CFFB Level 1 Cert

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					Day #1
Why Crossfit Football
  3 Categories: General, General
      Specific and Specific.
• General means exercises that do not directly assist in
  developing sport skill; but rather, serve to develop
  general physical qualities such as general work capacity,
  muscle cross-section, increased bone density,
  connective tissue strength, flexibility/mobility, etc.
• General exercises would include Olympic Weightlifting,
  power lifts, dumbbells, kettlebells, anything you can do
  with a barbell. This would include gymnastics, pull ups,
  ring dips, handstand push-ups.
• General Specific means exercises which match the
  energy system demands (speed of muscle contraction,
  duration of effort, etc) of the sport skill and some or all of
  the active musculature yet do not directly match the
  physical demands and direction of the sport skill.
    3 Categories: General, General
        Specific and Specific.
•   General Specific exercises would include would include met cons where we
    are training the time domains and performing functional movements
    performed at high intensity. Pushing and pulling of weighted equipment that
    fit within the time domain of training, 4-10 seconds. Sprint work, over speed,
    resisted running, dot drills, speed ladders and all athletically based
    footwork.
•   Specific qualifies are those which exactly match the amplitude and direction
    of the sport skill and, correspondingly, develop the special work capacity
    and have a direct effect on the development of sport skill.
•   Specific exercises are ones that are specific to football. This includes 7 on
    7, 1 on 1 drills, catching passes, running routes, pass pro drills, foot work
    drills, running ropes, line drills and anything that is directly related to specific
    training football.
•   CrossFit Football resides in the General and General Specific training for
    Football. But by utilizing general movements/skills and performing them in
    the General Specific time components we can create a new way to train for
    football, CrossFit Football.
    How do we cycle the program?
•    Off-season
    – Strength/Speed phase
    – Strength/Speed/Metcon
    – Strength/Metcon
•    Pre-season
    – a. Strength
•    Season
    – Strength/Metcon
     Forging Powerful Athletes: 9
          Basic Movements
•   Squat
•   Front Squat
•   Overhead Squat
•   Bench Press
•   Press
•   Push Press
•   Push Jerk
•   Deadlift
•   Power Clean
     Why these movements?
• The Squat is the cornerstone of every football
  player’s power. Football is played using the legs.
  A player goes from a loaded position and
  explodes upon the snap of the ball. This loaded
  or coiled position requires the legs to be able to
  travel through ROM and explode on contact.
  Strength is the biggest ally of this process. A
  player can develop his legs, gain size, strength
  and explosion and violently generate force
  through training the Back Squat
      Why these movements?
• The Front Squat is the training exercise of the Clean. It
  teaches a player to squat with a vertical back. It
  promotes hip flexibility and the ability to support load in a
  frontal plane. It teaches explosion in that if the player
  cannot generate force through the hips he cannot
  complete the lift. Different than the Back Squat where a
  player can lean at the waist to incorporate more back
  and finish a lift, if a player leans in the front the front
  squat the weight will ―dump‖. This is an excellent lift and
  some consider it better than a Back Squat. Why is it not
  better? Because through the back squat, a player can
  handle more weight thus recruiting more muscle and
  training overall strength more efficiently.
      Why these movements?
• It has been said you can tell a lot about an athlete by
  how he Overhead Squats. This is a true statement. It is
  a marker for athleticism and flexibility. The ability to
  reach a squatted position with weight held overhead is
  not an easy task. The ability to activate a player’s
  shoulders to support the weight and the flexibility and
  strength to complete the lift are a show of strength and
  athletic nature. This could be considered the vertical
  jump of the various squats. The vertical jump has long
  been considered the mark of an athlete. The Overhead
  Squat would be the marker for lifts.
      Why these movements?
• Bench Press is considered a body builder move and not
  considered functional. Maybe due to legions of guys at
  Gold Gym doing bench press with chrome weights this
  move is not considered ―functional‖ in the CrossFit
  community. However, while this thought might have
  merit, very few lifts are as functional in a sport as bench
  is to football. In a game where a player is required to use
  his hands to extend a defender or blocker the bench
  press is vital. This movement builds a large strong chest
  and excellent for shoulder stability if coached correctly.
  Much like the squat if not done properly it can be
  damaging. No other movement has as much function for
  day-to-day survival playing in the ―trenches‖ than the
  bench press.
    Why these movements?
• The Press is taught for overall strength
  and the ability to support the shoulder
  through full range of motion. Start with the
  weight on a player’s frontal deltoids and
  drive with the shoulders pressing the
  weight to overhead. This demonstrates
  strength through a full range and creates
  powerful strong shoulders. It will work in
  conjunction with the bench press to
  increase overall size and strength.
      Why these movements?
• Push Press teaches an athlete to recruit power from
  their hips. Much like the Shoulder Press the athlete
  starts with the load on the frontal deltoid then explosively
  rebounds their hips through a full ROM and comes to
  extension overhead. This teaches proper hip function
  and athleticism. Proper hip function is the largest
  deciding factor when looking at those players that are
  successful on the field. In high school size is the largest
  deciding factor in who is successful but once the player
  reaches a professional level where age, size and
  strength are consistent, hip function and the ability to
  generate violent force through a full range of motion is
  the deciding factor in who makes it and who does not.
      Why these movements?
• Push Jerk is the second part of the Clean and Jerk
  movement. This movement teaches the player to
  activate his hips and drive through to full extension and
  re-bend to catch the weight in a squatted position. It
  teaches a player how to explode through his hips and
  generate power in a short time period. The movement is
  done quickly and violently and has correlation to a player
  exploding his hips upon contact to make a hit or make a
  tackle. Hip function is vital to a player’s ability to be
  successful on the field. A vertical jump also
  demonstrates an athlete’s ability to generate force in a
  vertical plane. A push jerk demands the same task from
  a player except with weight and a vertical movement by
  the shoulders.
    Why these movements?
• Deadlift is fundamental much like the
  back squat because it incorporates a total
  body movement. It recruits large muscles
  to pull big weights off from a ―dead‖
  position to a standing position. It teaches
  an athlete to start at the bottom of a
  movement and under load pull to full
  extension. This movement is as vital to the
  football as any movement.
     Why these movements?
• Power Clean – One of the fastest movements in
  sports, the Clean is used for explosion and
  violent movement. Much like the push jerk and
  the front squat it requires a player to generate
  force from his hips. A player starts with an active
  hip and he travels into triple extension
  generating force in a vertical plane. Much like
  the vertical jump and push jerk it forces the
  athlete to move dynamically. This vertical
  dynamic movement is vital to football success.
Biomechanics & Motor Learning
                            Introduction
• WARNING: SAID Principle (Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demands) –
  Preparation for activities that are very dynamic & ballistic in nature with
  high amounts of Change of Direction (COD).
• Applicable to any activity or sport which demands the variables that we
  develop (MOE Factor)
• (3P’s)
    – Purposeful - What is the reason for the activity?
    – Practical - Can it be done?
    – Prudent - Is it developing the variable that it was intended to?

