RsrcGuide Advising by O0i1oX

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									                                   RESOURCE GUIDE
                                FOR EFFECTIVE ADVISING
                                    FOR STUDENTS
                             IN TEXAS TWO YEAR COLLEGES




This manual was funded through a grant from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board with funds provided by the Carl
                              D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education Act.




                                                                   1
                   The Purpose of This Manual
With the rapidly increasing workforce enrollment at community colleges, comes the
need for all advisors to have access to the available options unique to these technical
students. Workforce students differ from academic students in that their college classes
are designed for specific job-training skills enabling them to start a career within a year
or two. There are many specialized degree/certificate programs for these students with
which all advisors must be acquainted. Also, students may have already taken technical
courses in high school for college credit. Often community college catalogs do not
include sufficient facts to ensure successful learning and career preparation experiences
for these students. This manual fills that information void and streamlines the advisor’s
time needed to research the complex and essential data.

The purpose of this web-based Resource Guide is to provide a framework of information
and serve as a reference guide for career guidance and academic counseling programs.
It is designed to be a one-stop source to aid those who assist students in making
informed academic and workforce education decisions.

This manual includes general and statewide standard information essential to all
advising situations including both academic and workforce programs.

Each community college will add their own assessment tools and requirement criteria.
This manual enables each college to insert their specific information to customize the
handbook for their individual policies and requirements.

Recognizing that advising occurs in an ever-changing and challenging environment, the
manual is intended to be an evolving document that will function effectively only with
the insights and contributions of each student services team member. Advisors are
encouraged to offer ideas for improving the manual and to view it as a tool for sharing
important information and procedural updates.




                                                         2
                       How to Use This Manual

This information is generic providing each college the opportunity to
“personalize” the documents with their own definitive practices.

The manual’s composition follows the common sequence of an advisor
evaluating the student’s existing data, determining the appropriate college
admission requirements and culminating with a thorough overview of all degree
offerings available to the student. Other relevant topics such as Financial Aid as
well as many resource tools are included.

For most advisors, the individual college’s catalog is the most used reference.
This instrument is as a supplement that easily may be revised as warranted.

When advising a workforce student, the page, Helpful Questions for Student
Evaluation, lists the questions advisors may ask students and where the
answers can be found in the manual. The chart prompts the advisor to ask the
student specific questions as he/she explores and gathers all pertinent
information. This enables the advisor to provide the student with the most
accurate recommendations for the immediate and future academic path.
Adjacent to the questions is the corresponding page or section references
where the answer can be located in the manual.

Helpful Questions for Student Evaluation can be found in the Evaluating the
Education Path of Students section and as a link on the left.

Advisors have at their fingertips detailed information specific to workforce
students. The first section, Evaluating the Educational Path of Students,
covers all data common to most technical students entering community college.
This best helps the student as potentially qualifying technical courses and tests
previously taken may be identified. Career resources are provided for an
entering workforce student who may need guidance in making applicable job-
training course selections.

Likewise, the second section, Admission and Registration Processes, takes
the advisor through the admission and registration process for the student with
an easy step by step check list of the documents, test evaluation results and
procedures required to complete the student’s enrollment.

The following section, Academic Assessment and Course Placement
Programs, correlates with the previous section as it provides complete details
of placement requirements, state guidelines and developmental courses.



                                                   3
The bulk of the manual, Educational Programs and Curricula, helps the
advisor with all degree/certificate program offerings and their requirements.
Workforce degrees/certificates and programs are very specific in nature and
with the information in one place, the advisor spends less time searching for
details on every individual program.

Financial Aid is often an integral part of a student’s education. A section,
Financial Assistance, includes all such options for the advisor to cover with the
student.

The Appendix provides the advisor with an array of additional resources and
links helpful to the technical student.

The Glossary defines all terms used in the manual and common to workforce
advising.




                                                   4
             Steps on How to Compile Your Manual
              (A three-ring binder is recommended for easy updating)



1.    Click on Table of Contents on the left side of this page. Click
      Download and Print. This section lists all sections and headings in
      the document. Click Save and create a file folder for the manual
      document. (If you wish to update the TOC once you have inserted your college’s
      information, you will need to go to instructions below for downloading the entire
      document)

2.    Click on each section title link to the left. Example: Evaluating the
      Educational Path of Students. A page will open that gives a content
      summary. Click on the Download icon.

3.    Look for “Insert Your College Information” prompts on many of the
      pages throughout the manual. (Exception: Appendix and Glossary)

4.    Insert your college’s applicable information at these points in the
      document. (Examples of what information to include are throughout the manual)

5.    Click Save and save to the file folder you have created.

6.    Click Print for a hard copy of this customized manual section.

7.    Continue this process with each section title link (steps 2 – 6)

8.    Under Appendix is a list of Recommended Inserts for Your College
      to include in this manual. Those documents you wish to include from
      your college may be placed under a created General Information
      section.

9.    Click Save and save to your file folder.

10.   Click Print for a hard copy of this section.




                                                       5
                  Downloading Entire Document
     Another option is to download the entire manual document.


1.   Click on the Download icon below.

2.   Look for “Insert Your College Information” prompts on many of the
     pages. (Exception: Appendix and Glossary)

3.   Insert your college’s applicable information at these points in the
     document.(Examples of what information to include are throughout the manual)

4.   Click Save and create a file folder for the manual.

5.    Under Appendix is a list of Recommended Inserts for Your
     College to add. Those documents you wish to include from your
     college may be placed under a created General Information section.

6.   Click Save and save to file folder.

7.   Once the document is updated with all your college information go to
     the Table of Contents at the beginning of the document. Highlight
     the TOC and click F9. Click update entire table. This will update the
     page numbers.

8.   Click Save to save your revised manual.

9.   Click Print for a hard copy of your revised manual.




                                                  6
                        Updating Your Existing Manual
      As your college information is revised, this manual is easy to update
                                        accordingly.

1.       Open the manual file folder you have created.

2.       If you have saved the manual by sections, click on the section you
         wish to update.

3.       Highlight and delete the information you want to edit. Insert the
         current data.

4.       Click Save.

5.      Continue these steps (2 – 4) through each manual section/page that
        needs to be updated.
Your manual is now up-to-date.


If you have saved the entire manual document in a file folder:
1.        Open the document.


2.       Highlight and delete the information you want to edit. Insert the
         current data.

3.       Highlight Table of Contents and click F9. Click update page
         numbers only.

4.       Click Save.


Your manual is now up-to-date.




                                                  7
                            Table of Contents

The Purpose of This Manual                                                       2
Table of Contents                                                                8
Evaluating the Educational Path of Students                                     11
 Overview                                                                       11
 Identifying Workforce/Technical Students                                       12
 Helpful Questions for Student Evaluation                                       13
 Career Counseling for Workforce/Technical Students                             14
 Screening High School Transcripts for College Credit Courses                   15
 Overview                                                                       15
 College Board Advanced Placement Program                                       16
 Dual Credit by Concurrent College Enrollment                                   17
 The Advanced Technical Credit Program (ATC)                                    18
 Local Articulation Options                                                     20
 Other Methods for High School Students to Earn College Credit                  21
 Credit by Examination or for Experience                                        21
 Other Methods to Earn College Credit                                           22
 Credit For Military Experience                                                 22
 CATEMA – (Career and Technology Education Management Application) System       23
Admission and Registration Processes                                            24
 Overview                                                                       24
 Technical/Workforce Education Student Registration                             25
 Continuing Education - Workforce Student Registration                          27
 First –Time Entering Freshman Registration                                     28
 Returning Student Registration                                                 29
 Transfer Student Registration                                                  30
 Dual – Credit /Concurrent Credit Student Registration                          31
 Early Admissions Program                                                       31
 International Student Registration                                             33
 English as a Second Language Student Registration                              34
 Continuing Education – Non-Credit Student Registration                         36
 Distance Learning Student Registration                                         38
Academic Assessment and Course Placement Programs                               39
 Overview                                                                       39
 Texas Success Initiative (TSI)                                                 40
 Developmental Education Courses                                                45
 English as a Second Language Placement Courses                                 46
 The Texas Common Course Numbering System (TCCNS)-Course Transfer Eligibility   47
 Academic Fresh Start                                                           49




                                                     8
Educational Programs and Curricula                          50
 Overview                                                   50
Workforce/Technical Education                               51
 Overview                                                   51
 Graduate Guarantee for Workforce Students                  52
 Course Rubric and Number                                   53
 Types of Program Awards                                    54
 Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS)                  55
 Overview                                                   55
 Associate of Applied Arts Degree (AAA)                     59
 Overview                                                   59
 Credit Certificate Programs-Workforce/Technical            62
 Overview                                                   62
 Level One Certificate                                      63
 Level Two Certificate                                      64
 Enhanced Skills Certificate                                65
 Advanced Technical Certificate                             66
 Career Clusters                                            67
 Overview                                                   67
 Allied Health Cluster Programs                             70
 Institutional Awards                                       71
 Overview                                                   71
 Marketable Skills Achievement Awards (MSA)                 72
 Overview                                                   72
 Apprenticeship                                             73
 Overview                                                   73
 Workforce Students Transfer Agreements with Universities   74
 Continuing Education Credits                               76
 Overview                                                   76
Academic Degrees                                            77
 Overview                                                   77
 Associate of Arts Degree (AA)                              78
 Associate of Science Degree (AS)                           81
 Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT)                        83
Financial Assistance                                        86
 Overview                                                   86
 Federal Student Aid Summary Chart                          88
 Important Terminology for Financial Applications           89
 Veterans’ Information                                      91




                                                     9
Appendix                                                                        93
 Recommended Inserts for Your College                                           94
 College Guide for Advanced Technical Credit Program                            95
 Workforce Investment Act (WIA)                                                114
 National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) Statement of Core Values of
 Academic Advising                                                             115
 Students Right to Privacy Act                                                 117
 Workforce Education Resources                                                 118
 Helpful Links                                                                 120
 Virtual College of Texas (VCT)                                                123
Glossary                                                                       125




                                                  10
Evaluating the Educational Path of Students
Overview
With the limitless educational opportunities for students now, the advisor’s knowledge
of these options must expand in order to assist their students in reaching their goals.
Community colleges no longer are primarily for the academic student seeking course
hours for transfer to a university. The workforce initiative to train individuals for
workplace skills is an ever-increasing alternative that requires a broad approach to
advising a student.

Often incoming students are unaware of the existing programs that may optimally suit
their individual needs. When the advisor has a full cache of knowledge regarding the
array of educational paths, the student and the community are best served.

This approach to advising also falls in line with the vision of “The Closing the Gaps”
strategy initiated by The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board:

CLOSING THE GAPS VISION FOR TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION
Every Texan educated to the level necessary to achieve his or
her dreams; no one is left behind, and each can pursue higher
education; colleges and universities focus on the recruitment
and success of students while defining their own paths to
excellence; education is of high quality throughout; and all
levels of education, the business community, and the public
are constant partners in recruiting and preparing students and
faculty who will meet the state’s workforce and research needs.

Advisors will need to acquaint themselves with the many innovative programs in
today’s visionary approach to education, such as The Virtual College and the Advanced
Technical Credit Program, among many, to ensure the student can reach his/her full
educational potential.

It is recommended that advisors begin the screening process asking the student a few
open-ended questions to determine if the student is seeking academic classes with the
intent to earn an AS or AA degree and/or course credit for transferring to a four-year
university or is a workforce/technical student candidate seeking an AAS/AAA degree
or certificate.




                                                      11
Identifying Workforce/Technical Students
Though many high school students are becoming more informed about the
opportunities of workforce degrees and certificates, the community college advisor
cannot assume that the student is fully aware of these options.

The student’s answers to a few screening questions from the advisor can be strong
indicators as to how to direct the student in his/her course and career selection.

The following page lists questions that will aid the advisor in determining the student’s
goals.

The student’s answers to these questions will indicate if he/she is a workforce student.
Once a student is identified as a workforce student, community colleges have different
advising protocol they follow. Some colleges have advisors that are versed in assisting
both academic and workforce students. Others will refer the student to a workforce
advisor. In some cases, the student is referred to the faculty member in their area of
interest.

Insert here your college’s advising path for workforce
students
It is imperative that the initial advisor insures that the student is successfully directed to
the proper personnel. This can be accomplished by assisting the student in making an
appointment, emailing, or making a phone call to make the staff member aware of the
student’s need for advising.

Students and communities are best served when advisors input the technical/workforce
code on the student’s record so that their educational path/skills training can be tracked
appropriately.




                                                          12
              Helpful Questions for Student Evaluation                                                    See sections:
        Do you have a high school transcript?                               Screening High School Transcripts for College Credit Courses
                                                                             Dual Credit by Concurrent College Enrollment
                                                                             The Advanced Technical Credit Program (ATC)
                                                                             Local Articulation Options
       Have you taken any college-level courses or advanced placement       Screening High School Transcripts for College Credit Courses
    exams?                                                                   College Board Advanced Placement Program
                                                                             Dual Credit by Concurrent College Enrollment
                                                                             The Advanced Technical Credit Program
                                                                             Local Articulation Options
                                                                             Credit by Examination or for Experience
                                                                             CATEMA
       Have you taken the THEA or alternative assessment tests?             Texas Success Initiative
    SAT/ACT?                                                                 Developmental Education Courses
                                                                             English as a Second Language Developmental Courses
        How long do you want to be in college?                              Career Counseling for Workforce/Technical Students
                                                                             Workforce/Technical Education
                                                                             Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS)
                                                                             Associate of Applied Arts Degree
                                                                             Credit Certificate Programs
                                                                             Academic Degrees
                                                                             Associate of Arts Degree (AA)
                                                                             Associate of Science Degree (AS)
                                                                             Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT)
                                                                             Continuing Education Credits
        Are you planning to transfer to a university?                       The Texas Common Course Numbering System(TCCNS)
                                                                             Workforce Students Transfer Agreements with Universities
                                                                             Academic Degrees
                                                                             Associate of Arts Degree
                                                                             Associate of Science Degree
                                                                             Associate of Arts in Teaching Degree
        Do you know what university you want to attend?                     The Texas Common Course Numbering System (TCCNS)
                                                                             Workforce Students Transfer Agreements with Universities
        Do you have a petition for articulated credit?                      The Advanced Technical Credit Program
                                                                             Local Articulation Options
                                                                             College Guide for Advanced Technical Credit Program
                                                                             CATEMA
         Are you familiar with the difference between an associate and an   Academic Degrees
    associate of applied science degree?                                     Work Force/Technical Education
                                                                             Associate of Applied Science Degree
                                                                             Associate of Applied Arts Degree
                                                                             Credit Certificate Programs
        Do you want to earn a certificate for specific skills training?     Credit Certificate Program, Level 1 Certificate, Level 2 Certificate,
                                                                             Enhanced Skills Certificate, Advanced Technical Certificate,
                                                                             Institutional Awards, Marketable Skills Achievement Awards,
                                                                             Continuing Education Credits
        How soon do you want to enter the workforce?                        Workforce/Technical Education
                                                                             Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS)
                                                                             Associate of Applied Arts Degree (AAA)
                                                                             Credit Certificate Programs
        What type of job do you want?                                       Career Counseling for Workforce/Technical Students
                                                                             Associate of Applied Science Degree
                                                                             Associate of Applied Arts Degree
                                                                             Credit Certificate Programs
        What job skills do you have or want to learn?                       Career Counseling for Workforce/Technical Students
                                                                             Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS)
                                                                             Associate of Applied Arts Degree (AAA)
                                                                             Credit Certificate Programs

         Are you familiar with how Career Counseling services and           Career Counseling for Workforce/Technical Students
    testing can assist you in choosing a major or making a job choice?
         Do you have any military experience?                               Credit for Military Experience
         Have you previously earned any technical certificates? (i.e.       Associate of Applied Sciences Degree
    EMT, DMA)                                                                Allied Health
         Do you need information on how to apply for financial aid,         Financial Assistance, Veteran’s Aid, Scholarships
    veteran’s aid or scholarships?




                                                                                     13
    Career Counseling for Workforce/Technical Students

    Career Counseling has become an eminent tool for matching students’ interests and
    aptitudes to the career path for which they are best suited. While career counseling
    benefits any community college student, workforce students especially profit from such
    evaluation. The technical student begins his job skills training while taking college
    courses that will equip him/her to enter the workforce in that specialty in two years or
    less. The need for them to make a career decision is a priority and career counseling can
    validate or encourage a student to revise his/her goals.

    The first line of defense for students identifying their best educational route or job
    choice is career counseling. Many are accessible on-line free to the student; however,
    often these outcomes are best evaluated with a career counselor analyzing the results
    with the student.

    Career counseling may be effective for those students who need direction in what they
    want to do, have unrealistic job expectations, are taking random courses and/or are not
    succeeding in their classes. Career counselors also can assist students who have earned
    a workforce certificate and want direction in how to advance their training or build on
    that knowledge for another level of skills.

    Students need to know that career services generally include:
                  Personality and interests assessments to identify options that may “fit”
    you well
                  Counselors trained to discuss options after program completion
                  Resume writing and interviewing skills assistance for job placement
    preparation
                  Assistance in searching for jobs
                  Job fairs
                  Job postings
                  Interfacing with local businesses


    Following are a few of the on-line assessment inventories. Some are personality based
    while others offer a more comprehensive survey of all career assessment tools. Most
    colleges have their own on-line evaluation web sites.

    Insert your college’s career assessment tools and services (i.e.
    Sigi Plus, Bridges, Discover)

    The Occupational Skill Computer Assisted Researcher: www.ioscar.org/tx/oscar.asp

    Career Link: www.mpc.edu/cl/climain


                                                            14
Screening High School Transcripts for College Credit
Courses
Overview
Many incoming community college students have taken college credit courses while still
in high school. It is vital for advisors to review each high school transcript for such
cases so that students do not duplicate a course for which they already have earned
credit.

Four ways to earn college credit while in high school include:
The Advanced Technical Program (ATC)
Local articulation agreements
Dual credit courses
College Board Advanced Placement (AP) courses and exams

Each method has its own code indicated on the course description that identifies which
option applies. These courses may apply toward academic or technical
degrees/certificates at Texas colleges and universities.

Some of these options permit the student to earn college credit immediately while others
allow the student to earn banked credit (credit in escrow) or to test-out of a college level
course.

Advisors must familiarize themselves with these programs and their corresponding
codes to give their students the best recommendations for their college career paths.

Students may have also earned credit by examination (CLEP exams) or credit for
experience. That information is found on separate documents from the high school
transcript.




                                                         15
        College Board Advanced Placement Program

The College Board Advanced Placement Program (AP) is a nationally recognized
program for introducing students to college-level work while they are still in high
school. Students who enroll in higher-level academic courses identified for Advanced
Placement may have received college credit based on high school course grades and/or
for performance on national AP examinations.

Insert your college policy regarding award of AP credit or AP
advanced placement exams

Types of courses involved       Academic. Selected form over 30 state-approved AP
                                courses.

High School transcript          Look for “P” on transcript.
(AAR) course code

Tuition and fees                Although colleges may charge a fee to transcript credit,
                                no college tuition is required. There is a fee to take the
                                AP exam.

Benefits to students            Students who qualified receive college credit for
                                general academic core requirements for two-and four-
                                year college degrees.

Advanced Placement exams are offered at area high schools. For specific information on
high schools offering this exam, call (888) 225-5427 or (609) 771-7300, or send an
email to apexams@info.collegeboard.org. For more information go to
www.collegeboard.org/html/communications000.html

College Level Examination Program (CLEP), www.collegeboard.org/clep for more
information.

International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma exams. International Baccalaureate exams are
given at specific high schools. For more information on IB Diplomas go to
www.ibo.org.




                                                      16
        Dual Credit by Concurrent College Enrollment
Dual Credit by concurrent college enrollment is a process through which students gain
early admission to a college or university and enroll in academic and/or technical
courses for college credit before they graduate from high school (concurrent
enrollment).

 Students receive high school credit on successful completion of these courses (dual
credit).

Tuition for the college course is paid either by the student or by the student’s school, or
may be waived by a participating two-or four-year college.




Insert your college policy regarding dual credit enrollment


        Type of courses                    Academic or technical.
        involved
        High school                        Look for “D”next to course code on
        transcript (AAR)                   transcript.
        course code
        Terms for award                    High school as well as college credit, is
        of college credit                  transcripted immediately upon successful
                                           completion of the course.
        Tuition and fees                   Student pays all applicable college tuition and
                                           fees. The student’s school may pay tuition or
                                           colleges may waive tuition.

        Benefits to                        Students who qualified receive immediate
        students                           credit for general academic core requirements
                                           and/or technical requirements for two-or four-
                                           year college degrees.




                                                         17
       The Advanced Technical Credit Program (ATC)

The Advanced Technical Credit Program (Statewide Articulation) is an advanced
placement program initiated in the 1999-2000 school year to provide a method for high
school students who continue technical programs of study in college to received credit
for knowledge and skills without duplication of coursework.

Students successfully demonstrating college-level competence in content-enhanced high
school courses are eligibly to receive banked (in escrow) credit for courses that are part
of an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree or certificate plan offered by public
two-year colleges.

Some universities may also honor these courses, particularly those that offer BAAS,
BAT, BSIS, or similar baccalaureate degrees.




    Insert your college policies and course crosswalk for The
                   Advanced Technical Credit Program



Types of courses                          Primarily career and technology, selected
involved                                  from over 100 state-approved courses.

 High School                              Look for “A” next to course code on
 transcript (AAR)                         transcript.
 course code
 High School course                       Course abbreviation ends in –TP.
 numbers and                              For example: BCIS 1 –TP.
 abbreviations
 Tuition and fees                         Although colleges may charge a fee to
                                          transcript credit, there is no college tuition
                                          fee required.
 Benefits to students                     Students who qualified receive credit for
                                          technical course requirements for a AAS
                                          degree or one-year certificate.



