Docstoc

Basic Calculator

Document Sample
Basic Calculator Powered By Docstoc
					What
simple
calculators
can do
                       Clear

                       c.ce




Key in    1        +     2     +   3     +     4

You decide you do not want to do this
calculation after all…

Key in
              c.ce



Now key in the calculation you want to do
now: press
               1       +       1   =

You got the answer 8!
                                       c.ce
Why? Because when you pressed
only your last entry (4) was cleared. If
you want to start another calculation, you
need to press = so that the total appears in
the display before you clear.
            Directed numbers


                      +/-


To calculate –4 + 5 =

Key in
          4     +/-         +   5   =



To calculate –4 x 9 =

Key in
            4    +/-        x   5   =
                 Memory


        r.cm      m-         m+


Key in your age (or any other favourite
number).

Press
          m+        c.ce


Now do a calculation e.g. 37 x 49 =

Press
         c.ce


Press
        r.cm



Your age should now be displayed as it
was held in the memory.
                           r.cm
To clear memory, press            twice
and          once.
       c.ce
                 Memory


         r.cm         m-       m+


To work out the answer to a calculation
such as (4 x 4 ) – (3 x 3 )



Key in    4       x        4    m+      c.ce


Then      3       x        3    m-      r.cm


Simple calculators calculate “as you go”.
Without the use of the memory the
calculation would be interpreted as
4 x 4 – 3 x 3. On a simple calculator
this would work out as 39 as each
operation is completed as it is entered
into the calculator. Scientific
calculators wait for = before calculating
the answer and carry out operations in
order of “priority”.
           The constant function




Key in     1    +     =      then keep

pressing
           =
The calculator continues to count on in
steps of 1, starting at 1.

Key in                           then keep
           1    +     =     0


pressing   =

The calculator counts on in steps of 1,
starting at 0.
Key in     2    +    =     0     then keep

Pressing
           =

The calculator counts on in steps 2, starting
at 0.

Key in
           1    +    2     =     1   then



keep pressing   =

The calculator counts on in steps of 2,
starting at 1.
              Percentages

To find 10% of £25

Key in
          2     5        x   1        0    %


DO NOT PRESS =

                                   Was
To work out a discount           £36.99
                                 20% off



Key in
         36     .    99      -      20     %

DO NOT PRESS =
The display shows the discounted price.

To find how much the discount was.
Key in
         =
The display now shows the discount.
    To add V.A.T
    Key in

2    9   .   5     9   +   1   7   .   5   %
         Making a number machine




Key in    5    +     2      =

The calculator displays the answer.

Key in
          8     +     =
What has the calculator done?

Try entering some more.

You calculator is a number machine!
          The Square root key

                     √


To find the square root of a number, enter
it and press
               √
Key calculator skills for year 5

I know how to clear the display before I
start a calculation, including clearing the
                 memory.
 I can set up the appropriate number of
              decimal places.

 I can use the [+], [-], [x] and [÷], the [=}
   key and the [.] key to calculate with
               realistic data.
 I use the [clear entry] key to change an
accidental wrong entry rather than [clear
                     all].



  I recognise a negative number output.


   I know how to check what the last
         operation I used was.

 I know how to recall an answer that has
              been stored.
     I can key in and interpret money
calculations, including changing all amounts
              to the same unit.
   When I calculate money problems by
   turning all amounts into pence, I can
       change the total back into £.
 I am beginning to select the correct key
    sequence to carry out calculations
involving more than one step e.g. 8 x (37 +
                     58)

  I know that a number such as 81.75 is
      more than 81 and less than 82.

     I can interpret a number such as
   6.9999999 as 7 and know why these
        numbers sometimes appear.

I have a feel for the approximate size of
               the answer.

    I check answers by repeating the
calculation or by performing the inverse.

 I know how to “show my working” when I
   have used a calculator to work out an
                  answer.
Key calculator skills for year 6

 I can use the [clear] and [clear entry]
keys, all operation keys, the [=] and [.] to
      calculate with realistic data.

  I recognise a negative number output.


   I use the [sign change] key where
              appropriate.

I can key in and interpret the outcome of
   calculations involving sums of money.

     I can key in and interpret other
measurement calculations such as length,
         mass, capacity and time.
  I can key in fractions, recognise the
equivalent decimal form and use this form
     to compare and order fractions.

 I know that figures such as 0.3333333
   are read as “point three recurring”.

 I know that 0.3333333 represents one
third and that 0.6666666 represents two
                  thirds.
I have begun to use the memory keys for
calculations involving two sets of brackets
         e.g. (23 + 41) x (87 + 48)



I have a feel for the approximate size of
  an answer and check it appropriately.
 In situations where it is appropriate, I
 choose to use the calculator for speed
 even when I could use pencil and paper
                methods.

I recognise questions where the use of a
       calculator is appropriate.

I know how to “show my method” on paper
     when I have used the calculator.
Key calculator skills for year 7


      I can use the [√] and [ 2] keys.



          I can use the [%] key.

   I am aware that basic and scientific
 calculators work differently and choose
 the appropriate way of working for the
             different types.

    I use the [sign change] key where
               appropriate

 I can key in some measurements of time,
as decimal amounts e.g. 4 hours 15 minutes
                is 4.25 hours.
    I can use the memory and select the
  correct key sequence to carry out more
    than one step, including calculations
    involving division e.g. 364 ÷ (23 + 17)

 I know how to use the bracket keys on a
          scientific calculator.

   I can key in fractions, recognise the
 equivalent decimal form, and use this to
       compare and order fractions.
     I can use the constant function.


I have a feel for the approximate size of
  an answer and check it appropriately.

    I can input a negative number and
recognise a negative number in the display.

I can interpret the display in the context
    of a problem e.g. 109.2 could mean
      £109.20 or 109 metres and 20
    centimetres or 109 minutes and 12
                  seconds.
I read a display of 91.3333333 as 91 point
three recurring and know that 0.3333333
            represents one third.
    I realise that some calculators may
 produce rounding errors e.g. 2 x 7 ÷ 7 =
          1.9999999 instead of 2

I know that if, for example √3 is shown to
    be 1.732051 then (1.732051)2 ≈ 3

   I can convert units of time e.g. 1000
      minutes to hours and minutes.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: This is an example of basic calculator. This document is useful for conducting basic calculator.
Richard Cataman Richard Cataman
About