    – Persistent Pursuit of Perfection
• Coaches ACCOUNTABILITY & RESPONSIBILITY:
    – Didn’t teach
    – Didn’t reinforce
    – Praxis – The human body’s ability to coordinate motor function for performing
      new skills, stimulus and/or tasks.
    Biomechanics & Motor Learning
•   Praxis – The human body’s ability to coordinate motor function to address a
    problem(s).
•   Biomechanical Vocabulary (Basic Primal Movements)
         –   Upper Body Push
         –   Upper Body Pull
         –   Lower Body X-Axis (Squat)
         –   Lower Body Y-Axis (Lunge)
         –   Lower Body Z-Axis (Step Up)
•   Combination: Chunking – Individual memory units string to create patterns.
         –   Sequential
         –   Parallel
•   Transmitter Systems (Force) do not act in isolation
         –   Excitatory (Additive)
         –   Inhibitory
         –   Novel meta-modulatory effects
o Motor Sequential Learning - Incremental acquisition of movements into well-
  executed behavior.
o Motor Adaptation - Increasing capacity to compensate for environmental change.
          MOE Factor (Margin of Error)
                       Physiology of Developing Athletes
         Crossfit and Athletic Preparation “Bookend Benefits: 1st & Last”


•   Limiting Factors (Lf)
     ↑   Replication of Speed – You’ve taught them to do it once, condition them to do it every time
     ↑   Speed of Movement
     ↑   Power
     ↑   Strength
           − Greater Cross Sectional Area (CSA) – Greater # of myofibrils = a greater potential for cross bridging
           − Neural Recruitment
                  •   Rate Encoding
                  •   Number Encoding
                  •   Pattern Encoding
     ↑   Fundamental Movement Patterns (Primals)
     ↑   Joint Stability & Joint Mobility
     ↑   Work Capacity & General Physical Preparedness – Increased tolerance for:
           −   Higher Heart Rate (HR)
           −   Higher Respiratory Rate (RR)
           −   Higher acidic environment (LA)
           −   Higher level of discomfort
                         Posture & Speed
                Produce Force, Transmit Force & Reduce Force


• Speed can be developed in the weight room
    – Structural Integration -vs- Functional Integration
    – Underlies all performance – Transmission of Force “Wet Noodle Model”
    – “Break at the Ankles” body positioning
• Shoulder Girdle (ShG)
    – ShG Stability (Scapula)
        • Retracted
        • Depressed (Reverse Shrug)
    – ShG Mobility
        • Push musculature (Pecs, Delts & Triceps)
        • Pull musculature (Lats)
• Arm Swing [Flexion & Extension from the shoulders]
    – Punch – Stride Frequency
    – Hammer – Stride Length
• Pelvic Girdle (PlvG)
    – Maintained Neutral
Movements Practical
 (SAS & XLR8)
     Day 1
                  Dynamic Warm-Up #1
•   Dead Bugs (Perpetual Motion Hamstring Stretch)
     –   R Arm (:30)
     –   Left Arm (:30)
     –   Both Arms (:30)
•   Spiderman Complex
     –   w/ Horizontal Rotation
     –   w/ Vertical Rotation
     –   to Hamstring Stretch
•   See-Saw Walk to Burpie
     –   R to strict Burpie
     –   L to strict Burpie
•   Acceleration Warm-Up
     –   High Knees Fw & Bw
     –   Butt Kicks Fw & Bw
     –   High Knees R&L
     –   Butt Kicks R&L
         Straight Ahead Speed (SAS) &
              Acceleration (XLR8)
• Straight Ahead Speed (SAS) & Acceleration Phase “Dive & Drive”
    –   Wall Drill [linear piston action]

    –   Resisted Skips

    –   Resisted Runs

    –   Push Up Position [Lead R&L]
          • Emphasize: 1) Posture 2) Powerful, Urgent & rhythmic 6-Steps (10yds)

    –   Hanging Starts [Lead R&L]
          • Emphasize: 1) Posture 2) Powerful, Urgent & rhythmic 6-Steps (10yds)

    –   Lunge Position Starts
          • Open (O) R&L
          • Cross Over (Xo) R&L
          • Forward (R&L)
          • Backwards O & Xo / R&L

    –   40yd Dash – Stances & Starts
          • Athletic Pos
          • Shotgun Lead R&L
          • Rolling Start R&L
          • Natural breaks at 10yds & 20yds
CFFB Back Squat
  CFFB Athletes put the bar on
their traps. Just below the neck.
 Putting the bar high increases
    the distance bar to hips.
    This has several implications:
•   More torque on your lower back.
•   More upright position compared to low bar.
•   Easier to squat deep.
•   Hips & quads evenly emphasized.
•   Less maximal weight. (Lower Bar Back Squat)
•   Better transfer to Football.
•   Easier on your shoulders if you’re inflexible.
       Back Squat instruction and
              application
Set-up:                       Movement:
• Feet shoulder width apart   • Elbows down or back
• toes slightly turned out    • Drive butt back and pull
  (The Femur)                   the knees out
• Weight on heels             • Pull yourself down into
• Chest up                      bottom position
• Grip just outside           • Lumbar curve, chest up
  shoulders. (on the line)    • Weight in heels
• Pelvis turned forward       • Range of motion, hip
• Elbows down or back           below knee
• Scapula Contracted          • Drive up through heels
• Eyes forward                • Lead with elbows and
                                push the hips through
          Corrective Exercises
           (Static & Active):
• Holding Squats          • Spider-Mans
• Static Squats pushing   • Hop Ups / ―Burpees‖
  legs out                • Box Squats
• Step Ups                • 4 Position Squats
• Sumo Squat Touch        • Bottom Tabata
  Down                      Squats w/ ball pick up
• Sumo Walk Outs          • Wall Walk
• Bridges
Learning the Deadlift
 The Deadlift is the most basic
 of primal movements. The bar
is pulled off the ground with the
legs with straight arms until the
 knees, hips and shoulders are
           locked out.
                 Key Points:
• Stance: Feet slightly inside the shoulders; same
  starting position as the vertical jump.
• Grip: One thumb off of smooth section of the
  bar.
• Starting Position: Bar against the shins.
• Back Angle Starting Position: Back angle is
  found by positioning the bar under the scapula.
• The Pull: Pull starts from the heels: dragging the
  bar up the shins and pulling into the ―pocket‖.
            The Movement
• Lumbar Extension: Maintain a flat back
  through out the pull.
• Neck is placed in normal anatomical
  position: this is accomplished by looking
  at the floor 3-4 feet in front you.
• Take a large breath and contract the mid-
  section and prepare to pull.
• Make an even pull: Towing a Car with a
  slack chain vs. taut chain.
      Anatomical Differences