For more detailed information see the section “College Guide for Advanced Technical
Credit Program” in this manual.


                                                        18
                         Petition for Award of Advanced Technical Credit
Students: Complete and submit this form with an official high school transcript to a participating public
two-year college in Texas within 15 months of graduation.

Student Name ____________________________________________________


Address ____________________________________________________________________


City _________________________                    State _____________            Zip Code _______________


Phone ______ - ______ - ________


Email_________________                            Social Security Number _______ - _____ - ________


High School/District ___________________________________________________________


                                                            Graduation Plan       HS Tech Prep
Date of Graduation _____________________                     Regular  Recommended  Distinguished


Student Signature ________________________________________                              Date ______________

Record of HS ATC-Articulated Courses. This section to be completed by the college.

Course Name and                  Grade Taken       Course         College Course Equivalent      Date Transcripted
Abbreviation                    9, 10, 11 or 12    Grade             WECM  ACGM




Declared College Major __________________________________________________________

Date of college enrollment ________________  Date is within 15 months of HS graduation
Optional - Student has completed sic (6) additional non-developmental college hours in any area. (Indicate if
satisfied by Advanced Placement or CLEP examination scores, dual credit or after graduation.)
Advanced Placement or CLEP                              College Courses (dual credit or after graduation)
_______________________          ____________               _______________________           ____________
Course                           Grade
                                                            Course                    Grade
_______________________          ____________               _______________________ ____________
Course                           Grade                      Course                    Grade
Signature of college official                               Title                  Date




                                                             19
                       Local Articulation Options

Local articulation options provide high school students opportunities for award of
articulated college credit for high school or college courses not covered by the Advanced
Technical Credit Program (Statewide Articulation) and a method to articulate courses
and programs with colleges not participating in the ATC Program.

Conditions for award of credit for courses that are part of an Associate of Applied
Science (AAS) degree plan are described in locally developed articulation agreements.

 Some universities also may honor these courses.

    Insert your college policies and course crosswalk for Local
                              Articulation Options


How participation works           Schools elect to enter into articulation agreements for
                                  specific courses or programs with two-year colleges.
Types of courses involved         Primarily career technology, some academic.

High School transcript (AAR)      Look for “A” and identification of the college courses and
course code                       the participating college and course articulations in the
                                  local use area on the reverse side of the transcript (AAR).
Terms for award of college        Conditions outlined in the local articulation agreement.
credit
Tuition and fees                  Although colleges may charge a fee to transcript credit, there
                                  is no college tuition fees required.

Benefits to students              High school students who qualify receive credit for technical
                                  course requirements for a two-year associate of applied
                                  science (AAS) degree or one-year certificate.




                                                      20
Other Methods for High School Students to Earn
College Credit

            Credit by Examination or for Experience

Credit by examination or for experience offers students an opportunity to demonstrate
college-level knowledge and earn college credit or advanced placement by exam, or by
petitioning a college or university for credit after documentation of appropriate
experience.

 Students demonstrate knowledge by taking College Board CLEP exams (academic
courses) or college or university departmental exams (academic and technical courses).




     Insert your college score requirements for CLEP exams,
           departmental exams and credit for experience
Type of courses        Over 30 CLEP (academic only) exams are available. Many departmental
involved               opportunities to demonstrate proficiency in academic and technical
                       subjects exist.

Terms for award of     Each college sets their policy for award of credit or advanced placement
college credit         for CLEP exams and policies for departmental award of credit-by-
                       examination and/or for experience.

Tuition and fees       There are fees for CLEP exams. Colleges may charge a fee to transcript
                       credit.

Benefits to students   No specific courses need to be taken and there is no specific time line for
                       examinations.




                                                       21
Other Methods to Earn College Credit


                      Credit For Military Experience
Students with military service may receive college course credit for their experience.
To claim their credits, they must request a transcript from the branch of the service for
which they served.

The official transcript is sent to the college at no charge.

           Army                  The Army uses the AARTS system, which automatically
                                 captures academic credits from military training, and
                                 standardized tests. The AARTS system is available to enlisted
                                 soldiers only.
                                 Army Officers must use the form DD 295 (Application for
                                 Evaluation of Learning) to report their military training and
                                 experience.

     Navy and Marines            SMART system. This system automatically captures your
                                 training, experience and standardized test scores.
         Air Force               The Community College of the Air Force (CCAF) automatically
                                 captures your training, experience and standardized test scores.
        Coast Guard              The Coast Guard Institute (CGI) requires each service member
                                 to submit documentation of all training (except correspondence
                                 course records), along with an enrollment form, to receive a
                                 transcript.

          Veterans               Under most circumstances, veterans are eligible to use their
                                 former service branches transcript program.




      www.militaryguides.acenet.edu




                                                         22
CATEMA – (Career and Technology Education
Management Application) System (if applicable)

The CATEMA system is a web based tool designed to standardize reporting methods for
Tech Prep and other advanced educational courses. Many community colleges use the
CATEMA system to identify workforce students who are eligible for articulated credit.
An advisor’s account on the system allows them to verify a student’s recommendation for
advanced credit. They may view a student’s complete course history and whether or not
advanced credit was awarded.
www.catema.net

Insert your college’s CATEMA system here




                                                     23
        Admission and Registration Processes
Overview
This section includes admissions and registration requirements and procedures for
different categories of students enrolling in college.

 Learning Options       The admission requirements and process will vary according to the
                        learning option that best meets the needs of the student. The advisor
                        should assist the student in evaluating his/her needs and selecting the
                        type, or in some cases, combination of types of learning that are ideal for
                        the student. For purposes of admission, the individual will be admitted
                        as either a credit or continuing education student.
 Course Load            Overloading work and school commitments are the #1-reason students
 Guidelines             fail, have to drop, or end up on probation or suspension. Students should
                        consider this as they determine how many classes to take each semester.
                        Students should plan time for each hour they will spend in class plus an
                        additional two hours of study time per credit hour taken. Advisors
                        should use the information in the following table as a guide when
                        advising students in this area.


                         Work                                       School
                        40 hours                                 6 credit hours
                        30 hours                                 9 credit hours
                        20 hours                                12 credit hours
                     10 hours or less                          14-15 credit hours



  Registration          Most colleges now have several ways that a student can register for
  options               classes.
                        Students have the option of registering in person, on the internet, through
                        the mail or faxing required information to the college.




                                                      24
      Technical/Workforce Education Student Registration
      Technical Students whose goal is to gain job training skills equipping them to
      immediately enter the workforce rather than transferring to a university will be seeking
      certificate programs, AAS or AAA degree plans.

       Students will fill out an admission application and provide assessment scores for
      placement purposes. The student must also meet TSI requirements by taking the THEA
      test, by taking an approved alternative test, or submitting documentation to show an
      exemption or waiver.

       Students seeking a Level One Certificate do not need to meet the TSI requirements as
      long as they take no more than 6 SCH outside the curriculum for the certificate program.

       Many specific workforce programs have their own registration periods throughout the
      year and their own academic performance requirements of which the student needs to be
      informed.

              Documentation Required
High School Graduate                High school transcript
                                    Test scores to satisfy reading, writing and math TSI requirements
                                    (SAT/ACT) or
                                    THEA,Compass, Accuplacer, Asset or state approved assessment test
                                    results (unless seeking Level One Certificate)
                                    Admissions form
                                    Official GED score report

College or University Transfer                 Official transcripts from all colleges or universities
                                               attended
                                               Official THEA or alternative test scores or official
                                               exemption documentation (unless seeking Level One
                                               Certificate)
        Admissions form




                                                                                       Continued on next page



                                                             25
Technical/Workforce Education Student Registration,
continued
The following steps are general recommendations to follow for registration.

 Insert your college’s procedures and policies here



              Step                                           Action
               1         Direct student to complete admissions application if it has not been done
                         prior.
               2         Determine if student has assessment scores on file.
               3         Determine if any developmental courses are required.
               4         Determine if pre- requisites have been met for courses the student wants
                         to take.
               5         Recommend Career Counseling.
               6         Assess needs of student (full-time, part time, night classes, degree goals,
                         special interests).
               7         Discuss degree plan, degree or certificate requirements.
               8         Determine what courses are needed to meet core curriculum or degree
                         requirements if applicable.
               9         Check Common Course Numbering System for Course transfer
                         eligibility if applicable/provide transfer guide.
               10        Determine student’s in-district or out-of-district status.
               11        Advice and register student.
               12        Student pays tuition and fees.




                                                     26
Continuing Education - Workforce Student Registration

Workforce Continuing Education classes prepare individuals for jobs as well as improve
current job skills without requiring enrollment in college credit courses. Certificates are
awarded for workforce development programs and courses, some of which lead to
industry skills certification. Students earn Continuing Education Units (CEUs) for each
workforce development course completed.

The CEU is an internationally recognized credit unit for successful completion of
learning outcomes in a Continuing Education course/program. The International
Association maintains standards for Continuing Education and Training (IACET).

Students completing courses for CEUs have a permanent transcript available on request.
One CEU is defined as “ten (10) contact hours of participation in an organized
Continuing Education experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction, and
qualified instruction.”

All workforce development courses meet criteria established by the Texas Higher
Education Coordinating Board, IACET, and the Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools.

Some Continuing Education (CE) classes are linked to their corresponding semester
credit hours SCH courses. Both SCH students and CE students are enrolled in the same
section using the same textbooks and classroom materials. If students wish to receive
credit, they must enroll through the credit registration process rather that through the
Continuing Education process. Continuing Education students who register for linked
courses must meet the same requirements and prerequisites as credit students.

Some workforce CE courses qualify for Financial Aid.

       Insert your college’s procedures here

          Step                                         Action
           1              Direct student to complete registration form if it has not been
                          done prior.
           2              Determine if student meets qualifications for the particular
                          course/courses he wants to take.
           3              Assess needs of student (career goals, linked course options).
           4              Recommend Career Counseling.
           5              Verify if CE course is qualified for financial aid.
           6              Advise and register student.
           7              Student to pay class fee.



                                                        27
First –Time Entering Freshman Registration
A first time entering freshman seeking credit admission completes an admission
application and provides assessment scores for placement purposes.

The student must also meet TSI requirements by taking the THEA test, by taking an
approved alternative test, or by submitting documentation to show an exemption or
waiver.
                                                    Documentation Required
                   High School Graduate        High school transcript
                                               Test scores to satisfy reading writing
                                            and math TSI requirements (SAT/ACT)
                                            or
                                               THEA,Compass, Accuplacer, Asset
                                            or state approved assessment test results
                   GED                         Admissions form
                                                Official GED score report
The following steps are general recommendations to follow for registration.
                Insert your college’s procedures here
                    Step                                 Action
                     1       Direct student to complete admissions application if it
                             has not been done prior.
                      2      Determine TSI requirement status. Verify if the student
                             meets the requirements with SAT/ACT scores or THEA
                             test results or if he qualifies for TSI exemptions or
                             waivers.
                              THEA scores can be assessed at
                             www.nessds.nesinc.com with the student’s permission.
                      3      If the student is not exempt from TSI and has not
                             completed an assessment test or if the student is exempt
                             from TSI but still needs an assessment for placement
                             purposes, provide testing information and sign them up
                             for an assessment test.
                      4      If the student’s THEA test scores do not meet your
                             college’s passing requirements, determine the
                             developmental class level appropriate for the student.
                      5      Apply for Academic Fresh Start if needed.
                      6      Apply for Financial Aid if needed.
                      7      Assess needs of student (full-time, part time, night
                             classes, degree goals, special interests).
                      8      If student’s goals are to transfer to four year university,
                             check Texas Common Course Numbering System for
                             course transfer eligibility/provide transfer guide.
                      9      Determine student’s in-district or out-of-district status.

                                                 28
                     10      Advise and register the student for classes.
                     11      Student pays tuition and fees.


Returning Student Registration
Returning students who have not attended the college for a semester must
complete a new application.

 The returning student cannot register for classes if he/she has any holds on his/her
account. THEA assessment test scores must be on file.

The following steps are general recommendations to follow for registration.


                    Insert your college’s procedures here

   Step                                       Action
    1          Determine if student has assessment scores/transcripts on file.
    2          Determine if the student has any holds, if so; direct the student
               to the business office to clear his account.
     3         Determine if any developmental courses are still required.
     4         Determine if pre- requisites have been met for courses the
               student wants to take.
     5         Assess needs of student (full-time, part time, night classes,
               degree goals, special interests).
     6         Discuss degree plan or degree requirements if applicable.
     7         Determine what courses are needed to meet core curriculum or
               degree requirements.
     8         Check Common Course Numbering System for Course transfer
               eligibility if applicable/provide transfer guide.
     9         Determine student’s in-district or out-of-district status.
    10         Advice and register student.
    11         Apply for Financial Aid if needed.
    12         Student pays tuition and fees.




                                                 29
Transfer Student Registration
Students transferring from an accredited college or who are concurrently enrolled in an
accredited college must supply official transcripts from each college they have attended.

Student must provide THEA assessment test results or documentation of an exception or
waiver or documentation of earning a grade of C or better in one of the courses from an
accredited institution that satisfy TSI requirements.

                                                    Documentation Required
        College or University Transfer     Official transcripts from all colleges or universities
                                           attended
                                           Official THEA or alternative test scores or official
                                           exemption documentation
                                           Admissions form

      The following steps are general recommendations to follow for registration.
                          Insert your college’s procedures here

              Step                                        Action
               1          Direct student to complete admissions application if it has not been
                          done prior.
               2          Determine if student has assessment scores/transcripts on file.
               3          Determine if any developmental courses are still required.
               4          Determine if pre- requisites have been met for courses the student
                          wants to take.
               5          Assess needs of student (full-time, part time, night classes, degree
                          goals, special interests).
               6          Discuss degree plan or degree requirements if applicable.
               7          Determine what courses are needed to meet core curriculum or
                          degree requirements if applicable.
               8          Check Common Course Numbering System for Course transfer
                          eligibility if applicable/provide transfer guide.
                9         Determine student’s in-district or out-of-district status.
               10         Advice and register student.
               11         Apply for Financial Aid if needed.
               12         Student pays tuition and fees.




                                                      30
Dual – Credit /Concurrent Credit Student Registration
Early Admissions Program
The dual-credit program is designed for junior and senior high school students
who qualify to earn high school and college credit simultaneously.

 The THECB defines dual credit as college courses that also count toward high
school requirements. These courses may be taken at the high school or at a
college. The THECB defines concurrent credit as concurrent courses that are
college courses taken by a high school student not associated with the high
school or the high school curriculum. These courses earn college credit as well.

Students who want to take dual credit courses must meet TSI requirements with a
THEA assessment test or SAT/ACT/TAKS qualifying scores. They may take
college-level courses related to the area or areas of the test they pass.

The matrix for exemptions and waivers from TSI Testing Requirements based on
other test scores can be found at this site:
www.thecb.state.tx.us/reports/PDF/0904.PDF.
(Source: The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board)


       Documentation Required
       Dual-Credit/          Official THEA or alternative test scores or
       Concurrent Credit   SAT/ACT/TAKS qualifying scores
       Students              Proof of high school enrollment
                             Parent/guardian or high school written approval
                             Admissions form




                                                             Continued on next page




                                               31
Dual – Credit /Concurrent Credit Student
Registration
Early Admissions Program, continued



The following steps are general recommendations to follow for registration.
Insert your college’s individual registration steps and
policies regarding dual-credit students such as course load
limit, home schooled students etc.

  Step                                   Action
   1     Direct student to complete admissions application if it has not been
         done prior.
   2     Determine if student has assessment scores on file.
   3     Determine if any developmental courses are required.
   4     Determine if pre- requisites have been met for courses the student
         wants to take.
   5     Assess needs of student (full-time, part time, night classes, degree
         goals, special interests).
   6     Discuss degree plan or degree requirements if applicable.
   7     Determine what courses are needed to meet core curriculum or
         degree requirements if applicable.
   8     Check Common Course Numbering System for Course transfer
         eligibility if applicable/provide transfer guide.
    9    Determine student’s in-district or out-of-district status.
   10    Advice and register student.
   11    Student pays tuition and fees.




                                              32
International Student Registration
The Immigration and Nationality Act provides two nonimmigrant visa categories
for persons wishing to study in the United States. The "F" visa is reserved for
nonimmigrants wishing to pursue full time academic studies and/or language
training programs, and the "M" visa is reserved for nonimmigrants wishing to
pursue nonacademic or workforce studies.

                                      Documents required to obtain I-20 form
     International Student       Complete application for admissions form
                                 Notarized letter indicating evidence of sufficient
                              financial support for the academic year
                                 Most recent academic transcript

If all requirements are met then the student will receive an I-20 form to take to a
United States embassy or consulate in order to request a student visa (F-1).

Most colleges require students to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language
(TOEFL) and earn a minimum standard score.


                                      Documents required for Registration
     International Student       Official transcripts evaluated by an approved
                              service
                                 TOEFL scores, if applicable, to demonstrate
                              English proficiency
                                 Copies of all documentation (I-20, I-94)
                              supporting legal authorization to enroll in college
                                 Affidavit of financial support, if applicable or
                              sponsorship



Insert your college’s International Students requirements for
registration and admission




                                                 33
English as a Second Language Student
Registration
Community colleges offer a variety of classes and programs for non-native
English speaking students. The advisor’s first task is to access the level of
fluency and the student’s goals to make the proper course recommendations.

Non-English speaking students must take the ESL Compass Test first to evaluate
their competency in Listening/Speaking, Grammar/Writing and
Reading/Vocabulary. The results of this assessment determine the need for
placement classes or other options.

English as a Second Language (ESL) Students and English for Speakers of Other
Languages (ESOL) Students must meet the TSI requirements as well. (Exception:
Level 1 Certificate candidates). ESL classes are also offered as Continuing
Education Courses that do not require TSI requirements to be met.

Most colleges offer alternatives for students whose language skills fall below the
minimum scores for course level placement. There are Adult Education
Programs, learning communities and more.
Insert your college’s programs here

                      Documentation Required
English as a Second      High school transcript or
Language Students        Official GED score report
                         ESL Compass Test Score
                         Test scores to satisfy reading writing and math
                       TSI requirements (SAT/ACT) or
                       THEA,Compass, Accuplacer, Asset or state
                       approved assessment test results
                         Any official transcripts from other colleges
                          Admissions form




                                                                          Continued on next page


                                                34
English as a Second Language, continued

The following steps are general recommendations to follow for registration.
Insert your college’s procedures

       Step                                   Action
        1     Evaluate Compass ESL scores or direct student to take test before
              further advising.
        2     Determine if any ESL placement courses are required.
        3     Recommend alternative programs if skills fall below ESL
              placement courses minimum scores.
        4     Assess THEA/Compass scores or direct student to take the test.
        5     Determine if any developmental courses are required.
        6     Assess needs and goals of student to determine options of
              academic courses or continuing education classes.
        7     Direct student to complete admissions application if it has not been
              done prior.
        8     Determine if pre- requisites have been met for courses the student
              wants to take.
         9    Discuss degree plan or degree requirements if applicable.
        10    Determine what courses are needed to meet core curriculum or
              degree requirements if applicable.
        11    Check Common Course Numbering System for Course transfer
              eligibility if applicable/provide transfer guide.
        12    Determine student’s in-district or out- of- district status.
        13    Advice and register student.
        14    Student pays tuition and fees.




                                              35
Continuing Education – Non-Credit Student
Registration
Continuing Education courses address the learning needs of a community,
including workforce development, GED, ESL, literacy, recreation, and leisure
offerings.

Participants can develop a hobby, learn a skill, learn a language or learn about
a new topic without enrolling in college credit courses. Most offerings are
available to adults of any age, with special programs for youth and seniors.

Students earn Continuing Education Units (CEUs). The CEU is an
internationally recognized credit unit for successful completion of learning
outcomes in a Continuing Education course/program. The International
Association maintains standards for Continuing Education and Training
(IACET).

Students completing courses for CEUs have a permanent transcript available
on request. One CEU is defined as “ten (10) contact hours of participation in an
organized Continuing Education experience under responsible sponsorship,
capable direction, and qualified instruction.”

Some Continuing Education (CE) classes are linked to their corresponding
semester credit hours SCH courses. Both SCH students and CE students are
enrolled in the same section using the same textbooks and classroom materials.
If students wish to receive credit, they must enroll through the credit
registration process rather that through the Continuing Education process.
Continuing Education students who register for linked courses must meet the
same requirements and prerequisites as credit students.

Some CE courses qualify for Financial Aid.

Most colleges have separate Continuing Education Departments with specialized
Continuing Education Advisors. Admission requirements will vary depending on the
course selection.

 The following steps are general information.
 Insert your college’s information here




                                               36
S                                Action
t
e
p
1 Direct student to complete registration form if it has not been done
  prior.
2 Determine if student meets qualifications for the particular
  course/courses he/she wants to take.
3 Assess needs of student (career goals, linked course options).
4 Verify if CE course is qualified for financial aid.
5 Advise and register student.
6 Student to pay class fee.




                                      37
Distance Learning Student Registration
Distance learning allows students to earn college credit without traveling to a college
campus. The content and transferability of the courses are the same as traditional on-
campus courses.

With this flexibility comes a greater need for the student to be self-disciplined and self-
motivated. Students will need to be independent learners with basic computer skills.

Though the class environment is non-traditional, registration and admission requirements
remain the same. Many colleges have e-campus help desks that answer distance learning
students’ questions including technical issues.

