nicholasa. El Bronx Remembered: A Novella and Other Stories. 2nd ed. Houston:

       Arte Publico Press, 1986.

Nelson, Nancy. ―Romeo and Juliet.‖ Rpt. In Bridging English. Joseph O. Milner and

       Lucy F. M. Milner. New Jersey: Pearson Education, 2003. 3rd ed. 477.

The Odyssey. Director Andrei Konchalovsky. Videocassette. Hallmark Home

       Entertainment, 1997. VHS. 165 min.

Petersohn, Cheryl A. ―Types of Love in Romeo and Juliet‖. Folger Library.

       http://www.folger.edu/education/lesson.cfm?lessonid=50. 1999.

Romeo and Juliet. Director Franco Zeffirelli. Videocassette. Paramount, 1968. VHS. 138

       min.

―Romeo and Juliet Test‖. Darwin School online.

       http://www.darwin.cps.k12.il.us/Romeo%20and%20Juliet%20Test.htm. N.p.:

       n.p., n.d.

Shakespeare, William. Romeo and Juliet. New York: Dell Publishing Co., 1965.

Skidmore, Joel. ―Gods.‖ Mythweb. 2003. http://www.mythweb.com/gods.html

"Teaching Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet 2.5" Folger Library.

       http://www.folger.edu/education/pdfs/ohshe.pdf. 2001.
                                                                                    168


Thomas, Lucy. ―This Story is Small Because I am Not Sure it is Good.‖ McSweeney’s

       July 1999: 65.

Wolff, Tobias. ―Say Yes‖. The Story and Its Writer. Ed. Ann Charters. Bedford/St.

       Martin’s: Boston, 1999. 1384-1388.
           169




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