• The anatomy of the lifter will help
  determine the correct back angle in
  the starting position.
• Tall vs. Short
• Long Torso vs. Short Torso
Cool-down & Post WOD
      Stretching
Warm-up & Vertical Jump &
      Broad Jump
Dynamic Warm-Up
       &
 Movement Prep
Dynamic Warm-Up & Movement Prep
• Purpose of:
    –   Central Nervous System (CNS) arousal
    –   Optimal mobility
    –   Increase blood flow, circulation & cardiac output (Circulatory System)
    –   Prime the Metabolic System
    –   Increase core temperature
    –   Teach basics
    –   Reinforce prior lessons
    –   Teach & coach additional movements, skill points & progressions
    –   Corrective exercises
    –   Develop camaraderie
    –   WOD specific
    –   Set the tone for the WOD (Psychology)

• Decrease injury prevalence
• Increase performance
            Dynamic Warm-Up #2
• ITB Slow Twisting Kick Complex
   – Hands glued to the floor w/ a low kick
   – Low kick & Low reach
   – Butt drop & High kick
• Inch Worms
• Primal Warm-Up
   – Swimmer’s Squat
   – FwLunge w/ dLat Flx R&L
   – Carioca Lunge R&L
• Cocky Walk Complex
   – Walk F2B / R&L
   – Skip F2B / R&L
   – Flips F2B / R&L
Bench Press
Anyone who says the bench
   press is not a functional
 movement has never been
 involved in a contact sport.
               Key Points
• Position yourself on the bench so your
  hips and head are on the bench
• Grip: One thumb off of smooth section.
• Feet: Legs at 45 degrees; toes slightly in
  front of knees
• Walk shoulders down towards hips to
  create arch.
• Active shoulders.
          Key Points (cont.)
• Breath is drawn in and held.
• Bar starts over the top of the chest.
• Bar is lowered and touches chest right
  below the nipple line.
• Bar is pushed in a straight line back into
  starting position.
• Maintain active shoulders through out
  movement.
• Drive from your legs, pushing back not up.
Day #2
Combine Drills: Change of
Direction & Agility / Manual
        Resistances
     Physiology
          of
Manual Resistance (MR)
  Types of Muscular Contractions
• Muscular contractions:
  – Concentric: M. Tension __________ Ext. Force
  – IsoMetric: M. Tension __________ Ext. Force
  – Eccentric: M. Tension __________ Ext. Force


• Compensatory Action Reflexes
  – True Eccentric (AccNeg):
     M. Tension __________ Ext Force
  – Quasi-IsoMetric:
     M. Tension __________ Ext Force
Movements Practical
 (COD & Agility)
     Day 2
    Change of Direction (COD) & Agility
•   Change of Direction (COD)
     –   Athletic Position/ 2nd Lead [Linear] Open (O) & Cross Over (Xo)
     –   [w/ Rotation: Fw & Bw] @O&Xo

•   Pro Short Shuttle [5-10-5]
     –   Athletic Position / 2nd Lead Start @O&Xo
     –   Hard Cuts [Steps @3/6/3]
     –   Strong comparison to 40yd Dash times

•   3-Cone Pro Agility L-Drill
     –   40yd Dash Start
     –   Hard cuts for the 1st ½
     –   Speed Triangular cuts at the top of the fig. 8

•   Pro Long Shuttle [5-10-15]
     –   40yd Dash start
     –   Speed endurance
            Dynamic Warm-Up #3
• Pillar Complex
   – Front & Wide IsoLat R&L
   – Lateral Cpt. Morgan R&L
   – Rear Alt IsoLat R&L
• Jimmy Buffets R&L
• Leg Cradle to TwLunge (Lag leg only)
• Lateral Speed & Agility (LSA) Warm-Up
   –   Low & Slow R&L
   –   Quick R&L
   –   Singles Open (O) R&L
   –   Singles Cross Over (Xo) R&L
Power Clean
              Breathing
                  for
          Olympic Weightlifting
•   Take a deep breath in from your mouth.
•   Fill the stomach first.
•   Then the chest.
•   Hold the breath through the Snatch,
    Clean, and Jerk.
                  Grips?
• Open Grip ―The suicide grip!‖
• Close Grip
• Hook Grip
  – Holds better!
  – Requires less energy.
  – Harder to bend your elbows.
                 Hook Grip
• Press the hand against the bar.
• Make sure the skin is tight.
  – Do not let the skin in the hand fold in!
• Wrap thumb around the bar
• Fingers around the top of thumb.
  – Do not wrap the fingers above the knuckle!
• Relaxed Grip
  – You do not need a death grip!
               The Clean Grip
• Grab the bar outside hip width.
• Roughly one to one and half thumb width off the
  line.
• Your hands should sit 1‖ to 3‖ outside the
  shoulder width.
   – Wider: harder on the elbow to stay up.
   – Narrow: makes the start position tight, longer turn
     over and on the catch the hand may sit between the
     bar and the shoulder.
• Bar is in the frontal plane.
                  The Stance
• Starting Position:         • Landing Position:
   – Feet Under Hips. Like     – Feet outside hips.
     ―Take a free throw          ―Squat position‖
     shoot!‖                      • Knees bent.
   – Generation of force          • Chest up.
     against the ground.       – Weight on the heels of
     ―Try to push your           the feet.
     heels through the
     floor‖
   – A vertical extension
     ―Vertical Jump‖
                Front Squat
          (Would be what position?)
Set-up:                              Movement:
                                     • Weight against chest
      Same as Clean Grip!            • Elbows high
                                     • Drive butt back and pull the
• Feet shoulder width apart            knees out
• Weight on heels                    • Pull yourself down into bottom
• Chest Up                             position
• Grip just outside shoulders        • Lumbar curve, chest up
• Pelvis turned forward              • Weight in heels
• Elbows high, triceps parallel to   • Range of motion, hip below
  ground                               knee
• Eyes forward                       • Drive up through heels
                                     • Lead with elbows and push the
                                       hips through Feet outside hips.
    Clean & Front Squat Stretches
•   Pam Out Up & Down
•   Sit on Fingers (―Be Very CAREFUL!!!)
•   Squat Rack Stretch
•   Racked Stretch
•   Front Squat PNF Stretches
    (Proprioceptive Neuromuscular
    Facilitation Stretching)
    – Elbows Up
    – Elbows Down
          Clean Progression
•   Front Squat
•   High Hang
•   Mid Thigh Hang
•   Below Knee
•   Shin
•   Floor
                   Front Squat
                        to
              Hang (AKA: High Hang)
• High Hang Muscle Clean
   –   Elbows high, Quick Elbow Turn Over, Down to the High Hang, Shrug, Quick Elbow Turn
       Over, back to Front Squat Position