Advisors are to follow the same steps for those students falling into the categories of
freshman, transfer student, etc.
(See Virtual College of Texas in Appendix section.)

Insert your college’s distance learning program and web site




                                                 38
          Academic Assessment and Course
               Placement Programs
Overview
Long-term student success begins with a solid educational foundation in the core
areas of reading, writing and math. All new students entering Texas colleges are
required to take a placement test prior to enrolling in college-level courses to
determine their college readiness, unless exempt from testing according to the
Texas Success Initiative guidelines.

Some students may be required to take developmental courses to bring their
knowledge up to college level skills.

Non-English speaking students are required to take the ESL Compass Test to
evaluate their English competency and may be required to take course to improve
their skills.

The Texas Common Course Numbering System (TCCNS) determines course
equivalency between participating community colleges and four-year universities
and aids students in creating a seamless transition between the two institutions.

Furthermore, under the provisions of the Texas Education code, Section 51.931, a
Texas resident can opt to use the Academic Fresh Start Program to have all
academic course work earned ten or more years prior to requesting enrollment not
considered for enrollment purposes.




                                               39
     Texas Success Initiative (TSI)
     Success Initiative
     The TASP law has been repealed and replaced by a new program, the Texas
     Success Initiative (TSI). The TSI requires students to be assessed in reading,
     writing and math skills prior to enrolling in college and to be advised based on the
     results of that assessment.

     Now each institution determines what to do with students who do not pass one or
     more parts of the test. Institutions have the flexibility to determine the best path for
     individual students that will make them college ready.

     For more information:
     www.thecb.state.tx.us//OS/SuccessInitiatives/DevEd/dualcredit.cfm

     How is the Success Initiative different from TASP?

     Testing
                Exams currently approved for TASP purposes are still approved
     (THEA, COMPASS, ASSET, and ACCUPLACER).
                The National Evaluation Systems product known as TASP is now
     called the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA).
                Six statewide test dates will be available on the THEA.

     The following students shall be exempt from TSI requirements:

1.      For a period of five (5) years from the date of testing, a student who is tested
     and performs at or above the following standards:
                 ACT: composite score of 23 with a minimum of 19 on the English test
     and/or the mathematics test shall be exempt for those corresponding sections;
                 Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT): a combined verbal and mathematics
     score of 1070 with a minimum of 500 on the verbal test and/or the mathematics
     test shall be exempt for those corresponding sections; or
                 For a period of three (3) years from the date of testing, a student who is
     tested and performs on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) with a
     minimum scale score of 1770 on the writing test, a Texas Learning Index (TLI) of
     86 on the mathematics test and 89 on the reading test.
                 For a period of three (3) years from the date of testing, a student who is
     tested and performs on the Eleventh grade exit-level Texas Assessment of
     Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) with a minimum scale score of 2200 on the math
     section and/or a minimum scale score of 2200 on the English Language Arts
     section with a writing subsection score of at least 3, shall be exempt from the
     assessment required under this title for those corresponding sections.



                                                       40
                                                                               Continued on next page
     Texas Success Initiative (TSI), continued
2.      A student who has graduated with an associate or baccalaureate degree from an
     institution of higher education.
3.      A student who transfers to an institution from a private or independent
     institution of higher education or an accredited out-of-state institution of higher
     education and who has satisfactorily completed college-level coursework as
     determined by the receiving institution.
4.       A student who has previously attended any institution and has been
     determined to have met readiness standards by that institution.
5.       A student who is enrolled in a certificate program of one year or less (Level-
     One Certificates, 42 or fewer semester credit hours or the equivalent) at a public
     junior college, a public technical institute, or a public state college.
6.       A student who is serving on active duty as a member of the armed forces of
     the United States, the Texas National Guard, or as a member of a reserve
     component of the armed forces of the United States and has been serving for at
     least three years preceding enrollment.
7.       A student who on or after August 1, 1990, was honorably discharged, retired,
     or released from active duty as a member of the armed forces of the United States
     or the Texas National Guard or service as a member of a reserve component of the
     armed forces of the United States.
8.      An institution may exempt a non-degree-seeking or non-certificate-seeking
     student.
      (Source: THEB Chapter 4. Rules Applying to All Public Institutions of Higher
     Education in Texas Subchapter C. Texas Success Initiative)

     Minimum Passing Standards/Developmental Coursework
     The Higher Education Coordinating Board has set minimum passing standards as
     a benchmark for colleges while allowing them to require higher passing standards.

     Students who fail to meet their college’s standards in most cases will be required
     to take developmental courses.

     TSI Minimum Passing Standards
     The following minimum passing standards shall be used by an institution to
     determine a student's readiness to enroll in freshman-level academic coursework:
            ASSET: Reading Skills - 41; Elementary Algebra - 38; Writing Skills
     (objective) - 40; and Written Essay - 6.
            COMPASS: Reading Skills - 81; Algebra - 39; Writing Skills (objective)
     - 59; and Written Essay - 6.
            ACCUPLACER: Reading Comprehension - 78; Elementary Algebra - 63;
     Sentence Skills - 80; and Written Essay - 6.
            THEA: Reading - 230; Mathematics - 230; Writing - 220.


                                                     41
           The minimum passing standard for the written essay portion of all tests is
    a score of 6. However, an essay with a score of 5 will meet this standard if the
    student meets the objective writing test standard.
           An institution may require higher passing standards.
                                                                             Continued on next page




                                                    42
    Texas Success Initiative (TSI), continued
    Who needs to retest?
           The law requires that individuals who score below a deviation standard
    set by the Coordinating Board must retest. (an institution may require higher
    performance standards)
           Students who score above the deviation standard but below the passing
    standard on their initial test do not have to retest by law, but institutions may
    require students to do so as part of their developmental education plan.

          Students may retest using the test they took initially or any other Board-
    approved test.


    What happens to students who still do not score above the deviation score
    on the retest?
           The law does not provide any guidance. Colleges determine if the
    student is college ready and implement their own guidelines and developmental
    policies.
    (Source: THEB Chapter 4. Rules Applying to All Public Institutions of Higher
    Education in Texas Subchapter C. Texas Success Initiative)




                                                     43
Insert Your College TSI Assessment Chart and Requirements &
Retake Policies
Sample (used with permission: North Harris Montgomery Community College District)
                                             Assessment
                       The following scores are used for placement into courses

Course       THEA ASSET COMPASS ACCUPLACER ACT                                      SAT    TAAS TAKS
Math                                                                                               N/A
0306         0-224      NS23-       A 0-27 or        0-50
                        42          PA0-54
                        EA23-
                        34

0308         225-       NS43+       A28-43 or        51-62
             243        EA35-       PA55-100
                        42
0310         244-       EA43+       A44-59           63-85
             269        IA36-44
College      270+       IA45+       A60+             86+                    21+     52+
Level                   CA23+
Writing                                                                                            N/A
0306         0-179      23-34       1-35             0-50                   11-15
0307         180-       35-45 &     36-85 & 5        51-79                  16-
             219        5 or        or lower on                             18
                        lower on    essay
                        essay
1301         220+       45+ & 6     85+ & 6          80+ & 6                19+     500+   1770+   2200&
                        essay or    essay or 7       on essay or 7 on                              3 on
                        7 essay     essay only       essay only                                    essay
                        only
Reading                                                                                            N/A
0304         0-199      0-32        0-65             0-56                   13-16
0305         200-       33-40       66-80            57-77                  17-18
             229
1301         230+       41+         81+              78+                    19+     500+   89+     2200
                                                                                                   and a 3
                                                                                                   on
                                                                                                   essay

NS-Numerical Skills                           A-Algebra
EA-Elementary Algebra                         PA- Pre Algebra
IA-Intermediate Algebra                       CA-College Algebra




                                                            44
Developmental Education Courses
It is essential for students to be academically prepared for college level courses.
Developmental courses are offered in Math, English as a Second Language (ESL),
Study Skills, Reading and Writing.

Developmental courses do not transfer but appear on transcripts. The first-digit
developmental course numbers is “0” to indicate that the course does not carry
credit.

The need to take developmental courses is most commonly determined by the
Texas Standard Initiative (TSI) test scores. Courses are selected based on the
student’s individual math, writing and reading scores.

Non-native English students are also assessed by Compass ESL placement tests to
evaluate their skills for listening/speaking, grammar/writing and
reading/vocabulary.

Insert your college’s developmental programs and
assessment scores chart for placement into courses




                                               45
English as a Second Language Placement Courses

Non-English speaking students must take the ESL Compass Test first to evaluate
their competency in Listening/Speaking, Grammar/Writing and
Reading/Vocabulary.
The results of this assessment determine the need for placement classes or other
options.

Students must meet the TSI requirements also (except for Level 1 Certificate
candidates). ESL classes are also offered as Continuing Education Courses that do
not require TSI requirements to be met.

Most colleges offer alternatives for students whose language skills fall below the
minimum scores for course level placement. There are Adult Education Programs,
learning communities and more.
Insert Your Colleges ESL Placement Courses and
alternative programs here




                                               46
The Texas Common Course Numbering System
(TCCNS)-Course Transfer Eligibility

Academic advisors will frequently assist students who are planning to transfer to a
university. The Texas Common Course Numbering System identifies the
community college courses and their university equivalents to aid the student and
advisor in determining which courses and credits will transfer.

The TCCNS is a cooperative effort among Texas community colleges and
universities to facilitate transfer of freshman-and sophomore-level general
academic courses.

The TCCNS provides a shared, uniform set of course designations for students
and their advisors to use in determining both course equivalency and degree
applicability of transfer credit on a statewide basis.

When students transfer between two participating TCCNS institutions, a course
taken at the sending institution transfers as the course carrying, or cross-
referenced with the same TCCNS designation at the receiving institution. (Source:
ACGM)

Courses contained in the TCCNS are academic courses not developmental or
workforce courses.
For additional information about the TCCNS, consult the TCCNS Matrix Online.
(www.tccns.org/ccn/)




                                                47
    Insert Your Colleges Texas Common Course Matrix
    Sample (used with permission: Texas A & M University)

Texas A&M University Undergraduate Catalog- Sample
The Texas Common Course Numbering System (TCCNS) has been designed for the purpose of aiding students in
the transfer of general academic courses between colleges and universities throughout Texas. Common courses are
freshman and sophomore academic credit courses that have been identified as common by institutions that are
members of the common course numbering system. The system ensures that if the student takes the courses the
receiving institution designates as common, then the courses will be accepted in transfer and the credit will be
treated as if the courses had actually been taken on the receiving institution’s campus.
The table below lists the courses Texas A&M University has identified as common and their TCCNS equivalents.
Before using this table students should be sure that the institution they attend employs the TCCNS.

This table is revised quarterly in January, March, June and September. The most recent version may be obtained
from the Office of Admissions and Records.


    Texas A&M Course                                                                        TCCNS Equivalent Course

    ACCT        229              Intro. Accounting                                          ACCT       2301
    ACCT        229              Intro. Accounting                                          ACCT       2401
    ACCT        230              Intro. Accounting                                          ACCT       2302
    ACCT        230              Intro. Accounting                                          ACCT       2402
    AGEC        105              Intro. to Agri. Economics                                  AGRI       2317
    AGLS        101              Mod. Agri. Systems and Ren. Nat. Res.                      AGRI       1131
    AGLS        101              Mod. Agri. Systems and Ren. Nat. Res.                      AGRI       1231
    AGLS        201              Computer Applications in Agri.                             AGRI       1309
    AGRO        105              World Food and Fiber Crops                                 AGRI       1307
    AGRO        105              World Food and Fiber Crops                                 AGRI       1407
    AGSM        201              Farm Tractors and Power Units                              AGRI       2301
    ANSC        107              General Animal Science                                     AGRI       1319
    ANSC        107 & 108        General Animal Science                                     AGRI       1419
    ANTH        201              Intro. to Anthropology                                     ANTH       2346
    ANTH        202              Intro. to Archaeology                                      ANTH       2302
    ANTH        210              Social and Cultural Anthropology                           ANTH       2351
    ARTS        103              Design I                                                   ARTS       1311
    ARTS        111              Drawing I                                                  ARTS       1316
    ARTS        112              Drawing II                                                 ARTS       1317
    ARTS        149              Art History Survey I                                       ARTS       1303
    ARTS        150              Art History Survey II                                      ARTS       1304
    BIOL        111              Intro. Biology I                                           BIOL       1406
    BIOL        111              Intro. Biology I                                           BIOL       1306 & 1106
    BIOL        112              Intro. Biology II                                          BIOL       1407
    BIOL        112              Intro. Biology II                                          BIOL       1307 & 1107




                                                                  48
    Academic Fresh Start
    The Texas Senate Bill 1321 (1993) allows students who were enrolled in a
    postsecondary institution 10 or more years ago to seek admission to colleges
    without consideration of that work.

    Should the student seek admission under this option, then no college courses or
    credits ten years or older will be evaluated. Students must still submit records of
    college of attendance at previous institutions and submit transcripts indicating all
    previous course work attempted.

    Students are not allowed to pick and choose which courses can and cannot count.
    With the Academic Fresh Start option, no credit is received for any courses taken
    10 or more years ago.
             Courses taken previously cannot be used to fulfill new prerequisite
    requirements.

              Courses taken previously cannot be counted towards a new degree.

              Courses taken previously will not be counted in new G.P.A.
    calculations.

               The final authority on applying or interpreting Texas Education Code
    51.931, Right to an Academic Fresh Start is the Director of Admissions at the
    college or university where the student is planning to enroll.
    How does this affect admissions for undergraduates?
    Even if the student chooses the Academic Fresh Start option, he/she must still
    complete the usual admissions process, including providing information on all
    colleges or universities previously attended and providing copies of transcripts
    from all schools attended. Nothing in the law prohibits a public university from
    applying standard admissions requirements.
    How does this affect financial aid?
    Academic Fresh Start clears only the student’s academic record. When deciding
    eligibility for financial aid, the school must still count all prior credits earned.
    Students who earned a graduate degree prior to enrolling as an undergraduate
    under the Academic Fresh Start option will only be eligible for aid available to
    graduate students. Students should contact the Director of Financial Aid at the
    school they are enrolling in for details.
    (Source: CollegeforTexans.com) (CollegeForTexans.com is a project of the
    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board)




                                                      49
               Educational Programs and Curricula
Overview
Introduction      Community colleges offer a wide array of learning options that allow each
                  student to tailor an educational program to meet his/her unique needs.
                  Advisors must have a clear understanding of all educational programs and
                  learning methodologies in order to provide the best services to students.


Degrees           Associate of Arts (AA) – This degree consists primarily of core courses and
                  is designed for transfer to a four-year institution. Students who complete the
                  AA degree do not declare a major. It differs from the Associate of Science
                  degree in that it requires a literature course and offers more flexibility in
                  selecting electives.

                  Associate of Science (AS) – This degree consists primarily of core courses
                  and is designed for transfer to a four year institution. Students who complete
                  the AS degree do not declare a major. It differs from the Associate of Arts
                  Degree in that it requires additional course work in mathematics and natural
                  sciences.

                  Associate of Applied Science (AAS) – This degree is in a technical field for
                  students who wish to begin a career after completing the program of study.



Fields of Study   Curricula that will satisfy the lower division requirements for bachelor’s
                  degrees in specific academic areas at general academic teaching institutions.
                  Students shall receive full academic credit toward the degree programs for the
                  block of courses transferred which will meet the institution’s lower division
                  requirements. The advisor needs to be aware that the field of study is a
                  general guideline to follow. Individual universities have their own set of
                  requirements and it is recommended that the advisor refer to that as a source
                  along with the field of study curricula.

Certificates      Programs that vary in length and are designed to prepare students for
                  occupational employment.

Continuing        Continuing Education courses and programs are offered on a non-credit basis.
Education         C.E. is integrated into each academic division to ensure a seamless format to
Courses and       meet the needs of students. Advisors will serve the needs of CE students in
Programs          the same manner as other students.



                                                50
                     Workforce/Technical Education

    Overview
    One important mission of Technical/Workforce Education is to provide academic
    and skills training that meet the needs of local business and promotes economic
    growth in area industry.

    The Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) is the state agency that sets
    the standards for operation of all workforce programs. Compliance with these
    guidelines is mandatory for all workforce programs.

    The Coordinating Board Guidelines for Instructional Programs in Workforce
    Education (GIPWE) is the basis for much of the workforce information in this
    manual section. The complete GIPWE is found at
    www.thecb.state.tx.us//AAR/UnergraduateEd/Workforce/gipwe.

       A Workforce Education program consists of a coherent sequence of courses
    designed to prepare students for employment in a career field.

      A college working in close cooperation with business and industry to satisfy a
    need for timely and effective training develops the program.

      Many programs are articulated with secondary schools through dual credit,
    ATC ,Tech Prep and four-year college programs to provide students the
    opportunity for seamless transition and further education.

        A Workforce Education program has a competency-based curriculum
    organized to teach industry-driven educational outcomes in terms of appropriate
    skills, knowledge, and perspectives needed by a student to enter an occupation and
    its related career pathways.

       All Workforce programs must provide students with opportunities to attain
    competence in oral and written communication as well as math and computer
    skills.

       The program may lead to a single degree or certificate or contain a “career
    cluster” of multiple degrees or certificates.




                                                    51
     Graduate Guarantee for Workforce Students

     Community Colleges guarantee that graduates with an Associate of Applied
     Science degree will have acquired the job skills for entry-level employment in the
     field of their award.

     To meet this commitment, the college offers up to nine tuition-free hours of
     education for a program graduate judged by the employer to be unable to perform
     on the job the competencies as specified in the college program.

     To verify entry-level workplace competencies, the college must provide at least
     one of the following for each approved award: a) capstone experience, b)
     eligibility for a credentialing exam, and/or c) an external learning experience.


     Insert Your College’s Graduate Guarantee Requirements
     Sample (used with permission: Blinn Community College)

1.      The graduate must have earned the AS degree or certificate beginning May
    1993, or thereafter in a technical or occupational program identified in the General
    catalog.
2.      The graduate must have completed requirements for the AAS degree or a
    certificate program with Blinn holding a minimum of 75 percent of those credits
    earned at Blinn, and must have completed the degree or certificate within a five-
    year time span.
3.      Graduates must be employed full-time in an area directly related to the area of
    the program concentration.
4.      Employment must commence within 12 months of graduation.
5.      The employer must certify in writing that the employee is lacking entry-level
    skills identified by Blinn and validated by the Blinn program advisory committee,
    as program exit competencies and must specify the areas of deficiency within 90
    days of the graduate’s initial employment.
6.      The employer, graduate, Blinn Workforce Dean, advisor, and appropriate
    faculty members will develop a written educational plan for retraining.
7.      Retraining will be limited to 9 credit hours related to the identified skill
    deficiency and to those classes regularly scheduled during the period covered by
    the retraining plan.
8.      All retraining must complete within a calendar year from the time the
    educational plan is agreed upon.
9.      The graduate and/or employer are responsible for the cost of books, insurance,
    uniforms, fees and other course-related expenses.
10.     The guarantee does not imply that the graduate will pass any licensing or
    qualifying examination for a particular career.



                                                              52
    The graduate may initiate activation of the “graduate Guarantee Program” by
    contacting the Blinn Dean or Division Chairman within 90 days of the graduate’s
    initial employment.


    Course Rubric and Number


    Rubrics provide a common set of unique course designations for each
    occupational discipline. Each four-letter rubric identifies a cluster of skills and
    knowledge to be used in determining both course equivalency and degree
    applicability for transfer on a statewide basis.

    The rubric does not identify the only discipline for which a course may be
    suitable. Courses should be chosen based on course descriptions and learning
    outcomes, not on rubrics.

    The four-digit number after the rubric indicates the course level, the SCH and/or
    CEU value, the course type, and the suggested sequence.

       First digit identifies course level. For SCH and CEU courses, a “1” denotes
    an introductory course and a “2” denotes an advanced course. An intermediate
    course may be denoted with either a “1” or a “2”.

       The second digit defines the SCH or CEU value. For example, a “3” indicates
    a three SCH course and an “O” denotes a CEU course.


       The third and fourth digits establish the type of course and course sequence.




                                                      53
    Types of Program Awards

    Each program may have several awards. Generally, it is recommended that the
    number and type of awards in a program not exceed the following:

      One AAS or AAA degree

      Two Level One Certificates, each between 15- 42 semester credit hours (SCH)

      One Level Two Certificate between 43-59 SCH

      One Enhanced Skills Certificate between 6-15 SCH; and

      One or more Continuing Education Certificates




                                                 54
Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS)
Overview
The Associate of Applied Science degree, technical in nature, is for students
seeking skills, training and jobs in a specific career. Students must fulfill the
general requirements, the specific technical curriculum for each program and the
general education core requirements.

Degrees must be limited to a total of 60 – 72 semester credit hours. Each
Workforce Education program should have at least half of its coursework drawn
from a common technical specialty identified by the program CIP code.

The technical specialty component of an AAS degree should constitute 50
percent to 75 percent of the course credits.

The use of WECM Special Topics in the curriculum is limited to three courses.
(A Special Topics course is a WECM course that should be used only when
course content does not exist in any other WCM course. It is intended for
temporary use or transitional content)

In certain cases, there are parallel courses listed in the Workforce Education
Course Manual (WECM) and the Lower-Division Academic Course Guide
Manual (ACGM). In theses instances, the ACGM courses with WECM
equivalents may count as part of the technical specialty component. The
remaining 25 percent to 50 percent of an AAS degree should consist of support
and general education courses.

Each degree must have a minimum of 15 hours in general education. These
hours must include at least one course in each of the following three areas:
humanities/fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, and mathematics/natural
sciences.

Each degree program must also contain math, computer, and communications
competencies.

The courses must be academic transfer courses and of general nature, not geared
to a specific occupation.

Use of Speech or English Composition courses to satisfy the Humanities/Fine
Arts requirement is not recommended.




                                               55
     Insert Your College’s AAS Requirements

     Sample (used with permission: North Harris Montgomery Community College District)

                          Associate of Applied Science Requirements
   The general education block for each program must contain a minimum of 15
   college credit hours.
1.     The general education block for each program must include ENGL 1301.

2.      The general education block for each program must contain at least one
     course from each of the following categories:
                Math/Natural Sciences
                Social/Behavioral Sciences
                Humanities/Fine Arts

3.       In addition, graduates are expected to master the college perspective in the
     core curriculum and the basic intellectual competence in the core curriculum.
     These requirements can be fulfilled through successful completion of identified
     courses or attainment of identified competencies in a specific certificate or
     program. Program administrators, faculty, or advisors will provide specific
     information.

4.      Furthermore, graduates need to meet the computer literacy, math, oral
     communication competencies, and multicultural requirements.




                                                               56
Insert Your College’s Core Curriculum for AAS Degree


Sample (used with permission: North Harris Montgomery Community College District)

                                    Associate of Applied Science
A course cannot count toward more than one requirement of the degree with one exception – the
multicultural requirement. See individual program or certificate degree plans for specific courses.

See individual programs for specific information


Core Component                             Course Options                            Semester credit hours
(General Education courses)

Composition                     ENGL 1301
3 hours


Math/Natural Sciences          BIOL 1322, 1406 or 1408, 1407 or 1409, 2401, 2402, 2404, 2406, 2416
3 hours
         2420, 2421; CHEM 1105 and 1305 or 1405, 1411, 1412, 1419, 2423, 2425;
         ENVR 1401, 1402; GEOL 1403, 1404, 1405, 2307; MATH 1314, 1316, 1324,
         1325, 1332, 1342, *1350, *1351, 2320, 2412, 2413, 2414, 2415; PHIL 2303;
         PHYS 1401, 1402, 1404, 1410, 2425, 2426; minimum of 1 course
         ______________________________________________________________________________

Social/Behavioral             l ANTH 2301, 2346, 2351; CRIJ 1301, 1307; ECON 2301, 2302; GEOG 1300,
3 hours
Sciences                      1303; GOVT 2301, 2302, 2304; HIST 1301, 1302, 2301, 2311, 2312, 2321,
          2322; HUMA 2301; PSYC 2301, 2302, 2306, 2308, 2314, 2315, 2316, 2317,
          2319, 2340; SOCI 1301, 1306, 2301, 2319, 2326; minimum of 1 course
          ______________________________________________________________________________

Humanities/ Fine Arts        ARTS 1301, 1303, 1304, 1316, 2346, 2356, COMM 1318; DANC 2303;
3 hours
         DRAM 1120, 1121, 1310, 1330, 1351, 1352, 2120, 2361, 2362;
         ENGL 2307, 2322, 2323, 2327, 2328, 2332, 2333, 2341, 2342, 2343, 2351;
         HUMA 1301, 1302; MUSI 1301, 1306, 1308, 1309, 1310, PHIL 1301, 1304,
         2306, 2321; FREN 2311, 2312; GERM 2311, 2312; ITAL 2311, 2312;
         SPAN 2311, 2312; minimum of 1 course
         _______________________________________________________________________________

Elective                       To meet NHMCCD core requirements (general education courses),
3 hours
          see individual program degree plans for specific course.
          ________________________________________________________________________________
Specific Workforce OR
45-57 hours
Support Program Courses
                                                                                                         ________

Multicultural                    Students must take one of the above underlined courses to meet the multicultural
REQUIREMENTS                     requirement of this degree or master the multicultural competencies contained
          in a specific degree program or take one of the following courses to meet the multicultural
          requirement of this degree. FREN 1300, 1310, 1411, 1412;
          GERM 1411, 1412; ITAL 1411, 1412; JAPN 1411, 1412; SGNL 1401, 1402,
2301, 2302; SPAN 1300, 1310, 1411, 1412, 2306.

                                                                  57
TOTAL (individual programs vary) 60-72 hours
NOTE: The CORE COMPONENT of this degree is 15 semester hours

* Specifically designed for elementary and middle schoolteachers.
Please see graduation requirements




                                                                    58
Associate of Applied Arts Degree (AAA)
Overview
The Associate of Applied Arts degree, technical in nature, is for students seeking
skills, training and jobs in a specific career. Students must fulfill the general
requirements, the specific workforce curriculum for each program and the general
education core requirements.

Degrees must be limited to a total of 60 – 72 semester credit hours. Each
Workforce Education program should have at least half of its coursework drawn
from a common technical specialty identified by the program CIP code.

The technical specialty component of an AAA degree should constitute 50 to 75
percent of the course credits.

The use of WECM Special Topics in the curriculum is limited to three courses.
(A special Topics course is a WECM course that should be used only when course
content does not exist in any other WECM course. It is intended for temporary
use or transitional content.)

Each degree must have a minimum of 15 hours in general education. The 15
hours must include at least one course in each of the following three areas:
humanities/fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, and mathematics/natural sciences.

Each degree program must also contain math, computer, and communications
competencies. The courses must be academic transfer courses of general nature,
not geared to a specific occupation. Use of Speech or English Composition
courses to satisfy the Humanities/Fine Arts requirement is not recommended.




                                                59
     Insert Your College’s Requirements for AAA Degree
     Sample (used with permission: South Plains College)

                     Associate of Applied Arts Degree Requirements
     In order to receive the Associate of Applied Arts degree, technical students must
     meet the following specific degree requirements:

1.       Candidates for graduation must complete all prescribed entrance
     requirements for their major program of study.

2.       Candidates for graduation must satisfactorily complete the specified course
     of study for the declared major.

3.       Candidates for the Associate of Applied Arts degree must complete a
     minimum of 60 semester hours or up to a maximum of 72 semester hours unless
     the maximum is exceeded as a result of particular program outcomes and/or
     specialized accreditation or licensure.

4.       Candidates for graduation must have completed at least 25 percent of
     required course work (minimum of 15-18 semester hours of college-level credit)
     at South Plains College.

5.       To qualify for a second degree, a student must fulfill the residence
     requirements (25 percent of the required course work, usually 16-18 semester
     hours of college level credit) for the second degree and apply for graduation.




                                                           60
Insert Your College Core Curriculum for AAA Degree
Sample (used with permission: South Plains College)

FIRST SEMESTER                              Associate of Applied Arts Degree

MUSC 1303 or MUSC 1310          History of Popular Music or Masters of Bluegrass                                                       3
MUSC 1427                       Audio Engineering I                                                                                    4
MUSI 1301                       Music Fundamentals                                                                                     3
MUSP 1242                       Small Commercial Music Ensemble.                                                                       2
                                Commercial Music Ensemble** or Large Commercial Music Ensemble: Band**                                 2
                                Applied Commercial Music (Private Lesson)***                                                           2
MATH 1332                       College Mathematics                                                                                    3
                                Total Semester Hours                                                                                  19

SECOND SEMESTER

ARTV 1371                       Intro. to Video Production Tech.                                                                       3
ENGL 1301                       Composition I                                                                                          3
MUSC 1311                       Commercial Music Sight Singing and Ear Training I                                                      3
MUSC 1313                       Commercial Music Theory I                                                                              3
                                Commercial Music Ensemble** or Large Commercial Music Ensemble: Band**                                 2
                                Applied Commercial Music (Private Lesson)***                                                           2
                                Total Semester Hours                                                                                  16

THIRD SEMESTER

MUSC 1329                       Computer Music Notation I                                                                              3
MUSC 2313                       Commercial Music Theory II                                                                             3
MUSC 2311                       Commercial Music Sight Singing and Ear Training II                                                     3
                                Commercial Music Ensemble** or Large Commercial Music Ensemble: Band**                                 2
                                Adv. Applied Comm. Music (Private Lesson)****                                                          2
SPCH 1321                       Business and Prof. Speech                                                                              3
                                Total Semester Hours                                                                                  16

FOURTH SEMESTER

MUSB 2345                       Live Music and Talent Mgmt.                                                                            3
MUSC 1321                       Songwriting                                                                                            3
MUSC 2405                       Sound Reinforcement Systems                                                                            4
                                Commercial Music Ensemble** or Large Commercial Music Ensemble: Band**                                 2
                                Adv. Applied Comm. Music (Private Lesson)****                                                          2
PSYC 2301                       General Psychology                                                                                     3
                                Total Semester Hours                                                                                  17
* Although not a requirement for this degree, students are strongly encouraged to take ORNT 0110 during the first semester of enrollment.
** Consult faculty advisor for proper choice of commercial music ensemble courses from the following: MUSP 1209, MUSP 1240, MUSP
1242, MUSP 1246, MUSP 1250, MUSP 1251, MUSP 1253. *** Consult faculty advisor for proper choice of commercial music private
lessons courses from the following: MUSP 1203, MUSP 1204, MUSP 1205, MUSP 1206, MUSP 1211, MUSP 1215, MUSP 1217, MUSP
1219, MUSP 1221, MUSP 1223, MUSP 1227, MUSP 1228. **** Consult faculty advisor for proper choice of commercial music private
lessons courses from the following: MUSP 2230, MUSP 2231, MUSP 2232, MUSP 2233, MUSP 2237, MUSP 2240, MUSP 2243, MUSP
2247, MUSP 2249, MUSP 2250, MUSP 2252, MUSP 2253.

                                                                      61
Credit Certificate Programs-Workforce/Technical
Overview
A Credit Certificate should constitute a building block toward the AAS or AAA degree.

At least 50 percent of the course credits should be drawn from a focused technical specialty.
The remaining courses may be technical or academic courses.

A Certificate program varies in length and is designed to prepare the student for
occupational employment. The Certificate is awarded upon completion of specific courses
that have been industry validated and sequenced for the purpose of developing and
upgrading skills in an occupation.




                                                62
     Level One Certificate

     A student can complete a Level One Certificate in one calendar year or less. It must
     consist of at least 15 and no more than 42 semester credit hours. Students are not
     required to meet Texas Success initiative (TSI) requirements as long as they take no
     more than 6 SCH outside the curriculum for the certificate program.

     The curriculum for a Level One Certificate is limited to one Special Topics or Local Need
     course.

     A Certificate which exceeds 42 semester credit hours in a profession requiring both external
     program accreditation and licensure or certification examination for practitioners (e.g.,
     Licensed Vocational Nursing, LVN) may be approved by The Higher Education
     Coordinating Board staff as TSI-waived if the program can be completed in one year or less,
     has a maximum of 48 SCH for the program including all admissions and course
     prerequisites, and has a maximum of 18 SCH per fall or spring semester.




     Insert Your College’s Requirements for a Level One Certificate
     Sample (used with permission: North Harris Montgomery Community College District)

                                                Level One Certificate
     To be awarded a Certificate a student must have:

1.     Fulfilled all the course requirements for a certification program, completing at least 50
   percent of coursework at Cy-Fair College.
2.     Earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the certificate.
3.     Students must apply for graduation before a certificate can be awarded.




                                                               63
     Level Two Certificate

     A Level Two Certificate must consist of at least 43 and no more than 59 semester credit
     hours. Students are subject to the Texas Success Initiative (TSI) requirements.

     The curriculum for a Level Two Certificate is limited to no more than two Special Topics
     courses or Local Need courses.




     Insert Your College Requirements
     Sample (used with permission: North Harris Montgomery Community College District)

                                               Level Two Certificate
     To be awarded a certificate from Cy-fair Community College, A student must have:

1.     Fulfilled all the course requirements for a certification program, completing at least 50
   percent of coursework at Cy-Fair Community College.
2.     Earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the certificate.
3.     Students must apply for graduation before a certificate can be awarded.




                                                               64
Enhanced Skills Certificate

This certificate is associated with an AAS or AAA degree program. The associated AAS
or AAA must be a prerequisite for the Enhanced Skills Certificate.

It must consist of at least six and no more than 15 SCH and may extend an AAS or
AAA award to an overall total not to exceed 87 semester hours.

The award must not be used to circumvent the 72 SCH cap for degrees.

It is intended to provide skills beyond career entry or where external mandates make it
impossible for specified programs to meet the 72 SCH limit.




Insert Your College Requirements for Enhanced Skills Certificate
Sample (used with permission: North Harris Montgomery Community College District)



                                       Enhanced Skills Certificate
Students desiring an Enhanced Skills Certificate must complete the related Cy-Fair
Community College associate’s degree prior to enrollment.




                                                          65
Advanced Technical Certificate

This certificate has a defined associate or baccalaureate degree as a prerequisite for
admission. It must consist of at least 16 and no more than 50 SCH.

It must be focused, clearly related to the prerequisite degree, and justifiable to meet industry
or external agency requirements.

The curriculum for an advanced technical certificate is limited to no more than three Special
Topics or Local Need courses.

An AAS or AAA degree program that provides a shortened track of 16-50 SCH for students
who hold a related degree may offer an advanced technical certificate for the shortened
track.




Insert Your College Advanced Technical Certificate Requirements
Sample (used with permission: North Harris Montgomery Community College District)



                              Advanced Technical Certificate
Students desiring an Advanced Technical Certificate must complete a related associate or
bachelor degree prior to enrollment.




                                                          66
Career Clusters
Overview

Career Clusters identify pathways from secondary schools to two and four-year colleges,
graduate school, and the workplace, so students can learn in school about what they can do
in the future.

Advisors may use Career Clusters to help students explore options for the future.

A Career Cluster is a grouping of occupations and broad industries based on commonalities.
The sixteen Career Clusters provide an organizing tool for schools, small learning
communities and academies. Its mission is to develop a career-focused strategy for career
technical education that supports workforce preparation, economic development and
educational reform.

Clusters were designed to encompass three levels of knowledge and skills; the foundation,
pathway and specialty level.

Students can use Career Clusters to investigate a wide range of career choices. The Career
Cluster approach makes it easier for students to understand the relevance of their required
courses and helps them select their elective courses more wisely.


(Source: careerclusters.org)




                                               67
                                     Sixteen Career Clusters and Their Pathways


Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources
                                                        Hospitality & Tourism
Food Products and Processing Systems
                                                        Restaurants and Food/Beverage Services
Plant Systems
                                                        Lodging
Animal Systems
                                                        Travel & Tourism
Power, Structural & Technical Systems
                                                        Recreation, Amusements & Attractions
Natural Resources Systems
Environmental Service Systems
AgriBusiness Systems                                    Human Services
                                                        Early Childhood Development & Services
Architecture & Construction                             Counseling & Mental Health Services
Design/Pre-Construction                                 Family & Community Services
Construction                                            Personal Care Services
Maintenance/Operations                                  Consumer Services

Arts, Audio/Video Technology & Communications           Information Technology
Audio and Video Technology and Film                     Network Systems
Printing Technology                                     Information Support and Services
Visual Arts                                             Interactive Media
Performing Arts                                         Programming and Software Development
Journalism and Broadcasting
Telecommunications                                      Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security
                                                        Correction Services
Business, Management & Administration                   Emergency and Fire Management
Management                                                 Services
Business Financial Management &                         Security & Protective Services
   Accounting                                           Law Enforcement Services
Human Resources                                         Legal Services
Business Analysis
Marketing                                               Manufacturing
Administrative & Information Support                    Production
                                                        Manufacturing Production Process     Development
Education & Training                                    Maintenance, Installation & Repair
Administration and Administrative Support               Quality Assurance
Professional Support Services                           Logistics & Inventory Control
Teaching/Training                                       Health, Safety and Environmental
                                                           Assurance
Finance
Financial & Investment Planning                         Marketing, Sales & Service
Business Financial Management                           Management and Entrepreneurship
Banking & Related Services                              Professional Sales and Marketing
Insurance Services                                      Buying and Merchandising
                                                        Marketing Communications and Promotion
Government & Public Administration                      Marketing Information Management and   Research
Governance                                              Distribution and Logistics
National Security                                       E-Marketing
Foreign Service
Planning                                                Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics
Revenue and Taxation                                    Engineering and Technology
Regulation                                              Science and Math
Public Management and Administration
                                                        Transportation, Distribution & Logistics
Health Science                                          Transportation Operations
Therapeutic Services                                    Logistics Planning and Management
Diagnostic Services                                         Services
Health Informatics                                      Warehousing and Distribution Center
Support Services                                            Operations
Biotechnology Research and Development                  Facility and Mobile Equipment Maintenance
                                                        Transportation Systems/Infrastructure    Planning,
                                                        Management, and Regulation
                                                        Health, Safety and Environmental      Management
                                                        Sales and Service




                                                                     68
                                                         Insert Your College Degree and Certificate Clusters
                                                         (Sample from careerclusters.org)
                                                                                                                           Health Science Career Cluster


                                                                Planning, managing, and providing therapeutic services, diagnostic services, health informatics, support
                                                                                       services, and biotechnology research and development.
                                           Acupuncturist                           Cardiovascular Technologist             Admitting Clerk                                                       
                                                                                                                                                                         Biomedical / Clinical Engineer      Biochemist
                                           Anesthesiologist Assistant              Clinical Lab Technician                 Applied Researcher                        Biomedical / Clinical              Bioinformatics Associate
                                           Art / Music / Dance Therapist(s)        Computer Tomography (CT)                Community Services Specialists      Technician                                Bioinformatics Scientist
                                           Athletic Trainer                       Technologist                              Data Analyst                              Central Services                   Bioinformatics Specialist
                                           Audiologist                             Cytogenetic Technologist                Epidemiologist                            Environmental Health and           Biomedical Chemist
                                           Certified Nursing Assistant             Cytotechnologists                      (SHSMD Stratsocieety.org)             Safety                                    Biostatistician
                                           Chiropractor                            Diagnostic Medical Sonographers         Ethicist                                  Environmental Services             Cell Biologist
                                           Dental Assistant / Hygienist            Electrocardiographic (ECG)              Health Educator                           Facilities Manager                 Clinical Trials Research Associate
                                           Dental Lab Technician                  Technician                                Health Information Coder                  Food Service                       Clinical Trials Research Coordinator
                                           Dentist                                 Electronic Diagnostic (EEG)             Health Information Services               Hospital Maintenance Engineer
                                                                                                                                                                                                            Geneticist
                                           Dietician                              Technologist                              Healthcare Administrator                  Industrial Hygienist               Lab Assistant-Genetics
                                           Dosimetrist                             Exercise Physiologist                   Medical Assistant                         Materials Management               Lab Technician
                                                                               
Sample Career Specialties/Occupations




                                           EMT                                      Geneticist                              Medical Biller/Patient Financial          Transport Technician               Microbiologist
                                           Exercise Physiologist                   Histotechnician                        Services                                                                        Molecular Biologist
                                           Home Health Aide                        Histotechnologist                       Medical Information Technologist                                              Pharmaceutical Scientist
                                           Kinesiotherapist                        Magnetic Resonance (MR)                 Medical Librarian/Cybrarian                                                   Quality Assurance Technician
                                           Licensed Practical Nurse               Technologist                              Patient Advocates                                                             Quality Control Technician
                                           Massage Therapist                       Mammographer                            Public Health Educator                                                        Regulatory Affairs Specialist
                                           Medical Assistant                       Medical Technologist / Clinical         Reimbursement Specialist (HFMA)                                               Research Assistant
                                           Mortician                              Laboratory Scientist                      Risk Management                                                               Research Associate
                                           Occupational Therapist / Asst           Nuclear Medicine Technologist           Social Worker                                                                 Research Scientist
                                           Ophthalmic Medical Personnel            Nutritionist                            Transcriptionist                                                              Toxicologist
                                           Optometrist                             Pathologist                             Unit Coordinator
                                           Orthotist/Prosthetist                   Pathology Assistant                     Utilization Manager
                                           Paramedic                               Phlebotomist
                                           Pharmacist/Pharmacy Tech                Positron Emission Tomography
                                                                                   (PET) Technologist
                                           Physical Therapist / Assistant
                                                                                    RadiologicTechnologist/Radiographer
                                           Physician (MD/DO)
                                                                                    Radiologist
                                           Physician’s Assistant
                                           Psychologist
                                           Recreation Therapist
                                           Registered Nurse
                                           Respiratory Therapist
                                           Social Worker
                                           Speech Language Pathologist
                                           Surgical Technician
                                           Veterinarian / Vet Tech
Pathways




                                                                                                                                                                                                          Biotechnology Research
                                             Therapeutic Services                     Diagnostics Services                    Health Informatics                        Support Services
                                                                                                                                                                                                          and Development
Cluster K & S




                                                                                                                                                      Cluster Knowledge and Skills
                                                                                                         Academic Foundation  Communications  Systems  Employability Skills  Legal Responsibilities Ethics
                                                                                                      Safety Practices  Teamwork Health Maintenance Practices  Technical Skills Information Technology Applications




                                                                                                                                            69
Allied Health Cluster Programs
Many community colleges offer Allied Health Programs that train for medical support
professions such as sonographer, radiographer, and occupational therapy assistant. AAS
degrees and certificates are available under these programs. Most colleges have specialized
Allied Health advisors or faculty that students rely on for career path planning and course
recommendations.

Students who indicate an interest in Allied Health jobs may want to seek Career Counseling
and testing. An aptitude in science is a must for any student applying to an Allied Health
Program.

It is also important for the student to know that an AAS degree through an Allied Health
Cluster Program does not count towards any medical degrees such as a physician or
radiologist.

A best practice for the advisor may be to refer the student to an Allied Health Advisor as
each program carries its own admission requirements, mandatory information sessions,
application exams or interview process prior to applying.