• Mid-Thigh Muscle Clean
   –   Elbows high, Quick Elbow Turn Over, Down to the Mid-Thigh, Shrug, Quick Elbow Turn
       Over, back to Front Squat Position

• Knees Muscle Clean
   –   Elbows high, Quick Elbow Turn Over, Down to the Knees, Shrug, Quick Elbow Turn Over,
       back to Front Squat Position

• Shin (Like you were lifting off the ground.)
   –   Elbows high, Quick Elbow Turn Over, Down to the Shin, Shrug, Quick Elbow Turn Over,
       back to Front Squat Position
 Up-Down 4 Position Power Clean
• High Hang (Bar Starts)
  – Shrug, Quick Elbow Turn Over, Elbows high, Racked in a Quarter Front Squat position
• Mid-Thigh Hang
  – Shrug, Quick Elbow Turn Over, Elbows high, Racked in a Quarter Front Squat position
• Knee
  – Shrug, Quick Elbow Turn Over, Elbows high, Racked in a Quarter Front Squat position
• Shin or Ground
  – Shrug, Quick Elbow Turn Over, Elbows high, Racked in a Quarter Front Squat position
―Try and keep your hands on the bar the hole time
  Barski Style.‖
                 The 3 Pulls
• 1st Pull
  – The Pick off the ground
• Transition
  – Scoop / Double Knee Bend
• 2nd Pull
  – Jump phase
• 3rd Pull
  – Pull under
   The Scoop? AKA: Jumping
• Vertical Jump / Pulling
• Landing / Receiving
                Power Clean & Clean
                  Starting Position
Set-up:                                 Movement:
• Feet between hip and shoulder width   • Drive through heels
• Feet in Jumping/Pulling position.     • Arms like straps
• Stand over the bar.                   • Full extension at hips
• Bar close to the shin.                • Shrug
• Squat down.                           • Drop under bar
• Grip the bar relaxed.                 • Front squat up
• Shoulders over the bar.
• Tight back                            Progression: (Full)
• Weight on heels                       • Dead Lift
• Chest high                            • Clean Pulls (Ground & Blocks)
• Butt up                               • Front squat
• Shoulders in front of wrists          • 4 Pos. Muscle Clean (Hang)
• Load mid-shin                         • 4 Pos. Power Clean (Hang)
• Eyes forward                          • 4 Pos. Clean Pull (Ground/ That’s why
                                           is 2nd.)
                                        • Power Clean
Jerk
                  Jerk Stance
• Jumping / Driving
• Landing / Receiving (Split)
  – Determine front leg
     •   ―Trust me‖
     •   Push method
     •   For CrossFit WOD’s Alternate Feet
     •   For Max Weight use you dominate leg
              Jerk Grip
• Elbows down and out
• Same as clean and Front Squat grip for
  the most part
• Can go wider
           Jerk Progression
•   Rack Press
•   Rack Push Press
•   Rack Squat Jerk
•   Rack Split Jerk
•   Press
•   Push Press
•   Squat Jerk
•   Split Jerk
          Jerk Bar Warm Up
•   Press
•   Push Press
•   Squat Jerk
•   Split Jerk
            Dynamic Warm-Up #4
• Pelvic Tilt to Ninja Get-Ups
• Superman Complex
   – Stream-Line
   – “T”
   – Cobra
• SpCd Lunge Pos w/ Horizontal Rotation
   – Towards R&L
   – Away R&L
• V-Column Side Stretch R&L
• single Arm Hang R&L (high hand, same leg back)
• Quick Feet Complex
   – Run Ld R&L / Lateral Outside R&L
   – Scissors & Swivel / Lateral Cross Over (Xo) R&L
   – R&L Single Leg F2B / Lat R&L
CF Football Nutrition
      CrossFit Football Diet
• CFF Diet in a few words….”Eat meat,
  vegetables, fruit, nuts and seeds. Drink
  whole milk and eat eggs and cheese. Eat
  a little starch, no sugar, no wheat, barley
  or rye. Drink plenty of water. Avoid foods
  with ingredients you cannot pronounce.
  Remember no one ever got strong eating
  from a vending machine or a package.
        CrossFit Football Diet
• The CrossFit Football Diet is a blending of the Paleolithic
  Diet and Dairy. I believe the combination of Paleo and
  dairy is the best form of nutrition for a football player.
  Football is a primal sport and needs a primal diet. Here
  is some history on the Paleo Diet and why we believe a
  combination of Paleo and diary to be good for size and
  muscle gain. While CrossFit supports a Zone Diet…and I
  believe The Zone to be excellent I do not want to
  regulate calories and eating for football players. 90% of
  football players are in need to size and strength and
  allowing them to fill their hunger needs is my first priority.
  Rather than limit calories I want to give them a list of
  foods they can consume and let them go at. Here is
  some history on the Paleolithic Diet and it’s origins.
                 Paleo History
• There are races of people who are all slim, who are
  stronger and faster than us. They all have straight teeth
  and perfect eyesight. Arthritis, diabetes, hypertension,
  heart disease, stroke, depression, schizophrenia and
  cancer are absolute rarities for them. These people are
  the last 84 tribes of hunter-gatherers in the world. They
  share a secret that is over 2 million years old. Their
  secret is their diet- a diet that has changed little from that
  of the first humans 2 million years ago, and their
  predecessors up to 7 million years ago. Theirs is the diet
  that man evolved on, the diet that is coded for in our
  genes. It has some major differences to the diet of
  "civilization". You are in for a few big surprises.
             Paleo History
• The diet is usually referred to as the
  "Paleolithic Diet" referring to the Paleolithic
  or Stone Age era. It is also referred to as
  the "Stone Age Diet", "Cave Man Diet" or
  the "Hunter-Gatherer Diet". More romantic
  souls like to think of it as the diet that was
  eaten in the "Garden of Eden" and they
  are correct in thinking so.
              Paleo History
• The basic principles of the Paleolithic Diet are so
  simple that most high school students can
  understand them. Within 15 minutes from now
  you will grasp the major elements. At the
  technical level, Paleolithic Diet Theory has a
  depth and breadth that is unmatched by all other
  dietary theories. Paleolithic Diet Theory presents
  a fully integrated, holistic, comprehensive dietary
  theory combining the best features of all other
  dietary theories, eliminating the worst features
  and simplifying it all.
                 Paleo History
• All major dietary components are covered- (i.e. vitamins,
  fats, protein, fats, carbohydrates, antioxidants and
  phytosterols etc). This is for the simple reason that it is
  the only diet that is coded for in our genes- it contains
  only those foods that were "on the table" during our long
  evolution, and discards those which were not. Have you
  ever wondered why almost everybody feels the need to
  take vitamin supplements at times, or why so many
  people feel the need to "detoxify" their system? There
  are very real reasons for this that you will soon
  understand. Now, come with me, I’d like to share the
  secret with you...
   Basics of the Paleolithic Diet
• For millions of years, humans and their relatives
  have eaten meat, fish, fowl and the leaves, roots
  and fruits of many plants. One big obstacle to
  getting more calories from the environment is
  the fact that many plants are inedible. Grains,
  beans and potatoes are full of energy but all are
  inedible in the raw state as they contain many
  toxins. There is no doubt about that- please
  don’t try to eat them raw, they can make you
  very sick.
   Basics of the Paleolithic Diet
• Around 10,000 years ago, an enormous breakthrough
  was made- a breakthrough that was to change the
  course of history, and our diet, forever. This
  breakthrough was the discovery that cooking these foods
  made them edible- the heat destroyed enough toxins to
  render them edible. Grains include wheat, corn, barley,
  rice, sorghum, millet and oats. Grain based foods also
  include products such as flour, bread, noodles and
  pasta. These foods entered the menu of New Stone Age
  (Neolithic) man, and Paleolithic diet buffs often refer to
  them as Neolithic foods.
   Basics of the Paleolithic Diet
The cooking of grains, beans and potatoes had an