Insert your college’s Allied Health Clusters Advisors, Programs
and Requirements here




                                                70
    Institutional Awards
    Overview
    In addition to Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board-recognized awards, colleges may
    offer institutional awards of fewer than 15 SCH or 360 Continuing Education contact hours
    reflecting a course or series of courses which:
       Represent achievement of an identifiable skill proficiency, or
       Meet a student’s self-defined educational objective

    Institutional awards shall be based on existing WECM courses or courses that are part of the
    institutions approved Local Need inventory. They shall not be part of Texas Higher
    Education Coordinating Board – maintained Program Inventory.




    Insert Your College List of Institutional Awards




                                                   71
     Marketable Skills Achievement Awards (MSA)
     Overview
     A Marketable Skills Achievement Award is a sequence of credit courses totaling 9-14
     SCH or Workforce Continuing Education courses of 144-359 contact hours.

     These awards meet the minimum standard for program length specified by the Texas
     Workforce Commission for the Federal Workforce Investment Act (WIA) program but are
     too short to qualify as approved Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Certificate
     Programs.

     Typically, credits earned in an MSA will apply to a related certificate or AAS degree.

   The award is TSI-waived if it meets the following criteria:
1.       The content of the award must have been commended by an external workforce advisory
   committee or appear on the Local Workforce Developments Board’s Demand occupations
   list.
2.       The award should be composed of WECM courses only. Academic courses may be
   used occasionally if recommended by the external committee and if appropriate for a TSI-
   waived program.
3.       If the award does not have at least 50 percent of its course work in a CIP code area in
   which the college has an approved program on the program inventory.
4.       The college should document that the marketable skills achievement award prepares
   students for employment in accordance with guidelines for the Workforce Investment Act.


     Insert Your College MSA Awards Programs
     Sample (used with permission: Blinn College)


     Marketable Skills Achievement Award in Computer Information Technology (Bryan)
     The Marketable Skills Achievement Award is a concentration in creating interactive web
     pages; assembling and upgrading personal computers (hardware and software setup,
     configuration and troubleshooting); and network device installation and operation (cabled
     and wireless transmission). Students can achieve entry-level positions in personal computer
     servicing upon completion of the Award. These classes also act as pre-requisites for a
     certificate or degree in Computer Information Technology.

     Subject                                                         Semester Hrs.
     ITSC 1325......................................................................3
     ITNW 1325....................................................................3
     ITSE 1411......................................................................4
       Total 10 Hours



                                                                    72
Apprenticeship
Overview
Apprenticeship is a structured system of job training designed to prepare individuals for
occupations in skilled trades. It combines on-the-job training under the supervision of
experienced workers with job-related classroom instruction.

Traditional apprenticeship programs are in construction and manufacturing.

All apprenticeship programs must be registered with the Bureau of Apprenticeship and
Training (BAT) of the U.S. Department of Labor. Program sponsors are individual
employers, associations of employers or groups of employers in cooperation with organized
labor.

Most apprenticeship programs require 2,000 hours per year of on-the-job training and a
minimum of 144 of job-related classroom instruction per year. The length of training varies
by occupation and is determined by industry standards. The majority of apprenticeship
programs require four or five years of training.

The 144 or more hours of job-related classroom instruction per year could be CEU or SCH
courses. Of the total hours of on-the-job training acquired through apprenticeship, 1008
may be converted to SCH to apply toward student completion of a certificate or Associate of
Applied Science degree.

Apprentices are full-time, paid employees who work a regular 40-hour week and learn while
they earn. All programs require applicants to meet the minimum age requirements and be
physically able to perform the essential functions of the job.

Most occupations require the applicant to have a high school diploma or GED to enter
training.




Insert Your College Apprenticeship Programs




                                                73
Workforce Students Transfer Agreements with
Universities

Typically, technical programs are designed for students to immediately enter the job market
at the successful completion of their AAS/AAA degree or certificate. However, there exists
an alternative for those Workforce students who may desire to transfer to a four-year
university to complete a bachelor degree.

Many community colleges are working with universities to develop transfer agreements that
allow the student to apply technical education towards his/her baccalaureate degree.

Bachelor of Applied Technology (BAT), and Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences
(BAAS) are the most commonly sought degrees.

Most colleges require at least 12 hours of technical course credit for the student to be
considered for transfer under this program.

Tarleton State University, Sam Houston State University, Texas A&M Commerce and
University of Texas – Brownsville are just a few of the participating universities.



Insert Your College’s University Transfer Agreements




                                                 74
Sample (used with permission: North Harris Montgomery Community College District)

  Degree Program Name
                             CIP      NHMCCD has a transfer agreement with     Type of         College/University
   (Approved Tech Prep
                             Code       the following college or university.   Degree             Department
  AAS Degree Programs)

 Automotive Technology      47.0604   Sam Houston State Univ.                  BAAS      Voc. Ed.

                                                                                 BS      Management
 Child Development and                Univ. of Phoenix and Univ. of Houston
                            19.0708                                              BS      Interdisciplinary
 Family Studies                       Downtown and Sam Houston State Univ.
                                                                               BAAS      Vocational Ed.

 Computer Graphic Arts
                            10.0305   Univ. of Houston Downtown                  BS      Arts & Humanities
 Technology

 Computer Information                 Univ. of Houston Downtown and Sam
                            11.0101                                              BS      Computing Science
 Technology                           Houston State Univ.

                                                                                 BS      Interdisciplinary
 Emergency Medical                    Univ. of Houston Downtown and Sam
                            51.0904
 Services                             Houston State Univ.
                                                                               BAAS      Applied Arts & Sciences

 Engineering Design                   Sam Houston State Univ. and Univ. of
                            15.0612                                              BS      Technology/Enr. Tech
 Graphics Technology                  Houston Downtown

                                      Sam Houston State Univ. and Univ. of
 Engineering Technology     15.0303                                              BS      Technology/Enr. Tech
                                      Houston Downtown

 Health Information
                            51.0707   Sam Houston State Univ.                  BAAS      Voc. Ed.
 Technology

 Heating, Ventilation and
                            47.0201   Sam Houston State Univ.                  BAAS      Voc. Ed.
 Air Conditioning

 Interactive Media          13.0501   Univ. of Houston Downtown                  BS      Art & Humanities

                                                                                 BS      Art & Humanities
 Interpreter Training                 Univ. of Houston Downtown and Sam
                            16.1603
 Technology                           Houston State Univ.
                                                                               BAAS      Voc. Ed.

                                                                                         Bachelor of Science in
 Management                 52.0201   DeVry University                           BS
                                                                                         Technical Management

                                                                                         Bachelor of Science in
                                      DeVry University                         BSBA
                                                                                         Business Administration

                                                                                         Bachelor of Arts in
                                      University of Phoenix                     BA
                                                                                         Management

                                                                                         Bachelor of Applied Arts and
                                      University of Houston - Victoria         BAAS
                                                                                         Sciences

                                      University of Houston Downtown (must
                                                                                         Bachelor of Science in
                                      complete at University Center on MC        BS
                                                                                         Interdisciplinary Studies
                                      campus)

                                                                                BSN
                                      Prairie View A&M Univ. and UT Health
 Nursing                    51.1601                                                      Nursing
                                      Science
                                                                                BSN

 Paralegal Studies          22.0302   Univ. of Houston Downtown                  BS      Arts & Humanities




                                                                  75
    Continuing Education Credits
    Overview
    Continuing Education Courses offer the opportunity to learn a skill without enrolling in
    college credit courses. Students are awarded Continuing Education Units (CEU) when they
    satisfactorily complete the course.

    One CEU is ten contact hours of participation in an organized Continuing Education
    experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction, and qualified instruction.

    To be approved as a Workforce Education certificate program, a coherent sequence of
    Continuing Education courses, which total 360 or more contact hours is required.
    Courses shall be considered part of a coherent sequence if they:
      Include required and/or recommended prerequisites or co-requisites or
      Lead to an external credential (license, certification, or registration) or
      Are taken by a majority of students in sequence to meet occupational qualifications

    Workforce Education programs of 780 contact hours or more must be offered for SCH only.
    An exception is made for Emergency Medical Technology/Paramedic Continuing Education
    programs, which may have a maximum of 800 contact hours. (Source: GIPWE)

    Alternatively, a student may take mirror courses or linked courses in which both credit
    and Continuing Education students attend the same section. Continuing Education students
    in mirror courses must meet the same requirements and prerequisites as credit students.
    Faculty who teach mirror courses must meet the qualification standard for teaching the SCH
    version of the course.




                                                    76
                                Academic Degrees
Overview
The general purpose of the academic degree programs is to provide university parallel or
transfer courses for students planning to transfer to a university to complete a baccalaureate
degree. These lower division courses give students a good start, often with a more
economical tuition, before transferring to a four-year university.

These degrees offer a solid foundation through a traditional liberal arts education.

Included in the core curriculum of these degrees are basic intellectual competencies:
reading, writing, speaking, listening, critical thinking, and computer literacy, multicultural
competencies and mathematics.

The Associate Degrees in Arts, Science and in Teaching are designed for students
continuing their education at a four-year college.

The core curriculum is required of all AA, AAT, and AS graduates.
In 1997, the 75th Texas Legislature passed Senate Bill 148, which required the THECB to
adopt rules that include a statement of “the content, component areas, and objectives of the
core curriculum”. Every public institution of higher education was required by law to adopt,
a core curriculum of no less than 42 semester hours that will be fully transferable and, if
completed, will substitute for a receiving institution’s core curriculum.

Universities often have limitations on the amount of credit that can transfer from a
community college. That limit is usually around sixty-six semester hours taken at a
community college.

Students should verify the transferability of courses using the Texas Common Course
Numbering System available in their college’s catalog or at www.tccns.org.

Students who already have received an Associate Degree may obtain an additional Associate
degree in another area.

Students may choose a field of study curriculum that will satisfy the lower division
requirements for a bachelor’s degree at a university in a specific academic area. The advisor
needs to be aware that the field of study is a general guideline to follow. Individual
universities have their own set of requirements and it is recommended that the advisor refer
to that as a source along with the field of study curricula.




                                                 77
Associate of Arts Degree (AA)
The Associate of Arts Degree is a program of first and second year level courses designed to
transfer to a four-year university to complete a Bachelor of Arts degree.

A major is not declared.




Insert Your College Associate of Arts Degree Requirements


Sample (used with permission: Amarillo College)

                                Associate of Arts Degree Requirements
Completion of admission requirements.
Satisfactory completion of the curriculum as prescribed for the major and degree sought
including: A minimum of 62 semester hours, (courses with numbers which begin with zero
can not be included in total hours).
The general education requirements as specified.
Satisfactory completion of the competencies set forth in the syllabus for each course
specified for the particular degree or certificate will constitute successful completion of
program competencies.
A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0. Grades in courses not applying to the
degree may be waived by petition if approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs
and submitted to the Registrar. The waiver of grades as indicated above will not entitle a
student to graduate with honors.
Completion of at least 18 semester credit hours required at Amarillo College.
Any student who has completed a minimum of 42 semester hours of Amarillo College
course work may meet Amarillo College degree requirements by completing the required
course work at another accredited college or university. Students who wish to graduate
under this policy must file an application for graduation and meet all Amarillo College
catalog and program requirements in effect at the time of application.




                                                   78
Insert Your College Associate of Arts Degree Course
Requirements
                         Associate of Arts Degree Course Requirements
Sample (Used with permission: North Harris Montgomery County Community College District) A course cannot count
toward more than one requirement of the degree with one exception –the multicultural requirement

Core Component             Course Options                                                  Semester credit
hours




                                                         79





    80
    Associate of Science Degree (AS)
    The Associate of Science Degree is a program of first and second year level courses
    designed to transfer to a four-year university to complete a Bachelor of Science degree.

    A major is not declared.




    Insert Your College Associate of Science Degree Requirements
    Sample (used with permission: Amarillo College)

                                  Associate of Science Degree Requirements


       Completion of admission requirements.
       Satisfactory completion of the curriculum as prescribed for the major and degree sought
    including: A minimum of 62 semester hours, (courses with numbers which begin with zero
    can not be included in total hours).
       The general education requirements as specified.
       Satisfactory completion of the competencies set forth in the syllabus for each course
    specified for the particular degree or certificate will constitute successful completion of
    program competencies.
       A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0. Grades in courses not applying to
    the degree may be waived by petition if approved by the Vice President for Academic
    Affairs and submitted to the Registrar. The waiver of grades as indicated above will not
    entitle a student to graduate with honors.
       Completion of at least 18 semester credit hours required at Amarillo College.
       Any student who has completed a minimum of 42 semester hours of Amarillo College
    course work may meet Amarillo College degree requirements by completing the required
    course work at another accredited college or university. Students who wish to graduate
    under this policy must file an application for graduation and meet all Amarillo College
    catalog and program requirements in effect at the time of application.




                                                       81
Insert Your College Associate of Science Degree Course
Requirements
Sample (used with permission: North Harris Montgomery County Community College District)
A course cannot count toward more than one requirement of the degree with one exception – the multicultural
requirement
Core Component                     Course Options                                       Semester credit
hours




                                                       82
    Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT)
    The Associate of Arts in teaching (AAT) Degree is a THECB approved degree program
    consisting of lower division courses intended for transfer to baccalaureate programs that
    prepare students for initial Texas teacher certification.



    Insert Your College Associate of Arts in Teaching Degree
    Requirements
    Sample (used with permission: Amarillo College)

                           Associate of Arts in Teaching Degree Requirements
       Completion of admission requirements.
       Satisfactory completion of the curriculum as prescribed for the major and degree sought
    including: A minimum of 62 semester hours, (courses with numbers which begin with zero
    can not be included in total hours).
       The general education requirements as specified.
       Satisfactory completion of the competencies set forth in the syllabus for each course
    specified for the particular degree or certificate will constitute successful completion of
    program competencies.
       A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0. Grades in courses not applying to
    the degree may be waived by petition if approved by the Vice President for Academic
    Affairs and submitted to the Registrar. The waiver of grades as indicated above will not
    entitle a student to graduate with honors.
       Completion of at least 18 semester credit hours required at Amarillo College.
       Any student who has completed a minimum of 42 semester hours of Amarillo College
    course work may meet Amarillo College degree requirements by completing the required
    course work at another accredited college or university. Students who wish to graduate
    under this policy must file an application for graduation and meet all Amarillo College
    catalog and program requirements in effect at the time of application.




                                                      83
Insert Your College Associate of Arts in Teaching Degree Course
Requirements
Sample (used with permission: North Harris Montgomery County Community College District)

Requirements for the Associate of Arts in Teaching Grades 8-12 Specialists

Core Component                      Course Options                                 Semester credit hours




                                                          84
85
                           Financial Assistance
Overview
Financial assistance alleviates monetary obstacles that prevent students from achieving their
educational goals. Colleges participate in numerous programs that provide financial aid in
the form of grants, scholarships, loans and the federal work- study program.

Financial       All advisors need to inform students about applying for financial aid. Students
Aid             should be encouraged to apply as early as possible. Most colleges have
                financial aid offices to refer their students to for further advice. Students must
                complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid at:www.fafsa.ed.gov .

Grants          Grants are comprised of federal and state funds. All grants are based on
                financial need and are Title IV programs. It is recommended that students have
                application files completed prior to April 1 for the following fall /spring classes.

                • Federal Pell Grant
                • Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)
                • Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG)
                • National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent Grant

Loans           Loans are provided through a commercial lender and can be subsidized, which
                means the federal government pays the interest while the student is in school
                and during limited deferment and grace periods, or unsubsidized, which means
                the student is responsible for paying the interest during the entire life of the
                loans. Loans are awarded based on financial need and must be repaid.
                Repayment agreements are arranged at the time the loan is secured.

Scholarships Various individuals, local businesses, civic groups, governmental agencies, and
             organizations contribute to community college scholarship programs.
             Requirements and award amounts vary. Students complete a scholarship
             application for these funds

Federal         Under the FWS Program, students work part-time to earn money for their
Work-Study      education. The FWS Program:
Program         • Provides part-time employment while enrolled in school
                • Helps pay educational expenses
                • Is available to undergraduate and graduate students
                • Is available to full-time or part-time students
                • Is administered by schools participating in the FWS Program
                • Encourages community service work and work related to your course of study,
                whenever possible



                                                 86
Insert Your College Grants, Scholarships & Financial Aid
Information




                                 87
Federal Student Aid Summary Chart
                          (Source: FUNDING EDUCATION BEYOND HIGH SCHOOL
                                   The Guide to Federal Student Aid | 2007–08)

(Aid not applicable to community colleges is omitted)
Federal Student Aid           Type of Aid                         Program Details                           Annual Award Limits
Program
Federal Pell Grant            Grant: does not have to be repaid   Available almost exclusively to           $400 to $4,050 for 2006-07
                                                                  undergraduates; all eligible students
                                                                  will receive the Federal Pell Grant
                                                                  amount they qualify for.
Federal Supplemental          Grant: does not have to be repaid   For undergraduates with exceptional       $100 to $4,000
Educational Opportunity                                           financial need; priority is given to
Grant (FSEOG)                                                     Federal Pell Grant recipients; funds
                                                                  depend on availability at school.
Academic Competitiveness      Grant: does not have to be repaid   For undergraduates receiving Pell         First academic year students;
Grant (ACG)                                                       Grants who are U.S. citizens enrolled     up to $750
                                                                  full-time in their first or second
                                                                  academic year of study.                   Second academic year
                                                                  For first academic year students who      students; up to $1,300
                                                                  have completed a rigorous secondary
                                                                  school program of study, graduated
                                                                  from high school after Jan.1, 2006,
                                                                  and have not been previously enrolled
                                                                  in an undergraduate program.
                                                                  For second academic year students
                                                                  who have completed a rigorous
                                                                  secondary school program of study
                                                                  graduated from high school after
                                                                  Jan.1.2005, and have at least a 3.0
                                                                  cumulative GPA at the completion of
                                                                  their first year of postsecondary
                                                                  study.
Federal Work-Study            Money is earned while attending     For undergraduate and graduate            No annual minimum or
(FWS)                         school; does not have to be         students; jobs can be on campus or        maximum award amounts
                              repaid                              off campus; students are paid at least
                                                                  federal minimum wage.
Federal Perkins Loan          Loan: must be repaid                Interest charged on this loan is 5        $4,000 maximum for
                                                                  percent for both undergraduate and        undergraduate students, no
                                                                  graduate students; payment is owed to     minimum award amount
                                                                  the school that made the loan.
Subsidized direct or FFEL     Loan: must be repaid                Subsidized: U.S. department of            $3,500 to $8,500, depending
Stafford Loan                                                     Education pays interest while             on grade level
                                                                  borrower is in school and during
                                                                  grace and deferment periods; you
                                                                  must be at least a half time student
                                                                  and have financial need.
Unsubsidized Direct of        Loan: must be repaid                Unsubsidized; Borrower is                 $3,500 to $20,500 (less any
FFEL Stafford Loan                                                responsible for interest during life of   subsidized amounts received
                                                                  the loan; you must be at least a half     for the same period),
                                                                  time student; financial need is not a     depending on grade level and
                                                                  requirement.                              dependency status
Direct or FFEL PLUS Loan      Loan: must be repaid                Available to parents of dependent         Maximum amount is cost of
                                                                  undergraduate students who are            attendance minus any other
                                                                  enrolled at least half time. Financial    financial aid the student
                                                                  need is not a requirement.                receives; no minimum award
                                                                  PLUS Loans are unsubsidized:              amount
                                                                  Borrow is responsible for interest
                                                                  during the life of the loan.




                                                                     88
Important Terminology for Financial Applications
 Student Aid Report    A Student Aid Report (SAR) is a document students receive after the
(SAR)                  FAFSA is processed. The SAR will list all of the answers provided on
                       the FAFSA. The SAR will also contain EFC (Expected Family
                       Contribution), which measures the student’s family's financial strength
                       and is used to determine eligibility for federal student aid. The college
                       will use this number to decide how much financial aid the student is
                       eligible to receive based on the school's cost of attendance. If the student
                       did not provide electronic signatures or paper signature pages with the
                       FAFSA, he/she must sign the SAR and mail it back to the address
                       provided for final processing.

Eligibility               Be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen
Requirements              Have a valid Social Security number (unless from the Republic of the
                      Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, or the Republic of
                      Palau)
                          Comply with Selective Service registration, if required (see
                      www.sss.gov for more information)
                          Have a high school diploma or a General Education Development
                      (GED) Certificate or pass an approved ability-to-benefit (ATB) test
                          Be enrolled or accepted for enrollment as a regular student working
                      toward a degree or certificate in an eligible program at a school that
                      participates in the federal student aid programs
                          Must not owe a refund on a federal grant or be in default on a federal
                      student loan
                          You must have financial need (except for unsubsidized Stafford
                      Loans)
                          Must not have certain drug convictions
                          Maintain satisfactory academic progress according to college’s
                      criteria.
                        Other requirements may apply. Contact the financial aid office for more
                        information.
                      (source: fafsa.ed.gov)


                                                                           Continued on next page




                                                 89
Important Terminology for Financial Applications,
continued

Cost of Attendance   Total amount it costs a student to attend college. The cost includes
                     tuition and fees, room and board, books, supplies, and transportation.
                     The cost varies with different colleges.

Independent vs.
Dependent Student    For the 2007–08 academic year, the student is an independent student IF
                     at least one of the following applies:
                     • Born before Jan. 1, 1984.
                     • Married on the day of application (even if separated but not divorced).
                     • Have children who receive more than half their support from applicant.
                     • Have dependents (other than children or spouse) who live with
                     applicant and receive more than half their support from applicant at the
                     application time and through June 30, 2008.
                     • Both parents are deceased, or applicant is (or was until age 18) a ward
                     or dependent of the court.
                     • Currently serving on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces for purposes
                     other than training.
                     • Veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces.(A “veteran” includes students who
                     attended a U.S. service academy and were released under a condition
                     other than dishonorable.


Expected Family      Measures applicant’s family's financial strength, and used to determine
Contribution (EFC)   eligibility for federal student aid.

Need                 Financial need is based on a student’s EFC. If the EFC is below a certain
                     amount, a student will be eligible for a federal Pell grant assuming the
                     student meets all other eligibility requirements.




                                              90
Veterans’ Information

Overview       If the student was active duty military personnel, a reservist, or a
               dependent of a veteran who is 100% disabled or deceased due to a service
               related injury, he/she may qualify for educational benefits through the
               Veterans Administration.
               Students may contact the VA liaison at their campus for applications,
               choosing a degree or certificate program, and other general questions.
               The Hazelwood Act for Texas Veterans is also available to provide tuition
               and fee waivers for qualifying veterans. An application can be picked up
               at the college’s financial aid office.

How to apply   Determine what chapter the student is eligible for.
               The student completes the appropriate application packet pertaining to
               his/her chapter and status and returns it to the college’s Veteran’s Aid
               office. If the student is the veteran, he/she includes a copy of the DD214
               or DD2384, whichever applies. If the student is the dependent of a
               veteran, he/she includes a copy of birth certificate or marriage license.


Standards of   Students must select an approved degree objective and make satisfactory
Progress for   progress toward completion of the objective.
MGI Bill
recipients     Students must maintain a cumulative 2.00 grade point average (GPA). If
               the cumulative GPA is between 1.00 and 1.99, the student will be placed
               on probation and given one semester to achieve the 2.00 requirement.
               Failure to obtain a cumulative 2.00 GPA at the end of the probationary
               semester will result in suspension of benefits.




                                                                       Continued on next page




                                             91
Veterans’ Information, Continued
Student                Students must request certification of MGIB benefits each
Responsibility/ semester by contacting their college’s Veteran Affairs office.
Requirements
                       Students are responsible for the payment of their courses. GI Bill
                benefits are paid after the first month of school attendance.

                        Students must provide an official transcript from any previously
                  attended post secondary schools.

                         Courses must apply to the current approved degree/program in
                  order to be certified for benefits.

                         Students must report any course schedule changes to the Veteran
                  Affairs office within 1 week of the change in order to prevent
                  overpayments.

                         VA regulations prohibit payment for repeated courses ("A"
                  through "D" grades). The only exception is for degree programs that
                  require a “C” or above.

                         Although it is possible to be eligible for more than 1 chapter at a
                  time, students may only claim 1 chapter in any single semester.

                         In order to receive payment: Chapter 30 and chapter 1606 veterans
                  must complete enrollment verification each month on or after the last day
                  of the month in order to receive payment for that month. Enrollment
                  verification can be verified on the VA website (WAVE)
                  https://www.gibill.va.gov/wave/ or by phone at:
                  1-877-823-2378.

                  To apply for Vocational Rehabilitation, Chapter 31 benefits complete
                  application 22-1900 by:
Vocational
                         Applying online at http://vabenefits.vba.va.gov/vonapp/main.asp
Rehabilitation
                  Call 1-800-827-1000 to get an application mailed.
                  Pick up an orange veteran packet from the financial aid office. Complete
                  and return the packet to the Veteran Affairs office. The student must gain
                  approval from the VA counselor before enrolling in classes. The VA
                  counselor will send approval (28-1905).




                                                92
Appendix




    93
    Recommended Inserts for Your College
     Academic Calendar
     Add/Drop Schedule
     Auditing Classes
     Class Attendance
     Credit by Examination
     Disciplinary Probation
     Faculty /Advisors Telephone Directory
     Final Exam Schedule
     Final Grade Appeals
     Grading Policies
     Graduation
     Honors Program
     Immunization Requirements
     Inclement Weather Procedures
     In State/Out of State Tuition
     Instructional Divisions
     Mission Statement
     Petition for articulated credit form
     Refund Policy
     Registration Periods for Programs
     Religious Holidays
     Scholastic Probation or Suspension
     Services for Students with Disabilities
     Sex Offender Policy
     Students Clubs and Organizations
     Student Residency Requirements
     Telephone Directory
     Transcript Requests
     Tuition Charged for Excess Credit Hours
     Tutoring
     Withdrawal for College




                                                94
College Guide for Advanced Technical Credit Program
   The Advanced Technical Credit Program is a joint initiative of the THECB and the TEA designed to increase collegiate options for
  students while maximizing resources and minimizing duplication of effort. The program addresses the Texas Higher Education Plan,
                              Closing the Gaps, and Achieve Texas goals for participation and success.

The Advanced Technical Credit (ATC) Program is an advanced placement process for
students enrolling in postsecondary Workforce Education programs. The program provides
high school students with a method to “start a college technical major in high school.”
Public high schools in Texas have the option to offer content-enhanced courses that provide
instruction equivalent to courses listed in the Workforce Education Course Manual
(WECM).

Students meeting criteria outlined in the ATC standard articulation agreement are eligible to
receive credit for the corresponding college course(s) listed in the course crosswalk from
any college offering the corresponding WECM course(s) and participating in the program.

ATC is designed specifically to address issues related to quality control of instruction,
including documentation of high school faculty qualifications and methods for continuous
review and evaluation of the articulation process. Key components of the program that
address issues related to institutional effectiveness and accreditation criteria are outlined
below.

Course content and identification
Secondary courses approved for statewide articulation are identified with unique course
numbers and abbreviations assigned by TEA. Course abbreviations are identified on the
high school transcript (AAR), indicating course content that is enhanced to meet
postsecondary requirements. The unique course rubrics provide a method to track
enrollment in statewide-articulated courses and to evaluate the effectiveness of the statewide
articulation process. College course outcome profiles are available for each ATC course.

Standard Articulation Agreement
Criteria for award of college credit outlined in the standard agreement include: 1) minimum
grade of 80 on all courses in a ATC-required course sequence; 2) junior/senior status for the
course(s), or last course in a ATC-required sequence; 3) enrollment in a participating college
within 15 months of high school graduation and declaration of a related technical major; and
5) articulated course(s) apply to the degree plan. Colleges may require 6 hours of non-
developmental courses.

Faculty qualifications
High school teachers of statewide-articulated courses must meet minimum criteria required
by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) for college faculty teaching
WECM courses in AAS degree programs. Although a minimum of an associate degree in a
field directly related to the teaching area is required, most career and technology certified
teachers hold a minimum of a baccalaureate degree in a related field with related work
experience.


                                                                    95
    Staff development
    High school teachers of statewide-articulated courses must complete a TEA-required
    professional development program that includes instruction on collegiate course content
    delivered by subject-specific college faculty. Educational credentials and work history are
    recorded and entered on a statewide database. Qualified teachers receive a certificate of
    eligibility allowing them to teach specific statewide-articulated courses, with mandatory
    training repeated every three years.

    Continuous review
    Courses designated for statewide articulation are subject to periodic review by state-level
    alignment committees. A Statewide Leadership Committee, in coordination with the WECM
    leadership and maintenance project, provides oversight, guidance, and a mechanism for
    continuous review and improvement of the statewide articulation process.

                                 General Information for Colleges

        The ATC Standard Articulation Agreement is designed for use with high school courses
    listed in the ATC Articulated Course Crosswalk.
        Local articulation agreements are not required for courses listed in the ATC Articulated
    Course Crosswalk for participating colleges that offer the corresponding college courses.
    Local course articulation agreements are required in any other formal articulation process.
    Tech Prep program agreements (six-year plans) are not the same as course-to-course
    articulation agreements and may also be required.
        Any student may request statewide-articulated credit, not just students participating in a
    formal Tech Prep Program.
        A college may designate an articulated course as "credit only" or may include articulated
    courses in a student’s cumulative grade point average. Articulated courses may be noted by
    a letter grade, "credit" or "credit by articulation" on the college transcript.
        Articulated courses should not be identified as "Tech Prep" courses on the college
    transcript even if the articulated courses are part of a state-approved Tech Prep program.
        Tech Prep students may earn college technical credit through: 1) dual credit; 2)
    statewide articulation; and/or 3) local articulation.
        A college may not charge tuition or fees for the award of articulated credit hours,
    although a college may charge a nominal administrative fee to transcript articulated credit.
        A college may charge a nominal fee for challenge exams used to award academic credit
    for courses listed in the Academic Course Guide Manual (ACGM) to students eligible for
    articulated credit for a ACGM-equivalent WECM course.




                                                    96
                               Criteria for Award of College Credit
                                Standard Articulation Agreement

       The student completes the ATC statewide-articulated course with a grade of 80 (3.0) or
    better. If multiple courses and/or prerequisite courses are required in the ATC Articulated
    Course Crosswalk, a student must also complete each of these courses with a grade of 80
    (3.0) or better.
       The student enrolls in a participating college within 15 months of high school
    graduation. A college may extend this deadline.
       Articulated credit is awarded by the college on enrollment; however, a college may
    require a student to earn successfully six (6) hours of non-developmental college credit in
    any subject area. (This provision was effective January 5, 2004.)
       These hours may be satisfied before high school graduation by dual credit or by
    qualifying scores on College Board Advanced Placement (AP) and/or CLEP examinations.
       The college-equivalent course or courses should apply to the student’s declared major
    and degree plan.

                   Which high school courses are ATC statewide-articulated?

      Statewide-articulated high school courses are listed in the ATC Articulated Course
    Crosswalk
      Most statewide-articulated courses are equal to one or more high school credits. In
    some instances, two ½ credit high school courses are required for college equivalence.
    These are noted in the ATC Course Crosswalk.

                      How are articulated high school courses recognized?

       ATC statewide-articulated courses (which are content-enhanced) are identified by a
    course abbreviation that ends in “-TP.”
       The notation “:A” should also appear after the course abbreviation, identifying a course
    as articulated, either statewide or local.

    An example of an ATC articulated course as it correctly appears on a high school transcript
    is: ECAD-TP:A.




                                                   97
                             How to Evaluate ATC Statewide-Articulated
                                 Courses for College Credit Award

     STEP 1: IDENTIFY ARTICULATED COURSES: Are they Statewide (ATC) or
     Local?

     Check the student’s high school transcript. There are two types of articulated courses
     that may be on a high school transcript, ATC statewide-articulated courses and locally
     articulated courses. A student's transcript may have both.
     The college determines eligibility for college credit award based on the terms of the
     applicable articulation agreement, either the ATC Standard Articulation Agreement or the
     local agreement.

1.           ATC Statewide-Articulated Courses* are listed in the ATC Articulated Course
     Crosswalk and terms for award of college credit are outlined in the ATC Standard
     Articulation Agreement.

     ATC statewide-articulated courses have unique course abbreviations that identify
     them as statewide. These courses are identifiable readily on the high school transcript
     because they include the letters "-TP" which stand for "technical placement."

     Use of these course abbreviations by a school district indicates that the course content is
     enhanced to meet college expectations and that the high school teacher has received a
     certificate of eligibility to teach the ATC statewide-articulated course.

     ATC course numbers may also be used by school districts for high school courses covered
     under local agreements.
2.          Locally Articulated Courses* are not listed in the ATC Articulated Course
     Crosswalk and terms for award of college credit are covered by individual articulation
     agreements. The course should be noted with an "A" code on the high school transcript and
     high schools also should list the participating college and college course equivalent on the
     back of the transcript.
     Example - School years covered by the local agreement
     HS Course name                   Semiconductor Electronics Technology
     Course number                    SE: A
     College equivalent               See back of HS transcript
     Terms for award                  Local Articulation Agreement
     * Both types of articulated courses should be noted on the high school transcript with the "A"
     special explanation code, but schools may fail to use this code making it more difficult to identify
     locally articulated courses. If the status of the courses is in doubt, contact the high school’s
     registrar.




                                                         98
STEP 2: EVALUATE STUDENT ELIGIBILITY FOR AWARD OF COLLEGE
CREDIT
Verify the student’s grade.
In order to receive college credit for an ATC statewide-articulated course, the student must
earn a minimum grade of 80 (3.0 or higher) in the course.

Determine student standing.
To receive college credit for an ATC statewide-articulated course, the student should
complete the course as a junior (grade 11) or senior (grade 12). If the course is part of an
ATC-designated course sequence, to receive college credit the final course in the sequence
should be taken as a high school junior or senior. A college may elect to award credit for a
course taken in grades 9 and 10.

Verify completion of course sequences and prerequisites, if any, required for statewide
articulation.
In some cases, a student must complete more than one high school course to receive college
credit under statewide articulation. These situations are identified in the ATC Articulated
Course Crosswalk. To receive college credit, the student must earn a minimum grade of 80
(3.0 or higher) in all courses in the ATC-defined sequence.

Ensure that the student has enrolled within required time limitations.
The student should enroll in a public two-year institution within 15 months of high school
graduation. A college may extend this time line at its discretion. Articulated credit is
awarded by the college on enrollment; however, a college may require a student to
successfully earn six (6) hours of non-developmental college credit in any subject area.
(This provision became effective January 5, 2004.) The student may satisfy this requirement
after high school graduation, or may satisfy this requirement before graduation by dual
credit, or by qualifying AP or CLEP examination scores.

Determine college course equivalency from the list of courses in the ATC Articulated
Course Crosswalk.
Refer to the ATC Articulated Course Crosswalk to determine college course equivalency.
Select a college equivalent course that may be applied to the degree plan declared by the
student (courses may be transcripted as electives).
In most instances, ATC statewide-articulated high school courses are equivalent to courses
listed in the Workforce Education Course Manual (WECM).

At its discretion, a college may award academic credit from the Academic Course
Guide Manual (ACGM) for content equivalent courses. In order to meet SACS
requirements, it is recommended that a student pass a challenge exam prior to award of
academic credit for statewide-articulated courses.




                                                99
                             Answers to Common Questions



1.       Must all two-year colleges participate in the ATC program?


     No. Participation in the ATC Program is voluntary.



2.      Is statewide articulation the same as Tech Prep? Must a student be a Tech
     Prep program participant to take ATC articulated courses?



     No. Although ATC statewide-articulated courses are frequently part of a Tech Prep
     program, enrollment in ATC statewide-articulated courses is not dependent on participation
     in a Tech Prep program.

     A student may take ATC statewide-articulated courses in order to earn college credit in a
     college degree program, including a college Tech Prep program, without first participating in
     Tech Prep in high school.



3.      Who is responsible for verifying that a student has met requirements for
     award of college credit by articulation?



     It is the responsibility of the college to verify that a student has met terms of the ATC
     Standard Articulation Agreement for award of college credit.

     It is the responsibility of the school district to ensure that course content presented to
     students meets college-level requirements and that teachers have appropriate credentials
     and have met staff development requirements.



4.       May a student get credit for locally articulated courses at colleges other
     than the one listed in the local articulation agreement?


                                                    100
Maybe. Some colleges honor local articulation agreements executed by other two-year
colleges. Colleges evaluate student requests for award of credit based on individual merit.




                                              101
         Instructions for Students to Petition for Award of
         Advanced Technical Credit


          Steps for Award of College Credit – Advanced Technical Credit Program

1.       Complete the ATC articulated course or last course in an ATC- required
     sequence during grade 11 or 12. Complete all ATC-required prerequisites.

2.       Complete successfully ATC articulated high school courses and required
     prerequisites with a grade of 80 (3.0) or higher.

3.       Enroll in a participating two-year college within 15 months after high school
     graduation. Your college may extend this deadline.

4.       Declare a college major that includes the equivalent college course(s) in the
     degree plan.

5.       Visit your college advisor or program coordinator and enroll in the next level of
     courses.

6.        If required by your college, complete six (6) additional, non-developmental
     college hours in any subject (includes credit awarded by dual credit and/or
     qualifying scores on AP or CLEP exams).

7.       Petition for award of advanced technical credit. (NOTE: Your college may
     award academic transfer credit for eligible courses if you meet additional
     requirements, such as a passing grade on a challenge exam).

8.       Verify that articulated courses have been posted to your college transcript.

                                   NOTE TO STUDENTS:

      Contact the college of your choice to verify that they will award advanced
       technical credit for the courses you plan to take, or have taken, in high
                                         school.
              Not all public two-year colleges in Texas participate in the
                   Advanced Technical Credit Program and not all
        participating colleges offer all courses covered by the ATC Program.




                                                102
                 Petition for Award of Advanced Technical Credit
Students: Complete and submit this form with an official high school transcript to a participating public two-year
college in Texas within 15 months of graduation.

Student Name ____________________________________________________


Address ____________________________________________________________________


City _________________________                  State _____________           Zip Code _______________


Phone ______ - ______ - ________ Email

________________________                        Social Security Number _______ - _____ - ________


High School/District __________________________________________________________


                                                          Graduation Plan       HS Tech Prep
Date of Graduation _____________________                   Regular  Recommended  Distinguished


Student Signature ________________________________________                           Date ______________

Record of HS ATC-Articulated Courses. This section to be completed by the college.

                                Grade Taken      Course
Course Name and                                               College Course Equivalent       Date Transcripted
                                 9, 10, 11 or
Abbreviation                                     Grade           WECM  ACGM
                                      12




Declared College Major __________________________________________________________

Date of college enrollment ________________  Date is within 15 months of HS graduation
Optional - Student has completed six (6) additional non-developmental college hours in any area.
(Indicate if satisfied by Advanced Placement or CLEP examination scores, dual credit or after graduation.)
Advanced Placement or CLEP                             College Courses (dual credit or after graduation)
_______________________           ____________            _______________________          ____________
Course                            Grade
                                                          Course                    Grade
_______________________           ____________            _______________________ ____________
Course                            Grade                   Course                    Grade
Signature of college official                             Title                 Date




                                                            103
             Example of ATC Statewide-Articulated Courses
              That Appear in Two-Year College Programs*
*These examples were taken from certificate and degree plans from participating two-year
colleges and are not necessarily representative of options available at all participating
colleges.


 College AAS Degree Program: Electronics/Computer Information Systems
 High School Course                    WECM Equivalent College Course     Credit Hours
 Electricity/Electronics Technology    Electricity Principles                   4
 (EET-TP)                              CETT 1402
 Engineering Computer-Aided Drafting   Basic Computer-Aided Drafting            4
 I (ECAD-TP)                           DFTG 1409


 College AAS Degree Program: Industrial Instrumentation
 High School Course                    WECM Equivalent College Course     Credit Hours
 Electricity/Electronics Technology    Electricity Principles                   4
 (EET-TP)                              CETT 1402
 Computer Applications (CA-TP)         Introduction to Computers                3
                                       ITSC 1301
 Principles of Technology I (PT1-TP)   Applied Petrochemical Technology         3
                                       CTEC 1301


 College AAS Degree Program: Business Technology
 High School Course                    WECM Equivalent College Course     Credit Hours
 Accounting I (BACCT-TP)               Introduction to Accounting I             3
                                       ACNT 1303
                                       Principles of Management                 3
 Business Management (BMGMT-TP)        BMGT 1303
 (1/2) and

 Business Ownership (BOWNS-
 TP)(1/2)




                                                 104
College AAS Degree Program: Business Management
High School Course                    WECM Equivalent College Course      Credit Hours
Business Computer Information         Computer Applications I                   3
Systems I (BCIS1-TP)                  POFI 1301
Business Management (BMGMT-TP)        Principles of Management                  3
(1/2) and                             BMGT 1303

Business Ownership (BOWNS-
TP)(1/2)


College AAS Degree Program: Computer Graphics and Multimedia
High School Course                    WECM Equivalent College Course      Credit Hours
Business Computer Information         Digital Publishing I                      4
Systems I (BCIS1-TP) and Business     ARTC 1413
Computer Information Systems II
(ABCIS-TP)
Word Processing Applications          Desktop Publishing for the Office         3
(WDPAP-TP)                            POFI 2331
Business Image Management and         Introduction to Multimedia                4
Multimedia (BIM&M-TP)                 IMED 1401


College AAS Degree Program: Drafting and Design Technology
High School Course                    WECM Equivalent College Course      Credit Hours
Technical Introduction/Computer-      Technical Drafting                        4
Aided Drafting (TICAD-TP)             DFTG 1405
Engineering Computer-Aided Drafting   Basic Computer-Aided Drafting             4
I (ECAD-TP)                           DFTG 1409
Engineering Computer-Aided Drafting   Intermediate Computer-Aided               4
II (ECAD2-TP)                         Drafting DFTG 2419




                                                105
         Two-Year Colleges Indicating Interest in Participating in the
                   Advanced Technical Credit Program

      The following colleges have indicated an interest in participating in the Advanced Technical
                                           Credit Program.
                         Contact individual colleges to verify their participation.
                              Not all colleges offer all courses or programs.

      Alamo Community College District                N. Harris Montgomery Community
      Palo Alto College                               College District
      Alvin Community College                         Cy-Fair College
      Angelina College                                Kingwood College
      Austin Community College                        Montgomery College
      Blinn College                                   North Harris College
      Brazosport College                              Tomball College
      Central Texas College                           Odessa College
      Cisco Junior College                            Panola College
      College of the Mainland                         Paris Junior College
      El Paso Community College                       Ranger College
      Frank Phillips College                          San Jacinto College District
      Galveston College                               South Plains College
      Grayson County College                          South Texas Community College
      Hill College                                    Southwest Texas Junior College
      Houston Community College System                Temple College
      Howard College                                  Texarkana College
      Kilgore College                                 Texas Southmost College
      Lamar Institute of Technology                   Texas State Technical College
      Lamar State College - Orange                    Harlingen
      Lamar State College - Pt. Arthur                Marshall
      Laredo Community College                        Sweetwater
      Lee College                                     Waco
      McLennan Community College                      Trinity Valley Community College
      Navarro College                                 Tyler Junior College
      Northeast Texas Community College               Vernon Regional Junior College
                                                      Weatherford College
                                                      Western Texas College
                                                      Wharton County College


If your local two-year college is not on the above list, contact the College Dean of Technical or
          Workforce Education for information about that college’s participation in the
                             Advanced Technical Credit Program.