  enormous effect on our food intake- perhaps
  doubling the number of calories that we could
  obtain from the plant foods in our environment.
  Other advantages were soon obvious with these
  foods:
• they could store for long periods (refrigeration of
  course being unavailable in those days)
• they were dense in calories- ie a small weight
  contains a lot of calories, enabling easy
  transport
    Basics of the Paleolithic Diet
• the food was also the seed of the plant- later allowing ready farming
  of the species
• These advantages made it much easier to store and transport food.
  We could more easily store food for winter, and for nomads and
  travelers to carry supplies. Food storage also enabled surpluses to
  be stored, and this in turn made it possible to free some people from
  food gathering to become specialists in other activities, such as
  builders, warriors and rulers. This in turn set us on the course to
  modern day civilization. Despite these advantages, our genes were
  never developed with grains, beans and potatoes and were not in
  tune with them, and still are not. Man soon improved further on
  these advances- by farming plants and animals.
• Instead of being able to eat only a fraction of the animal and plant
  life in an area, farming allows us to fill a particular area with a large
  number of edible plants and animals. This in turn increases the
  number of calories that we can obtain from an area by some 10 to
  100 fold or more.
  Basics of the Paleolithic Diet
• Paleolithic Diet buffs refer to the new
  foods as Neolithic foods and the old as
  Paleolithic Diet foods. In simple terms we
  see Neolithic as bad and Paleolithic as
  good.
   Basics of the Paleolithic Diet
• Grains, Beans and Potatoes (GBP) share the following
  important characteristics:
   – They are all toxic when raw- there is no doubt about this- it is a
     fact that no competent source would dispute- they can be
     extremely dangerous and it is important never to eat them raw or
     undercooked. These toxins include enzyme blockers, lectins and
     other types. I will talk about them in detail later as they are very
     important.
   – Cooking destroys most but not all of the toxins. Insufficient
     cooking can lead to sickness such as acute gastroenteritis.
   – They are all rich sources of carbohydrate, and once cooked this
     is often rapidly digestible-giving a high glycemic index (sugar
     spike).
   Basics of the Paleolithic Diet
Therefore diets high in grains beans and potatoes
  (GBP):
• Contain toxins in small amounts
• Have a high glycemic index (ie have a similar
  effect to raw sugar on blood glucose levels)
• Are low in many vitamins, minerals, antioxidants
  and phytosterols- ie they are the original "empty
  calories"
• Have problems caused by the GBP displacing
  other foods
   Basics of the Paleolithic Diet
Therefore diets high in grains beans and potatoes (GBP):
• As grains, beans and potatoes form such a large
  proportion of the modern diet, you can now understand
  why it is so common for people to feel they need
  supplements or that they need to detoxify (ie that they
  have toxins in their system)- indeed both feelings are
  absolutely correct. Unfortunately, we don’t necessarily
  realize which supplements we need, and ironically when
  people go on detoxification diets they unfortunately often
  consume even more Neolithic foods (eg soy beans) and
  therefore more toxins than usual (perhaps they
  sometimes benefit from a change in toxins). More detail
  on these issues follows in subsequent pages.
    The essentials of the Paleolithic
               Diet are:
Eat none of the following:
• Grains- including bread, pasta, noodles
• Beans- including string beans, kidney beans, lentils, peanuts, snow-peas
   and peas
• Potatoes
• Sugar
• Salt
Eat the following:
• Meat, chicken and fish
• Eggs
• Fruit
• Vegetables (especially root vegetables, but definitely not including potatoes)
• Nuts, eg. walnuts, brazil nuts, macadamia, almond. Do not eat peanuts (a
   bean) or cashews (a family of their own)
• Berries- strawberries, blueberries, raspberries etc.
   The essentials of the Paleolithic
              Diet are:
Try to increase your intake of:
• Root vegetables- carrots, turnips, parsnips, rutabagas,
  Swedes
• Organ meats- liver and kidneys (I accept that many
  people find these unpalatable and won’t eat them)
• Expect some minor tuning problems- don’t worry, you
  can deal with them:
• It will take some time for your body to adjust to the
  changes after all these years. There is a huge surge in
  your vitamin intake. There is a huge decrease in your
  toxin intake.
   The essentials of the Paleolithic
              Diet are:
Try to increase your intake of:
• Start with breakfast for few days, as this is the easiest
  place to start as most people eat it at home, and it tends
  to be the least Paleolithic meal of the standard 3. For
  weight loss you will eventually need to reduce your
  carbohydrate intake, but ignore this initially as most
  people have high carb intakes and this can continue for
  the first few days that you are on this diet. If you reduce
  too quickly then you may fell unwell. Then move on to
  lunch or dinner for a few days and then to all 3 meals. If
  you work, you will often find it easier to take your lunch
  to work.
         Why Are Beans Bad?
• Beans too are full of enzyme blockers and lectins.
  Potatoes contain enzyme blockers, lectins and another
  family of toxins called glycoalkaloids. Glycoalkaloids
  (GA) unlike lectins and enzyme blockers aren't
  destroyed by cooking, even deep-frying. GA are
  particularly high in green or injured potatoes, which must
  never be eaten even if trimmed heavily and well-cooked.
  Many people have told me that they eat small amounts
  of raw potato- this is a dangerous habit and it should be
  discouraged very strongly.
• These toxins in foods are commonly referred to as
  antinutrients. Let's learn some more about them:
            Why Are Beans Bad?
•   Enzyme Blockers: These enzyme blockers are abundant in all seeds
    including grains and beans, and also in potatoes, serving to hold them in
    suspended animation and also acting as pesticides. Most commonly they
    block the enzymes that digest protein (proteases), and are called "protease
    inhibitors". They can affect the stomach protease enzyme "pepsin", and the
    small intestine protease enzymes "trypsin" and "chymotrypsin". These small
    intestine enzymes are made by the pancreas (it does a lot of other
    important things besides making insulin). Some enzyme blockers affect the
    enzymes that digest starch (amylase) and are called "amylase inhibitors".
•   When GBP are cooked, most of the enzyme blockers are destroyed, but
    some are not. In human volunteers and in animal experiments high levels of
    protease inhibitors lead to increased secretion of digestive enzymes by the
    pancreas. This is because the body can sense that the enzymes have been
    knocked out and orders to pancreas to make more. Even if the effect of
    GBP based foods is only a small increase in pancreatic enzyme secretion,
    over many years it all adds up to a lot of extra work.
             Why Are Beans Bad?
•   They are effective poisons- rats cannot gain weight if they have substantial
    amounts of enzyme blockers in the diet. As far as their preservative action
    is concerned, I need only to remind you that the potted grains in the tombs
    of the Egyptian pharaohs were still viable and sprouted after thousands of
    years locked away.
•   Grain eating birds have evolved digestive enzymes that are resistant to
    grain protease inhibitors. Lectins (Haemagglutins)................ Meet Hannibal
•   Lectins are natural proteins that have a large variety of roles. They are
    amongst the most fascinating and stimulating of all biological compounds,
    and I have no doubt that they play a major role in many "unexplained "
    diseases. I think of them as "Hannibal Lectins" as they remind of the
    devious criminal mastermind in the shock horror movie "Silence of the
    Lambs.' Lectins are like master code-breakers. The cells of our bodies are
    studded with receptors which are like code pads to ensure stimulation only
    under the correct circumstances. Lectins have the ability to crack these
    codes and stimulate the receptors causing a variety of responses- covering
    basically the full repertoire of the cell and even tricking the cell into doing
    things it normally cannot do.
More Bad Thing From Beans!
They also have a knack for bypassing our defenses and
  "getting behind the lines", and then they can travel all
  over the body causing harm. They can, for example:
• strip protective mucus off tissues,
• damage the cells lining the small intestine- disrupting the
  microscopic fingers called villi and microvilli,
• get swallowed whole by the small intestine cells
  ("pinocytosis")
• bind to cells including blood cells causing a clot to form
  (hence they were initially called "haemagglutins")
More Bad Thing From Beans!
They also have a knack for bypassing our defenses and
  "getting behind the lines", and then they can travel all
  over the body causing harm. They can, for example:
• make a cell act as if it has been stimulated by a
  hormone-
• stimulate a cell to secrete a hormone
• promote cell division at the wrong time
• cause gowth or shrinkage of lymphatic tissue ("outposts"
  of white blood cells)
• cause enlargement of the pancreas
• cause cells to present codes (HLA's) that they normally
  should not use
• cause cell death (apoptosis)
More Bad Thing From Beans!
• Lectins break down the surface of the small intestine,
  stripping it of mucus and causing the cells to become
  irregular and leaky. Some lectins make cells act as if
  they have been stimulated by insulin. Others cause the
  pancreas to release insulin. Others cause immune cells
  to divide in the wrong way, causing growth of some white
  blood cells and breaking down the control of the immune
  system. Others cause cells to present the wrong codes
  (HLA's) on their surface, tricking the immune system into
  thinking that intruders have been found and activating
  the immune system inappropriately- thus leading to
  "autoimmune disease" where the body's tissues are
  attacked by its own immune system.
More Bad Thing From Beans!
• Autoimmune diseases are incredibly
  common and increase every year that a
  person gets older. A disordered immune
  system also has a much harder job
  recognizing and attacking the real
  intruders- invading germs and cancer cells
  (you may have heard that scientists think
  that most people generate many cancer
  cells in a life time but that the immune
  system cleans most of them up).
                       Fat
• Fat is a key player in the CFF Diet. With 9
  calories coming from every gram of fat it is an
  easy way to increase calories in diet. The
  absence of fat in a Westernized Diet has
  destroyed America’s physical fitness and
  physique. We want to include good fats in the
  form of tree nuts, avocado, olive oil, coconut and
  coconut oil. We need to include Omega 3’s in
  the form of fish, grass fed beef, grass fed milk
  and wild game. We can also supplement with
  Cod Liver Oil for Omega 3’s…this will help with
  recovery and performance.
                         Dairy
• Milk, eggs and cheese are vital to the CFF Diet. This
  allows an athlete to consume more calories over the
  course of a day. There are requirements to consuming
  dairy products on this diet.
• Raw Unpasteurized Whole Milk is one of the best foods
  an athlete can consume. The milk has not been treated
  by heat and very healthy and full of good vitamins.
• Whole Milk is a must. Do not drink low fat or non-fat milk.
  We want the fat from the milk this gives us more
  calories. CFF would like an athlete to drink a few large
  glasses of milk in their post workout meal.
                             Dairy
• The protein in milk is about 80 percent whey and 20 percent casein.
  Both are high-quality proteins, but whey is known as a "fast protein"
  because it's quickly broken down into amino acids and absorbed
  into the bloodstream. That makes it a very good protein to consume
  after your workout. Casein, on the other hand, is digested more
  slowly. So it's ideal for providing your body with a steady supply of
  smaller amounts of protein for a longer period of time — like
  between meals or while you sleep. Since milk provides both, one big
  glass gives your body an ideal combination of muscle-building
  proteins.
• A gallon of milk has about 3600 calories, so if an individual drank a
  gallon a day he would be picking up an extra pound of body weight.
  But what else is in the milk that might lend claim to this increase in
  size and strength? I found this information concerning what is else is
  in milk other than just protein and fat.
                             Dairy
• This information was reported in Milkweed. High levels of Insulin-like
  Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) are found in milk. Milk from cows injected
  with rbGH have significantly higher levels of IGF-1 than normal
  cow's milk. Injecting synthetic growth hormones in milk cows
  increases their production of 1GF-1, a powerful "secondary"
  hormone responsible for muscle growth and increased growth
  hormone levels. IGF-1 is exactly the same in bovines and humans
  and spurs cellular growth function.
• rBGH (recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone) is a genetically
  engineered, potent variant of the natural growth hormone produced
  by cows, Manufactured by Monsanto, it is sold to dairy farmers
  under the trade name POSILAC. Injection of this hormone forces
  cows to increase their milk production by about 10%.
                         Dairy
What is Insulin-like Growth Factor-1?
• IGF1 is a polypeptide hormone about the same size as
  insulin, or 70 amino acids; a type of growth factor. IGF-1
  is a highly anabolic hormone released primarily in the
  liver (but also in peripheral tissues) with the stimulus of
  growth hormone (GH). It is responsible for much of the
  anabolic activity of GH, including nitrogen retention and
  protein synthesis as well as muscle cell hyperplasia
  (increase in number of muscle cells), as well as
  mitogenesis (the growth of new muscle fibers). It can
  also induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy by activating the
  phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt pathway. In fact,
  IGF-1 acts on several different tissues to enhance
  growth via several mechanisms.
                        Dairy
• So it seems that the rBGh given to milk cows increases
  their levels of IGF-1. These high levels of IGF-1 are
  passed into the milk and onto the consumer. Their is no
  difference between bovine and human IGF-1, so we
  could expect that the muscle building properties of IGF-1
  are present when drinking large amounts of whole milk
  from milk cows treated with rBGH. This would translate
  into an increase in strength...muscle and size gain.
• Eggs are an excellent source of protein, fat, vitamin D
  and K. Cholesterol is one building blocks of testosterone
  and Cholesterol is needed to build a strong body. We
  would like for an athlete to consume Omega 3 eggs as
  we are in constant need to Omega 3.
                         CFF Diet
• Meat – Red Meat, Chicken, Fish, Lean Pork, Turkey
• Vegetables – Dark Green Vegetables like broccoli, spinach and
  kale. Roots like carrots and beets are excellent. Sweet Potatoes and
  Yams.
• Fruits – Berries, apples, oranges, ect.
• Diary – Whole Milk, Eggs, Cheese
• Tree Nuts – Almonds, Pecans, Walnuts, Macadamia
• Avocados
• Olive Oil, Coconut Oil, Avocado Oil
• ***Combine these food elements for all meals.
• Avoid Gluten, Barley and Rye. This translates in whole wheat
  bread, pasta, bagels, and anything that has wheal in it.
• Avoid all processed foods.
• Nobody ever got big and strong eating from a vending machine
  or package.
CF Football Programming