                                                      106
                                       Questions about the Program


     PARTICIPATION

1.          Must all public schools and/or two-year colleges participate in the Advanced
     Technical Credit Program (Statewide Articulation)?
     No. Participation in the Advanced Technical Credit Program is voluntary.

2.           Must all colleges participating in the ATC Program award credit for any ATC
     statewide-articulated course a student takes?
     No. A participating college awards credit based on the following criteria:
                   Student grade of 80 (3.0) or higher) on the high school course, courses in a
     required sequence, and any required prerequisites;
                   Articulated course, or final course in a required sequence, taken with junior or
     senior standing;
                   Enrollment within 15 months of high school graduation; and
                   The course(s) may be applied to the college certificate or degree plan.

     NOTE: Colleges may elect to waive one or more of these requirements. Colleges may require
     completion of six (6) additional non-developmental college credits (credit awarded by dual
     credit, or qualifying scores on College Board Advanced Placement or CLEP examinations count
     toward this requirement).

     ARTICULATED COURSES

3.          How are ATC statewide-articulated courses different than other high school courses
     with the same course name?
     ATC statewide-articulated courses provide advanced instruction beyond, or in greater depth, than
     required in the secondary curriculum defined by the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills
     (TEKS). College-equivalent outcomes are outlined for each course.

4.           How does a college recognize ATC statewide-articulated courses?
     ATC statewide-articulated high school courses have unique abbreviations that end in
     “-TP” making them readily identifiable on a high school transcript. These courses also should be
     identified with the high school transcript special explanation course code “A” that denotes an
     articulated course, but schools do not always include this notation.

5.           How are ATC statewide-articulated and locally-articulated courses differentiated on
     the high school transcript?
     Locally articulated high school course abbreviations do not end in "-TP" and should include on
     the reverse side of the transcript (local use area) a notation of the participating college(s) and the
     equivalent college course(s).




                                                      107
6.          Do ATC statewide-articulated courses apply only to two-year technical degrees?
     Advanced Technical Credit (statewide articulation) is a form of advanced placement that
     prepares students for college and for technical careers. In most cases, technical credit is awarded
     from the postsecondary Workforce Education Course Manual (WECM) for statewide-articulated
     courses.

     Under specific circumstances a college may at its discretion award academic credit from the
     postsecondary Academic Course Guide Manual (ACGM). To satisfy SACS requirements, a
     student may be required to demonstrate course proficiency by taking an examination.

7.           Will additional courses be approved for Advanced Technical Credit?
     Yes. Additional courses will be added over the next several years if appropriate. The ATC
     Articulated Course Crosswalk will be updated as needed based upon changes in WECM and
     TEKS.

8.            Who is responsible for verifying that a student has met requirements for award of
     college credit by articulation?
     It is the responsibility of the college to verify that a student has met terms of the ATC Standard
     Articulation Agreement for award of college credit.

     It is the responsibility of the school district to ensure that course content presented to students
     meets college-level requirements and that teachers have appropriate credentials and have met
     staff development requirements.

9.           May a student get credit for locally articulated courses at colleges other than the one
     listed in the local articulation agreement?
     Maybe. Some colleges honor local articulation agreements executed by other community and
     technical colleges. Colleges evaluate student requests for award of credit based on individual
     merit.




                                                      108
10.           Our college does not participate in the ATC program. Although we have several
      local articulation agreements with local school districts, some of our schools want to offer
      ATC statewide-articulated courses to their students. How can we do both?
      Simply use the ATC statewide-articulated high school course abbreviations in the local
      articulation agreement, as well as the regular high school course abbreviations. Schools that
      have ATC qualified and trained teachers may then offer the statewide-articulated courses.

      For example, if you have a local articulation agreement for Accounting 1303with a school that
      has an ATC qualified and trained teacher, also use the PEIMS course abbreviation BACCT-TP
      and course code 1202210T in the articulation agreement. Students in the course receive the ATC
      enhanced instruction.

      This provides the greatest flexibility for colleges and opportunity for students. The local college
      may give credit under the terms of the local agreement and colleges participating in the ATC
      Program may give credit for Accounting 1303 under the terms of the ATC Statewide Articulation
      Agreement.

11.          Can a high school mix students enrolled in different course numbers in the same
      classroom?
      Yes, but only under special circumstances.

      Dual Credit and ATC Articulated Courses - A class may be composed of students enrolled in an
      ATC statewide-articulated course and students concurrently enrolled in college for purposes of
      earning dual credit because all students in the class are receiving college-level instruction.

      High School Credit and ATC Articulated Courses - A class may be composed of students
      enrolled in an ATC statewide-articulated course and students enrolled in the non-articulated
      course with the same name. In this instance, students enrolled in the statewide-articulated course
      MUST receive more in-depth instruction and the teacher must be ATC qualified and have
      participated in required staff development. The unique course abbreviation must only appear on
      the high school transcript of students receiving enhanced instruction.




                                                     109
      ATC AND TECH PREP PROGRAMS

12.          Is the Advanced Technical Credit Program (statewide articulation) the same as
      Tech Prep? Must a student be a Tech Prep program participant to take ATC statewide-
      articulated courses?
      No. Although ATC statewide-articulated courses are frequently part of a Tech Prep program,
      enrollment in a statewide-articulated course is not dependent on participation in a Tech Prep
      program.

13.          If a college is participating in the Advanced Technical Credit Program and Tech
      Prep, must it continue to have Tech Prep program articulation agreements?
      Yes. Tech Prep programs require program-level articulation agreements, or six-year graduation
      plans, that outline the seamless high school and college curriculum. A Tech Prep program may
      include ATC statewide-articulated courses, courses that are subject to a local articulation
      agreement, and/or dual credit technical courses.
14.          Is articulation the only way a Tech Prep student can earn college credit while in
      high school?
             No. A participant in a Tech Prep program may earn college credit by:
      Content-enhanced articulated courses (ATC, statewide and local);
             Dual academic and/or technical credit (by concurrent enrollment); and/or
      College Board Advanced Placement (AP)

      The definition of a Tech Prep program is outlined by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating
      Board in the Guidelines for Instructional Programs in Workforce Education (GIPWE), Part II.

      TEACHER QUALIFICATIONS

15.          What qualifications must high school teachers possess in order to teach ATC
      statewide-articulated courses?
      Courses articulated in the Advanced Technical Credit Program are designed for award of
      technical credit for courses in the postsecondary Workforce Education Course Manual (WECM).

      Consequently, a high school teacher must meet requirements outlined by the Southern
      Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges and by the Texas Higher
      Education Coordinating Board in the Guidelines for Instructional Programs in Workforce
      Education (GIPWE).

      For award of academic transfer credit for courses in the postsecondary Academic Course Guide
      Manual (ACGM), these qualifications include a master’s degree and 18 semester credit hours in
      the subject area. A student enrolled in a course where the teacher does not possess these
      qualifications may take a challenge exam for award of college credit in lieu of this requirement.




                                                     110
16.            What staff development is required by TEA before a teacher may teach ATC
      statewide-articulated courses?
      A high school teacher who meets the faculty qualifications listed in this guide must also complete
      a training program every three years. The training program consists of:
                     Part I – general information on articulation and Tech Prep programs; and
                     Part II – specific instruction provided by college faculty on course content
      enhancement that is required to meet college-level competence.

17.          If a teacher has completed Part I and Part II of state-approved ATC teacher
      training, what courses may he/she teach?
      A teacher may teach only the courses listed on their official Certificate of Eligibility provided by
      the Advanced Technical Credit Program office. Lists of trained teachers and the courses they are
      approved to teach are available to school districts each school year.

      A data base of all teachers is maintained by the ATC Teacher Approval state office located in the
      College of Education at Stephen F. Austin State University (SFA). The database of trained
      teachers can be accessed at www.atcTexas.org.

                     Advanced Technical Credit Program Teacher Qualifications
                                         (Effective March 8, 2004)
      Teachers must meet the one of the two following requirements to be approved to teach a course
      for Advanced Technical Credit:

      Requirement 1: The teacher must have a baccalaureate degree or higher in the teaching
      discipline.
      OR
      Requirement 2: The teacher must have a minimum of an associate degree and 3 years verifiable
      non-teaching work experience directly related to the teaching discipline.
      The teaching discipline is the subject area for the ATC course. For example, the teaching
      discipline for "Principles of Marketing" would be marketing.
      NOTE:
      Teachers who are not fully certified in the teaching discipline by the State Board for Educator
      Certification (i.e. state teaching certification) will be asked to provide the ATC Office with proof
      that they meet the above requirements. For proof of their degree, they must have official
      transcripts sent directly to the ATC Office from the college or university. For proof of work
      experience, they will be asked to submit full work history information to the ATC Office.
      For more information: www.atctexas.org/articulation/sbec_certified.htm
      Teachers of courses eligible for inclusion in a postsecondary workforce education program that is
      subject to accreditation by external agencies and/or that prepare students for licensure or
      certification must meet the qualifications required by the external agency. (i.e.: ASE, CNA) For
      more information:www.atctexas.org/articulation/external_certification.htm
               Non-degreed individuals ARE NOT eligible for ATC approval.
      For more information, refer to: www.atcTexas.org



                                                      111
                                     Frequently Asked Questions

1.        Our college has elected to participate in the Advanced Technical Credit Program, but our
     college’s Marketing and Management Program doesn’t offer any of the related courses that are
     listed in the ATC Articulated Course Crosswalk.

     How do we address this situation?
     Because the college doesn’t offer the courses listed in the ATC Crosswalk, the college may elect
     to award credit through a local articulation agreement for college courses that they do offer with
     comparable content.

2.      Our college has elected not to participate in the Advanced Technical Credit Program;
     however, we have several local articulation agreements with regional school districts. For
     example, one of our agreements is for the high school courses Business Computer Information
     Systems I (BEGBCIS1) and Business Computer Information Systems II (BCIS2CP).

     A student has requested award of credit under this local agreement for the ATC articulated
     courses Business Computer Information Systems I (BCIS1-TP) and Business Computer
     Information Systems II (ACIS-TP).

     How do we address this situation?
     Use of an ATC statewide-articulated course number should not affect credit award. Because
     content-enhanced ATC statewide-articulated courses are based on the same secondary
     curriculum as the non-statewide-articulated versions of these courses, the college should honor
     these course numbers in the local agreement.

3.       Occasionally we have students who are eligible to receive ATC statewide-articulated credit,
     but want to repeat the course at the college to improve their grade point average (GPA).

        How do we address this situation?
        Students may elect to repeat courses for any reason that conforms to college policy.

4.        Our college is participating in the Advanced Technical Credit Program, but has a local
     articulation agreement that articulates Introduction to Computers (COSC 1400) for Business
     Computer Information Systems I (BEGBCIS1) because we don’t offer Computer Applications I
     (POFI 1301).

     Can this college course be added to the ATC Articulated Course Crosswalk?
     No. Introduction to Computers (COSC 1400) cannot be added to the ATC Crosswalk because it
     is a course found in the Academic Course Guide Manual (ACGM) rather than the Workforce
     Education Course Manual (WECM). A college may elect to offer credit for an academic transfer
     course and to decide if a student should pass a challenge exam before credit is awarded.




                                                    112
5.       Our local school district does not have a high school teacher in Automotive Technology with
     the credentials required to teach ATC statewide-articulated courses, but our faculty are confident
     that that teacher is competent to teach the course to college standards even though he does not
     have an associate degree in automotive technology.

     Is it possible to articulate locally with the district?
     A college may elect to enter into a local articulation agreement with a school district that does
     not have a teacher with the credentials required to teach ATC statewide-articulated courses;
     however, because the teacher is not ATC eligible and cannot be ATC certified, the course
     CANNOT be noted as ATC.




                                                     113
Workforce Investment Act (WIA)

Overview   The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 authorizes financial assistance to
           individuals age 18 and above who need some type of education or training to
           get a job, maintain a job, or advance into a new job.

           Administered by your local Workforce Development Board, financial aid can
           be used for tuition, fees, books, and supplies. All students must apply and
           qualify for financial assistance.

           “WIA approved programs” are typically AAS, AAA degrees and certificates.
           A list of Texas program locations may be found at:
           www.twc.state.tx.us/dirs/wdbs/wdbmap




                                       114
National Academic Advising Association (NACADA)
Statement of Core Values of Academic Advising
Students deserve dependable, accurate, timely, respectful, and honest responses. Through this
Statement of Core Values, NACADA communicates the expectations that others should hold for
advisors in their advising roles. Advisors' responsibilities to their many constituents form the
foundation upon which the Core Values rest.

Advisors are      Academic advisors work to strengthen the importance, dignity, potential, and
responsible to    unique nature of each individual within the academic setting. Advisors' work
the               is guided by their beliefs that students:
individuals          have diverse backgrounds that can include different ethnic, racial,
they advise.      domestic, and international communities; sexual orientations; ages; gender
                  and gender identities; physical, emotional, and psychological abilities;
                  political, religious, and educational beliefs
                     hold their own beliefs and opinions
                     responsible for their own behaviors and the outcomes of those behaviors
                     can be successful based upon their individual goals and efforts
                     have a desire to learn
                     have learning needs that vary based upon individual skills, goals,
                  responsibilities, and experiences
                     use a variety of techniques and technologies to navigate their world.
                  In support of these beliefs, the cooperative efforts of all who advise include,
                  but are not limited to, providing accurate and timely information,
                  communicating in useful and efficient ways, maintaining regular office
                  hours, and offering varied contact modes.

                  Advising, as part of the educational process, involves helping students
                  develop a realistic self-perception and successfully transition to the
                  postsecondary institution. Advisors encourage, respect, and assist students in
                  establishing their goals and objectives.

                  Advisors seek to gain the trust of their students and strive to honor students'
                  expectations of academic advising and its importance in their lives.

Advisors are      Effective advising requires a holistic approach. At many institutions, a
responsible for   network of people and resources is available to students. Advisors serve as
involving         mediators and facilitators who effectively use their specialized knowledge and
others, when      experience for student benefit. Advisors recognize their limitations and make
appropriate in    referrals to qualified persons when appropriate. To connect academic and
the advising      workforce advising to students' lives, advisors actively seek resources and
process.          inform students of specialists who can further assess student needs and
                  provide access to appropriate programs and services. Advisors help students
                  integrate information so they can make well-informed academic decisions.
                                                                                Continued on next page



                                                115
NACADA Statement of Core Values of Academic Advising,
continued
Advisors are      Advisors nurture collegial relationships. They uphold the specific policies,
responsible to    procedures, and values of their departments and institutions. Advisors
their             maintain clear lines of communication with those not directly involved in the
institutions.     advising process but who have responsibility and authority for decisions
                  regarding academic advising at the institution. Advisors recognize their
                  individual roles in the success of their institutions.



Advisors are      Academic advisors honor academic freedom. They realize that academic
responsible to    advising is not limited to any one theoretical perspective and that practice is
higher            informed by a variety of theories from the fields of social sciences, the
education.        humanities, and education. They are free to base their work with students on
                  the most relevant theories and on optimal models for the delivery of academic
                  advising programs. Advisors advocate for student educational achievement to
                  the highest attainable standard, support student goals, and uphold the
                  educational mission of the institution.


Advisors are      Academic advisors interpret their institution's mission as well as its goals and
responsible       values. They convey institutional information and characteristics of student
their             success to the local, state, regional, national, and global communities that
educational       support the student body. Advisors are sensitive to the values of the
community.        surrounding community. They are familiar with community programs and
                  services that may provide students with additional educational opportunities
                  and resources. Advisors may become models for students by participating in
                  community activities.



Advisors are      Advisors participate in professional development opportunities, establish
responsible for   appropriate relationships and boundaries with advisees, and create
their             environments that promote physical, emotional, and spiritual health. Advisors
professional      maintain a healthy balance in their lives and articulate personal and
practices and     professional needs when appropriate. They consider continued professional
for themselves    growth and development to be the responsibility of both themselves and their
personally.       institutions.




                                                116
Students Right to Privacy Act
FERPA
                   The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. §
Overview           1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a federal law that protects the privacy of student
                   educational records. The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an
                   applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education.
                   FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children's education
                   records. These rights transfer to the student when he/she reaches the age of 18
                   or attends a school beyond the high school level. Students to whom the rights
                   have transferred are "eligible students."
                   Educational records are all records that contain information directly related to
                   a student and all records that are maintained by an educational agency.


FERPA Rights          Right to inspect and review educational records.
of Students           Right to request that the college correct records which they believe to be
                   inaccurate or misleading.
                      Right to have some control over the disclosure of information from
                   educational records.

FERPA allows       Generally, schools must have written permission from the parent or eligible
schools to         student in order to release any information from a student's education record.
disclose           FERPA allows schools to disclose those records, without consent, to the
student’s          following parties or under the following conditions (34 CFR § 99.31):
educational
                      School officials with legitimate educational interest
records to
certain parties       Other schools to which a student is transferring
and certain           Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes
conditions            Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student
                      Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school
                      Accrediting organizations
                      To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena
                      Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies
                      State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to
                   specific State law

Schools may          Directory information such as a student's name, address, telephone
disclose,          number, date and place of birth, honors and awards, and dates of attendance.
without            Schools must tell parents and eligible students about directory information.
consent              Schools must notify parents and eligible students annually of their rights
                   under FERPA.




                                                117
Workforce Education Resources
CATEMA – Career and Technology Education Management Application–www.catema.net
Offers online registration and system management for career and technology education. Manages
Tech-Prep and CTE information relating to courses, classes, school districts, high schools,
teachers, counselors, college registrars, college advisors, and students. Allows students, teachers,
counselors, and school administrators to establish and maintain their own user accounts. Many
colleges use this system to identify workforce students who are eligible for articulated credit.

U.S. Department of Labor – Bureau of Labor Statistics-http://www.bls.gov/oco/
Includes information about the training and education needed, earnings, expected job prospects,
what workers do on the job and working conditions. This web site also gives job search tips and
links to information about the state wide job market.

Texas Labor Market Information - www.tracer2.com
The Labor Market & Career Information Department (LMCI) of the Texas Workforce
Commission provides statistics and analyses on the dynamics of the Texas labor market designed
to support informed educational and career decisions.

Wage Information Network- www.texasindustryprofiles.com/apps/win
Includes a wide range of wage data, including entry level and experienced level wages. Also
includes detailed information about occupations including the description, wage ranges, and
much more.

WORK IN TEXAS- www.WorkInTexas.com
WorkInTexas.com is an online application that matches job openings with qualified job seekers.
Employers can post job openings, run job matches, and search for qualified job seekers free of
charge. Job seekers have immediate access to job matching services such as browsing thousands
of job postings, including all Texas state agency jobs. They can refer themselves to open
positions, complete résumés and/or state applications and store them online.

The Texas Workforce- www.texasworkforce.org
The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) is the state government agency charged with
overseeing and providing workforce development services to employers and job seekers of
Texas. For employers, TWC offers recruiting, retention, training and retraining, and
outplacement services as well as valuable information on labor law and labor market statistics.
For job seekers, TWC offers career development information, job search resources, training
programs, and unemployment benefits. While targeted populations receive intensive assistance to
overcome barriers to employment all Texans can benefit from the services offered by TWC and
our network of workforce partners.

Texas Local Workforce Development Boards-www.twc.state.tx.us/dirs/wdbs/wdbmap
www.twc.state.tx.us/dirs/wdas/wdamap

Labor Market and Career Information- www.cdr.state.tx.us/JobSeekers/JobSeekers.asp -
job seeker resources for career choice selection


                                                118
.   Regional Job Assistance Web Sites:

Houston Area -www.theworksource.org
The WorkSource is a public/private partnership providing a comprehensive human resource service for
businesses and residents of the 13-county Houston-Galveston Gulf Coast region. The WorkSource helps
employers solve workforce-related business problems and area residents build careers, so that both can
better compete in the changing worldwide economy.


Workforce Solutions Brazos Valley www.bvjobs.org
Provides job seekers with free job search assistance in the Brazos Valley area.