      Power Athlete
               Levels of Training
• Simply put, a novice, as we use the term here, is a trainee for whom
  the stress applied during a single workout and the recovery from that
  single stress is sufficient to cause an adaptation by the next
  workout. The end of the novice phase is marked by a performance
  plateau occurring sometime between the third and ninth month of
  training, with variations due to individual differences. Programming
  for the novice is essentially the linear progression model that is
  described in the ACSM manual and defined specifically for weight
  training in our book Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training
  (Aasgaard, 2007). It is important to understand here that the novice
  is adapted to inactivity (as it relates to weight training) and therefore
  progress can be made with training programs that are not specific to
  the task involved.
              Levels of Training
• For example, doing high-volume hypertrophy work would also
  increase a novice's absolute strength for one repetition. A previously
  sedentary beginner can even improve his 1RM (one-repetition
  maximum) squat by riding a bike. This would not be the case with
  intermediate or advanced trainees, where progress in strength,
  power, or mass is absolutely linked to appropriate application of
  specific training programs.
  Novices accomplish two things with every workout: they "test" their
  strength, and the test loads the body to become stronger in the next
  workout. The act of moving 10 more pounds for the prescribed sets
  and reps both confirms that the previous workout was a success at
  improving the novice's strength and causes his body to adapt and
  become stronger for the next workout.
                 Levels of Training
•   As the intermediate lifter begins to handle training loads closer to his
    genetic potential, his recovery ability is also affected differently by the
    stress. Recovery requires a longer period of time-a period encompassing
    multiple workouts (efficiently managed using a weekly schedule). This is
    because the athlete has developed the ability to apply stress to the system
    that requires a longer period of time for recovery. For an intermediate
    trainee, the stress required for a disruption of homeostasis exceeds the
    capacity for recovery within that period of time (say, within the week). To
    allow for both sufficient stress and sufficient recovery, then, the training load
    must be varied over the week. This variation can take several forms, but the
    critical factor is the distribution, which allows enough stress to be applied in
    a pattern that facilitates recovery. The key to successful training in this
    stage of development is to balance these two important and opposing
    phenomena. Simple weekly periodization of training loads facilitates
    recovery following one or more heavier training bouts within a single week.
           Levels of Training
• Intermediate trainees benefit from exposure to
  more exercises than novices. These athletes are
  developing their skills with new movement
  patterns, and as this happens they are
  developing their ability to acquire new skills. It is
  during this period that trainees actually become
  athletes, choosing a sport and making decisions
  that affect the rest of their competitive careers.
  These decisions are more effectively made if
  based on a broad exposure to a wide variety of
  training and competition options.
               Levels of Training
• The end of the intermediate phase of training is marked by a
  performance plateau following a series of progressively more difficult
  weekly training organizations. This can occur in as little as two years
  or in as many as four or more, depending on individual tolerances
  and adherence to year-round progressive training. It is likely that
  75% or more of all trainees will not require programming complexity
  beyond this level (remember, the amount of weight lifted or years of
  training do not classify a trainee). Virtually all sports-specific weight
  training can be accomplished with this model. Athletes in non-
  weightlifting sports will not train progressively in the weight room all
  year; they will focus much of their training on their primary
  competitive sport. This effectively extends the duration of this stage
  in the trainee's development to the extent that even very
  accomplished athletes may never exhaust the benefits of
  intermediate-level weight lifting programming.
               Levels of Training
• Advanced trainees in the barbell sports work relatively close to their
  genetic potentials. The work tolerance of the advanced trainee is
  quite high, given that the ability of an athlete to recover from training
  is itself trainable. However, the training loads the advanced athlete
  must handle in order to produce an adaptation are also quite high,
  since the adaptation that brought the athlete to the advanced stage
  has already occurred. This level of training volume and intensity is
  very taxing and requires longer periods of recovery than do
  intermediate training loads. Both the loading and the recovery
  parameters must be applied in more complex and variable ways and
  over longer periods of time. When combined, the loading and
  recovery periods required for successful progress range in duration
  from a month to several months.
              Levels of Training
• For example, we may apply a single week of very heavy training to
  induce adaptation. That week of training may require three or more
  weeks of work at lighter loadings for complete recovery and
  improvement to occur. The average slope of the improvement curve
  here is very shallow (fig. 1-3), closely approaching maximum genetic
  potential at a very slow rate, and rather large amounts of training
  effort will be expended for rather small degrees of improvement. For
  this reason too, the number of exercises advanced trainees use is
  typically lower than for intermediates; they do not require exposure
  to new movement patterns and stress types, since they have
  already specialized and adapted to those that are specific to their
  sport.
                   Levels of Training
•   Complex manipulation of training parameters is appropriate for use with these
    trainees. The majority of trainees will never attain the level of development that
    makes advanced periodization necessary, since most trainees voluntarily terminate
    their competitive careers before the advanced stage is reached.


•   The elite athlete is in a special subset of the advanced category. Elite athletes are the
    genetically gifted few who also happen to be motivated to achieve success despite
    enormous physical and social costs. They have stayed in their sport by virtue of their
    success and have dedicated themselves to training at this level because their training
    investment has been returned. An advanced lifter is one, who has progressed beyond
    the intermediate; an elite or professional lifter is one who performs at an professional
    or elite level within the standards of the sport. (By this definition, the elite designation
    could actually be applied to an intermediate lifter performing at the
    national/international level. There occasionally exist a few athletes so talented and
    genetically endowed that this situation occurs.)
            Levels of Training
• Previous training has brought the elite athlete very close
  to genetic potential, and additional progress requires
  much greater program complexity to scratch out those
  small improvements that might still remain unrealized.
  These athletes must be exposed to training programs
  that are very complex-highly variable in terms of stress,
  although probably simple in terms of exercise selection
  forcing the already adapted athlete closer to the ultimate
  level of performance. At this point the program may be
  considered in terms of several months, a year, or even
  an Olympic quadrennium. Any approach to the training
  of an athlete of this caliber is a highly individualized
  matter and is beyond the scope of this text. We propose
  that far less than 1% of all trainees regardless of training
  history reach this level
  3 Categories: General, General
      Specific and Specific.
• General means exercises that do not directly assist in developing
  sport skill; but rather, serve to develop general physical qualities
  such as general work capacity, muscle cross-section, increased
  bone density, connective tissue strength, flexibility/mobility, etc.
• General exercises would include Olympic Weightlifting, power lifts,
  dumbbells, kettlebells, anything you can do with a barbell. This
  would include gymnastics, pull ups, ring dips, handstand push-ups.
• General Specific means exercises which match the energy system
  demands (speed of muscle contraction, duration of effort, etc) of the
  sport skill and some or all of the active musculature yet do not
  directly match the physical demands and direction of the sport skill.
• General Specific exercises would include would include met cons
  where we are training the time domains and performing functional
  movements performed at high intensity. Pushing and pulling of
  weighted equipment that fit within the time domain of training, 4-10
  seconds. Sprint work, over speed, resisted running, dot drills, speed
  ladders and all athletically based footwork.
  3 Categories: General, General
      Specific and Specific.
• Specific qualifies are those which exactly match the
  amplitude and direction of the sport skill and,
  correspondingly, develop the special work capacity and
  have a direct effect on the development of sport skill.
• Specific exercises are ones that are specific to football.
  This includes 7 on 7, 1 on 1 drills, catching passes,
  running routes, pass pro drills, foot work drills, running
  ropes, line drills and anything that is directly related to
  specific training football.
• CrossFit Football resides in the General and General
  Specific training for Football. But by utilizing general
  movements/skills and performing them in the General
  Specific time components we can create a new way to
  train for football, CrossFit Football.
    How do we cycle the program?
•    Off-season
    – Strength/Speed phase
    – Strength/Speed/Metcon
    – Strength/Metcon
•    Pre-season
    – a. Strength
•    Season
    – Strength/Metcon
     Forging Powerful Athletes: 9
          Basic Movements
•   Squat
•   Front Squat
•   Overhead Squat
•   Bench Press
•   Press
•   Push Press
•   Push Jerk
•   Deadlift
•   Power Clean
CrossFit Football Basic Movements
• The Squat is the cornerstone of every football
  player’s power. Football is played using the legs.
  A player goes from a loaded position and
  explodes upon the snap of the ball. This loaded
  or coiled position requires the legs to be able to
  travel threw ROM and explode on contact.
  Strength is the biggest ally of this process.
  Through training the Back Squat a player can
  develop his legs, gain size, strength, explosion
  and violently generate force.
CrossFit Football Basic Movements
• Bench Press is considered a body builder move and not
  considered functional, thus maybe due to legions of guys
  at Gold Gym doing bench press with chrome weights this
  move is not considered ―functional‖ in the CrossFit
  community. However, while this thought might have
  merit, very few lifts are as functional in a sport as bench
  is to football. In a game where a player is required to use
  his hands to extend a defender or blocker the bench
  press is vital. This movement builds a large strong chest
  and excellent for shoulder stability if coached correctly.
  Much like the squat if not done properly it can be
  damaging. No other movement has as much function for
  day-to-day survival playing in the ―trenches‖ than the
  bench press.
CrossFit Football Basic Movements
• Deadlift is the fundamental much like the back
  squat because it incorporates a total body
  movement. It recruits large muscles to pull big
  weights off from a ―dead‖ position to a standing
  position. It teaches an athlete to start at the
  bottom of a movement and under load pull to full
  extension. A Deadlift is opposite of a squat
  where an athlete starts at full extension drops
  into a squatted position and returns to full
  extension. This movement is as vital to the
  football as any movement.
CrossFit Football Basic Movements
• The Power Clean is one of the fastest
  movements in sports. The Clean is used for
  explosion and violent movement. Much like the
  push jerk and the front squat it requires a player
  to generate force from his hips. A player starts
  with an active hip and he travels into triple
  extension generating force in a vertical plane.
  Much like the vertical jump and push jerk it
  forces the athlete to move dynamically. This
  vertical dynamic movement is vital to football
  success.
CrossFit Football Basic Movements
• The Split Jerk is the second part of the Clean and Jerk
  movement. This movement teaches the player to
  activate his hips and drive through to full extension and
  split to catch the weight. It teaches a player how to
  explode through his hips and generate power in a short
  time period. The foot movement being done teaches foot
  speed and the ability to drive a players foot into the
  ground, thus having carry-over for an initial first step.
  Every play in football starts with a explosive first step.
  The split jerk also teaches hip function and this is vital to
  a player’s ability to be successful on the field. A vertical
  jump also demonstrates an athlete’s ability to generate
  force in a vertical plane; the jerk also works at generating
  force in a vertical plane.
Program Design
      &
Motor Learning
Motor Learning & Program Design
•   Application of Loads & Stresses
     –   General
           •   ex: Primal
     –   Directed
           •   ex: Olympic Lift
     –   Specific
           •   ex: Explosive movement that resembles exact
     –   Exact
           •   ex: Movement drill

•   Scaling Metcons for a) Position specific b) Competition c) Team Accountability
     –   Frequency
     –   Intensity
     –   Duration
     –   Mode

•   Additional Topics
     –   Politics of S&C [Head Coach / ATCs]
     –   Chaos

				
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posted:11/11/2011
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