                                                 119
Helpful Links
Achieve Texas: www.achievetexas.org
Adventures in Education: www.aie.org
Career Clusters: www.careerclusters.org
College Board : www.collegeboard.com
College is Possible: www.collegeispossible.org
College Preparation Information: www.collegefortexans.com
College info for all ages: www.knowhow2go.org
FAFSA: www.fafsa.ed.gov
Financial Aid Information: www.finaid.org
Free Scholarship Search: www.fastweb.com
International Student Guidance: www.edupass.org
Job Accommodation Network: disability employment assistance: www.jan.wvu.edu
National Council for Workforce Education: www.ncwe.org
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS): www.sacscoc.org
Student Aid: www.studentaid.ed.gov
Students with Disabilities Resource: www.disabilityresources.org/TEXAS
TechPrep: www.techpreptexas.org
Texas Association of College Technical Educators: www.tacte.org
Texas Association of Community Colleges: www.tacc.org
Texas Common Course Numbering System: www.tccn.org
Texas Workforce Commission Apprenticeships: www.twc.state.tx.us/svcs/apprentice
Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board’s website: www.thecb.state.tx.us
THEA: www.thea.nesinc.com/index.asp
THEA Faculty Manual: www.thea.nesinc.com/PDFs/THEA_FacultyManual.pdf
Virtual College of Texas: www.vct.org




                                                                        Continued on next page




                                           120
              Helpful Links, continued
              Web Site Addresses from THECB GIPWE:

             Accrediting Bureau of Health Education Schools (ABHES) - www.abhes.org
             American Assoc. of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) www.aacrao.org
oc. of Community Colleges (AACC): www.aacc.nche.edu
             American Assoc. of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE): www.aacte.org
             American Assoc. of Medical Assistants (AAMA): www.aama-ntl.org
             American Assoc. for Respiratory Care (AARC): www.aarc.org
             American Bar Assoc. (ABA) Standing Committee on Legal Assistants:
             www.abanet.org/legalservices/legalassistants/home.html
             American Board of Funeral Service Education (ABFSE): www.abfse.org
             American Culinary Federation, Inc. (ACF): www.acfchefs.org
             American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA): www.ahima.org
             American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc. (AOTA): www.aota.org
             American Physical Therapy Association (APTA): www.apta.org
             American Registry of Diagnostic medical Sonographers (ARDMS): www.ardms.org
             American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP): www.ascp.org
             Assoc. for Career and Technical Education (ACTE): www.acteonline.org
             Assoc. of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP): www.acbsp.org
             Assoc. for Institutional Research (AIR): www.airweb.org
             Assoc. on Higher Education and Disabilities (AHEAD): www.ahead.org
             Assoc. of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP)
             www.hsc.missouri.edu/~shrp/asahp/info.html
             Assoc. of Surgical Technologists (AST): www.ast.org
             Career Colleges and Schools of Texas (CCST): www.colleges-schools.org
             Career Development Resources (CDR) www.cdr.state.tx.us
             Center for the Health Professions – PEW Health Professions Commission:
             www.futurehealth.ucsf.edu/compubs.html
             Certification Information for Aviation Maintenance Technician Schools: www.2.faa.gov
             Cisco Training and Certifications: www.cisco.com/warp/public/10/wwtraining
             Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs: www.caahep.org
             Emergency Medical Services Educators’ Association of Texas (EMSEAT): www.emseat.org
             ERIC Database (online search function): www.ericir.syr.edu/Eric
             Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS): www.nces.ed.gov/ipeds/index.html
             Joint Review Committee in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT): www.jrcert.org
             Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS) Information: www.mous.net
             National Accreditation Commission of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences (NACCAS)
             www.naccas.org
             National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS): www.naacls.org
             National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD):
             www.arts-accredit.org/nasad/consult.html
             National Center for Education Statistics (NCES): www.nces.ed.gov
                                                                                   Continued on next page




                                                        121
Helpful Links, continued
Web Site Addresses from THECB GIPWE, continued

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE): www.ncate.org
National Court Reporters Association (NCRA) Verbatim Reporters Center: www.ncraonline.org
National Society for Histotechnology (NSH): www.nsh.org
North American Veterinary Technician Association (NAVTA): www.navta.net
Novell Professional Certifications: www.education.novell.com/certinfo
Occupational Information Network (O-NET): www.doleta.gov/programs/onet
Occupational Outlook Handbook (online searchable edition): www.bls.gov/oco/home.htm
State of Texas Official Web Site: www.state.tx.us
Texas Administrators of Continuing Education (TACE): www.taceonline.org
Texas Association for Developmental Education (TADE): www.tade.org
Texas Association of College Technical Educators (TACTE): www.TACTE.ORG
Texas Board of Nurse Examiners (BNE): www.bvne.state.tx.us
Texas Board of Vocational Nurse Examiners (BVNE): www.link.tsl.state.tx.us/tx/bvne
Texas Commission on Fire Protection (TCFP): www.tcfp.state.tx.us
Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education (TCLEOSE)
www.tcleose.state.tx.us
Texas Community College Teachers Association (TCCTA): www.tccta.org
Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) www.tdcj.state.tx.us
Texas Department of Health (TDH): www.tdh.state.tx.us
Texas Department of Human Services (TDHHS):www.dhs.state.tx.us
Texas Labor Market Information: www.twc.state.tx.us/lmi/lmi.html
Texas Skill Standards Board: www.tssb.org
Texas Society of Allied Health Professions (TSAHP): www.health.swt.edu/tsahp
Texas State Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (SOICC)
www.soicc.state.tx.us
Texas Workforce Commission/ Local Workforce Development Boards
www.twc.state.tx.us/dirs/wdbs/wdbmap.html
TexasWorkforceCommission/ProprietaryInstitutions:
www.twc.state.tx.us/svcs/propschools/prophp.html
Texas Workforce Commission/ Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998
www.twc.state.tx.us/svcs/jtpa/wiajtpa.html
U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Home Page (BLS): www.bls.gov
U.S. Department of Education/ Office of Vocational and Adult Education
www.ed.gov/offices/OVAE/index.html




                                           122
    Virtual College of Texas (VCT)
    (www.vct.org)

    The Virtual College of Texas is a collaborative of all Texas public two-year colleges. It was
    created by the Texas Association of Community Colleges to facilitate sharing of distance
    learning courses among member colleges.

    By the terms of the formal VCT collaborative agreement signed by Texas two-year colleges,
    students may enroll at their local colleges to access courses provided by other colleges that
    participate in VCT. Each college participates in VCT as it chooses.

    It is important to understand that VCT is not a separate educational entity that offers courses and
    enrolls students. Only VCT member colleges do that. To take a course offered through VCT, the
    student must be admitted to a local community college.

    If a student is interested in taking a course listed in the VCT online schedule, the first step is for
    that student to contact their local community college. That is where the student will register, even
    though the course itself is provided by another college.

    After the student is admitted, he/she then may request that a space be reserved in a VCT course.
    Once a space is reserved, the student is formally enrolled in it, following the local college's
    registration procedures.

    Just because a course is in a VCT course schedule does not mean that the college will elect to
    enroll anyone in it. Community colleges select the courses offered through VCT that it wants to
    make available to students in its service area.

    VCT host colleges are responsible for providing support services that a student may needs.
    These services may include:
      learning resources (library)
      counseling
      financial aid
      computer lab access
      testing
      tutoring and other services

    The local VCT Coordinator can help students access services that they may need.

    The rights and responsibilities of a VCT student are the same as any other student at that
    community college. The policies of the local college, applies when the student enrolls.

                                                                                     Continued on next page




                                                     123
Virtual College of Texas, continued
The following colleges currently participate as Host colleges in VCT. That means that they
selectively offer courses that are available through VCT.

Alvin Community College
Angelina College
Austin Community College
Blinn College
Brazosport College
Cisco Jr. College
Clarendon College
College of the Mainland
Del Mar College
El Paso Community College
Frank Phillips College
Galveston College
Howard College
Kilgore College
Laredo Community College
Lee College
Midland College
Navarro College
North Central Texas College
Northeast Texas Community College
North Harris Montgomery Community College District
Odessa College
Panola College
Paris Jr. College
South Plains College
Southwest Texas Jr. College
TSTC-Harlingen
TSTC-Marshall
TSTC-Waco
Tarrant County College
Temple College
Texarkana College
Texas Southmost College
Trinity Valley Community College
Tyler Jr. College
Vernon College
Victoria College
Weatherford College
Western Texas College




                                              124
                                         Glossary
Academic: A term referring to courses and programs designed for transfer.

Academic Associate Degree: A type of degree program leading to the Associate of Arts (AA) or
Associate of Science (AS) degree and intended to transfer to a four-year college or university.

Academic Fresh Start: allows students who were enrolled in a postsecondary institution 10 or
more years ago to seek admission to colleges without consideration of that work. Should the
student seek admission under this option, then no college courses or credits ten years or older
will be evaluated. Students must still submit records of college of attendance at previous
institutions, and submit transcripts indicating all previous course work attempted. Students are
not allowed to pick and choose which courses can and cannot count.

ACCUPLACER: one of the TSI assessments tests to evaluate if students are ready for college-
level work. Other tests are ASSET,THEA, and COMPASS.

Advanced Placement Program (AP): The College Board Advanced Placement Program is a
nationally recognized program for introducing students to college-level work while they are still
in high school. Students who enroll in higher-level academic courses identified for Advanced
Placement may have received college credit based on high school course grades and performance
on national AP examinations.

Advanced technical certificate: A certificate that has a specific associate or baccalaureate
degree (or, in some circumstances, junior-level standing in a baccalaureate degree program) as
prerequisite for admission. It must consist of at least 16 and no more that 50 SCH. It must be
focused, clearly related to the prerequisite degree, and justifiable to meet industry or external
agency requirements.

Affiliation agreement: Documentation between a college and business/industry affiliate
defining an educational partnership, and specifying conditions, roles, and time lines.

Applied Associate Degree: A type of degree program designed to lead the individual directly to
employment in a specific career. Refers to the associate of applied arts, associate of applied
science and the associate of occupational studies degrees. The term “applied” in an associate
degree name is the distinguishing characteristic of the technical nature of the college work. See
Associate of Applied Arts, Associate of Applied Science, and Associate of Occupational Studies.

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Glossary, continued
Apprenticeship training program: A program, registered with the U.S. Department of Labor or
the state apprenticeship agency in accordance with the National Apprenticeship Act (29 U.S.C.
50), that is conducted or sponsored by an employer, a group of employers, or a joint
apprenticeship committee representing both employers and a union, and that contains all terms
and conditions for the qualification, recruitment, selection, employment, and training of
apprentices. These programs must be certified by the Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training
(BAT) of the U. S. Department of Labor.

Articulation: A planned process linking educational institutions and experiences to assist
students in making a smooth transition from one level of education to another without
experiencing delays or duplication in learning.

Articulation agreement: A commitment to a program designed to provide students with a non-
duplicative sequence of progressive achievement. Such an agreement might be signed between
two institutions, such as high schools and colleges or between two-year and four-year institutions
to promote the transfer and success of students.

Assessment (of students): All colleges must have policies and procedures for the proper
assessment of students in basic skills of reading, writing, and math to ensure proper advising and
course placement.

ASSET: one of the TSI assessments tests to evaluate if students are ready for college-level work.
Other tests are THEA, ACCUPLACER and COMPASS.

Associate of Applied Arts (AAA) degree program: A program of study designed for
immediate employment and/or career advancement that emphasizes the application of artistic
principles and the humanities through an orderly, identifiable sequence of courses. The degree
program is composed of technical courses, general education courses, related instruction courses,
and, as appropriate, elective courses to prepare students for employment in the performing arts.

Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree program: A program of study designed for
immediate employment and/or career advancement that is composed of an orderly, identifiable
sequence of courses designed to meet specific occupational competencies and outcomes. The
degree program is composed of technical courses, general education courses, related instruction,
and, as appropriate, elective courses to prepare students for employment as technicians or
professionals.
The Associate of Arts in Teaching Degree (AAT): a Texas Higher Education Coordinating
Board (THECB) approved degree program consisting of lower division courses intended for
transfer to baccalaureate programs that prepare students for initial Texas teacher certification.

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Glossary, continued
The Advanced Technical Credit Program (Statewide Articulation): is an advanced
placement program provide a method for high school students who continue technical programs
of study in college to received credit for knowledge and skills without duplication of coursework.
Students successfully demonstrating college-level competence in content-enhanced high school
courses are eligibly to receive banked (in escrow) credit for courses that are part of an associate
of applied science (AAS) degree or certificate plan offered by public two-year colleges. Some
universities may also honor these courses, particularly those that offer BAAS, BAT, BSIS, or
similar baccalaureate degrees.

Automated Student and Adult Learner Follow-Up System (ASALFS): An automated process
that uses employment and education databases to track program completers, verifying their status
in terms of employment or further education. The follow-up system is conducted by Career
Development Resources (CDR).

Award: The credential granted a student for successful completion of a set curriculum such as a
degree or certificate.

BAT: An acronym for the Bureau of Apprenticeship Training of the U.S. Department of Labor.

Capstone experience: A learning experience that results in consolidation and synthesis of
program competencies.

Career cluster: A group of related awards or exit options (degrees or certificates) identified by a
four- or six-digit CIP code.

Career Center Services: Student services which allow students to evaluate and adjust career
plans based upon information on employers, occupations, wages, job openings, skill
qualifications, and education and training options.

CATEMA: system is a web based tool designed to standardize reporting methods for Tech Prep
and other advanced educational courses. Many community colleges use the CATEMA system to
identify workforce students who are eligible for articulated credit. An advisor’s account on the
system allows them to verify a student’s recommendation for advanced credit. They can view a
student’s complete course history and whether advanced credit was awarded.

Certificate program: A technical program designed for entry-level employment or for
upgrading skills and knowledge within an occupation. Certificate programs serve as building
blocks and exit points within AAS degree programs. Post AAS certificates are also available.

Certification/licensure/registration: A process sponsored by an agency or association, and
designed by educators in cooperation with business, industry, and/or labor, that validates and/or
certifies the skills and learning experiences of a candidate and enters the name of the successful
candidate on a registry.
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Glossary, continued
CIP code: The Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) is a federal taxonomy developed
by the National Center for Education Statistics of the U.S. Department of Education and used
throughout the nation by government agencies and professional associations to establish standard
terminology and record-keeping for higher education programs.

Clinical education: A type of external learning experience whereby the student receives
instruction at a sponsoring health professions setting. Clinical practice is supervised by qualified
faculty members employed by the educational institution sponsoring the program or by
preceptors employed by the clinical site.

Commission on Colleges: The Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges
and Schools (SACS) is the recognized regional accrediting body in the 11 U.S. Southern states,
including Texas.

Concurrent course credit: See dual credit.

Concurrent enrollment (dual enrollment): Enrollment by a student in two different institutions
simultaneously.

Contact hour: The basic instructional unit for funding purposes. A time unit of instruction
consisting of 60 minutes, of which 50 minutes must be direct instruction.

Continuing Education certificate: A Coordinating Board approved Workforce education
certificate containing a coherent sequence of Continuing Education courses totaling 360 or more
contact hours and listed on the college’s approved inventory of programs.

Continuing Education course: A Coordinating Board-approved higher education technical
course offered for Continuing Education units and conducted in a competency-based format.
Such a course provides a quick and flexible response to business, industry, and student needs for
intensive preparatory, supplemental or upgrade training and education and has specific
occupational and/or apprenticeship training objectives.

Continuing Education Unit (CEU): Basic unit for Continuing Education courses. One
Continuing Education unit (CEU) is 10 contact hours of participation in an organized continuing
education experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction, and qualified instruction.

Contract instruction: The delivery of a course or courses to meet the needs of a contracting
entity, which may be a business, industry, or external agency. Refer to Chapter 9 of THECB
Rules and Regulations.

Co-operative education: A type of external learning experience where students receive both
lecture instruction and practical experience at a worksite.
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Glossary, continued
Coordinating Board: A reference to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB).
The Coordinating Board was created by the Texas Legislature in 1965. The Board is made up of
members appointed from across the state by the Governor for six-year terms.

COMPASS: one of the TSI assessments tests to evaluate if students are ready for college-level
work. Other tests are ASSET, ACCUPLACER and THEA.

Course inventory: A list of courses approved by the Coordinating Board for use by a specific
college.

Developmental courses: Courses designated as remedial or compensatory to help students
develop basic skills. Developmental courses approved for state funding are listed in the Lower
Division Academic Course Guide Manual (ACGM). A TSI approved test
COMPASS,ASSET,ACCUPLACER or THEA) determine the need.

Dual credit: A process by which a high school student enrolls in a college course and receives
simultaneous academic credit for the course from both the college and the high school.

Dual enrollment: See Concurrent enrollment.

Enhanced skills certificate: A certificate consisting of at least six and no more than 15 semester
credit hours and attached to an applied associate degree that provides the student with enhanced
skills.

English as a Second Language Compass Test: Non-English speaking students must take this
test first to evaluate their competency in Listening/Speaking, Grammar/Writing and
Reading/Vocabulary. The results of this assessment determine the need for developmental
classes.

External learning experiences: Competency-based learning experiences, paid or unpaid, that
supplement lectures and laboratory instruction and that are offered in business and industry.
(examples: co-operative education, clinical experience, practicum, internship or apprenticeship).

Field of Study Curriculum (FOSC): A set of academic courses that will satisfy the lower-
division requirements for a baccalaureate degree in a specific academic area at a general
academic teaching institution. A field of study curriculum affects academic degree programs at
public colleges or universities as designated within the particular field of study curriculum.

Graduate guarantee: College certification of student competencies as defined by the Program
Competency Profile. A college Graduate Guarantee policy allows graduates who are judged by
an employer to be lacking in technical job skills identified as exit competencies for their specific
degree or certificate program to return to the college for up to nine tuition-free hours of
education.
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Glossary, continued
Institutional Award: A course or series of courses with fewer than 15 SCH or 360 CE contact
hours that is not part of the Coordinating Board maintained Program Inventory, that represents
achievement of an identifiable skill proficiency or meets a student’s self-defined educational
objective.

Internship: A supervised, external learning experience for students in non-health professions
programs. Students may be paid or unpaid.

Labor market information: Documentation pertinent to local, regional, state, and/or national
workforce demand for the program i.e. targeted occupations identified by an appropriate state or
federal agency or committee.

Level One Certificate: program of study of no more than one year that consists of at least 15
and no more than 42 semester credit hours. Level I certificate programs are exempt from the
requirements of the Texas Success Initiative, although all certificate programs must provide for
local assessment and remediation of students.

Level Two Certificate: A program of study that consists of at least 43 and no more than 59
semester credit hours. Level 2 Certificates are subject to the requirements of the Texas Success
Initiative.

Level Three Certificates: See Enhanced Skills Certificate.

Licensing: Legal authorization to practice in an occupational field, granted by a state agency
after passage of a formal examination.

Local articulation: options provide high school students opportunities for award of articulated
college credit for high school or college courses not covered by the Advanced Technical Credit
Program (Statewide Articulation) and a method to articulate courses and programs with colleges
not participating in the ATC Program. Conditions for award of credit for courses that are part of
an associate of applied science (AAS) degree plan are described in locally developed articulation
agreements. Some universities may also honor these courses.

Local Need Course: A workforce education course approved for a specific college.

Local Workforce Development Board: Mechanism authorized by the Texas Legislature and
used by a local governmental or economic development body to determine the workforce
development needs of the area. Refer to the website
http://www.twc.state.tx.us/dirs/wdbs/wdbmap.html for a listing of local boards.

Lower Division Academic Course Guide Manual (ACGM): The Coordinating Board’s official
statewide inventory of lower division academic courses that may be offered for state funding by
any community college.
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Glossary, continued
Marketable Skills Achievement Award: A credit program of 9-14 SCH or a workforce
continuing education program of 144-359 contact hours that meet the minimum standard for
program length specified in the federal Workforce Investment Act (WIA) but are too short to
qualify as certificate programs on the Coordinating Board program inventory.

Mirror-image course: A Workforce Education Course Manual (WECM) course that may be
offered in both a SCH and a CEU format.

Non-credit courses: Courses that result in the award of continuing education units (CEU) as
specified by SACS criteria. Only courses that result in the award of CEU may be submitted for
state funding.

Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) codes: Five-digit identifiers for occupational
clusters that comprise a coding system designed by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. These
codes are used by the Texas Workforce Commission to generate occupational projections and
expected industry staffing patterns for Texas.

Options: Different associate degrees in the same CIP code.

Practicum: A type of external learning experience whereby students receive practical
experiences in the workplace.

Prerequisite: A course or competency required prior to entering a program or a course.

Program: An organized curriculum directly related to the acquisition and/or upgrading of
technical skills which may include several awards. Programs are defined by a CIP code.

Program linkage: Agreements between community and/or technical college programs and other
educational institutions to facilitate transfer of courses or course credits and promote a seamless
educational pathway.

Remediation: An activity designed to teach basic competencies in such areas as reading, writing,
oral communication and mathematics. See developmental courses.

SCANS skills: Skills identified by the Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills as
needed by American workers entry-level employment.

Shortened semester: A semester that is compressed into fewer than 16 weeks.

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS): A regional agency that sets standards
for colleges and schools desiring accreditation. See Commission on Colleges.
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Glossary, continued
Special Topics course: A WECM course that should be used only when course content does not
exist in any other WECM course. The Special Topics course is intended for temporary use or
transitional content.

Specializations: Concentrations within certificate or applied associate degree programs that
reflect the training required for specific occupations within a broad career field and result in the
same award. Specializations must share a common core of courses.

Technical: A term referring to workforce education courses and programs.

Texas Education Code (TEC): Statutes of the State of Texas dealing with education. In
general, the statutes dealing with higher education are within Title III of the code.

Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB): See Coordinating Board.

Texas Success Initiative (TSI): A program of assessment, advising, developmental education,
and other strategies to ensure college readiness. Replaces the Texas Academic Skills Program
(TASP) on September 1, 2003. THEA, ASSET, ACCUPLACER and COMPASS are the TSI
evaluation tests that determine college- readiness or the need for Developmental Education.

Texas Workforce Commission: The agency established by the Texas Legislature to address
welfare reform and workforce development program consolidation.

THEA: one of the TSI assessments tests to evaluate if students are ready for college-level work.
Other tests are ASSET, ACCUPLACER and COMPASS.

TSI-waived: Refers to Level 1 certificate programs that are not subject to state mandated
assessment and remediation requirements. Continuing Education courses do not require TSI
assessment.

Workforce Continuing Education course: See Continuing Education course.

Workforce Education Course Manual (WECM): The Coordinating Board’s official statewide
inventory of workforce education courses.

Workforce Transfer Agreements with Universities: Many community colleges are working
with universities to develop transfer agreements that allow the student to apply technical
education towards his baccalaureate degree.




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